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Sample records for additional arginine residues

  1. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, P.A.; Matthews, K.S.

    1987-10-06

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of /sup 14/C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of approx. 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA.

  2. Chemical modification studies on arginine kinase: essential cysteine and arginine residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Jing; Li, Miao; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2007-12-01

    Chemical modification was used to elucidate the essential amino acids in the catalytic activity of arginine kinase (AK) from Migratoria manilensis. Among six cysteine (Cys) residues only one Cys residue was determined to be essential in the active site by Tsou's method. Furthermore, the AK modified by DTNB can be fully reactivated by dithiothreitol (DTT) in a monophasic kinetic course. At the same time, this reactivation can be slowed down in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the essential Cys is located near the ATP binding site. The ionizing groups at the AK active site were studied and the standard dissociation enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) was 12.38kcal/mol, showing that the dissociation group may be the guanidino of arginine (Arg). Using the specific chemical modifier phenylglyoxal (PG) demonstrated that only one Arg, located near the ATP binding site, is essential for the activity of AK. PMID:17765964

  3. Evaluation of chemical labeling methods for identifying functional arginine residues of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wanigasekara, Maheshika S K; Chowdhury, Saiful M

    2016-09-01

    Arginine residues undergo several kinds of post-translational modifications (PTMs). These PTMs are associated with several inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Mass spectrometric studies of arginine modified proteins and peptides are very important, not only to identify the reactive arginine residues but also to understand the tandem mass spectrometry behavior of these peptides for assigning the sequences unambiguously. Herein, we utilize tandem mass spectrometry to report the performance of two widely used arginine labeling reagents, 1,2-cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylglyoxal (PG) with several arginine containing peptides and proteins. Time course labeling studies were performed to demonstrate the selectivity of the reagents in proteins or protein digests. Structural studies on the proteins were also explored to better understand the reaction sites and position of arginine residues. We found CHD showed better labeling efficiencies compared to phenylglyoxal. Reactive arginine profiling on a purified albumin protein clearly pointed out the cellular glycation modification site for this protein with high confidence. We believe these detailed mass-spectrometric studies will provide significant input to profile reactive arginine residues in large-scale studies; therefore, targeted proteomics can be performed to the short listed reactive sites for cellular arginine modifications. PMID:27543028

  4. Glucose autoxidation induces functional damage to proteins via modification of critical arginine residues.

    PubMed

    Chetyrkin, Sergei; Mathis, Missy; Pedchenko, Vadim; Sanchez, Otto A; McDonald, W Hayes; Hachey, David L; Madu, Hartman; Stec, Donald; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2011-07-12

    Nonenzymatic modification of proteins in hyperglycemia is a major mechanism causing diabetic complications. These modifications can have pathogenic consequences when they target active site residues, thus affecting protein function. In the present study, we examined the role of glucose autoxidation in functional protein damage using lysozyme and RGD-α3NC1 domain of collagen IV as model proteins in vitro. We demonstrated that glucose autoxidation induced inhibition of lysozyme activity as well as NC1 domain binding to α(V)β(3) integrin receptor via modification of critical arginine residues by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal while nonoxidative glucose adduction to the protein did not affect protein function. The role of RCS in protein damage was confirmed using pyridoxamine which blocked glucose autoxidation and RCS production, thus protecting protein function, even in the presence of high concentrations of glucose. Glucose autoxidation may cause protein damage in vivo since increased levels of GO-derived modifications of arginine residues were detected within the assembly interface of collagen IV NC1 domains isolated from renal ECM of diabetic rats. Since arginine residues are frequently present within protein active sites, glucose autoxidation may be a common mechanism contributing to ECM protein functional damage in hyperglycemia and oxidative environment. Our data also point out the pitfalls in functional studies, particularly in cell culture experiments, that involve glucose treatment but do not take into account toxic effects of RCS derived from glucose autoxidation.

  5. Evidence for proximal cysteine and lysine residues at or near the active site of arginine kinase of Stichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qin; Chen, Baoyu; Wang, Xicheng

    2004-12-01

    Inactivation of arginine kinase (AK) of Stichopus japonicus by o-phthalaldehyde (OPTA) was investigated. The modified enzyme showed an absorption peak at 337 nm and a fluorescent emission peak at 410 nm, which are characteristic of an isoindole derivative formed by OPTA binding to a thiol and an amine group in proximity within the enzyme. Loss of enzymatic activity was concomitant with an increase in fluorescence intensity at 410 nm. Stoichiometry studies by Tsou's method showed that among the cysteine residues available for OPTA modification in the enzyme, only one was essential for the enzyme activity. This cysteine residue is located in a highly hydrophobic environment, presumably near ATP and ADP binding region. This conclusion was verified by 5,5 -dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) modification. In addition, these results were supported by means of electrophoresis and ultraviolet, fluorescence, circular dichroism spectroscopy and fast performance liquid chromatography. Sequence comparison suggested that this essential cysteine residue maybe the conservative Cys274. PMID:15627388

  6. Arginine, a key residue for the enhancing ability of an antifreeze protein of the beetle Dendroides canadensis†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sen; Amornwittawat, Natapol; Juwita, Vonny; Kao, Yu; Duman, John G.; Pascal, Tod A.; Goddard, William A.; Wen, Xin

    2009-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) can produce a difference between the nonequilibrium freezing point and the melting point is termed thermal hysteresis (TH). The TH activity of an antifreeze protein (AFP) depends on the specific AFP, its concentration as well as the presence of co-solutes including low-molecular-mass solutes and/or proteins. We recently identified series of carboxylates and polyols as efficient enhancers for an AFP from the beetle Dendroides canadensis. In this study, we chemically modified DAFP-1 using the arginine-specific reagent 1,2-cyclohexanedione. We demonstrated that 1,2-cyclohexanedione specifically modifies one arginine residue and the modified DAFP-1 loses its enhancing ability completely or partially in the presence of previously identified enhancers. The stronger the enhancement ability of the enhancer on the native DAFP-1, the stronger the enhancement effect of the enhancer has on the modified DAFP-1. The weaker enhancers (e.g., glycerol) completely lose their enhancement effect on the modified DAFP-1 due to their inability to compete with 1,2-cyclohexanedione for the arginine residue. Regeneration of the arginine residue using hydroxylamine fully restored the enhancing ability of DAFP-1. These studies indicated that an arginine residue is critical for the enhancing ability of DAFP-1 and the guanidinium group of the arginine residue is important for its interaction with the enhancers, where the general mechanism of arginine-ligand interaction is borne. This work may initiate a complete mechanistic study of the enhancement effect in AFPs. PMID:19746966

  7. Arginine residues within the DNA binding domain of STAT3 promote intracellular shuttling and phosphorylation of STAT3.

    PubMed

    Ginter, Torsten; Fahrer, Jörg; Kröhnert, Ulrike; Fetz, Verena; Garrone, Alessio; Stauber, Roland H; Reichardt, Werner; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Kosan, Christian; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2014-08-01

    Acetylation-dependent inactivation of STAT1 can be mimicked by the exchange of its lysine residues K410 and K413 to glutamine residues. STAT3 harbors non-acetylatable arginine moieties at the corresponding sites R414 and R417. It is unclear whether the mutation of these sites to glutamine residues antagonizes STAT3 activation. Here, we show that an arginine-glutamine-exchange at the STAT3 moieties R414 and R417 (R414Q and R417Q) reduces cytokine-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3. This inhibitory effect can be partially rescued by phosphatase inhibition. In addition, the R414Q and R417Q mutations enhance the nuclear accumulation of unphosphorylated STAT3. STAT3 R414Q and STAT3 R417Q show a reduced response to cytokine stimulation emanating from the plasma membrane. Moreover, these STAT3 mutants have no direct inhibitory effect on the cytokine-induced activation of STAT1/STAT3-mediated gene expression. Since the mutations R414Q and R417Q reside within the STAT3 DNA binding domain (DBD), the STAT3 R414Q and R417Q mutants also lack intrinsic activity as transcription factors. Furthermore, in contrast to wild-type STAT3 they cannot compensate for a loss of STAT1 and they cannot promote STAT1/STAT3-dependent transcriptional activation. We further analyzed a STAT3 arginine-lysine-exchange mutant (R414K/R417K). This molecule mimics corresponding lysine residues found within the DBD of STAT1. Compared to wild-type STAT3, the STAT3 R414K/R417K mutant shows attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation and it is a less active transcription factor. In addition, STAT3 R414K/R417K is not activated by deacetylase inhibition. On the other hand, C-terminal acetylation of STAT3 is intact in STAT3 R414K/R417K. Our results suggest that the exchange of amino acid residues within the DBDs of STAT1/STAT3 affects their phosphorylation as well as their intracellular shuttling. PMID:24721162

  8. Different functional roles of arginine residues 39 and 61 and tyrosine residue 98 in transport and channel mode of the glutamate transporter EAAC1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yani; Vasilets, Larisa A; Fei, Jian; Guo, Lihe; Schwarz, Wolfgang

    2004-10-11

    The excitatory amino acid transporter EAAC1 is an electrogenic Na+ - and K+ -gradient-driven transporter. In addition, the transporter mediates in the presence of Na+ and glutamate an anion conductance uncoupled from the transport of the glutamate. The first two N-terminal domains, important for forming the conductance mode, are extracellularly bordered by positively charged arginine residues, R39 and R61, being completely conserved throughout the transporter family. Also the conserved tyrosine residue Y98 could be important for Cl- conductance. We have investigated, by measurements of glutamate uptake and glutamate-induced currents, the effects of mutation of the arginines and the tyrosine to alanine. The mutation R39A hardly affects transport and channel mode. The mutation R61A, on the other hand, reduces the activity of transport but stimulates the channel conductance. In addition, the apparent Km values for glutamate uptake and for the glutamate-activated current are reduced. Glutamate stimulation of current seems to be associated with a voltage-dependent step, and the apparent valence of charge moved during binding is reduced in the R61A mutant. The mutation Y98A leads to reduced function with reduced apparent Km value for glutamate, and with strong reduction of the selectivity ration between NO3- and Cl- of the conductance mode.

  9. GABA Production in Lactococcus lactis Is Enhanced by Arginine and Co-addition of Malate.

    PubMed

    Laroute, Valérie; Yasaro, Chonthicha; Narin, Waranya; Mazzoli, Roberto; Pessione, Enrica; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Loubière, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis NCDO 2118 was previously selected for its ability to decarboxylate glutamate to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an interesting nutritional supplement able to improve mood and relaxation. Amino acid decarboxylation is generally considered as among the biochemical systems allowing lactic acid bacteria to counteracting acidic stress and obtaining metabolic energy. These strategies also include arginine deiminase pathway and malolactic fermentation but little is known about their possible interactions of with GABA production. In the present study, the effects of glutamate, arginine, and malate (i.e., the substrates of these acid-resistance pathways) on L. lactis NCDO 2118 growth and GABA production performances were analyzed. Both malate and arginine supplementation resulted in an efficient reduction of acidity and improvement of bacterial biomass compared to glutamate supplementation. Glutamate decarboxylation was limited to narrow environmental conditions (pH < 5.1) and physiological state (stationary phase). However, some conditions were able to improve GABA production or activate glutamate decarboxylation system even outside of this compass. Arginine clearly stimulated glutamate decarboxylation: the highest GABA production (8.6 mM) was observed in cultures supplemented with both arginine and glutamate. The simultaneous addition of arginine, malate, and glutamate enabled earlier GABA production (i.e., during exponential growth) at relatively high pH (6.5). As far as we know, no previous study has reported GABA production in such conditions. Although further studies are needed to understand the molecular basis of these phenomena, these results represent important keys suitable of application in GABA production processes. PMID:27458444

  10. GABA Production in Lactococcus lactis Is Enhanced by Arginine and Co-addition of Malate

    PubMed Central

    Laroute, Valérie; Yasaro, Chonthicha; Narin, Waranya; Mazzoli, Roberto; Pessione, Enrica; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Loubière, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis NCDO 2118 was previously selected for its ability to decarboxylate glutamate to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an interesting nutritional supplement able to improve mood and relaxation. Amino acid decarboxylation is generally considered as among the biochemical systems allowing lactic acid bacteria to counteracting acidic stress and obtaining metabolic energy. These strategies also include arginine deiminase pathway and malolactic fermentation but little is known about their possible interactions of with GABA production. In the present study, the effects of glutamate, arginine, and malate (i.e., the substrates of these acid-resistance pathways) on L. lactis NCDO 2118 growth and GABA production performances were analyzed. Both malate and arginine supplementation resulted in an efficient reduction of acidity and improvement of bacterial biomass compared to glutamate supplementation. Glutamate decarboxylation was limited to narrow environmental conditions (pH < 5.1) and physiological state (stationary phase). However, some conditions were able to improve GABA production or activate glutamate decarboxylation system even outside of this compass. Arginine clearly stimulated glutamate decarboxylation: the highest GABA production (8.6 mM) was observed in cultures supplemented with both arginine and glutamate. The simultaneous addition of arginine, malate, and glutamate enabled earlier GABA production (i.e., during exponential growth) at relatively high pH (6.5). As far as we know, no previous study has reported GABA production in such conditions. Although further studies are needed to understand the molecular basis of these phenomena, these results represent important keys suitable of application in GABA production processes. PMID:27458444

  11. Two arginine residues suppress the flexibility of nucleosomal DNA in the canonical nucleosome core.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hidetoshi; Shirayama, Kazuyoshi; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of nucleosomes containing either canonical H3 or its centromere-specific variant CENP-A were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations showed that the histone cores were structurally stable during simulation periods of 100 ns and 50 ns, while DNA was highly flexible at the entry and exit regions and partially dissociated from the histone core. In particular, approximately 20-25 bp of DNA at the entry and exit regions of the CENP-A nucleosome exhibited larger fluctuations than DNA at the entry and exit regions of the H3 nucleosome. Our detailed analysis clarified that this difference in dynamics was attributable to a difference in two basic amino acids in the αN helix; two arginine (Arg) residues in H3 were substituted by lysine (Lys) residues at the corresponding sites in CENP-A. The difference in the ability to form hydrogen bonds with DNA of these two residues regulated the flexibility of nucleosomal DNA at the entry and exit regions. Our exonuclease III assay consistently revealed that replacement of these two Arg residues in the H3 nucleosome by Lys enhanced endonuclease susceptibility, suggesting that the DNA ends of the CENP-A nucleosome are more flexible than those of the H3 nucleosome. This difference in the dynamics between the two types of nucleosomes may be important for forming higher order structures in different phases.

  12. Arginine and proline applied as food additives stimulate high freeze tolerance in larvae of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Koštál, Vladimír; Korbelová, Jaroslava; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Moos, Martin; Šimek, Petr

    2016-08-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an insect of tropical origin. Its larval stage is evolutionarily adapted for rapid growth and development under warm conditions and shows high sensitivity to cold. In this study, we further developed an optimal acclimation and freezing protocol that significantly improves larval freeze tolerance (an ability to survive at -5°C when most of the freezable fraction of water is converted to ice). Using the optimal protocol, freeze survival to adult stage increased from 0.7% to 12.6% in the larvae fed standard diet (agar, sugar, yeast, cornmeal). Next, we fed the larvae diets augmented with 31 different amino compounds, administered in different concentrations, and observed their effects on larval metabolomic composition, viability, rate of development and freeze tolerance. While some diet additives were toxic, others showed positive effects on freeze tolerance. Statistical correlation revealed tight association between high freeze tolerance and high levels of amino compounds involved in arginine and proline metabolism. Proline- and arginine-augmented diets showed the highest potential, improving freeze survival to 42.1% and 50.6%, respectively. Two plausible mechanisms by which high concentrations of proline and arginine might stimulate high freeze tolerance are discussed: (i) proline, probably in combination with trehalose, could reduce partial unfolding of proteins and prevent membrane fusions in the larvae exposed to thermal stress (prior to freezing) or during freeze dehydration; (ii) both arginine and proline are exceptional among amino compounds in their ability to form supramolecular aggregates which probably bind partially unfolded proteins and inhibit their aggregation under increasing freeze dehydration.

  13. Arginine and proline applied as food additives stimulate high freeze tolerance in larvae of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Koštál, Vladimír; Korbelová, Jaroslava; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Moos, Martin; Šimek, Petr

    2016-08-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an insect of tropical origin. Its larval stage is evolutionarily adapted for rapid growth and development under warm conditions and shows high sensitivity to cold. In this study, we further developed an optimal acclimation and freezing protocol that significantly improves larval freeze tolerance (an ability to survive at -5°C when most of the freezable fraction of water is converted to ice). Using the optimal protocol, freeze survival to adult stage increased from 0.7% to 12.6% in the larvae fed standard diet (agar, sugar, yeast, cornmeal). Next, we fed the larvae diets augmented with 31 different amino compounds, administered in different concentrations, and observed their effects on larval metabolomic composition, viability, rate of development and freeze tolerance. While some diet additives were toxic, others showed positive effects on freeze tolerance. Statistical correlation revealed tight association between high freeze tolerance and high levels of amino compounds involved in arginine and proline metabolism. Proline- and arginine-augmented diets showed the highest potential, improving freeze survival to 42.1% and 50.6%, respectively. Two plausible mechanisms by which high concentrations of proline and arginine might stimulate high freeze tolerance are discussed: (i) proline, probably in combination with trehalose, could reduce partial unfolding of proteins and prevent membrane fusions in the larvae exposed to thermal stress (prior to freezing) or during freeze dehydration; (ii) both arginine and proline are exceptional among amino compounds in their ability to form supramolecular aggregates which probably bind partially unfolded proteins and inhibit their aggregation under increasing freeze dehydration. PMID:27489218

  14. Two conserved arginine residues from the SK3 potassium channel outer vestibule control selectivity of recognition by scorpion toxins.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing; Hu, Youtian; Yi, Hong; Yin, Shijin; Han, Song; Hu, Jun; Chen, Zongyun; Yang, Weishan; Cao, Zhijian; De Waard, Michel; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang

    2013-05-01

    Potassium channel functions are often deciphered by using selective and potent scorpion toxins. Among these toxins, only a limited subset is capable of selectively blocking small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels. The structural bases of this selective SK channel recognition remain unclear. In this work, we demonstrate the key role of the electric charges of two conserved arginine residues (Arg-485 and Arg-489) from the SK3 channel outer vestibule in the selective recognition by the SK3-blocking BmP05 toxin. Indeed, individually substituting these residues with histidyl or lysyl (maintaining the positive electric charge partially or fully), although decreasing BmP05 affinity, still preserved the toxin sensitivity profile of the SK3 channel (as evidenced by the lack of recognition by many other types of potassium channel-sensitive charybdotoxin). In contrast, when Arg-485 or Arg-489 of the SK3 channel was mutated to an acidic (Glu) or alcoholic (Ser) amino acid residue, the channel lost its sensitivity to BmP05 and became susceptible to the "new" blocking activity by charybdotoxin. In addition to these SK3 channel basic residues important for sensitivity, two acidic residues, Asp-492 and Asp-518, also located in the SK3 channel outer vestibule, were identified as being critical for toxin affinity. Furthermore, molecular modeling data indicate the existence of a compact SK3 channel turret conformation (like a peptide screener), where the basic rings of Arg-485 and Arg-489 are stabilized by strong ionic interactions with Asp-492 and Asp-518. In conclusion, the unique properties of Arg-485 and Arg-489 (spatial orientations and molecular interactions) in the SK3 channel account for its toxin sensitivity profile. PMID:23511633

  15. Unveiling the Mechanism of Arginine Transport through AdiC with Molecular Dynamics Simulations: The Guiding Role of Aromatic Residues

    PubMed Central

    Krammer, Eva-Maria; Ghaddar, Kassem; André, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Commensal and pathogenic enteric bacteria have developed several systems to adapt to proton leakage into the cytoplasm resulting from extreme acidic conditions. One such system involves arginine uptake followed by export of the decarboxylated product agmatine, carried out by the arginine/agmatine antiporter (AdiC), which thus works as a virtual proton pump. Here, using classical and targeted molecular dynamics, we investigated at the atomic level the mechanism of arginine transport through AdiC of E. coli. Overall, our MD simulation data clearly demonstrate that global rearrangements of several transmembrane segments are necessary but not sufficient for achieving transitions between structural states along the arginine translocation pathway. In particular, local structural changes, namely rotameric conversions of two aromatic residues, are needed to regulate access to both the outward- and inward-facing states. Our simulations have also enabled identification of a few residues, overwhelmingly aromatic, which are essential to guiding arginine in the course of its translocation. Most of them belong to gating elements whose coordinated motions contribute to the alternating access mechanism. Their conservation in all known E. coli acid resistance antiporters suggests that the transport mechanisms of these systems share common features. Last but not least, knowledge of the functional properties of AdiC can advance our understanding of the members of the amino acid-carbocation-polyamine superfamily, notably in eukaryotic cells. PMID:27482712

  16. Unveiling the Mechanism of Arginine Transport through AdiC with Molecular Dynamics Simulations: The Guiding Role of Aromatic Residues.

    PubMed

    Krammer, Eva-Maria; Ghaddar, Kassem; André, Bruno; Prévost, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Commensal and pathogenic enteric bacteria have developed several systems to adapt to proton leakage into the cytoplasm resulting from extreme acidic conditions. One such system involves arginine uptake followed by export of the decarboxylated product agmatine, carried out by the arginine/agmatine antiporter (AdiC), which thus works as a virtual proton pump. Here, using classical and targeted molecular dynamics, we investigated at the atomic level the mechanism of arginine transport through AdiC of E. coli. Overall, our MD simulation data clearly demonstrate that global rearrangements of several transmembrane segments are necessary but not sufficient for achieving transitions between structural states along the arginine translocation pathway. In particular, local structural changes, namely rotameric conversions of two aromatic residues, are needed to regulate access to both the outward- and inward-facing states. Our simulations have also enabled identification of a few residues, overwhelmingly aromatic, which are essential to guiding arginine in the course of its translocation. Most of them belong to gating elements whose coordinated motions contribute to the alternating access mechanism. Their conservation in all known E. coli acid resistance antiporters suggests that the transport mechanisms of these systems share common features. Last but not least, knowledge of the functional properties of AdiC can advance our understanding of the members of the amino acid-carbocation-polyamine superfamily, notably in eukaryotic cells. PMID:27482712

  17. The Rap-RapGAP complex: GTP hydrolysis without catalytic glutamine and arginine residues.

    PubMed

    Scrima, Andrea; Thomas, Christoph; Deaconescu, Delia; Wittinghofer, Alfred

    2008-04-01

    The GTP-binding protein Rap1 regulates integrin-mediated and other cell adhesion processes. Unlike most other Ras-related proteins, it contains a threonine in switch II instead of a glutamine (Gln61 in Ras), a residue crucial for the GTPase reaction of most G proteins. Furthermore, unlike most other GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for small G proteins, which supply a catalytically important Arg-finger, no arginine residue of RapGAP makes a significant contribution to the GTPase reaction of Rap1. For a detailed understanding of the reaction mechanism, we have solved the structure of Rap1 in complex with Rap1GAP. It shows that the Thr61 of Rap is away from the active site and that an invariant asparagine of RapGAPs, the Asn-thumb, takes over the role of the cis-glutamine of Ras, Rho or Ran. The structure and biochemical data allow to further explain the mechanism and to define the important role of a conserved tyrosine. The structure and biochemical data furthermore show that the RapGAP homologous region of the tumour suppressor Tuberin is sufficient for catalysis on Rheb.

  18. Neutralization of a single arginine residue gates open a two-pore domain, alkali-activated K+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; González-Nilo, Fernando D.; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Wendy; Cid, L. Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V.

    2007-01-01

    Potassium channels share a common selectivity filter that determines the conduction characteristics of the pore. Diversity in K+ channels is given by how they are gated open. TASK-2, TALK-1, and TALK-2 are two-pore region (2P) KCNK K+ channels gated open by extracellular alkalinization. We have explored the mechanism for this alkalinization-dependent gating using molecular simulation and site-directed mutagenesis followed by functional assay. We show that the side chain of a single arginine residue (R224) near the pore senses pH in TASK-2 with an unusual pKa of 8.0, a shift likely due to its hydrophobic environment. R224 would block the channel through an electrostatic effect on the pore, a situation relieved by its deprotonation by alkalinization. A lysine residue in TALK-2 fulfills the same role but with a largely unchanged pKa, which correlates with an environment that stabilizes its positive charge. In addition to suggesting unified alkaline pH-gating mechanisms within the TALK subfamily of channels, our results illustrate in a physiological context the principle that hydrophobic environment can drastically modulate the pKa of charged amino acids within a protein. PMID:17197424

  19. Molecular studies on bromovirus capsid protein. VII. Selective packaging on BMV RNA4 by specific N-terminal arginine residuals.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y G; Rao, A L

    2000-09-15

    An arginine-rich RNA-binding motif (ARM) found at the N-proximal region of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) coat protein (CP) adopts alpha-helical conformation and shares homology with CPs of plant and insect RNA viruses, HIV-Rev and Tat proteins, bacterial antiterminators, and ribosomal splicing factors. The ARM of BMV CP, consisting of amino acids 9 through 21 with six arginine residues, is essential for RNA binding and subsequent packaging. In this study analysis of the alpha-helical contents of wild-type and mutant peptides by circular dichroism spectra identified protein determinants required for such conformation. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays between viral RNA and BMV CP peptides with either proline or alanine substitutions revealed that the interaction is nonspecific. Expression in vivo of mature full-length BMV CP subunits, having the same substitutions for each arginine within the ARM, derived from biologically active clones was found to be competent to assemble into infectious virions and cause visible symptom phenotypes in whole plants. However, analysis of virion progeny RNA profiles of CP variants and subsequent in vitro reassembly assays between mutant CP and four BMV RNAs unveiled the ability of arginine residues at positions 10, 13, or 14 of the ARM to confer selective packaging of BMV RNA4. Thus, BMV CP contains determinants that specifically interact with RNA4 to ensure selective packaging.

  20. Characterization studies on the additives mixed L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haja Hameed, A. S.; Karthikeyan, C.; Ravi, G.; Rohani, S.

    2011-04-01

    L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP), potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) mixed LAP (LAP:KSCN) and sodium sulfite (Na 2SO 3) mixed LAP (LAP:Na 2SO 3) single crystals were grown by slow cooling technique. The effect of microbial contamination and coloration on the growth solutions was studied. The crystalline powders of the grown crystals were examined by X-ray diffraction and the lattice parameters of the crystals were estimated. From the FTIR spectroscopic analysis, various functional group frequencies associated with the crystals were assigned. Vickers microhardness studies were done on {1 0 0} faces for pure and additives mixed LAP crystals. From the preliminary surface second harmonic generation (SHG) results, it was found that the SHG intensity at (1 0 0) face of LAP:KSCN crystal was much stronger than that of pure LAP.

  1. Role of the Dinitrogenase Reductase Arginine 101 Residue in Dinitrogenase Reductase ADP-Ribosyltransferase Binding, NAD Binding, and Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Ludden, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Dinitrogenase reductase is posttranslationally regulated by dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DRAT) via ADP-ribosylation of the arginine 101 residue in some bacteria. Rhodospirillum rubrum strains in which the arginine 101 of dinitrogenase reductase was replaced by tyrosine, phenylalanine, or leucine were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the nifH gene. The strain containing the R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase retains 91%, the strain containing the R101Y form retains 72%, and the strain containing the R101L form retains only 28% of in vivo nitrogenase activity of the strain containing the dinitrogenase reductase with arginine at position 101. In vivo acetylene reduction assays, immunoblotting with anti-dinitrogenase reductase antibody, and [adenylate-32P]NAD labeling experiments showed that no switch-off of nitrogenase activity occurred in any of the three mutants and no ADP-ribosylation of altered dinitrogenase reductases occurred either in vivo or in vitro. Altered dinitrogenase reductases from strains UR629 (R101Y) and UR630 (R101F) were purified to homogeneity. The R101F and R101Y forms of dinitrogenase reductase were able to form a complex with DRAT that could be chemically cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide. The R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase and DRAT together were not able to cleave NAD. This suggests that arginine 101 is not critical for the binding of DRAT to dinitrogenase reductase but that the availability of arginine 101 is important for NAD cleavage. Both DRAT and dinitrogenase reductase can be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD individually upon UV irradiation, but most 14C label is incorporated into DRAT when both proteins are present. The ability of R101F dinitrogenase reductase to be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD suggested that Arg 101 is not absolutely required for NAD binding. PMID:11114923

  2. Isolation of cucurmoschin, a novel antifungal peptide abundant in arginine, glutamate and glycine residues from black pumpkin seeds.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2003-07-01

    A novel antifungal peptide, with a molecular mass of 8 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and in gel filtration on Superdex 75 and designated cucurmoschin, was isolated from the seeds of the black pumpkin. The peptide was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose but adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel. Cucurmoschin inhibited mycelial growth in the fungi Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum and Mycosphaerella oxysporum. It inhibited translation in a cell-free rabbit reticulocyte lysate system with an IC50 of 1.2 microM. The N-terminal sequence of cucurmoschin was rich in arginine, glutamate and glycine residues.

  3. Characterization of conserved arginine residues on Cdt1 that affect licensing activity and interaction with Geminin or Mcm complex.

    PubMed

    You, Zhiying; Ode, Koji L; Shindo, Mayumi; Takisawa, Haruhiko; Masai, Hisao

    2016-05-01

    All organisms ensure once and only once replication during S phase through a process called replication licensing. Cdt1 is a key component and crucial loading factor of Mcm complex, which is a central component for the eukaryotic replicative helicase. In higher eukaryotes, timely inhibition of Cdt1 by Geminin is essential to prevent rereplication. Here, we address the mechanism of DNA licensing using purified Cdt1, Mcm and Geminin proteins in combination with replication in Xenopus egg extracts. We mutagenized the 223th arginine of mouse Cdt1 (mCdt1) to cysteine or serine (R-S or R-C, respectively) and 342nd and 346th arginines constituting an arginine finger-like structure to alanine (RR-AA). The RR-AA mutant of Cdt1 could not only rescue the DNA replication activity in Cdt1-depleted extracts but also its specific activity for DNA replication and licensing was significantly increased compared to the wild-type protein. In contrast, the R223 mutants were partially defective in rescue of DNA replication and licensing. Biochemical analyses of these mutant Cdt1 proteins indicated that the RR-AA mutation disabled its functional interaction with Geminin, while R223 mutations resulted in ablation in interaction with the Mcm2∼7 complex. Intriguingly, the R223 mutants are more susceptible to the phosphorylation-induced inactivation or chromatin dissociation. Our results show that conserved arginine residues play critical roles in interaction with Geminin and Mcm that are crucial for proper conformation of the complexes and its licensing activity. PMID:26940553

  4. Symmetrical dimethylation of arginine residues in spliceosomal Sm protein B/B' and the Sm-like protein LSm4, and their interaction with the SMN protein.

    PubMed Central

    Brahms, H; Meheus, L; de Brabandere, V; Fischer, U; Lührmann, R

    2001-01-01

    Arginine residues in RG-rich proteins are frequently dimethylated posttranslationally by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). The most common methylation pattern is asymmetrical dimethylation, a modification important for protein shuttling and signal transduction. Symmetrically dimethylated arginines (sDMA) have until now been confined to the myelin basic protein MBP and the Sm proteins D1 and D3. We show here by mass spectrometry and protein sequencing that also the human Sm protein B/B' and, for the first time, one of the Sm-like proteins, LSm4, contain sDMA in vivo. The symmetrical dimethylation of B/B', LSm4, D1, and D3 decisively influences their binding to the Tudor domain of the "survival of motor neurons" protein (SMN): inhibition of dimethylation by S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) abolished the binding of D1, D3, B/B', and LSm4 to this domain. A synthetic peptide containing nine sDMA-glycine dipeptides, but not asymmetrically modified or nonmodified peptides, specifically inhibited the interaction of D1, D3, B/B', LSm4, and UsnRNPs with SMN-Tudor. Recombinant D1 and a synthetic peptide could be methylated in vitro by both HeLa cytosolic S100 extract and nuclear extract; however, only the cytosolic extract produced symmetrical dimethylarginines. Thus, the Sm-modifying PRMT is cytoplasmic, and symmetrical dimethylation of B/B', D1, and D3 is a prerequisite for the SMN-dependent cytoplasmic core-UsnRNP assembly. Our demonstration of sDMAs in LSm4 suggests additional functions of sDMAs in tri-UsnRNP biogenesis and mRNA decay. Our findings also have interesting implications for the understanding of the aetiology of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). PMID:11720283

  5. Symmetrical dimethylation of arginine residues in spliceosomal Sm protein B/B' and the Sm-like protein LSm4, and their interaction with the SMN protein.

    PubMed

    Brahms, H; Meheus, L; de Brabandere, V; Fischer, U; Lührmann, R

    2001-11-01

    Arginine residues in RG-rich proteins are frequently dimethylated posttranslationally by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). The most common methylation pattern is asymmetrical dimethylation, a modification important for protein shuttling and signal transduction. Symmetrically dimethylated arginines (sDMA) have until now been confined to the myelin basic protein MBP and the Sm proteins D1 and D3. We show here by mass spectrometry and protein sequencing that also the human Sm protein B/B' and, for the first time, one of the Sm-like proteins, LSm4, contain sDMA in vivo. The symmetrical dimethylation of B/B', LSm4, D1, and D3 decisively influences their binding to the Tudor domain of the "survival of motor neurons" protein (SMN): inhibition of dimethylation by S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) abolished the binding of D1, D3, B/B', and LSm4 to this domain. A synthetic peptide containing nine sDMA-glycine dipeptides, but not asymmetrically modified or nonmodified peptides, specifically inhibited the interaction of D1, D3, B/B', LSm4, and UsnRNPs with SMN-Tudor. Recombinant D1 and a synthetic peptide could be methylated in vitro by both HeLa cytosolic S100 extract and nuclear extract; however, only the cytosolic extract produced symmetrical dimethylarginines. Thus, the Sm-modifying PRMT is cytoplasmic, and symmetrical dimethylation of B/B', D1, and D3 is a prerequisite for the SMN-dependent cytoplasmic core-UsnRNP assembly. Our demonstration of sDMAs in LSm4 suggests additional functions of sDMAs in tri-UsnRNP biogenesis and mRNA decay. Our findings also have interesting implications for the understanding of the aetiology of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  6. Effect of counter ions of arginine as an additive for the solubilization of protein and aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Shunsuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2016-10-01

    Arginine is widely used in biotechnological application, but mostly with chloride counter ion. Here, we examined the effects of various anions on solubilization of aromatic compounds and reduced lysozyme and on refolding of the lysozyme. All arginine salts tested increased the solubility of propyl gallate with acetate much more effectively than chloride. The effects of arginine salts were compared with those of sodium or guanidine salts, indicating that the ability of anions to modulate the propyl gallate solubility is independent of the cation. Comparison of transfer free energy of propyl gallate between sodium and arginine salts indicates that the interaction of propyl gallate is more favorable with arginine than sodium. On the contrary, the solubility of aromatic amino acids is only slightly modulated by anions, implying that there is specific interaction between acetic acid and propyl gallate. Unlike their effects on the solubility of small aromatic compounds, the solubility of reduced lysozyme was much higher in arginine chloride than in arginine acetate or sulfate. Consistent with high solubility, refolding of reduced lysozyme was most effective in arginine chloride. These results suggest potential broader applications of arginine modulated by different anions. PMID:27234496

  7. Effect of counter ions of arginine as an additive for the solubilization of protein and aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Shunsuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2016-10-01

    Arginine is widely used in biotechnological application, but mostly with chloride counter ion. Here, we examined the effects of various anions on solubilization of aromatic compounds and reduced lysozyme and on refolding of the lysozyme. All arginine salts tested increased the solubility of propyl gallate with acetate much more effectively than chloride. The effects of arginine salts were compared with those of sodium or guanidine salts, indicating that the ability of anions to modulate the propyl gallate solubility is independent of the cation. Comparison of transfer free energy of propyl gallate between sodium and arginine salts indicates that the interaction of propyl gallate is more favorable with arginine than sodium. On the contrary, the solubility of aromatic amino acids is only slightly modulated by anions, implying that there is specific interaction between acetic acid and propyl gallate. Unlike their effects on the solubility of small aromatic compounds, the solubility of reduced lysozyme was much higher in arginine chloride than in arginine acetate or sulfate. Consistent with high solubility, refolding of reduced lysozyme was most effective in arginine chloride. These results suggest potential broader applications of arginine modulated by different anions.

  8. Effect of Site-directed Mutagenesis of Methylglyoxal- Modifiable Arginine Residues on the Structure and Chaperone Function of Human αA-crystallin

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Ashis; Miller, Antonia; Oya-Ito, Tomoko; Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Bhat, Manjunatha; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2008-01-01

    We reported previously that chemical modification of human αA-crystallin by a metabolic dicarbonyl compound, methylglyoxal (MGO), enhances its chaperone-like function, a phenomenon which we attributed to formation of argpyrimidine at arginine residues (R) 21, 49 and 103. This structural change removes the positive charge on the arginine residues. To explore this mechanism further, we replaced these three R residues with a neutral alanine (A) residue one at time or in combination and examined the impact on the structure and chaperone function. Measurement of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and near-UV CD spectra revealed alteration of the microenvironment of aromatic amino acid residue in mutant proteins. When compared to wild type (wt) αA-crystallin, the chaperone function of R21A and R103A mutants increased 20% and 18% as measured by the insulin aggregation assay, and increased it as much as 39% and 28% when measured by the citrate synthase (CS) aggregation assay. While the R49A mutant lost most of its chaperone function, R21A/R103A and R21A/R49A/R103A mutants had slightly better function (6–14% and 10–14%) than the wt protein in these assays. R21A and R103A mutants had higher surface hydrophobicity than wt αA-crystallin, but the R49A mutant had lower hydrophobicity. R21A and R103A mutants, but not the R49A mutant, were more efficient than wt protein in refolding guanidine hydrochloride-treated malate dehydrogenase to its native state. Our findings indicate that the positive charges on R21, R49 and R103 are important determinants of the chaperone function of αA-crystallin and suggest that chemical modification of arginine residues may play a role in protein aggregation during lens aging and cataract formation. PMID:16584192

  9. Insights into the modulation of optimum pH by a single histidine residue in arginine deiminase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hanjing; Liu, Hui; Yin, Yan; Ding, Ying; Jia, Yan; Chen, Qingming; Zou, Guolin; Zheng, Zhongliang

    2012-09-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a potential antitumor agent for the arginine deprivation treatment of L-arginine auxotrophic tumors. The optimum pH of ADI varies significantly, yet little is known about the origin of this variety. Here, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ADI (PaADI), an enzyme that functions only at acidic pH, was utilized as the model system. The results of UV-pH titration imply that the nucleophilic Cys406 thiol group is protonated in the resting state. The H405R single mutation resulted in an altered pH optimum (from pH 5.5 to 6.5), an increased k(cat) (from 9.8 s(-1) to 101.7 s(-1) at pH 6.5), and a shifted pH rate dependence (ascending limb pK(a) from 3.6 to 4.4). Other mutants were constructed to investigate the effects of hydrogen bonding, charge distribution, and hydrophobicity on the properties of the enzyme. The pH optima of His405 mutants were all shifted to a relatively neutral pH except for the H405E mutant. The results of kinetic characterizations and molecular dynamic simulations revealed that the active site hydrogen bonding network involving Asp280 and His405 plays an important role in controlling the dependence of PaADI activity on pH. Moreover, the H405R variant showed increased cytotoxicity towards arginine auxotrophic cancer cell lines.

  10. Characterization of an endoprotease from rat small intestinal mucosal secretory granules which generates somatostatin-28 from prosomatostatin by cleavage after a single arginine residue.

    PubMed

    Beinfeld, M C; Bourdais, J; Kuks, P; Morel, A; Cohen, P

    1989-03-15

    We have extracted, characterized, and partially purified an enzyme from secretory granules from rat small intestinal mucosa which cleaves a synthetic prosomatostatin substrate on the carboxyl side of a single arginine residue. This substrate Leu-Gln-Arg-Ser-Ala-Asn-Ser-NH2 contains the monobasic site at which mammalian prosomatostatin is cleaved in vivo to generate somatostatin-28. This activity was released from the granules by osmotic shock followed by extraction with 500 mM KCl. The enzyme had a molecular weight of about 55,000, a pH optimum of about 7.5, and a Km for the synthetic substrate of 20 microM. It was partially inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, iodoacetate, soybean trypsin inhibitor, and EDTA. It was also very sensitive to aprotinin (complete inhibition at 25 micrograms/ml) but was not inhibited by bestatin, pepstatin, or p-chloromercuribenzoate. This endoprotease was unable to cleave three small trypsin and kallikrein substrates (N alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester, N alpha-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide, and N alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine 7-amido-4-methylcoumarin). It was unable to cleave either the Arg-Asp bond in CCK 12 or the Arg-Glu and Arg-Met bonds of synthetic peptides corresponding to sequences of anglerfish prosomatostatin II situated upstream from the somatostatin-28 domain. These observations together suggest that adjacent amino acids play a role in determining the conformational specificity of the monobasic cleavage. This soluble enzyme was also able to cleave three synthetic substrates containing dibasic residues (Arg-Lys or Lys-Arg) on the carboxyl side of the arginine, although it did so less rapidly than at the monobasic cleavage sites. When incubated with partially purified prosomatostatin from anglerfish pancreas, significant quantities of somatostatin-28 II were produced. All these cleavages were completely blocked by preincubation with aprotinin. Although further work is required to

  11. Intra- and inter-molecular effects of a conserved arginine residue of neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthases on FMN and calmodulin binding.

    PubMed

    Panda, Satya Prakash; Polusani, Srikanth R; Kellogg, Dean L; Venkatakrishnan, Priya; Roman, Madeline G; Demeler, Borries; Masters, Bettie Sue S; Roman, Linda J

    2013-05-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) synthesize nitric oxide (NO), a signaling molecule, from l-arginine, utilizing electrons from NADPH. NOSs are flavo-hemo proteins, with two flavin molecules (FAD and FMN) and one heme per monomer, which require the binding of calcium/calmodulin (Ca(2+)/CaM) to produce NO. It is therefore important to understand the molecular factors influencing CaM binding from a structure/function perspective. A crystal structure of the CaM-bound iNOS FMN-binding domain predicted a salt bridge between R536 of human iNOS and E47 of CaM. To characterize the interaction between the homologous Arg of rat nNOS (R753) and murine iNOS (R530) with CaM, the Arg was mutated to Ala and, in iNOS, to Glu. The mutation weakens the interaction between nNOS and CaM, decreasing affinity by ~3-fold. The rate of electron transfer from FMN is greatly attenuated; however, little effect on electron transfer from FAD is observed. The mutated proteins showed reduced FMN binding, from 20% to 60%, suggesting an influence of this residue on FMN incorporation. The weakened FMN binding may be due to conformational changes caused by the arginine mutation. Our data show that this Arg residue plays an important role in CaM binding and influences FMN binding. PMID:23507581

  12. Intra- and inter-molecular effects of a conserved arginine residue of neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthases on FMN and calmodulin binding

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Satya Prakash; Polusani, Srikanth R.; Kellogg, Dean L.; Venkatakrishnan, Priya; Roman, Madeline G.; Demeler, Borries; Masters, Bettie Sue S.; Roman, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) synthesize nitric oxide (NO), a signaling molecule, from l-arginine, utilizing electrons from NADPH. NOSs are flavo-hemo proteins, with two flavin molecules (FAD and FMN) and one heme per monomer, which require the binding of calcium/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) to produce NO. It is therefore important to understand the molecular factors influencing CaM binding from a structure/function perspective. A crystal structure of the CaM-bound iNOS FMN-binding domain predicted a salt bridge between R536 of human iNOS and E47 of CaM. To characterize the interaction between the homologous Arg of rat nNOS (R753) and murine iNOS (R530) with CaM, the Arg was mutated to Ala and, in iNOS, to Glu. The mutation weakens the interaction between nNOS and CaM, decreasing affinity by ∼3-fold. The rate of electron transfer from FMN is greatly attenuated; however, little effect on electron transfer from FAD is observed. The mutated proteins showed reduced FMN binding, from 20% to 60%, suggesting an influence of this residue on FMN incorporation. The weakened FMN binding may be due to conformational changes caused by the arginine mutation. Our data show that this Arg residue plays an important role in CaM binding and influences FMN binding. PMID:23507581

  13. Survey of residual solvents in natural food additives by standard addition head-space GC.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Y; Hirata, K; Suzuki, K; Iida, K; Kamata, K

    2002-04-01

    Residual levels of 12 solvents in 87 natural food additives (66 samples of food colours, 19 samples of natural antioxidants and two natural preservatives) collected between 1997 and 1999 were determined by automated head-space GC using FID, with a porous-polymer (PLOT) column. Calibration curves were prepared by the method of standard addition. Confirmation was by manually injected head-space GC using mass spectrometric detection. 1,2-Dichloroethane was found in turmeric colour (natural food colour) collected in 1997 at the concentrations of 8.6 microg g(-1), but was not found in samples collected in 1998 and 1999. Hexane was found in three samples of dunaliella carotene (11, 72 and 75 microg g(-1)), and in chlorophyll at 93 microg g(-1) (both natural food colours). Acetone was found in turmeric colour, annatto colour, dunaliella carotene, kaoliang colour, cacao colour at a concentration between 8.7 and 42 microg g(-1) (all natural food colours).

  14. Effects of arginine and other solution additives on the self-association of different surfactants: an investigation at single-molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2011-05-17

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is used to monitor the self-association of SDS and DTAB monomers at single-molecule resolution. Tetramethylrhodamine-5-maleimide (TMR) has been chosen as a probe because rhodamine dyes have been shown to bind surfactant micelles. Correlation functions obtained by FCS experiments have been fit using conventional discrete diffusional component analysis as well as the more recent maximum entropy method (MEM). Hydrodynamic radii calculated from the diffusion time values increase with surfactant concentration as the monomers self-associate. Effects of several solution additives on the self-association property of the surfactants have been studied. Urea and glycerol inhibit self-association, and arginine shows a dual nature. With SDS, arginine favors self-association, and with DTAB, it inhibits micelle formation. We propose surfactant self-association to be a "supersimplified" model of protein aggregation.

  15. In vitro mutagenesis studies at the arginine residues of adenylate kinase. A revised binding site for AMP in the X-ray-deduced model.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Nishikawa, S; Tokutomi, Y; Takenaka, H; Hamada, M; Kuby, S A; Uesugi, S

    1990-02-01

    Although X-ray crystallographic and NMR studies have been made on the adenylate kinases, the substrate-binding sites are not unequivocally established. In an attempt to shed light on the binding sites for MgATP2- and for AMP2- in human cytosolic adenylate kinase (EC 2.7.4.3, hAK1), we have investigated the enzymic effects of replacement of the arginine residues (R44, R132, R138, and R149), which had been assumed by Pai et al. [Pai, E. F., Sachsenheimer, W., Schirmer, R. H., & Schulz, G. E. (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 114, 37-45] to interact with the phosphoryl groups of AMP2- and MgATP2-. With use of the site-directed mutagenesis method, point mutations were made in the artificial gene for hAK1 [Kim, H. J., Nishikawa, S., Tanaka, T., Uesugi, S., Takenaka, H., Hamada, M., & Kuby, S. A. (1989) Protein Eng. 2, 379-386] to replace these arginine residues with alanyl residues and yield the mutants R44A hAK1, R132A hAK1, R138A hAK1, and R149A hAK1. The resulting large increases in the Km,app values for AMP2- of the mutant enzymes, the relatively small increases in the Km,app values for MgATP2-, and the fact that the R132A, R138A, and R149A mutant enzymes proved to be very poor catalysts are consistent with the idea that the assigned substrate binding sites of Pai et al. (1977) have been reversed and that their ATP-binding site may be assigned as the AMP site.

  16. Identification of arginine 331 as an important active site residue in the class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, S.; Marsh, K.; Berry, A.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of the Class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase of Escherichia coli with the arginine-specific alpha-dicarbonyl reagents, butanedione or phenylglyoxal, results in inactivation of the enzyme. The enzyme is protected from inactivation by the substrate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, or by inorganic phosphate. Modification with [7-14C] phenylglyoxal in the absence of substrate demonstrates that enzyme activity is abolished by the incorporation of approximately 2 moles of reagent per mole of enzyme. Sequence alignment of the eight known Class II FBP-aldolases shows that only one arginine residue is conserved in all the known sequences. This residue, Arg-331, was mutated to either alanine or glutamic acid. The mutant enzymes were much less susceptible to inactivation by phenylglyoxal. Measurement of the steady-state kinetic parameters revealed that mutation of Arg-331 dramatically increased the K(m) for fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. Comparatively small differences in the inhibitor constant Ki for dihydroxyacetone phosphate or its analogue, 2-phosphoglycolate, were found between the wild-type and mutant enzymes. In contrast, the mutation caused large changes in the kinetic parameters when glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate was used as an inhibitor. Kinetic analysis of the oxidation of the carbanionic aldolase-substrate intermediate of the reaction by hexacyanoferrate (III) revealed that the K(m) for dihydroxyacetone phosphate was again unaffected, whereas that for fructose 1,6-bisphosphate was dramatically increased. Taken together, these results show that Arg-331 is critically involved in the binding of fructose bisphosphate by the enzyme and demonstrate that it interacts with the C-6 phosphate group of the substrate. PMID:8771208

  17. Polygalacturonase-Inhibiting Protein Interacts with Pectin through a Binding Site Formed by Four Clustered Residues of Arginine and Lysine1

    PubMed Central

    Spadoni, Sara; Zabotina, Olga; Di Matteo, Adele; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Mattei, Benedetta; Bellincampi, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) is a cell wall protein that inhibits fungal polygalacturonases (PGs) and retards the invasion of plant tissues by phytopathogenic fungi. Here, we report the interaction of two PGIP isoforms from Phaseolus vulgaris (PvPGIP1 and PvPGIP2) with both polygalacturonic acid and cell wall fractions containing uronic acids. We identify in the three-dimensional structure of PvPGIP2 a motif of four clustered arginine and lysine residues (R183, R206, K230, and R252) responsible for this binding. The four residues were mutated and the protein variants were expressed in Pichia pastoris. The ability of both wild-type and mutated proteins to bind pectins was investigated by affinity chromatography. Single mutations impaired the binding and double mutations abolished the interaction, thus indicating that the four clustered residues form the pectin-binding site. Remarkably, the binding of PGIP to pectin is displaced in vitro by PGs, suggesting that PGIP interacts with pectin and PGs through overlapping although not identical regions. The specific interaction of PGIP with polygalacturonic acid may be strategic to protect pectins from the degrading activity of fungal PGs. PMID:16648220

  18. The Arginine Residue within the C-Terminal Active Core of Bombyx mori Pheromone Biosynthesis-Activating Neuropeptide is Essential for Receptor Binding and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Takeshi; Lee, Jae Min; Nagata, Koji; Matsumoto, Shogo; Tanokura, Masaru; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2012-01-01

    In most lepidopteran insects, the biosynthesis of sex pheromones is regulated by pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN). Bombyx mori PBAN (BomPBAN) consists of 33 amino acid residues and contains a C-terminus FSPRLamide motif as the active core. Among neuropeptides containing the FXPRLamide motif, the arginine (Arg, R) residue at the second position from the C-terminus is highly conserved across several neuropeptides, which can be designated as RXamide peptides. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of the Arg residue in the BomPBAN active core. We synthesized 10-residue peptides corresponding to the C-terminal part of BomPBAN with a series of replacements at the second position from the C-terminus, termed the C2 position, and measured their efficacy in stimulating Ca2+ influx in insect cells expressing a fluorescent PBAN receptor chimera (PBANR–EGFP) using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, Fura Red–AM. The PBAN analogs with the C2 position replaced with alanine (Ala, A), aspartic acid (Asp, D), serine (Ser, S), or l-2-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc) decreased PBAN-like activity. RC2A (SKTRYFSPALamide) and RC2D (SKTRYFSPDLamide) had the lowest activity and could not inhibit the activity of PBAN C10 (SKTRYFSPRLamide). We also prepared Rhodamine Red-labeled peptides of the PBAN analogs and examined their ability to bind PBANR. In contrast to Rhodamine Red-PBAN C10 at 100 nM, none of the synthetic analogs exhibited PBANR binding at the same concentration. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the C2 Arg residue in BomPBAN is essential for PBANR binding and activation. PMID:22654866

  19. Two perfectly conserved arginine residues are required for substrate binding in a high-affinity nitrate transporter.

    PubMed

    Unkles, Shiela E; Rouch, Duncan A; Wang, Ye; Siddiqi, M Yaeesh; Glass, Anthony D M; Kinghorn, James R

    2004-12-14

    This study represents the first attempt to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which nitrate, an anion of significant ecological, agricultural, and medical importance, is transported into cells by high-affinity nitrate transporters. Two charged residues, R87 and R368, located within hydrophobic transmembrane domains 2 and 8, respectively, are conserved in all 52 high-affinity nitrate transporters sequenced thus far. Site-directed replacements of either of R87 or R368 residues by lysine were found to be tolerated, but such residue changes increased the K(m) for nitrate influx from micromolar to millimolar values. Seven other amino acid substitutions of R87 or R368 all led to loss of function and lack of growth on nitrate. No evidence was obtained of R87 or R368 forming a salt-bridge with conserved acidic residues. Remarkably, the phenotype of loss-of-function mutant R87T was found to be alleviated by an alteration to lysine of N459, present in the second copy of the nitrate signature (transmembrane domain 11), suggesting a structural or functional interplay between residues R87 and N459 in the three-dimensional NrtA protein structure. Failure of the potential reciprocal second site suppressor N168K (in the first nitrate signature copy of transmembrane domain 5) to revert R368T was observed. Taken with recent structural studies of other major facilitator superfamily proteins, the results suggest that R87 and R368 are involved in substrate binding and probably located in a region of the protein close to N459. PMID:15576512

  20. Structural and kinetic analyses of arginine residues in the active site of the acetate kinase from Methanosarcina thermophila.

    PubMed

    Gorrell, Andrea; Lawrence, Sarah H; Ferry, James G

    2005-03-18

    Acetate kinase catalyzes transfer of the gamma-phosphate of ATP to acetate. The only crystal structure reported for acetate kinase is the homodimeric enzyme from Methanosarcina thermophila containing ADP and sulfate in the active site (Buss, K. A., Cooper, D. C., Ingram-Smith, C., Ferry, J. G., Sanders, D. A., and Hasson, M. S. (2001) J. Bacteriol. 193, 680-686). Here we report two new crystal structure of the M. thermophila enzyme in the presence of substrate and transition state analogs. The enzyme co-crystallized with the ATP analog adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate contained AMP adjacent to thiopyrophosphate in the active site cleft of monomer B. The enzyme co-crystallized with ADP, acetate, Al(3+), and F(-) contained a linear array of ADP-AlF(3)-acetate in the active site cleft of monomer B. Together, the structures clarify the substrate binding sites and support a direct in-line transfer mechanism in which AlF(3) mimics the meta-phosphate transition state. Monomers A of both structures contained ADP and sulfate, and the active site clefts were closed less than in monomers B, suggesting that domain movement contributes to catalysis. The finding that His(180) was in close proximity to AlF(3) is consistent with a role for stabilization of the meta-phosphate that is in agreement with a previous report indicating that this residue is essential for catalysis. Residue Arg(241) was also found adjacent to AlF(3), consistent with a role for stabilization of the transition state. Kinetic analyses of Arg(241) and Arg(91) replacement variants indicated that these residues are essential for catalysis and also indicated a role in binding acetate. PMID:15647264

  1. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  2. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  3. Substitution of a single amino acid residue in the aromatic/arginine selectivity filter alters the transport profiles of tonoplast aquaporin homologs.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Yoshikawa, Naoki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporins are integral membrane proteins that facilitate the transport of water and some small solutes across cellular membranes. X-ray crystallography of aquaporins indicates that four amino acids constitute an aromatic/arginine (ar/R) pore constriction known as the selectivity filter. On the basis of these four amino acids, tonoplast aquaporins called tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) are divided into three groups in Arabidopsis. Herein, we describe the characterization of two group I TIP1s (TgTIP1;1 and TgTIP1;2) from tulip (Tulipa gesneriana). TgTIP1;1 and TgTIP1;2 have a novel isoleucine in loop E (LE2 position) of the ar/R filter; the residue at LE2 is a valine in all group I TIPs from model plants. The homologs showed mercury-sensitive water channel activity in a fast kinetics swelling assay upon heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. Heterologous expression of both homologs promoted the growth of P. pastoris on ammonium or urea as sole sources of nitrogen and decreased growth and survival in the presence of H(2)O(2). TgTIP1;1- and TgTIP1;2-mediated H(2)O(2) conductance was demonstrated further by a fluorescence assay. Substitutions in the ar/R selectivity filter of TgTIP1;1 showed that mutants that mimicked the ar/R constriction of group I TIPs could conduct the same substrates that were transported by wild-type TgTIP1;1. In contrast, mutants that mimicked group II TIPs showed no evidence of urea or H(2)O(2) conductance. These results suggest that the amino acid residue at LE2 position is critical for the transport selectivity of the TIP homologs and group I TIPs might have a broader spectrum of substrate selectivity than group II TIPs.

  4. Effect of organic residues addition on the technological properties of clay bricks.

    PubMed

    Demir, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the utilization potential of several organic residues in clay bricks. Sawdust, tobacco residues, and grass are widespread by-products of industrial and agricultural processes in Turkey. These residue materials have long cellulose fibres. Sawdust and tobacco residues generally are used as fuel, and the grass is utilized for agricultural purposes. The insulation capacity of brick increases with the increasing porosity of the clay body. Combustible, organic types of pore-forming additives are most frequently used for this purpose. For this reason, increasing amounts of organic residues (0%, 2.5%, 5% and 10% in wt.) were mixed with raw brick-clay. All samples were fired at 900 degrees C. Effects on shaping, plasticity, density, and mechanical properties were investigated. The organic residue additions were found to be effective for pore-forming in the clay body with the clay maintaining acceptable mechanical properties. It was observed that the fibrous nature of the residues did not create extrusion problems. However, higher residue addition required a higher water content to ensure the right plasticity. As a result, sawdust, tobacco residues, and grass can be utilized in an environmentally safe way as organic pore-forming agents in brick-clay.

  5. The roles of selected arginine and lysine residues of TAFI (Pro-CPU) in its activation to TAFIa by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengliang; Kim, Paul Y; Manuel, Reg; Seto, Marian; Whitlow, Marc; Nagashima, Mariko; Morser, John; Gils, Ann; Declerck, Paul; Nesheim, Michael E

    2009-03-13

    Thrombomodulin (TM) increases the catalytic efficiency of thrombin (IIa)-mediated activation of thrombin-activable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) 1250-fold. Negatively charged residues of the C-loop of TM-EGF-like domain 3 are required for TAFI activation. Molecular models suggested several positively charged residues of TAFI with which the C-loop residues could interact. Seven TAFI mutants were constructed to determine if these residues are required for efficient TAFI activation. TAFI wild-type or mutants were activated in the presence or absence of TM and the kinetic parameters of TAFI activation were determined. When the three consecutive lysine residues in the activation peptide of TAFI were substituted with alanine (K42/43/44A), the catalytic efficiencies for TAFI activation with TM decreased 8-fold. When other positively charged surface residues of TAFI (Lys-133, Lys-211, Lys-212, Arg-220, Lys-240, or Arg-275) were mutated to alanine, the catalytic efficiencies for TAFI activation with TM decreased by 1.7-2.7-fold. All decreases were highly statistically significant. In the absence of TM, catalytic efficiencies ranged from 2.8-fold lower to 1.24-fold higher than wild-type. None of these, except the 2.8-fold lower value, was statistically significant. The average half-life of the TAFIa mutants was 8.1+/-0.6 min, and that of wild type was 8.4+/-0.3 min at 37 degrees C. Our data show that these residues are important in the activation of TAFI by IIa, especially in the presence of TM. Whether the mutated residues promote a TAFI-TM or TAFI-IIa interaction remains to be determined. In addition, these residues do not influence spontaneous inactivation of TAFIa.

  6. Comparing the additive composition of smokeless gunpowder and its handgun-fired residues.

    PubMed

    Reardon, M R; MacCrehan, W A; Rowe, W F

    2000-11-01

    Detecting the use of handguns via the determination of the organic additives in smokeless gunpowder residues (OGSR) presents a promising alternative to primer metal residue analysis. Compositional analysis of the gunpowder additives nitroglycerin, diphenylamine, and ethyl centralite provides information that can associate residue samples with unfired gunpowder. We evaluated the composition of seven reloading smokeless gunpowders, both in bulk and as single particles, by ultrasonic solvent extraction/capillary electrophoresis. Handgun-fired residues obtained from three common weapon calibers loaded with the known reloading powders were compared with the unfired powders. In general, the composition of the residues was similar to that found in the unfired powders. For double-base powders, comparing the ratio of the propellant (P) to the total amount of stabilizer (S) for both residue and gunpowder samples proved to be a useful measurement for identification. This P/S ratio demonstrated that the additives in the residues did not greatly change relative to the unfired powder, providing a useful indicator to aid in forensic powder and residue evaluation.

  7. Neisseria meningitidis Translation Elongation Factor P and Its Active-Site Arginine Residue Are Essential for Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Takehiro; Masuda, Akiko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Translation elongation factor P (EF-P), a ubiquitous protein over the entire range of bacterial species, rescues ribosomal stalling at consecutive prolines in proteins. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, the post-translational β-lysyl modification of Lys34 of EF-P is important for the EF-P activity. The β-lysyl EF-P modification pathway is conserved among only 26–28% of bacteria. Recently, it was found that the Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa EF-P proteins, containing an Arg residue at position 32, are modified with rhamnose, which is a novel post-translational modification. In these bacteria, EF-P and its Arg modification are both dispensable for cell viability, similar to the E. coli and S. enterica EF-P proteins and their Lys34 modification. However, in the present study, we found that EF-P and Arg32 are essential for the viability of the human pathogen, Neisseria meningitidis. We therefore analyzed the modification of Arg32 in the N. meningitidis EF-P protein, and identified the same rhamnosyl modification as in the S. oneidensis and P. aeruginosa EF-P proteins. N. meningitidis also has the orthologue of the rhamnosyl modification enzyme (EarP) from S. oneidensis and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, EarP should be a promising target for antibacterial drug development specifically against N. meningitidis. The pair of genes encoding N. meningitidis EF-P and EarP suppressed the slow-growth phenotype of the EF-P-deficient mutant of E. coli, indicating that the activity of N. meningitidis rhamnosyl–EF-P for rescuing the stalled ribosomes at proline stretches is similar to that of E. coli β-lysyl–EF-P. The possible reasons for the unique requirement of rhamnosyl–EF-P for N. meningitidis cells are that more proline stretch-containing proteins are essential and/or the basal ribosomal activity to synthesize proline stretch-containing proteins in the absence of EF-P is lower in this bacterium than in others. PMID:26840407

  8. Soil nitrous oxide emissions following crop residue addition: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaihai; Li, Xuechao; Hu, Feng; Shi, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Annual production of crop residues has reached nearly 4 billion metric tons globally. Retention of this large amount of residues on agricultural land can be beneficial to soil C sequestration. Such potential impacts, however, may be offset if residue retention substantially increases soil emissions of N(2)O, a potent greenhouse gas and ozone depletion substance. Residue effects on soil N(2)O emissions have gained considerable attention since early 1990s; yet, it is still a great challenge to predict the magnitude and direction of soil N(2)O emissions following residue amendment. Here, we used a meta-analysis to assess residue impacts on soil N(2)O emissions in relation to soil and residue attributes, i.e., soil pH, soil texture, soil water content, residue C and N input, and residue C : N ratio. Residue effects were negatively associated with C : N ratios, but generally residue amendment could not reduce soil N(2)O emissions, even for C : N ratios well above ca. 30, the threshold for net N immobilization. Residue effects were also comparable to, if not greater than, those of synthetic N fertilizers. In addition, residue effects on soil N(2)O emissions were positively related to the amounts of residue C input as well as residue effects on soil CO(2) respiration. Furthermore, most significant and stimulatory effects occurred at 60-90% soil water-filled pore space and soil pH 7.1-7.8. Stimulatory effects were also present for all soil textures except sand or clay content ≤10%. However, inhibitory effects were found for soils with >90% water-filled pore space. Altogether, our meta-analysis suggests that crop residues played roles beyond N supply for N(2)O production. Perhaps, by stimulating microbial respiration, crop residues enhanced oxygen depletion and therefore promoted anaerobic conditions for denitrification and N(2)O production. Our meta-analysis highlights the necessity to connect the quantity and quality of crop residues with soil properties for predicting

  9. "Keep a low profile": pesticide residue, additives, and freon use in Australian tobacco manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, S

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To review the Australian tobacco industry's knowledge of pesticide residue on Australian tobacco and its policies and practices on resisting calls by tobacco control advocates that consumers should be informed about pesticide residue as well as additives. Methods: Review of previously internal industry documents relevant to pesticides and additives in Australian tobacco located from the Master Settlement Agreement websites. Results: Between 1972 and 1994 Philip Morris Australia was aware that its leaf samples were often contaminated with pesticide residue, sometimes including organochlorine levels described by PM's European laboratories as being "extremely high". Consumers were not advised of the contamination nor products withdrawn. From 1981, the industry also resisted calls to declare fully the extent of use and long term safety data on all additives used in their products. They developed standard public responses that were evasive and misleading and, in 2000, implemented voluntary additive disclosure which allowed the companies to continue to avoid disclosure of any ingredient they deemed to be a trade secret. There was extensive use of ozone depleting freon in Australian tobacco manufacturing. Again, the industry kept this information away from consumers. Conclusions: Australian smokers are unable to make informed decisions about smoking because pesticide and additive disclosure remains voluntary. The Australian government should regulate tobacco to require full disclosure including information on the likely health consequences of inhaling pesticide and additive pyrolysis products. PMID:14645948

  10. Utilization of arginine by Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, B; Magasanik, B

    1978-02-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes utilized arginine as the sole source of carbon or nitrogen for growth. Arginine was degraded to 2-ketoglutarate and not to succinate, since a citrate synthaseless mutant grows on arginine as the only nitrogen source. When glucose was the energy source, all four nitrogen atoms of arginine were utilized. Three of them apparently did not pass through ammonia but were transferred by transamination, since a mutant unable to produce glutamate by glutamate synthase or glutamate dehydrogenase utilized three of four nitrogen atoms of arginine. Urea was not involved as intermediate, since a unreaseless mutant did not accumulate urea and grew on arginine as efficiently as the wild-type strain. Ornithine appeared to be an intermediate, because cells grown either on glucose and arginine or arginine alone could convert arginine in the presence of hydroxylamine to ornithine. This indicates that an amidinotransferase is the initiating enzyme of arginine breakdown. In addition, the cells contained a transaminase specific for ornithine. In contrast to the hydroxylamine-dependent reaction, this activity could be demonstrated in extracts. The arginine-utilizing system (aut) is apparently controlled like the enzymes responsible for the degradation of histidine (hut) through induction, catabolite repression, and activation by glutamine synthetase.

  11. A novel mutation affecting the arginine-137 residue of AVPR2 in dizygous twins leads to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and attenuated urine exosome aquaporin-2.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Gitte R; Hansen, Louise H; Nielsen, Maria R; Fagerberg, Christina; Dieperink, Hans; Rittig, Søren; Jensen, Boye L

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor gene AVPR2 may cause X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus by defective apical insertion of aquaporin-2 in the renal collecting duct principal cell. Substitution mutations with exchange of arginine at codon 137 can cause nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis or congenital X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. We present a novel mutation in codon 137 within AVPR2 with substitution of glycine for arginine in male dizygotic twins. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated by water deprivation test and resistance to vasopressin administration. While a similar urine exosome release rate was shown between probands and controls by western blotting for the marker ALIX, there was a selective decrease in exosome aquaporin-2 versus aquaporin-1 protein in probands compared to controls. PMID:27117808

  12. A novel mutation affecting the arginine-137 residue of AVPR2 in dizygous twins leads to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and attenuated urine exosome aquaporin-2.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Gitte R; Hansen, Louise H; Nielsen, Maria R; Fagerberg, Christina; Dieperink, Hans; Rittig, Søren; Jensen, Boye L

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor gene AVPR2 may cause X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus by defective apical insertion of aquaporin-2 in the renal collecting duct principal cell. Substitution mutations with exchange of arginine at codon 137 can cause nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis or congenital X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. We present a novel mutation in codon 137 within AVPR2 with substitution of glycine for arginine in male dizygotic twins. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated by water deprivation test and resistance to vasopressin administration. While a similar urine exosome release rate was shown between probands and controls by western blotting for the marker ALIX, there was a selective decrease in exosome aquaporin-2 versus aquaporin-1 protein in probands compared to controls.

  13. Arginine Coordination in Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer: Evaluation of the Effect of Arg166 Mutations in Escherichia Coli Alkaline Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, P.J.; Lassila, J.K.; Fenn, T.D.; Zalatan, J.G.; Herschlag, D.

    2009-05-22

    Arginine residues are commonly found in the active sites of enzymes catalyzing phosphoryl transfer reactions. Numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments establish the importance of these residues for efficient catalysis, but their role in catalysis is not clear. To examine the role of arginine residues in the phosphoryl transfer reaction, we have measured the consequences of mutations to arginine 166 in Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase on hydrolysis of ethyl phosphate, on individual reaction steps in the hydrolysis of the covalent enzyme-phosphoryl intermediate, and on thio substitution effects. The results show that the role of the arginine side chain extends beyond its positive charge, as the Arg166Lys mutant is as compromised in activity as Arg166Ser. Through measurement of individual reaction steps, we construct a free energy profile for the hydrolysis of the enzyme-phosphate intermediate. This analysis indicates that the arginine side chain strengthens binding by {approx}3 kcal/mol and provides an additional 1-2 kcal/mol stabilization of the chemical transition state. A 2.1 {angstrom} X-ray diffraction structure of Arg166Ser AP is presented, which shows little difference in enzyme structure compared to the wild-type enzyme but shows a significant reorientation of the bound phosphate. Altogether, these results support a model in which the arginine contributes to catalysis through binding interactions and through additional transition state stabilization that may arise from complementarity of the guanidinum group to the geometry of the trigonal bipyramidal transition state.

  14. Refolding single-chain antibody (scFv) using lauroyl-L-glutamate as a solubilization detergent and arginine as a refolding additive.

    PubMed

    Kudou, Motonori; Ejima, Daisuke; Sato, Haruna; Yumioka, Ryosuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2011-05-01

    Therapeutic potential of immunoconjugates has opened a new window for antibody-based biopharmaceuticals. Greater tissue penetration and hence enhanced cell toxicity are obtained with a smaller version of antibodies. While the whole antibody can be readily produced via mammalian expression system, antibody fragments often require refolding of insoluble proteins. Here we report a new refolding method for antibody fragments using a novel amino acid-based detergent as a solubilizing agent and arginine-assisted refolding. Inclusion bodies of antibody fragments were solubilized by 2.5% lauroyl-L-Glu (C12-L-Glu) and successfully refolded by multi-step dilution into a buffer solution containing arginine hydrochloride and thiol/disulfide-exchange reagents. Adjustment of temperature was found to be critical for increase in the refolding yield. Although each protein requires appropriate optimization, solubilization by C12-L-Glu and dilution refolding assisted by arginine can generate the native, functional antibody fragments. The procedure should enable us to utilize bacterial expression systems for the large-scale manufacturing.

  15. Arginine deprivation therapy for malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Ki; Frankel, Arthur E; Feun, Lynn G; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Kim, Kevin B

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent development of promising immunotherapeutic and targeted drugs, prognosis in patients with advanced melanoma remains poor, and a cure for this disease remains elusive in most patients. The success of melanoma therapy depends on a better understanding of the biology of melanoma and development of drugs that effectively target the relevant genes or proteins essential for tumor cell survival. Melanoma cells frequently lack argininosuccinate synthetase, an essential enzyme for arginine synthesis, and as a result they become dependent on the availability of exogenous arginine. Accordingly, a therapeutic approach involving depletion of available arginine has been shown to be effective in preclinical studies. Early clinical studies have demonstrated sufficient antitumor activity to give rise to cautious optimism. In this article, the rationale for arginine deprivation therapy is discussed. Additionally, various strategies for depleting arginine are discussed and the preclinical and clinical investigations of arginine deprivation therapy in melanoma are reviewed. PMID:23293541

  16. Changes in Transmembrane Helix Alignment by Arginine Residues revealed by Solid-State NMR Experiments and Coarse-Grained MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Hall, Benjamin A.; Greathouse, Denise V.; Koeppe, Roger E.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Independent experimental and computational approaches show agreement concerning arginine/membrane interactions when a single arginine is introduced at selected positions within the membrane-spanning region of acetyl-GGALW5LALALAL12AL14ALALW19LAGA-ethanolamide, designated GWALP23. Peptide sequence isomers having Arg in position 12 or position 14 display markedly different behaviors, as deduced by both solid-state NMR experiments and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations. With respect to the membrane normal of DOPC or DPPC lipid bilayer membranes, GWALP23-R14 shows one major state whose apparent average tilt is ~10° greater than that of GWALP23. The presence of R14 furthermore induces bilayer thinning and peptide displacement to “lift” the charged guanidinium toward the bilayer surface. By contrast, GWALP23-R12 exhibits multiple states that are in slow exchange on the NMR time scale, with CG-MD simulations indicating two distinct positions with different screw rotation angles in the membrane, along with an increased tendency to exit the lipid bilayer. PMID:20373735

  17. Evaluation of an eastern shale oil residue as an asphalt additive

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.P.; Harnsberger, P.M.

    1995-09-01

    An evaluation of eastern shale oil (ESO) residue as an asphalt additive to reduce oxidative age hardening and moisture susceptibility was conducted by Western Research Institute (WRI). The ESO residue, have a viscosity of 23.9 Pa{lg_bullet}s at 60{degree}C (140{degree}F), was blended with three different petroleum-derived asphalts, ASD-1, AAK-1, and AAM-1, which are known to be very susceptible to oxidative aging. Rheological and infrared analyses of the unaged and aged asphalts and the blends were then conducted to evaluate oxidative age hardening. In addition, the petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends were coated onto three different aggregates, Lithonia granite (RA), a low-absorption limestone (RD), and a siliceous Gulf Coast gravel (RL), and compacted into briquettes. Successive freeze-thaw cycling was then conducted to evaluate the moisture susceptibility of the prepared briquettes. The rheological analyses of the unaged petroleum-derived asphalts and their respective blends indicate that the samples satisfy the rutting requirement. However, the aging indexes for the rolling thin film oven (RTFO)-aged and RTFO/pressure aging vessel (PAV)-aged samples indicate that the blends are stiffer than the petroleum-derived asphalts. This means that when in service the blends will be more prone to pavement embrittlement and fatigue cracking than the petroleum-derived asphalts. Infrared analyses were also conducted on the three petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends before and after RTFO/PAV aging. In general, upon RTFO/PAV aging, the amounts of carbonyls and sulfoxides in the samples increase, indicating that the addition of the ESO residue does not mitigate the chemical aging (oxidation) of the petroleum-derived asphalts. This information correlates with the rheological data and the aging indexes that were calculated for the petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends.

  18. Effect of additives on the tensile performance and protein solubility of industrial oilseed residual based plastics.

    PubMed

    Newson, William R; Kuktaite, Ramune; Hedenqvist, Mikael S; Gällstedt, Mikael; Johansson, Eva

    2014-07-16

    Ten chemical additives were selected from the literature for their proposed modifying activity in protein-protein interactions. These consisted of acids, bases, reducing agents, and denaturants and were added to residual deoiled meals of Crambe abyssinica (crambe) and Brassica carinata (carinata) to modify the properties of plastics produced through hot compression molding at 130 °C. The films produced were examined for tensile properties, protein solubility, molecular weight distribution, and water absorption. Of the additives tested, NaOH had the greatest positive effect on tensile properties, with increases of 105% in maximum stress and 200% in strain at maximum stress for crambe and a 70% increase in strain at maximum stress for carinata. Stiffness was not increased by any of the applied additives. Changes in tensile strength and elongation for crambe and elongation for carinata were related to changes in protein solubility. Increased pH was the most successful in improving the protein aggregation and mechanical properties within the complex chemistry of residual oilseed meals.

  19. Effect of additives on the tensile performance and protein solubility of industrial oilseed residual based plastics.

    PubMed

    Newson, William R; Kuktaite, Ramune; Hedenqvist, Mikael S; Gällstedt, Mikael; Johansson, Eva

    2014-07-16

    Ten chemical additives were selected from the literature for their proposed modifying activity in protein-protein interactions. These consisted of acids, bases, reducing agents, and denaturants and were added to residual deoiled meals of Crambe abyssinica (crambe) and Brassica carinata (carinata) to modify the properties of plastics produced through hot compression molding at 130 °C. The films produced were examined for tensile properties, protein solubility, molecular weight distribution, and water absorption. Of the additives tested, NaOH had the greatest positive effect on tensile properties, with increases of 105% in maximum stress and 200% in strain at maximum stress for crambe and a 70% increase in strain at maximum stress for carinata. Stiffness was not increased by any of the applied additives. Changes in tensile strength and elongation for crambe and elongation for carinata were related to changes in protein solubility. Increased pH was the most successful in improving the protein aggregation and mechanical properties within the complex chemistry of residual oilseed meals. PMID:24971658

  20. L-arginine

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle and nervous system problems). There is some interest in using L-arginine to improve symptoms associated ... might also increase potassium in the body. In theory, taking L-arginine along with some "water pills" ...

  1. Substitution of lysine for arginine in the N-terminal 217th amino acid residue of the H gamma II of Staphylococcal gamma-hemolysin lowers the activity of the toxin.

    PubMed

    Sudo, K; Choorit, W; Asami, I; Kaneko, J; Muramoto, K; Kamio, Y

    1995-09-01

    The staphylococcal toxin gamma-hemolysin consists of two protein components, LukF and H gamma II. Staphylococcus aureus P83 was found to have five components, LukF, LukF-PV, LukM, LukS, and H gamma II for leukocidin or gamma-hemolysin. H gamma II of S. aureus P83 was demonstrated to be a naturally-occurring analogous molecule of H gamma II [H gamma II(P83)], in which the 217th arginine residue was replaced by lysine. The H gamma II(P83) showed about 50% of the hemolytic activity of normal H gamma II in the presence of LukF.

  2. Evaluation of an eastern shale oil residue as an asphalt additive

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.P.; Harnsberger, P.M.

    1995-12-19

    An evaluation of eastern shale oil (ESO) residue as an asphalt additive to reduce oxidative age-hardening and moisture susceptibility was conducted. The ESO residue, having a viscosity of 23.9 Pa{sm_bullet}s at 60{degrees}C (140{degrees}F), was blended with three different petroleum-derived asphalts, AAD-1, AAK-1, and AAM-1, that are known to be very susceptible to oxidative aging. Rheological and infrared analyses of the unaged and aged asphalts and the blends were then conducted to evaluate oxidative age-hardening. In addition, the petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends were coated onto three different aggregates, Lithonia granite (RA), a low-absorption limestone (RD), and a silicious Gulf Coast gravel (RL), and compacted into briquets. Successive freeze-thaw cycling was then conducted to evaluate the moisture susceptibility of the prepared briquets. The abbreviations used above for the asphalts and the aggregates are part of the Strategic Highway Research Program nomenclature.

  3. Hybrid Residual Flexibility/Mass-Additive Method for Structural Dynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    A large fixture was designed and constructed for modal vibration testing of International Space Station elements. This fixed-base test fixture, which weighs thousands of pounds and is anchored to a massive concrete floor, initially utilized spherical bearings and pendulum mechanisms to simulate Shuttle orbiter boundary constraints for launch of the hardware. Many difficulties were encountered during a checkout test of the common module prototype structure, mainly due to undesirable friction and excessive clearances in the test-article-to-fixture interface bearings. Measured mode shapes and frequencies were not representative of orbiter-constrained modes due to the friction and clearance effects in the bearings. As a result, a major redesign effort for the interface mechanisms was undertaken. The total cost of the fixture design, construction and checkout, and redesign was over $2 million. Because of the problems experienced with fixed-base testing, alternative free-suspension methods were studied, including the residual flexibility and mass-additive approaches. Free-suspension structural dynamics test methods utilize soft elastic bungee cords and overhead frame suspension systems that are less complex and much less expensive than fixed-base systems. The cost of free-suspension fixturing is on the order of tens of thousands of dollars as opposed to millions, for large fixed-base fixturing. In addition, free-suspension test configurations are portable, allowing modal tests to be done at sites without modal test facilities. For example, a mass-additive modal test of the ASTRO-1 Shuttle payload was done at the Kennedy Space Center launch site. In this Technical Memorandum, the mass-additive and residual flexibility test methods are described in detail. A discussion of a hybrid approach that combines the best characteristics of each method follows and is the focus of the study.

  4. Addition of an organic amendment and/or residue mud to bauxite residue sand in order to improve its properties as a growth medium.

    PubMed

    Jones, B E H; Haynes, R J; Phillips, I R

    2012-03-01

    The effects of addition of carbonated residue mud (RMC) or seawater neutralized residue mud (RMS), at two rates, in the presence or absence of added green waste compost, on the chemical, physical and microbial properties of gypsum-treated bauxite residue sand were studied in a laboratory incubation study. The growth of two species commonly used in revegetation of residue sand (Lolium rigidum and Acacia saligna) in the treatments was then studied in a 18-week greenhouse study. Addition of green waste-based compost increased ammonium acetate-extractable (exchangeable) Mg, K and Na. Addition of residue mud at 5 and 10% w/w reduced exchangeable Ca but increased that of Mg and Na (and K for RMS). Concentrations of K, Na, Mg and level of EC in saturation paste extracts were increased by residue mud additions. Concentrations of cations in water extracts were considerably higher than those in saturation paste extracts but trends with treatment were broadly similar. Addition of both compost and residue mud caused a significant decrease in macroporosity with a concomitant increase in mesoporosity and microporosity, available water holding capacity and the quantity of water held at field capacity. Increasing rates of added residue mud reduced the percentage of sample present as discrete sand particles and increased that in aggregated form (particularly in the 1-2 and >10mm diameter ranges). Organic C content, C/N ratio, soluble organic C, microbial biomass C and basal respiration were increased by compost additions. Where compost was added, residue mud additions caused a substantial increase in microbial biomass and basal respiration. L. rigidum grew satisfactorily in all treatments although yields tended to be reduced by additions of mud (especially RMC) particularly in the absence of added compost. Growth of A. saligna was poor in sand alone and mud-amended sand and was greatly promoted by additions of compost. However, in the presence of compost, addition of carbonated

  5. Titration of the bacteriorhodopsin Schiff base involves titration of an additional protein residue.

    PubMed

    Zadok, Uri; Asato, Alfred E; Sheves, Mordechai

    2005-06-14

    The retinal protein protonated Schiff base linkage plays a key role in the function of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) as a light-driven proton pump. In the unphotolyzed pigment, the Schiff base (SB) is titrated with a pK(a) of approximately 13, but following light absorption, it experiences a decrease in the pK(a) and undergoes several alterations, including a deprotonation process. We have studied the SB titration using retinal analogues which have intrinsically lower pK(a)'s which allow for SB titrations over a much lower pH range. We found that above pH 9 the channel for the SB titration is perturbed, and the titration rate is considerably reduced. On the basis of studies with several mutants, it is suggested that the protonation state of residue Glu204 is responsible for the channel perturbation. We suggest that above pH 12 a channel for the SB titration is restored probably due to titration of an additional protein residue. The observations may imply that during the bR photocycle and M photointermediate formation the rate of Schiff base protonation from the bulk is decreased. This rate decrease may be due to the deprotonation process of the "proton-releasing complex" which includes Glu204. In contrast, during the lifetime of the O intermediate, the protonated SB is exposed to the bulk. Possible implications for the switch mechanism, and the directionality of the proton movement, are discussed.

  6. Exogenous arginine in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Luiking, Yvette C; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2007-09-01

    Sepsis is a severe condition in critically ill patients and is considered an arginine deficiency state. The rationale for arginine deficiency in sepsis is mainly based on the reduced arginine levels in sepsis that are associated with the specific changes in arginine metabolism related to endothelial dysfunction, severe catabolism, and worse outcome. Exogenous arginine supplementation in sepsis shows controversial results with only limited data in humans and variable results in animal models of sepsis. Since in these studies the severity of sepsis varies but also the route, timing, and dose of arginine, it is difficult to draw a definitive conclusion for sepsis in general without considering the influence of these factors. Enhanced nitric oxide production in sepsis is related to suggested detrimental effects on hemodynamic instability and enhanced oxidative stress. Potential mechanisms for beneficial effects of exogenous arginine in sepsis include enhanced (protein) metabolism, improved microcirculation and organ function, effects on immune function and antibacterial effects, improved gut function, and an antioxidant role of arginine. We recently performed a study indicating that arginine can be given to septic patients without major effects on hemodynamics, suggesting that more studies can be conducted on the effects of arginine supplementation in septic patients.

  7. A unique serpin P1' glutamate and a conserved β-sheet C arginine are key residues for activity, protease recognition and stability of serpinA12 (vaspin).

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, David; Pippel, Jan; Schultz, Stephan; Meier, René; Sträter, Norbert; Heiker, John T

    2015-09-15

    SerpinA12 (vaspin) is thought to be mainly expressed in adipose tissue and has multiple beneficial effects on metabolic, inflammatory and atherogenic processes related to obesity. KLK7 (kallikrein 7) is the only known protease target of vaspin to date and is inhibited with a moderate inhibition rate. In the crystal structure, the cleavage site (P1-P1') of the vaspin reactive centre loop is fairly rigid compared with the flexible residues before P2, possibly supported by an ionic interaction of P1' glutamate (Glu(379)) with an arginine residue (Arg(302)) of the β-sheet C. A P1' glutamate seems highly unusual and unfavourable for the protease KLK7. We characterized vaspin mutants to investigate the roles of these two residues in protease inhibition and recognition by vaspin. Reactive centre loop mutations changing the P1' residue or altering the reactive centre loop conformation significantly increased inhibition parameters, whereas removal of the positive charge within β-sheet C impeded the serpin-protease interaction. Arg(302) is a crucial contact to enable vaspin recognition by KLK7 and it supports moderate inhibition of the serpin despite the presence of the detrimental P1' Glu(379), which clearly represents a major limiting factor for vaspin-inhibitory activity. We also show that the vaspin-inhibition rate for KLK7 can be modestly increased by heparin and demonstrate that vaspin is a heparin-binding serpin. Noteworthily, we observed vaspin as a remarkably thermostable serpin and found that Glu(379) and Arg(302) influence heat-induced polymerization. These structural and functional results reveal the mechanistic basis of how reactive centre loop sequence and exosite interaction in vaspin enable KLK7 recognition and regulate protease inhibition as well as stability of this adipose tissue-derived serpin.

  8. Nitrification in lake sediment with addition of drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Liu, Juanfeng; Wang, Zhixin; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-06-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs), non-hazardous by-products generated during potable water production, can effectively reduce the lake internal phosphorus (P) loading and improve water quality in lakes. It stands to reason that special attention regarding the beneficial reuse of WTRs should be given not only to the effectiveness of P pollution control, but also to the effects on the migration and transformation of other nutrients (e.g., nitrogen (N)). In this work, based on laboratory enrichment tests, the effects of WTRs addition on nitrification in lake sediment were investigated using batch tests, fluorescence in situ hybridization, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic analysis techniques. The results indicated that WTRs addition had minor effects on the morphologies of AOB and NOB; however, the addition slightly enhanced the sediment nitrification potential from 12.8 to 13.2 μg-N g(-1)-dry sample h(-1) and also increased the ammonia oxidation bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) abundances, particularly the AOB abundances (P < 0.05), which increased from 1.11 × 10(8) to 1.31 × 10(8) copies g(-1)-dry sample. Moreover, WTRs addition was beneficial to the enrichment of Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira multiformis and promoted the emergence of a new Nitrospira cluster, causing the increase in AOB and NOB diversities. Further analysis showed that the variations of nitrification in lake sediment after WTRs addition were primarily due to the decrease of bioavailable P, the introduction of new nitrifiers and the increase of favorable carriers for microorganism attachment in sediments. Overall, these results suggested that WTRs reuse for the control of lake internal P loading would also lead to conditions that are beneficial to nitrification.

  9. Rmt1 catalyzes zinc-finger independent arginine methylation of ribosomal protein Rps2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Lipson, Rebecca S.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2010-01-22

    Rps2/rpS2 is a well conserved protein of the eukaryotic ribosomal small subunit. Rps2 has previously been shown to contain asymmetric dimethylarginine residues, the addition of which is catalyzed by zinc-finger-containing arginine methyltransferase 3 (Rmt3) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and protein arginine methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3) in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate that despite the lack of a zinc-finger-containing homolog of Rmt3/PRMT3 in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rps2 is partially modified to generate asymmetric dimethylarginine and monomethylarginine residues. We find that this modification of Rps2 is dependent upon the major arginine methyltransferase 1 (Rmt1) in S. cerevisiae. These results are suggestive of a role for Rmt1 in modifying the function of Rps2 in a manner distinct from that occurring in S. pombe and mammalian cells.

  10. Determining the Volume of Additive Solution and Residual Plasma in Whole Blood Filtered and Buffy Coat Processed Red Cell Concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Andrew; Acker, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Residual plasma in transfused red cell concentrates (RCCs) has been associated with adverse transfusion outcomes. Despite this, there is no consensus on the standard procedure for measuring residual plasma volume. Methods The volumes of residual plasma and additive solution were measured in RCCs processed using two separation methods: whole blood filtration (WBF) and buffy coat (BC)/RCC filtration. The concentration of mannitol and albumin in RCC components was measured using colorimetric assays. Mannitol concentration was used to calculate additive solution volume. Residual plasma volume was calculated using two methods. Results Calculated RCC supernatant volumes were much lower in BC-processed components compared to WBF-processed components (BC = 97 ± 6 ml, WBF = 109 ± 4 ml; p < 0.05). Calculated additive solution volumes were greater in WBF- than in BC-processed components (BC = 81 ± 4 ml, WBF = 105 ± 2 ml; p < 0.05). Absolute residual plasma volume varied significantly based on the calculation method used. Conclusion Disparity between plasma volume calculation methods was observed. Efforts should be made to standardize residual plasma volume measurement methods in order to accurately assess the impact of residual plasma on transfusion outcomes. PMID:27330533

  11. [Multi-residue method for determination of veterinary drugs and feed additives in meats by HPLC].

    PubMed

    Chonan, Takao; Fujimoto, Toru; Ueno, Ken-Ichi; Tazawa, Teijiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2007-10-01

    A simple and rapid multi-residue method was developed for the determination of 28 kinds of veterinary drugs and feed additives (drugs) in muscle of cattle, pig and chicken. The drugs were extracted with acetonitrile-water (95:5) in a homogenizer and ultrasonic generator. The extracted solution was poured into an alumina column and the drugs were eluted with acetonitrile-water (90:10). The eluate was washed with n-hexane saturated with acetonitrile and then evaporated. The drugs were separated on a Inertsil ODS-3V column (4.6 mm i.d. x 250 mm) with a gradient system of 0.1% phosphoric acid-acetonitrile as the mobile phase, with monitoring at 280 and 340 nm. The recoveries of the 26 kinds of drugs were over 60% from the meats fortified at 0.1 microg/g, and the quantification limits of most drugs were 0.01 microg/g. This proposed method was found to be effective and suitable for the screening of the above drugs in meats.

  12. Investigation of the Roles of Allosteric Domain Arginine, Aspartate, and Glutamate Residues of Rhizobium etli Pyruvate Carboxylase in Relation to Its Activation by Acetyl CoA.

    PubMed

    Sirithanakorn, Chaiyos; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Attwood, Paul V

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of allosteric activation of pyruvate carboxylase by acetyl CoA is not fully understood. Here we have examined the roles of residues near the acetyl CoA binding site in the allosteric activation of Rhizobium etli pyruvate carboxylase using site-directed mutagenesis. Arg429 was found to be especially important for acetyl CoA binding as substitution with serine resulted in a 100-fold increase in the Ka of acetyl CoA activation and a large decrease in the cooperativity of this activation. Asp420 and Arg424, which do not make direct contact with bound acetyl CoA, were nonetheless found to affect acetyl CoA binding when mutated, probably through changed interactions with another acetyl CoA binding residue, Arg427. Thermodynamic activation parameters for the pyruvate carboxylation reaction were determined from modified Arrhenius plots and showed that acetyl CoA acts to decrease the activation free energy of the reaction by both increasing the activation entropy and decreasing the activation enthalpy. Most importantly, mutations of Asp420, Arg424, and Arg429 enhanced the activity of the enzyme in the absence of acetyl CoA. A main focus of this work was the detailed investigation of how this increase in activity occurred in the R424S mutant. This mutation decreased the activation enthalpy of the pyruvate carboxylation reaction by an amount consistent with removal of a single hydrogen bond. It is postulated that Arg424 forms a hydrogen bonding interaction with another residue that stabilizes the asymmetrical conformation of the R. etli pyruvate carboxylase tetramer, constraining its interconversion to the symmetrical conformer that is required for catalysis. PMID:27379711

  13. Targeting a cluster of arginine residues of neuraminidase to avoid oseltamivir resistance in influenza A (H1N1): a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gema, L Ramírez-Salinas; Tolentino-Lopez, L E; Martínez-Ramos, F; Padilla-Martínez, I; García-Machorro, J; Correa-Basurto, J

    2015-01-01

    Following the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in Mexico and around the world in 2009, the numbers of oseltamivir-resistant clinical cases have increased through a mechanism that remains unclear. In this work, we focus on studying the mutated NA structures ADA71175 (GenBank) and 3CKZ (PDB ID). Recently crystallized NA (PDB ID: 3NSS) was used as a wild-type structure and template to construct the three-dimensional (3D) structure of ADA71175. Then, the NA mutants and 3NSS natives as well as their refined monomer structures as determined through MD simulations (snapshots at 50 ns) were used as models to perform a docking study using a set of aryl-oseltamivir derivatives. These aryl-oseltamivir derivatives have better recognition properties than oseltamivir because of cation-π interactions with a cluster of Arg residues (118, 292, and 371) at the binding site. This cluster of Arg residues represents a potential binding site for aryl-oseltamivir derivatives that are potentially new NA inhibitors.

  14. The C-terminal 18 Amino Acid Region of Dengue Virus NS5 Regulates its Subcellular Localization and Contains a Conserved Arginine Residue Essential for Infectious Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ivan H. W.; Chan, Kitti W. K.; Zhao, Yongqian; Ooi, Eng Eong; Lescar, Julien; Jans, David A.; Forwood, Jade K.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus NS5 is the most highly conserved amongst the viral non-structural proteins and is responsible for capping, methylation and replication of the flavivirus RNA genome. Interactions of NS5 with host proteins also modulate host immune responses. Although replication occurs in the cytoplasm, an unusual characteristic of DENV2 NS5 is that it localizes to the nucleus during infection with no clear role in replication or pathogenesis. We examined NS5 of DENV1 and 2, which exhibit the most prominent difference in nuclear localization, employing a combination of functional and structural analyses. Extensive gene swapping between DENV1 and 2 NS5 identified that the C-terminal 18 residues (Cter18) alone was sufficient to direct the protein to the cytoplasm or nucleus, respectively. The low micromolar binding affinity between NS5 Cter18 and the nuclear import receptor importin-alpha (Impα), allowed their molecular complex to be purified, crystallised and visualized at 2.2 Å resolution using x-ray crystallography. Structure-guided mutational analysis of this region in GFP-NS5 clones of DENV1 or 2 and in a DENV2 infectious clone reveal residues important for NS5 subcellular localization. Notably, the trans conformation adopted by Pro-884 allows proper presentation for binding Impα and mutating this proline to Thr, as present in DENV1 NS5, results in mislocalizaion of NS5 to the cytoplasm without compromising virus fitness. In contrast, a single mutation to alanine at NS5 position R888, a residue conserved in all flaviviruses, resulted in a completely non-viable virus, and the R888K mutation led to a severely attenuated phentoype, even though NS5 was located in the nucleus. R888 forms a hydrogen bond with Y838 that is also conserved in all flaviviruses. Our data suggests an evolutionarily conserved function for NS5 Cter18, possibly in RNA interactions that are critical for replication, that is independent of its role in subcellular localization. PMID:27622521

  15. The C-terminal 18 Amino Acid Region of Dengue Virus NS5 Regulates its Subcellular Localization and Contains a Conserved Arginine Residue Essential for Infectious Virus Production.

    PubMed

    Tay, Moon Y F; Smith, Kate; Ng, Ivan H W; Chan, Kitti W K; Zhao, Yongqian; Ooi, Eng Eong; Lescar, Julien; Luo, Dahai; Jans, David A; Forwood, Jade K; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2016-09-01

    Dengue virus NS5 is the most highly conserved amongst the viral non-structural proteins and is responsible for capping, methylation and replication of the flavivirus RNA genome. Interactions of NS5 with host proteins also modulate host immune responses. Although replication occurs in the cytoplasm, an unusual characteristic of DENV2 NS5 is that it localizes to the nucleus during infection with no clear role in replication or pathogenesis. We examined NS5 of DENV1 and 2, which exhibit the most prominent difference in nuclear localization, employing a combination of functional and structural analyses. Extensive gene swapping between DENV1 and 2 NS5 identified that the C-terminal 18 residues (Cter18) alone was sufficient to direct the protein to the cytoplasm or nucleus, respectively. The low micromolar binding affinity between NS5 Cter18 and the nuclear import receptor importin-alpha (Impα), allowed their molecular complex to be purified, crystallised and visualized at 2.2 Å resolution using x-ray crystallography. Structure-guided mutational analysis of this region in GFP-NS5 clones of DENV1 or 2 and in a DENV2 infectious clone reveal residues important for NS5 subcellular localization. Notably, the trans conformation adopted by Pro-884 allows proper presentation for binding Impα and mutating this proline to Thr, as present in DENV1 NS5, results in mislocalizaion of NS5 to the cytoplasm without compromising virus fitness. In contrast, a single mutation to alanine at NS5 position R888, a residue conserved in all flaviviruses, resulted in a completely non-viable virus, and the R888K mutation led to a severely attenuated phentoype, even though NS5 was located in the nucleus. R888 forms a hydrogen bond with Y838 that is also conserved in all flaviviruses. Our data suggests an evolutionarily conserved function for NS5 Cter18, possibly in RNA interactions that are critical for replication, that is independent of its role in subcellular localization. PMID:27622521

  16. Associating cooking additives with sodium hydroxide to pretreat bamboo residues for improving the enzymatic saccharification and monosaccharides production.

    PubMed

    Huang, Caoxing; He, Juan; Wang, Yan; Min, Douyong; Yong, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Cooking additive pulping technique is used in kraft mill to increase delignification degree and pulp yield. In this work, cooking additives were firstly applied in the sodium hydroxide pretreatment for improving the bioconversion of bamboo residues to monosaccharides. Meanwhile, steam explosion and sulfuric acid pretreatments were also carried out on the sample to compare their impacts on monosaccharides production. Results indicated that associating anthraquinone with sodium hydroxide pretreatment showed the best performance in improving the original carbohydrates recovery, delignification, enzymatic saccharification, and monosaccharides production. After consecutive pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification process, 347.49 g, 307.48 g, 142.93 g, and 87.15 g of monosaccharides were released from 1000 g dry bamboo residues pretreated by sodium hydroxide associating with anthraquinone, sodium hydroxide, steam explosion and sulfuric acid, respectively. The results suggested that associating cooking additive with sodium hydroxide is an effective pretreatment for bamboo residues to enhance enzymatic saccharification for monosaccharides production.

  17. Addition of a clay subsoil to a sandy top soil alters CO2 release and the interactions in residue mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shi, Andong; Marschner, Petra

    2013-11-01

    Addition of clay-rich subsoils to sandy top soils is an agricultural management option to increase water and nutrient retention and may also increase organic carbon sequestration by decreasing the decomposition rates. An incubation experiment was carried out in a loamy sand top soil mixed with a clay-rich subsoil (84% clay) at 0, 10 and 30% (w/w) amended with finely ground mature shoot residues of two native perennial grasses and annual barley individually or in 1:1 mixtures of two residues. Extractable C, microbial biomass C, available N and soil pH were analysed at days 0, 3, 14 and 28. Cumulative respiration after 28 days was highest with barley residue and lowest with Wallaby grass at all clay soil addition rates; 30% clay soil addition reduced cumulative respiration, especially with barley alone. In the mixture of native grasses and barley, the measured respiration was lower than expected at a clay soil addition rate of 10%. A synergistic effect (higher than expected cumulative respiration) was only found in mixture of Kangaroo grass and barley at a clay soil addition rate of 30%. Clay soil addition also decreased extractable C, available N and soil pH. The temporal change in microbial biomass C and available N in residue mixtures differed among clay addition rates. In the mixture of Wallaby grass and Kangaroo grass, microbial biomass C (MBC) decreased from day 0 to day 28 at clay soil addition rates of 0 and 10%, whereas at 30% clay MBC increased from day 0 to day 3 and then decreased. Our study shows that addition of a clay-rich subsoil to a loamy sand soil can increase C sequestration by reducing CO2 release and extractable C which are further modulated by the type of residues present individually or as mixtures.

  18. Mechanistic studies on transcriptional coactivator protein arginine methyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Rust, Heather L; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia I; Clarke, Steven; Thompson, Paul R

    2011-04-26

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to the guanidinium group of arginine residues in a number of important cell signaling proteins. PRMT1 is the founding member of this family, and its activity appears to be dysregulated in heart disease and cancer. To begin to characterize the catalytic mechanism of this isozyme, we assessed the effects of mutating a number of highly conserved active site residues (i.e., Y39, R54, E100, E144, E153, M155, and H293), which are believed to play key roles in SAM recognition, substrate binding, and catalysis. The results of these studies, as well as pH-rate studies, and the determination of solvent isotope effects (SIEs) indicate that M155 plays a critical role in both SAM binding and the processivity of the reaction but is not responsible for the regiospecific formation of asymmetrically dimethylated arginine (ADMA). Additionally, mutagenesis studies on H293, combined with pH studies and the lack of a normal SIE, do not support a role for this residue as a general base. Furthermore, the lack of a normal SIE with either the wild type or catalytically impaired mutants suggests that general acid/base catalysis is not important for promoting methyl transfer. This result, combined with the fact that the E144A/E153A double mutant retains considerably more activity then the single mutants alone, suggests that the PRMT1-catalyzed reaction is primarily driven by bringing the substrate guanidinium into the proximity of the S-methyl group of SAM and that the prior deprotonation of the substrate guanidinium is not required for methyl transfer.

  19. The protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 promotes D2-like dopamine receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Likhite, Neah; Jackson, Christopher A; Liang, Mao-Shih; Krzyzanowski, Michelle C; Lei, Pedro; Wood, Jordan F; Birkaya, Barbara; Michaels, Kerry L; Andreadis, Stelios T; Clark, Stewart D; Yu, Michael C; Ferkey, Denise M

    2015-11-10

    Protein arginine methylation regulates diverse functions of eukaryotic cells, including gene expression, the DNA damage response, and circadian rhythms. We showed that arginine residues within the third intracellular loop of the human D2 dopamine receptor, which are conserved in the DOP-3 receptor in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, were methylated by protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5). By mutating these arginine residues, we further showed that their methylation enhanced the D2 receptor-mediated inhibition of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in cultured human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells. Analysis of prmt-5-deficient worms indicated that methylation promoted the dopamine-mediated modulation of chemosensory and locomotory behaviors in C. elegans through the DOP-3 receptor. In addition to delineating a previously uncharacterized means of regulating GPCR (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptor) signaling, these findings may lead to the development of a new class of pharmacological therapies that modulate GPCR signaling by changing the methylation status of these key proteins. PMID:26554819

  20. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    PubMed

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides. PMID:27003128

  1. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    PubMed

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

  2. Characterization and comparative study of coal combustion residues from a primary and additional flue gas secondary desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, S.; Francois, M.; Evrard, O.; Pellissier, C.

    1998-11-01

    An extensive characterization and comparative study was done on two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) residues derived from the same coal. LR residues (originated from Loire/Rhone in the south of Lyon, France) are obtained after a primary desulfurization process (SO{sub 2} is trapped by reaction with CaO at a temperature of about 1100 C), and LM residues (originating from La Maxe, near Metz in the east of France) are obtained after an additional secondary desulfurization process (SO{sub 2} is removed further by reaction with Ca(OH){sub 2} at a temperature of about 120 C). Various and complementary investigation methods were used to determine their chemical, physical, and mineralogical properties: x-ray fluorescence and diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry analysis, granulometric distribution, pycnometric density, BET specific surface area and pH, conductivity measurements, and chemical analysis of their insoluble fraction. The FGD residues contain basically two main components: a silico-aluminous fly ash part and calcic FGD phases. In the LR residues the two components can be considered as independent, whereas they are linked in the LM residues because chemical reactions have occurred, leading to the formation of silico-calcic gel CSH, hydrated aluminate AFm, and AFt phases.

  3. Neuroprotective peptides fused to arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides: Neuroprotective mechanism likely mediated by peptide endocytic properties.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Bruno P; Milani, Diego; Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; O'Hare Doig, Ryan L; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Palmer, T Norman; Knuckey, Neville W

    2015-09-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that TAT and other arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have intrinsic neuroprotective properties in their own right. Examples, we have demonstrated that in addition to TAT, poly-arginine peptides (R8 to R18; containing 8-18 arginine residues) as well as some other arginine-rich peptides are neuroprotective in vitro (in neurons exposed to glutamic acid excitotoxicity and oxygen glucose deprivation) and in the case of R9 in vivo (after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat). Based on several lines of evidence, we propose that this neuroprotection is related to the peptide's endocytosis-inducing properties, with peptide charge and arginine residues being critical factors. Specifically, we propose that during peptide endocytosis neuronal cell surface structures such as ion channels and transporters are internalised, thereby reducing calcium influx associated with excitotoxicity and other receptor-mediated neurodamaging signalling pathways. We also hypothesise that a peptide cargo can act synergistically with TAT and other arginine-rich CPPs due to potentiation of the CPPs endocytic traits rather than by the cargo-peptide acting directly on its supposedly intended intracellular target. In this review, we systematically consider a number of studies that have used CPPs to deliver neuroprotective peptides to the central nervous system (CNS) following stroke and other neurological disorders. Consequently, we critically review evidence that supports our hypothesis that neuroprotection is mediated by carrier peptide endocytosis. In conclusion, we believe that there are strong grounds to regard arginine-rich peptides as a new class of neuroprotective molecules for the treatment of a range of neurological disorders.

  4. Influence of residue and nitrogen fertilizer additions on carbon mineralization in soils with different texture and cropping histories

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using soil sampled from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ul...

  5. Mutation of Glu-361 in Human Endothelial Nitric-oxide Synthase Selectively Abolishes L-Arginine Binding without Perturbing the Behavior of Heme and Other Redox Centers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Feng; Tsai, Ah-Lim; Berka, Vladimir; Wu, Kenneth K.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and L-citrulline are formed from the oxidation of L-arginine by three different isoforms of NO synthase (NOS). Defining amino acid residues responsible for L-arginine binding and oxidation is a primary step toward a detailed understanding of the NOS reaction mechanisms and designing strategies for the selective inhibition of the individual isoform. We have altered Glu-361 in human endothelial NOS to Gln or Leu by site-directed mutagenesis and found that these mutations resulted in a complete loss of L-citrulline formation without disruption of the cytochrome c reductase and NADPH oxidase activities. Optical and EPR spectroscopic studies demonstrated that the Glu-361 mutants had similar spectra either in resting state or reduced CO-complex as the wild type. The heme ligand, imidazole, could induce a low spin state in both wild-type and Glu-361 mutants. However, unlike the wild-type enzyme, the low spin imidazole complex of Glu-361 mutants was not reversed to a high spin state by addition of either L-arginine, acetylguanidine, or 2-aminothiazole. Direct L-arginine binding could not be detected in the mutants either. These results strongly indicate that Glu-361 in human endothelial NOS is specifically involved in the interaction with L-arginine. Mutation of this residue abolished the L-arginine binding without disruption of other functional characteristics. PMID:9045621

  6. Conserved arginine residues in the carboxyl terminus of the equine arteritis virus E protein may play a role in heparin binding but may not affect viral infectivity in equine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhengchun; Sarkar, Sanjay; Zhang, Jianqiang; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-04-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV), the causative agent of equine viral arteritis, has relatively broad cell tropism in vitro. In horses, EAV primarily replicates in macrophages and endothelial cells of small blood vessels. Until now, neither the cellular receptor(s) nor the mechanism(s) of virus attachment and entry have been determined for this virus. In this study, we investigated the effect of heparin on EAV infection in equine endothelial cells (EECs). Heparin, but not other glycosaminoglycans, could reduce EAV infection up to 93 %. Sequence analysis of the EAV E minor envelope protein revealed a conserved amino acid sequence (52 RSLVARCSRGARYR 65) at the carboxy terminus of the E protein, which was predicted to be the heparin-binding domain. The basic arginine (R) amino acid residues were subsequently mutated to glycine by site-directed mutagenesis of ORF2a in an E protein expression vector and an infectious cDNA clone of EAV. Two single mutations in E (R52G and R57G) did not affect the heparin-binding capability, whereas the E double mutation (R52,60G) completely eliminated the interaction between the E protein and heparin. Although the mutant R52,60G EAV did not bind heparin, the mutations did not completely abolish infectivity, indicating that heparin is not the only critical factor for EAV infection. This also suggested that other viral envelope protein(s) might be involved in attachment through heparin or other cell-surface molecules, and this warrants further investigation.

  7. Freeze-Drying of L-Arginine/Sucrose-Based Protein Formulations, Part 2: Optimization of Formulation Design and Freeze-Drying Process Conditions for an L-Arginine Chloride-Based Protein Formulation System.

    PubMed

    Stärtzel, Peter; Gieseler, Henning; Gieseler, Margit; Abdul-Fattah, Ahmad M; Adler, Michael; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Goldbach, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported that the presence of chloride counter ions in freeze-dried l-arginine/sucrose formulations provided the greatest protein stability, but led to low collapse temperatures and glass transition temperatures of the freeze concentrates. The objectives of this study were to identify l-arginine chloride-based formulations and optimize freeze-drying process conditions to deliver a freeze-dried product with good physical quality attributes (including cake appearance, residual moisture, and reconstitution time). Additional properties were tested such as thermal properties, cake microstructure, and protein physical stability. Excipient concentrations were varied with and without a model protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). Formulations were frozen with and without annealing or with and without controlled nucleation. Primary drying was conducted at high and low shelf temperature. Cakes with least defects and optimum physical attributes were achieved when protein to excipient ratios were high. Controlled nucleation led to elegant cakes for most systems at a low shelf temperature. Replacing BSA by a monoclonal antibody showed that protein (physical) stability was slightly improved under stress storage temperature (i.e., 40°C) in the presence of a low concentration of l-arginine in a sucrose-based formulation. At higher l-arginine concentrations, cake defects increased. Using optimized formulation design, addition of l-arginine chloride to a sucrose-based formulation provided elegant cakes and benefits for protein stability.

  8. Interaction of arginine with Capto MMC in multimodal chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Atsushi; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Kameda, Tomoshi

    2014-04-18

    This study highlights the ability of arginine to elute bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a monoclonal antibody against interleukin-8 (mAb-IL8) from Capto MMC, which is a multimodal cation exchanger. Arginine provides high recovery of monomeric BSA from Capto MMC chromatography columns at yields similar to NaCl elution, and oligomeric BSA was more readily eluted by arginine than by NaCl. The effectiveness of arginine as an eluent also enabled the separation of monomeric BSA from the oligomeric forms. The purification of mAb-IL8 was successfully achieved using Capto MMC chromatography and arginine as the eluent. The mechanism of the effects of arginine on protein elution was determined by calculating the binding free energy between arginine and Capto MMC using molecular dynamics simulations. The overall affinity of arginine for Capto MMC was associated with electrostatic interactions. However, additional affinities contributed by hydrophobic interaction or hydrogen bonding were also observed to play a role in the interaction between arginine and Capto MMC, which likely results in the characteristic elution by arginine.

  9. Protective Effects of Arginine on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Against Ethanol Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yanfei; Du, Zhaoli; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses in the process of industrial fermentation. As the currently main organism for bio-ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffers from ethanol stress. Some amino acids have been reported to be related to yeast tolerance to stresses. Here the relationship between arginine and yeast response to ethanol stress was investigated. Marked inhibitions of ethanol on cell growth, expression of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and intracellular accumulation of arginine were observed. Furthermore, extracellular addition of arginine can abate the ethanol damage largely. To further confirm the protective effects of arginine on yeast cells, yeast strains with different levels of arginine content were constructed by overexpression of ARG4 involved in arginine biosynthesis or CAR1 encoding arginase. Intracellular arginine was increased by 18.9% or 13.1% respectively by overexpression of ARG4 or disruption of CAR1, which enhanced yeast tolerance to ethanol stress. Moreover, a 41.1% decrease of intracellular arginine was observed in CAR1 overexpressing strain, which made yeast cells keenly sensitive to ethanol. Further investigations indicated that arginine protected yeast cells from ethanol damage by maintaining the integrity of cell wall and cytoplasma membrane, stabilizing the morphology and function of organellae due to low ROS generation. PMID:27507154

  10. Protective Effects of Arginine on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Against Ethanol Stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yanfei; Du, Zhaoli; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses in the process of industrial fermentation. As the currently main organism for bio-ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffers from ethanol stress. Some amino acids have been reported to be related to yeast tolerance to stresses. Here the relationship between arginine and yeast response to ethanol stress was investigated. Marked inhibitions of ethanol on cell growth, expression of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and intracellular accumulation of arginine were observed. Furthermore, extracellular addition of arginine can abate the ethanol damage largely. To further confirm the protective effects of arginine on yeast cells, yeast strains with different levels of arginine content were constructed by overexpression of ARG4 involved in arginine biosynthesis or CAR1 encoding arginase. Intracellular arginine was increased by 18.9% or 13.1% respectively by overexpression of ARG4 or disruption of CAR1, which enhanced yeast tolerance to ethanol stress. Moreover, a 41.1% decrease of intracellular arginine was observed in CAR1 overexpressing strain, which made yeast cells keenly sensitive to ethanol. Further investigations indicated that arginine protected yeast cells from ethanol damage by maintaining the integrity of cell wall and cytoplasma membrane, stabilizing the morphology and function of organellae due to low ROS generation. PMID:27507154

  11. Effects of Solvent and Residual Water on Enhancing the Reactivity of Six-Membered Silyloxyallyl Cations toward Nucleophilic Addition.

    PubMed

    Malone, Joshua A; Cleveland, Alexander H; Fronczek, Frank R; Kartika, Rendy

    2016-09-01

    A new strategy for the generation of six-membered unsymmetrical silyloxyallyl cations using catalytic mild Brønsted acid is reported. These reactive intermediates were found to readily undergo direct nucleophilic addition with a broad range of nucleophiles to produce various α,α'-disubstituted silyl enol ether structural motifs. The findings also highlight the significance of the solvent effect and residual water in enhancing the reaction rate. PMID:27538538

  12. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  13. Stabilisation/solidification of APC residues from MSW incineration with hydraulic binders and chemical additives.

    PubMed

    Quina, Margarida J; Bordado, João C M; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2014-01-15

    This study focuses on the stabilisation/solidification (S/S) treatment of air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration. Six formulations (T1-T6) were tested based on different cements as binders, for the immobilisation of pollutants and to prevent their entering into the environment at unacceptable rates. Soluble phosphates and silicates were considered in some cases to fix heavy metals. The performance of T1-T6 products was measured in terms of initial and final setting times, mechanical strength, total availability and leaching from S/S products. Two monolithic leaching tests were used to estimate emissions of pollutants over 48h and 64 days. The results showed that the setting time was reduced when soluble phosphates were used. Moreover, although all the treatments have met the threshold of 1MPa for unconfined compressive strength, this parameter was significantly reduced due to matrix dissolution during immersion. After three cycles of leaching, the limit of 10% for solubilisation was exceeded for all treatments with the exception of T5 (with phosphates). This study demonstrated that the S/S treatment used at the industrial level can be improved with respect to toxic heavy metals, by using soluble silicates or phosphates, but not regarding soluble salts.

  14. Additive effect of waste tire on the hydrogenolysis reaction of coal liquefaction residue

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyuki Sugano; Daigorou Onda; Kiyoshi Mashimo

    2006-12-15

    A numerous amount of waste tire is landfilled or dumped all over the world, which causes environmental problems, such as destruction of natural places and the risk of fires. On the other hand, the coal liquefaction residue (CLR) is produced in 30% yield through the process supporting unit (PSU) of the NEDOL coal liquefaction process. Therefore, the investigation on an effective method for utilization of waste tire and CLR is required. In this study, the simultaneous hydrogenolysis of CLR and pulverized waste tire was carried out by using tetralin. The yields in the simultaneous hydrogenolysis were compared with algebraic sum of the yields of the individual hydrogenolyses of waste tire alone and coal alone. In the simultaneous hydrogenolysis, the synergistic effects to upgrading, such as an increase in the yield of the oil constituent and a decrease in the yield of the asphaltene constituent, occurred because of the stabilization of asphaltenic radicals from CLR with aliphatic radicals from tire. The decrease in asphaltene yield in the simultaneous hydrogenolysis was pronounced with the increase in the tire:CLR ratio because the solvent effects of liquefied tire, such as stabilization of radicals, hydrogen shuttling, and heat transfer, were enhanced. Accordingly, it is estimated that the simultaneous hydrogenolysis of CLR and waste tire is an effective method for processing both materials. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Relevance of arginines in the mode of binding of H1 histones to DNA.

    PubMed

    Piscopo, Marina; Conte, Mariachiara; Di Paola, Flaviano; Conforti, Salvatore; Rana, Gina; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Fucci, Laura; Geraci, Giuseppe

    2010-07-01

    The mode of binding of sperm and somatic H1 histones to DNA has been investigated by analyzing the effect of their addition on the electrophoretic mobility of linear and circular plasmid molecules. Low concentrations of sperm histones do not appear to alter the electrophoretic mobility of DNA, whereas at increasing concentrations, an additional DNA band is observed near the migration origin. This band then becomes the only component at higher values. In contrast, somatic histones cause a gradual retardation in the mobility of the DNA band at low concentrations and aggregated structures are observed only at higher values. Experiments on the H1 globular domain obtained by limited proteolysis indicate that the mode of binding to DNA depends on the H1 globular domain. The arginine residues appear to be relevant for the different effects as indicated by experiments on sperm histone and on protamine with arginines deguanidinated to ornithines. The modified molecules influence DNA mobility like somatic H1s, indicating that the positive guanidino groups of arginines cannot be substituted by the positive amino groups of ornithines. Modifications of the amino groups of lysines show that these residues are necessary for the binding of H1 histones to DNA but they have no influence on the binding mode. PMID:20438368

  16. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"

    PubMed Central

    Durzan, Don J

    2009-01-01

    Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compounds were also probably present in decoctions prepared in the severe winter. The semi-essential arginine, proline and all the essential amino acids, would have provided additional nutritional benefits for the rapid recovery from scurvy by vitamin C when food supply was limited. The value of arginine, especially in the recovery of the critically ill sailors, is postulated as a source of nitric oxide, and the arginine-derived guanidino compounds as controlling factors for the activities of different nitric oxide synthases. This review provides further insights into the use of the candidate "trees of life" by indigenous peoples in eastern Canada. It raises hypotheses on the nutritional and synergistic roles of arginine, its metabolites, and other biofactors complementing the role of vitamin C especially in treating Cartier's critically ill sailors. PMID:19187550

  17. Assessment of Nano Cellulose from Peach Palm Residue as Potential Food Additive: Part II: Preliminary Studies.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Dayanne Regina Mendes; Mendonça, Márcia Helena; Helm, Cristiane Vieira; Magalhães, Washington L E; de Muniz, Graciela Ines Bonzon; Kestur, Satyanarayana G

    2015-09-01

    High consumption of dietary fibers in the diet is related to the reduction of the risk of non-transmitting of chronic diseases, prevention of the constipation etc. Rich diets in dietary fibers promote beneficial effects for the metabolism. Considering the above and recognizing the multifaceted advantages of nano materials, there have been many attempts in recent times to use the nano materials in the food sector including as food additive. However, whenever new product for human and animal consumption is developed, it has to be tested for their effectiveness regarding improvement in the health of consumers, safety aspects and side effects. However, before it is tried with human beings, normally such materials would be assessed through biological tests on a living organism to understand its effect on health condition of the consumer. Accordingly, based on the authors' finding reported in a previous paper, this paper presents body weight, biochemical (glucose, cholesterol and lipid profile in blood, analysis of feces) and histological tests carried out with biomass based cellulose nano fibrils prepared by the authors for its possible use as food additive. Preliminary results of the study with mice have clearly brought out potential of these fibers for the said purpose. PMID:26344977

  18. 157 nm Photodissociation of Dipeptide Ions Containing N-Terminal Arginine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Nathaniel; He, Yi; Reilly, James P.

    2013-12-01

    Twenty singly-charged dipeptide ions with N-terminal arginine were photodissociated using 157 nm light in both a linear ion-trap mass spectrometer and a MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometer. Analogous to previous work on dipeptides containing C-terminal arginine, this set of samples enabled insights into the photofragmentation propensities associated with individual residues. In addition to familiar products such as a-, d-, and immonium ions, m2 and m2+13 ions were also observed. Certain side chains tended to cleave between their β and γ carbons without necessarily forming d- or w-type ions, and a few other ions were produced by the high-energy fragmentation of multiple bonds.

  19. Asymmetric Arginine dimethylation of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 promotes DNA targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Henrik; Barth, Stephanie; Mamiani, Alfredo; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; West, Michelle J.; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Graesser, Friedrich A.

    2010-02-20

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) growth-transforms B-lymphocytes. The virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) is essential for transformation and activates gene expression by association with DNA-bound transcription factors such as RBPJkappa (CSL/CBF1). We have previously shown that EBNA2 contains symmetrically dimethylated Arginine (sDMA) residues. Deletion of the RG-repeat results in a reduced ability of the virus to immortalise B-cells. We now show that the RG repeat also contains asymmetrically dimethylated Arginines (aDMA) but neither non-methylated (NMA) Arginines nor citrulline residues. We demonstrate that only aDMA-containing EBNA2 is found in a complex with DNA-bound RBPJkappa in vitro and preferentially associates with the EBNA2-responsive EBV C, LMP1 and LMP2A promoters in vivo. Inhibition of methylation in EBV-infected cells results in reduced expression of the EBNA2-regulated viral gene LMP1, providing additional evidence that methylation is a prerequisite for DNA-binding by EBNA2 via association with the transcription factor RBPJkappa.

  20. Converting the Yeast Arginine Can1 Permease to a Lysine Permease*

    PubMed Central

    Ghaddar, Kassem; Krammer, Eva-Maria; Mihajlovic, Natalija; Brohée, Sylvain; André, Bruno; Prévost, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Amino acid uptake in yeast cells is mediated by about 16 plasma membrane permeases, most of which belong to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) transporter family. These proteins display various substrate specificity ranges. For instance, the general amino acid permease Gap1 transports all amino acids, whereas Can1 and Lyp1 catalyze specific uptake of arginine and lysine, respectively. Although Can1 and Lyp1 have different narrow substrate specificities, they are close homologs. Here we investigated the molecular rules determining the substrate specificity of the H+-driven arginine-specific permease Can1. Using a Can1-Lyp1 sequence alignment as a guideline and a three-dimensional Can1 structural model based on the crystal structure of the bacterial APC family arginine/agmatine antiporter, we introduced amino acid substitutions liable to alter Can1 substrate specificity. We show that the single substitution T456S results in a Can1 variant transporting lysine in addition to arginine and that the combined substitutions T456S and S176N convert Can1 to a Lyp1-like permease. Replacement of a highly conserved glutamate in the Can1 binding site leads to variants (E184Q and E184A) incapable of any amino acid transport, pointing to a potential role for this glutamate in H+ coupling. Measurements of the kinetic parameters of arginine and lysine uptake by the wild-type and mutant Can1 permeases, together with docking calculations for each amino acid in their binding site, suggest a model in which residues at positions 176 and 456 confer substrate selectivity at the ligand-binding stage and/or in the course of conformational changes required for transport. PMID:24448798

  1. Converting the yeast arginine can1 permease to a lysine permease.

    PubMed

    Ghaddar, Kassem; Krammer, Eva-Maria; Mihajlovic, Natalija; Brohée, Sylvain; André, Bruno; Prévost, Martine

    2014-03-01

    Amino acid uptake in yeast cells is mediated by about 16 plasma membrane permeases, most of which belong to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) transporter family. These proteins display various substrate specificity ranges. For instance, the general amino acid permease Gap1 transports all amino acids, whereas Can1 and Lyp1 catalyze specific uptake of arginine and lysine, respectively. Although Can1 and Lyp1 have different narrow substrate specificities, they are close homologs. Here we investigated the molecular rules determining the substrate specificity of the H(+)-driven arginine-specific permease Can1. Using a Can1-Lyp1 sequence alignment as a guideline and a three-dimensional Can1 structural model based on the crystal structure of the bacterial APC family arginine/agmatine antiporter, we introduced amino acid substitutions liable to alter Can1 substrate specificity. We show that the single substitution T456S results in a Can1 variant transporting lysine in addition to arginine and that the combined substitutions T456S and S176N convert Can1 to a Lyp1-like permease. Replacement of a highly conserved glutamate in the Can1 binding site leads to variants (E184Q and E184A) incapable of any amino acid transport, pointing to a potential role for this glutamate in H(+) coupling. Measurements of the kinetic parameters of arginine and lysine uptake by the wild-type and mutant Can1 permeases, together with docking calculations for each amino acid in their binding site, suggest a model in which residues at positions 176 and 456 confer substrate selectivity at the ligand-binding stage and/or in the course of conformational changes required for transport.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Arginine Repressor Protein in Complex With the DNA Operator From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, L.T.; Cherney, M.M.; Garen, C.R.; Lu, G.J.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-12

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gene product encoded by open reading frame Rv1657 is an arginine repressor (ArgR). All genes involved in the L-arginine (hereafter arginine) biosynthetic pathway are essential for optimal growth of the Mtb pathogen, thus making MtbArgR a potential target for drug design. The C-terminal domains of arginine repressors (CArgR) participate in oligomerization and arginine binding. Several crystal forms of CArgR from Mtb (MtbCArgR) have been obtained. The X-ray crystal structures of MtbCArgR were determined at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution with bound arginine and at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution in the unliganded form. These structures show that six molecules of MtbCArgR are arranged into a hexamer having approximate 32 point symmetry that is formed from two trimers. The trimers rotate relative to each other by about 11{sup o} upon binding arginine. All residues in MtbCArgR deemed to be important for hexamer formation and for arginine binding have been identified from the experimentally determined structures presented. The hexamer contains six regular sites in which the arginine molecules have one common binding mode and three sites in which the arginine molecules have two overlapping binding modes. The latter sites only bind the ligand at high (200 mM) arginine concentrations.

  3. Influence of Residue and Nitrogen Fertilizer Additions on Carbon Mineralization in Soils with Different Texture and Cropping Histories

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianni; Wang, Xudong; Liebman, Matt; Cavigelli, Michel; Wander, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using samples from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ultisols in Maryland [MDsoil]) comparing conventional grain systems (Conv) amended with inorganic fertilizers with 3 yr (Med) and longer (Long), more diverse cropping systems amended with manure. A double exponential model was used to estimate the size (Ca, Cs) and decay rates (ka, ks) of active and slow C pools which we compared with total particulate organic matter (POM) and occluded-POM (OPOM). The high-SOC IAsoil containing highly active smectite clays maintained smaller labile pools and higher decay rates than the low-SOC MDsoil containing semi-active kaolinitic clays. Net SOC loss was greater (2.6 g kg−1; 8.6%) from the IAsoil than the MDsoil (0.9 g kg−1, 6.3%); fractions and coefficients suggest losses were principally from IAsoil’s resistant pool. Cropping history did not alter SOC pool size or decay rates in IAsoil where rotation-based differences in OPOM-C were small. In MDsoil, use of diversified rotations and manure increased ka by 32% and ks by 46% compared to Conv; differences mirrored in POM- and OPOM-C contents. Residue addition prompted greater increases in Ca (340% vs 230%) and Cs (38% vs 21%) and decreases in ka (58% vs 9%) in IAsoil than MDsoil. Reduced losses of SOC from residue-amended MDsoil were associated with increased OPOM-C. Nitrogen addition dampened CO2-C release. Clay type and C saturation dominated the IAsoil’s response to external inputs and made labile and stable fractions more vulnerable to decay. Trends in OPOM suggest aggregate protection influences C turnover in the low active MDsoil. Clay charge and OPOM-C contents were better predictors of soil C dynamics than clay or POM-C contents. PMID:25078458

  4. Evaluation of a zirconium additive for the mitigation of molten ash formation during combustion of residual fuel oil

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Florida Power & Light Company (FP&L) currently fires a residual fuel oil (RFO) containing catalyst fines, which results in a troublesome black aluminosilicate liquid phase that forms on heat-transfer surfaces, remains molten, and flows to the bottom of the boiler. When the unit is shut down for a scheduled outage, this liquid phase freezes to a hard black glass that damages the contracting waterwalls of the boiler. Cleaning the boiler bottom and repairing damaged surfaces increase the boiler downtime, at a significant cost to FP&L. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) proposed to perform a series of tests for FP&L to evaluate the effectiveness of a zirconium additive to modify the mechanism that forms this liquid phase, resulting in the formation of a dry refractory phase that may be easily handled during cleanup of the boiler.

  5. Scintillation Proximity Assay of Arginine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiang; Xie, Nan; Feng, You; Zheng, Y. George

    2011-01-01

    Methylation of arginine residues, catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), is one important protein post-translational modification involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. A fast and effective assay for PRMT can provide valuable information for dissecting the biological functions of PRMTs, as well as for screening small-molecule inhibitors of arginine methylation. Currently, among the methods used for PRMT activity measurement, many contain laborious separation procedures, which restrict the applications of these assays for high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery. The authors report here a mix-and-measure method to measure PRMT activity based on the principle of scintillation proximity assay (SPA). In this assay, 3H-AdoMet was used as methyl donor, and biotin-modified histone H4 peptide served as a methylation substrate. Following the methylation reaction catalyzed by PRMTs, streptavidin-coated SPA beads were added to the reaction solution, and SPA signals were detected by a MicroBeta scintillation counter. No separation step is needed, which simplifies the assay procedure and greatly enhances the assay speed. Particularly, the miniaturization and robustness suggest that this method is suited for HTS of PRMT inhibitors. PMID:21821785

  6. Reclamation of acidic mine residues by creation of technosoils with the addition of biochar and marble waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Barriga, Fabián; Díaz, Vicente; Acosta, José; Faz, Ángel; Zornoza, Raul

    2016-04-01

    This study reports the short-term effect of biochar and marble waste addition for the reclamation of acidic mine residues. A lab incubation was carried out for 90 days. Biochars derived from pig manure (PM), crop residues (CR) and municipal solid waste (MSW) were added to the soil at a rate of 20 g kg-1. The marble waste (MW) was added at a rate of 200 g kg-1. Bochars and MW were applied independently and combined. A control soil was used without application of amendments. The evolution of different physical, chemical and biochemical properties and availability of heavy metals was periodically monitored. Results showed that original pH (2.8) was increased with all amendments, those samples containing MW being the ones with the highest pH (~8.0). The electrical conductivity (EC) decreased from 6.6 to 3.0-4.5 mS cm-1 in all the treatments receiving MW. Soil organic C (SOC) increased in all samples receiving biochar up to 18-20 g kg-1, with no shifts during the 90 d incubation, indicating the high stability of the C supplied. Recalcitrant organic C accounted for ~90-98% of the SOC. No significant effect of amendment addition was observed for carbohydrates, soluble C, microbial biomass C and β-glucosidase activity. However, arylesterase activity increased with amendments, highly related to pH. The availability of heavy metals decreased up to 90-95% owing to the addition of amendments, mainly in samples containing MW. The MW provided conditions to increase pH and decrease EC and metals mobility. Biochar was an effective strategy to increase SOC, recalcitrant C and AS, essential to create soil structure. However, a labile source of organic matter should be added together with the proposed amendments to promote the activation of microbial communities. Acknowledgement : This work has been funded by Fundación Séneca (Agency of Science and Technology of the Region of Murcia, Spain) by the project 18920/JLI/13

  7. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1) is an ecdysone receptor co-repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shuhei; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Ito, Saya; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sari; Murata, Takuya; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-07-11

    Histone arginine methylation is an epigenetic marker that regulates gene expression by defining the chromatin state. Arginine methyltransferases, therefore, serve as transcriptional co-regulators. However, unlike other transcriptional co-regulators, the physiological roles of arginine methyltransferases are poorly understood. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1), the mammalian PRMT1 homologue, methylates the arginine residue of histone H4 (H4R3me2). Disruption of DART1 in Drosophila by imprecise P-element excision resulted in low viability during metamorphosis in the pupal stages. In the pupal stage, an ecdysone hormone signal is critical for developmental progression. DART1 interacted with the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) in a ligand-dependent manner, and co-repressed EcR in intact flies. These findings suggest that DART1, a histone arginine methyltransferase, is a co-repressor of EcR that is indispensable for normal pupal development in the intact fly.

  8. Arginine production in the neonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous arginine synthesis in adults is a complex multiorgan process, in which citrulline is synthesized in the gut, enters the general circulation, and is converted into arginine in the kidney, by what is known as the intestinal-renal axis. In neonates, the enzymes required to convert citrulline...

  9. Arginine deiminase inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis surface attachment

    PubMed Central

    Cugini, Carla; Stephens, Danielle N.; Nguyen, Daniel; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2013-01-01

    The oral cavity is host to a complex microbial community whose maintenance depends on an array of cell-to-cell interactions and communication networks, with little known regarding the nature of the signals or mechanisms by which they are sensed and transmitted. Determining the signals that control attachment, biofilm development and outgrowth of oral pathogens is fundamental to understanding pathogenic biofilm development. We have previously identified a secreted arginine deiminase (ADI) produced by Streptococcus intermedius that inhibited biofilm development of the commensal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis through downregulation of genes encoding the major (fimA) and minor (mfa1) fimbriae, both of which are required for proper biofilm development. Here we report that this inhibitory effect is dependent on enzymic activity. We have successfully cloned, expressed and defined the conditions to ensure that ADI from S. intermedius is enzymically active. Along with the cloning of the wild-type allele, we have created a catalytic mutant (ADIC399S), in which the resulting protein is not able to catalyse the hydrolysis of l-arginine to l-citrulline. P. gingivalis is insensitive to the ADIC399S catalytic mutant, demonstrating that enzymic activity is required for the effects of ADI on biofilm formation. Biofilm formation is absent under l-arginine-deplete conditions, and can be recovered by the addition of the amino acid. Taken together, the results indicate that arginine is an important signal that directs biofilm formation by this anaerobe. Based on our findings, we postulate that ADI functions to reduce arginine levels and, by a yet to be identified mechanism, signals P. gingivalis to alter biofilm development. ADI release from the streptococcal cell and its cross-genera effects are important findings in understanding the nature of inter-bacterial signalling and biofilm-mediated diseases of the oral cavity. PMID:23242802

  10. Effect of water treatment additives on lime softening residual trace chemical composition--implications for disposal and reuse.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weizhi; Roessler, Justin; Blaisi, Nawaf I; Townsend, Timothy G

    2014-12-01

    Drinking water treatment residues (WTR) offer potential benefits when recycled through land application. The current guidance in Florida, US allows for unrestricted land application of lime softening WTR; alum and ferric WTR require additional evaluation of total and leachable concentrations of select trace metals prior to land application. In some cases a mixed WTR is produced when lime softening is accompanied by the addition of a coagulant or other treatment chemical; applicability of the current guidance is unclear. The objective of this research was to characterize the total and leachable chemical content of WTR from Florida facilities that utilize multiple treatment chemicals. Lime and mixed lime WTR samples were collected from 18 water treatment facilities in Florida. Total and leachable concentrations of the WTR were measured. To assess the potential for disposal of mixed WTR as clean fill below the water table, leaching tests were conducted at multiple liquid to solid ratios and under reducing conditions. The results were compared to risk-based soil and groundwater contamination thresholds. Total metal concentrations of WTR were found to be below Florida soil contaminant thresholds with Fe found in the highest abundance at a concentration of 3600 mg/kg-dry. Aluminum was the only element that exceeded the Florida groundwater contaminant thresholds using SPLP (95% UCL = 0.23 mg/L; risk threshold = 0.2 mg/L). Tests under reducing conditions showed elevated concentrations of Fe and Mn, ranging from 1 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than SPLP leachates. Mixed lime WTR concentrations (total and leachable) were lower than the ferric and alum WTR concentrations, supporting that mixed WTR are appropriately represented as lime WTR. Testing of WTR under reducing conditions demonstrated the potential for release of certain trace metals (Fe, Al, Mn) above applicable regulatory thresholds; additional evaluation is needed to assess management options where

  11. Arginine mimetic structures in biologically active antagonists and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Masic, Lucija Peterlin

    2006-01-01

    Peptidomimetics have found wide application as bioavailable, biostable, and potent mimetics of naturally occurring biologically active peptides. L-Arginine is a guanidino group-containing basic amino acid, which is positively charged at neutral pH and is involved in many important physiological and pathophysiological processes. Many enzymes display a preference for the arginine residue that is found in many natural substrates and in synthetic inhibitors of many trypsin-like serine proteases, e.g. thrombin, factor Xa, factor VIIa, trypsin, and in integrin receptor antagonists, used to treat many blood-coagulation disorders. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by oxidation of L-arginine in an NADPH- and O(2)-dependent process catalyzed by isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), exhibits diverse roles in both normal and pathological physiologies and has been postulated to be a contributor to the etiology of various diseases. Development of NOS inhibitors as well as analogs and mimetics of the natural substrate L-arginine, is desirable for potential therapeutic use and for a better understanding of their conformation when bound in the arginine binding site. The guanidino residue of arginine in many substrates, inhibitors, and antagonists forms strong ionic interactions with the carboxylate of an aspartic acid moiety, which provides specificity for the basic amino acid residue in the active side. However, a highly basic guanidino moiety incorporated in enzyme inhibitors or receptor antagonists is often associated with low selectivity and poor bioavailability after peroral application. Thus, significant effort is focused on the design and preparation of arginine mimetics that can confer selective inhibition for specific trypsin-like serine proteases and NOS inhibitors as well as integrin receptor antagonists and possess reduced basicity for enhanced oral bioavailability. This review will describe the survey of arginine mimetics designed to mimic the function of the

  12. Protein arginine methylation facilitates KCNQ channel-PIP2 interaction leading to seizure suppression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ji; Jeong, Myong-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Ran; Jung, Chang-Yun; Lee, Seul-Yi; Kim, Hanna; Koh, Jewoo; Vuong, Tuan Anh; Jung, Seungmoon; Yang, Hyunwoo; Park, Su-Kyung; Choi, Dahee; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, KyeongJin; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Park, Joo Min; Jeon, Daejong; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Ho, Won-Kyung; Kang, Jong-Sun; Kim, Seong-Tae; Cho, Hana

    2016-01-01

    KCNQ channels are critical determinants of neuronal excitability, thus emerging as a novel target of anti-epileptic drugs. To date, the mechanisms of KCNQ channel modulation have been mostly characterized to be inhibitory via Gq-coupled receptors, Ca2+/CaM, and protein kinase C. Here we demonstrate that methylation of KCNQ by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (Prmt1) positively regulates KCNQ channel activity, thereby preventing neuronal hyperexcitability. Prmt1+/- mice exhibit epileptic seizures. Methylation of KCNQ2 channels at 4 arginine residues by Prmt1 enhances PIP2 binding, and Prmt1 depletion lowers PIP2 affinity of KCNQ2 channels and thereby the channel activities. Consistently, exogenous PIP2 addition to Prmt1+/- neurons restores KCNQ currents and neuronal excitability to the WT level. Collectively, we propose that Prmt1-dependent facilitation of KCNQ-PIP2 interaction underlies the positive regulation of KCNQ activity by arginine methylation, which may serve as a key target for prevention of neuronal hyperexcitability and seizures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17159.001 PMID:27466704

  13. Standard addition method for the determination of pharmaceutical residues in drinking water by SPE-LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Cimetiere, Nicolas; Soutrel, Isabelle; Lemasle, Marguerite; Laplanche, Alain; Crocq, André

    2013-01-01

    The study of the occurrence and fate of pharmaceutical compounds in drinking or waste water processes has become very popular in recent years. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical tool often used to determine pharmaceutical residues at trace level in water. However, many steps may disrupt the analytical procedure and bias the results. A list of 27 environmentally relevant molecules, including various therapeutic classes and (cardiovascular, veterinary and human antibiotics, neuroleptics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, hormones and other miscellaneous pharmaceutical compounds), was selected. In this work, a method was developed using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) and solid-phase extraction to determine the concentration of the 27 targeted pharmaceutical compounds at the nanogram per litre level. The matrix effect was evaluated from water sampled at different treatment stages. Conventional methods with external calibration and internal standard correction were compared with the standard addition method (SAM). An accurate determination of pharmaceutical compounds in drinking water was obtained by the SAM associated with UPLC-MS/MS. The developed method was used to evaluate the occurrence and fate of pharmaceutical compounds in some drinking water treatment plants in the west of France.

  14. Investigation on the eco-toxicity of lake sediments with the addition of drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Nannan; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2016-08-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) have a potential to realize eutrophication control objectives by reducing the internal phosphorus (P) load of lake sediments. Information regarding the ecological risk of dewatered WTR reuse in aquatic environments is generally lacking, however. In this study, we analyzed the eco-toxicity of leachates from sediments with or without dewatered WTRs toward algae Chlorella vulgaris via algal growth inhibition testing with algal cell density, chlorophyll content, malondialdehyde content, antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase activity, and subcellular structure indices. The results suggested that leachates from sediments unanimously inhibited algal growth, with or without the addition of different WTR doses (10% or 50% of the sediment in dry weight) at different pH values (8-9), as well as from sediments treated for different durations (10 or 180days). The inhibition was primarily the result of P deficiency in the leachates owing to WTR P adsorption, however, our results suggest that the dewatered WTRs were considered as a favorable potential material for internal P loading control in lake restoration projects, as it shows acceptably low risk toward aquatic plants.

  15. Investigation on the eco-toxicity of lake sediments with the addition of drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Nannan; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2016-08-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) have a potential to realize eutrophication control objectives by reducing the internal phosphorus (P) load of lake sediments. Information regarding the ecological risk of dewatered WTR reuse in aquatic environments is generally lacking, however. In this study, we analyzed the eco-toxicity of leachates from sediments with or without dewatered WTRs toward algae Chlorella vulgaris via algal growth inhibition testing with algal cell density, chlorophyll content, malondialdehyde content, antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase activity, and subcellular structure indices. The results suggested that leachates from sediments unanimously inhibited algal growth, with or without the addition of different WTR doses (10% or 50% of the sediment in dry weight) at different pH values (8-9), as well as from sediments treated for different durations (10 or 180days). The inhibition was primarily the result of P deficiency in the leachates owing to WTR P adsorption, however, our results suggest that the dewatered WTRs were considered as a favorable potential material for internal P loading control in lake restoration projects, as it shows acceptably low risk toward aquatic plants. PMID:27521931

  16. Role of residual additives in the cytotoxicity and cytokine release caused by polyvinyl chloride particles in pulmonary cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiyan; Dinsdale, David; Nemery, Benoit; Hoet, Peter H M

    2003-03-01

    Occupational exposure to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) dust has been linked to pulmonary disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate, in vitro, the role of additives in the cytotoxicity and the release of inflammatory mediators caused by PVC particles in different cells. We compared two types of emulsion PVC particles (E3 and E8) with their washed (hence, "additive-free") counterparts (W3 and W8). A positive control (crystalline SiO2, Min-U-Sil) and the pure additives, sodium lauryl sulfate (A3) and sodium alkylbenzenesulfonate (A8), were tested concurrently. Cytotoxicity (MTT assay) was assessed in primary cultures of rat alveolar macrophages, rat type II pneumocytes, and human alveolar macrophages (h-AM), and cultures of the A549 cell line (type II cell-derived) and the differentiated THP-1 cell line (macrophage-like). Hemolytic potential was assessed after a 2-h incubation with human erythrocytes. Cytokine release (IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-alpha) by A549 cells, THP-1 cells, and h-AM, was measured by ELISA after 4, 16, 24 and/or 48 h of exposure. Cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity of the washed particles were abolished or markedly decreased compared with their nonwashed forms. In A549 cells, E3 and E8 (2.5 mg/ml) caused a 3-fold increase in IL-8 release and a more than 10-fold increase in IL-6 release, whereas W3 and W8 did not elicit any significant response at similar concentrations. Compared with Min-U-Sil (0.1, 0.5, and 2.5 mg/ml), the response to E3 and E8 occurred later and was slightly lower (IL-8) or much more pronounced (IL-6). A3 and A8 exhibited similar responses to E3 and E8, at concentrations corresponding to those present in the particles. In conclusion, the in vitro cytotoxicity and inflammatory potential of some PVC particles appear to be mostly due to their residual additives.

  17. Combinatorial effects of arginine and fluoride on oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Cheng, X; Wang, L; Qiu, W; Wang, S; Zhou, Y; Li, M; Li, Y; Cheng, L; Li, J; Zhou, X; Xu, X

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries is closely associated with the microbial disequilibrium between acidogenic/aciduric pathogens and alkali-generating commensal residents within the dental plaque. Fluoride is a widely used anticaries agent, which promotes tooth hard-tissue remineralization and suppresses bacterial activities. Recent clinical trials have shown that oral hygiene products containing both fluoride and arginine possess a greater anticaries effect compared with those containing fluoride alone, indicating synergy between fluoride and arginine in caries management. Here, we hypothesize that arginine may augment the ecological benefit of fluoride by enriching alkali-generating bacteria in the plaque biofilm and thus synergizes with fluoride in controlling dental caries. Specifically, we assessed the combinatory effects of NaF/arginine on planktonic and biofilm cultures of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis with checkerboard microdilution assays. The optimal NaF/arginine combinations were selected, and their combinatory effects on microbial composition were further examined in single-, dual-, and 3-species biofilm using bacterial species-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found that arginine synergized with fluoride in suppressing acidogenic S. mutans in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. In addition, the NaF/arginine combination synergistically reduced S. mutans but enriched S. sanguinis within the multispecies biofilms. More importantly, the optimal combination of NaF/arginine maintained a "streptococcal pressure" against the potential growth of oral anaerobe P. gingivalis within the alkalized biofilm. Taken together, we conclude that the combinatory application of fluoride and arginine has a potential synergistic effect in maintaining a healthy oral microbial equilibrium and thus represents a promising ecological approach to caries management.

  18. Discrimination between citrulline and arginine transport in activated murine macrophages: inefficient synthesis of NO from recycling of citrulline to arginine.

    PubMed Central

    Baydoun, A. R.; Bogle, R. G.; Pearson, J. D.; Mann, G. E.

    1994-01-01

    1. The kinetics, specificity, pH- and Na(+)-dependency of L-citrulline transport were examined in unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine macrophage J774 cells. The dependency of nitric oxide production on extracellular arginine or citrulline was investigated in cells activated with LPS (1 microgram ml-1) for 24 h. 2. In unstimulated J774 cells, transport of citrulline was saturable (Kt = 0.16 mM and Vmax = 32 pmol micrograms-1 protein min-1), pH-insensitive and partially Na(+)-dependent. In contrast to arginine, transport of citrulline was unchanged in LPS-activated (1 microgram ml-1, 24 h) cells. 3. Kinetic inhibition experiments revealed that arginine was a relatively poor inhibitor of citrulline transport, whilst citrulline was a more potent inhibitor (Ki = 3.4 mM) of arginine transport but only in the presence of extracellular Na+. Neutral amino acids inhibited citrulline transport (Ki = 0.2-0.3 mM), but were poor inhibitors of arginine transport. 4. Activated J774 cells did not release nitrite in the absence of exogenous arginine. Addition of citrulline (0.01-10 mM), in the absence of exogenous arginine, could only partially restore the ability of cells to synthesize nitrite, which was abolished by 100 microM NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or NG-iminoethyl-L-ornithine. 5. Intracellular metabolism of L-[14C]-citrulline to L-[14C]-arginine was detected in unstimulated J774 cells and was increased further in cells activated with LPS and interferon-gamma. 6. We conclude that J774 macrophage cells transport citrulline via a saturable but nonselective neutral carrier which is insensitive to induction by LPS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8075867

  19. Bioinformatic evaluation of L-arginine catabolic pathways in 24 cyanobacteria and transcriptional analysis of genes encoding enzymes of L-arginine catabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Schriek, Sarah; Rückert, Christian; Staiger, Dorothee; Pistorius, Elfriede K; Michel, Klaus-Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background So far very limited knowledge exists on L-arginine catabolism in cyanobacteria, although six major L-arginine-degrading pathways have been described for prokaryotes. Thus, we have performed a bioinformatic analysis of possible L-arginine-degrading pathways in cyanobacteria. Further, we chose Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for a more detailed bioinformatic analysis and for validation of the bioinformatic predictions on L-arginine catabolism with a transcript analysis. Results We have evaluated 24 cyanobacterial genomes of freshwater or marine strains for the presence of putative L-arginine-degrading enzymes. We identified an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway in all 24 strains. In addition, cyanobacteria have one or two further pathways representing either an arginase pathway or L-arginine deiminase pathway or an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. An L-arginine amidinotransferase pathway as a major L-arginine-degrading pathway is not likely but can not be entirely excluded. A rather unusual finding was that the cyanobacterial L-arginine deiminases are substantially larger than the enzymes in non-photosynthetic bacteria and that they are membrane-bound. A more detailed bioinformatic analysis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 revealed that three different L-arginine-degrading pathways may in principle be functional in this cyanobacterium. These are (i) an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway, (ii) an L-arginine deiminase pathway, and (iii) an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. A transcript analysis of cells grown either with nitrate or L-arginine as sole N-source and with an illumination of 50 μmol photons m-2 s-1 showed that the transcripts for the first enzyme(s) of all three pathways were present, but that the transcript levels for the L-arginine deiminase and the L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase were substantially higher than that of the three isoenzymes of L-arginine decarboxylase. Conclusion The evaluation of 24 cyanobacterial genomes revealed that

  20. Role of arginine in the stabilization of proteins against aggregation.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Brian M; Wang, Daniel I C; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2005-03-29

    The amino acid arginine is frequently used as a solution additive to stabilize proteins against aggregation, especially in the process of protein refolding. Despite arginine's prevalence, the mechanism by which it stabilizes proteins is not presently understood. We propose that arginine deters aggregation by slowing protein-protein association reactions, with only a small concomitant effect on protein folding. The associated rate effect was observed experimentally in association of globular proteins (insulin and a monoclonal anti-insulin) and in refolding of carbonic anhydrase. We suggest that this effect arises because arginine is preferentially excluded from protein-protein encounter complexes but not from dissociated protein molecules. Such an effect is predicted by our gap effect theory [Baynes and Trout (2004) Biophys. J. 87, 1631] for "neutral crowder" additives such as arginine which are significantly larger than water but have only a small effect on the free energies of isolated protein molecules. The effect of arginine on refolding of carbonic anhydrase was also shown to be consistent with this hypothesis.

  1. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Seventy-eighth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues of food. The first part of the report considers general principles regarding the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs within the terms of reference of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), including extrapolation of maximum residue limits (MRLs) to minor species, MRLs for veterinary drug residues in honey, MRLs relating to fish and fish species, dietary exposure assessment methodologies, the decision-tree approach to the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs and guidance for JECFA experts. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicology and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two anthelminthic agents (derquantel, monepantel), three antiparasitic agents (emanectin benzoate, ivermectin, lasalocid sodium), one antibacterial, antifungal and anthelminthic agent (gentian violet), a production aid (recombinant bovine somatotropins) and an adrenoceptor agonist and growth promoter (zilpaterol hydorchloride). Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes (ADIs)) and proposed MRLs. PMID:25591324

  2. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas; Lyon, David; Mullari, Meeli; Madsen, Maria V; Daniel, Jeremy A; Jensen, Lars J; Nielsen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The posttranslational modification of proteins by arginine methylation is functionally important, yet the breadth of this modification is not well characterized. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 8030 arginine methylation sites within 3300 human proteins in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified by methylation. Through quantitative proteomics and RNA interference to examine arginine methylation stoichiometry, we unexpectedly found that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of arginine methyltransferases catalyzed methylation independently of arginine sequence context. In contrast to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially regulated the functions of the pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 (serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2) and the RNA transport ribonucleoprotein HNRNPUL1 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like 1). Knocking down PRMT5 impaired the RNA binding function of SRSF2, whereas knocking down PRMT4 [also known as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human arginine methylome provides a missing piece in the global and integrative view of cellular physiology and protein regulation. PMID:27577262

  3. Protein arginine deiminase 2 binds calcium in an ordered fashion: Implications for inhibitor design

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, Daniel J.; Fang, Pengfei; Dreyton, Christina J.; Zhang, Ying; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Rempel, Don; Bax, Benjamin D.; Coonrod, Scott A.; Lewis, Huw D.; Guo, Min; Gross, Michael L.; Thompson, Paul R.

    2015-01-26

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) are calcium-dependent histone-modifying enzymes whose activity is dysregulated in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PAD2 functions as an Estrogen Receptor (ER) coactivator in breast cancer cells via the citrullination of histone tail arginine residues at ER binding sites. Although an attractive therapeutic target, the mechanisms that regulate PAD2 activity are largely unknown, especially the detailed role of how calcium facilitates enzyme activation. To gain insights into these regulatory processes, we determined the first structures of PAD2 (27 in total), and through calcium-titrations by X-ray crystallography, determined the order of binding and affinity for the six calcium ions that bind and activate this enzyme. These structures also identified several PAD2 regulatory elements, including a calcium switch that controls proper positioning of the catalytic cysteine residue, and a novel active site shielding mechanism. Additional biochemical and mass-spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies support these structural findings. The identification of multiple intermediate calcium-bound structures along the PAD2 activation pathway provides critical insights that will aid the development of allosteric inhibitors targeting the PADs.

  4. Protein arginine deiminase 2 binds calcium in an ordered fashion: Implications for inhibitor design

    DOE PAGES

    Slade, Daniel J.; Fang, Pengfei; Dreyton, Christina J.; Zhang, Ying; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Rempel, Don; Bax, Benjamin D.; Coonrod, Scott A.; Lewis, Huw D.; Guo, Min; et al

    2015-01-26

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) are calcium-dependent histone-modifying enzymes whose activity is dysregulated in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PAD2 functions as an Estrogen Receptor (ER) coactivator in breast cancer cells via the citrullination of histone tail arginine residues at ER binding sites. Although an attractive therapeutic target, the mechanisms that regulate PAD2 activity are largely unknown, especially the detailed role of how calcium facilitates enzyme activation. To gain insights into these regulatory processes, we determined the first structures of PAD2 (27 in total), and through calcium-titrations by X-ray crystallography, determined the order of binding and affinity for the six calcium ionsmore » that bind and activate this enzyme. These structures also identified several PAD2 regulatory elements, including a calcium switch that controls proper positioning of the catalytic cysteine residue, and a novel active site shielding mechanism. Additional biochemical and mass-spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies support these structural findings. The identification of multiple intermediate calcium-bound structures along the PAD2 activation pathway provides critical insights that will aid the development of allosteric inhibitors targeting the PADs.« less

  5. Protein arginine deiminase 2 binds calcium in an ordered fashion: implications for inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Slade, Daniel J; Fang, Pengfei; Dreyton, Christina J; Zhang, Ying; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Rempel, Don; Bax, Benjamin D; Coonrod, Scott A; Lewis, Huw D; Guo, Min; Gross, Michael L; Thompson, Paul R

    2015-04-17

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) are calcium-dependent histone-modifying enzymes whose activity is dysregulated in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PAD2 functions as an Estrogen Receptor (ER) coactivator in breast cancer cells via the citrullination of histone tail arginine residues at ER binding sites. Although an attractive therapeutic target, the mechanisms that regulate PAD2 activity are largely unknown, especially the detailed role of how calcium facilitates enzyme activation. To gain insights into these regulatory processes, we determined the first structures of PAD2 (27 in total), and through calcium-titrations by X-ray crystallography, determined the order of binding and affinity for the six calcium ions that bind and activate this enzyme. These structures also identified several PAD2 regulatory elements, including a calcium switch that controls proper positioning of the catalytic cysteine residue, and a novel active site shielding mechanism. Additional biochemical and mass-spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies support these structural findings. The identification of multiple intermediate calcium-bound structures along the PAD2 activation pathway provides critical insights that will aid the development of allosteric inhibitors targeting the PADs.

  6. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Sixty-sixth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers general principles regarding the evaluation of veterinary drugs within the terms of reference of JECFA, including compounds without an ADI or MRL; recommendations on principles and methods in derivation of MRLs, including a new procedure for estimating chronic dietary intakes; the use of a spreadsheet-based procedure for the statistical evaluation of residue depletion data; a revised approach for the derivation of microbiological ADIs; and the Committee's review of and comments on documents provided by the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: three antimicrobial agents (colistin, erythromycin, flumequine), two production aids (melengestrol acetate, ractopamine hydrochloride), an insecticide (trichlorfon (metrifonate)) and an anthelminthic (triclabendazole). In addition, the attempt by the Committee to use tylosin as an example to investigate if evaluations are possible based on published data in the absence of data submissions from sponsors is described. Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes and proposed maximum residue limits. PMID:17373572

  7. FORMATION OF FINE PARTICLES FROM RESIDUAL OIL COMBUSTION: REDUCING ULTRAFINE NUCLEI THROUGH THE ADDITION OF INORGANIC SORBENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an investigation, using an 82-kW-rated laboratory-scale refractory-lined combustor, of the characteristics of particulate matter emitted from residual oil combustion and the reduction of ultrafine nuclei by postflame sorbent injection. Without sorbent a...

  8. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Eighty-first report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers general principles regarding the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs within the terms of reference of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), including MRLs for generic fish species, acute reference doses (ARfDs) for veterinary drugs, an approach for dietary exposure assessment of compounds used for multiple purposes (i.e veterinary drugs and pesticides), dietary exposure assessment for less-than-lifetime exposure, and the assessment of short-term (90-day and 12-month) studies in dogs. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two insecticides (diflubenzuron and teflubenzuron), an antiparasitic agent (ivermectin), an ectoparasiticide (sisapronil) and a β2-adrenoceptor agonist (zilpaterol hydrochloride). In addition, the Committee considered issues raised in concern forms from the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods on lasalocid sodium, an antiparasitic agent. Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes (ADIs), ARfDs and proposed MRLs. PMID:27509597

  9. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Eighty-first report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers general principles regarding the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs within the terms of reference of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), including MRLs for generic fish species, acute reference doses (ARfDs) for veterinary drugs, an approach for dietary exposure assessment of compounds used for multiple purposes (i.e veterinary drugs and pesticides), dietary exposure assessment for less-than-lifetime exposure, and the assessment of short-term (90-day and 12-month) studies in dogs. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two insecticides (diflubenzuron and teflubenzuron), an antiparasitic agent (ivermectin), an ectoparasiticide (sisapronil) and a β2-adrenoceptor agonist (zilpaterol hydrochloride). In addition, the Committee considered issues raised in concern forms from the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods on lasalocid sodium, an antiparasitic agent. Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes (ADIs), ARfDs and proposed MRLs.

  10. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    SciTech Connect

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  11. Development of an Eastern Shale Oil Residue as an Asphalt Additive - Subtask 2.5: Topical report, February 1, 1994-February 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    An evaluation of eastern shale oil as an asphalt additive to reduce oxidative age hardening and moisture susceptibility is being conducted. An eastern shale oil residue having a viscosity of 1.30 Pa`s at 60{degrees}C (140{degrees}F) was blended with three different petroleum-derived asphalts that are known to be very susceptible to oxidative aging. In addition, blends of the eastern shale oil residue and the petroleum-derived asphalts are being coated onto three different aggregates that are known to be susceptible to water stripping. The oxidative age hardening portion of this study is not complete at this time. To date, information has been obtained on the unaged samples and two of the aged petroleum-derived asphalts (AAD-1 and AAK-1). When complete, this data will include rheological data on the unaged, RTFO-aged, and the RTFO/PAV-aged samples and infrared data on the unaged and RTFO/PAV-aged samples. With respect to the rheological data, asphalt AAD-1 meets the specifications of a PG 58 asphalt while asphalt AAK-1 does not. In the latter case this indicates that AAK-1 is more appropriately evaluated at a higher temperature range. The infrared spectroscopic data obtained for the eastern shale oil residue show that it contains appreciable amounts of carbonyl and sulfoxide compound types, 0.22 absorbance units and 0. 27 moles/L, respectively. Thus, upon the addition of this residue to the three petroleum-derived asphalts the blends contain increased amounts of these functional groups relative to the petroleum-derived asphalts. This has been observed with other additives and is not considered detrimental. In addition, the data that has been collected to date indicate that the moisture susceptibility of blends of eastern shale oil residue and asphalt AAK-1 are somewhat improved when coated onto Lithonia granite.

  12. Unusual Arginine Formations in Protein Function and Assembly: Rings, Strings and Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Marco A. C.; Yeager, Mark; Abagyan, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interfaces are often stabilized by a small number of dominant contacts, exemplified by the overrepresentation of arginine residues at oligomerization interfaces. Positively charged arginines are most commonly involved in ion pairs of opposite charge; however, previous work of Scheraga and coworkers described the stable, close range interaction between guanidinium pairs in a solvated environment. To extend this work, we searched over 70 thousand protein structures and complexes for unusual formations of arginine residues supported by the electron density. Symmetry transformations were used to generate full assemblies. Clusters of four to eight arginine residues with Cζ-Cζ distances < 5 Å, organized as rings with 4 to 8 members, stacks of two arginines, and strings of stacked arginines, are commonly located at the interfaces of oligomeric proteins. The positive charge is properly balanced by negatively charged counter ions in about 90% of the cases. We also observed planar stacking of guanidinium groups, bridged by hydrogen bonds and interactions with water molecules. The guanidinium groups are commonly involved in 5 hydrogen bonds with water molecules and acceptor groups from surrounding amino acids. Water molecules have a bridging effect on the arginine pairs, but in some cases small molecular weight chemicals in the crystallization buffer may be misinterpreted as water molecules. In summary, despite electrostatic repulsion, arginines do form various clusters that are exposed to interact with and potentially be controlled or switched by charged metabolites, membrane lipids, nucleic acids or side chains of other proteins. Control of the stability of arginine clusters may play an important role in protein-protein oligomerization, molecular recognition and ligand binding. PMID:22497303

  13. Enhancement of interleukin-2 immunotherapy with L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, M D; Nishioka, K; Redmond, H P; Daly, J M

    1992-02-01

    Nutrient substrates have been shown to enhance cell-mediated immunity, but their role as adjuvants to immunotherapy has not been previously determined. This study evaluated L-arginine as an essential substrate for optimal generation of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. This experiment also assessed supplemental dietary L-arginine as a means to potentiate the host antitumor response to interleukin-2 (IL-2) in a murine neuroblastoma (NRB) model. A/J mice received 1% arginine or isonitrogenous 1.7% glycine in addition to a regular diet 14 days before subcutaneous inoculation with C1300 NRB cells. Twenty-four hours later, animals received low (1 x 10(6) U/kg three times a day) or high (3 x 10(6) U/kg three times a day) doses of IL-2 or saline intraperitoneally for 4 days. On days 4 and 10 post-C1300 NRB inoculation, mice were killed for assessment of natural killer cell and tumor specific cytotoxicity. Remaining animals were followed for tumor incidence, tumor growth, and duration of host survival. Interleukin-2 therapy in mice receiving dietary arginine compared with those receiving glycine resulted in significantly augmented natural killer cell cytotoxicity (day 4) and generation of specific tumoricidal mechanisms (day 10). The addition of dietary arginine to low-dose IL-2 therapy significantly diminished C1300 NRB engraftment (p less than 0.05) and growth (p less than 0.001) and prolonged the duration of host survival (p less than 0.05) compared with the glycine treatment group. In vitro studies demonstrated that L-arginine is an essential substrate for optimal generation of LAK cells. Thus, supplemental dietary L-arginine enhances lymphocyte cytotoxic mechanisms and potentiates IL-2 immunotherapy.

  14. Use of generalized additive models and cokriging of spatial residuals to improve land-use regression estimates of nitrogen oxides in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lianfa; Wu, Jun; Wilhelm, Michelle; Ritz, Beate

    2012-01-01

    Land-use regression (LUR) models have been developed to estimate spatial distributions of traffic-related pollutants. Several studies have examined spatial autocorrelation among residuals in LUR models, but few utilized spatial residual information in model prediction, or examined the impact of modeling methods, monitoring site selection, or traffic data quality on LUR performance. This study aims to improve spatial models for traffic-related pollutants using generalized additive models (GAM) combined with cokriging of spatial residuals. Specifically, we developed spatial models for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) concentrations in Southern California separately for two seasons (summer and winter) based on over 240 sampling locations. Pollutant concentrations were disaggregated into three components: local means, spatial residuals, and normal random residuals. Local means were modeled by GAM. Spatial residuals were cokriged with global residuals at nearby sampling locations that were spatially auto-correlated. We compared this two-stage approach with four commonly-used spatial models: universal kriging, multiple linear LUR and GAM with and without a spatial smoothing term. Leave-one-out cross validation was conducted for model validation and comparison purposes. The results show that our GAM plus cokriging models predicted summer and winter NO2 and NOx concentration surfaces well, with cross validation R2 values ranging from 0.88 to 0.92. While local covariates accounted for partial variance of the measured NO2 and NOx concentrations, spatial autocorrelation accounted for about 20% of the variance. Our spatial GAM model improved R2 considerably compared to the other four approaches. Conclusively, our two-stage model captured summer and winter differences in NO2 and NOx spatial distributions in Southern California well. When sampling location selection cannot be optimized for the intended model and fewer covariates are available as predictors for

  15. Mannitol/l-Arginine-Based Formulation Systems for Freeze Drying of Protein Pharmaceuticals: Effect of the l-Arginine Counter Ion and Formulation Composition on the Formulation Properties and the Physical State of Mannitol.

    PubMed

    Stärtzel, Peter; Gieseler, Henning; Gieseler, Margit; Abdul-Fattah, Ahmad M; Adler, Michael; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Goldbach, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that protein storage stability in freeze-dried l-arginine-based systems improved in the presence of chloride ions. However, chloride ions reduced the glass transition temperature of the freeze concentrate (Tg') and made freeze drying more challenging. In this study, l-arginine was freeze dried with mannitol to obtain partially crystalline solids that can be freeze dried in a fast process and result in elegant cakes. We characterized the effect of different l-arginine counter ions on physicochemical properties of mannitol compared with mannitol/sucrose systems. Thermal properties of formulations with different compositions were correlated to thermal history during freeze drying and to physicochemical properties (cake appearance, residual moisture, reconstitution time, crystallinity). Partially crystalline solids were obtained even at the highest l-arginine level (mannitol:l-arginine of 2:1) used in this study. All l-arginine-containing formulations yielded elegant cakes. Only cakes containing l-arginine chloride and succinate showed a surface "crust" formed by phase separation. X-ray powder diffraction showed that inhibition of mannitol crystallization was stronger for l-arginine compared with sucrose and varied with the type of l-arginine counter ion. The counter ion affected mannitol polymorphism and higher levels of mannitol hemi-hydrate were obtained at high levels of l-arginine chloride.

  16. Mannitol/l-Arginine-Based Formulation Systems for Freeze Drying of Protein Pharmaceuticals: Effect of the l-Arginine Counter Ion and Formulation Composition on the Formulation Properties and the Physical State of Mannitol.

    PubMed

    Stärtzel, Peter; Gieseler, Henning; Gieseler, Margit; Abdul-Fattah, Ahmad M; Adler, Michael; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Goldbach, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that protein storage stability in freeze-dried l-arginine-based systems improved in the presence of chloride ions. However, chloride ions reduced the glass transition temperature of the freeze concentrate (Tg') and made freeze drying more challenging. In this study, l-arginine was freeze dried with mannitol to obtain partially crystalline solids that can be freeze dried in a fast process and result in elegant cakes. We characterized the effect of different l-arginine counter ions on physicochemical properties of mannitol compared with mannitol/sucrose systems. Thermal properties of formulations with different compositions were correlated to thermal history during freeze drying and to physicochemical properties (cake appearance, residual moisture, reconstitution time, crystallinity). Partially crystalline solids were obtained even at the highest l-arginine level (mannitol:l-arginine of 2:1) used in this study. All l-arginine-containing formulations yielded elegant cakes. Only cakes containing l-arginine chloride and succinate showed a surface "crust" formed by phase separation. X-ray powder diffraction showed that inhibition of mannitol crystallization was stronger for l-arginine compared with sucrose and varied with the type of l-arginine counter ion. The counter ion affected mannitol polymorphism and higher levels of mannitol hemi-hydrate were obtained at high levels of l-arginine chloride. PMID:27506270

  17. Protein arginine methylation of non-histone proteins and its role in diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Han; Mundade, Rasika; Lange, Kevin C; Lu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) are a family of enzymes that can methylate arginine residues on histones and other proteins. PRMTs play a crucial role in influencing various cellular functions, including cellular development and tumorigenesis. Arginine methylation by PRMTs is found on both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. Recently, there is increasing evidence regarding post-translational modifications of non-histone proteins by PRMTs, illustrating the previously unknown importance of PRMTs in the regulation of various cellular functions by post-translational modifications. In this review, we present the recent developments in the regulation of non-histone proteins by PRMTs. PMID:24296620

  18. Arginine transport in catabolic disease states.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ming; Choudry, Haroon A; Epler, Mark J; Meng, Qinghe; Karinch, Anne; Lin, Chengmao; Souba, Wiley

    2004-10-01

    Arginine appears to be a semiessential amino acid in humans during critical illness. Catabolic disease states such as sepsis, injury, and cancer cause an increase in arginine utilization, which exceeds body production, leading to arginine depletion. This is aggravated by the reduced nutrient intake that is associated with critical illness. Arginine depletion may have negative consequences on tissue function under these circumstances. Nutritional regimens containing arginine have been shown to improve nitrogen balance and lymphocyte function, and stimulate arginine transport in the liver. We have studied the effects of stress mediators on arginine transport in vascular endothelium, liver, and gut epithelium. In vascular endothelium, endotoxin stimulates arginine uptake, an effect that is mediated by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and by the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. This TNF-alpha stimulation involves the activation of intracellular protein kinase C (PKC). A significant increase in hepatic arginine transport activity also occurs following burn injury and in rats with progressive malignant disease. Surgical removal of the growing tumor results in a normalization of the accelerated hepatic arginine transport within days. Chronic metabolic acidosis and sepsis individually augment intestinal arginine transport in rats and Caco-2 cell culture. PKC and mitogen-activated protein kinases are involved in mediating the sepsis/acidosis stimulation of arginine transport. Understanding the regulation of plasma membrane arginine transport will enhance our knowledge of nutrition and metabolism in seriously ill patients and may lead to the design of improved nutritional support formulas. PMID:15465794

  19. Glutamine, arginine, and leucine signaling in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Marc Rhoads, J; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Glutamine and leucine are abundant constituents of plant and animal proteins, whereas the content of arginine in foods and physiological fluids varies greatly. Besides their role in protein synthesis, these three amino acids individually activate signaling pathway to promote protein synthesis and possibly inhibit autophagy-mediated protein degradation in intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, glutamine and arginine stimulate the mitogen-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 (s6) kinase pathways, respectively, to enhance mucosal cell migration and restitution. Moreover, through the nitric oxide-dependent cGMP signaling cascade, arginine regulates multiple physiological events in the intestine that are beneficial for cell homeostasis and survival. Available evidence from both in vitro and in vivo animal studies shows that glutamine and arginine promote cell proliferation and exert differential cytoprotective effects in response to nutrient deprivation, oxidative injury, stress, and immunological challenge. Additionally, when nitric oxide is available, leucine increases the migration of intestinal cells. Therefore, through cellular signaling mechanisms, arginine, glutamine, and leucine play crucial roles in intestinal growth, integrity, and function.

  20. Arginine kinase: a potential pharmacological target in trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Claudio A

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids parasites have complex life cycles which involve a wide diversity of milieus with very different physicochemical properties. Arginine kinase is one of the key enzymes, responsible for the parasites' metabolic plasticity, which maintains the cell energy homeostasis during environment changes. Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible phosphorylation between phosphoarginine and ADP. The phosphagen phosphoarginine sustains high levels of cellular activity until metabolic events, such as glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, are switched on. In different unicellular and multicellular organisms including trypanosomatids, it was demonstrated that arginine kinase is an important component in resistance mechanisms to different stress factors, such as reactive oxygen species, trypanocidal drugs, pH and starvation. In addition, few arginine kinase inhibitors were identified during the lasts years, some of them with trypanocidal activity, such as polyphenolic compounds. All these unique features, in addition to the fact that arginine kinase is completely absent in mammals, make this pathway a favorable start point for rational drug design for the treatment of human trypanosomamiases.

  1. Effect of lactic acid bacteria inoculant and beet pulp addition on fermentation characteristics and in vitro ruminal digestion of vegetable residue silage.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Cai, Y; Takahashi, T; Yoshida, N; Tohno, M; Uegaki, R; Nonaka, K; Terada, F

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of beet pulp (BP) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage fermentation quality and in vitro ruminal dry matter (DM) digestion of vegetable residues, including white cabbage, Chinese cabbage, red cabbage, and lettuce. Silage was prepared using a small-scale fermentation system, and treatments were designed as control silage without additive or with BP (30% fresh matter basis), LAB inoculant Chikuso-1 (Lactobacillus plantarum, 5mg/kg, fresh matter basis), and BP+LAB. In vitro incubation was performed using rumen fluid mixed with McDougall's artificial saliva (at a ratio of 1:4, vol/vol) at 39°C for 6h to determine the ruminal fermentability of the vegetable residue silages. These vegetable residues contained high levels of crude protein (20.6-22.8% of DM) and moderate levels of neutral detergent fiber (22.7-33.6% of DM). In all silages, the pH sharply decreased and lactic acid increased, and the growth of bacilli, coliform bacteria, molds, and yeasts was inhibited by the low pH at the early stage of ensiling. The silage treated with BP or LAB had a lower pH and a higher lactic acid content than the control silage. After 6h of incubation, all silages had relatively high DM digestibility (38.6-44.9%); in particular, the LAB-inoculated silage had the highest DM digestibility and the lowest methane production. The vegetable residues had high nutritional content and high in vitro DM digestibility. Also, both the addition of a LAB inoculant and moisture adjustment with BP improved the fermentation quality of the vegetable residue silages. In addition, LAB increased DM digestibility and decreased ruminal methane production. PMID:21787927

  2. Absence of Btn1p in the yeast model for juvenile Batten disease may cause arginine to become toxic to yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Seasson Phillips; Wolfe, Devin M; Pearce, David A

    2007-05-01

    Lymphoblast cell lines established from individuals with juvenile Batten disease (JNCL) bearing mutations in CLN3 and yeast strains lacking Btn1p (btn1-Delta), the homolog to CLN3, have decreased intracellular levels of arginine and defective lysosomal/vacuolar transport of arginine. It is important to establish the basis for this decrease in arginine levels and whether restoration of arginine levels would be of therapeutic value for Batten disease. Previous studies have suggested that synthesis and degradation of arginine are unaltered in btn1-Delta. Using the yeast model for the Batten disease, we have determined that although btn1-Delta results in decreased intracellular arginine levels, it does not result from altered arginine uptake, arginine efflux or differences in arginine incorporation into peptides. However, expression of BTN1 is dependent on arginine and Gcn4p, the master regulator of amino acid biosynthesis. Moreover, deletion of GCN4 (gcn4-Delta), in combination with btn1-Delta, results in a very specific growth requirement for arginine. In addition, increasing the intracellular levels of arginine through overexpression of Can1p, the plasma membrane basic amino acid permease, results in increased cell volume and a severe growth defect specific to basic amino acid availability for btn1-Delta, but not wild-type cells. Therefore, elevation of intracellular levels of arginine in btn1-Delta cells is detrimental and is suggestive that btn1-Delta and perhaps mutation of CLN3 predispose cells to keep arginine levels lower than normal.

  3. Increase in the carbohydrate content of the microalgae Spirulina in culture by nutrient starvation and the addition of residues of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Vieira Salla, Ana Cláudia; Margarites, Ana Cláudia; Seibel, Fábio Ivan; Holz, Luiz Carlos; Brião, Vandré Barbosa; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Colla, Luciane Maria; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2016-06-01

    Non-renewable sources that will end with time are the largest part of world energy consumption, which emphasizes the necessity to develop renewable sources of energy. This necessity has created opportunities for the use of microalgae as a biofuel. The use of microalgae as a feedstock source for bioethanol production requires high yields of both biomass and carbohydrates. With mixotrophic cultures, wastewater can be used to culture algae. The aim of the study was to increase the carbohydrate content in the microalgae Spirulina with the additions of residues from the ultra and nanofiltration of whey protein. The nutrient deficit in the Zarrouk medium diluted to 20% and the addition of 2.5% of both residue types led to high carbohydrate productivity (60 mg L(-1) d(-1)). With these culture conditions, the increase in carbohydrate production in Spirulina indicated that the conditions were appropriate for use with microalgae as a feedstock in the production of bioethanol.

  4. Different roles of cell surface and exogenous glycosaminoglycans in controlling gene delivery by arginine-rich peptides with varied distribution of arginines.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rangeetha J; Chatterjee, Anindo; Ganguli, Munia

    2013-06-01

    The role of cell surface and exogenous glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in DNA delivery by cationic peptides is controlled to a large extent by the peptide chemistry and the nature of its complex with DNA. We have previously shown that complexes formed by arginine homopeptides with DNA adopt a GAG-independent cellular internalization mechanism and show enhanced gene delivery in presence of exogenous GAGs. In contrast, lysine complexes gain cellular entry primarily by a GAG-dependent pathway and are destabilized by exogenous GAGs. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the factors governing the role of cell surface and soluble glycosaminoglycans in DNA delivery by sequences of arginine-rich peptides with altered arginine distributions (compared to homopeptide). Using peptides with clustered arginines which constitute known heparin-binding motifs and a control peptide with arginines alternating with alanines, we show that complexes formed by these peptides do not require cell surface GAGs for cellular uptake and DNA delivery. However, the charge distribution and the spacing of arginine residues affects DNA delivery efficiency of these peptides in presence of soluble GAGs, since these peptides show only a marginal increase in transfection in presence of exogenous GAGs unlike that observed with arginine homopeptides. Our results indicate that presence of arginine by itself drives these peptides to a cell surface GAG-independent route of entry to efficiently deliver functional DNA into cells in vitro. However, the inherent stability of the complexes differ when the distribution of arginines in the peptides is altered, thereby modulating its interaction with exogenous GAGs.

  5. l-Arginine modulates neonatal lymphocyte proliferation through an interleukin-2 independent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Li-Tung; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Tain, You-Lin; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Huang, Hsin-Chun; Yang, Kuender D; Ou, Chia-Yo; Hsu, Te-Yao

    2014-01-01

    In cases of arginine depletion, lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production and CD3ζ chain expression are all diminished. In addition to myeloid suppressor cells, polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) also exert T-cell immune suppressive effects through arginase-induced l-arginine depletion, especially during pregnancy. In this study, we investigated how arginase/l-arginine modulates neonatal lymphocyte proliferation. Results showed that the neonatal plasma l-arginine level was lower than in adults (48·1 ± 11·3 versus 86·5 ± 14·6 μm; P = 0·003). Neonatal PMN had a greater abundance of arginase I protein than adult PMN. Both transcriptional regulation and post-transcriptional regulation were responsible for the higher arginase I expression of neonatal PMN. Exogenous l-arginine enhanced neonate lymphocyte proliferation but not that of adult cells. The RNA-binding protein HuR was important but was not the only modulation factor in l-arginine-regulated neonatal T-cell proliferation. l-Arginine-mediated neonatal lymphocyte proliferation could not be blocked by interleukin-2 receptor blocking antibodies. These results suggest that the altered arginase/l-arginine cascade may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to altered neonatal immune responses. Exogenous l-arginine could enhance neonate lymphocyte proliferation through an interleukin-2-independent pathway. PMID:24697328

  6. Delineation of the arginine- and tetrahydrobiopterin-binding sites of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Boyhan, A; Smith, D; Charles, I G; Saqi, M; Lowe, P N

    1997-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (EC 1.14.13.39) catalyses the conversion of arginine, NADPH and oxygen to nitric oxide and citrulline, using haem, (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-l-biopterin (tetrahydrobiopterin), calmodulin, FAD and FMN as cofactors. The enzyme consists of a central calmodulin-binding sequence flanked on the N-terminal side by a haem-binding region that contains the arginine and tetrahydrobiopterin sites and on the C-terminal side by a region homologous with NADPH:cytochrome P-450 reductase. By using domain boundaries defined by limited proteolysis of full-length enzyme, recombinant haem-binding regions of rat brain neuronal nitric oxide synthase were expressed and purified. Two proteins were made in high yield: one, corresponding to residues 221-724, contained bound haem and tetrahydrobiopterin and was able to bind Nomega-nitro-l-arginine (nitroarginine) or arginine; the other, containing residues 350-724, contained bound haem but was unable to bind tetrahydrobiopterin, nitroarginine or arginine. These results showed that rat brain neuronal nitric oxide synthase contains a critical determinant for arginine/tetrahydrobiopterin binding between residues 221 and 350. Limited proteolysis with chymotrypsin of the former protein resulted in a new species with an N-terminal residue 275 that retained the ability to bind nitroarginine, further defining the critical region for arginine binding as being between 275 and 350. Comparison of the sequences of nitric oxide synthase and the tetrahydrobiopterin-requiring amino acid hydroxylases revealed a similarity in the region between residues 470 and 600, suggesting that this might represent the core region of the pterin-binding site. The stoichiometries of binding of substrate and cofactors to the recombinant domains were not more than 0.5 mol/mol of monomer, suggesting that there might be a single high-affinity site per dimer. PMID:9173872

  7. Influence of L-arginine during bovine in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago Velasco Guimarães; da Silva, Bruno Baraúna; de Sá, André Luiz Alves; da Costa, Nathalia Nogueira; Sampaio, Rafael Vilar; Cordeiro, Marcela da Silva; Santana, Priscila Di Paula Bessa; Adona, Paulo Roberto; Santos, Simone do Socorro Damasceno; Miranda, Moysés dos Santos; Ohashi, Otávio Mitio

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of using L-arginine during in vitro fertilization (IVF) on in vitro embryonic development using Bos taurus and Bos indicus semen. Effect of different concentrations (0, 1, 10 and 50 mM) of L-arginine, added to the IVF medium, was evaluated on the fertilization rate at 18 h post-fertilization (hpf), NO3(-)/NO2(-) production during IVF by the Griess colorimetric method (30 hpf), cleavage and blastocyst rates (on Day 2 and Day 7 of culture, respectively) and total blastocyst cell number (Day 7 of culture). The results reveal that the addition of 50 mM L-arginine to IVF medium, with either Bos taurus or Bos indicus spermatozoa, decreased the cleavage rate and blastocyst rate compared to the control group. Other concentrations did not affect embryo production. However, 1 mM L-arginine with Bos indicus semen increased the proportion of hatched blastocysts. These results indicate that high L-arginine concentrations may exhibit toxic effects on bovine gametes during in vitro fertilization. PMID:25651608

  8. Arginine and citrulline supplementation in sports and exercise: ergogenic nutrients?

    PubMed

    Sureda, Antoni; Pons, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    Dietary L-citrulline malate supplements may increase levels of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, although this response has not been related to an improvement in athletic performance. NO plays an important role in many functions in the body regulating vasodilatation, blood flow, mitochondrial respiration and platelet function. L-Arginine is the main precursor of NO via nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. Additionally, L-citrulline has been indicated to be a second NO donor in the NOS-dependent pathway, since it can be converted to L-arginine. The importance of L-citrulline as an ergogenic support derives from the fact that L-citrulline is not subject to pre-systemic elimination and, consequently, could be a more efficient way to elevate extracellular levels of L-arginine by itself. L-Citrulline malate can develop beneficial effects on the elimination of NH(3) in the course of recovery from exhaustive muscular exercise and also as an effective precursor of L-arginine and creatine. Dietary supplementation with L-citrulline alone does not improve exercise performance. The ergogenic response of L-citrulline or L-arginine supplements depends on the training status of the subjects. Studies involving untrained or moderately healthy subjects showed that NO donors could improve tolerance to aerobic and anaerobic exercise. However, when highly-trained subjects were supplemented, no positive effect on performance was indicated. PMID:23075551

  9. Influence of L-arginine during bovine in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago Velasco Guimarães; da Silva, Bruno Baraúna; de Sá, André Luiz Alves; da Costa, Nathalia Nogueira; Sampaio, Rafael Vilar; Cordeiro, Marcela da Silva; Santana, Priscila Di Paula Bessa; Adona, Paulo Roberto; Santos, Simone do Socorro Damasceno; Miranda, Moysés dos Santos; Ohashi, Otávio Mitio

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of using L-arginine during in vitro fertilization (IVF) on in vitro embryonic development using Bos taurus and Bos indicus semen. Effect of different concentrations (0, 1, 10 and 50 mM) of L-arginine, added to the IVF medium, was evaluated on the fertilization rate at 18 h post-fertilization (hpf), NO3(-)/NO2(-) production during IVF by the Griess colorimetric method (30 hpf), cleavage and blastocyst rates (on Day 2 and Day 7 of culture, respectively) and total blastocyst cell number (Day 7 of culture). The results reveal that the addition of 50 mM L-arginine to IVF medium, with either Bos taurus or Bos indicus spermatozoa, decreased the cleavage rate and blastocyst rate compared to the control group. Other concentrations did not affect embryo production. However, 1 mM L-arginine with Bos indicus semen increased the proportion of hatched blastocysts. These results indicate that high L-arginine concentrations may exhibit toxic effects on bovine gametes during in vitro fertilization.

  10. The Conserved Arginine Cluster in the Insert of the Third Cytoplasmic Loop of the Long Form of the D₂ Dopamine Receptor (D2L-R) Acts as an Intracellular Retention Signal.

    PubMed

    Kubale, Valentina; Blagotinšek, Kaja; Nøhr, Jane; Eidne, Karin A; Vrecl, Milka

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether the conserved arginine cluster present within the 29-amino acid insert of the long form of the D₂ dopamine receptor (D2L-R) confers its predominant intracellular localization. We hypothesized that the conserved arginine cluster (RRR) located within the insert could act as an RXR-type endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal. Arginine residues (R) within the cluster at positions 267, 268, and 269 were charge-reserved to glutamic acids (E), either individually or in clusters, thus generating single, double, and triple D2L-R mutants. Through analyses of cellular localization by confocal microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radioligand binding assay, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET²) β-arrestin 2 (βarr2) recruitment assay, and cAMP signaling, it was revealed that charge reversal of the R residues at all three positions within the motif impaired their colocalization with ER marker calnexin and led to significantly improved cell surface expression. Additionally, these data demonstrate that an R to glutamic acid (E) substitution at position 2 within the RXR motif is not functionally permissible. Furthermore, all generated D2L-R mutants preserved their functional integrity regarding ligand binding, agonist-induced βarr2 recruitment and Gαi-mediated signaling. In summary, our results show that the conserved arginine cluster within the 29-amino acid insert of third cytoplasmic loop (IC3) of the D2L-R appears to be the ER retention signal.

  11. The Conserved Arginine Cluster in the Insert of the Third Cytoplasmic Loop of the Long Form of the D₂ Dopamine Receptor (D2L-R) Acts as an Intracellular Retention Signal.

    PubMed

    Kubale, Valentina; Blagotinšek, Kaja; Nøhr, Jane; Eidne, Karin A; Vrecl, Milka

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether the conserved arginine cluster present within the 29-amino acid insert of the long form of the D₂ dopamine receptor (D2L-R) confers its predominant intracellular localization. We hypothesized that the conserved arginine cluster (RRR) located within the insert could act as an RXR-type endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal. Arginine residues (R) within the cluster at positions 267, 268, and 269 were charge-reserved to glutamic acids (E), either individually or in clusters, thus generating single, double, and triple D2L-R mutants. Through analyses of cellular localization by confocal microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radioligand binding assay, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET²) β-arrestin 2 (βarr2) recruitment assay, and cAMP signaling, it was revealed that charge reversal of the R residues at all three positions within the motif impaired their colocalization with ER marker calnexin and led to significantly improved cell surface expression. Additionally, these data demonstrate that an R to glutamic acid (E) substitution at position 2 within the RXR motif is not functionally permissible. Furthermore, all generated D2L-R mutants preserved their functional integrity regarding ligand binding, agonist-induced βarr2 recruitment and Gαi-mediated signaling. In summary, our results show that the conserved arginine cluster within the 29-amino acid insert of third cytoplasmic loop (IC3) of the D2L-R appears to be the ER retention signal. PMID:27447620

  12. Protein arginine Methyltransferase 8 gene is expressed in pluripotent stem cells and its expression is modulated by the transcription factor Sox2.

    PubMed

    Solari, Claudia; Echegaray, Camila Vázquez; Luzzani, Carlos; Cosentino, María Soledad; Waisman, Ariel; Petrone, María Victoria; Francia, Marcos; Sassone, Alina; Canizo, Jésica; Sevlever, Gustavo; Barañao, Lino; Miriuka, Santiago; Guberman, Alejandra

    2016-04-22

    Addition of methyl groups to arginine residues is catalyzed by a group of enzymes called Protein Arginine Methyltransferases (Prmt). Although Prmt1 is essential in development, its paralogue Prmt8 has been poorly studied. This gene was reported to be expressed in nervous system and involved in neurogenesis. In this work, we found that Prmt8 is expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and in induced pluripotent stem cells, and modulated along differentiation to neural precursor cells. We found that Prmt8 promoter activity is induced by the pluripotency transcription factors Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog. Moreover, endogenous Prmt8 mRNA levels were reduced in ESC transfected with Sox2 shRNA vector. As a whole, our results indicate that Prmt8 is expressed in pluripotent stem cells and its transcription is modulated by pluripotency transcription factors. These findings suggest that besides its known function in nervous system, Prmt8 could play a role in pluripotent stem cells.

  13. Protein-arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) methylates Ash2L, a shared component of mammalian histone H3K4 methyltransferase complexes.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jill S; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia I; Clarke, Steven G; Bedford, Mark T; Dent, Sharon Y R

    2011-04-01

    Multiple enzymes and enzymatic complexes coordinately regulate the addition and removal of post-translational modifications on histone proteins. The oncoprotein Ash2L is a component of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) family members 1-4, Setd1A, and Setd1B mammalian histone H3K4 methyltransferase complexes and is essential to maintain global trimethylation of histone H3K4. However, regulation of these complexes at the level of expression and activity remains poorly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that Ash2L is methylated on arginine residues both in vitro and in cells. We found that both protein-arginine methyltransferases 1 and 5 methylate Arg-296 within Ash2L. These findings are the first to demonstrate that post-translational modifications occur on the Ash2L protein and provide a novel example of cross-talk between chromatin-modifying enzyme complexes. PMID:21285357

  14. Differential role of arginine mutations on the structure and functions of α-crystallin☆

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Alok Kumar; Nandi, Sandip Kumar; Chakraborty, Ayon; Nagaraj, Ram H.; Biswas, Ashis

    2016-01-01

    Background α-Crystallin is a major protein of the eye lens in vertebrates. It is composed of two subunits, αA- and αB-crystallin. α-Crystallin is an oligomeric protein having these two subunits in 3:1 ratio. It belongs to small heat shock protein family and exhibits molecular chaperone function, which plays an important role in maintaining the lens transparency. Apart from chaperone function, both subunits also exhibit anti-apoptotic property. Comparison of their primary sequences reveals that αA- and αB-crystallin posses 13 and 14 arginine residues, respectively. Several of them undergo mutations which eventually lead to various eye diseases such as congenital cataract, juvenile cataract, and retinal degeneration. Interestingly, many arginine residues of these subunits are modified during glycation and even some are truncated during aging. All these facts indicate the importance of arginine residues in α-crystallin. Scope of review In this review, we will emphasize the recent in vitro and in vivo findings related to congenital cataract causing arginine mutations in α-crystallin. Major conclusions Congenital cataract causing arginine mutations alters the structure and decreases the chaperone function of α-crystallin. These mutations also affect the lens morphology and phenotypes. Interestingly, non-natural arginine mutations (generated for mimicking the glycation and truncation environment) improve the chaperone function of α-crystallin which may play an important role in maintaining the eye lens transparency during aging. General significance The neutralization of positive charge on the guanidino group of arginine residues is not always detrimental to the functionality of α-crystallin. PMID:26080000

  15. HPLC analysis of ADMA and other methylated L-arginine analogs in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Teerlink, Tom

    2007-05-15

    Post-translational methylation of arginine residues in proteins leads to generation of N(G)-monomethylarginine (MMA) and both symmetric and asymmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA and ADMA), that are released into the cytosol upon proteolysis. Both MMA and ADMA are inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase and especially elevated levels of ADMA are associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Plasma concentrations of ADMA and SDMA are very low, typically between 0.3 and 0.8 microM, making their quantification by HPLC an analytical challenge. Sample preparation usually involves a cleanup step by solid-phase extraction on cation-exchange columns followed by derivatization of amino acids into fluorescent adducts. Because ADMA and SDMA concentrations in healthy subjects show a very narrow distribution, with a between-subject variability of 13% for ADMA and 19% for SDMA, very low imprecision is an essential assay feature. Procedures for sample cleanup, derivatization, and chromatographic separation of arginine and its methylated analogs are the main topics of this review. In addition, important aspects of method validation, pre-analytical factors, and reference values are discussed. PMID:16931194

  16. Arginine methylation in yeast proteins during stationary-phase growth and heat shock.

    PubMed

    Lakowski, Ted M; Pak, Magnolia L; Szeitz, András; Thomas, Dylan; Vhuiyan, Mynol I; Clement, Bernd; Frankel, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Arginine methyltransferases (RMTs) catalyze the methylation of arginine residues on proteins. We examined the effects of log-phase growth, stationary-phase growth, and heat shock on the formation of methylarginines on yeast proteins to determine if the conditions favor a particular type of methylation. Utilizing linear ion trap mass spectrometry, we identify methylarginines in wild-type and RMT deletion yeast strains using secondary product ion scans (MS(3)), and quantify the methylarginines using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Employing MS(3) and isotopic incorporation, we demonstrate for the first time that Nη1, Nη2-dimethylarginine (sDMA) is present on yeast proteins, and make a detailed structural determination of the fragment ions from the spectra. Nη-monomethylarginine (ηMMA), Nδ-monomethylarginine (δMMA), Nη1, Nη1-dimethylarginine (aDMA), and sDMA were detected in RMT deletion yeast using MS(3) and MRM with and without isotopic incorporation, suggesting that additional RMT enzymes remain to be discovered in yeast. The concentrations of ηMMA and δMMA decreased by half during heat shock and stationary phase compared to log-phase growth of wild-type yeast, whereas sDMA increased by as much as sevenfold and aDMA decreased by 11-fold. Therefore, upon entering stressful conditions like heat shock or stationary-phase growth, there is a net increase in sDMA and decreases in aDMA, ηMMA, and δMMA on yeast proteins.

  17. TRPA1 is activated by direct addition of cysteine residues to the N-hydroxysuccinyl esters of acrylic and cinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    Sadofsky, Laura R; Boa, Andrew N; Maher, Sarah A; Birrell, Mark A; Belvisi, Maria G; Morice, Alyn H

    2011-01-01

    The nociceptor TRPA1 is thought to be activated through covalent modification of specific cysteine residues on the N terminal of the channel. The precise mechanism of covalent modification with unsaturated carbonyl-containing compounds is unclear, therefore by examining a range of compounds which can undergo both conjugate and/or direct addition reactions we sought to further elucidate the mechanism(s) whereby TRPA1 can be activated by covalent modification. Calcium signalling was used to determine the mechanism of activation of TRPA1 expressed in HEK293 cells with a series of related compounds which were capable of either direct and/or conjugate addition processes. These results were confirmed using physiological recordings with isolated vagus nerve preparations. We found negligible channel activation with chemicals which could only react with cysteine residues via conjugate addition such as acrylamide, acrylic acid, and cinnamic acid. Compounds able to react via either conjugate or direct addition, such as acrolein, methyl vinyl ketone, mesityl oxide, acrylic acid NHS ester, cinnamaldehyde and cinnamic acid NHS ester, activated TRPA1 in a concentration dependent manner as did compounds only capable of direct addition, namely propionic acid NHS ester and hydrocinnamic acid NHS ester. These compounds failed to activate TRPV1 expressed in HEK293 cells or mock transfected HEK293 cells. For molecules capable of direct or conjugate additions, the results suggest for the first time that TRPA1 may be activated preferentially by direct addition of the thiol group of TRPA1 cysteines to the agonist carbonyl carbon of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl-containing compounds.

  18. Critical Role for Arginine Methylation in Adenovirus-Infected Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Iacovides, Demetris C.; O'Shea, Clodagh C.; Oses-Prieto, Juan; Burlingame, Alma; McCormick, Frank

    2007-01-01

    During the late stages of adenovirus infection, the 100K protein (100K) inhibits the translation of cellular messages in the cytoplasm and regulates hexon trimerization and assembly in the nucleus. However, it is not known how it switches between these two functions. Here we show that 100K is methylated on arginine residues at its C terminus during infection and that this region is necessary for binding PRMT1 methylase. Methylated 100K is exclusively nuclear. Mutation of the third RGG motif (amino acids 741 to 743) prevents localization to the nucleus during infection, suggesting that methylation of that sequence is important for 100K shuttling. Treatment of infected cells with methylation inhibitors inhibits expression of late structural proteins. These data suggest that arginine methylation of 100K is necessary for its localization to the nucleus and is a critical cellular function necessary for productive adenovirus infection. PMID:17686851

  19. Arginine kinase from Myzostoma cirriferum, a basal member of annelids.

    PubMed

    Yano, Daichi; Mimura, Sayo; Uda, Kouji; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2016-08-01

    We assembled a phosphagen kinase gene from the Expressed Sequence Tags database of Myzostoma cirriferum, a basal member of annelids. The assembled gene sequence was synthesized using an overlap extension polymerase chain reaction method and was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme (355 residues) exhibited monomeric behavior on a gel filtration column and showed strong activity only for l-arginine. Thus, the enzyme was identified as arginine kinase (AK). The two-substrate kinetic parameters were obtained and compared with other AKs. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of phosphagen kinases indicated that the Myzostoma AK gene lineage differed from that of the polychaete Sabellastarte spectabilis AK, which is a dimer of creatine kinase (CK) origin. It is likely that the Myzostoma AK gene lineage was lost at an early stage of annelid evolution and that Sabellastarte AK evolved secondarily from the CK gene. This work contributes to our understanding of the evolution of phosphagen kinases of annelids with marked diversity.

  20. The role of phosphagen specificity loops in arginine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Arezki; Clark, Shawn A.; Ellington, W. Ross; Chapman, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    Phosphagen kinases catalyze the reversible transfer of a phosphate between ATP and guanidino substrates, a reaction that is central to cellular energy homeostasis. Members of this conserved family include creatine and arginine kinases and have similar reaction mechanisms, but they have distinct specificities for different guanidino substrates. There has not been a full structural rationalization of specificity, but two loops have been implicated repeatedly. A small domain loop is of length that complements the size of the guanidino substrate, and is located where it could mediate a lock-and-key mechanism. The second loop contacts the substrate with a valine in the methyl-substituted guanidinium of creatine, and with a glutamate in the unsubstituted arginine substrate, leading to the proposal of a discriminating hydrophobic/hydrophilic minipocket. In the present work, chimeric mutants were constructed with creatine kinase loop elements inserted into arginine kinase. Contrary to the prior rationalizations of specificity, most had measurable arginine kinase activity but no creatine kinase activity or enhanced phosphocreatine binding. Guided by structure, additional mutations were introduced in each loop, recovering arginine kinase activities as high as 15% and 64% of wild type, respectively, even though little activity would be expected in the constructs if the implicated sites had dominant roles in specificity. An atomic structure of the mismatched complex of arginine kinase with creatine and ADP indicates that specificity can also be mediated by an active site that allows substrate prealignment that is optimal for reactivity only with cognate substrates and not with close homologs that bind but do not react. PMID:14978299

  1. ARGININE DEIMINASE PLAYS MULTIPLE REGULATORY ROLES IN THE BIOLOGY OF GIARDIA LAMBLIA

    PubMed Central

    Touz, Maria Carolina; Ropolo, Andrea Silvana; Rivero, Maria Romina; Vranych, Cecilia Veronica; Conrad, John Thomas; Svard, Staffan Gunnar; Nash, Theodore Elliot

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia utilizes arginine deiminase (gADI) to produce energy from free L-arginine under anaerobic conditions. In this work, we demonstrate that in addition to its known role as a metabolic enzyme, it also functions as a pepidtyl-arginine deiminase converting protein-bound arginine into citrulline. gADI specifically binds to and citrullinates the arginine in the conserved CRGKA tail of variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) affecting both antigenic switching and antibody mediated cell death. During encystation gADI translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and appear to play a regulatory role in the expression of encystation specific genes. gADI is also sumoylated, which may modulate its activity. Our findings reveal a dual role played by gADI and define novel regulatory pathways used by Giardia for survival. PMID:18697833

  2. The influence of a novel pentadecapeptide, BPC 157, on N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester and L-arginine effects on stomach mucosa integrity and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Sikirić, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarević, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagić, V; Turković, B; Rotkvić, I; Mise, S; Zoricić, I; Konjevoda, P; Perović, D; Jurina, L; Separović, J; Hanzevacki, M; Artuković, B; Bratulić, M; Tisljar, M; Gjurasin, M; Miklić, P; Stancić-Rokotov, D; Slobodnjak, Z; Jelovac, N; Marović, A

    1997-07-30

    The known effects of a novel stomach pentadecapeptide BPC157 (10 microg or 10 ng/kg), namely its salutary activity against ethanol (96%, i.g.)-induced gastric lesions (simultaneously applied i.p.) and in blood pressure maintenance (given i.v.), were investigated in rats challenged with a combination of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME) (5 mg/kg i.v.), a competitive inhibitor of endothelium nitric oxide (NO)-generation and NO precursor, L-arginine (200 mg/kg i.v.) (D-arginine was ineffective). In the gastric lesions assay, NO agents were given 5 min before ethanol injury and BPC 157 medication. Given alone, BPC157 had an antiulcer effect, as did L-arginine, but L-NAME had no effect. L-NAME completely abolished the effect of L-arginine, whereas it only attenuated the effect of BPC 157. After application of the combination of L-NAME + L-arginine, the BPC157 effect was additionally impaired. In blood pressure studies, compared with L-arginine, pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (without effect on basal normal values) had both a mimicking effect (impaired L-NAME-blood pressure increase, when applied prophylactically and decreased already raised L-NAME values, given at the time of the maximal L-NAME-blood pressure increase (i.e., 10 min after L-NAME)) and preventive activity (L-arginine-induced moderate blood pressure decrease was prevented by BPC 157 pretreatment). When BPC 157 was given 10 min after L-NAME + L-arginine combination, which still led to a blood pressure increase, its previously clear effect (noted in L-NAME treated rats) disappeared. In vitro, in gastric mucosa from rat stomach tissue homogenates, BPC 157, given in the same dose (100 microM) as L-arginine, induced a comparable generation of NO. But, BPC 157 effect could not be inhibited by L-NAME, even when L-NAME was given in a tenfold (100 versus 1000 microM) higher dose than that needed for inhibition of the L-arginine effect. NO synthesis was blunted when the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 and L-arginine

  3. Immediate postoperative radiotherapy in residual nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma: Beneficial effect on local control without additional negative impact on pituitary function and life expectancy

    SciTech Connect

    Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den . E-mail: a.c.m.van.den.bergh@rt.umcg.nl; Berg, Gerrit van den; Schoorl, Michiel A.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Vliet, Anton M. van der; Hoving, Eelco W.; Szabo, Ben G.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Dullaart, Robin P.F.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the benefit of immediate postoperative radiotherapy in residual nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFA) in perspective to the need for hormonal substitution and life expectancy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective cohort analysis of 122 patients, operated for NFA between 1979 and 1998. Recurrence was defined as regrowth on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The occurrence of hormonal deficiencies was defined as the starting date of hormonal substitution therapy. Results: Seventy-six patients had residual NFA after surgery and received immediate postoperative radiotherapy (Group 1); three patients developed a recurrence, resulting in a 95% local control rate at 10 years. Twenty-eight patients had residual NFA after surgery, but were followed by a wait-and-see policy (Group 2). Sixteen developed a recurrence, resulting in a local control rate of 49% at 5 years and 22% at 10 years (p < 0.001 compared with Group 1). There were no differences between Group 1 and 2 regarding the need for substitution with thyroid hormone, glucocorticoids, and sex hormones before first surgery, directly after surgery and at end of follow-up. There were no differences in hormone substitution free survival between Group 1 and Group 2 during the study period after first surgery. Life expectancy was similar in Group 1 and 2, and their median life expectancy did not differ from median life expectancy in the general population. Conclusions: Immediate postoperative radiotherapy provides a marked improvement of local control among patients with residual NFA compared with surgery alone, without an additional deleterious effect on pituitary function and life expectancy.

  4. Enzymic degradation of plasma arginine using arginine deiminase inhibits nitric oxide production and protects mice from the lethal effects of tumour necrosis factor alpha and endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J Brandon; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Ensor, C Mark; Bomalaski, John S; Clark, Mike A

    2002-01-01

    Septic shock is mediated in part by nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha). NO is synthesized primarily from extracellular arginine. We tested the ability of an arginine-degrading enzyme to inhibit NO production in mice and to protect mice from the hypotension and lethality that occur after the administration of TNFalpha or endotoxin. Treatment of BALB/c mice with arginine deiminase (ADI) formulated with succinimidyl succinimide polyethylene glycol of M(r) 20000 (ADI-SS PEG(20000)) eliminated all measurable plasma arginine (from normal levels of approximately 155 microM arginine to 2 microM). In addition, ADI-SS PEG(20000) also inhibited the production of NO, as quantified by plasma nitrate+nitrite. Treatment of mice with TNFalpha or endotoxin resulted in a dose-dependent increase in NO production and lethality. Pretreatment of mice with ADI-SS PEG(20000) resulted in increased resistance to the lethal effects of TNFalpha and endotoxin. These observations are consistent with NO production resulting, to some extent, from the metabolism of extracellular arginine. The toxic effects of TNFalpha and endotoxin may be partially inhibited by enzymic degradation of plasma arginine by ADI-SS PEG(20000). Interestingly, pretreatment with ADI-SS PEG(20000) did not inhibit the anti-tumour activity of TNFalpha in vitro or in vivo. This treatment may allow greater amounts of TNFalpha, as well as other cytokines, to be administered while abrogating side effects such as hypotension and death. PMID:11964159

  5. Arginine of retinoic acid receptor beta which coordinates with the carboxyl group of retinoic acid functions independent of the amino acid residues responsible for retinoic acid receptor subtype ligand specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zeng Ping; Hutcheson, Juliet M; Poynton, Helen C; Gabriel, Jerome L; Soprano, Kenneth J; Soprano, Dianne Robert

    2003-01-15

    The biological actions of retinoic acid (RA) are mediated by retinoic acid receptors (RARalpha, RARbeta, and RARgamma) and retinoid X receptors (RXRalpha, RXRbeta, and RXRgamma). Consistent with the X-ray crystal structures of RARalpha and RARgamma, site-directed mutagenesis studies have demonstrated the importance of a conserved Arg residue (alphaArg(276), betaArg(269), and gammaArg(278)) for coordination with the carboxyl group of RA. However, mutation of Arg(269) to Ala in RARbeta causes only a 3- to 6-fold increase in the K(d) for RA and EC(50) in RA-dependent transcriptional transactivation assays while the homologous mutation in either RARalpha or RARgamma causes a 110-fold and a 45-fold increase in EC(50) value, respectively. To further investigate the nature of this difference, we prepared mutant RARs to determine the effect of conversion of betaR269A to a mutant which mimics either RARalpha ligand selectivity (betaA225S/R269A) or RARgamma ligand selectivity (betaI263M/R269A/V338A). Our results demonstrate that in RARbeta mutants that acquire either RARalpha or RARgamma ligand specificity the Arg(269) position responsible for coordination with the carboxyl group of retinoids continued to function like that of RARbeta. Furthermore, three mutant receptors (betaA225S/R269A, betaA225S/F279, and alphaF286A) were found to have a greater than wild-type affinity for the RARalpha-selective ligand Am580. Finally, a homology-based computer model of the ligand binding domain (LBD) of RARbeta and the X-ray crystal structures of the LBD of both RARalpha and RARgamma are used to describe potential mechanisms responsible for the increased affinity of some mutants for Am580 and for the difference in the effect of mutation of Arg(269) in RARbeta compared to its homologous Arg in RARalpha and RARgamma.

  6. Systematic analysis of the in situ crosstalk of tyrosine modifications reveals no additional natural selection on multiply modified residues

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhicheng; Liu, Zexian; Cheng, Han; Wang, Yongbo; Gao, Tianshun; Ullah, Shahid; Ren, Jian; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that different post-translational modifications (PTMs) synergistically orchestrate specific biological processes by crosstalks. However, the preference of the crosstalk among different PTMs and the evolutionary constraint on the PTM crosstalk need further dissections. In this study, the in situ crosstalk at the same positions among three tyrosine PTMs including sulfation, nitration and phosphorylation were systematically analyzed. The experimentally identified sulfation, nitration and phosphorylation sites were collected and integrated with reliable predictions to perform large-scale analyses of in situ crosstalks. From the results, we observed that the in situ crosstalk between sulfation and nitration is significantly under-represented, whereas both sulfation and nitration prefer to co-occupy with phosphorylation at same tyrosines. Further analyses suggested that sulfation and nitration preferentially co-occur with phosphorylation at specific positions in proteins, and participate in distinct biological processes and functions. More interestingly, the long-term evolutionary analysis indicated that multi-PTM targeting tyrosines didn't show any higher conservation than singly modified ones. Also, the analysis of human genetic variations demonstrated that there is no additional functional constraint on inherited disease, cancer or rare mutations of multiply modified tyrosines. Taken together, our systematic analyses provided a better understanding of the in situ crosstalk among PTMs. PMID:25476580

  7. Physiological implications of arginine metabolism in plants

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Gudrun; Todd, Christopher D.; Trovato, Maurizio; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen is a limiting resource for plant growth in most terrestrial habitats since large amounts of nitrogen are needed to synthesize nucleic acids and proteins. Among the 21 proteinogenic amino acids, arginine has the highest nitrogen to carbon ratio, which makes it especially suitable as a storage form of organic nitrogen. Synthesis in chloroplasts via ornithine is apparently the only operational pathway to provide arginine in plants, and the rate of arginine synthesis is tightly regulated by various feedback mechanisms in accordance with the overall nutritional status. While several steps of arginine biosynthesis still remain poorly characterized in plants, much wider attention has been paid to inter- and intracellular arginine transport as well as arginine-derived metabolites. A role of arginine as alternative source besides glutamate for proline biosynthesis is still discussed controversially and may be prevented by differential subcellular localization of enzymes. Apparently, arginine is a precursor for nitric oxide (NO), although the molecular mechanism of NO production from arginine remains unclear in higher plants. In contrast, conversion of arginine to polyamines is well documented, and in several plant species also ornithine can serve as a precursor for polyamines. Both NO and polyamines play crucial roles in regulating developmental processes as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stress. It is thus conceivable that arginine catabolism serves on the one hand to mobilize nitrogen storages, while on the other hand it may be used to fine-tune development and defense mechanisms against stress. This review summarizes the recent advances in our knowledge about arginine metabolism, with a special focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and pinpoints still unresolved critical questions. PMID:26284079

  8. Evaluation of western shale-oil residue as an additive to petroleum asphalt for use as a pavement crack and joint sealant material

    SciTech Connect

    Harnsberger, P.M.; Wolf, J.M.; Robertson, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a preliminary evaluation of using a distillation residue from Green River Formation (western) shale oil as an additive to a petroleum asphalt for use as a crack and joint filler material in portland cement concrete and asphaltic pavements. A commercially available rubberized asphalt crack and joint filler material was also tested for comparison. ASTM specification tests for sealant materials used in concrete and asphalt pavements were performed on the sealant materials. Portland cement concrete briquets prepared with an asphalt material sandwiched between two concrete wafers were tested in a stress-relaxation experiment to evaluate the relaxation and recovery properties of the sealant materials. The results show that the shale-oil modified petroleum asphalts and the neat petroleum asphalt do not pass the extension portion of the ASTM test; however, there is indication of improvement in the adhesive properties of the shale-oil modified asphalts. There is also evidence that the addition of shale-oil residue to the petroleum asphalt, especially at the 20% level, improves the relaxation and recovery properties compared with the petroleum asphalt.

  9. Increase in the carbohydrate content of the microalgae Spirulina in culture by nutrient starvation and the addition of residues of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Vieira Salla, Ana Cláudia; Margarites, Ana Cláudia; Seibel, Fábio Ivan; Holz, Luiz Carlos; Brião, Vandré Barbosa; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Colla, Luciane Maria; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2016-06-01

    Non-renewable sources that will end with time are the largest part of world energy consumption, which emphasizes the necessity to develop renewable sources of energy. This necessity has created opportunities for the use of microalgae as a biofuel. The use of microalgae as a feedstock source for bioethanol production requires high yields of both biomass and carbohydrates. With mixotrophic cultures, wastewater can be used to culture algae. The aim of the study was to increase the carbohydrate content in the microalgae Spirulina with the additions of residues from the ultra and nanofiltration of whey protein. The nutrient deficit in the Zarrouk medium diluted to 20% and the addition of 2.5% of both residue types led to high carbohydrate productivity (60 mg L(-1) d(-1)). With these culture conditions, the increase in carbohydrate production in Spirulina indicated that the conditions were appropriate for use with microalgae as a feedstock in the production of bioethanol. PMID:26967336

  10. Generation and propagation of recombinant mumps viruses exhibiting an additional U residue in the homopolymeric U tract of the F gene-end signal.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Christian J; Ngo, Laurie; Simonyan, Vahan; Cong, Yu; Zhang, Cheryl; Link, Malen; Malik, Tahir; Rubin, Steven A

    2015-08-01

    As a member of the family paramyxoviridae, subfamily paramyxovirinae, the genome of mumps virus (MuV) is postulated to be polyhexameric in length in order to be able to replicate efficiently. While all natural MuV strains sequenced so far obey to this "rule of six," we describe here the isolation of recombinant MuVs that appeared to contain an additional U residue in the homopolymeric tract of the F gene-end signal, resulting in a genome length of 6n + 1. Sequencing of several plaque-purified viruses from these preparations did not reveal the existence of length-correcting mutations, suggesting that they are violators of the rule of six. Employing high-throughput sequencing technology, we provide evidence that the insertion of an additional U residue is mainly the result of the rescue system used that relies on T7 RNA polymerase. Limited in vitro and in vivo testing of the viruses did not reveal any significant impact of the longer genome on virus replication or virulence, suggesting that the rule of six is not a strict requirement for MuV replication.

  11. Dietary arginine affects energy metabolism through polyamine turnover in juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Synne M; Holen, Elisabeth; Aksnes, Anders; Rønnestad, Ivar; Zerrahn, Jens-Erik; Espe, Marit

    2013-12-14

    In the present study, quadruplicate groups of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were fed plant protein-based diets with increasing arginine inclusions (range 28·8-37·4 g/kg DM) to investigate whether arginine supplementation affects growth and lipid accumulation through an elevated polyamine turnover. Dietary lysine was held at a constant concentration, just below the requirement. All other amino acids were balanced and equal in the diets. Arginine supplementation increased protein and fat accretion, without affecting the hepatosomatic or visceralsomatic indices. Dietary arginine correlated with putrescine in the liver (R 0·78, P= 0·01) and with ornithine in the muscle, liver and plasma (P= 0·0002, 0·003 and 0·0002, respectively). The mRNA of ornithine decarboxylase, the enzyme producing putrescine, was up-regulated in the white adipose tissue of fish fed the high-arginine inclusion compared with those fed the low-arginine diet. Concomitantly, spermidine/spermine-(N1)-acetyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine turnover that consumes acetyl-CoA, showed an increased activity in the liver of fish fed the arginine-supplemented diets. In addition, lower acetyl-CoA concentrations were observed in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet, while ATP, which is used in the process of synthesising spermidine and spermine, did not show a similar trend. Gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, was up-regulated in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet. Taken together, the data support that increased dietary arginine activates polyamine turnover and β-oxidation in the liver of juvenile Atlantic salmon and may act to improve the metabolic status of the fish. PMID:23656796

  12. Dietary arginine affects energy metabolism through polyamine turnover in juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Synne M; Holen, Elisabeth; Aksnes, Anders; Rønnestad, Ivar; Zerrahn, Jens-Erik; Espe, Marit

    2013-12-14

    In the present study, quadruplicate groups of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were fed plant protein-based diets with increasing arginine inclusions (range 28·8-37·4 g/kg DM) to investigate whether arginine supplementation affects growth and lipid accumulation through an elevated polyamine turnover. Dietary lysine was held at a constant concentration, just below the requirement. All other amino acids were balanced and equal in the diets. Arginine supplementation increased protein and fat accretion, without affecting the hepatosomatic or visceralsomatic indices. Dietary arginine correlated with putrescine in the liver (R 0·78, P= 0·01) and with ornithine in the muscle, liver and plasma (P= 0·0002, 0·003 and 0·0002, respectively). The mRNA of ornithine decarboxylase, the enzyme producing putrescine, was up-regulated in the white adipose tissue of fish fed the high-arginine inclusion compared with those fed the low-arginine diet. Concomitantly, spermidine/spermine-(N1)-acetyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine turnover that consumes acetyl-CoA, showed an increased activity in the liver of fish fed the arginine-supplemented diets. In addition, lower acetyl-CoA concentrations were observed in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet, while ATP, which is used in the process of synthesising spermidine and spermine, did not show a similar trend. Gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, was up-regulated in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet. Taken together, the data support that increased dietary arginine activates polyamine turnover and β-oxidation in the liver of juvenile Atlantic salmon and may act to improve the metabolic status of the fish.

  13. Tissue injury caused by deposition of immune complexes is L-arginine dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, M S; Hevel, J M; Marletta, M A; Ward, P A

    1991-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO.), a free radical that is generated from L-arginine by stimulated endothelial cells, neutrophils, activated macrophages, and other cell types, reacts with superoxide anion (O2.-) to form peroxynitrite, which itself may be tissue toxic or can then react further to form the highly reactive and toxic hydroxyl radical (HO.). Because vascular injury produced by tissue deposition of immune complexes is linked to formation of toxic products derived from activated neutrophils, we have assessed whether immune complex-induced injury of rat lung and dermal vasculature is arginine dependent. The arginine analogue, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (N-MeArg), which blocks NO. formation, protects against immune complex-induced vascular injury in rats. The protective effects of N-MeArg are reversed by the presence of L-arginine but not D-arginine. Additionally, in the absence of N-MeArg, injury is enhanced by the presence of L-arginine but not by D-arginine. Protection by N-MeArg is not associated with diminished recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from animals undergoing immune complex deposition in lung contain the decomposition products of NO.--namely, nitrite and nitrate. In the presence of N-MeArg these products are greatly diminished. These data suggest that immune complex-induced injury of rat lung and skin is L-arginine dependent. These data also suggest that in vivo metabolic products of L-arginine, such as NO(.), are directly or indirectly linked to immune complex-induced tissue injury. Images PMID:1648737

  14. Resolution and quantification of arginine, monomethylarginine, asymmetric dimethylarginine, and symmetric dimethylarginine in plasma using HPLC with internal calibration

    PubMed Central

    Alkaitis, Matthew S.; Nardone, Glenn; Chertow, Jessica H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract NG,NG‐dimethyl‐l‐arginine (asymmetric dimethylarginine, ADMA),NG‐monomethyl‐l‐arginine (l‐NMMA) and NG,N G’‐dimethyl‐l‐arginine (symmetric dimethylarginine, SDMA) are released during hydrolysis of proteins containing methylated arginine residues. ADMA and l‐NMMA inhibit nitric oxide synthase by competing with l‐arginine substrate. All three methylarginine derivatives also inhibit arginine transport. To enable investigation of methylarginines in diseases involving impaired nitric oxide synthesis, we developed a high‐performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay to simultaneously quantify arginine, ADMA, l‐NMMA and SDMA. Our assay requires 12 μL of plasma and is ideal for applications where sample availability is limited. We extracted arginine and methylarginines with mixed‐mode cation‐exchange columns, using synthetic monoethyl‐l‐arginine as an internal standard. Metabolites were derivatized with ortho‐phthaldialdeyhde and 3‐mercaptopropionic acid, separated by reverse‐phase HPLC and quantified with fluorescence detection. Standard curve linearity was ≥0.9995 for all metabolites. Inter‐day coefficient of variation (CV) values were ≤5% for arginine, ADMA and SDMA in human plasma and for arginine and ADMA in mouse plasma. The CV value for l‐NMMA was higher in human (10.4%) and mouse (15.8%) plasma because concentrations were substantially lower than ADMA and SDMA. This assay provides unique advantages of small sample volume requirements, excellent separation of target metabolites from contaminants and validation for both human and mouse plasma samples. © 2015 The Authors Biomedical Chromatography published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26130049

  15. Structural basis of arginine asymmetrical dimethylation by PRMT6.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Zheng, Weihong; Eram, Mohammad S; Vhuiyan, Mynol; Dong, Aiping; Zeng, Hong; He, Hao; Brown, Peter; Frankel, Adam; Vedadi, Masoud; Luo, Minkui; Min, Jinrong

    2016-10-01

    PRMT6 is a type I protein arginine methyltransferase, generating the asymmetric dimethylarginine mark on proteins such as histone H3R2. Asymmetric dimethylation of histone H3R2 by PRMT6 acts as a repressive mark that antagonizes trimethylation of H3 lysine 4 by the MLL histone H3K4 methyltransferase. PRMT6 is overexpressed in several cancer types, including prostate, bladder and lung cancers; therefore, it is of great interest to develop potent and selective inhibitors for PRMT6. Here, we report the synthesis of a potent bisubstrate inhibitor GMS [6'-methyleneamine sinefungin, an analog of sinefungin (SNF)], and the crystal structures of human PRMT6 in complex, respectively, with S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) and the bisubstrate inhibitor GMS that shed light on the significantly improved inhibition effect of GMS on methylation activity of PRMT6 compared with SAH and an S-adenosyl-L-methionine competitive methyltransferase inhibitor SNF. In addition, we also crystallized PRMT6 in complex with SAH and a short arginine-containing peptide. Based on the structural information here and available in the PDB database, we proposed a mechanism that can rationalize the distinctive arginine methylation product specificity of different types of arginine methyltransferases and pinpoint the structural determinant of such a specificity. PMID:27480107

  16. Arginine starvation-associated atypical cellular death involves mitochondrial dysfunction, nuclear DNA leakage, and chromatin autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Changou, Chun A.; Chen, Yun-Ru; Xing, Li; Yen, Yun; Chuang, Frank Y. S.; Cheng, R. Holland; Bold, Richard J.; Ann, David K.; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is the principal catabolic prosurvival pathway during nutritional starvation. However, excessive autophagy could be cytotoxic, contributing to cell death, but its mechanism remains elusive. Arginine starvation has emerged as a potential therapy for several types of cancers, owing to their tumor-selective deficiency of the arginine metabolism. We demonstrated here that arginine depletion by arginine deiminase induces a cytotoxic autophagy in argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1)-deficient prostate cancer cells. Advanced microscopic analyses of arginine-deprived dying cells revealed a novel phenotype with giant autophagosome formation, nucleus membrane rupture, and histone-associated DNA leakage encaptured by autophagosomes, which we shall refer to as chromatin autophagy, or chromatophagy. In addition, nuclear inner membrane (lamin A/C) underwent localized rearrangement and outer membrane (NUP98) partially fused with autophagosome membrane. Further analysis showed that prolonged arginine depletion impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation function and depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential. Thus, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production significantly increased in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, presumably leading to DNA damage accumulation. Addition of ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine or knockdown of ATG5 or BECLIN1 attenuated the chromatophagy phenotype. Our data uncover an atypical autophagy-related death pathway and suggest that mitochondrial damage is central to linking arginine starvation and chromatophagy in two distinct cellular compartments. PMID:25122679

  17. Arginine starvation-associated atypical cellular death involves mitochondrial dysfunction, nuclear DNA leakage, and chromatin autophagy.

    PubMed

    Changou, Chun A; Chen, Yun-Ru; Xing, Li; Yen, Yun; Chuang, Frank Y S; Cheng, R Holland; Bold, Richard J; Ann, David K; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2014-09-30

    Autophagy is the principal catabolic prosurvival pathway during nutritional starvation. However, excessive autophagy could be cytotoxic, contributing to cell death, but its mechanism remains elusive. Arginine starvation has emerged as a potential therapy for several types of cancers, owing to their tumor-selective deficiency of the arginine metabolism. We demonstrated here that arginine depletion by arginine deiminase induces a cytotoxic autophagy in argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1)-deficient prostate cancer cells. Advanced microscopic analyses of arginine-deprived dying cells revealed a novel phenotype with giant autophagosome formation, nucleus membrane rupture, and histone-associated DNA leakage encaptured by autophagosomes, which we shall refer to as chromatin autophagy, or chromatophagy. In addition, nuclear inner membrane (lamin A/C) underwent localized rearrangement and outer membrane (NUP98) partially fused with autophagosome membrane. Further analysis showed that prolonged arginine depletion impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation function and depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential. Thus, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production significantly increased in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, presumably leading to DNA damage accumulation. Addition of ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine or knockdown of ATG5 or BECLIN1 attenuated the chromatophagy phenotype. Our data uncover an atypical autophagy-related death pathway and suggest that mitochondrial damage is central to linking arginine starvation and chromatophagy in two distinct cellular compartments.

  18. Role of arginine-43 and arginine-69 of the Hin recombinase catalytic domain in the binding of Hin to the hix DNA recombination sites.

    PubMed

    Adams, C W; Nanassy, O; Johnson, R C; Hughes, K T

    1997-06-01

    The Hin recombinase mediates the site-specific inversion of a segment of the Salmonella chromosome between two flanking 26bp hix DNA recombination sites. Mutations in two amino acid residues, R43 and R69 of the catalytic domain of the Hin recombinase, were identified that can compensate for loss of binding resulting from elimination of certain major and minor groove contacts within the hix recombination sites. With one exception, the R43 and R69 mutants were also able to bind a hix sequence with an additional 4bp added to the centre of the site, unlike wild-type Hin. Purified Hin mutants R43H and R69C had both partial cleavage and inversion activities in vitro while mutants R43L, R43C, R69S, and R69P had no detectable cleavage and inversion activities. These data support a model in which the catalytic domain plays a role in DNA-binding specificity, and suggest that the arginine residues at positions 43 and 69 function to position the Hin recombinase on the DNA for a step in the recombination reaction which occurs either at and/or prior to DNA cleavage.

  19. Rate-limiting domain and loop motions in arginine kinase.

    PubMed

    Davulcu, Omar; Skalicky, Jack J; Chapman, Michael S

    2011-05-17

    Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphoryl group between ATP and arginine. It is the arthropod homologue of creatine kinase, buffering cellular ATP levels. Crystal structures of arginine kinase, in substrate-free and substrate-bound forms, have revealed large conformational changes associated with the catalytic cycle. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance identified movements of the N-terminal domain and a loop comprising residues I182--G209 with conformational exchange rates in the substrate-free enzyme similar to the turnover rate. Here, to understand whether these motions might be rate-limiting, we determined activation barriers for both the intrinsic dynamics and enzyme turnover using measurements over a temperature range of 15-30 °C. (15)N transverse relaxation dispersion yields activation barriers of 46 ± 8 and 34 ± 12 kJ/mol for the N-terminal domain and I182--G209 loop, respectively. An activation barrier of 34 ± 13 kJ/mol was obtained for enzyme turnover from steady-state kinetics. The similarity between the activation barriers is indeed consistent with turnover being limited by backbone conformational dynamics and pinpoints the locations of potentially rate-limiting motions.

  20. Influence of commercial and residual sorbents and silicates as additives on the stabilisation/solidification of organic and inorganic industrial waste.

    PubMed

    Coz, A; Andrés, A; Soriano, S; Viguri, J R; Ruiz, M C; Irabien, J A

    2009-05-30

    An environmental problem of the foundry activities is the management of industrial waste generated in different processes. The foundry sludge from gas wet cleaning treatment that contains organic and inorganic compounds and a high content of water is an interesting example. Due to their characteristics, they can be managed using different stabilisation/solidification (S/S) technologies prior to land disposal. The purpose of this work is to study S/S formulations in order to improve the control of the mobility of the pollutants and the ecotoxicity of the samples. Different mixtures of cement or lime as binders and additives (foundry sand, silica fume, sodium silicate, silicic acid, activated carbon and black carbon) have been used in order to reduce the mobility of the chemical and ecotoxicological regulated parameters and to compare the results for commercial and residual additives. The best results have been obtained with sorbents (activated carbon and black carbon) or sodium silicate. The results of the foundry sand ash as additive can conclude that it can be used as replacement in the cement products. However, silica fume in the samples with lime and siliceous resin sand as additives gives products that do not fulfil the regulated limits. Finally, some linear expressions between the chemical parameters and the quantity of material used in the samples have been obtained. PMID:18835094

  1. CROP/Luc7A, a novel serine/arginine-rich nuclear protein, isolated from cisplatin-resistant cell line.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Y; Morishima, M; Kakehi, Y; Umehara, K; Kioka, N; Terano, Y; Amachi, T; Ueda, K

    2000-01-14

    A novel putative SR protein, designated cisplatin resistance-associated overexpressed protein (CROP), has been cloned from cisplatin-resistant cell lines by differential display. The N-half of the deduced amino acid sequence of 432 amino acids of CROP contains cysteine/histidine motifs and leucine zipper-like repeats. The C-half consists mostly of charged and polar amino acids: arginine (58 residues or 25%), glutamate (36 residues or 16%), serine (35 residues or 15%), lysine (30 residues, 13%), and aspartate (20 residues or 9%). The C-half is extremely hydrophilic and comprises domains rich in lysine and glutamate residues, rich in alternating arginine and glutamate residues, and rich in arginine and serine residues. The arginine/serine-rich domain is dominated by a series of 8 amino acid imperfect repetitive motif (consensus sequence, Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg-Asp/Glu-Arg-Arg-Arg), which has been found in RNA splicing factors. The RNase protection assay and Western blotting analysis indicate that the expression of CROP is about 2-3-fold higher in mRNA and protein levels in cisplatin-resistant ACHN/CDDP cells than in host ACHN cells. CROP is the human homologue of yeast Luc7p, which is supposed to be involved in 5'-splice site recognition and is essential for vegetative growth. PMID:10631324

  2. Terminal uridylyl transferase of Vigna unguiculata: purification and characterization of an enzyme catalyzing the addition of a single UMP residue to the 3'-end of an RNA primer.

    PubMed Central

    Zabel, P; Dorssers, L; Wernars, K; Van Kammen, A

    1981-01-01

    An enzyme which catalyzes the addition of a single UMP residue from UTP to the 3'-end of an RNA primer and which is referred to as terminal uridylyl transferase (TUT) has been extensively purified from the membrane fraction of vigna unguiculata leaves. The purification procedure involved (i) solubilization by cation depletion (ii) DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography (iii) affinity chromatography of poly(U)-Sepharose 4B and (iv) glycerol gradient centrifugation. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was approximately 50,000 as determined by velocity sedimentation. Under conditions that were optimal for UMP-incorporation (5 mM Mg2+, low salt, 30 degrees C) TUT displayed a marked specificity for UTP as substrate, was unable to incorporate deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates and required a single-stranded oligo- or polyribonucleotide as primer. When oligoA20, tRNAasp of E. coli or alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 were used as primers at various substrate to primer ratio's, the vast majority of the product appeared to consist of primer molecules elongated with a single UMP residue as shown by polyacrylamide gelelectrophoresis and nearest neighbour analysis. We believe TUT to be a novel enzyme which has not been reported before and which may be a feasible tool in RNA sequencing as it enables the specific 3'-terminal labeling of RNA molecules. Images PMID:6269049

  3. Granulocyte functions are independent of arginine availability.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Katharina; Prüfer, Steve; Michel, Christian S; Habermeier, Alice; Luckner-Minden, Claudia; Giese, Thomas; Bomalaski, John; Langhans, Claus-Dieter; Kropf, Pascale; Müller, Ingrid; Closs, Ellen I; Radsak, Markus P; Munder, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Arginine depletion via myeloid cell arginase is critically involved in suppression of the adaptive immune system during cancer or chronic inflammation. On the other hand, arginine depletion is being developed as a novel anti-tumor metabolic strategy to deprive arginine-auxotrophic cancer cells of this amino acid. In human immune cells, arginase is mainly expressed constitutively in PMNs. We therefore purified human primary PMNs from healthy donors and analyzed PMN function as the main innate effector cell and arginase producer in the context of arginine deficiency. We demonstrate that human PMN viability, activation-induced IL-8 synthesis, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, generation of ROS, and fungicidal activity are not impaired by the absence of arginine in vitro. Also, profound pharmacological arginine depletion in vivo via ADI-PEG20 did not inhibit PMN functions in a mouse model of pulmonary invasive aspergillosis; PMN invasion into the lung, activation, and successful PMN-dependent clearance of Aspergillus fumigatus and survival of mice were not impaired. These novel findings add to a better understanding of immunity during inflammation-associated arginine depletion and are also important for the development of therapeutic arginine depletion as anti-metabolic tumor therapy. PMID:25104794

  4. Triple therapy with pyridoxine, arginine supplementation and dietary lysine restriction in pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy: Neurodevelopmental outcome.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Curtis R; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Al-Hertani, Walla; Shuen, Andrew Y; Jaggumantri, Sravan; Jack, Rhona M; Gaughan, Sommer; Burns, Casey; Mirsky, David M; Gallagher, Renata C; Van Hove, Johan L K

    2015-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is an epileptic encephalopathy characterized by response to pharmacologic doses of pyridoxine. PDE is caused by deficiency of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase resulting in impaired lysine degradation and subsequent accumulation of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde. Despite adequate seizure control with pyridoxine monotherapy, 75% of individuals with PDE have significant developmental delay and intellectual disability. We describe a new combined therapeutic approach to reduce putative toxic metabolites from impaired lysine metabolism. This approach utilizes pyridoxine, a lysine-restricted diet to limit the substrate that leads to neurotoxic metabolite accumulation and L-arginine to compete for brain lysine influx and liver mitochondrial import. We report the developmental and biochemical outcome of six subjects who were treated with this triple therapy. Triple therapy reduced CSF, plasma, and urine biomarkers associated with neurotoxicity in PDE. The addition of arginine supplementation to children already treated with dietary lysine restriction and pyridoxine further reduced toxic metabolites, and in some subjects appeared to improve neurodevelopmental outcome. Dietary lysine restriction was associated with improved seizure control in one subject, and the addition of arginine supplementation increased the objective motor outcome scale in two twin siblings, illustrating the contribution of each component of this treatment combination. Optimal results were noted in the individual treated with triple therapy early in the course of the disease. Residual disease symptoms could be related to early injury suggested by initial MR imaging prior to initiation of treatment or from severe epilepsy prior to diagnosis. This observational study reports the use of triple therapy, which combines three effective components in this rare condition, and suggests that early diagnosis and treatment with this new triple therapy may ameliorate the

  5. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A R; Brinkmann, Saskia J H; Buijs, Nikki; Beishuizen, Albertus; Bet, Pierre M; Houdijk, Alexander P J; van Goudoever, Johannes B; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of glutamine in critically ill patients remain unknown. Therefore we investigated the effect of a therapeutically relevant dose of L-glutamine on synthesis of L-citrulline and subsequent L-arginine in this group. Ten versus ten critically ill patients receiving full enteral nutrition, or isocaloric isonitrogenous enteral nutrition including 0.5 g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were studied using stable isotopes. A cross-over design using intravenous and enteral tracers enabled splanchnic extraction (SE) calculations. Endogenous rate of appearance and SE of glutamine citrulline and arginine was not different (SE controls versus alanyl-glutamine: glutamine 48 and 48%, citrulline 33 versus 45%, and arginine 45 versus 42%). Turnover from glutamine to citrulline and arginine was not higher in glutamine-administered patients. In critically ill nonseptic patients receiving adequate nutrition and a relevant dose of glutamine there was no extra citrulline or arginine synthesis and glutamine SE was not increased. This suggests that for arginine synthesis enhancement there is no need for an additional dose of glutamine when this population is adequately fed. This trial is registered with NTR2285.

  6. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.; Brinkmann, Saskia J. H.; Buijs, Nikki; Beishuizen, Albertus; Bet, Pierre M.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of glutamine in critically ill patients remain unknown. Therefore we investigated the effect of a therapeutically relevant dose of L-glutamine on synthesis of L-citrulline and subsequent L-arginine in this group. Ten versus ten critically ill patients receiving full enteral nutrition, or isocaloric isonitrogenous enteral nutrition including 0.5 g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were studied using stable isotopes. A cross-over design using intravenous and enteral tracers enabled splanchnic extraction (SE) calculations. Endogenous rate of appearance and SE of glutamine citrulline and arginine was not different (SE controls versus alanyl-glutamine: glutamine 48 and 48%, citrulline 33 versus 45%, and arginine 45 versus 42%). Turnover from glutamine to citrulline and arginine was not higher in glutamine-administered patients. In critically ill nonseptic patients receiving adequate nutrition and a relevant dose of glutamine there was no extra citrulline or arginine synthesis and glutamine SE was not increased. This suggests that for arginine synthesis enhancement there is no need for an additional dose of glutamine when this population is adequately fed. This trial is registered with NTR2285. PMID:27200186

  7. Regulatory role for L-arginine in the utilization of amino acids by pig small-intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhao-Lai; Li, Xi-Long; Xi, Peng-Bin; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Guoyao; Zhu, Wei-Yun

    2012-07-01

    We recently reported that bacteria from the pig small intestine rapidly utilize and metabolize amino acids (AA). This study investigated the effect of L-arginine on the utilization of AA by pure bacterial strains (Streptococcus sp., Escherichia coli and Klebsiella sp.) and mixed bacterial cultures derived from the pig small intestine. Bacteria were incubated at 37°C for 3 h in anaerobic AA media containing 0-5 mmol/L of arginine to determine the effect of arginine on the bacterial utilization of AA. Amino acids in the medium plus cell extracts were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results indicated concentration-dependent increases in the bacterial utilization of arginine and altered fluxes of arginine into ornithine and citrulline in the bacteria. Net glutamine utilization increased in pure bacterial strains with increased concentrations of arginine. With the addition of arginine, net utilization of threonine, glycine, phenylalanine and branched-chain AA increased (P<0.05) in Streptococcus sp. and Klebsiella sp., but decreased in E. coli. Net utilization of lysine, threonine, isoleucine, leucine, glycine and alanine by jejunal or ileal mixed bacteria decreased (P<0.05) with the addition of arginine. Complete utilization of asparagine, aspartate and serine were observed in pig small-intestinal bacteria after 3 h of incubation. Overall, the addition of arginine affected the metabolism of the arginine-family of AA and the serine- and aspartate-family of AA in small-intestinal bacteria and reduced the utilization of most AA in ileal mixed bacteria. These novel findings indicate that arginine exerts its beneficial effects on swine nutrition partially by regulating AA utilization and metabolism in the small-intestinal microbiota.

  8. Diminished L-arginine bioavailability in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moss, Monique B; Brunini, Tatiana M C; Soares De Moura, Roberto; Novaes Malagris, Lúcia E; Roberts, Norman B; Ellory, J Clive; Mann, Giovanni E; Mendes Ribeiro, Antônio C

    2004-10-01

    L-Arginine is the precursor of NO (nitric oxide), a key endogenous mediator involved in endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and platelet function. Although the concentration of intracellular L-arginine is well above the Km for NO synthesis, in many cells and pathological conditions the transport of L-arginine is essential for NO production (L-arginine paradox). The present study was designed to investigate the modulation of L-arginine/NO pathway in systemic arterial hypertension. Transport of L-arginine into RBCs (red blood cells) and platelets, NOS (NO synthase) activity and amino acid profiles in plasma were analysed in hypertensive patients and in an animal model of hypertension. Influx of L-arginine into RBCs was mediated by the cationic amino acid transport systems y+ and y+L, whereas, in platelets, influx was mediated only via system y+L. Chromatographic analyses revealed higher plasma levels of L-arginine in hypertensive patients (175+/-19 micromol/l) compared with control subjects (137+/-8 micromol/l). L-Arginine transport via system y+L, but not y+, was significantly reduced in RBCs from hypertensive patients (60+/-7 micromol.l(-1).cells(-1).h(-1); n=16) compared with controls (90+/-17 micromol.l(-1).cells(-1).h(-1); n=18). In human platelets, the Vmax for L-arginine transport via system y+L was 86+/-17 pmol.10(9) cells(-1).min(-1) in controls compared with 36+/-9 pmol.10(9) cells(-1).min(-1) in hypertensive patients (n=10; P<0.05). Basal NOS activity was decreased in platelets from hypertensive patients (0.12+/-0.02 pmol/10(8) cells; n=8) compared with controls (0.22+/-0.01 pmol/10(8) cells; n=8; P<0.05). Studies with spontaneously hypertensive rats demonstrated that transport of L-arginine via system y+L was also inhibited in RBCs. Our findings provide the first evidence that hypertension is associated with an inhibition of L-arginine transport via system y+L in both humans and animals, with reduced availability of L-arginine limiting NO synthesis

  9. Diminished L-arginine bioavailability in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moss, Monique B; Brunini, Tatiana M C; Soares De Moura, Roberto; Novaes Malagris, Lúcia E; Roberts, Norman B; Ellory, J Clive; Mann, Giovanni E; Mendes Ribeiro, Antônio C

    2004-10-01

    L-Arginine is the precursor of NO (nitric oxide), a key endogenous mediator involved in endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and platelet function. Although the concentration of intracellular L-arginine is well above the Km for NO synthesis, in many cells and pathological conditions the transport of L-arginine is essential for NO production (L-arginine paradox). The present study was designed to investigate the modulation of L-arginine/NO pathway in systemic arterial hypertension. Transport of L-arginine into RBCs (red blood cells) and platelets, NOS (NO synthase) activity and amino acid profiles in plasma were analysed in hypertensive patients and in an animal model of hypertension. Influx of L-arginine into RBCs was mediated by the cationic amino acid transport systems y+ and y+L, whereas, in platelets, influx was mediated only via system y+L. Chromatographic analyses revealed higher plasma levels of L-arginine in hypertensive patients (175+/-19 micromol/l) compared with control subjects (137+/-8 micromol/l). L-Arginine transport via system y+L, but not y+, was significantly reduced in RBCs from hypertensive patients (60+/-7 micromol.l(-1).cells(-1).h(-1); n=16) compared with controls (90+/-17 micromol.l(-1).cells(-1).h(-1); n=18). In human platelets, the Vmax for L-arginine transport via system y+L was 86+/-17 pmol.10(9) cells(-1).min(-1) in controls compared with 36+/-9 pmol.10(9) cells(-1).min(-1) in hypertensive patients (n=10; P<0.05). Basal NOS activity was decreased in platelets from hypertensive patients (0.12+/-0.02 pmol/10(8) cells; n=8) compared with controls (0.22+/-0.01 pmol/10(8) cells; n=8; P<0.05). Studies with spontaneously hypertensive rats demonstrated that transport of L-arginine via system y+L was also inhibited in RBCs. Our findings provide the first evidence that hypertension is associated with an inhibition of L-arginine transport via system y+L in both humans and animals, with reduced availability of L-arginine limiting NO synthesis

  10. A Study on the Effect of Surface Lysine to Arginine Mutagenesis on Protein Stability and Structure Using Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering. PMID:22792305

  11. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S.; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria. These enzymes were present in all heterofermentative lactobacilli and most leuconostocs but were absent in all the homofermentative lactobacilli and pediococci examined. There was a good correlation among arginine degradation, formation of ammonia and citrulline, and the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes. Urea was not detected during arginine degradation, suggesting that the catabolism of arginine did not proceed via the arginase-catalyzed reaction, as has been suggested in some earlier studies. Detection of ammonia with Nessler's reagent was shown to be a simple, rapid test to assess the ability of wine lactic acid bacteria to degrade arginine, although in media containing relatively high concentrations (>0.5%) of fructose, ammonia formation is inhibited. PMID:16534912

  12. Redox Control of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Yalemi; Nitzel, Damon V.; Price, Owen M.; Gui, Shanying; Li, Jun; Qu, Jun; Hevel, Joan M.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) correlate with risk factors for cardiovascular disease. ADMA is generated by the catabolism of proteins methylated on arginine residues by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and is degraded by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase. Reports have shown that dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase activity is down-regulated and PRMT1 protein expression is up-regulated under oxidative stress conditions, leading many to conclude that ADMA accumulation occurs via increased synthesis by PRMTs and decreased degradation. However, we now report that the methyltransferase activity of PRMT1, the major PRMT isoform in humans, is impaired under oxidative conditions. Oxidized PRMT1 displays decreased activity, which can be rescued by reduction. This oxidation event involves one or more cysteine residues that become oxidized to sulfenic acid (-SOH). We demonstrate a hydrogen peroxide concentration-dependent inhibition of PRMT1 activity that is readily reversed under physiological H2O2 concentrations. Our results challenge the unilateral view that increased PRMT1 expression necessarily results in increased ADMA synthesis and demonstrate that enzymatic activity can be regulated in a redox-sensitive manner. PMID:25911106

  13. An allosteric inhibitor of protein arginine methyltransferase 3.

    PubMed

    Siarheyeva, Alena; Senisterra, Guillermo; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Dong, Aiping; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Wasney, Gregory A; Chau, Irene; Marcellus, Richard; Hajian, Taraneh; Liu, Feng; Korboukh, Ilia; Smil, David; Bolshan, Yuri; Min, Jinrong; Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Loppnau, Peter; Poda, Gennadiy; Griffin, Carly; Aman, Ahmed; Brown, Peter J; Jin, Jian; Al-Awar, Rima; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Schapira, Matthieu; Vedadi, Masoud

    2012-08-01

    PRMT3, a protein arginine methyltransferase, has been shown to influence ribosomal biosynthesis by catalyzing the dimethylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S2. Although PRMT3 has been reported to be a cytosolic protein, it has been shown to methylate histone H4 peptide (H4 1-24) in vitro. Here, we report the identification of a PRMT3 inhibitor (1-(benzo[d][1,2,3]thiadiazol-6-yl)-3-(2-cyclohexenylethyl)urea; compound 1) with IC50 value of 2.5 μM by screening a library of 16,000 compounds using H4 (1-24) peptide as a substrate. The crystal structure of PRMT3 in complex with compound 1 as well as kinetic analysis reveals an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. Mutating PRMT3 residues within the allosteric site or using compound 1 analogs that disrupt interactions with allosteric site residues both abrogated binding and inhibitory activity. These data demonstrate an allosteric mechanism for inhibition of protein arginine methyltransferases, an emerging class of therapeutic targets.

  14. Dysregulated Arginine Metabolism and Cardiopulmonary Dysfunction in Patients with Thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Claudia R.; Kim, Hae-Young; Klings, Elizabeth S.; Wood, John; Porter, John B.; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Sweeters, Nancy; Olivieri, Nancy F; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Virzi, Lisa; Hassell, Kathryn; Taher, Ali; Neufeld, Ellis J; Thompson, Alexis A.; Larkin, Sandra; Suh, Jung H.; Vichinsky, Elliott P; Kuypers, Frans A.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) commonly develops in thalassaemia syndromes, but is poorly characterized. The goal of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of the cardiopulmonary and biological profile of patients with thalassaemia at risk for PH. A case-control study of thalassaemia patients at high versus low PH-risk was performed. A single cross-sectional measurement for variables reflecting cardiopulmonary status and biological pathophysiology were obtained, including Doppler-echocardiography, 6-minute-walk-test, Borg Dyspnea Score, New York Heart Association functional class, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), chest-computerized tomography, pulmonary function testing and laboratory analyses targeting mechanism of coagulation, inflammation, haemolysis, adhesion and the arginine-nitric oxide pathway. Twenty-seven thalassaemia patients were evaluated, 14 with an elevated tricuspid-regurgitant-jet-velocity (TRV) ≥2.5m/s. Patients with increased TRV had a higher frequency of splenectomy, and significantly larger right atrial size, left atrial volume and left septal-wall thickness on echocardiography and/or MRI, with elevated biomarkers of abnormal coagulation, lactate dehydrogenase levels and arginase concentration, and lower arginine-bioavailability compared to low-risk patients. Arginase concentration correlated significantly to several echocardiography/MRI parameters of cardiovascular function in addition to global-arginine-bioavailability and biomarkers of haemolytic rate, including lactate dehydrogenase, haemoglobin and bilirubin. Thalassaemia patients with a TRV ≥2.5m/s have additional echocardiography and cardiac-MRI parameters suggestive of right and left-sided cardiac dysfunction. In addition, low arginine bioavailability may contribute to cardiopulmonary dysfunction in β-thalassaemia. PMID:25907665

  15. Differential responses of needle and branch order-based root decay to nitrogen addition: dominant effects of acid-unhydrolyzable residue and microbial enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Liang; Chen, Weiwei; Zhang, Xinyu; Gao, Wenlong; Yang, Hao; Li, Dandan; Li, Shenggong

    2016-04-01

    Both chemical differences between foliage and different orders of fine roots and their contrasting decomposing microenvironments may affect their decomposition. However, little is known about how foliage and branch order-based root decomposition responds to increased N availability and the response mechanisms behind. The effects of different doses of N addition on the decomposition of needles and order-based roots of Pinus elliottii (slash pine) were monitored using the litterbag method for 524 days in a subtropical slash pine plantation in south China. The acid-unhydrolyzable residue (AUR) concentration and microbial extracellular enzymatic activities (EEA) in decomposing needles and roots were also determined. Our results indicate that the responses of needle and order-based root decomposition were N-dose-specific. The decomposition of both needles and lower-order roots was inhibited under the high N dose rate. The retarded decomposition of lower-order roots could be explained more by the increased binding of AUR to inorganic N ions, while the retarded decomposition of needles could be explained more by the reduced microbial EEA. Further, in contrast to lower-order roots, N addition had no effect on the decomposition of higher-order roots. We conclude that the decomposition of foliage and fine roots may fail to mirror each other at ambient conditions or in response to N deposition due to their contrasting decomposition microenvironments and tissue chemistry. Given the differential effects of N addition on order-based roots, our findings highlight the need to consider the tissue chemistry heterogeneity within branching fine root systems when predicting the responses of root decomposition to N loading.

  16. Role of an upstream open reading frame in mediating arginine-specific translational control in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Z; Sachs, M S

    1996-01-01

    The Neurospora crassa arg-2 transcript contains an upstream open reading frame (uORF) specifying a 24-residue leader peptide and is subject to a novel form of negative translational regulation in response to arginine. The role of the arg-2 uORF in arginine-specific negative regulation was investigated by using translational fusions of wild-type and mutant arg-2 sequences to the Escherichia coli lacZ reporter gene specifying beta-galactosidase. The wild-type uORF conferred Arg-specific regulation on the reporter gene in N. crassa, but mutated or truncated uORFs did not, as determined by measurements of beta-galactosidase activity produced in N. crassa strains expressing arg-2-lacZ fusion genes. All effects on reporter gene expression were posttranscriptional, as determined by measurement of RNA levels. Both sequence-dependent and sequence-independent effects of uORFs were observed. Genes containing the wild-type uORF or a 21-codon mutated uORF showed reduced translation in comparison with that of a gene lacking a uORF. Both uORF-containing transcripts showed reduced association with polysomes relative to transcripts lacking a uORF, but only the transcript with the wild-type uORF showed a reduced average number of ribosomes associated with it in response to arginine addition. Direct translational fusions between uORF sequences and lacZ sequences indicated that the uORF is translated. Overlapping the uORF with the lacZ initiation codon indicated that ribosome reinitiation at a downstream start codon is not integral to uORF-mediated, Arg-specific translational regulation. These studies provide direct biochemical evidence for arg-2 uORF function in translational control. PMID:8636015

  17. Use of arginine aminopeptidase activity in characterization of arginine-utilizing mycoplasmas.

    PubMed Central

    Ball, H J; Neill, S D; Reid, L R

    1982-01-01

    The aminopeptidase activity of arginine-utilizing mycoplasmas was investigated with 20 aminoacyl beta-naphthylamide substrates. High levels of arginyl-beta-naphthylamide hydrolysis were demonstrated in 6 of 11 species when extracts of concentrated washed organisms were used. Relatively low arginine aminopeptidase activity was demonstrated with similar extracts from 22 species not utilizing arginine. The high level of arginine aminopeptidase activity could also be demonstrated with unwashed, unconcentrated samples of the same 6 species and also with Mycoplasma arthritidis. The procedure for preparing the extract of M. arthritidis appeared to remove the arginine aminopeptidase activity which was demonstrated to be present in the untreated culture. Fluorogenic and chromogenic tests were developed whereby this distinctive arginine aminopeptidase activity could be demonstrated within 4 h with the use of small volumes of broth culture (10 microliter) or single colonies, thus providing a rapid test for early characterization of some Mycoplasma species. PMID:6764773

  18. L-Arginine but not L-glutamine likely increases exogenous carbohydrate oxidation during endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, David S; Clarke, Jim; Green, Jackson G; Shi, Xiaocai

    2012-07-01

    The addition of L-arginine or L-glutamine to glucose-electrolyte solutions can increase intestinal water, glucose, and sodium absorption in rats and humans. We evaluated the utility of L-arginine and L-glutamine in energy-rehydration beverages through assessment of exogenous glucose oxidation and perceptions of exertion and gastrointestinal distress during endurance exercise. Eight cyclists rode 150 min at 50% of peak power on four occasions while ingesting solutions at a rate of 150 mL 15 min(-1) that contained (13)C-enriched glucose (266 mmol L(-1)) and sodium citrate ([Na(+)] 60 mmol L(-1)), and either: 4.25 mmol L(-1) L-arginine or 45 mmol L(-1) L-glutamine, and as controls glucose only or no glucose. Relative to glucose only, L-arginine invoked a likely 12% increase in exogenous glucose oxidation (90% confidence limits: ± 8%); however, the effect of L-glutamine was possibly trivial (4.5 ± 7.3%). L-Arginine also led to very likely small reductions in endogenous fat oxidation rate relative to glucose (12 ± 4%) and L-glutamine (14 ± 4%), and relative to no glucose, likely reductions in exercise oxygen consumption (2.6 ± 1.5%) and plasma lactate concentration (0.20 ± 0.16 mmol L(-1)). Effects on endogenous and total carbohydrate oxidation were inconsequential. Compared with glucose only, L-arginine and L-glutamine caused likely small-moderate effect size increases in perceptions of stomach fullness, abdominal cramp, exertion, and muscle tiredness during exercise. Addition of L-arginine to a glucose and electrolyte solution increases the oxidation of exogenous glucose and decreases the oxygen cost of exercise, although the mechanisms responsible and impact on endurance performance require further investigation. However, L-arginine also increases subjective feelings of gastrointestinal distress, which may attenuate its other benefits. PMID:22048324

  19. L-Arginine but not L-glutamine likely increases exogenous carbohydrate oxidation during endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, David S; Clarke, Jim; Green, Jackson G; Shi, Xiaocai

    2012-07-01

    The addition of L-arginine or L-glutamine to glucose-electrolyte solutions can increase intestinal water, glucose, and sodium absorption in rats and humans. We evaluated the utility of L-arginine and L-glutamine in energy-rehydration beverages through assessment of exogenous glucose oxidation and perceptions of exertion and gastrointestinal distress during endurance exercise. Eight cyclists rode 150 min at 50% of peak power on four occasions while ingesting solutions at a rate of 150 mL 15 min(-1) that contained (13)C-enriched glucose (266 mmol L(-1)) and sodium citrate ([Na(+)] 60 mmol L(-1)), and either: 4.25 mmol L(-1) L-arginine or 45 mmol L(-1) L-glutamine, and as controls glucose only or no glucose. Relative to glucose only, L-arginine invoked a likely 12% increase in exogenous glucose oxidation (90% confidence limits: ± 8%); however, the effect of L-glutamine was possibly trivial (4.5 ± 7.3%). L-Arginine also led to very likely small reductions in endogenous fat oxidation rate relative to glucose (12 ± 4%) and L-glutamine (14 ± 4%), and relative to no glucose, likely reductions in exercise oxygen consumption (2.6 ± 1.5%) and plasma lactate concentration (0.20 ± 0.16 mmol L(-1)). Effects on endogenous and total carbohydrate oxidation were inconsequential. Compared with glucose only, L-arginine and L-glutamine caused likely small-moderate effect size increases in perceptions of stomach fullness, abdominal cramp, exertion, and muscle tiredness during exercise. Addition of L-arginine to a glucose and electrolyte solution increases the oxidation of exogenous glucose and decreases the oxygen cost of exercise, although the mechanisms responsible and impact on endurance performance require further investigation. However, L-arginine also increases subjective feelings of gastrointestinal distress, which may attenuate its other benefits.

  20. Arginine requirement of starting broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Cuca, M; Jensen, L S

    1990-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted to estimate the arginine requirement of male broiler chicks from 0 to 3 wk of age. The experiments were conducted in battery brooders with wires floors, and the birds received water and feed ad libitum. In the first experiment, chicks were fed a diet based on corn, soybean meal, casein, and corn-gluten meal containing 3,200 kcal ME per kg and either 20 or 23% crude protein. Regression analysis indicated an arginine requirement of 1.22% for maximum growth rate and feed efficiency with the 20% protein diet. For chicks fed the 23% protein diet, neither growth rate nor feed efficiency was significantly different among the diets containing arginine ranging from 1.13 to 1.43%. In the second experiment, a basal diet was used containing 17.5% casein and 22.5% protein with arginine ranging from 1.03 to 1.43%. An arginine requirement of 1.18% for maximum body weight gain was estimated by regression analysis, but no significant response to arginine above the basal level was observed for feed efficiency. Performance of chicks fed the basal diet was somewhat reduced because of a difficulty with adherence of feed to the beaks. In a third experiment, three basal diets containing 21, 22, or 23% protein were formulated from practical ingredients without use of casein. The requirement for maximum growth rate and feed efficiency was estimated to be 1.24 to 1.28% for the three diets. The results of these investigations indicate that the arginine requirement for starting chicks suggested by the National Research Council in 1984 of 1.44% in diets containing 3,200 kcal ME per kg is too high for practical diets. The data presented here support an arginine requirement of 1.25%. PMID:2235851

  1. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Forty-eighth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in foods and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers standards for the performance of studies, residues at the injection site, and several initiatives to promote transparency of the process for setting Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two anthelminthic agents (moxidectin and tiabendazole), eight antimicrobial agents (ceftiofur, danofloxacin, dihydrostreptomycin, streptomycin, enrofloxacin, flumequine, gentamicin and spiramycin), one glucocorticosteroid (dexamethasone), and two insecticides (cyfluthrin and fluazuron). Annexed to the report are a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including Acceptable Daily Intakes and MRL's and further toxicological studies and other information required.

  2. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Sixty-second report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on food additives.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers conclusions on specific toxicological end-points, lipid-soluble residues of veterinary drugs with MRLs in milk, statistical methods for the estimation of MRLs, and the Committee's review and comments on documents provided by Codex Committees. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: five antibacterial agents (cefuroxime, chloramphenicol, flumequine, lincomycin, pirlimycin), four insecticides (cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and alpha-cypermethrin, doramectin, phoxim), and two production aids (melengestrol acetate, ractopamine). The Committee's comments on chloramphenicol found at low levels in animal products are also summarized. Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes and proposed maximum residue limits. PMID:15587045

  3. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Forty-eighth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in foods and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers standards for the performance of studies, residues at the injection site, and several initiatives to promote transparency of the process for setting Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two anthelminthic agents (moxidectin and tiabendazole), eight antimicrobial agents (ceftiofur, danofloxacin, dihydrostreptomycin, streptomycin, enrofloxacin, flumequine, gentamicin and spiramycin), one glucocorticosteroid (dexamethasone), and two insecticides (cyfluthrin and fluazuron). Annexed to the report are a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including Acceptable Daily Intakes and MRL's and further toxicological studies and other information required. PMID:9727328

  4. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depl...

  5. Arginine-to-lysine substitutions influence recombinant horseradish peroxidase stability and immobilisation effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Barry J; Ó'Fágáin, Ciarán

    2007-01-01

    Background Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) plays important roles in many biotechnological fields, including diagnostics, biosensors and biocatalysis. Often, it is used in immobilised form. With conventional immobilisation techniques, the enzyme adheres in random orientation: the active site may face the solid phase rather than bulk medium, impeding substrate access and leading to sub-optimal catalytic performance. The ability to immobilise HRP in a directional manner, such that the active site would always face outwards from the insoluble matrix, would maximise the immobilised enzyme's catalytic potential and could increase HRP's range of actual and potential applications. Results We have replaced arginine residues on the face of glycan-free recombinant HRP opposite to the active site by lysines. Our strategy differs from previous reports of specific HRP immobilisation via an engineered affinity tag or single reactive residue. These conservative Arg-to-Lys substitutions provide a means of multipoint covalent immobilisation such that the active site will always face away from the immobilisation matrix. One triple and one pentuple mutant were generated by substitution of solvent-exposed arginines on the "back" of the polypeptide (R118, R159 and R283) and of residues known to influence stability (K232 and K241). Orientated HRP immobilisation was demonstrated using a modified polyethersulfone (PES) membrane; the protein was forced to orientate its active site away from the membrane and towards the bulk solution phase. Mutant properties and bioinformatic analysis suggested the reversion of K283R to improve stability, thus generating two additional mutants (K118/R159K and R118K/K232N/K241F/R283K). While most mutants were less stable in free solution than wild type rHRP, the quadruple revertant regained some stability over its mutant counterparts. A greater degree of immobilisation on CNBr-activated Sepharose™ was noted with increased lysine content; however, only marginal

  6. Plasma arginine correlations in trauma and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chiarla, C; Giovannini, I; Siegel, J H

    2006-02-01

    Arginine (ARG) is an amino acid (AA) with unique properties and with a key-role in the metabolic, immune and reparative response to trauma and sepsis. This study has been performed to characterize the correlations between plasma levels of ARG, of other AA and of multiple metabolic variables in trauma and sepsis. Two-hundred and sixty-three plasma amino-acidograms with a large series of additional biochemical and blood variables were obtained consecutively in 9 trauma patients who developed sepsis, undergoing total parenteral nutrition with dextrose, fat and a mixed AA solution containing 10.4% arginine. ARG was low soon after trauma, then it increased with increasing distance from trauma and with the development of sepsis. ARG was also directly related to the AA infusion rate (AAIR) and for any given AAIR, was lower after trauma than after the development of sepsis. ARG was also related directly to the plasma levels of most of the other AA, the best correlation being that with lysine (r(2) = 0.81, p < 0.001). These correlations were often shifted downwards (showing lower ARG for any given level of the other AA) in measurements performed after trauma, compared to those performed after development of sepsis; this effect was more pronounced for the correlations with branched chain AA. Correlations between ARG and non-AA variables were not particularly relevant. The best simultaneous correlates of ARG, among variables involved in plasma ARG availability, were citrulline level, AAIR and urinary 3-methylhistidine excretion (accounting for the effect of endogenous proteolysis) (multiple r(2) = 0.70, p < 0.001). Plasma ornithine (ORN), the AA more specifically linked to ARG metabolism, correlated with AAIR better than ARG and, for any given AAIR, was lower after trauma than after the development of sepsis. Correlations of ORN with other AA levels were poorer than those found for ARG, however ORN was directly related to white blood cell and platelet count, fibrinogen

  7. Amelioration of bauxite residue sand by intermittent additions of nitrogen fertiliser and leaching fractions: The effect on growth of kikuyu grass and fate of applied nutrients.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navjot; Phillips, Ian; Fey, Martin V

    2016-04-15

    Bauxite residue, a waste product of aluminium processing operations is characterised by high pH, salinity and exchangeable sodium which hinders sustainable plant growth. The aim of this study was to investigate the uptake form, optimum application rate and timing of nitrogen fertiliser to improve bauxite residue characteristics for plant growth. Kikuyu grass was grown in plastic columns filled with residue sand/carbonated residue mud mixture (20:1) previously amended with gypsum, phosphoric acid and basal nutrients. The experiment was set up as a 4×4 factorial design comprising four levels of applied nitrogen (N) fertiliser (0, 3, 6 and 12mgNkg(-1) residue) and four frequencies of leaching (16, 8 and 4day intervals). We hypothesised that the use of ammonium sulfate fertiliser would increase retention of N within the rhizosphere thereby encouraging more efficient fertiliser use. We found that N uptake by kikuyu grass was enhanced due to leaching of excess salts and alkalinity from the residue profile. It was also concluded that biomass production and associated N uptake by kikuyu grass grown in residue is dependent on the type of fertiliser used.

  8. Amelioration of bauxite residue sand by intermittent additions of nitrogen fertiliser and leaching fractions: The effect on growth of kikuyu grass and fate of applied nutrients.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navjot; Phillips, Ian; Fey, Martin V

    2016-04-15

    Bauxite residue, a waste product of aluminium processing operations is characterised by high pH, salinity and exchangeable sodium which hinders sustainable plant growth. The aim of this study was to investigate the uptake form, optimum application rate and timing of nitrogen fertiliser to improve bauxite residue characteristics for plant growth. Kikuyu grass was grown in plastic columns filled with residue sand/carbonated residue mud mixture (20:1) previously amended with gypsum, phosphoric acid and basal nutrients. The experiment was set up as a 4×4 factorial design comprising four levels of applied nitrogen (N) fertiliser (0, 3, 6 and 12mgNkg(-1) residue) and four frequencies of leaching (16, 8 and 4day intervals). We hypothesised that the use of ammonium sulfate fertiliser would increase retention of N within the rhizosphere thereby encouraging more efficient fertiliser use. We found that N uptake by kikuyu grass was enhanced due to leaching of excess salts and alkalinity from the residue profile. It was also concluded that biomass production and associated N uptake by kikuyu grass grown in residue is dependent on the type of fertiliser used. PMID:26824271

  9. Arginine promotes Proteus mirabilis motility and fitness by contributing to conservation of the proton gradient and proton motive force

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Hodges, Steven A; Smith, Sara N; Alteri, Christopher J; Mobley, Harry L T

    2014-01-01

    Swarming contributes to Proteus mirabilis pathogenicity by facilitating access to the catheterized urinary tract. We previously demonstrated that 0.1–20 mmol/L arginine promotes swarming on normally nonpermissive media and that putrescine biosynthesis is required for arginine-induced swarming. We also previously determined that arginine-induced swarming is pH dependent, indicating that the external proton concentration is critical for arginine-dependent effects on swarming. In this study, we utilized survival at pH 5 and motility as surrogates for measuring changes in the proton gradient (ΔpH) and proton motive force (μH+) in response to arginine. We determined that arginine primarily contributes to ΔpH (and therefore μH+) through the action of arginine decarboxylase (speA), independent of the role of this enzyme in putrescine biosynthesis. In addition to being required for motility, speA also contributed to fitness during infection. In conclusion, consumption of intracellular protons via arginine decarboxylase is one mechanism used by P. mirabilis to conserve ΔpH and μH+ for motility. PMID:25100003

  10. Arginine Relieves the Inflammatory Response and Enhances the Casein Expression in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells Induced by Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tianyou; Wang, Chao; Ding, Luoyang; Shen, Yizhao; Cui, Huihui; Wang, Mengzhi; Wang, Hongrong

    2016-01-01

    As one of functional active amino acids, L-arginine holds a key position in immunity. However, the mechanism that arginine modulates cow mammary inflammatory response in ruminant is unclear. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of L-arginine on inflammatory response and casein expression after challenging the bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs) with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The cells were divided into four groups, stimulated with or without LPS (10 μg/mL) and treated with or without arginine (100 μg/mL) for 12 h. The concentration of proinflammatory cytokines, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathways as well as the casein was determined. The results showed that arginine reduced the LPS-induced production like IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and iNOS. Though the expression of NF-κB was attenuated and the mTOR signaling pathway was upregulated, arginine had no effect on TLR4 expression. In addition, our results show that the content of β-casein and the total casein were enhanced after arginine was supplemented in LPS-induced BMECs. In conclusion, arginine could relieve the inflammatory reaction induced by LPS and enhance the concentration of β-casein and the total casein in bovine mammary epithelial cells. PMID:27110069

  11. Biocatalytic synthesis, antimicrobial properties and toxicity studies of arginine derivative surfactants.

    PubMed

    Fait, M Elisa; Garrote, Graciela L; Clapés, Pere; Tanco, Sebastian; Lorenzo, Julia; Morcelle, Susana R

    2015-07-01

    Two novel arginine-based cationic surfactants were synthesized using as biocatalyst papain, an endopeptidase from Carica papaya latex, adsorbed onto polyamide. The classical substrate N (α)-benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester hydrochloride for the determination of cysteine and serine proteases activity was used as the arginine donor, whereas decyl- and dodecylamine were used as nucleophiles for the condensation reaction. Yields higher than 90 and 80 % were achieved for the synthesis of N (α)-benzoyl-arginine decyl amide (Bz-Arg-NHC10) and N (α)-benzoyl-arginine dodecyl amide (Bz-Arg-NHC12), respectively. The purification process was developed in order to make it more sustainable, by using water and ethanol as the main separation solvents in a single cationic exchange chromatographic separation step. Bz-Arg-NHC10 and Bz-Arg-NHC12 proved antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, revealing their potential use as effective disinfectants as they reduced 99 % the initial bacterial population after only 1 h of contact. The cytotoxic effect towards different cell types of both arginine derivatives was also measured. Bz-Arg-NHCn demonstrated lower haemolytic activity and were less eye-irritating than the commercial cationic surfactant cetrimide. A similar trend could also be observed when cytotoxicity was tested on hepatocytes and fibroblast cell lines: both arginine derivatives were less toxic than cetrimide. All these properties would make the two novel arginine compounds a promising alternative to commercial cationic surfactants, especially for their use as additives in topical formulations. PMID:25894891

  12. The scent of danger: arginine as an olfactory cue of reduced predation risk.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Ryan P; Zimmer, Richard K

    2007-05-01

    Animal perception of chemosensory cues is a function of ecological context. Larvae of the California newt (Taricha torosa), for example, exhibit predator-avoidance behavior in response to a chemical from cannibalistic adults. The poison tetrodotoxin (TTX), well known as an adult chemical defense, stimulates larval escape to refuges. Although they are cannibals, adult newts feed preferentially on worms (Eisenia rosea) over conspecific young. Hence, larval avoidance reactions to TTX are suppressed in the presence of odor from these alternative prey. The free amino acid, arginine, is abundant in fluids emitted by injured worms. Here, we demonstrate that arginine is a natural suppressant of TTX-stimulated larval escape behavior. Compared to a tapwater control, larvae initiated vigorous swimming in response to 10(-7) mol l(-1) TTX. This excitatory response was eliminated when larval nasal cavities were blocked with an inert gel, but not when gel was placed on the forehead (control). In additional trials, a binary mixture of arginine and 10(-7) mol l(-1) TTX failed to induce larval swimming. The inhibitory effect of arginine was, however, dose dependent. An arginine concentration as low as 0.3-times that of TTX was significantly suppressant. Further analysis showed that suppression by arginine of TTX-stimulated behavior was eliminated by altering the positively-charged guanidinium moiety, but not by modifying the carbon chain, carboxyl group, or amine group. These results are best explained by a mechanism of competitive inhibition between arginine and TTX for common, olfactory receptor binding sites. Although arginine alone has no impact on larval behavior, it nevertheless signals active adult predation on alternative prey, and hence, reduced cannibalism risk. PMID:17488940

  13. Biocatalytic synthesis, antimicrobial properties and toxicity studies of arginine derivative surfactants.

    PubMed

    Fait, M Elisa; Garrote, Graciela L; Clapés, Pere; Tanco, Sebastian; Lorenzo, Julia; Morcelle, Susana R

    2015-07-01

    Two novel arginine-based cationic surfactants were synthesized using as biocatalyst papain, an endopeptidase from Carica papaya latex, adsorbed onto polyamide. The classical substrate N (α)-benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester hydrochloride for the determination of cysteine and serine proteases activity was used as the arginine donor, whereas decyl- and dodecylamine were used as nucleophiles for the condensation reaction. Yields higher than 90 and 80 % were achieved for the synthesis of N (α)-benzoyl-arginine decyl amide (Bz-Arg-NHC10) and N (α)-benzoyl-arginine dodecyl amide (Bz-Arg-NHC12), respectively. The purification process was developed in order to make it more sustainable, by using water and ethanol as the main separation solvents in a single cationic exchange chromatographic separation step. Bz-Arg-NHC10 and Bz-Arg-NHC12 proved antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, revealing their potential use as effective disinfectants as they reduced 99 % the initial bacterial population after only 1 h of contact. The cytotoxic effect towards different cell types of both arginine derivatives was also measured. Bz-Arg-NHCn demonstrated lower haemolytic activity and were less eye-irritating than the commercial cationic surfactant cetrimide. A similar trend could also be observed when cytotoxicity was tested on hepatocytes and fibroblast cell lines: both arginine derivatives were less toxic than cetrimide. All these properties would make the two novel arginine compounds a promising alternative to commercial cationic surfactants, especially for their use as additives in topical formulations.

  14. Abnormal Mitochondrial L-Arginine Transport Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Heart Failure and Rexoygenation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Melissa; Joshi, Mandar; Horlock, Duncan; Lam, Nicholas T.; Gregorevic, Paul; McGee, Sean L.; Kaye, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired mitochondrial function is fundamental feature of heart failure (HF) and myocardial ischemia. In addition to the effects of heightened oxidative stress, altered nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, generated by a mitochondrial NO synthase, has also been proposed to impact upon mitochondrial function. However, the mechanism responsible for arginine transport into mitochondria and the effect of HF on such a process is unknown. We therefore aimed to characterize mitochondrial L-arginine transport and to investigate the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial L-arginine transport plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and myocardial injury. Methods and Results In mitochondria isolated from failing hearts (sheep rapid pacing model and mouse Mst1 transgenic model) we demonstrated a marked reduction in L-arginine uptake (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively) and expression of the principal L-arginine transporter, CAT-1 (p<0.001, p<0.01) compared to controls. This was accompanied by significantly lower NO production and higher 3-nitrotyrosine levels (both p<0.05). The role of mitochondrial L-arginine transport in modulating cardiac stress responses was examined in cardiomyocytes with mitochondrial specific overexpression of CAT-1 (mtCAT1) exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation stress. mtCAT1 cardiomyocytes had significantly improved mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and ATP turnover together with significantly decreased reactive oxygen species production and cell death following mitochondrial stress. Conclusion These data provide new insights into the role of L-arginine transport in mitochondrial biology and cardiovascular disease. Augmentation of mitochondrial L-arginine availability may be a novel therapeutic strategy for myocardial disorders involving mitochondrial stress such as heart failure and reperfusion injury. PMID:25111602

  15. Arginine- and Polyamine-Induced Lactic Acid Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zheng; Tang, M. Matt; Wu, Xueliang; Phillips, Nancy; Galkowski, Dariusz; Jarvis, Gary A.; Fan, Huizhou

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-derived lactic acid protects women from pathogens in their genital tract. The purpose of this study was to determine lactic acid susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and identify potential acid resistance mechanisms present in this pathogen. Tested in vitro, lactic acid killed all 10 gonococcal strains analyzed in a low pH-dependent manner. Full inactivation occurred at pH 4.5. At low pH, lactic acid treatment resulted in the entry of the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide into the microbial cells, suggesting that hydrogen ions from lactic acid compromise the integrity of the bacterial cell wall/membrane. Most likely, hydrogen ions also inactivate intracellular proteins since arginine rendered significant protection against lactic acid presumably through action of the gonococcal arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme located in the bacterial cytoplasm. Surprisingly, arginine also lessened lactic acid-mediated cell wall/membrane disruption. This effect is probably mediated by agmatine, a triamine product of arginine decarboxylase, since agmatine demonstrated a stronger protective effect on GC than arginine at equal molar concentration. In addition to agmatine, diamines cadaverine and putrescine, which are generated by bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes, also induced significant resistance to lactic acid-mediated GC killing and cell wall/membrane disruption. These findings suggest that the arginine-rich semen protects gonococci through both neutralization-dependent and independent mechanisms, whereas polyamine-induced acid resistance contributes to the increased risk of gonorrhea in women with bacterial vaginosis. PMID:26808268

  16. Arginine- and Polyamine-Induced Lactic Acid Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Tang, M Matt; Wu, Xueliang; Phillips, Nancy; Galkowski, Dariusz; Jarvis, Gary A; Fan, Huizhou

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-derived lactic acid protects women from pathogens in their genital tract. The purpose of this study was to determine lactic acid susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and identify potential acid resistance mechanisms present in this pathogen. Tested in vitro, lactic acid killed all 10 gonococcal strains analyzed in a low pH-dependent manner. Full inactivation occurred at pH 4.5. At low pH, lactic acid treatment resulted in the entry of the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide into the microbial cells, suggesting that hydrogen ions from lactic acid compromise the integrity of the bacterial cell wall/membrane. Most likely, hydrogen ions also inactivate intracellular proteins since arginine rendered significant protection against lactic acid presumably through action of the gonococcal arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme located in the bacterial cytoplasm. Surprisingly, arginine also lessened lactic acid-mediated cell wall/membrane disruption. This effect is probably mediated by agmatine, a triamine product of arginine decarboxylase, since agmatine demonstrated a stronger protective effect on GC than arginine at equal molar concentration. In addition to agmatine, diamines cadaverine and putrescine, which are generated by bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes, also induced significant resistance to lactic acid-mediated GC killing and cell wall/membrane disruption. These findings suggest that the arginine-rich semen protects gonococci through both neutralization-dependent and independent mechanisms, whereas polyamine-induced acid resistance contributes to the increased risk of gonorrhea in women with bacterial vaginosis.

  17. Arginine- and Polyamine-Induced Lactic Acid Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Tang, M Matt; Wu, Xueliang; Phillips, Nancy; Galkowski, Dariusz; Jarvis, Gary A; Fan, Huizhou

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-derived lactic acid protects women from pathogens in their genital tract. The purpose of this study was to determine lactic acid susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and identify potential acid resistance mechanisms present in this pathogen. Tested in vitro, lactic acid killed all 10 gonococcal strains analyzed in a low pH-dependent manner. Full inactivation occurred at pH 4.5. At low pH, lactic acid treatment resulted in the entry of the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide into the microbial cells, suggesting that hydrogen ions from lactic acid compromise the integrity of the bacterial cell wall/membrane. Most likely, hydrogen ions also inactivate intracellular proteins since arginine rendered significant protection against lactic acid presumably through action of the gonococcal arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme located in the bacterial cytoplasm. Surprisingly, arginine also lessened lactic acid-mediated cell wall/membrane disruption. This effect is probably mediated by agmatine, a triamine product of arginine decarboxylase, since agmatine demonstrated a stronger protective effect on GC than arginine at equal molar concentration. In addition to agmatine, diamines cadaverine and putrescine, which are generated by bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes, also induced significant resistance to lactic acid-mediated GC killing and cell wall/membrane disruption. These findings suggest that the arginine-rich semen protects gonococci through both neutralization-dependent and independent mechanisms, whereas polyamine-induced acid resistance contributes to the increased risk of gonorrhea in women with bacterial vaginosis. PMID:26808268

  18. Resveratrol inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi arginine kinase and exerts a trypanocidal activity.

    PubMed

    Valera Vera, Edward A; Sayé, Melisa; Reigada, Chantal; Damasceno, Flávia S; Silber, Ariel M; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-06-01

    Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible transphosphorylation between ADP and phosphoarginine which plays a critical role in the maintenance of cellular energy homeostasis. Arginine kinase from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, meets the requirements to be considered as a potential therapeutic target for rational drug design including being absent in its mammalian hosts. In this study a group of polyphenolic compounds was evaluated as potential inhibitors of arginine kinase using molecular docking techniques. Among the analyzed compounds with the lowest free binding energy to the arginine kinase active site (<-6.96kcal/mol), resveratrol was chosen for subsequent assays. Resveratrol inhibits 50% of recombinant arginine kinase activity at 325μM. The trypanocidal effect of resveratrol was evaluated on the T. cruzi trypomastigotes bursting from infected CHO K1 cells, with IC50=77μM. Additionally epimastigotes overexpressing arginine kinase were 5 times more resistant to resveratrol compared to controls. Taking into account that: (1) resveratrol is considered as completely nontoxic; (2) is easily accessible due to its low market price; and (3) has as a well-defined target enzyme which is absent in the mammalian host, it is a promising compound as a trypanocidal drug for Chagas disease.

  19. EWS is a substrate of type I protein arginine methyltransferase, PRMT8.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Dal; Kako, Koichiro; Kakiuchi, Misako; Park, Gwi Gun; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2008-09-01

    EWS, a pro-oncoprotein which is encoded by the Ewing sarcoma (EWS) gene, contains arginine-glycine-glycine repeats (RGG box) in its COOH-terminus. We previously found that the RGG box of EWS is a target for dimethylation catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). Although it has been observed that arginine residues in EWS are dimethylated in vivo, the endogenous enzyme(s) responsible for this reaction have not been identified to date. In the present study, we determined that EWS was physically associated with PRMT8, the novel eighth member of the PRMT family, through the COOH-terminal region of EWS including RGG3 with the NH2-terminal region of PRMT8 encompassing the S-adenosyl-L-methionine binding domain, and that arginine residues in EWS were asymmetrically dimethylated by PRMT8 using amino acid analysis with thin-layer chromatography. These results suggested that EWS is a substrate for PRMT8, as efficient as for PRMT1.

  20. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Fiftieth report of the joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues. The first part of the report considers the neurotoxicity of anthelminthics belonging to the avermectin and milbemycin classes of compounds and the evaluation policy of the Committee in establishing Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) for veterinary drugs in food. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: five anthelminthic agents (eprinomectin, febantel, fenbendazole, oxfendazole and moxidectin), seven antimicrobial agents (gentamicin, procaine benzylpenicillin, sarafloxacin, spectinomycin, chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline and tetracycline), three antiprotozoal agents (diclazuril, imidocarb and nicarbazin), one glucocorticosteroid (dexamethasone), one production aid (recombinant bovine somatotropins) and one tranquilizing agent (azaperone). Annexed to the report are a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including Acceptable Daily Intakes and MRLs, and further toxicological studies and other information required. PMID:10416362

  1. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Forty-third report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in foods. The first part of the report considers the evaluation of veterinary drugs with a long history of use and the implications of veterinary drug use in aquaculture, and discusses the need for adequate data. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: a beta-adrenoceptor-blocking agent (carazolol), seven antimicrobial agents (dihydrostreptomycin and streptomycin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, neomycin, oxolinic acid and spiramycin) a glucocorticosteroid (dexamethasone), and a tranquilizing agent (azaperone). Annexed to the report are a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including Acceptable Daily intakes and Maximum Residue Limits, and a list of further toxicological studies and other information required or desired. PMID:8585227

  2. Glucose Autoxidation Induces Functional Damage to Proteins via Modification of Critical Arginine Residues†

    PubMed Central

    Chetyrkin, Sergei; Mathis, Missy; Pedchenko, Vadim; Sanchez, Otto A.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Hachey, David L.; Madu, Hartman; Stec, Donald; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Non-enzymatic modification of proteins in hyperglycemia is a major mechanism causing diabetic complications. These modifications can have pathogenic consequences when they target active site residues, thus affecting protein function. In the present study, we examined the role of glucose autoxidation in functional protein damage using lysozyme and RGD-α3NC1 domain of collagen IV as model proteins in vitro. We demonstrated that glucose autoxidation induced inhibition of lysozyme activity as well as NC1 domain binding to αVβ3 integrin receptor via modification of critical arginine residues by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal while non-oxidative glucose adduction to the protein did not affect protein function. The role of RCS in protein damage was confirmed using pyridoxamine which blocked glucose autoxidation and RCS production, thus protecting protein function, even in the presence of high concentrations of glucose. Glucose autoxidation may cause protein damage in vivo since increased levels of GO-derived modifications of arginine residues were detected within the assembly interface of collagen IV NC1 domains isolated from renal ECM of diabetic rats. Since arginine residues are frequently present within protein active sites, glucose autoxidation may be a common mechanism contributing to ECM protein functional damage in hyperglycemia and oxidative environment. Our data also point out the pitfalls in functional studies, particularly in cell culture experiments, that involve glucose treatment but do not take into account toxic effects of RCS derived from glucose autoxidation. PMID:21661747

  3. Arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase has activity against primary acute myeloid leukemia cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miraki-Moud, Farideh; Ghazaly, Essam; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Hodby, Katharine A; Clear, Andrew; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Liapis, Konstantinos; Grantham, Marianne; Sohrabi, Fareeda; Cavenagh, Jamie; Bomalaski, John S; Gribben, John G; Szlosarek, Peter W; Bonnet, Dominique; Taussig, David C

    2015-06-25

    The strategy of enzymatic degradation of amino acids to deprive malignant cells of important nutrients is an established component of induction therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we show that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells from most patients with AML are deficient in a critical enzyme required for arginine synthesis, argininosuccinate synthetase-1 (ASS1). Thus, these ASS1-deficient AML cells are dependent on importing extracellular arginine. We therefore investigated the effect of plasma arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) against primary AMLs in a xenograft model and in vitro. ADI-PEG 20 alone induced responses in 19 of 38 AMLs in vitro and 3 of 6 AMLs in vivo, leading to caspase activation in sensitive AMLs. ADI-PEG 20-resistant AMLs showed higher relative expression of ASS1 than sensitive AMLs. This suggests that the resistant AMLs survive by producing arginine through this metabolic pathway and ASS1 expression could be used as a biomarker for response. Sensitive AMLs showed more avid uptake of arginine from the extracellular environment consistent with their auxotrophy for arginine. The combination of ADI-PEG 20 and cytarabine chemotherapy was more effective than either treatment alone resulting in responses in 6 of 6 AMLs tested in vivo. Our data show that arginine deprivation is a reasonable strategy in AML that paves the way for clinical trials. PMID:25896651

  4. Targeting Arginine-Dependent Cancers with Arginine-Degrading Enzymes: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Melissa M.; Sheaff, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Arginine deprivation is a novel antimetabolite strategy for the treatment of arginine-dependent cancers that exploits differential expression and regulation of key urea cycle enzymes. Several studies have focused on inactivation of argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) in a range of malignancies, including melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), mesothelial and urological cancers, sarcomas, and lymphomas. Epigenetic silencing has been identified as a key mechanism for loss of the tumor suppressor role of ASS1 leading to tumoral dependence on exogenous arginine. More recently, dysregulation of argininosuccinate lyase has been documented in a subset of arginine auxotrophic glioblastoma multiforme, HCC and in fumarate hydratase-mutant renal cancers. Clinical trials of several arginine depletors are ongoing, including pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20, Polaris Group) and bioengineered forms of human arginase. ADI-PEG20 is furthest along the path of clinical development from combinatorial phase 1 to phase 3 trials and is described in more detail. The challenge will be to identify tumors sensitive to drugs such as ADI-PEG20 and integrate these agents into multimodality drug regimens using imaging and tissue/fluid-based biomarkers as predictors of response. Lastly, resistance pathways to arginine deprivation require further study to optimize arginine-targeted therapies in the oncology clinic. PMID:24453997

  5. Interaction of arginine with protein during refolding process probed by amide H/D exchange mass spectrometry and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dawei; Liu, Yongdong; Zhang, Guifeng; Zhang, Chun; Li, Xiunan; Wang, Qingqing; Shi, Hong; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Arginine has been widely used as low molecular weight additive to promote protein refolding by suppressing aggregate formation. However, methods to investigate the role of arginine in protein refolding are often limited on protein's global conformational properties. Here, hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) was used to study the effects of arginine on recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) refolding at the scale of peptide mapping. It was found that deuteration levels of rhG-CSF refolded with arginine was higher than that without arginine during the whole refolding process, but they became almost the same when the refolding reached equilibrium. This phenomenon indicated that arginine could protect some amide deuterium atoms from being exchanged with hydrogen, but the protection diminished gradually along with refolding proceeding. Enzymatic digestion revealed six particular peptides of 16-47, 72-84, 84-93, 114-124, 145-153 and 154-162 were mainly responsible for the deuteration, and all of them dominantly located in protein's α-helix domain. Furthermore, thermodynamics analysis by isothermal titration calorimetry provided direct evidence that arginine could only react with denatured and partially refolded rhG-CSF. Taking all of the results together, we suggest that arginine suppresses protein aggregation by a reversible combination. At the initial refolding stage, arginine could combine with the denatured protein mainly through hydrogen bonding. Subsequently, arginine is gradually excluded from protein with protein's native conformation recovering.

  6. The Conserved Arginine Cluster in the Insert of the Third Cytoplasmic Loop of the Long Form of the D2 Dopamine Receptor (D2L-R) Acts as an Intracellular Retention Signal

    PubMed Central

    Kubale, Valentina; Blagotinšek, Kaja; Nøhr, Jane; Eidne, Karin A.; Vrecl, Milka

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether the conserved arginine cluster present within the 29-amino acid insert of the long form of the D2 dopamine receptor (D2L-R) confers its predominant intracellular localization. We hypothesized that the conserved arginine cluster (RRR) located within the insert could act as an RXR-type endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal. Arginine residues (R) within the cluster at positions 267, 268, and 269 were charge-reserved to glutamic acids (E), either individually or in clusters, thus generating single, double, and triple D2L-R mutants. Through analyses of cellular localization by confocal microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radioligand binding assay, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET2) β-arrestin 2 (βarr2) recruitment assay, and cAMP signaling, it was revealed that charge reversal of the R residues at all three positions within the motif impaired their colocalization with ER marker calnexin and led to significantly improved cell surface expression. Additionally, these data demonstrate that an R to glutamic acid (E) substitution at position 2 within the RXR motif is not functionally permissible. Furthermore, all generated D2L-R mutants preserved their functional integrity regarding ligand binding, agonist-induced βarr2 recruitment and Gαi-mediated signaling. In summary, our results show that the conserved arginine cluster within the 29-amino acid insert of third cytoplasmic loop (IC3) of the D2L-R appears to be the ER retention signal. PMID:27447620

  7. The Role of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases in Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, Byong Chul; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Hong, Sungyoul

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) mediate the methylation of a number of protein substrates of arginine residues and serve critical functions in many cellular responses, including cancer development, progression, and aggressiveness, T-lymphocyte activation, and hepatic gluconeogenesis. There are nine members of the PRMT family, which are divided into 4 types (types I–IV). Although most PRMTs do not require posttranslational modification (PTM) to be activated, fine-tuning modifications, such as interactions between cofactor proteins, subcellular compartmentalization, and regulation of RNA, via micro-RNAs, seem to be required. Inflammation is an essential defense reaction of the body to eliminate harmful stimuli, including damaged cells, irritants, or pathogens. However, chronic inflammation can eventually cause several types of diseases, including some cancers, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. Therefore, inflammation responses should be well modulated. In this review, we briefly discuss the role of PRMTs in the control of inflammation. More specifically, we review the roles of four PRMTs (CARM1, PRMT1, PRMT5, and PRMT6) in modulating inflammation responses, particularly in terms of modulating the transcriptional factors or cofactors related to inflammation. Based on the regulatory roles known so far, we propose that PRMTs should be considered one of the target molecule groups that modulate inflammatory responses. PMID:27041824

  8. Impaired nitric oxide production in children with MELAS syndrome and the effect of arginine and citrulline supplementation.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Emrick, Lisa T; Hsu, Jean W; Chanprasert, Sirisak; Almannai, Mohammed; Craigen, William J; Jahoor, Farook; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is one of the most frequent maternally inherited mitochondrial disorders. The pathogenesis of this syndrome is not fully understood and believed to result from several interacting mechanisms including impaired mitochondrial energy production, microvasculature angiopathy, and nitric oxide (NO) deficiency. NO deficiency in MELAS syndrome is likely to be multifactorial in origin with the decreased availability of the NO precursors, arginine and citrulline, playing a major role. In this study we used stable isotope infusion techniques to assess NO production in children with MELAS syndrome and healthy pediatric controls. We also assessed the effect of oral arginine and citrulline supplementations on NO production in children with MELAS syndrome. When compared to control subjects, children with MELAS syndrome were found to have lower NO production, arginine flux, plasma arginine, and citrulline flux. In children with MELAS syndrome, arginine supplementation resulted in increased NO production, arginine flux, and arginine concentration. Citrulline supplementation resulted in a greater increase of these parameters. Additionally, citrulline supplementation was associated with a robust increase in citrulline concentration and flux and de novo arginine synthesis rate. The greater effect of citrulline in increasing NO production is due to its greater ability to increase arginine availability particularly in the intracellular compartment in which NO synthesis takes place. This study, which is the first one to assess NO metabolism in children with mitochondrial diseases, adds more evidence to the notion that NO deficiency occurs in MELAS syndrome, suggests a better effect for citrulline because of its greater role as NO precursor, and indicates that impaired NO production occurs in children as well as adults with MELAS syndrome. Thus, the initiation of treatment with NO precursors may be

  9. A Biocompatible Arginine-based Polycation

    PubMed Central

    Zern, Blaine J.; Chu, Hunghao; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Gao, Jin; Wang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Self assembly between cations and anions is ubiquitous throughout nature. Important biological structures such as chromatin often use polyvalent assembly between a polycation and a polyaninon. Biomedical importance of synthetic polycations arises from their affinity to polyanions such as nucleic acid and heparan sulfate. However, the limited biocompatibility of synthetic polycations hampers the realization of their immense potential. By examining biocompatible cationic peptides, we hypothesize that a biocompatible polycation should be biodegradable and made from endogenous cations. We designed an arginine-based biodegradable polycation and demonstrated that it was orders of magnitude more compatible than conventional polycations in vitro and in vivo. This biocompatibility diminishes when L-arginine is substituted with D-arginine or when the biodegradable ester linker changes to a biostable ether linker. We believe this design can lead to many biocompatible polycations that can significantly advance a wide range of applications including controlled release, tissue engineering, biosensing, and medical devices. PMID:23393493

  10. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover and carbon content of a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleeem Abbasi, M.; Tahir, M. Mahmood; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2015-02-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in soil-plant systems. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water-filled pore space) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues, i.e., the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Populus euramericana, Robinia pseudoacacia and Elaeagnus umbellata, incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed a wide variation in total N, C, lignin, polyphenols and C / N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of Glycine max and the shoot and root of Trifolium repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% recovery of N that had been released from these added resources. The roots of Glycine max and Zea mays and the shoot of Zea mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation. After an initial immobilization, leaves of Populus euramericana, Robinia pseudoacacia and Elaeagnus umbellata exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively, and representing a 16, 32 and 33% N recovery, respectively. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ≤ 0.01) and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ≤ 0.01), C / N ratio (r = -0.69; p ≤ 0.05), lignin / N ratio (r = -0.68; p ≤ 0.05), polyphenol / N ratio (r = -0.73; p ≤ 0.05) and (lignin + polyphenol) : N ratio (r = -0.70; p ≤ 0.05) indicating a

  11. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on carbon-nitrogen content and nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover in a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, M. K.; Tahir, M. M.; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2014-10-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, soil properties improvement and plant growth promotion. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water filled pore space (WFPS)) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues i.e. the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Poplus euramericana, Rubinia pseudoacacia and Elagnus umbellate incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed wide variation in total N, carbon, lignin, polyphenols and C/N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of G. max and the shoot and root of T. repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% of added N being released from these resources. The roots of G. max and Z. mays and the shoot of Z. mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation showing net immobilization. After an initial immobilization, leaves of P. euramericana, R. pseudoacacia and E. umbellate exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively and representing a 16, 32 and 33% of added N being released. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ≤ 0.01), and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ≤ 0.01), C/N ratio (r = -0.69; p ≤ 0.05), lignin/N ratio (r = -0.68; p ≤ 0.05), polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.73; p ≤ 0.05) and ligin + polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.70; p ≤ 0.05) indicating

  12. Arginine conjugates of metallo-supramolecular cylinders prescribe helicity and enhance DNA junction binding and cellular activity.

    PubMed

    Cardo, Lucia; Sadovnikova, Victoria; Phongtongpasuk, Siriporn; Hodges, Nikolas J; Hannon, Michael J

    2011-06-21

    The conjugation of arginine residues at the ends of a metallo-supramolecular triple-helical cylinder enables absolute control over the helicity of the cylinder core, and boosts the DNA junction recognition by the complexes and their activity against a cancer cell line.

  13. Pancreatic cancer cell lines deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase are sensitive to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Tawnya L.; Kim, Randie; Galante, Joseph; Parsons, Colin M.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bold, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells can synthesize the non-essential amino acid arginine from aspartate and citrulline using the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). It has been observed that ASS is under-expressed in various types of cancers ASS, for which arginine become auxotrophic. Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a prokaryotic enzyme that metabolizes arginine to citrulline and has been found to inhibit melanoma and hepatoma cancer cells deficient of ASS. We tested the hypothesis that pancreatic cancers have low ASS expression and therefore arginine deprivation by ADI will inhibit cell growth. ASS expression was examined in 47 malignant and 20 non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues as well as a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Arginine deprivation was achieved by treatment with a recombinant form of ADI formulated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-ADI). Effects on caspase activation, cell growth and cell death were examined. Furthermore, the effect of PEG-ADI on the in vivo growth of pancreatic xenografts was examined. Eighty-seven percent of the tumors lacked ASS expression; 5 of 7 cell lines similarly lacked ASS expression. PEG-ADI specifically inhibited growth of those cell lines lacking ASS. PEG-ADI treatment induced caspase activation and induction of apoptosis. PEG-ADI was well tolerated in mice despite complete elimination of plasma arginine; tumor growth was inhibited by ∼50%. Reduced expression of ASS occurs in pancreatic cancer and predicts sensitivity to arginine deprivation achieved by PEG-ADI treatment. Therefore, these findings suggest that arginine deprivation by ADI could provide a beneficial strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a malignancy in which new therapy is desperately needed. PMID:18661517

  14. Pancreatic cancer cell lines deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase are sensitive to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Tawnya L; Kim, Randie; Galante, Joseph; Parsons, Colin M; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bold, Richard J

    2008-10-15

    Eukaryotic cells can synthesize the non-essential amino acid arginine from aspartate and citrulline using the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). It has been observed that ASS is underexpressed in various types of cancers ASS, for which arginine become auxotrophic. Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a prokaryotic enzyme that metabolizes arginine to citrulline and has been found to inhibit melanoma and hepatoma cancer cells deficient of ASS. We tested the hypothesis that pancreatic cancers have low ASS expression and therefore arginine deprivation by ADI will inhibit cell growth. ASS expression was examined in 47 malignant and 20 non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues as well as a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Arginine deprivation was achieved by treatment with a recombinant form of ADI formulated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-ADI). Effects on caspase activation, cell growth and cell death were examined. Furthermore, the effect of PEG-ADI on the in vivo growth of pancreatic xenografts was examined. Eighty-seven percent of the tumors lacked ASS expression; 5 of 7 cell lines similarly lacked ASS expression. PEG-ADI specifically inhibited growth of those cell lines lacking ASS. PEG-ADI treatment induced caspase activation and induction of apoptosis. PEG-ADI was well tolerated in mice despite complete elimination of plasma arginine; tumor growth was inhibited by approximately 50%. Reduced expression of ASS occurs in pancreatic cancer and predicts sensitivity to arginine deprivation achieved by PEG-ADI treatment. Therefore, these findings suggest that arginine deprivation by ADI could provide a beneficial strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a malignancy in which new therapy is desperately needed.

  15. JMJD6 Regulates ERα Methylation on Arginine

    PubMed Central

    Poulard, Coralie; Rambaud, Juliette; Hussein, Nader; Corbo, Laura; Le Romancer, Muriel

    2014-01-01

    ERα functions are tightly controlled by numerous post-translational modifications including arginine methylation, which is required to mediate the extranuclear functions of the receptor. We report that upon oestrogenic stimulation, JMJD6, the only arginine demethylase described so far, interacts with and regulates methylated ERα (metERα) function. Moreover, by combining the silencing of JMJD6 with demethylation assays, we show that metERα is a new substrate for JMJD6. We propose that the demethylase activity of JMJD6 is a decisive regulator of the rapid physiological responses to oestrogen. PMID:24498420

  16. Chemical modification of cationic residues in toxin a from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom.

    PubMed

    Lin, S R; Chi, S H; Chang, L S; Kuo, K W; Chang, C C

    1996-01-01

    The cationic groups of arginine and lysine residues in alpha-neurotoxin, Toxin a, isolated from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom were subjected to modification with trinitrobenzene sulfonate (TNBS) and p-hydroxyphenylglyoxal (HPG), respectively. The trinitrophenylated (TNP) derivatives of Toxin a at Lys-10, 56, or 71 showed approximately 25% residual lethality, and modifications on Lys-10 and 56 or Lys-10 and 50 resulted in a decrease of lethality by 84% and 86%, respectively. Modifications on Arg-34, 37, and 70 and Arg-34, 37, and 72 in Toxin a caused a decrease in lethality by 92% and 93%, respectively, and it almost completely lost its lethality and binding activity to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) when all four arginine residues were modified. These results indicate that in addition to the cationic residues on loop II (Arg-34, 37), loop III (Lys-50, 56), and the C-terminal tail (Arg-70, 72; Lys-71), Lys-10 on loop I is also related to the neurotoxicity of Toxin a.

  17. Arginine: A Potent Prey Attractant to Predatory Newts in Mountain Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, R. P.; Zimmer, R. K.

    2005-05-01

    Chemoreception of aquatic organisms has been well-studied in the laboratory, but rarely in the field. The California newt, Taricha torosa, in natural stream habitats is an excellent animal for exploring behavioral responses to prey odors. Here, we selected 13 amino acids for field bioassays based on their concentrations in prey tissue extracts. Bioassays were calibrated for stimulus dilution by means of fluorescent dye releases and flow-through spectrofluorometry. Moreover, hydrodynamic properties of stream flows were determined using an electromagnetic current meter. Of all amino acids tested, only arginine, alanine and glycine were significantly attractive (relative to stream water controls). These three substances caused free-ranging newts to turn upstream and swim towards the odor sources. Additional experiments showed that arginine was the most effective attractant, evoking plume-tracking behavior at concentrations as low as 10 nM. In subsequent trials, nine arginine analogs were tested, but each compound failed to elicit a significant response. Even subtle changes to arginine, such as the addition of a single carbon to the side chain, destroyed all bioactivity. Within its natural habitat, the California newt thus exhibits keen sensitivity and narrow tuning to the free amino acid, arginine, a chemical signal of its prey.

  18. Transition state stabilization by six arginines clustered in the active site of creatine kinase.

    PubMed

    Jourden, Michael J; Geiss, Paul R; Thomenius, Michael J; Horst, Lindsay A; Barty, Melissa M; Brym, Melissa J; Mulligan, Guy B; Almeida, Ryan M; Kersteen, Betsy A; Myers, Nichole R; Snider, Mark J; Borders, Charles L; Edmiston, Paul L

    2005-08-10

    Six fully conserved arginine residues (R129, R131, R235, R291, R319, and R340) closely grouped in the nucleotide binding site of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (rmCK) were mutated; four to alanine and all six to lysine. Kinetic analyses in the direction of phosphocreatine formation showed that all four alanine mutants led to substantial losses of activity with three (R129A, R131A, and R235A) having no detectable activity. All six lysine mutants retained variable degrees of reduced enzymatic activity. Static quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence was used to measure the binding constants for MgADP and MgATP. Nucleotide binding was at most only modestly affected by mutation of the arginine residues. Thus, the cluster of arginines seem to be primarily responsible for transition state stabilization which is further supported by the observation that none of the inactive mutants demonstrated the ability to form a transition analogue complex of MgADP.nitrate.creatine as determined by fluorescence quenching assays. As a whole, the results suggest that the most important role these residues play is to properly align the substrates for stabilization of the phosphoryl transfer reaction.

  19. Characterization and origin of bacterial arginine kinases.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomohiko; Soga, Shuhei; Inoue, Masahiro; Uda, Kouji

    2013-06-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) plays a key role in ATP buffering systems of tissues and nerves that display high and variable rates of ATP turnover and is widely distributed in invertebrate animals. The enzyme is also found in unicellular organisms, protists and bacteria, but its occurrence is intermittent among species. The AK sequence is structurally divided into two domains, N- and C-terminal domains. The purpose of this study is to clarify the origin of bacterial AK. A search of over 1700 bacterial genomic sequences revealed eight species from Deinococcus-Thermus (Oceanithermus profundus) and Proteobacteria (Ahrensia sp., Nitratifractor salsuginis, Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, Desulfotalea psychrophila, Myxococcus xanthus, Moritella sp. and Sulfurovum sp.) possessing a complete AK sequence homologue. In addition, we searched another key protein that is homologous with that of the C-terminal domain of AK (mcsB). The mcsB is more widely distributed in about 150 species across at least nine bacterial genera. In agreement with the report by other authors, a phylogenetic tree of AK homologues shows that the eight species are separated into two clusters: cluster-A with AKs from ciliates Tetrahymena and Sterkiella and a porifera and the larger cluster-B, including most of the invertebrate AKs. We cloned and expressed the AK from Sulfurovum lithotrophicum in cluster-A and determined its enzymatic properties. Bacterial AKs were characterized as having the highest catalytic efficiency among known AKs, although there was a marked difference in kcat values for cluster-A and -B bacterial AKs. These observations suggest that bacterial AKs in cluster-B may be the prototype of invertebrate AKs. On the other hand, it appears that bacterial AKs in cluster-A diverged at an early stage of bacterial evolution after the appearance of AK, or introduced by horizontal gene transfer.

  20. Arginine and citrulline and the immune response in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wijnands, Karolina A P; Castermans, Tessy M R; Hommen, Merel P J; Meesters, Dennis M; Poeze, Martijn

    2015-02-18

    Arginine, a semi-essential amino acid is an important initiator of the immune response. Arginine serves as a precursor in several metabolic pathways in different organs. In the immune response, arginine metabolism and availability is determined by the nitric oxide synthases and the arginase enzymes, which convert arginine into nitric oxide (NO) and ornithine, respectively. Limitations in arginine availability during inflammatory conditions regulate macrophages and T-lymfocyte activation. Furthermore, over the past years more evidence has been gathered which showed that arginine and citrulline deficiencies may underlie the detrimental outcome of inflammatory conditions, such as sepsis and endotoxemia. Not only does the immune response contribute to the arginine deficiency, also the impaired arginine de novo synthesis in the kidney has a key role in the eventual observed arginine deficiency. The complex interplay between the immune response and the arginine-NO metabolism is further underscored by recent data of our group. In this review we give an overview of physiological arginine and citrulline metabolism and we address the experimental and clinical studies in which the arginine-citrulline NO pathway plays an essential role in the immune response, as initiator and therapeutic target.

  1. Arginine and Citrulline and the Immune Response in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wijnands, Karolina A.P.; Castermans, Tessy M.R.; Hommen, Merel P.J.; Meesters, Dennis M.; Poeze, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Arginine, a semi-essential amino acid is an important initiator of the immune response. Arginine serves as a precursor in several metabolic pathways in different organs. In the immune response, arginine metabolism and availability is determined by the nitric oxide synthases and the arginase enzymes, which convert arginine into nitric oxide (NO) and ornithine, respectively. Limitations in arginine availability during inflammatory conditions regulate macrophages and T-lymfocyte activation. Furthermore, over the past years more evidence has been gathered which showed that arginine and citrulline deficiencies may underlie the detrimental outcome of inflammatory conditions, such as sepsis and endotoxemia. Not only does the immune response contribute to the arginine deficiency, also the impaired arginine de novo synthesis in the kidney has a key role in the eventual observed arginine deficiency. The complex interplay between the immune response and the arginine-NO metabolism is further underscored by recent data of our group. In this review we give an overview of physiological arginine and citrulline metabolism and we address the experimental and clinical studies in which the arginine-citrulline NO pathway plays an essential role in the immune response, as initiator and therapeutic target. PMID:25699985

  2. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5145 - Arginine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arginine. 582.5145 Section 582.5145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  7. Altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P; Jing, Y; Collie, N D; Dean, B; Bilkey, D K; Zhang, H

    2016-01-01

    Previous research implicates altered metabolism of l-arginine, a versatile amino acid with a number of bioactive metabolites, in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The present study, for we believe the first time, systematically compared the metabolic profile of l-arginine in the frontal cortex (Brodmann's area 8) obtained post-mortem from schizophrenic individuals and age- and gender-matched non-psychiatric controls (n=20 per group). The enzyme assays revealed no change in total nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, but significantly increased arginase activity in the schizophrenia group. Western blot showed reduced endothelial NOS protein expression and increased arginase II protein level in the disease group. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assays confirmed significantly reduced levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), but increased agmatine concentration and glutamate/GABA ratio in the schizophrenia cases. Regression analysis indicated positive correlations between arginase activity and the age of disease onset and between l-ornithine level and the duration of illness. Moreover, cluster analyses revealed that l-arginine and its main metabolites l-citrulline, l-ornithine and agmatine formed distinct groups, which were altered in the schizophrenia group. The present study provides further evidence of altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia, which enhances our understanding of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and may lead to the future development of novel preventions and/or therapeutics for the disease. PMID:27529679

  8. Arginine modifications by methylglyoxal: discovery in a recombinant monoclonal antibody and contribution to acidic species.

    PubMed

    Chumsae, Chris; Gifford, Kathreen; Lian, Wei; Liu, Hongcheng; Radziejewski, Czeslaw H; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2013-12-01

    Heterogeneity is common among protein therapeutics. For example, the so-called acidic species (charge variants) are typically observed when recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are analyzed by weak-cation exchange chromatography (WCX). Several protein post-translational modifications have been established as contributors but still cannot completely account for all heterogeneity. As reported herein, an unexpected modification by methylglyoxal (MGO) was identified, for the first time, in a recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Modifications of arginine residues by methylglyoxal lead to two adducts (dihydroxyimidazolidine and hydroimidazolone) with increases of molecular weights of 72 and 54 Da, respectively. In addition, the modification by methylglyoxal causes the antibody to elute earlier in the weak cation exchange chromatogram. Consequently, the extent to which an antibody was modified at multiple sites corresponds to the degree of shift in elution time. Furthermore, cell culture parameters also affected the extent of modifications by methylglyoxal, a highly reactive metabolite that can be generated from glucose or lipids or other metabolic pathways. Our findings again highlight the impact that cell culture conditions can have on the product quality of recombinant protein pharmaceuticals.

  9. Arginine Modifications by Methylglyoxal: Discovery in a Recombinant Monoclonal Antibody and Contribution to Acidic Species

    PubMed Central

    Chumsae, Chris; Gifford, Kathreen; Lian, Wei; Liu, Hongcheng; Radziejewski, Czeslaw H.; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity is common among protein therapeutics. For example, the so-called acidic species (charge variants) are typically observed when recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are analyzed by weak-cation exchange chromatography (WCX). Several protein post-translational modifications have been established as contributors, but still cannot completely account for all heterogeneity. As reported herein, an unexpected modification by methylglyoxal (MGO) was identified, for the first time, in a recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Modifications of arginine residues by methylglyoxal lead to two adducts (dihydroxyimidazolidine and hydroimidazolone) with increase of molecular weights of 72 and 54 Daltons, respectively. In addition, the modification by methylglyoxal causes the antibody to elute earlier in the weak cation exchange chromatogram. Consequently, the extent to which an antibody was modified at multiple sites corresponds to the degree of shift in elution time. Furthermore, cell culture parameters also affected the extent of modifications by methylglyoxal, a highly reactive metabolite that can be generated from glucose or lipids or other metabolic pathways. Our findings again highlight the impact that cell culture conditions can have on the product quality of recombinant protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:24168114

  10. Phosphorylation drives a dynamic switch in serine/arginine-rich proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shengqi; Gapsys, Vytautas; Kim, Hai-Young; Bessonov, Sergey; Hsiao, He-Hsuan; Möhlmann, Sina; Klaukien, Volker; Ficner, Ralf; Becker, Stefan; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; de Groot, Bert; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important players in RNA metabolism and are extensively phosphorylated at serine residues in RS repeats. Here, we show that phosphorylation switches the RS domain of the serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 from a fully disordered state to a partially rigidified arch-like structure. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the conformational switch is restricted to RS repeats, critically depends on the phosphate charge state and strongly decreases the conformational entropy of RS domains. The dynamic switch also occurs in the 100 kDa SR-related protein hPrp28, for which phosphorylation at the RS repeat is required for spliceosome assembly. Thus, a phosphorylation-induced dynamic switch is common to the class of serine/arginine-rich proteins and provides a molecular basis for the functional redundancy of serine/arginine-rich proteins and the profound influence of RS domain phosphorylation on protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. PMID:24183573

  11. Risk-based approach to developing a national residue sampling plan for testing under European Union regulation for veterinary medicinal products and coccidiostat feed additives in domestic animal production.

    PubMed

    Danaher, Martin; Shanahan, Conor; Butler, Francis; Evans, Rhodri; O'Sullivan, Dan; Glynn, Denise; Camon, Tim; Lawlor, Peadar; O'Keeffe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    A ranking system for veterinary medicinal products and coccidiostat feed additives has been developed as a tool to be applied in a risk-based approach to the residue testing programme for foods of animal origin in the Irish National Residue Control Plan (NRCP). Three characteristics of substances that may occur as residues in food are included in the developed risk ranking system: Potency, as measured by the acceptable daily intake assigned by the European Medicines Agency Committee for Medicinal Products for Veterinary Use, to each substance; Usage, as measured by the three factors of Number of Doses, use on Individual animals or for Group treatment, and Withdrawal Period; and Residue Occurrence, as measured by the number of Non-Compliant Samples in the NRCP. For both Number of Doses and Non-Compliant Samples, data for the 5-year period 2008-12 have been used. The risk ranking system for substances was developed for beef cattle, sheep and goats, pigs, chickens and dairy cattle using a scoring system applied to the various parameters described above to give an overall score based on the following equation: Potency × Usage (Number of Doses + Individual/Group Use + Withdrawal Period) × Residue Occurrence. Applying this risk ranking system, the following substances are ranked very highly: antimicrobials such as amoxicillin (for all species except pigs), marbofloxacillin (for beef cattle), oxytetracycline (for all species except chickens), sulfadiazine with trimethoprim (for pigs and chickens) and tilmicosin (for chickens); antiparasitic drugs, such as the benzimidazoles triclabendazole (for beef and dairy cattle), fenbendazole/oxfendazole (for sheep/goats and dairy cattle) and albendazole (for dairy cattle), the avermectin ivermectin (for beef cattle), and anti-fluke drugs closantel and rafoxanide (for sheep/goats); the anticoccidials monensin, narasin, nicarbazin and toltrazuril (for chickens). The risk ranking system described is a relatively simple system

  12. Risk-based approach to developing a national residue sampling plan for testing under European Union regulation for veterinary medicinal products and coccidiostat feed additives in domestic animal production.

    PubMed

    Danaher, Martin; Shanahan, Conor; Butler, Francis; Evans, Rhodri; O'Sullivan, Dan; Glynn, Denise; Camon, Tim; Lawlor, Peadar; O'Keeffe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    A ranking system for veterinary medicinal products and coccidiostat feed additives has been developed as a tool to be applied in a risk-based approach to the residue testing programme for foods of animal origin in the Irish National Residue Control Plan (NRCP). Three characteristics of substances that may occur as residues in food are included in the developed risk ranking system: Potency, as measured by the acceptable daily intake assigned by the European Medicines Agency Committee for Medicinal Products for Veterinary Use, to each substance; Usage, as measured by the three factors of Number of Doses, use on Individual animals or for Group treatment, and Withdrawal Period; and Residue Occurrence, as measured by the number of Non-Compliant Samples in the NRCP. For both Number of Doses and Non-Compliant Samples, data for the 5-year period 2008-12 have been used. The risk ranking system for substances was developed for beef cattle, sheep and goats, pigs, chickens and dairy cattle using a scoring system applied to the various parameters described above to give an overall score based on the following equation: Potency × Usage (Number of Doses + Individual/Group Use + Withdrawal Period) × Residue Occurrence. Applying this risk ranking system, the following substances are ranked very highly: antimicrobials such as amoxicillin (for all species except pigs), marbofloxacillin (for beef cattle), oxytetracycline (for all species except chickens), sulfadiazine with trimethoprim (for pigs and chickens) and tilmicosin (for chickens); antiparasitic drugs, such as the benzimidazoles triclabendazole (for beef and dairy cattle), fenbendazole/oxfendazole (for sheep/goats and dairy cattle) and albendazole (for dairy cattle), the avermectin ivermectin (for beef cattle), and anti-fluke drugs closantel and rafoxanide (for sheep/goats); the anticoccidials monensin, narasin, nicarbazin and toltrazuril (for chickens). The risk ranking system described is a relatively simple system

  13. Identification of key residues involved in Si transport by the aquaglyceroporins.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Gabriel A; Garneau, Alexandre P; Marcoux, Andrée-Anne; Noël, Micheline; Frenette-Cotton, Rachelle; Isenring, Paul

    2016-09-01

    We recently demonstrated that the aquaglyceroporins (AQGPs) could act as potent transporters for orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4). Although interesting, this finding raised the question of whether water and H4SiO4, the transportable form of Si, permeate AQGPs by interacting with the same region of the pore, especially in view of the difference in molecular radius between the two substrates. Here, our goal was to identify residues that endow the AQGPs with the ability to facilitate Si diffusion by examining the transport characteristics of mutants in which residues were interchanged between a water-permeable but Si-impermeable channel (aquaporin 1 [AQP1]) and a Si-permeable but water-impermeable channel (AQP10). Our results indicate that the composition of the arginine filter (XX/R), known to include three residues that play an important role in water transport, may also be involved in Si selectivity. Interchanging the identities of the nonarginine residues within this filter causes Si transport to increase by approximately sevenfold in AQP1 and to decrease by approximately threefold in AQP10, whereas water transport and channel expression remain unaffected. Our results further indicate that two additional residues in the AQP arginine filter may be involved in substrate selectivity: replacing one of the residues has a profound effect on water permeability, and replacing the other has a profound effect on Si permeability. This study has thus led to the identification of residues that could play a key role in Si transport by the AQGPs and shown that substrate selectivity is likely ensured by more than one checkpoint within or near the pore.

  14. Identification of key residues involved in Si transport by the aquaglyceroporins.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Gabriel A; Garneau, Alexandre P; Marcoux, Andrée-Anne; Noël, Micheline; Frenette-Cotton, Rachelle; Isenring, Paul

    2016-09-01

    We recently demonstrated that the aquaglyceroporins (AQGPs) could act as potent transporters for orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4). Although interesting, this finding raised the question of whether water and H4SiO4, the transportable form of Si, permeate AQGPs by interacting with the same region of the pore, especially in view of the difference in molecular radius between the two substrates. Here, our goal was to identify residues that endow the AQGPs with the ability to facilitate Si diffusion by examining the transport characteristics of mutants in which residues were interchanged between a water-permeable but Si-impermeable channel (aquaporin 1 [AQP1]) and a Si-permeable but water-impermeable channel (AQP10). Our results indicate that the composition of the arginine filter (XX/R), known to include three residues that play an important role in water transport, may also be involved in Si selectivity. Interchanging the identities of the nonarginine residues within this filter causes Si transport to increase by approximately sevenfold in AQP1 and to decrease by approximately threefold in AQP10, whereas water transport and channel expression remain unaffected. Our results further indicate that two additional residues in the AQP arginine filter may be involved in substrate selectivity: replacing one of the residues has a profound effect on water permeability, and replacing the other has a profound effect on Si permeability. This study has thus led to the identification of residues that could play a key role in Si transport by the AQGPs and shown that substrate selectivity is likely ensured by more than one checkpoint within or near the pore. PMID:27527099

  15. L-arginine in combination with sildenafil potentiates the attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Hiti, H; Chovanec, M; Melenovský, V; Vajnerová, O; Baňasová, A; Kautzner, J; Herget, J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia induces an increased production of nitric oxide (NO) in pulmonary prealveolar arterioles. Bioavailability of the NO in the pulmonary vessels correlates with concentration of L-arginine as well as activity of phosphodiesterase-5 enzyme (PDE-5). We tested a hypothesis whether a combination of L-arginine and PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil has an additive effect in reduction of the hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) in rats. Animals were exposed to chronic normobaric hypoxia for 3 weeks. In the AH group, rats were administered L-arginine during chronic hypoxic exposure. In the SH group, rats were administered sildenafil during chronic hypoxic exposure. In the SAH group, rats were treated by the combination of L-arginine as well as sildenafil during exposure to chronic hypoxia. Mean PAP, structural remodeling of peripheral pulmonary arterioles (%DL) and RV/LV+S ratio was significantly decreased in the SAH group compared to hypoxic controls even decreased compared to the AH and the SH groups in first two measured parameters. Plasmatic concentration of cGMP and NOx were significantly lower in the SAH group compared to hypoxic controls. We demonstrate that NO synthase substrate L-arginine and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil administered in combination are more potent in attenuation of the HPH compared to a treatment by substances given alone. PMID:23869884

  16. Activities of Arginine and Ornithine Decarboxylases in Various Plant Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Birecka, Helena; Bitonti, Alan J.; McCann, Peter P.

    1985-01-01

    In extracts from the youngest leaves of Avena sativa, Hordeum vulgare, Zea Mays, Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris, Lactuca sativa, and four pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing species of Heliotropium, the activities of ornithine decarboxylase, close to Vmax, ranged between traces and 1.5 nanomoles per hour per gram fresh weight when based on putrescine formed during incubation with labeled ornithine. The arginine decarboxylase activities in the same extracts ranged between 8 and 8000 nanomoles per hour per gram fresh weight being lowest in the borages and highest in oat and barley. α-Difluoromethylornithine and α-difluoromethylarginine inhibited ornithine and arginine decarboxylases, respectively, in all species. Agmatine, putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were found in all, diaminopropane in eight, and cadaverine in three species. No correlation was observed between arginine or ornithine decarboxylase level and the levels of total polyamines. The in vitro decarboxylase activities found in the borages cannot explain the high accumulation of putrescine-derived pyrrolizidines in their youngest leaves if the pyrrolizidines are produced in situ from arginine and/or ornithine as precursors; other possibilities are discussed. In assays of ornithine decarboxylase, an interference of decarboxylation not due to this enzyme was observed in extracts from all species. In arginine decarboxylase assays, the interfering decarboxylation as well as the interference of arginase were apparent in two species. Addition of aminoguanidine was needed to suppress oxidative degradation of putrescine and agmatine during incubation of extracts from pea, bean, lettuce, Heliotropium angiospermum, and Heliotropium indicum. PMID:16664442

  17. Arginine de novo and nitric oxide production in disease states.

    PubMed

    Luiking, Yvette C; Ten Have, Gabriella A M; Wolfe, Robert R; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2012-11-15

    Arginine is derived from dietary protein intake, body protein breakdown, or endogenous de novo arginine production. The latter may be linked to the availability of citrulline, which is the immediate precursor of arginine and limiting factor for de novo arginine production. Arginine metabolism is highly compartmentalized due to the expression of the enzymes involved in arginine metabolism in various organs. A small fraction of arginine enters the NO synthase (NOS) pathway. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential and rate-limiting cofactor for the production of NO. Depletion of BH4 in oxidative-stressed endothelial cells can result in so-called NOS3 "uncoupling," resulting in production of superoxide instead of NO. Moreover, distribution of arginine between intracellular transporters and arginine-converting enzymes, as well as between the arginine-converting and arginine-synthesizing enzymes, determines the metabolic fate of arginine. Alternatively, NO can be derived from conversion of nitrite. Reduced arginine availability stemming from reduced de novo production and elevated arginase activity have been reported in various conditions of acute and chronic stress, which are often characterized by increased NOS2 and reduced NOS3 activity. Cardiovascular and pulmonary disorders such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, ischemic heart disease, and hypertension are characterized by NOS3 uncoupling. Therapeutic applications to influence (de novo) arginine and NO metabolism aim at increasing substrate availability or at influencing the metabolic fate of specific pathways related to NO bioavailability and prevention of NOS3 uncoupling. These include supplementation of arginine or citrulline, provision of NO donors including inhaled NO and nitrite (sources), NOS3 modulating agents, or the targeting of endogenous NOS inhibitors like asymmetric dimethylarginine.

  18. Structural insight into the arginine-binding specificity of CASTOR1 in amino acid-dependent mTORC1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Tianlong; Ding, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is central to the cellular response to changes in nutrient signals such as amino acids. CASTOR1 is shown to be an arginine sensor, which plays an important role in the activation of the mTORC1 pathway. In the deficiency of arginine, CASTOR1 interacts with GATOR2, which together with GATOR1 and Rag GTPases controls the relocalization of mTORC1 to lysosomes. The binding of arginine to CASTOR1 disrupts its association with GATOR2 and hence activates the mTORC1 signaling. Here, we report the crystal structure of CASTOR1 in complex with arginine at 2.5 Å resolution. CASTOR1 comprises of four tandem ACT domains with an architecture resembling the C-terminal allosteric domains of aspartate kinases. ACT1 and ACT3 adopt the typical βαββαβ topology and function in dimerization via the conserved residues from helices α1 of ACT1 and α5 of ACT3; whereas ACT 2 and ACT4, both comprising of two non-sequential regions, assume the unusual ββαββα topology and contribute an arginine-binding pocket at the interface. The bound arginine makes a number of hydrogen-bonding interactions and extensive hydrophobic contacts with the surrounding residues of the binding pocket. The functional roles of the key residues are validated by mutagenesis and biochemical assays. Our structural and functional data together reveal the molecular basis for the arginine-binding specificity of CASTOR1 in the arginine-dependent activation of the mTORC1 signaling. PMID:27648300

  19. Structural insight into the arginine-binding specificity of CASTOR1 in amino acid-dependent mTORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Tianlong; Ding, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is central to the cellular response to changes in nutrient signals such as amino acids. CASTOR1 is shown to be an arginine sensor, which plays an important role in the activation of the mTORC1 pathway. In the deficiency of arginine, CASTOR1 interacts with GATOR2, which together with GATOR1 and Rag GTPases controls the relocalization of mTORC1 to lysosomes. The binding of arginine to CASTOR1 disrupts its association with GATOR2 and hence activates the mTORC1 signaling. Here, we report the crystal structure of CASTOR1 in complex with arginine at 2.5 Å resolution. CASTOR1 comprises of four tandem ACT domains with an architecture resembling the C-terminal allosteric domains of aspartate kinases. ACT1 and ACT3 adopt the typical βαββαβ topology and function in dimerization via the conserved residues from helices α1 of ACT1 and α5 of ACT3; whereas ACT 2 and ACT4, both comprising of two non-sequential regions, assume the unusual ββαββα topology and contribute an arginine-binding pocket at the interface. The bound arginine makes a number of hydrogen-bonding interactions and extensive hydrophobic contacts with the surrounding residues of the binding pocket. The functional roles of the key residues are validated by mutagenesis and biochemical assays. Our structural and functional data together reveal the molecular basis for the arginine-binding specificity of CASTOR1 in the arginine-dependent activation of the mTORC1 signaling.

  20. Structural insight into the arginine-binding specificity of CASTOR1 in amino acid-dependent mTORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Tianlong; Ding, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is central to the cellular response to changes in nutrient signals such as amino acids. CASTOR1 is shown to be an arginine sensor, which plays an important role in the activation of the mTORC1 pathway. In the deficiency of arginine, CASTOR1 interacts with GATOR2, which together with GATOR1 and Rag GTPases controls the relocalization of mTORC1 to lysosomes. The binding of arginine to CASTOR1 disrupts its association with GATOR2 and hence activates the mTORC1 signaling. Here, we report the crystal structure of CASTOR1 in complex with arginine at 2.5 Å resolution. CASTOR1 comprises of four tandem ACT domains with an architecture resembling the C-terminal allosteric domains of aspartate kinases. ACT1 and ACT3 adopt the typical βαββαβ topology and function in dimerization via the conserved residues from helices α1 of ACT1 and α5 of ACT3; whereas ACT 2 and ACT4, both comprising of two non-sequential regions, assume the unusual ββαββα topology and contribute an arginine-binding pocket at the interface. The bound arginine makes a number of hydrogen-bonding interactions and extensive hydrophobic contacts with the surrounding residues of the binding pocket. The functional roles of the key residues are validated by mutagenesis and biochemical assays. Our structural and functional data together reveal the molecular basis for the arginine-binding specificity of CASTOR1 in the arginine-dependent activation of the mTORC1 signaling. PMID:27648300

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi: Oxidative stress induces arginine kinase expression.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Mariana R; Canepa, Gaspar E; Bouvier, Leon A; Pereira, Claudio A

    2006-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi arginine kinase is a key enzyme in cell energy management and is also involved in pH and nutritional stress response mechanisms. T. cruzi epimastigotes treated with hydrogen peroxide presented a time-dependent increase in arginine kinase expression, up to 10-fold, when compared with untreated parasites. Among other oxidative stress-generating compounds tested, only nifurtimox produced more than 2-fold increase in arginine kinase expression. Moreover, parasites overexpressing arginine kinase showed significantly increased survival capability during hydrogen peroxide exposure. These findings suggest the participation of arginine kinase in oxidative stress response systems. PMID:16725140

  2. Regulation of Pyrimidine and Arginine Biosynthesis Investigated by the Use of Phaseolotoxin and 5-Fluorouracil 1

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Steve; Sung, Zinmay Renee

    1981-01-01

    Purified phaseolotoxin inhibits the growth of carrot cells. Such inhibitions can be reversed completely by citrulline but not by arginine. This toxin inhibits ornithine transcarbamylase activity in vitro, which leads to an accumulation of ornithine and a decrease in arginine levels intracellularly. In carrot cells, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) toxicity can be reduced by the addition of purified toxin and citrulline, or ornithine. The toxin also decreases the incorporation of [14C]uracil and [14C]5-FU into trichloroacetic acid precipitable material by 50%. Finally, a 5-FU-resistant line, F5 (Sung ZR, Jacques S 1980 Planta 148: 389-396), was found to be more sensitive to the toxin than were 5-FU-sensitive cells. One millimolar 5-FU roughly doubled the ability of F5 to tolerate phaseolotoxin. These results demonstrate a close regulation between the pyrimidine and arginine path-ways in carrots. PMID:16661663

  3. Site-directed mutation of arginine 282 to glutamate uncouples the movement of peptides and protons by the rabbit proton-peptide cotransporter PepT1.

    PubMed

    Meredith, David

    2004-04-16

    A conserved positive residue in the seventh transmembrane domain of the mammalian proton-coupled di- and tripeptide transporter PepT1 has been shown by site-directed mutagenesis to be a key residue for protein function. Substitution of arginine 282 with a glutamate residue (R282E-PepT1) gave a protein at the plasma membrane of Xenopus laevis oocytes that was able to transport the non-hydrolyzable dipeptide [3H]d-Phe-l-Gln, although unlike the wild type, the rate of transport by R282E-PepT1 was independent of the extracellular pH level, and the substrate could not be accumulated above equilibrium. The binding affinity of the mutant transport protein was unchanged from the wild type. Thus, R282E-Pept1 appears to have been changed from a proton-driven to a facilitated transporter for peptides. In addition, peptide transport by R282E-PepT1 still induced depolarization as measured by microelectrode recordings of membrane potential. A more detailed study by two-electrode voltage clamping revealed that R282E-PepT1 behaved as a peptide-gated non-selective cation channel with the ion selectivity series lithium > sodium > N-methyl-d-glucamine at pH 7.4. There was also a proton conductance (comparing pH 7.4 and 8.4), and at pH 5.5 the predominant conductance was for potassium ions. Therefore, it can be concluded that changing arginine 282 to a glutamate not only uncouples the cotransport of protons and peptides of the wild-type PepT1 but also creates a peptide-gated cation channel in the protein.

  4. The role of arginine in infection and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Luiking, Yvette C; Poeze, Martijn; Ramsay, Graham; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2005-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic response to an infection, with high morbidity and mortality rates. Metabolic changes during infection and sepsis could be related to changes in metabolism of the amino acid L-arginine. In sepsis, protein breakdown is increased, which is a key process to maintain arginine delivery because both endogenous de novo arginine production from citrulline and food intake are reduced. Arginine catabolism, on the other hand, is markedly increased by enhanced use of arginine via the arginase and nitric oxide pathways. As a result, lowered plasma arginine levels are usually found. Arginine may therefore be considered as an essential amino acid in sepsis, and supplementation could be beneficial in sepsis by improving microcirculation and protein anabolism. L-Arginine supplementation in a hyperdynamic pig model of sepsis prohibits the increase in pulmonary arterial blood pressure, improves muscle and liver protein metabolism, and restores the intestinal motility pattern. Arguments raised against arginine supplementation are mainly pointed at stimulating nitric oxide (NO) production, with concerns about toxicity of increased NO and hemodynamic instability with refractory hypotension. NO synthase inhibition, however, increased mortality. Arginine supplementation in septic patients has transient effects on hemodynamics when supplied as a bolus but seems without hemodynamic side effects when supplied continuously. In conclusion, arginine could have an essential role in infection and sepsis.

  5. Dietary arginine requirement of juvenile hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M E; Wilson, K A; Brown, P B

    1994-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the dietary arginine requirement of juvenile hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops); a third experiment evaluated the interaction of lysine and arginine. Diets in Experiments 1 and 2 were supplemented with graded concentrations of L-arginine-HCl, resulting in eight dietary treatments. Dietary arginine concentrations ranged from 1.0 to 2.4 g/100 g diet in Experiment 1 and from 0.6 to 2.0 g/100 g diet in Experiment 2. Weight gain was not affected by dietary treatments in Experiment 1. Feed efficiency was significantly affected by dietary arginine concentrations, and the data, when subjected to broken-line analysis, resulted in a requirement estimate of 1.53 +/- 0.20 g/100 g diet. Weight gain and feed efficiency were both significantly affected by dietary arginine concentrations in Experiment 2. Broken-line analyses of weight gain and feed efficiency data indicated the dietary arginine requirement to be 1.55 +/- 0.10 and 1.45 +/- 0.12 g/100 g diet, respectively. Diets in Experiment 3 contained lysine and arginine in ratios of 1:1, 1:1.5, 1:2 and 1:2.5 for the previously estimated requirements for both lysine:arginine and arginine:lysine. No differences were observed in weight gain or feed efficiency for fish fed various lysine:arginine ratios, but serum lysine was significantly different among treatment groups.

  6. Activity concentrations of 224Ra, 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K radionuclides in refinery products and the additional radiation dose originated from oil residues in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Parmaksiz, A; Agus, Y; Bulgurlu, F; Bulur, E; Yildiz, Ç; Öncü, T

    2013-10-01

    A total of 56 crude oil, refinery product, waste water, sludge and scale samples collected from three refineries were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Except for nine samples, all refinery product samples were found to have activity concentrations below the minimum detectable activity (MDA) values. The maximum (224)Ra, (226)Ra, (228)Ra and (40)K activity concentrations in crude oil and refinery product samples were measured as 11.7 ± 4.5, 14.9 ± 3.5, 11.6 ± 4.5, 248.5 ± 18.5 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The maximum (224)Ra, (226)Ra, (228)Ra and (40)K activity concentrations in scale, sludge and water samples were measured as 343.7 ± 11.8, 809.2 ± 29.0, 302.5 ± 21.6, 623.0 ± 80.9 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Radium equivalent activities of the residue samples were calculated up to 1241.8 ± 42.4 Bq kg(-1). The maximum activity concentration index and the alpha index were found to be 4.2 and 4.0, respectively. The annual effective doses of residue samples were calculated below the permitted dose rate for the public, i.e. 1 mSv y(-1).

  7. Structure-based rational design and introduction of arginines on the surface of an alkaline α-amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica for improved thermostability.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhuangmei; Yang, Haiquan; Shin, Hyun-dong; Li, Jianghua; Liu, Long

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the thermostability of an alkaline α-amylase from Alkalimonas amylolytica was significantly improved through structure-based rational and the introduction of multiple arginines (Arg) on the protein surface. Based on an analysis of the tertiary structure, seven residues (glutamine (Gln) 166, Gln 169, serine (Ser) 270, lysine (Lys) 315, Gln 327, asparagine (Asn) 346, and Asn 423) were selected as engineering targets and individually replaced with arginine. Five of the seven single-mutated enzymes-S270R, K315R, Q327R, N346R, and N423R-showed enhanced thermostability. Multiple arginines were subsequently introduced on the protein surface, and the quintuple-mutated enzyme S270R/K315R/Q327R/N346R/N423R showed a 6.4-fold improvement in half-life at 60 and a 5.4 °C increase in melting temperature (T m) compared with those of wild-type enzyme. Concomitantly, the optimal temperature, optimal pH, and catalytic efficiency of this mutated enzyme also improved. The mutated enzyme displayed a large shift in optimal pH from 9.5 to 11.0. In addition, the optimum temperature increased from 50 to 55 °C, and the catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m) increased from 1.8 × 10(4) to 3.6 × 10(4) L/(g · min). The intramolecular interactions of mutated enzymes that contributed to increased thermostability were examined through comparative analysis of the model structures of wild-type and mutated enzymes. The thermostable mutated enzymes generated in this study have potential applications in the textile industry.

  8. Unique Features of Human Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 9 (PRMT9) and Its Substrate RNA Splicing Factor SF3B2*

    PubMed Central

    Hadjikyriacou, Andrea; Yang, Yanzhong; Espejo, Alexsandra; Bedford, Mark T.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Human protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) 9 symmetrically dimethylates arginine residues on splicing factor SF3B2 (SAP145) and has been functionally linked to the regulation of alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis studies on this enzyme and its substrate had revealed essential unique residues in the double E loop and the importance of the C-terminal duplicated methyltransferase domain. In contrast to what had been observed with other PRMTs and their physiological substrates, a peptide containing the methylatable Arg-508 of SF3B2 was not recognized by PRMT9 in vitro. Although amino acid substitutions of residues surrounding Arg-508 had no great effect on PRMT9 recognition of SF3B2, moving the arginine residue within this sequence abolished methylation. PRMT9 and PRMT5 are the only known mammalian enzymes capable of forming symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) residues as type II PRMTs. We demonstrate here that the specificity of these enzymes for their substrates is distinct and not redundant. The loss of PRMT5 activity in mouse embryo fibroblasts results in almost complete loss of SDMA, suggesting that PRMT5 is the primary SDMA-forming enzyme in these cells. PRMT9, with its duplicated methyltransferase domain and conserved sequence in the double E loop, appears to have a unique structure and specificity among PRMTs for methylating SF3B2 and potentially other polypeptides. PMID:25979344

  9. How Common Is Disorder? Occurrence of Disordered Residues in Four Domains of Life

    PubMed Central

    Lobanov, Mikhail Yu.; Galzitskaya, Oxana V.

    2015-01-01

    Disordered regions play important roles in protein adaptation to challenging environmental conditions. Flexible and disordered residues have the highest propensities to alter the protein packing. Therefore, identification of disordered/flexible regions is important for structural and functional analysis of proteins. We used the IsUnstruct program to predict the ordered or disordered status of residues in 122 proteomes, including 97 eukaryotic and 25 large bacterial proteomes larger than 2,500,000 residues. We found that bacterial and eukaryotic proteomes contain comparable fraction of disordered residues, which was 0.31 in the bacterial and 0.38 in the eukaryotic proteomes. Additional analysis of the total of 1540 bacterial proteomes of various sizes yielded a smaller fraction of disordered residues, which was only 0.26. Together, the results showed that the larger is the size of the proteome, the larger is the fraction of the disordered residues. A continuous dependence of the fraction of disordered residues on the size of the proteome is observed for four domains of life: Eukaryota, Bacteria, Archaea, and Viruses. Furthermore, our analysis of 122 proteomes showed that the fraction of disordered residues increased with increasing the length of homo-repeats for polar, charged, and small residues, and decreased for hydrophobic residues. The maximal fraction of disordered residues was obtained for proteins containing lysine and arginine homo-repeats. The minimal fraction was found in valine and leucine homo-repeats. For 15-residue long homo-repeats these values were 0.2 (for Val and Leu) and 0.7 (for Lys and Arg). PMID:26295225

  10. MEP50/PRMT5 reduces gene expression by histone arginine methylation and this is reversed by PKCδ/p38δ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Kamalika; Adhikary, Gautam; Eckert, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    PKCδ and p38δ are key proteins in a cascade that stimulates keratinocyte differentiation. This cascade activates transcription of involucrin (hINV) and other genes associated with differentiation. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is an arginine methyltransferase that symmetrically dimethylates arginine residues. This protein interacts with a cofactor, MEP50, and symmetrically dimethylates arginine eight of histone 3 (H3R8me2s) and arginine three of histone 4 (H4R3me2s) to silence gene expression. We use the involucrin gene as a tool to understand the relationship between PKCδ/p38δ and PRMT5/MEP50 signaling. MEP50 suppresses hINV mRNA level and promoter activity. This is associated with increased arginine dimethylation of hINV gene-associated H3/H4. We further show that the PKCδ/p38δ keratinocyte differentiation cascade reduces PRMT5 and MEP50 expression, association with the hINV gene promoter, and H3R8me2s and H4R2me2s formation. We propose that PRMT5/MEP50-dependent methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that assists in silencing of hINV expression, and that PKCδ signaling activates gene expression by directly activating transcription and by suppressing PRMT5/MEP50 dependent arginine dimethylation of promoter associated histones. This is an example of crosstalk between PKCδ/p38δ signaling and PRMT5/MEP50 epigenetic silencing. PMID:26763441

  11. Protein arginine methyltransferase 6 enhances polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor function and toxicity in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzzino, Chiara; Casci, Ian; Parodi, Sara; Lievens, Patricia M J; Polanco, Maria J; Milioto, Carmelo; Chivet, Mathilde; Monaghan, John; Mishra, Ashutosh; Badders, Nisha; Aggarwal, Tanya; Grunseich, Christopher; Sambataro, Fabio; Basso, Manuela; Fackelmayer, Frank O; Taylor, J Paul; Pandey, Udai Bhan; Pennuto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine expansion in androgen receptor (AR) is responsible for spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) that leads to selective loss of lower motor neurons. Using SBMA as a model, we explored the relationship between protein structure/function and neurodegeneration in polyglutamine diseases. We show here that protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6) is a specific co-activator of normal and mutant AR and that the interaction of PRMT6 with AR is significantly enhanced in the AR mutant. AR and PRMT6 interaction occurs through the PRMT6 steroid receptor interaction motif, LXXLL, and the AR activating function 2 surface. AR transactivation requires PRMT6 catalytic activity and involves methylation of arginine residues at Akt consensus site motifs, which is mutually exclusive with serine phosphorylation by Akt. The enhanced interaction of PRMT6 and mutant AR leads to neurodegeneration in cell and fly models of SBMA. These findings demonstrate a direct role of arginine methylation in polyglutamine disease pathogenesis.

  12. Evolution of phosphagen kinase V. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of two molluscan arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Ban, T; Furukohri, T

    1997-06-20

    The cDNAs of arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica (Polyplacophora) and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus (Gastropoda) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the complete nucleotide sequences of 1669 and 1624 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Liolophura arginine kinase is 1050 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 349 amino acid residues, and that for Battilus is 1077 nucleotides and 358 residues. The validity of the cDNA-derived amino acid sequence was supported by chemical sequencing of internal tryptic peptides. The molecular masses were calculated to be 39,057 and 39,795 Da, respectively. The amino acid sequence of Liolophura arginine kinase showed 65-68% identity with those of Battilus and Nordotis (abalone) arginine kinases, and the homology between Battilus and Nordotis was 79%. Molluscan arginine kinases also show lower, but significant homology (38-43%) with rabbit creatine kinase. The sequences of arginine kinases could be used as a molecular clock to elucidate the phylogeny of Mollusca, one of the most diverse animal phyla.

  13. Protein arginine Methyltransferase 8 gene is expressed in pluripotent stem cells and its expression is modulated by the transcription factor Sox2.

    PubMed

    Solari, Claudia; Echegaray, Camila Vázquez; Luzzani, Carlos; Cosentino, María Soledad; Waisman, Ariel; Petrone, María Victoria; Francia, Marcos; Sassone, Alina; Canizo, Jésica; Sevlever, Gustavo; Barañao, Lino; Miriuka, Santiago; Guberman, Alejandra

    2016-04-22

    Addition of methyl groups to arginine residues is catalyzed by a group of enzymes called Protein Arginine Methyltransferases (Prmt). Although Prmt1 is essential in development, its paralogue Prmt8 has been poorly studied. This gene was reported to be expressed in nervous system and involved in neurogenesis. In this work, we found that Prmt8 is expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and in induced pluripotent stem cells, and modulated along differentiation to neural precursor cells. We found that Prmt8 promoter activity is induced by the pluripotency transcription factors Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog. Moreover, endogenous Prmt8 mRNA levels were reduced in ESC transfected with Sox2 shRNA vector. As a whole, our results indicate that Prmt8 is expressed in pluripotent stem cells and its transcription is modulated by pluripotency transcription factors. These findings suggest that besides its known function in nervous system, Prmt8 could play a role in pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27012206

  14. Type II arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 regulates gene expression of inhibitors of differentiation/DNA binding Id2 and Id4 during glial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinghan; Vogel, Gillian; Yu, Zhenbao; Almazan, Guillermina; Richard, Stéphane

    2011-12-30

    PRMT5 is a type II protein arginine methyltranferase that catalyzes monomethylation and symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues. PRMT5 is functionally involved in a variety of biological processes including embryo development and circadian clock regulation. However, the role of PRMT5 in oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination is unknown. Here we show that PRMT5 expression gradually increases throughout postnatal brain development, coinciding with the period of active myelination. PRMT5 expression was observed in neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. siRNA-mediated depletion of PRMT5 in mouse primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cells abrogated oligodendrocyte differentiation. In addition, the PRMT5-depleted oligodendrocyte progenitor and C6 glioma cells expressed high levels of the inhibitors of differentiation/DNA binding, Id2 and Id4, known repressors of glial cell differentiation. We observed that CpG-rich islands within the Id2 and Id4 genes were bound by PRMT5 and were hypomethylated in PRMT5-deficient cells, suggesting that PRMT5 plays a role in gene silencing during glial cell differentiation. Our findings define a role of PRMT5 in glial cell differentiation and link PRMT5 to epigenetic changes during oligodendrocyte differentiation. PMID:22041901

  15. Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase in phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Khan, A J; Minocha, S C

    1989-01-01

    It has been reported that while bacteria and higher plants possess two different pathways for the biosynthesis of putrescine, via ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and arginine decarboxylase (ADC); the fungi, like animals, only use the former pathway. We found that contrary to the earlier reports, two of the phytopathogenic fungi (Ceratocystis minor and Verticillium dahliae) contain significant levels of ADC activity with very little ODC. The ADC in these fungi has high pH optimum (8.4) and low Km (0.237 mM for C. minor, 0.103 mM for V. dahliae), and is strongly inhibited by alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), putrescine and spermidine, further showing that this enzyme is probably involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and not in the catabolism of arginine as in Escherichia coli. The growth of these fungi is strongly inhibited by DFMA while alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) has little effect.

  16. Different methylation characteristics of protein arginine methyltransferase 1 and 3 toward the Ewing Sarcoma protein and a peptide.

    PubMed

    Pahlich, Steffen; Bschir, Karim; Chiavi, Claudio; Belyanskaya, Larisa; Gehring, Heinz

    2005-10-01

    The multifunctional Ewing Sarcoma (EWS) protein, a member of a large family of RNA-binding proteins, is extensively asymmetrically dimethylated at arginine residues within RGG consensus sequences. Using recombinant proteins we examined whether type I protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT)1 or 3 is responsible for asymmetric dimethylations of the EWS protein. After in vitro methylation of the EWS protein by GST-PRMT1, we identified 27 dimethylated arginine residues out of 30 potential methylation sites by mass spectrometry-based techniques (MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS). Thus, PRMT1 recognizes most if not all methylation sites of the EWS protein. With GST-PRMT3, however, only nine dimethylated arginines, located mainly in the C-terminal region of EWS protein, could be assigned, indicating that structural determinants prevent complete methylation. In contrary to previous reports this study also revealed that trypsin is able to cleave after methylated arginines. Pull-down experiments showed that endogenous EWS protein binds efficiently to GST-PRMT1 but less to GST-PRMT3, which is in accordance to the in vitro methylation results. Furthermore, methylation of a peptide containing different methylation sites revealed differences in the site selectivity as well as in the kinetic properties of GST-PRMT1 and GST-PRMT3. Kinetic differences due to an inhibition effect of the methylation inhibitor S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine could be excluded by determining the corresponding K(i) values of the two enzymes and the K(d) values for the methyl donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine. The study demonstrates the strength of MS-based methods for a qualitative and quantitative analysis of enzymic arginine methylation, a posttranslational modification that becomes more and more the object of investigations.

  17. Methylation of ethanolamine groups in phosphoethanolamines is relevant for L-arginine insertion in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Ana; Lairion, Fabiana; Disalvo, Anibal

    2012-05-01

    The interaction of L-arginine with membranes composed by phospholipids with different degrees of methylation of the ethanolamine group was studied by means of surface and dipole potentials and surface pressure variations. The subsequent methylation of the amine head group appears to hinder the synergic response of the adsorption observed in phosphatidylethanolamine membranes. The kinetics of the binding process denotes that the methyl groups are relevant in regulating the specific interaction of the amino acid with the interface by hydrogen bonds. This response can be put in correlation with the function of signal transduction assigned previously to methyl lipids [F. Hirata and J. Axelrod, 1980] and appears to be relevant to understand the mechanism of insertion of arginine residues in peptides of biological interest.

  18. Effect of dietary arginine on the immune response and gene expression in head kidney and spleen following infection of Jian carp with Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gangfu; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Jiang, Weidan; Kuang, Shengyao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wuneng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiaoqiu; Feng, Lin

    2015-05-01

    This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that elevated dietary arginine enhances immunity of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). Fish were fed graded levels of dietary arginine for 9 weeks. Subsequently, a challenge test was conducted by injection of Aeromonas hydrophila. Head kidney and spleen weights, as well as erythrocyte and leukocyte counts were significantly influenced by dietary arginine levels. A similar trend was also observed for hemagglutination titre, serum lysozyme activity, IgM concentration, C3 and C4 content. The highest survival rates following A. hydrophila infection were obtained in fish fed the diets containing arginine at 16.1-21.9 g/kg diet. Phagocytic activity of leukocytes was significantly enhanced by dietary arginine supplementation. In contrast, acid phosphatase activity significantly decreased with dietary arginine levels. Dietary arginine levels did not have a significant effect on the total iron-binding capacity. Gene expression of TNF-α and TGF-β in head kidney significantly increased with dietary arginine levels up to 21.9 g/kg diet, and decreased thereafter. Fish fed the basal diet exhibited the highest IL-10 mRNA expression level. Gene expression of IL-1β and TOR increased with dietary arginine addition, reaching a plateau at 18.5 and 21.9 g arginine/kg diet, respectively. In spleen, higher IL-1β and TNF-α gene expressions were obtained in fish fed the diets containing 24.5 g arginine/kg diet than in fish fed the other dietary treatments. TGF-β mRNA expression levels were significantly lower in fish fed the diets containing ≤21.9 g arginine/kg diet. IL-10 and TOR mRNA expression levels were lower in fish fed 16.1 g arginine/kg diet, while 4E-BP mRNA expression levels increased with dietary arginine levels up to 12.7 g/kg diet and decreased thereafter. Our results indicate that arginine has beneficial effects on regulating mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines, as well as TOR and 4E-BP and improving

  19. Crenarchaeal Arginine Decarboxylase Evolved from an S-Adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase Enzyme*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Teresa N.; Graham, David E.

    2008-01-01

    The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus uses arginine to produce putrescine for polyamine biosynthesis. However, genome sequences from S. solfataricus and most crenarchaea have no known homologs of the previously characterized pyridoxal 5′-phosphate or pyruvoyl-dependent arginine decarboxylases that catalyze the first step in this pathway. Instead they have two paralogs of the S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC). The gene at locus SSO0585 produces an AdoMetDC enzyme, whereas the gene at locus SSO0536 produces a novel arginine decarboxylase (ArgDC). Both thermostable enzymes self-cleave at conserved serine residues to form amino-terminal β-domains and carboxyl-terminal α-domains with reactive pyruvoyl cofactors. The ArgDC enzyme specifically catalyzed arginine decarboxylation more efficiently than previously studied pyruvoyl enzymes. α-Difluoromethylarginine significantly reduced the ArgDC activity of purified enzyme, and treating growing S. solfataricus cells with this inhibitor reduced the cells' ratio of spermidine to norspermine by decreasing the putrescine pool. The crenarchaeal ArgDC had no AdoMetDC activity, whereas its AdoMetDC paralog had no ArgDC activity. A chimeric protein containing the β-subunit of SSO0536 and the α-subunit of SSO0585 had ArgDC activity, implicating residues responsible for substrate specificity in the amino-terminal domain. This crenarchaeal ArgDC is the first example of alternative substrate specificity in the AdoMetDC family. ArgDC activity has evolved through convergent evolution at least five times, demonstrating the utility of this enzyme and the plasticity of amino acid decarboxylases. PMID:18650422

  20. Molecular characterization of arginine deiminase pathway in Laribacter hongkongensis and unique regulation of arginine catabolism and anabolism by multiple environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lifeng; Teng, Jade L L; Watt, Rory M; Liu, Cuihua; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-11-01

    The betaproteobacterium Laribacter hongkongensis is associated with invasive bacteremic infections and gastroenteritis. Its genome contains two adjacent arc gene cassettes (arc1 and arc2) under independent transcriptional control, which are essential for acid resistance. Laribacter hongkongensis also encodes duplicate copies of the argA and argB genes from the arginine biosynthesis pathway. We show that arginine enhances the transcription of arcA2 but suppresses arcA1 expression. We demonstrate that ArgR acts as a transcriptional regulator of the two arc operons through binding to ARG operator sites (ARG boxes). Upon temperature shift from 20°C to 37°C, arcA1 transcription is upregulated while arcA2, argA2, argB2 and argG are downregulated. The transcription of arcA1 and arcA2 are augmented under anaerobic and acidic conditions. The transcription levels of argA1, argA2, argB1, argB2 and argG are significantly increased under anaerobic and acidic conditions but are repressed by the addition of arginine. Deletion of argR significantly decreases bacterial survival in macrophages, while expression of both arc operons, argR and all five of the anabolic arg genes increases 8 h post-infection. Our results show that arginine catabolism in L. hongkongensis is finely regulated by controlling the transcription of two arc operons, whereas arginine anabolism is controlled by two copies of argA and argB.

  1. Structure of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase from Maricaulis maris with the allosteric inhibitor L-arginine bound.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Haskins, Nantaporn; Jin, Zhongmin; M Allewell, Norma; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-08-01

    Maricaulis maris N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (mmNAGS/K) catalyzes the first two steps in L-arginine biosynthesis and has a high degree of sequence and structural homology to human N-acetylglutamate synthase, a regulator of the urea cycle. The synthase activity of both mmNAGS/K and human NAGS are regulated by L-arginine, although L-arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of mmNAGS/K, but an activator of human NAGS. To investigate the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K by L-arginine, we have determined the structure of the mmNAGS/K complexed with L-arginine at 2.8 Å resolution. In contrast to the structure of mmNAGS/K in the absence of L-arginine where there are conformational differences between the four subunits in the asymmetric unit, all four subunits in the L-arginine liganded structure have very similar conformations. In this conformation, the AcCoA binding site in the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain is blocked by a loop from the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain, as a result of a domain rotation that occurs when L-arginine binds. This structural change provides an explanation for the allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K and related enzymes by L-arginine. The allosterically regulated mechanism for mmNAGS/K differs significantly from that for Neisseria gonorrhoeae NAGS (ngNAGS). To define the active site, several residues near the putative active site were mutated and their activities determined. These experiments identify roles for Lys356, Arg386, Asn391 and Tyr397 in the catalytic mechanism. PMID:23850694

  2. Postprandial hyperglycemia impairs vascular endothelial function in healthy men by inducing lipid peroxidation and increasing asymmetric dimethylarginine:arginine.

    PubMed

    Mah, Eunice; Noh, Sang K; Ballard, Kevin D; Matos, Manuel E; Volek, Jeff S; Bruno, Richard S

    2011-11-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia induces vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) and increases future cardiovascular disease risk. We hypothesized that postprandial hyperglycemia would decrease vascular function in healthy men by inducing oxidative stress and proinflammatory responses and increasing asymmetric dimethylarginine:arginine (ADMA:arginine), a biomarker that is predictive of reduced NO biosynthesis. In a randomized, cross-over design, healthy men (n = 16; 21.6 ± 0.8 y) ingested glucose or fructose (75 g) after an overnight fast. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), plasma glucose and insulin, antioxidants, malondialdehyde (MDA), inflammatory proteins, arginine, and ADMA were measured at regular intervals during the 3-h postprandial period. Baseline FMD did not differ between trials (P > 0.05). Postprandial FMD was reduced following the ingestion of glucose only. Postprandial MDA concentrations increased to a greater extent following the ingestion of glucose compared to fructose. Plasma arginine decreased and the ratio of ADMA:arginine increased to a greater extent following the ingestion of glucose. Inflammatory cytokines and cellular adhesion molecules were unaffected by the ingestion of either sugar. Postprandial AUC(0-3 h) for FMD and MDA were inversely related (r = -0.80; P < 0.05), suggesting that hyperglycemia-induced lipid peroxidation suppresses postprandial vascular function. Collectively, these findings suggest that postprandial hyperglycemia in healthy men reduces endothelium-dependent vasodilation by increasing lipid peroxidation independent of inflammation. Postprandial alterations in arginine and ADMA:arginine also suggest that acute hyperglycemia may induce VED by decreasing NO bioavailability through an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism. Additional work is warranted to define whether inhibiting lipid peroxidation and restoring arginine metabolism would mitigate hyperglycemia-mediated decreases in vascular function. PMID:21940510

  3. Antagonistic reactions of arginine and lysine against formaldehyde and their relation to cell proliferation, apoptosis, folate cycle and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Trézl, Lajos; Hullán, Lehel; Jászay, Zsuzsa M; Szarvas, Tibor; Petneházy, Imre; Szende, Béla; Bocsi, József; Takáts, Zoltán; Vékey, Károly; Töke, László

    2003-02-01

    1H, 13C NMR, ESMS and MS/MS investigations proved that there is an antagonism in the spontaneous reaction of formaldehyde with L-lysine and L-arginine. L-Arginine can only be hydroxymethylated on the guanidino group in a very fast reaction forming mono-, di-, and trihydroxymethyl arginines (HMA). L-Lysine can be methylated on the epsilon-amino group forming mono-, di-, and trimethyl lysine on physiological pH. Hydroxymethyl arginines are relative stable, isolable products, and can also be formed in biological systems, especially in plants. Significant amounts of hydroxymethyl arginines were identified in the aqueous extract of lyophilized kohlrabi, which can be formed in photosynthesis during CO2 fixation. 14C-Formaldehyde formed in a short-term (10, 30 sec) 14CO2 fixation reaction in Zea mays L. (early maturity variety: Szegedi TC 277) was captured by L-arginine, which occurs in leaves in large amount. Formaldehyde formed during photosynthesis can react not only with the arginine, but with ribulose-1,5-diphosphate present in leaves. In model reactions formaldehyde can react with the 'ene diole' group of ribulose-1,5-diphosphate in the absence of Rubisco enzyme, which is a similar reaction to the addition of formaldehyde to L-ascorbic acid. Hydroxymethyl arginines (HMA) are endogenous formaldehyde carrier molecules transferring the bound formaldehyde to thymidylate synthase enzyme system incorporating it into the folate cycle. HMA can also carry the bound formaldehyde to the cells especially to the tumorous cells (HT29 adenocarcinoma), and cause significant inhibition of cell proliferation and causes apoptosis.

  4. Production of arginine by the kidney is impaired in a model of sepsis: early events following LPS.

    PubMed

    Lortie, Mark J; Satriano, Joseph; Gabbai, Francis B; Thareau, Sonia; Khang, Ser; Deng, Aihua; Pizzo, Donald P; Thomson, Scott C; Blantz, Roland C; Munger, Karen A

    2004-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is used experimentally to elicit the innate physiological responses observed in human sepsis. We have previously shown that LPS causes depletion of plasma arginine before inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, indicating that changes in arginine uptake and/or production rather than enhanced consumption are responsible. Because the kidney is the primary source of circulating arginine and renal failure is a hallmark of septicemia, we determined the time course of changes in arginine metabolism and kidney function relative to iNOS expression. LPS given intravenously to anesthetized rats caused a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure after 120 min that coincided with increased plasma nitric oxide end products (NOx) and iNOS expression in lung and liver. Interestingly, impairment of renal function preceded iNOS activity by 30-60 min and occurred in tandem with decreased renal arginine production. The baseline rate of renal arginine production was approximately 60 micromol.h(-1).kg(-1), corresponding to an apparent plasma half-life of approximately 20 min, and decreased by one-half within 60 min of LPS. Calculations based on the systemic production and clearance show that normally only 5% of kidney arginine output is destined to become nitric oxide and that <25% of LPS-impaired renal production was converted to NOx in the first 4 h. In addition, we provide novel observations indicating that the kidney appears refractory to iNOS induction by LPS because no discernible enhancement of renal NOx production occurred within 4 h, and iNOS expression in the kidney was muted compared with that in liver or lung. These studies demonstrate that the major factor responsible for the rapid decrease in extracellular arginine content following LPS is impaired production by the kidney, a phenomenon that appears linked to reduced renal perfusion.

  5. Postprandial hyperglycemia impairs vascular endothelial function in healthy men by inducing lipid peroxidation and increasing asymmetric dimethylarginine:arginine.

    PubMed

    Mah, Eunice; Noh, Sang K; Ballard, Kevin D; Matos, Manuel E; Volek, Jeff S; Bruno, Richard S

    2011-11-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia induces vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) and increases future cardiovascular disease risk. We hypothesized that postprandial hyperglycemia would decrease vascular function in healthy men by inducing oxidative stress and proinflammatory responses and increasing asymmetric dimethylarginine:arginine (ADMA:arginine), a biomarker that is predictive of reduced NO biosynthesis. In a randomized, cross-over design, healthy men (n = 16; 21.6 ± 0.8 y) ingested glucose or fructose (75 g) after an overnight fast. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), plasma glucose and insulin, antioxidants, malondialdehyde (MDA), inflammatory proteins, arginine, and ADMA were measured at regular intervals during the 3-h postprandial period. Baseline FMD did not differ between trials (P > 0.05). Postprandial FMD was reduced following the ingestion of glucose only. Postprandial MDA concentrations increased to a greater extent following the ingestion of glucose compared to fructose. Plasma arginine decreased and the ratio of ADMA:arginine increased to a greater extent following the ingestion of glucose. Inflammatory cytokines and cellular adhesion molecules were unaffected by the ingestion of either sugar. Postprandial AUC(0-3 h) for FMD and MDA were inversely related (r = -0.80; P < 0.05), suggesting that hyperglycemia-induced lipid peroxidation suppresses postprandial vascular function. Collectively, these findings suggest that postprandial hyperglycemia in healthy men reduces endothelium-dependent vasodilation by increasing lipid peroxidation independent of inflammation. Postprandial alterations in arginine and ADMA:arginine also suggest that acute hyperglycemia may induce VED by decreasing NO bioavailability through an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism. Additional work is warranted to define whether inhibiting lipid peroxidation and restoring arginine metabolism would mitigate hyperglycemia-mediated decreases in vascular function.

  6. The Sakaguchi reaction product quenches phycobilisome fluorescence, allowing determination of the arginine concentration in cells of Anabaena strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Ke, Shan; Haselkorn, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena fixes nitrogen in specialized cells called heterocysts. The immediate product of fixation, ammonia, is known to be assimilated by addition to glutamate to make glutamine. How fixed nitrogen is transported along the filament to the 10 to 20 vegetative cells that separate heterocysts is unknown. N-fixing heterocysts accumulate an insoluble polymer containing aspartate and arginine at the cell poles. Lockau's group has proposed that the polymer is degraded at the poles to provide a mobile carrier, arginine, to the vegetative cells (R. Richter, M. Hejazi, R. Kraft, K. Ziegler, and W. Lockau, Eur. J. Biochem. 263:163-169, 1999). We wished to use the Sakaguchi reaction for arginine to determine the relative cellular concentration of arginine along the filament. At present, the methods for measuring absorption of the Sakaguchi reaction product at 520 nm are insufficiently sensitive for that purpose. However, that product quenches the fluorescence of phycobiliproteins, which we have adapted to a determination of arginine. Our results are consistent with the proposal that arginine is a principal nitrogen carrier from heterocysts to vegetative cells in Anabaena.

  7. Arginine Biosynthesis in Thermotoga maritima: Characterization of the Arginine-Sensitive N-Acetyl-l-Glutamate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Murga, M. Leonor; Gil-Ortiz, Fernando; Llácer, José L.; Rubio, Vicente

    2004-01-01

    To help clarify the control of arginine synthesis in Thermotoga maritima, the putative gene (argB) for N-acetyl-l-glutamate kinase (NAGK) from this microorganism was cloned and overexpressed, and the resulting protein was purified and shown to be a highly thermostable and specific NAGK that is potently and selectively inhibited by arginine. Therefore, NAGK is in T. maritima the feedback control point of arginine synthesis, a process that in this organism involves acetyl group recycling and appears not to involve classical acetylglutamate synthase. The inhibition of NAGK by arginine was found to be pH independent and to depend sigmoidally on the concentration of arginine, with a Hill coefficient (N) of ∼4, and the 50% inhibitory arginine concentration (I0.5) was shown to increase with temperature, approaching above 65°C the I0.50 observed at 37°C with the mesophilic NAGK of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (the best-studied arginine-inhibitable NAGK). At 75°C, the inhibition by arginine of T. maritima NAGK was due to a large increase in the Km for acetylglutamate triggered by the inhibitor, but at 37°C arginine also substantially decreased the Vmax of the enzyme. The NAGKs of T. maritima and P. aeruginosa behaved in gel filtration as hexamers, justifying the sigmoidicity and high Hill coefficient of arginine inhibition, and arginine or the substrates failed to disaggregate these enzymes. In contrast, Escherichia coli NAGK is not inhibited by arginine and is dimeric, and thus the hexameric architecture may be an important determinant of arginine sensitivity. Potential thermostability determinants of T. maritima NAGK are also discussed. PMID:15342584

  8. Identification of arginine and its "Downstream" molecules as potential markers of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lu; Gao, Yu; Cao, Yunfeng; Zhang, Yinxu; Xu, Minghao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Jing, Yu; Guo, Shengnan; Jing, Fangyu; Hu, Xiaodan; Zhu, Zhitu

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women worldwide. Arginine is a semiessential amino acid in humans and is essential for several biological pathways in malignant and normal cells, such as ornithine and N1, N12-diacetylspermine (DiAcSpm). This study aimed to determine the role of arginine and these downstream molecules in BC. Plasma arginine, ornithine, and arginine-to-ornithine ratio (AOR) were analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Urine samples were measured by the colloid gold aggregation to test determination of urinary diAcSpm. A principal component analysis was performed to evaluate the results observed between breast tumor and control characteristics. Differences in individual metabolite concentrations between BC patients and controls were tested by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses. Student's t tests were used to detect the differences between two groups of normally distributed variables, and Wilcoxon sign rank tests were performed for asymmetrically distributed variables. As we analyzed, BC patients had lower plasma arginine and arginine/ornithine level, and higher plasma ornithine and urinary DiAcSpm concentrations as compared with control patients (P = 0.028, 0.020, 0.002, and 0.011, respectively). And the ROC curve was drawn and the area under the curve of the metabolites was calculated to be 0.659 (P = 0.028), 0.645 (P = 0.045), 0.7233 (P = 0.002), 0.683 (P = 0.011), respectively. In addition, our analysis showed that arginine concentrations and AOR had a positive correlation with ER status, while ornithine had a negative correlation with T stage (P = 0.042, 0.023, respectively).In conclusion, arginine and these downstream molecules were biomarkers for BC. More studies are needed to highlight the theoretical strengths. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):817-822, 2016. PMID:27641058

  9. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Christina C; Bandi, Venkata; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K; Wu, Manhong; Castillo, Leticia; Jahoor, Farook

    2009-06-02

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by NO synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions which play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore affect NO synthesis in patients with sepsis. The objective of the present study was to investigate whole-body in vivo arginine and citrulline metabolism and NO synthesis rates, and their relationship to protein breakdown in patients with sepsis or septic shock and in healthy volunteers. Endogenous leucine flux, an index of whole-body protein breakdown rate, was measured in 13 critically ill patients with sepsis or septic shock and seven healthy controls using an intravenous infusion of [1-13C]leucine. Arginine flux, citrulline flux and the rate of conversion of arginine into citrulline (an index of NO synthesis) were measured with intravenous infusions of [15N2]guanidino-arginine and [5,5-2H2]citrulline. Plasma concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate, arginine, citrulline and asymmetric dimethylarginine were measured. Compared with controls, patients had a higher leucine flux and higher NO metabolites, but arginine flux, plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine concentration and the rate of NO synthesis were not different. Citrulline flux and plasma arginine and citrulline were lower in patients than in controls. Arginine production was positively correlated with the protein breakdown rate. Whole-body arginine production and NO synthesis were similar in patients with sepsis and septic shock and healthy controls. Despite increased proteolysis in sepsis, there is a decreased arginine plasma concentration, suggesting inadequate de novo synthesis secondary to decreased citrulline production.

  10. Mutagenesis in four candidate heparin binding regions (residues 279-282, 291-304, 390-393, and 439-448) and identification of residues affecting heparin binding of human lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y; Henderson, H E; Liu, M S; Zhang, H; Forsythe, I J; Clarke-Lewis, I; Hayden, M R; Brunzell, J D

    1994-11-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) interaction with membrane-associated polyanions is a critical component of normal catalytic function. Two strong candidate binding regions, rich in arginine and lysine residues, have been defined in the N-terminal domain (aa279-282 and aa292-304) that show homology to the heparin-binding consensus sequences -X-B-B-X-B-X- and -X-B-B-B-X-X-B-X-, respectively. Additional candidate regions appear in the C-terminal domain, (residues 390-393), which are homologous to the thrombospondin heparin-binding repeat, and the positively charged terminal decapeptide (residues 439-448). To determine residues and domains critical to heparin binding, we have generated different LPL mutants that have alanine substitutions of single arginine and lysine residues and sequence interchanges with the homologous hepatic (HL) and pancreatic (PL) lipases. The mutant cDNAs were expressed in COS-1 cells and catalytically active mutants were assessed for binding to heparin-Sepharose. All the alanine substitutions within the two regions homologous to the heparin-binding consensus sequences in the N-terminal domain either abolished activity or produced a lowering of heparin binding affinity. None of the mutants in the C-terminal domain of LPL showed a loss of activity or a reduction in heparin binding affinity. These data demonstrate that charged residues at positions 279-282 and 292-304 of LPL are important for heparin binding affinity whereas the residues 390-393 and 439-448 in the C-terminal domain are not involved in heparin binding. PMID:7868983

  11. Characterization of arginine decarboxylase from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Hak; Cho, Ki Joon; Choi, Yu Jin; Park, Ky Young; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2004-04-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines in higher plants, whereas ornithine decarboxylase represents the sole pathway of polyamine biosynthesis in animals. Previously, we characterized a genomic clone from Dianthus caryophyllus, in which the deduced polypeptide of ADC was 725 amino acids with a molecular mass of 78 kDa. In the present study, the ADC gene was subcloned into the pGEX4T1 expression vector in combination with glutathione S-transferase (GST). The fusion protein GST-ADC was water-soluble and thus was purified by sequential GSTrap-arginine affinity chromatography. A thrombin-mediated on-column cleavage reaction was employed to release free ADC from GST. Hiload superdex gel filtration FPLC was then used to obtain a highly purified ADC. The identity of the ADC was confirmed by immunoblot analysis, and its specific activity with respect to (14)C-arginine decarboxylation reaction was determined to be 0.9 CO(2) pkat mg(-1) protein. K(m) and V(max) of the reaction between ADC and the substrate were 0.077 +/- 0.001 mM and 6.0 +/- 0.6 pkat mg(-1) protein, respectively. ADC activity was reduced by 70% in the presence of 0.1 mM Cu(2+) or CO(2+), but was only marginally affected by Mg(2+), or Ca(2+) at the same concentration. Moreover, spermine at 1 mM significantly reduced its activity by 30%.

  12. The effects of fuel composition and ammonium sulfate addition on PCDD, PCDF, PCN and PCB concentrations during the combustion of biomass and paper production residuals.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Lisa; Jansson, Stina

    2014-01-01

    The use of waste wood as an energy carrier has increased during the last decade. However, the higher levels of alkali metals and chlorine in waste wood compared to virgin biomass can promote the formation of deposits and organic pollutants. Here, the effect of fuel composition and the inhibitory effects of ammonium sulfate, (NH4)2SO4, on the concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the flue gas of a lab-scale combustor was investigated. Ammonium sulfate is often used as a corrosion-preventing additive and may also inhibit formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs). In addition to PCDDs and PCDFs, polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCN) and biphenyls (PCB) were also analyzed. It was found that the flue gas composition changed dramatically when (NH4)2SO4 was added: CO, SO2, and NH3 levels increased, while those of HCl decreased to almost zero. However, the additive's effects on POP formation were less pronounced. When (NH4)2SO4 was added to give an S:Cl ratio of 3, only the PCDF concentration was reduced, indicating that this ratio was not sufficient to achieve a general reduction in POP emissions. Conversely, at an S:Cl ratio of 6, significant reductions in the WHO-TEQ value and the PCDD and PCDF contents of the flue gas were observed. The effect on the PCDF concentration was especially pronounced. PCN formation seemed to be promoted by the elevated CO concentrations caused by adding (NH4)2SO4.

  13. Characterization of the Effects of Arginine and Glucose on Glucagon and Insulin Release from the Perfused Rat Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Gerich, John E.; Charles, M. Arthur; Grodsky, Gerold M.

    1974-01-01

    To characterize the mechanisms by which arginine and glucose affect pancreatic alpha and beta cell function, the effects of these agents over their full dose response, both alone and in various combinations, were studied using the perfused rat pancreas. Arginine (0-38 mM), in the absence of glucose, stimulated biphasic glucagon (IRG) secretion (Km≃3-4 mM) at concentrations less than 1 mM and caused nonphasic insulin (IRI) release (Km≃12-13 mM) but only at concentrations greater than 6 mM. Glucose (0-27.5 mM) alone stimulated biphasic IRI release (Km≃9-10 mM) at concentrations in excess of 5.5 mM and caused nonphasic inhibition of IRG secretion (Kt≃5-6 mM) at concentrations as low as 4.1 mM. These results demonstrate fundamental differences in pancreatic alpha and beta cell secretory patterns in response to glucose and arginine and suggest that glucagon secretion is more sensitive to the effect of both glucose and arginine. Various concentrations of arginine in the presence of 5.5 mM glucose stimulated biphasic IRG and IRI release: IRG responses were diminished and IRI responses were enhanced compared with those seen with arginine in the absence of glucose. Glucose (0-27.5 mM) in the presence of 3.2 or 19.2 mM arginine caused similar inhibition of IRG secretion (Km≃5-6 mM) and stimulation of IRI release (Km≃9-10 mM) as that seen with glucose alone, although greater IRG and IRI release occurred. This augmentation of IRI secretion was greater than that expected from mere additive effects of glucose and arginine. Classical Lineweaver-Burk analysis of these results indicates that glucose is a non-competitive inhibitor arginine-stimulated glucagon secretion and suggests that glucose and arginine affect pancreatic alpha and beta cell function via different mechanisms. In addition, comparison of simultaneous insulin and glucagon secretion patterns under various conditions suggests that endogenous insulin per se has little or no direct effect on IRG secretion

  14. Application of dispersive solid-phase extraction and ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry in food additive residue analysis of red wine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Hong; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Shen, Hao-Yu; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2012-11-01

    A novel and effective dispersive solid-phase extraction (dSPE) procedure with rapid magnetic separation using ethylenediamine-functionalized magnetic polymer as an adsorbent was developed. The new procedure had excellent clean-up ability for the selective removal of the matrix in red wine. An accurate, simple, and rapid analytical method using ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) for the simultaneous determination of nine food additives (i.e., acesulfame, saccharin, sodium cyclamate, aspartame, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, stevioside, dehydroacetic acid, and neotame) in red wine was also used and validated. Recoveries ranging from 78.5% to 99.2% with relative standard deviations ranging from 0.46% to 6.3% were obtained using the new method. All target compounds showed good linearities in the tested range with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.9993. The limits of quantification for the nine food additives were between 0.10 μg/L and 50.0 μg/L. The proposed dSPE-UFLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied in the food-safety risk monitoring of real red wine in Zhejiang Province, China.

  15. Direct observation of an anisotropic in-plane residual stress induced by B addition as an origin of high magnetic anisotropy field of Ru/FeCoB film

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Ken-ichiro; Gomi, Shunsuke; Mashiko, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2010-05-15

    Although boron-free FeCo films prepared on a Ru underlayer exhibits isotropic in-plane magnetic property, boron added FeCoB films prepared on Ru underlayer revealed large in-plane magnetic anisotropy with a high anisotropy field of 500 Oe. The effect of boron addition on the in-plane anisotropic residual stress in FeCoB film was investigated using sin{sup 2} {psi} method of x-ray diffraction analysis. Large isotropic compressive stress was observed in Ru/FeCo film. In contrast, anisotropic in-plane residual stress was observed in Ru/FeCoB film. The compressive stress along the easy axis of Ru/FeCoB film is released more than that along the hard axis. Such anisotropic residual stress is regarded as an origin of the in-plane magnetic anisotropy through inverse magnetostriction effect. Owing to the configuration of the facing targets sputtering system, boron atoms are sputtered and deposited anisotropically, and so they penetrate FeCo crystals and release the compressive stress along the incidence direction.

  16. A comparison of DNA compaction by arginine and lysine peptides: A physical basis for arginine rich protamines

    PubMed Central

    DeRouchey, Jason; Hoover, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Protamines are small, highly positively charged peptides used to package DNA to very high densities in sperm nuclei. Tight DNA packing is considered essential to minimize DNA damage by mutagens and reactive oxidizing species. A striking and general feature of protamines is the almost exclusive use of arginine over lysine for the positive charge to neutralize DNA. We have investigated whether this preference for arginine might arise from a difference in DNA condensation by arginine and lysine peptides. The forces underlying DNA compaction by arginine, lysine, and ornithine peptides are measured using the osmotic stress technique coupled with x-ray scattering. The equilibrium spacings between DNA helices condensed by lysine and ornithine peptides are significantly larger than the interhelical distances with comparable arginine peptides. The DNA surface-to-surface separation, for example, is some 50% larger with poly-lysine compared to poly-arginine. DNA packing by lysine rich peptides in sperm nuclei would allow much greater accessibility to small molecules that could damage DNA. The larger spacing with lysine peptides is due to both a weaker attraction and a stronger short ranged repulsion relative to the arginine peptides. A previously proposed model for poly-arginine and protamine binding to DNA provides a convenient framework for understanding the differences between the ability of lysine and arginine peptides to assemble DNA. PMID:23540557

  17. L-arginine recognition by yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Cavarelli, J; Delagoutte, B; Eriani, G; Gangloff, J; Moras, D

    1998-01-01

    The crystal structure of arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS), with L-arginine bound to the active site has been solved at 2.75 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R-factor of 19.7%. ArgRS is composed predominantly of alpha-helices and can be divided into five domains, including the class I-specific active site. The N-terminal domain shows striking similarity to some completely unrelated proteins and defines a module which should participate in specific tRNA recognition. The C-terminal domain, which is the putative anticodon-binding module, displays an all-alpha-helix fold highly similar to that of Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase. While ArgRS requires tRNAArg for the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, the results show that its presence is not a prerequisite for L-arginine binding. All H-bond-forming capability of L-arginine is used by the protein for the specific recognition. The guanidinium group forms two salt bridge interactions with two acidic residues, and one H-bond with a tyrosine residue; these three residues are strictly conserved in all ArgRS sequences. This tyrosine is also conserved in other class I aaRS active sites but plays several functional roles. The ArgRS structure allows the definition of a new framework for sequence alignments and subclass definition in class I aaRSs. PMID:9736621

  18. A glutamate/aspartate switch controls product specificity in a protein arginine methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Debler, Erik W.; Jain, Kanishk; Warmack, Rebeccah A.; Feng, You; Clarke, Steven G.; Blobel, Günter; Stavropoulos, Pete

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei PRMT7 (TbPRMT7) is a protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) that strictly monomethylates various substrates, thus classifying it as a type III PRMT. However, the molecular basis of its unique product specificity has remained elusive. Here, we present the structure of TbPRMT7 in complex with its cofactor product S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (AdoHcy) at 2.8 Å resolution and identify a glutamate residue critical for its monomethylation behavior. TbPRMT7 comprises the conserved methyltransferase and β-barrel domains, an N-terminal extension, and a dimerization arm. The active site at the interface of the N-terminal extension, methyltransferase, and β-barrel domains is stabilized by the dimerization arm of the neighboring protomer, providing a structural basis for dimerization as a prerequisite for catalytic activity. Mutagenesis of active-site residues highlights the importance of Glu181, the second of the two invariant glutamate residues of the double E loop that coordinate the target arginine in substrate peptides/proteins and that increase its nucleophilicity. Strikingly, mutation of Glu181 to aspartate converts TbPRMT7 into a type I PRMT, producing asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) using a histone H4 peptide showed that the Glu181Asp mutant has markedly increased affinity for monomethylated peptide with respect to the WT, suggesting that the enlarged active site can favorably accommodate monomethylated peptide and provide sufficient space for ADMA formation. In conclusion, these findings yield valuable insights into the product specificity and the catalytic mechanism of protein arginine methyltransferases and have important implications for the rational (re)design of PRMTs. PMID:26858449

  19. Repression of Escherichia coli carbamoylphosphate synthase: relationships with enzyme synthesis in the arginine and pyrimidine pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Piérard, A; Glansdorff, N; Gigot, D; Crabeel, M; Halleux, P; Thiry, L

    1976-01-01

    Cumulative repression of Escherichia coli carbamoylphosphate synthase (CPSase; EC 2.7.2.9) by arginine and pyrimidine was analyzed in relation to control enzyme synthesis in the arginine and pyrimidine pathways. The expression of carA and carB, the adjacent genes that specify the two subunits of the enzyme, was estimated by means of an in vitro complementation assay. The synthesis of each gene product was found to be under repression control. Coordinate expression of the two genes was observed under most conditions investigated. They might thus form an operon. The preparation of strains blocked in the degradation of cytidine and harboring leaky mutations affecting several steps of pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis made it possible to distinguish between the effects of cytidine and uridine compounds in the repression of the pyrimidine pathway enzymes. The data obtained suggest that derivatives of both cytidine and uridine participate in the repression of CPSase. In addition, repression of CPSase by arginine did not appear to occur unless pyrimidines were present at a significant intracellular concentration. This observation, together with our previous report that argR mutations impair the cumulative repression of CPSase, suggests that this control is mediated through the concerted effects of regulatory elements specific for the arginine and pyrimidine pathways. PMID:179975

  20. Using FT-NIR spectroscopy technique to determine arginine content in fermented Cordyceps sinensis mycelium.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chuanqi; Xu, Ning; Shao, Yongni; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated the feasibility of using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectral technique for determining arginine content in fermented Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis) mycelium. Three different models were carried out to predict the arginine content. Wavenumber selection methods such as competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) and successive projections algorithm (SPA) were used to identify the most important wavenumbers and reduce the high dimensionality of the raw spectral data. Only a few wavenumbers were selected by CARS and CARS-SPA as the optimal wavenumbers, respectively. Among the prediction models, CARS-least squares-support vector machine (CARS-LS-SVM) model performed best with the highest values of the coefficient of determination of prediction (Rp(2)=0.8370) and residual predictive deviation (RPD=2.4741), the lowest value of root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP=0.0841). Moreover, the number of the input variables was forty-five, which only accounts for 2.04% of that of the full wavenumbers. The results showed that FT-NIR spectral technique has the potential to be an objective and non-destructive method to detect arginine content in fermented C. sinensis mycelium.

  1. Arginine-derived advanced glycation end products generated in peptide-glucose mixtures during boiling.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Andrej; Schmidt, Rico; Spiller, Sandro; Greifenhagen, Uta; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2014-04-23

    Glycation refers to the reaction of amino groups, for example in proteins, with reducing sugars. Intermediately formed Amadori products can be degraded by oxidation (Maillard reactions) leading to a heterogeneous class of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), especially during exposure to heat. AGEs are considered to be toxic in vivo due to their pronounced local and systemic inflammatory effects. At high temperatures, these reactions have been mostly investigated at the amino acid level. Here, we studied the formation of arginine-related AGEs in peptides under conditions simulating household cooking at physiological d-glucose concentrations. High quantities of AGE-modified peptides were produced within 15 min, especially glyoxal-derived products. The intermediately formed dihydroxy-imidazolidine yielded glyoxal- (Glarg) and methylglyoxal-derived hydro-imidazolinones (MG-H), with Glarg being further degraded to carboxymethyl-l-arginine (CMA). Carboxyethyl-l-arginine was not detected. The formation rates and yields were strongly increased in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of Fe(II)-ions and ascorbate. A nearby histidine residue increased the content of AGEs, whereas glutamic acid significantly reduced the CMA levels.

  2. Arginine methylation of HSP70 regulates retinoid acid-mediated RARβ2 gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei-wei; Xiao, Rong-quan; Peng, Bing-ling; Xu, Huan-teng; Shen, Hai-feng; Huang, Ming-feng; Shi, Tao-tao; Yi, Jia; Zhang, Wen-juan; Wu, Xiao-nan; Gao, Xiang; Lin, Xiang-zhi; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.; Liu, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Although “histone” methyltransferases and demethylases are well established to regulate transcriptional programs and to use nonhistone proteins as substrates, their possible roles in regulation of heat-shock proteins in the nucleus have not been investigated. Here, we report that a highly conserved arginine residue, R469, in HSP70 (heat-shock protein of 70 kDa) proteins, an evolutionarily conserved protein family of ATP-dependent molecular chaperone, was monomethylated (me1), at least partially, by coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1/protein arginine methyltransferase 4 (CARM1/PRMT4) and demethylated by jumonji-domain–containing 6 (JMJD6), both in vitro and in cultured cells. Functional studies revealed that HSP70 could directly regulate retinoid acid (RA)-induced retinoid acid receptor β2 (RARβ2) gene transcription through its binding to chromatin, with R469me1 being essential in this process. HSP70’s function in gene transcriptional regulation appears to be distinct from its protein chaperon activity. R469me1 was shown to mediate the interaction between HSP70 and TFIIH, which involves in RNA polymerase II phosphorylation and thus transcriptional initiation. Our findings expand the repertoire of nonhistone substrates targeted by PRMT4 and JMJD6, and reveal a new function of HSP70 proteins in gene transcription at the chromatin level aside from its classic role in protein folding and quality control. PMID:26080448

  3. Arginine Decarboxylase Is Localized in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Borrell, A.; Culianez-Macia, F. A.; Altabella, T.; Besford, R. T.; Flores, D.; Tiburcio, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Plants, unlike animals, can use either ornithine decarboxylase or arginine decarboxylase (ADC) to produce the polyamine precursor putrescine. Lack of knowledge of the exact cellular and subcellular location of these enzymes has been one of the main obstacles to our understanding of the biological role of polyamines in plants. We have generated polyclonal antibodies to oat (Avena sativa L.) ADC to study the spatial distribution and subcellular localization of ADC protein in different oat tissues. By immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, we show that ADC is organ specific. By cell fractionation and immunoblotting, we show that ADC is localized in chloroplasts associated with the thylakoid membrane. The results also show that increased levels of ADC protein are correlated with high levels of ADC activity and putrescine in osmotically stressed oat leaves. A model of compartmentalization for the arginine pathway and putrescine biosynthesis in active photosynthetic tissues has been proposed. In the context of endosymbiote-driven metabolic evolution in plants, the location of ADC in the chloroplast compartment may have major evolutionary significance, since it explains (a) why plants can use two alternative pathways for putrescine biosynthesis and (b) why animals do not possess ADC. PMID:12228631

  4. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer strategy and its application in the Sudan dyes residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liang; Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Sicen

    2015-07-31

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have become a hotspot owing to the dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the MMIPs were obtained by the surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using Sudan I as the template. The resultant MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and X-ray diffraction. Benefiting from the controlled/living property of the RAFT strategy, the uniform MIP layer was successfully grafted on the surface of RAFT agent-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, favoring the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four Sudan dyes (Sudan I, II, III, and IV) from chili powder samples. The recoveries of the spiked samples in chili powder samples ranged from 74.1 to 93.3% with RSD lower than 6.4% and the relative standard uncertainty lower than 0.029. This work provided a good platform for the extraction and removal of Sudan dyes in complicated matrixes and demonstrated a bright future for the application of the well-constructed MMIPs in the field of solid-phase extraction. PMID:26077971

  5. Addition of microbially-treated sugar beet residue and a native bacterium increases structural stability in heavy metal-contaminated Mediterranean soils.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Caravaca, F; Azcón, R; Kohler, J; Roldán, A

    2009-10-15

    A mesocosm experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of the addition of Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste, in the presence of rock phosphate, and inoculation with a native, metal-tolerant bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis, on the stabilisation of soil aggregates of two mine tailings, with differing pH values, from a semiarid Mediterranean area and on the stimulation of growth of Piptatherum miliaceum. Bacterium combined with organic amendment enhanced structural stability (38% in acidic soil and 106% in neutral soil compared with their corresponding controls). Only the organic amendment increased pH, electrical conductivity, water-soluble C, water-soluble carbohydrates and plant growth, in both soils. While in neutral soil both organic amendment and bacterium increased dehydrogenase activity, only organic amendment had a significant effect in acidic soil. This study demonstrates that the use of P. miliaceum in combination with organic amendment and bacterium is a suitable tool for the stabilisation of the soil structure of degraded mine tailings, although its effectiveness is dependent on soil pH. PMID:19660785

  6. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer strategy and its application in the Sudan dyes residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liang; Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Sicen

    2015-07-31

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have become a hotspot owing to the dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the MMIPs were obtained by the surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using Sudan I as the template. The resultant MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and X-ray diffraction. Benefiting from the controlled/living property of the RAFT strategy, the uniform MIP layer was successfully grafted on the surface of RAFT agent-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, favoring the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four Sudan dyes (Sudan I, II, III, and IV) from chili powder samples. The recoveries of the spiked samples in chili powder samples ranged from 74.1 to 93.3% with RSD lower than 6.4% and the relative standard uncertainty lower than 0.029. This work provided a good platform for the extraction and removal of Sudan dyes in complicated matrixes and demonstrated a bright future for the application of the well-constructed MMIPs in the field of solid-phase extraction.

  7. Acid-base properties and copper(II) complexes of dipeptides containing histidine and additional chelating bis(imidazol-2-yl) residues.

    PubMed

    Osz, Katalin; Várnagy, Katalin; Süli-Vargha, Helga; Csámpay, Antal; Sanna, Daniele; Micera, Giovanni; Sóvágó, Imre

    2004-01-01

    Copper(II) complexes of dipeptides of histidine containing additional chelating bis(imidazol-2-yl) agent at the C-termini (PheHis-BIMA [N-phenylalanyl-histidyl-bis(imidazol-2-yl)methylamine] and HisPhe-BIMA [N-histidyl-phenylalanyl-bis(imidazol-2-yl)methylamine]) were studied by potentiometric, UV-Visible and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) techniques. The imidazole nitrogen donor atoms of the bis(imidazol-2-yl)methyl group are described as the primary metal binding sites forming stable mono- and bis(ligand) complexes at acidic pH. The formation of a ligand-bridged dinuclear complex [Cu2L2]4+ is detected in equimolar solutions of copper(II) and HisPhe-BIMA. The coordination isomers of the dinuclear complex are described via the metal binding of the bis(imidazol-2-yl)methyl, amino-carbonyl and amino-imidazole(His) functions. In the case of the copper(II)-PheHis-BIMA system the [NH2, N-(amide), N(Im)] tridentate coordination of the ligand is favoured and results in the formation of di- and trinuclear complexes [Cu2H(-1)L]3+ and [Cu3H(-2)L2]4+ in equimolar solutions. The presence of these coordination modes shifts the formation of "tripeptide-like" ([NH2, N-, N-, N(Im)]-coordinated) [CuH(-2)L] complexes into alkaline pH range as compared to other dipeptide derivatives of bis(imidazol-2-yl) ligands. Although there are different types of imidazoles in these ligands, the deprotonation and coordination of the pyrrole-type N(1)H groups does not occur below pH 10. PMID:14659629

  8. Structural characterization and IgE epitope analysis of arginine kinase from Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hai-Yan; Cao, Min-Jie; Maleki, Soheila J; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Su, Wen-Jin; Yang, Yang; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) is reported to be the pan-allergen of shellfish. However, there is limited information on its IgE epitopes and structural characteristics. In this study, AK from Scylla paramamosain was purified and characterized. The purified AK is a glycoprotein with the molecular weight of 40 kDa and it demonstrates cross-reactivity with the related allergens present in other shellfish. The cDNA of S. paramamosain AK was cloned, which encodes 357 amino acid residues. Nine linear epitopes and seven conformational epitopes were predicted following bioinformatics analysis. In addition, the entire recombinant AK (rAK) and three partial recombinant AKs (rAK1, rAK2, and rAK3) were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The proteins of rAK1, rAK2 and rAK have strong IgE reactivity with the pooled sera from crab allergic patients, while rAK3 has significantly weaker IgE reactivity, which indicates that the IgE epitopes of AK are mainly distributed in the regions of rAK1 and rAK2. Furthermore, three experimental linear epitopes (epitope 1: AA 127-141, epitope 2: AA 141-155, and epitope 3: AA 211-225) were discovered in the region of rAK1 and rAK2 using synthetized overlapping peptides. The experimental linear epitopes were mapped onto the protein homology model of AK. Meanwhile, in the IgE-binding assays of the sera from nine crab allergic patients, only three sera reacted with the denatured, linear AK as shown by Western-blotting, eight sera reacted with the native, folded AK by both dot-blotting and ELISA, which indicates that the conformational IgE epitopes of S. paramamosain AK may be more predominant.

  9. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice.

    PubMed

    Marini, Juan C; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 μmol/L), and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight.

  10. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  11. Nutritional consequences of interspecies differences in arginine and lysine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ball, Ronald O; Urschel, Kristine L; Pencharz, Paul B

    2007-06-01

    Differences in lysine and arginine requirements among various species such as omnivores (humans, pigs, rats, dogs), carnivores (cats), herbivores (rabbits, horses), ruminants (cattle), poultry, and fish, are covered in detail in this article. Although lysine is classified as an indispensable amino acid across species, the classification of arginine as either an indispensable or dispensable amino acid is more ambiguous because of differences among species in rates of de novo arginine synthesis. Because lysine is most often the limiting amino acid in the diet, its requirement has been extensively studied. By use of the ideal protein concept, the requirements of the other indispensable amino acids can be extrapolated from the lysine requirement. The successful use of this concept in pigs is compared with potential application of the ideal protein concept in humans. The current dietary arginine requirement varies widely among species, with ruminants, rabbits, and rats having relatively low requirements and carnivores, fish, and poultry having high requirements. Interspecies differences in metabolic arginine utilization and reasons for different rates of de novo arginine synthesis are reviewed in detail, as these are the primary determinants of the dietary arginine requirement. There is presently no dietary requirement for humans of any age, although this needs to be reassessed, particularly in neonates. A thorough understanding of the factors contributing to the lysine and arginine requirements in different species will be useful in our understanding of human amino acid requirements.

  12. Arginine Deprivation as a Targeted Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feun, L.; You, M.; Wu, C.J.; Kuo, M.T.; Wangpaichitr, M.; Spector, S.; Savaraj, N.

    2011-01-01

    Certain cancers may be auxotrophic for a particular amino acid and amino acid deprivation is one method to treat these tumors. Arginine deprivation is a novel approach to target tumors which lack argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression. ASS is a key enzyme which converts citrulline to arginine. Tumors which usually do not express ASS include melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, some mesotheliomas and some renal cell cancers. Arginine can be degraded by several enzymes including arginine deiminase (ADI). Although ADI is a microbial enzyme from mycoplasma, it has high affinity to arginine and catalyzes arginine to citrulline and ammonia. Citrulline can be recycled back to arginine in normal cells which express ASS, whereas ASS(−) tumor cells cannot. A pegylated form of ADI (ADI-PEG20) has been formulated and has shown in vitro and in vivo activity against melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. ADI-PEG20 induces apoptosis in melanoma cell lines. However, arginine deprivation can also induce ASS expression in certain melanoma cell lines which can lead to in-vitro drug resistance. Phase I and II clinical trials with ADI-PEG20 have been conducted in patients with melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma and antitumor activity has been demonstrated in both cancers. This article reviews our laboratory and clinical experience as well as others with ADI-PEG20 as an antineoplastic agent. Future direction in utilizing this agent is also discussed. PMID:18473854

  13. Loss of RUNX1/AML1 arginine-methylation impairs peripheral T cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Shinsuke; Yoshida, Tatsushi; Zhao, Xinyang; Nimer, Stephen D; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Okuda, Tsukasa

    2015-09-01

    RUNX1 (previously termed AML1) is a frequent target of human leukaemia-associated gene aberrations, and it encodes the DNA-binding subunit of the Core-Binding Factor transcription factor complex. RUNX1 expression is essential for the initiation of definitive haematopoiesis, for steady-state thrombopoiesis, and for normal lymphocytes development. Recent studies revealed that protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1), which accounts for the majority of the type I PRMT activity in cells, methylates two arginine residues in RUNX1 (R206 and R210), and these modifications inhibit corepressor-binding to RUNX1 thereby enhancing its transcriptional activity. In order to elucidate the biological significance of these methylations, we established novel knock-in mouse lines with non-methylable, double arginine-to-lysine (RTAMR-to-KTAMK) mutations in RUNX1. Homozygous Runx1(KTAMK) (/) (KTAMK) mice are born alive and appear normal during adulthood. However, Runx1(KTAMK) (/) (KTAMK) mice showed a reduction in CD3(+) T lymphoid cells and a decrease in CD4(+) T cells in peripheral lymphoid organs, in comparison to their wild-type littermates, leading to a reduction in the CD4(+) to CD8(+) T-cell ratio. These findings suggest that arginine-methylation of RUNX1 in the RTAMR-motif is dispensable for the development of definitive haematopoiesis and for steady-state platelet production, however this modification affects the role of RUNX1 in the maintenance of the peripheral CD4(+) T-cell population. PMID:26010396

  14. Purification of free arginine from chickpea (Cicer arietinum) seeds.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Megías, Cristina; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Chickpea is a grain legume widely consumed in the Mediterranean region and other parts of the world. Chickpea seeds are rich in proteins but they also contain a substantial amount of free amino acids, especially arginine. Hence chickpea may represent a useful source of free amino acids for nutritional or pharmaceutical purposes. Arginine is receiving great attention in recent years because it is the substrate for the synthesis of nitric oxide, an important signaling molecule involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes in mammals. In this work we describe a simple procedure for the purification of arginine from chickpea seeds, using nanofiltration technology and an ion-exchange resin, Amberlite IR-120. Arginine was finally purified by precipitation or crystallization, yielding preparations with purities of 91% and 100%, respectively. Chickpea may represent an affordable green source of arginine, and a useful alternative to production by fermentation or protein hydrolysis.

  15. Pegylated arginine deiminase: a novel anticancer enzyme agent

    PubMed Central

    Feun, Lynn; Savaraj, Niramol

    2011-01-01

    Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) is a novel anticancer enzyme that produces depletion of arginine, which is a nonessential amino acid in humans. Certain tumours, such as malignant melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, are auxotrophic for arginine. These tumours that are sensitive to arginine depletion do not express argininosuccinate synthetase, a key enzyme in the synthesis of arginine from citrulline. ADI-PEG20 inhibits human melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas in vitro and in vivo. Phase I – II trials in patients with melanoma and hepatocellular carcinomas have shown the drug to have antitumour activity and tolerable side effects. Large Phase II trials and randomised, controlled Phase III trials are needed to determine its overall efficacy in the treatment of these malignancies and others. PMID:16787144

  16. Release of arginine, glutamate and glutamine in the hippocampus of freely moving rats: Involvement of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Watts, Jo; Fowler, Leslie; Whitton, Peter S; Pearce, Brian

    2005-05-30

    Using in vivo microdialysis, we have monitored the release of three amino acids (arginine, glutamate and glutamine) in the hippocampus of freely moving rats in response to various drugs. In response to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) infusion, extracellular glutamate was increased, glutamine was decreased and arginine remained unchanged. By contrast, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleproprionic acid (AMPA) elicited an increase in arginine release but had no effect on either glutamate or glutamine. When S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, was infused into the hippocampus, an increase in glutamate, a decrease in glutamine and no change in arginine were recorded. The effect of SNAP on extracellular glutamine levels was reversed by prior infusion of the guanylate cyclase inhibitor oxadiazolo[4,3-alpha]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), however its effect on glutamate release was unchanged. Interestingly, SNAP was found to promote the release of arginine in the presence of ODQ. We also assessed the effect of two nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, N-nitro-l-arginine methylester (l-NAME) and 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), on the release of these amino acids. l-NAME was found to increase arginine and glutamate levels but decrease those of glutamine. In contrast, 7-NI reduced the release of all three amino acids. The results presented here confirm some but not all of the findings previously obtained using in vitro preparations. In addition, they suggest that complex relationships exist between the release of these amino acids, and that endogenous NO plays an important role in regulating their release.

  17. An engineered l-arginine sensor of Chlamydia pneumoniae enables arginine-adjustable transcription control in mammalian cells and mice

    PubMed Central

    Hartenbach, Shizuka; Daoud-El Baba, Marie; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-01-01

    For optimal compatibility with biopharmaceutical manufacturing and gene therapy, heterologous transgene control systems must be responsive to side-effect-free physiologic inducer molecules. The arginine-inducible interaction of the ArgR repressor and the ArgR-specific ARG box, which synchronize arginine import and synthesis in the intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae, was engineered for arginine-regulated transgene (ART) expression in mammalian cells. A synthetic arginine-responsive transactivator (ARG), consisting of ArgR fused to the Herpes simplex VP16 transactivation domain, reversibly adjusted transgene transcription of chimeric ARG box-containing mammalian minimal promoters (PART) in an arginine-inducible manner. Arginine-controlled transgene expression showed rapid induction kinetics in a variety of mammalian cell lines and was adjustable and reversible at concentrations which were compatible with host cell physiology. ART variants containing different transactivation domains, variable spacing between ARG box and minimal promoter and several tandem ARG boxes showed modified regulation performance tailored for specific expression scenarios and cell types. Mice implanted with microencapsulated cells engineered for ART-inducible expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) exhibited adjustable serum phosphatase levels after treatment with different arginine doses. Using a physiologic inducer, such as the amino acid l-arginine, to control heterologous transgenes in a seamless manner which is devoid of noticeable metabolic interference will foster novel opportunities for precise expression dosing in future gene therapy scenarios as well as the manufacturing of difficult-to-produce protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:17947334

  18. Arginine changes the conformation of the arginine attenuator peptide relative to the ribosome tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng; Wei, Jiajie; Lin, Pen-Jen; Tu, Liwei; Deutsch, Carol; Johnson, Arthur E.; Sachs, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    The fungal arginine attenuator peptide (AAP) is a regulatory peptide that controls ribosome function. As a nascent peptide within the ribosome exit tunnel, it acts to stall ribosomes in response to arginine (Arg). We used three approaches to probe the molecular basis for stalling. First, PEGylation assays revealed that the AAP did not undergo overall compaction in the tunnel in response to Arg. Second, site-specific photocrosslinking showed that Arg altered the conformation of the wild-type AAP, but not nonfunctional mutants, with respect to the tunnel. Third, using time-resolved spectral measurements with a fluorescent probe placed in the nascent AAP, we detected sequence-specific changes in the disposition of the AAP near the peptidyltransferase center in response to Arg. These data provide evidence that an Arg-induced change in AAP conformation and/or environment in the ribosome tunnel is important for stalling. PMID:22244852

  19. Elucidating the effects of arginine and lysine on a monoclonal antibody C-terminal lysine variation in CHO cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xintao; Tang, Hongping; Sun, Ya-Ting; Liu, Xuping; Tan, Wen-Song; Fan, Li

    2015-08-01

    C-terminal lysine variants are commonly observed in monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and found sensitive to process conditions, especially specific components in culture medium. The potential roles of media arginine (Arg) and lysine (Lys) in mAb heavy chain C-terminal lysine processing were investigated by monitoring the lysine variant levels under various Arg and Lys concentrations. Both Arg and Lys were found to significantly affect lysine variant level. Specifically, lysine variant level increased from 18.7 to 31.8 % when Arg and Lys concentrations were increased from 2 to 10 mM. Since heterogeneity of C-terminal lysine residues is due to the varying degree of proteolysis by basic carboxypeptidases (Cps), enzyme (basic Cps) level, pH conditions, and product (Arg and Lys) inhibition, which potentially affect the enzymatic reaction, were investigated under various Arg and Lys conditions. Enzyme level and pH conditions were found not to account for the different lysine variant levels, which was evident from the minimal variation in transcription level and intracellular pH. On the other hand, product inhibition effect of Arg and Lys on basic Cps was evident from the notable intracellular and extracellular Arg and Lys concentrations comparable with Ki values (inhibition constant) of basic Cps and further confirmed by cell-free assays. Additionally, a kinetic study of lysine variant level during the cell culture process enabled further characterization of the C-terminal lysine processing.

  20. Arginine Vasopressin and Copeptin in Perinatology

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Katrina Suzanne; Wellmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a major role in the homeostasis of fluid balance, vascular tonus, and the regulation of the endocrine stress response. The measurement of AVP levels is difficult due to its short half-life and laborious method of detection. Copeptin is a more stable peptide derived from the same precursor molecule, is released in an equimolar ratio to AVP, and has a very similar response to osmotic, hemodynamic, and stress-related stimuli. In fact, copeptin has been propagated as surrogate marker to indirectly determine circulating AVP concentrations in various conditions. Here, we present an overview of the current knowledge on AVP and copeptin in perinatology with a particular focus on the baby’s transition from placenta to lung breathing. We performed a systematic review of the literature on fetal stress hormone levels, including norepinephrine, cortisol, AVP, and copeptin, in regard to birth stress. Finally, diagnostic and therapeutic options for copeptin measurement and AVP functions are discussed. PMID:27532032

  1. The Bacterial Twin-Arginine Translocation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Philip A.; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle; Georgiou, George

    2009-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is responsible for the export of folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria. Substrates for the Tat pathway include redox enzymes requiring cofactor insertion in the cytoplasm, multimeric proteins that have to assemble into a complex prior to export, certain membrane proteins, and proteins whose folding is incompatible with Sec export. These proteins are involved in a diverse range of cellular activities including anaerobic metabolism, cell envelope biogenesis, metal acquisition and detoxification, and virulence. The Escherichia coli translocase consists of the TatA, TatB, and TatC proteins, but little is known about the precise sequence of events that leads to protein translocation, the energetic requirements, or the mechanism that prevents the export of misfolded proteins. Owing to the unique characteristics of the pathway, it holds promise for biotechnological applications. PMID:16756481

  2. Arginine Vasopressin and Copeptin in Perinatology.

    PubMed

    Evers, Katrina Suzanne; Wellmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a major role in the homeostasis of fluid balance, vascular tonus, and the regulation of the endocrine stress response. The measurement of AVP levels is difficult due to its short half-life and laborious method of detection. Copeptin is a more stable peptide derived from the same precursor molecule, is released in an equimolar ratio to AVP, and has a very similar response to osmotic, hemodynamic, and stress-related stimuli. In fact, copeptin has been propagated as surrogate marker to indirectly determine circulating AVP concentrations in various conditions. Here, we present an overview of the current knowledge on AVP and copeptin in perinatology with a particular focus on the baby's transition from placenta to lung breathing. We performed a systematic review of the literature on fetal stress hormone levels, including norepinephrine, cortisol, AVP, and copeptin, in regard to birth stress. Finally, diagnostic and therapeutic options for copeptin measurement and AVP functions are discussed. PMID:27532032

  3. Arginine Inhibits Adsorption of Proteins on Polystyrene Surface

    PubMed Central

    Shikiya, Yui; Tomita, Shunsuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    Nonspecific adsorption of protein on solid surfaces causes a reduction of concentration as well as enzyme inactivation during purification and storage. However, there are no versatile inhibitors of the adsorption between proteins and solid surfaces at low concentrations. Therefore, we examined additives for the prevention of protein adsorption on polystyrene particles (PS particles) as a commonly-used material for vessels such as disposable test tubes and microtubes. A protein solution was mixed with PS particles, and then adsorption of protein was monitored by the concentration and activity of protein in the supernatant after centrifugation. Five different proteins bound to PS particles through electrostatic, hydrophobic, and aromatic interactions, causing a decrease in protein concentration and loss of enzyme activity in the supernatant. Among the additives, including arginine hydrochloride (Arg), lysine hydrochloride, guanidine hydrochloride, NaCl, glycine, and glucose, Arg was most effective in preventing the binding of proteins to PS particles as well as activity loss. Moreover, even after the mixing of protein and PS particles, the addition of Arg caused desorption of the bound protein from PS particles. This study demonstrated a new function of Arg, which expands the potential for application of Arg to proteins. PMID:23967100

  4. Murine elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is posttranslationally modified by novel amide-linked ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol moieties. Addition of ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol to specific glutamic acid residues on EF-1 alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteheart, S.W.; Shenbagamurthi, P.; Chen, L.; Cotter, R.J.; Hart, G.W. )

    1989-08-25

    Elongation Factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha), an important eukaryotic translation factor, transports charged aminoacyl-tRNA from the cytosol to the ribosomes during poly-peptide synthesis. Metabolic radiolabeling with ({sup 3}H) ethanolamine shows that, in all cells examined, EF-1 alpha is the major radiolabeled protein. Radiolabeled EF-1 alpha has an apparent Mr = 53,000 and a basic isoelectric point. It is cytosolic and does not contain N-linked oligosaccharides. Trypsin digestion of murine EF-1 alpha generated two major ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine-labeled peptides. Three peptides were sequenced and were identical to two distinct regions of the human EF-1 alpha protein. Blank sequencing cycles coinciding with glutamic acid in the human cDNA-derived sequence were also found to release ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine, and compositional analysis of these peptides confirmed the presence of glutamic acid. Dansylation analysis demonstrates that the amine group of the ethanolamine is blocked. These results indicate that EF-1 alpha is posttranslationally modified by the covalent attachment of ethanolamine via an amide bond to at least two specific glutamic acid residues (Glu-301 and Glu-374). The hydroxyl group of the attached ethanolamine was shown by mass spectrometry and compositional analysis, to be further modified by the addition of a phosphoglycerol unit. This novel posttranslational modification may represent an important alteration of EF-1 alpha, comparable to the regulatory effects of posttranslational methylation of EF-1 alpha lysine residues.

  5. A few positively charged residues slow movement of a polypeptide chain across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Marifu; Onishi, Yukiko; Yoshimura, Shotaro; Fujita, Hidenobu; Imai, Kenta; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2014-08-26

    Many polypeptide chains are translocated across and integrated into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane through protein-conducting channels. During the process, amino acid sequences of translocating polypeptide chains are scanned by the channels and classified to be retained in the membrane or translocated into the lumen. We established an experimental system with which the kinetic effect of each amino acid residue on the polypeptide chain movement can be analyzed with a time resolution of tens of seconds. Positive charges greatly slow movement; only two lysine residues caused a remarkable slow down, and their effects were additive. The lysine residue was more effective than arginine. In contrast, clusters comprising three residues of each of the other 18 amino acids had little effect on chain movement. We also demonstrated that a four lysine cluster can exert the effect after being fully exposed from the ribosome. We concluded that as few as two to three residues of positively charged amino acids can slow the movement of the nascent polypeptide chain across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. This effect provides a fundamental basis of the topogenic function of positively charged amino acids. PMID:25093244

  6. Arginine depletion increases susceptibility to serious infections in preterm newborns

    PubMed Central

    Badurdeen, Shiraz; Mulongo, Musa; Berkley, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm newborns are highly susceptible to bacterial infections. This susceptibility is regarded as being due to immaturity of multiple pathways of the immune system. However, it is unclear whether a mechanism that unifies these different, suppressed pathways exists. Here, we argue that the immune vulnerability of the preterm neonate is critically related to arginine depletion. Arginine, a “conditionally essential” amino acid, is depleted in acute catabolic states, including sepsis. Its metabolism is highly compartmentalized and regulated, including by arginase-mediated hydrolysis. Recent data suggest that arginase II-mediated arginine depletion is essential for the innate immune suppression that occurs in newborn models of bacterial challenge, impairing pathways critical for the immune response. Evidence that arginine depletion mediates protection from immune activation during first gut colonization suggests a regulatory role in controlling gut-derived pathogens. Clinical studies show that plasma arginine is depleted during sepsis. In keeping with animal studies, small clinical trials of L-arginine supplementation have shown benefit in reducing necrotizing enterocolitis in premature neonates. We propose a novel, broader hypothesis that arginine depletion during bacterial challenge is a key factor limiting the neonate's ability to mount an adequate immune response, contributing to the increased susceptibility to infections, particularly with respect to gut-derived sepsis. PMID:25360828

  7. Accumulation of D-arginine by rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Molina, R; Pardo, J P; Saavedra-Molina, A; Piña, E

    1987-12-01

    The permeability of the inner mitochondrial membrane from rat liver to D-arginine was studied. By using safranin as a probe of the membrane potential, depolarization of energized liver mitochondria occurred in a dose-dependent fashion starting at 3.3 mmol/L of D- or DL-arginine. When ethidium bromide fluorescence was employed, a decrease in the membrane potential due to D- or DL-arginine was observed. A parallel significant change in succinate-induced respiration in rat liver mitochondria was found in response to osmotic swelling in 125 mmol/L of D-arginine salts. L-Arginine, L-glutamine, L-asparagine, L-ornithine, D-ornithine, and L-lysine did not modify the membrane potential at the concentrations tested. D-Arginine was not transformed into citrulline, but 1.0 mmol/L of the D-amino acid inhibited, by 42%, the state 3 of mitochondrial respiration using succinate as substrate. When D-arginine was used in combination with nigericin, a 40% inhibition of mitochondrial respiration in state 3 was recorded with succinate and with glutamate-malate as substrates. PMID:3454185

  8. Antiatherogenic effects of L-arginine in the hypercholesterolemic rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, J P; Singer, A H; Tsao, P; Zera, P; Rowan, R A; Billingham, M E

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if chronic administration of L-arginine, the precursor of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF), normalizes endothelium-dependent relaxation and decreases atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic animals. Male rabbits were fed (a) normal rabbit chow; (b) 1% cholesterol diet; or (c) 1% cholesterol diet supplemented by 2.25% L-arginine HCl in drinking water. Arginine supplementation doubled plasma arginine levels without affecting serum cholesterol values. After 10 wk, the thoracic aorta was harvested for studies of vascular reactivity and histomorphometry. Endothelium-dependent relaxations (to acetylcholine and calcium ionophore A23187) were significantly impaired in thoracic aortae from animals fed a 1% cholesterol diet. By contrast, vessels from hypercholesterolemic animals receiving L-arginine supplementation exhibited significantly improved endothelium-dependent relaxations. Responses to norepinephrine or nitroglycerin were not affected by either dietary intervention. Histomorphometric analysis revealed a reduction in lesion surface area and intimal thickness in thoracic aortae from arginine-supplemented animals compared to those from untreated hypercholesterolemic rabbits. This is the first study to demonstrate that supplementation of dietary L-arginine, the EDRF precursor, improves endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. More importantly, we have shown that this improvement in EDRF activity is associated with a reduction in atherogenesis. PMID:1522225

  9. Unique Photobleaching Phenomena of the Twin-Arginine Translocase Respiratory Enzyme Chaperone DmsD

    PubMed Central

    Rivardo, Fabrizio; Leach, Thorin G.H.; Chan, Catherine S.; Winstone, Tara M.L.; Ladner, Carol L.; Sarfo, Kwabena J.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    DmsD is a chaperone of the redox enzyme maturation protein family specifically required for biogenesis of DMSO reductase in Escherichia coli. It exists in multiple folding forms, all of which are capable of binding its known substrate, the twin-arginine leader sequence of the DmsA catalytic subunit. It is important for maturation of the reductase and targeting to the cytoplasmic membrane for translocation. Here, we demonstrate that DmsD exhibits an irreversible photobleaching phenomenon upon 280 nm excitation irradiation. The phenomenon is due to quenching of the tryptophan residues in DmsD and is dependent on its folding and conformation. We also show that a tryptophan residue involved in DmsA signal peptide binding (W87) is important for photobleaching of DmsD. Mutation of W87, or binding of the DmsA twin-arginine signal peptide to DmsD in the pocket that includes W72, W80, and W91 significantly affects the degree of photobleaching. This study highlights the advantage of a photobleaching phenomenon to study protein folding and conformation changes within a protein that was once considered unusable in fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:24497893

  10. Overview of existing European food consumption databases: critical aspects in relation to their use for the assessment of dietary exposure to additives, flavourings and residues of food contact materials.

    PubMed

    Le Donne, Cinzia; Piccinelli, Raffaela; Sette, Stefania; Leclercq, Catherine

    2011-03-01

    A critical analysis of existing food consumption databases was performed with particular regard for their current and potential use for the assessment of dietary exposure to additives, flavourings and residues of food contact materials. Within the European Food Consumption Validation project (EFCOVAL), a questionnaire on critical aspects of such datasets was developed and administered to researchers responsible for the collection/analysis of national food consumption data in European countries. Information collected was complemented through a review of the literature and of grey publications in order to provide an inventory of the main food consumption surveys performed in Europe from 1994 to 2007, for a total of 23 countries and 37 surveys. It appeared that existing European food consumption surveys have as a main objective the assessment of nutrient intake in the population. On the other hand, most of the databases were shown to be used also for the purpose of dietary exposure assessment.

  11. Development of a three-dimensional CysLT1 (LTD4) antagonist model with an incorporated amino acid residue from the receptor.

    PubMed

    Zwaagstra, M E; Schoenmakers, S H; Nederkoorn, P H; Gelens, E; Timmerman, H; Zhang, M Q

    1998-04-23

    This paper describes the molecular modeling of leukotriene CysLT1 (or LTD4) receptor antagonists. Several different structural classes of CysLT1 antagonists were superimposed onto the new and highly rigid CysLT1 antagonist 8-carboxy-3'-[2-(2-quinolinyl)ethenyl]flavone (1, VUF 5017) to generate a common pharmacophoric arrangement. On the basis of known structure-activity relationships of CysLT1 antagonists, the quinoline nitrogen (or a bioisosteric equivalent thereof) and an acidic function were taken as the matching points. In order to optimize the fitting of acidic moieties of all antagonists, an arginine residue from the receptor was proposed as the interaction site for the acidic moieties. Incorporation of this amino acid residue into the model revealed additional interactions between the guanidine group and the nitrogen atoms of quinoline-containing CysLT1 antagonists. In some cases, the arginine may even interact with pi-clouds of phenyl residues of CysLT1 antagonists. The alignment of Montelukast (MK-476) suggests the presence of an additional pocket in the binding site for CysLT1 antagonists. The derived model should be useful for a better understanding of the molecular recognition of the leukotriene CysLT1 receptor.

  12. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 Reduces Bleeding and Thrombocytopenia after Amputation in Rats Treated with Heparin, Warfarin, L-NAME and L-Arginine

    PubMed Central

    Stupnisek, Mirjana; Kokot, Antonio; Drmic, Domagoj; Hrelec Patrlj, Masa; Zenko Sever, Anita; Kolenc, Danijela; Radic, Bozo; Suran, Jelena; Bojic, Davor; Vcev, Aleksandar; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    Background BPC 157 is a stable gastric pentadecapeptide recently implicated with a role in hemostasis. While NO is largely implicated in hemostatic mechanisms, in tail-amputation-models under heparin- and warfarin-administration, both the NO-synthase (NOS)-blocker, L-NAME (prothrombotic) and the NOS-substrate L-arginine (antithrombotic), were little investigated. Objective. To investigate the effect of L-NAME and L-arginine on hemostatic parameters, and to reveal the effects of BPC 157 on the L-NAME- and L-arginine-induced hemostatic actions under different pathological condition: tail amputation without or with anticoagulants, heparin or warfarin. Methods Tail amputation, and/or i.v.-heparin (10 mg/kg), i.g.-warfarin (1.5 mg/kg/day for 3 days) were used in rats. Treatment includes BPC 157, L-NAME, L-arginine, per se and their combination. Results After (tail) amputation, with or without i.v.-heparin or i.g.-warfarin, BPC 157 (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg, i.p., i.v. (heparin), 10 μg/kg i.g. (warfarin)) always reduced bleeding time and/or haemorrhage and counteracted thrombocytopenia. As for L-NAME and/or L-arginine, we noted: L-arginine (100 mg/kg i.p.)–rats: more bleeding, less/no thrombocytopenia; L-NAME (5 mg/kg i.p.)-rats: less bleeding (amputation only), but present thrombocytopenia; L-NAME+L-arginine-rats also exhibited thrombocytopenia: L-NAME counteracted L-arginine-increased bleeding, L-arginine did not counteract L-NAME-thrombocytopenia. All animals receiving BPC 157 in addition (BPC 157μg+L-NAME; BPC 157μg+L-arginine, BPC 157μg+L-NAME+L-arginine), exhibited decreased haemorrhage and markedly counteracted thrombocytopenia. Conclusions L-NAME (thrombocytopenia), L-arginine (increased haemorrhage) counteraction and BPC 157 (decreased haemorrhage, counteracted thrombocytopenia) with rescue against two different anticoagulants, implicate a BPC 157 modulatory and balancing role with rescued NO-hemostatic mechanisms. PMID:25897838

  13. A cyanase is transcriptionally regulated by arginine and involved in cyanate decomposition in Sordaria macrospora.

    PubMed

    Elleuche, Skander; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2008-11-01

    Cyanase degrades toxic cyanate to NH3 and CO2 in a bicarbonate-dependent reaction. High concentrations of cyanate are fairly toxic to organisms. Here, we characterize a eukaryotic cyanase for the first time. We have isolated the cyn1 gene encoding a cyanase from the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora and functionally characterized the cyn1 product after heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed a predicted catalytic centre of three conserved amino-acids. A Deltacyn1 knockout in S. macrospora was totally devoid of cyanase activity and showed an increased sensitivity to exogenously supplied cyanate in an arginine-depleted medium, defects in ascospore germination, but no other obvious morphological phenotype. By means of real-time PCR we have demonstrated that the transcriptional level of cyn1 is markedly elevated in the presence of cyanate and down-regulated by addition of arginine. The putative functions of cyanase in fungi are discussed.

  14. A plant viral coat protein RNA binding consensus sequence contains a crucial arginine.

    PubMed Central

    Ansel-McKinney, P; Scott, S W; Swanson, M; Ge, X; Gehrke, L

    1996-01-01

    A defining feature of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and ilarviruses [type virus: tobacco streak virus (TSV)] is that, in addition to genomic RNAs, viral coat protein is required to establish infection in plants. AMV and TSV coat proteins, which share little primary amino acid sequence identity, are functionally interchangeable in RNA binding and initiation of infection. The lysine-rich amino-terminal RNA binding domain of the AMV coat protein lacks previously identified RNA binding motifs. Here, the AMV coat protein RNA binding domain is shown to contain a single arginine whose specific side chain and position are crucial for RNA binding. In addition, the putative RNA binding domain of two ilarvirus coat proteins, TSV and citrus variegation virus, is identified and also shown to contain a crucial arginine. AMV and ilarvirus coat protein sequence alignment centering on the key arginine revealed a new RNA binding consensus sequence. This consensus may explain in part why heterologous viral RNA-coat protein mixtures are infectious. Images PMID:8890181

  15. PRMT4-Mediated Arginine Methylation Negatively Regulates Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Protein and Promotes E2F-1 Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kevin Y.; Wang, Don-Hong; Campbell, Mel; Huerta, Steve B.; Shevchenko, Bogdan; Izumiya, Chie

    2014-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRb/p105) tumor suppressor plays a pivotal role in cell cycle regulation by blockage of the G1-to-S-phase transition. pRb tumor suppressor activity is governed by a variety of posttranslational modifications, most notably phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes. Here we report a novel regulation of pRb through protein arginine methyltransferase 4 (PRMT4)-mediated arginine methylation, which parallels phosphorylation. PRMT4 specifically methylates pRb at the pRb C-terminal domain (pRb Cterm) on arginine (R) residues R775, R787, and R798 in vitro and R787 in vivo. Arginine methylation is important for efficient pRb Cterm phosphorylation, as manifested by the reduced phosphorylation of a methylation-impaired mutant, pRb (R3K). A methylmimetic form of pRb, pRb (R3F), disrupts the formation of the E2F-1/DP1-pRb complex in cells as well as in an isolated system. Finally, studies using a Gal4–E2F-1 reporter system show that pRb (R3F) expression reduces the ability of pRb to repress E2F-1 transcriptional activation, while pRb (R3K) expression further represses E2F-1 transcriptional activation relative to that for cells expressing wild-type pRb. Together, our results suggest that arginine methylation negatively regulates the tumor suppressor function of pRb during cell cycle control, in part by creating a better substrate for Cdk complex phosphorylation and disrupting the interaction of pRb with E2F-1. PMID:25348716

  16. BRAF inhibitor resistance enhances vulnerability to arginine deprivation in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying-Ying; Wu, Chunjing; Chen, Shu-Mei; Shah, Sumedh S.; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Feun, Lynn G.; Kuo, Macus T.; Suarez, Miguel; Prince, Jeffrey; Savaraj, Niramol

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) has been used for treatment of melanomas harboring V600E mutation. Despite a high initial response rate, resistance to BRAFi is inevitable. Here, we demonstrate that BRAFi-resistant (BR) melanomas are susceptible to arginine deprivation due to inability to initiate re-expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1, a key enzyme for arginine synthesis) as well as ineffective autophagy. Autophagy and ASS1 re-expression are known to protect melanoma cells from cell death upon arginine deprivation. When melanoma cells become BR cells by long-term in vitro incubation with BRAFi, c-Myc-mediated ASS1 re-expression and the levels of autophagy-associated proteins (AMPK-α1 and Atg5) are attenuated. Furthermore, our study uncovers that downregulation of deubiquitinase USP28 which results in more active c-Myc degradation via ubiquitin-proteasome machinery is the primary mechanism for inability to re-express ASS1 upon arginine deprivation in BR cells. Overexpression of USP28 in BR cells enhances c-Myc expression and hence increases ASS1 transcription upon arginine deprivation, and consequently leads to cell survival. On the other hand, overexpression of Atg5 or AMPK-α1 in BR cells can redirect arginine deprivation-induced apoptosis toward autophagy. The xenograft models also confirm that BR tumors possess lower expression of ASS1 and are hypersensitive to arginine deprivation. These biochemical changes in BRAFi resistance which make them vulnerable to arginine deprivation can be exploited for the future treatment of BR melanoma patients. PMID:26771234

  17. Interplay among coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1, CBP, and CIITA in IFN-gamma-inducible MHC-II gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zika, Eleni; Fauquier, Lucas; Vandel, Laurence; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2005-11-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (MHC-II) genes are prototype targets of IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma activates the expression of the non-DNA-binding master regulator of MHC-II, class II transactivator (CIITA), which is crucial for enhanceosome formation and gene activation. This report shows the importance of the histone methyltransferase, coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase (CARM1/PRMT4), during IFN-gamma-induced MHC-II gene activation. It also demonstrates the coordinated regulation of CIITA, CARM1, and the acetyltransferase cyclic-AMP response element binding (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) during this process. CARM1 synergizes with CIITA in activating MHC-II transcription and synergy is abrogated when an arginine methyltransferase-defective CARM1 mutant is used. Protein-arginine methyltransferase 1 has much less effect on MHC-II transcription. Specific RNA interference reduced CARM1 expression as well as MHC-II expression. The recruitment of CARM1 to the promoter requires endogenous CIITA and results in methylation of histone H3-R17; hence, CIITA is an upstream regulator of histone methylation. Previous work has shown that CARM1 can methylate CBP at three arginine residues. Using wild-type CBP and a mutant of CBP lacking the CARM1-targeted arginine residues (R3A), we show that arginine methylation of CBP is required for IFN-gamma induction of MHC-II. A kinetic analysis shows that CIITA, CARM1, and H3-R17 methylation all precede CBP loading on the MHC-II promoter during IFN-gamma treatment. These results suggest functional and temporal relationships among CIITA, CARM1, and CBP for IFN-gamma induction of MHC-II.

  18. Mutagenesis identifies the critical amino acid residues of human endonuclease G involved in catalysis, magnesium coordination, and substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shih-Lu; Li, Chia-Cheng; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Chen, Yi-Jin; Lin, Ching-Ting; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2009-01-01

    Background Endonuclease G (EndoG), a member of DNA/RNA nonspecific ββα-Me-finger nucleases, is involved in apoptosis and normal cellular proliferation. In this study, we analyzed the critical amino acid residues of EndoG and proposed the catalytic mechanism of EndoG. Methods To identify the critical amino acid residues of human EndoG, we replaced the conserved histidine, asparagine, and arginine residues with alanine. The catalytic efficacies of Escherichia coli-expressed EndoG variants were further analyzed by kinetic studies. Results Diethyl pyrocarbonate modification assay revealed that histidine residues were involved in EndoG activity. His-141, Asn-163, and Asn-172 in the H-N-H motif of EndoG were critical for catalysis and substrate specificity. H141A mutant required a higher magnesium concentration to achieve its activity, suggesting the unique role of His-141 in both catalysis and magnesium coordination. Furthermore, an additional catalytic residue (Asn-251) and an additional metal ion binding site (Glu-271) of human EndoG were identified. Conclusion Based on the mutational analysis and homology modeling, we proposed that human EndoG shared a similar catalytic mechanism with nuclease A from Anabaena. PMID:19272175

  19. How to improve fertility of African soils? Leguminous fallows (Cameroon), addition of farmyard manure and mineral fertilizer (Kenya), organic residues management and introduction of N2 fixing species in forest plantations (Congo).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutika, Lydie-Stella; Mareschal, Louis; Mouanda, Cadeau; Epron, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Most of African soils are inherently infertile and poor in nutrients mainly nitrogen and phosphorus. Several practices are used to improve soil fertility, increase productivity and ensure their sustainability. Soil fertility in the leguminous fallows was evaluated through particulate organic matter (POM), the more active part of soil organic matter (SOM) in Cameroon. The combination of mineral and organic (manure) fertilizers increased microbial P biomass allowing the release of P along the plant growing period in the Kenyan soils. Organic residues management and introduction of nitrogen fixing species (Acacia) were used to improve soil fertility and sustain forest productivity on the coastal plains of Congo. SOM fractionation was made under Pueraria, Mucuna fallows and natural regrowth mainly Chromolaena and under 3 forest plantation treatments installed in previous savanna: 1) no input, 2) normal input, and 3) double input of organic residues. Microbial P biomass and sequential P fractionation were evaluated in high and low P fixing soils. N, C, available P and pH were determined on soil sampled in acacia (100A), eucalypt (100E) and mixed-species (50A:50E) stands. N and P were determined in aboveground litters and in leaves, bark and wood of trees. The two leguminous fallows increased N content in POM fractions i.e., N >1% for Pueraria and Mucuna against N<1% for natural regrowth in the 0-0.10m depth, probably through N input from N2 fixation from the atmosphere (Cameroon).The addition of mineral fertilizers and farmyard manure increases P biomass (4.8 after 2 weeks to 15.2 after 16 weeks), and then decreased to 9.7 mg P g-1 soil (week 32). It also changes the P Hedley fractions partition in the high P fixing Kenyan soil (0-0.10m). After two rotations (14 years), SOM mineralization was the highest in the double input of organic residues treatment (low coarse POM 5.6 g kg-1 of soil and high organo-mineral fraction (OMF) 115 g kg-1 of soil). The introduction of A

  20. Geometry of guanidinium groups in arginines.

    PubMed

    Malinska, Maura; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    The restraints in common usage today have been obtained based on small molecule X-ray crystal structures available 25 years ago and recent reports have shown that the values of bond lengths and valence angles can be, in fact, significantly different from those stored in libraries, for example for the peptide bond or the histidine ring geometry. We showed that almost 50% of outliers found in protein validation reports released in the Protein Data Bank on 23 March 2016 come from geometry of guanidine groups in arginines. Therefore, structures of small molecules and atomic resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive new target values for the geometry of this group. The most significant difference was found for NE-CZ-NH1 and NE-CZ-NH2 angles, showing that the guanidinium group is not symmetric. The NE-CZ-NH1 angle is larger, 121.5(10)˚, than NE-CZ-NH2, 119.2(10)˚, due to the repulsive interaction between NH1 and CD1 atom.

  1. Inhibiting Protein Arginine Deiminases Has Antioxidant Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Witalison, Erin E.; Cui, Xiangli; Hofseth, Anne B.; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Causey, Corey P.; Thompson, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a dynamic, idiopathic, chronic inflammatory condition that carries a high colon cancer risk. We previously showed that Cl-amidine, a small-molecule inhibitor of the protein arginine deiminases, suppresses colitis in mice. Because colitis is defined as inflammation of the colon associated with infiltration of white blood cells that release free radicals and citrullination is an inflammation-dependent process, we asked whether Cl-amidine has antioxidant properties. Here we show that colitis induced with azoxymethane via intraperitoneal injection + 2% dextran sulfate sodium in the drinking water is suppressed by Cl-amidine (also given in the drinking water). Inducible nitric oxide synthase, an inflammatory marker, was also downregulated in macrophages by Cl-amidine. Because epithelial cell DNA damage associated with colitis is at least in part a result of an oxidative burst from overactive leukocytes, we tested the hypothesis that Cl-amidine can inhibit leukocyte activation, as well as subsequent target epithelial cell DNA damage in vitro and in vivo. Results are consistent with this hypothesis, and because DNA damage is a procancerous mechanism, our data predict that Cl-amidine will not only suppress colitis, but we hypothesize that it may prevent colon cancer associated with colitis. PMID:25635139

  2. Modeling of cellular arginine uptake by more than one transporter.

    PubMed

    Nel, Marietha J; Woodiwiss, Angela J; Candy, Geoffrey P

    2012-01-01

    Determining the kinetic constants of arginine uptake by endothelial cells mediated by more than one transporter from linearization of data as Eadie-Hofstee plots or modeling which does not include the concentration of trace radiolabeled amino acid used to measure uptake may not be correct. The initial rate of uptake of trace [³H]L-arginine by HUVECs and ECV₃₀₄ cells in the presence of a range of unlabeled arginine and modifiers was used in nonlinear models to calculate the constants of arginine uptake using GraphPad Prism. Theoretical plots of uptake derived from constants determined from Eadie-Hofstee graphs overestimated uptake, whereas those from the nonlinear modeling approach agreed with experimental data. The contribution of uptake by individual transporters could be modeled and showed that leucine inhibited the individual transporters differently and not necessarily competitively. N-Ethylmaleimide inhibited only y⁺ transport, and BCH may be a selective inhibitor of y⁺L transport. The absence of sodium reduced arginine uptake by y⁺L transport and reduced the K(m)', whereas reducing sodium decreased arginine uptake by y⁺ transport without affecting the K (m)'. The nonlinear modeling approach using raw data avoided the errors inherent in methods deriving constants from the linearization of the uptake processes following Michaelian kinetics. This study provides explanations for discrepancies in the literature and suggests that a nonlinear modeling approach better characterizes the kinetics of amino acid uptake into cells by more than one transporter.

  3. An Arginine Finger Regulates the Sequential Action of Asymmetrical Hexameric ATPase in the Double-Stranded DNA Translocation Motor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhengyi; De-Donatis, Gian Marco; Schwartz, Chad; Fang, Huaming; Li, Jingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Biological motors are ubiquitous in living systems. Currently, how the motor components coordinate the unidirectional motion is elusive in most cases. Here, we report that the sequential action of the ATPase ring in the DNA packaging motor of bacteriophage ϕ29 is regulated by an arginine finger that extends from one ATPase subunit to the adjacent unit to promote noncovalent dimer formation. Mutation of the arginine finger resulted in the interruption of ATPase oligomerization, ATP binding/hydrolysis, and DNA translocation. Dimer formation reappeared when arginine mutants were mixed with other ATPase subunits that can offer the arginine to promote their interaction. Ultracentrifugation and virion assembly assays indicated that the ATPase was presenting as monomers and dimer mixtures. The isolated dimer alone was inactive in DNA translocation, but the addition of monomer could restore the activity, suggesting that the hexameric ATPase ring contained both dimer and monomers. Moreover, ATP binding or hydrolysis resulted in conformation and entropy changes of the ATPase with high or low DNA affinity. Taking these observations together, we concluded that the arginine finger regulates sequential action of the motor ATPase subunit by promoting the formation of the dimer inside the hexamer. The finding of asymmetrical hexameric organization is supported by structural evidence of many other ATPase systems showing the presence of one noncovalent dimer and four monomer subunits. All of these provide clues for why the asymmetrical hexameric ATPase gp16 of ϕ29 was previously reported as a pentameric configuration by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) since the contact by the arginine finger renders two adjacent ATPase subunits closer than other subunits. Thus, the asymmetrical hexamer would appear as a pentamer by cryo-EM, a technology that acquires the average of many images. PMID:27457616

  4. l-Arginine-dependent suppression of apoptosis in Trypanosoma cruzi: Contribution of the nitric oxide and polyamine pathways

    PubMed Central

    Piacenza, Lucía; Peluffo, Gonzalo; Radi, Rafael

    2001-01-01

    Until recently, a capacity for apoptosis and synthesis of nitric oxide (⋅NO) were viewed as exclusive to multicellular organisms. The existence of these processes in unicellular parasites was recently described, with their biological significance remaining to be elucidated. We have evaluated l-arginine metabolism in Trypanosoma cruzi in the context of human serum-induced apoptotic death. Apoptosis was evidenced by the induction of DNA fragmentation and the inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation, which were inhibited by the caspase inhibitor Ac-Asp-Glu-Val-aspartic acid aldehyde (DEVD-CHO). In T. cruzi exposed to death stimuli, supplementation with l-arginine inhibited DNA fragmentation, restored [3H]thymidine incorporation, and augmented parasite ⋅NO production. These effects were inhibited by the ⋅NO synthase inhibitor Nω-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME). Exogenous ⋅NO limited DNA fragmentation but did not restore proliferation rates. Because l-arginine is also a substrate for arginine decarboxylase (ADC), and its product agmatine is a precursor for polyamine synthesis, we evaluated the contribution of polyamines to limiting apoptosis. Addition of agmatine, putrescine, and the polyamines spermine and spermidine to T. cruzi sustained parasite proliferation and inhibited DNA fragmentation. Also, the ADC inhibitor difluoromethylarginine inhibited l-arginine-dependent restoration of parasite replication rates, while the protection from DNA fragmentation persisted. In aggregate, these results indicate that T. cruzi epimastigotes can undergo programmed cell death that can be inhibited by l-arginine by means of (i) a ⋅NO synthase-dependent ⋅NO production that suppresses apoptosis and (ii) an ADC-dependent production of polyamines that support parasite proliferation. PMID:11404465

  5. Dietary L-arginine supplementation increases muscle gain and reduces body fat mass in growing-finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong; Liu, Zhiqiang; Li, Xinguo; Xu, Haijun; Kong, Xiangfeng; Huang, Ruilin; Tang, Wenjie; Shinzato, Izuru; Smith, Stephen B; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Obesity in humans is a major public health crisis worldwide. In addition, livestock species exhibit excessive subcutaneous fat at market weight. However, there are currently few means of reducing adiposity in mammals. This study was conducted with a swine model to test the hypothesis that dietary L-arginine supplementation may increase muscle gain and decrease fat deposition. Twenty-four 110-day-old barrows were assigned randomly into two treatments, representing supplementation with 1.0% L-arginine or 2.05% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) to a corn- and soybean meal-based diet. Growth performance was measured based on weight gain and food intake. After a 60-day period of supplementation, carcass and muscle composition were measured. Serum triglyceride concentration was 20% lower (P < 0.01) but glucagon level was 36% greater (P < 0.05) in arginine-supplemented than in control pigs. Compared with the control, arginine supplementation increased (P < 0.05) body weight gain by 6.5% and carcass skeletal-muscle content by 5.5%, while decreasing (P < 0.01) carcass fat content by 11%. The arginine treatment enhanced (P < 0.05) longissimus dorsi muscle protein, glycogen, and fat contents by 4.8, 42, and 70%, respectively, as well as muscle pH at 45 min post-mortem by 0.32, while reducing muscle lactate content by 37%. These results support our hypothesis that dietary arginine supplementation beneficially promotes muscle gain and reduces body fat accretion in growing-finishing pigs. The findings have a positive impact on development of novel therapeutics to treat human obesity and enhance swine lean-tissue growth.

  6. Plasma arginine and ornithine are the main citrulline precursors in mice infused with arginine-free diets.

    PubMed

    Marini, Juan C; Didelija, Inka Cajo; Castillo, Leticia; Lee, Brendan

    2010-08-01

    Dietary arginine is the main dietary precursor for citrulline synthesis, but it is not known if other precursors can compensate when arginine is absent in the diet. To address this question, the contributions of plasma and dietary precursors were determined by using multitracer protocols in conscious mice infused i.g. either an arginine-sufficient diet [Arg(+)] or an arginine-free diet [Arg(-)]. The plasma entry rate of citrulline and arginine did not differ between the 2 diet groups (156 +/- 6 and 564 +/- 30 micromol kg(-1) h(-1), respectively); however, the entry rate of ornithine was greater in the mice fed the Arg(+) than the Arg(-) diet (332 +/- 33 vs. 180 +/- 16 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)). There was a greater utilization of plasma ornithine for the synthesis of citrulline (49 +/- 4 vs. 36 +/- 3 micromol kg(-1) h(-1), 30 +/- 3% vs. 24 +/- 2% of citrulline entry rate) in the mice fed the Arg(-) diet than the Arg(+) diet. The utilization of plasma arginine did not differ between the 2 diet groups for citrulline synthesis, either through plasma ornithine (approximately 29 +/- 3 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)) or at the site of citrulline synthesis (approximately 12 +/- 3 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)). The contribution of dietary proline to the synthesis of citrulline was mainly at the site of citrulline production (17 +/- 1 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)), rather than through plasma ornithine (5 +/- 0.4 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)). Dietary glutamine was utilized only at the site of citrulline synthesis (4 +/- 0.2 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)). Dietary glutamine and proline made a greater contribution to the synthesis of citrulline in mice fed the Arg(-) diet but remained minor sources for citrulline production. Plasma arginine and ornithine are able to support citrulline synthesis during arginine-free feeding.

  7. Lysozyme affects the microbial catabolism of free arginine in raw-milk hard cheeses.

    PubMed

    D'Incecco, P; Gatti, M; Hogenboom, J A; Bottari, B; Rosi, V; Neviani, E; Pellegrino, L

    2016-08-01

    Lysozyme (LZ) is used in several cheese varieties to prevent late blowing which results from fermentation of lactate by Clostridium tyrobutyricum. Side effects of LZ on lactic acid bacteria population and free amino acid pattern were studied in 16 raw-milk hard cheeses produced in eight parallel cheese makings conducted at four different dairies using the same milk with (LZ+) or without (LZ-) addition of LZ. The LZ-cheeses were characterized by higher numbers of cultivable microbial population and lower amount of DNA arising from lysed bacterial cells with respect to LZ + cheeses. At both 9 and 16 months of ripening, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus fermentum proved to be the species mostly affected by LZ. The total content of free amino acids indicated the proteolysis extent to be characteristic of the dairy, regardless to the presence of LZ. In contrast, the relative patterns showed the microbial degradation of arginine to be promoted in LZ + cheeses. The data demonstrated that the arginine-deiminase pathway was only partially adopted since citrulline represented the main product and only trace levels of ornithine were found. Differences in arginine degradation were considered for starter and non-starter lactic acid bacteria, at different cheese ripening stages.

  8. Lysozyme affects the microbial catabolism of free arginine in raw-milk hard cheeses.

    PubMed

    D'Incecco, P; Gatti, M; Hogenboom, J A; Bottari, B; Rosi, V; Neviani, E; Pellegrino, L

    2016-08-01

    Lysozyme (LZ) is used in several cheese varieties to prevent late blowing which results from fermentation of lactate by Clostridium tyrobutyricum. Side effects of LZ on lactic acid bacteria population and free amino acid pattern were studied in 16 raw-milk hard cheeses produced in eight parallel cheese makings conducted at four different dairies using the same milk with (LZ+) or without (LZ-) addition of LZ. The LZ-cheeses were characterized by higher numbers of cultivable microbial population and lower amount of DNA arising from lysed bacterial cells with respect to LZ + cheeses. At both 9 and 16 months of ripening, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus fermentum proved to be the species mostly affected by LZ. The total content of free amino acids indicated the proteolysis extent to be characteristic of the dairy, regardless to the presence of LZ. In contrast, the relative patterns showed the microbial degradation of arginine to be promoted in LZ + cheeses. The data demonstrated that the arginine-deiminase pathway was only partially adopted since citrulline represented the main product and only trace levels of ornithine were found. Differences in arginine degradation were considered for starter and non-starter lactic acid bacteria, at different cheese ripening stages. PMID:27052697

  9. Arginine metabolism and nutrition in growth, health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazer, Fuller W.; Davis, Teresa A.; Kim, Sung Woo; Li, Peng; Rhoads, J. Marc; Satterfield, M. Carey; Smith, Stephen B.; Spencer, Thomas E.; Yin, Yulong

    2009-01-01

    l-Arginine (Arg) is synthesised from glutamine, glutamate, and proline via the intestinal-renal axis in humans and most other mammals (including pigs, sheep and rats). Arg degradation occurs via multiple pathways that are initiated by arginase, nitric-oxide synthase, Arg:glycine amidinotransferase, and Arg decarboxylase. These pathways produce nitric oxide, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine, and agmatine with each having enormous biological importance. Arg is also required for the detoxification of ammonia, which is an extremely toxic substance for the central nervous system. There is compelling evidence that Arg regulates interorgan metabolism of energy substrates and the function of multiple organs. The results of both experimental and clinical studies indicate that Arg is a nutritionally essential amino acid (AA) for spermatogenesis, embryonic survival, fetal and neonatal growth, as well as maintenance of vascular tone and hemodynamics. Moreover, a growing body of evidence clearly indicates that dietary supplementation or intravenous administration of Arg is beneficial in improving reproductive, cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, gastrointestinal, liver and immune functions, as well as facilitating wound healing, enhancing insulin sensitivity, and maintaining tissue integrity. Additionally, Arg or l-citrulline may provide novel and effective therapies for obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. The effect of Arg in treating many developmental and health problems is unique among AAs, and offers great promise for improved health and wellbeing of humans and animals. PMID:19030957

  10. Arginine side chain interactions and the role of arginine as a gating charge carrier in voltage sensitive ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Craig T.; Mason, Philip E.; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Dempsey, Christopher E.

    2016-02-01

    Gating charges in voltage-sensing domains (VSD) of voltage-sensitive ion channels and enzymes are carried on arginine side chains rather than lysine. This arginine preference may result from the unique hydration properties of the side chain guanidinium group which facilitates its movement through a hydrophobic plug that seals the center of the VSD, as suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. To test for side chain interactions implicit in this model we inspected interactions of the side chains of arginine and lysine with each of the 19 non-glycine amino acids in proteins in the protein data bank. The arginine guanidinium interacts with non-polar aromatic and aliphatic side chains above and below the guanidinium plane while hydrogen bonding with polar side chains is restricted to in-plane positions. In contrast, non-polar side chains interact largely with the aliphatic part of the lysine side chain. The hydration properties of arginine and lysine are strongly reflected in their respective interactions with non-polar and polar side chains as observed in protein structures and in molecular dynamics simulations, and likely underlie the preference for arginine as a mobile charge carrier in VSD.

  11. Arginine side chain interactions and the role of arginine as a gating charge carrier in voltage sensitive ion channels.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Craig T; Mason, Philip E; Anderson, J L Ross; Dempsey, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    Gating charges in voltage-sensing domains (VSD) of voltage-sensitive ion channels and enzymes are carried on arginine side chains rather than lysine. This arginine preference may result from the unique hydration properties of the side chain guanidinium group which facilitates its movement through a hydrophobic plug that seals the center of the VSD, as suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. To test for side chain interactions implicit in this model we inspected interactions of the side chains of arginine and lysine with each of the 19 non-glycine amino acids in proteins in the protein data bank. The arginine guanidinium interacts with non-polar aromatic and aliphatic side chains above and below the guanidinium plane while hydrogen bonding with polar side chains is restricted to in-plane positions. In contrast, non-polar side chains interact largely with the aliphatic part of the lysine side chain. The hydration properties of arginine and lysine are strongly reflected in their respective interactions with non-polar and polar side chains as observed in protein structures and in molecular dynamics simulations, and likely underlie the preference for arginine as a mobile charge carrier in VSD. PMID:26899474

  12. Arginine side chain interactions and the role of arginine as a gating charge carrier in voltage sensitive ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Craig T.; Mason, Philip E.; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Dempsey, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Gating charges in voltage-sensing domains (VSD) of voltage-sensitive ion channels and enzymes are carried on arginine side chains rather than lysine. This arginine preference may result from the unique hydration properties of the side chain guanidinium group which facilitates its movement through a hydrophobic plug that seals the center of the VSD, as suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. To test for side chain interactions implicit in this model we inspected interactions of the side chains of arginine and lysine with each of the 19 non-glycine amino acids in proteins in the protein data bank. The arginine guanidinium interacts with non-polar aromatic and aliphatic side chains above and below the guanidinium plane while hydrogen bonding with polar side chains is restricted to in-plane positions. In contrast, non-polar side chains interact largely with the aliphatic part of the lysine side chain. The hydration properties of arginine and lysine are strongly reflected in their respective interactions with non-polar and polar side chains as observed in protein structures and in molecular dynamics simulations, and likely underlie the preference for arginine as a mobile charge carrier in VSD. PMID:26899474

  13. ARGININE DEIMINASE AS A NOVEL THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER INDUCES AUTOPHAGY AND CASPASE-INDEPENDENT APOPTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Randie H.; Coates, Jodi M.; Bowles, Tawnya L.; McNerney, Gregory P.; Sutcliffe, Julie; Jung, Jae U.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Chuang, Frank Y.S.; Bold, Richard J.; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2008-01-01

    Arginine deprivation as an anti-cancer therapy has historically been met with limited success. The development of pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) has renewed interest in arginine deprivation for the treatment of some cancers. The efficacy of ADI-PEG20 is directly correlated with argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) deficiency. CWR22Rv1 prostate cancer cells do not express ASS, the rate-limiting enzyme in arginine synthesis, and are susceptible to ADI-PEG20 in vitro. Interestingly, apoptosis by 0.3 μg/mL ADI-PEG20 occurs 96 hours post treatment and is caspase-independent. The effect of ADI-PEG20 in vivo reveals reduced tumor activity by microPET as well as reduced tumor growth as a monotherapy and in combination with docetaxel against CWR22Rv1 mouse xenografts. In addition, we demonstrate autophagy is induced by single amino acid depletion by ADI-PEG20. Here, autophagy is an early event that is detected within 1 to 4 hours of 0.3 μg/mL ADI-PEG20 treatment and is an initial protective response to ADI-PEG20 in CWR22Rv1 cells. Significantly, the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine and Beclin1 siRNA knockdown enhances and accelerates ADI-PEG20-induced cell death. PC3 cells, which express reduced ASS, also undergo autophagy and are responsive to autophagy inhibition and ADI-PEG20 treatment. In contrast, LNCaP cells highly express ASS and are therefore resistant to both ADI-PEG20 and autophagic inhibition. These data point to an interrelationship among ASS deficiency, autophagy, and cell death by ADI-PEG20. Finally, a tissue microarray of 88 prostate tumor samples lacked expression of ASS, indicating ADI-PEG20 is a potential novel therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:19147587

  14. Arginine deiminase as a novel therapy for prostate cancer induces autophagy and caspase-independent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Randie H; Coates, Jodi M; Bowles, Tawnya L; McNerney, Gregory P; Sutcliffe, Julie; Jung, Jae U; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Chuang, Frank Y S; Bold, Richard J; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2009-01-15

    Arginine deprivation as an anticancer therapy has historically been met with limited success. The development of pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) has renewed interest in arginine deprivation for the treatment of some cancers. The efficacy of ADI-PEG20 is directly correlated with argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) deficiency. CWR22Rv1 prostate cancer cells do not express ASS, the rate-limiting enzyme in arginine synthesis, and are susceptible to ADI-PEG20 in vitro. Interestingly, apoptosis by 0.3 microg/mL ADI-PEG20 occurs 96 hours posttreatment and is caspase independent. The effect of ADI-PEG20 in vivo reveals reduced tumor activity by micropositron emission tomography as well as reduced tumor growth as a monotherapy and in combination with docetaxel against CWR22Rv1 mouse xenografts. In addition, we show autophagy is induced by single amino acid depletion by ADI-PEG20. Here, autophagy is an early event that is detected within 1 to 4 hours of 0.3 microg/mL ADI-PEG20 treatment and is an initial protective response to ADI-PEG20 in CWR22Rv1 cells. Significantly, the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine and Beclin1 siRNA knockdown enhances and accelerates ADI-PEG20-induced cell death. PC3 cells, which express reduced ASS, also undergo autophagy and are responsive to autophagy inhibition and ADI-PEG20 treatment. In contrast, LNCaP cells highly express ASS and are therefore resistant to both ADI-PEG20 and autophagic inhibition. These data point to an interrelationship among ASS deficiency, autophagy, and cell death by ADI-PEG20. Finally, a tissue microarray of 88 prostate tumor samples lacked expression of ASS, indicating ADI-PEG20 is a potential novel therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

  15. Peptidyl arginine deiminase from Porphyromonas gingivalis abolishes anaphylatoxin C5a activity.

    PubMed

    Bielecka, Ewa; Scavenius, Carsten; Kantyka, Tomasz; Jusko, Monika; Mizgalska, Danuta; Szmigielski, Borys; Potempa, Barbara; Enghild, Jan J; Prossnitz, Eric R; Blom, Anna M; Potempa, Jan

    2014-11-21

    Evasion of killing by the complement system, a crucial part of innate immunity, is a key evolutionary strategy of many human pathogens. A major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, the Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, produces a vast arsenal of virulence factors that compromise human defense mechanisms. One of these is peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD), an enzyme unique to P. gingivalis among bacteria, which converts Arg residues in polypeptide chains into citrulline. Here, we report that PPAD citrullination of a critical C-terminal arginine of the anaphylatoxin C5a disabled the protein function. Treatment of C5a with PPAD in vitro resulted in decreased chemotaxis of human neutrophils and diminished calcium signaling in monocytic cell line U937 transfected with the C5a receptor (C5aR) and loaded with a fluorescent intracellular calcium probe: Fura-2 AM. Moreover, a low degree of citrullination of internal arginine residues by PPAD was also detected using mass spectrometry. Further, after treatment of C5 with outer membrane vesicles naturally shed by P. gingivalis, we observed generation of C5a totally citrullinated at the C-terminal Arg-74 residue (Arg74Cit). In stark contrast, only native C5a was detected after treatment with PPAD-null outer membrane vesicles. Our study suggests reduced antibacterial and proinflammatory capacity of citrullinated C5a, achieved via lower level of chemotactic potential of the modified molecule, and weaker cell activation. In the context of previous studies, which showed crosstalk between C5aR and Toll-like receptors, as well as enhanced arthritis development in mice infected with PPAD-expressing P. gingivalis, our findings support a crucial role of PPAD in the virulence of P. gingivalis. PMID:25324545

  16. Luffa acutangula agglutinin: Primary structure determination and identification of a tryptophan residue involved in its carbohydrate-binding activity using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gnanesh; Mishra, Padmanabh; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2015-12-01

    A lectin from phloem exudates of Luffa acutangula (ridge gourd) was purified on chitin affinity chromatography and characterized for its amino acid sequence and to study the role of tryptophan in its activity. The purified lectin was subjected to various proteolytic digestions, and the resulting peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometer. The peptide precursor ions were fragmented by collision-induced dissociation or electron transfer dissociation experiments, and a manual interpretation of MS/MS was performed to deduce amino acid sequence. This gave rise to almost complete sequence coverage of the lectin which showed high-sequence similarity with deduced sequences of phloem lectins present in the database. Chemical modification of lysine, tyrosine, histidine, arginine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid residues did not inhibit the hemagglutinating activity. However, the modification of tryptophan residues using N-bromosuccinimide showed the loss of hemagglutinating activity. Additionally, the mapping of tryptophan residues was performed to determine the extent and number of residues modified, which revealed that six residues per molecule were oxidized suggesting their accessibility. The retention of the lectin activity was seen when the modifications were performed in the presence of chitooligosaccharides due to protection of a tryptophan residue (W102) in the protein. These studies taken together have led to the identification of a particular tryptophan residue (W102) in the activity of the lectin. PMID:26597132

  17. Cell compatible arginine containing cationic polymer: one-pot synthesis and preliminary biological assessment.

    PubMed

    Zavradashvili, Nino; Memanishvili, Tamar; Kupatadze, Nino; Baldi, Lucia; Shen, Xiao; Tugushi, David; Wandrey, Christine; Katsarava, Ramaz

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic cationic polymers are of interest as both nonviral vectors for intracellular gene delivery and antimicrobial agents. For both applications synthetic polymers containing guanidine groups are of special interest since such kind of organic compounds/polymers show a high transfection potential along with antibacterial activity. It is important that the delocalization of the positive charge of the cationic group in guanidine significantly decreases the toxicity compared to the ammonium functionality. One of the most convenient ways for incorporating guanidine groups is the synthesis of polymers composed of the amino acid arginine (Arg) via either application of Arg-based monomers or chemical modification of polymers with derivatives of Arg. It is also important to have biodegradable cationic polymers that will be cleared from the body after their function as transfection or antimicrobial agent is fulfilled. This chapter deals with a two-step/one-pot synthesis of a new biodegradable cationic polymer-poly(ethylene malamide) containing L-arginine methyl ester covalently attached to the macrochains in β-position of the malamide residue via the α-amino group. The goal cationic polymer was synthesized by in situ interaction of arginine methyl ester dihydrochloride with intermediary poly(ethylene epoxy succinimide) formed by polycondensation of di-p-nitrophenyl-trans-epoxy succinate with ethylenediamine. The cell compatibility study with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and insect Schneider 2 cells (S2) within the concentration range of 0.02-500 mg/mL revealed that the new polymer is not cytotoxic. It formed nanocomplexes with pDNA (120-180 nm in size) at low polymer/DNA weight ratios (WR = 5-10). A preliminarily transfection efficiency of the Arg-containing new cationic polymer was assessed using CHO, S2, H5, and Sf9 cells.

  18. Effect of the basic residue on the energetics, dynamics, and mechanisms of gas-phase fragmentation of protonated peptides.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Song, Tao; Lam, Corey; Chu, Ivan K

    2010-11-17

    The effect of the basic residue on the energetics, dynamics, and mechanisms of backbone fragmentation of protonated peptides was investigated. Time-resolved and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of singly protonated peptides with the N-terminal arginine residue and their analogues, in which arginine is replaced with less basic lysine and histidine residues, was examined using a specially configured Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR-MS). SID experiments demonstrated different kinetics of formation of several primary product ions of peptides with and without arginine residue. The energetics and dynamics of these pathways were determined from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling of the experimental data. Comparison between the kinetics and energetics of fragmentation of arginine-containing peptides and the corresponding methyl ester derivatives provides important information on the effect of dissociation pathways involving salt bridge (SB) intermediates on the observed fragmentation behavior. Because pathways involving SB intermediates are characterized by low threshold energies, they efficiently compete with classical oxazolone and imine/enol pathways of arginine-containing peptides on a long time scale of the FTICR instrument. In contrast, fragmentation of histidine- and lysine-containing peptides is largely determined by canonical pathways. Because SB pathways are characterized by negative activation entropies, fragmentation of arginine-containing peptides is kinetically hindered and observed at higher collision energies as compared to their lysine- and histidine-containing analogues.

  19. The effect of arginine on oral biofilm communities.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, M M; Browngardt, C; Xiaohui, X; Klepac-Ceraj, V; Paster, B J; Burne, R A

    2014-02-01

    Alkali production by oral bacteria via the arginine deiminase system (ADS) increases the pH of oral biofilms and reduces the risk for development of carious lesions. This study tested the hypothesis that increased availability of arginine in the oral environment through an exogenous source enhances the ADS activity levels in saliva and dental plaque. Saliva and supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 19 caries-free (CF) individuals (DMFT = 0) and 19 caries-active (CA) individuals (DMFT ≥ 2) before and after treatment, which comprised the use of a fluoride-free toothpaste containing 1.5% arginine, or a regular fluoride-containing toothpaste twice daily for 4 weeks. ADS activity was measured by quantification of ammonia produced from arginine by oral samples at baseline, after washout period, 4 weeks of treatment, and 2 weeks post-treatment. Higher ADS activity levels were observed in plaque samples from CF compared to those of CA individuals (P = 0.048) at baseline. The use of the arginine toothpaste significantly increased ADS activity in plaque of CA individuals (P = 0.026). The plaque microbial profiles of CA treated with the arginine toothpaste showed a shift in bacterial composition to a healthier community, more similar to that of CF individuals. Thus, an anti-caries effect may be expected from arginine-containing formulations due in large part to the enhancement of ADS activity levels and potential favorable modification to the composition of the oral microbiome.

  20. Inhibition of lytic infection of pseudorabies virus by arginine depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.-C.; Kao, Y.-C.; Chang, T-J.; Wong, M.-L. . E-mail: mlwong@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2005-08-26

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a member of Alphahepesviruses; it is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded DNA genome. Polyamines (such as spermine and spermidine) are ubiquitous in animal cells and participate in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Previous results of our laboratory showed that the PRV can accomplish lytic infection either in the presence of exogenous spermine (or spermidine) or depletion of cellular polyamines. The amino acid arginine is a precursor of polyamine biosynthesis. In this work, we investigated the role of arginine in PRV infection. It was found that the plaque formation of PRV was inhibited by arginase (enzyme catalyzing the conversion of arginine into ornithine and urea) treatment whereas this inhibition can be reversed by exogenous arginine, suggesting that arginine is essential for PRV proliferation. Western blotting was conducted to study the effect of arginine depletion on the levels of structural proteins of PRV in virus-infected cells. Four PRV structural proteins (gB, gE, UL47, and UL48) were chosen for examination, and results revealed that the levels of viral proteins were obviously reduced in long time arginase treatment. However, the overall protein synthesis machinery was apparently not influenced by arginase treatment either in mock or PRV-infected cells. Analyzing with native gel, we found that arginase treatment affected the mobility of PRV structural proteins, suggesting the conformational change of viral proteins by arginine depletion. Heat shock proteins, acting as molecular chaperons, participate in protein folding and translocation. Our results demonstrated that long time arginase treatment could reduce the expression of cellular heat shock proteins 70 (hsc70 and hsp70), and transcriptional suppression of heat shock protein 70 gene promoter was one of the mechanisms involved in this reduced expression.

  1. To assess whether indoor residual spraying can provide additional protection against clinical malaria over current best practice of long-lasting insecticidal mosquito nets in The Gambia: study protocol for a two-armed cluster-randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently, there has been mounting interest in scaling-up vector control against malaria in Africa. It needs to be determined if indoor residual spraying (IRS with DDT) will provide significant marginal protection against malaria over current best practice of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and prompt treatment in a controlled trial, given that DDT is currently the most persistent insecticide for IRS. Methods A 2 armed cluster-randomised controlled trial will be conducted to assess whether DDT IRS and LLINs combined provide better protection against clinical malaria in children than LLINs alone in rural Gambia. Each cluster will be a village, or a group of small adjacent villages; all clusters will receive LLINs and half will receive IRS in addition. Study children, aged 6 months to 13 years, will be enrolled from all clusters and followed for clinical malaria using passive case detection to estimate malaria incidence for 2 malaria transmission seasons in 2010 and 2011. This will be the primary endpoint. Exposure to malaria parasites will be assessed using light and exit traps followed by detection of Anopheles gambiae species and sporozoite infection. Study children will be surveyed at the end of each transmission season to estimate the prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum infection and the prevalence of anaemia. Discussion Practical issues concerning intervention implementation, as well as the potential benefits and risks of the study, are discussed. Trial Registration ISRCTN01738840 - Spraying And Nets Towards malaria Elimination (SANTE) PMID:21663656

  2. Isotope labeling studies on the formation of multiple addition products of alanine in the pyrolysis residue of glucose/alanine mixtures by high-resolution ESI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Chu, Fong Lam; Sleno, Lekha; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2011-11-01

    Pyrolysis was used as a microscale sample preparation tool to generate glucose/alanine reaction products to minimize the use of expensive labeled precursors in isotope labeling studies. The residue remaining after the pyrolysis at 250 °C was analyzed by electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS). It was observed that a peak at m/z 199.1445 in the ESI-TOF-MS spectrum appeared only when the model system contained at least 2-fold excess alanine. The accurate mass determination indeed indicated the presence of two nitrogen atoms in the molecular formula (C(10)H(18)N(2)O(2)). To verify the origin of the carbon atoms in this unknown compound, model studies with [(13)U(6)]glucose, [(13)C-1]alanine, [(13)C-2]alanine, [(13)C-3]alanine, and [(15)N]alanine were also performed. Glucose furnished six carbon atoms, and alanine provides four carbon (2 × C-2 and 2 × C-3) and two nitrogen atoms. When commercially available fructosylalanine (N-attached to C-1) was reacted with only 1 mol of alanine, a peak at m/z 199.1445 was once again observed. In addition, when 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG) was reacted with a 2-fold excess of alanine, a peak at m/z 199.1433 was also generated, confirming the points of attachment of the two amino acids at C-1 and C-2 atoms of 3-DG. These studies have indicated that amino acids can undergo multiple addition reactions with 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds such as 3-deoxyglucosone and eventually form a tetrahydropyrazine moiety.

  3. Using oriented peptide array libraries to evaluate methylarginine-specific antibodies and arginine methyltransferase substrate motifs.

    PubMed

    Gayatri, Sitaram; Cowles, Martis W; Vemulapalli, Vidyasiri; Cheng, Donghang; Sun, Zu-Wen; Bedford, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Signal transduction in response to stimuli relies on the generation of cascades of posttranslational modifications that promote protein-protein interactions and facilitate the assembly of distinct signaling complexes. Arginine methylation is one such modification, which is catalyzed by a family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases, or PRMTs. Elucidating the substrate specificity of each PRMT will promote a better understanding of which signaling networks these enzymes contribute to. Although many PRMT substrates have been identified, and their methylation sites mapped, the optimal target motif for each of the nine PRMTs has not been systematically addressed. Here we describe the use of Oriented Peptide Array Libraries (OPALs) to methodically dissect the preferred methylation motifs for three of these enzymes - PRMT1, CARM1 and PRMT9. In parallel, we show that an OPAL platform with a fixed methylarginine residue can be used to validate the methyl-specific and sequence-specific properties of antibodies that have been generated against different PRMT substrates, and can also be used to confirm the pan nature of some methylarginine-specific antibodies. PMID:27338245

  4. Arginine-phosphate salt bridges between histones and DNA: intermolecular actuators that control nucleosome architecture.

    PubMed

    Yusufaly, Tahir I; Li, Yun; Singh, Gautam; Olson, Wilma K

    2014-10-28

    Structural bioinformatics and van der Waals density functional theory are combined to investigate the mechanochemical impact of a major class of histone-DNA interactions, namely, the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. Principal component analysis reveals that the configurational fluctuations of the sugar-phosphate backbone display sequence-specific directionality and variability, and clustering of nucleosome crystal structures identifies two major salt-bridge configurations: a monodentate form in which the arginine end-group guanidinium only forms one hydrogen bond with the phosphate, and a bidentate form in which it forms two. Density functional theory calculations highlight that the combination of sequence, denticity, and salt-bridge positioning enables the histones to apply a tunable mechanochemical stress to the DNA via precise and specific activation of backbone deformations. The results suggest that selection for specific placements of van der Waals contacts, with high-precision control of the spatial distribution of intermolecular forces, may serve as an underlying evolutionary design principle for the structure and function of nucleosomes, a conjecture that is corroborated by previous experimental studies.

  5. In vivo and in vitro arginine methylation of RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Q; Dreyfuss, G

    1995-01-01

    Heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) bind pre-mRNAs and facilitate their processing into mRNAs. Many of the hnRNPs undergo extensive posttranslational modifications including methylation on arginine residues. hnRNPs contain about 65% of the total NG,NG-dimethylarginine found in the cell nucleus. The role of this modification is not known. Here we identify the hnRNPs that are methylated in HeLa cells and demonstrate that most of the pre-mRNA-binding proteins receive this modification. Using recombinant human hnRNP A1 as a substrate, we have partially purified and characterized a protein-arginine N-methyltransferase specific for hnRNPs from HeLa cells. This methyltransferase can methylate the same subset of hnRNPs in vitro as are methylated in vivo. Furthermore, it can also methylate other RNA-binding proteins that contain the RGG motif RNA-binding domain. This activity is evolutionarily conserved from lower eukaryotes to mammals, suggesting that methylation has a significant role in the function of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:7739561

  6. Arginine-phosphate salt bridges between histones and DNA: Intermolecular actuators that control nucleosome architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Li, Yun; Singh, Gautam; Olson, Wilma K.

    2014-10-01

    Structural bioinformatics and van der Waals density functional theory are combined to investigate the mechanochemical impact of a major class of histone-DNA interactions, namely, the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. Principal component analysis reveals that the configurational fluctuations of the sugar-phosphate backbone display sequence-specific directionality and variability, and clustering of nucleosome crystal structures identifies two major salt-bridge configurations: a monodentate form in which the arginine end-group guanidinium only forms one hydrogen bond with the phosphate, and a bidentate form in which it forms two. Density functional theory calculations highlight that the combination of sequence, denticity, and salt-bridge positioning enables the histones to apply a tunable mechanochemical stress to the DNA via precise and specific activation of backbone deformations. The results suggest that selection for specific placements of van der Waals contacts, with high-precision control of the spatial distribution of intermolecular forces, may serve as an underlying evolutionary design principle for the structure and function of nucleosomes, a conjecture that is corroborated by previous experimental studies.

  7. Using oriented peptide array libraries to evaluate methylarginine-specific antibodies and arginine methyltransferase substrate motifs

    PubMed Central

    Gayatri, Sitaram; Cowles, Martis W.; Vemulapalli, Vidyasiri; Cheng, Donghang; Sun, Zu-Wen; Bedford, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Signal transduction in response to stimuli relies on the generation of cascades of posttranslational modifications that promote protein-protein interactions and facilitate the assembly of distinct signaling complexes. Arginine methylation is one such modification, which is catalyzed by a family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases, or PRMTs. Elucidating the substrate specificity of each PRMT will promote a better understanding of which signaling networks these enzymes contribute to. Although many PRMT substrates have been identified, and their methylation sites mapped, the optimal target motif for each of the nine PRMTs has not been systematically addressed. Here we describe the use of Oriented Peptide Array Libraries (OPALs) to methodically dissect the preferred methylation motifs for three of these enzymes – PRMT1, CARM1 and PRMT9. In parallel, we show that an OPAL platform with a fixed methylarginine residue can be used to validate the methyl-specific and sequence-specific properties of antibodies that have been generated against different PRMT substrates, and can also be used to confirm the pan nature of some methylarginine-specific antibodies. PMID:27338245

  8. Fragment based discovery of Arginine isosteres through REPLACE: towards non-ATP competitive CDK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Premnath, Padmavathy Nandha; Liu, Shu; Perkins, Tracy; Abbott, Jennifer; Anderson, Erin; McInnes, Campbell

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop non-ATP competitive CDK2/cyclin A inhibitors, the REPLACE strategy has been applied to generate fragment alternatives for the N-terminal tetrapeptide of the cyclin binding motif (HAKRRLIF) involved in substrate recruitment prior to phosphotransfer. The docking approach used for the prediction of small molecule mimics for peptide determinants was validated through reproduction of experimental binding modes of known inhibitors and provides useful information for evaluating binding to protein-protein interaction sites. Further to this, potential arginine isosteres predicted using the validated LigandFit docking method were ligated to the truncated C-terminal peptide, RLIF using solid phase synthesis and evaluated in a competitive binding assay. After testing, identified fragments were shown to represent not only appropriate mimics for a critical arginine residue but also to interact effectively with a minor hydrophobic pocket present in the binding groove. Further evaluation of binding modes was undertaken to optimize the potency of these compounds. Through further application of the REPLACE strategy in this study, peptide-small molecule hybrid CDK2 inhibitors were identified that are more drug-like and suitable for further optimization as anti-tumor therapeutics. PMID:24286762

  9. SMN and symmetric arginine dimethylation of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain control termination.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dorothy Yanling; Gish, Gerald; Braunschweig, Ulrich; Li, Yue; Ni, Zuyao; Schmitges, Frank W; Zhong, Guoqing; Liu, Ke; Li, Weiguo; Moffat, Jason; Vedadi, Masoud; Min, Jinrong; Pawson, Tony J; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Greenblatt, Jack F

    2016-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) subunit POLR2A is a platform for modifications specifying the recruitment of factors that regulate transcription, mRNA processing, and chromatin remodelling. Here we show that a CTD arginine residue (R1810 in human) that is conserved across vertebrates is symmetrically dimethylated (me2s). This R1810me2s modification requires protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) and recruits the Tudor domain of the survival of motor neuron (SMN, also known as GEMIN1) protein, which is mutated in spinal muscular atrophy. SMN interacts with senataxin, which is sometimes mutated in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2 and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Because POLR2A R1810me2s and SMN, like senataxin, are required for resolving RNA-DNA hybrids created by RNA polymerase II that form R-loops in transcription termination regions, we propose that R1810me2s, SMN, and senataxin are components of an R-loop resolution pathway. Defects in this pathway can influence transcription termination and may contribute to neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26700805

  10. The formation of argpyrimidine, a methylglyoxal-arginine adduct, in the nucleus of neural cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakadate, Yusuke; Uchida, Koji; Shikata, Keiji; Yoshimura, Saori; Azuma, Masayuki; Hirata, Tatsumi; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Tachibana, Taro

    2009-01-09

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is an endogenous metabolite in glycolysis and forms stable adducts primarily with arginine residues of intracellular proteins. The biological role of this modification in cell function is not known. In the present study, we found that a MG-detoxification enzyme glyoxalase I (GLO1) is mainly expressed in the ventricular zone (VZ) at embryonic day 16 which neural stem and progenitor cells localize. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that argpyrimidine, a major MG-arginine adduct, is predominantly produced in cortical plate neurons not VZ during cerebral cortex development and is exclusively located in the nucleus. Immunoblotting experiment showed that the formation of argpyrimidine occurs on some nuclear proteins of cortical neurons. To our knowledge, this is first report of the argpyrimidine formation in the nucleus of neuron. These findings suggest that GLO1, which is dominantly expressed in the embryonic VZ, reduces the intracellular level of MG and suppresses the formation of argpyrimidine in neural stem and progenitor cells. Argpyrimidine may contribute to the neural differentiation and/or the maintenance of the differentiated state via the modification of nuclear proteins.

  11. Increased mitochondrial arginine metabolism supports bioenergetics in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weiling; Ghosh, Sudakshina; Comhair, Suzy A.A.; Asosingh, Kewal; Janocha, Allison J.; Mavrakis, Deloris A.; Bennett, Carole D.; Gruca, Lourdes L.; Graham, Brian B.; Queisser, Kimberly A.; Kao, Christina C.; Wedes, Samuel H.; Petrich, John M.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2016-01-01

    High levels of arginine metabolizing enzymes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and arginase (ARG), are typical in asthmatic airway epithelium; however, little is known about the metabolic effects of enhanced arginine flux in asthma. Here, we demonstrated that increased metabolism sustains arginine availability in asthmatic airway epithelium with consequences for bioenergetics and inflammation. Expression of iNOS, ARG2, arginine synthetic enzymes, and mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV was elevated in asthmatic lung samples compared with healthy controls. ARG2 overexpression in a human bronchial epithelial cell line accelerated oxidative bioenergetic pathways and suppressed hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) and phosphorylation of the signal transducer for atopic Th2 inflammation STAT6 (pSTAT6), both of which are implicated in asthma etiology. Arg2-deficient mice had lower mitochondrial membrane potential and greater HIF-2α than WT animals. In an allergen-induced asthma model, mice lacking Arg2 had greater Th2 inflammation than WT mice, as indicated by higher levels of pSTAT6, IL-13, IL-17, eotaxin, and eosinophils and more mucus metaplasia. Bone marrow transplants from Arg2-deficient mice did not affect airway inflammation in recipient mice, supporting resident lung cells as the drivers of elevated Th2 inflammation. These data demonstrate that arginine flux preserves cellular respiration and suppresses pathological signaling events that promote inflammation in asthma. PMID:27214549

  12. Dietary arginine deprivation and delayed puberty in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Pau, M Y; Milner, J A

    1984-01-01

    Dietary arginine deprivation was found to delay puberty in the female rat. Physiological pinealectomy by exposing to constant light suggests this gland is not involved in this delay. Compensatory ovarian hypertrophy (COH) was used to test the hypothalamic sensitivity to negative steroid feedback. COH occurred in hemiovariectomized immature rats ad libitum fed the control or arginine-deficient diet but failed to occur in hemiovariectomized, underfed, growth-matched control rats, which suggests that feed restriction and arginine deficiency do not exert identical effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Puberty, as defined by vaginal opening, first ovulation and the initiation of estrous cycles, was advanced by a week in the immature female rat fed a control diet after treatment with estradiol benzoate, 0.05 microgram/(100 g body weight X day) starting at 26 days of age. The time of first estrus and the first ovulation was not advanced in arginine-deficient rats by the same dosage of estrogen when administration began at 26 days of age. Treatment at an older age (40 or 54 days) or with a higher dosage [0.25 microgram/(100 g body weight X day)] at 26 days of age did advance puberty. The failure of estrogen to induce a vaginal cyclicity suggests an insufficient amount of endogenous estrogen to trigger a gonadotropin surge to cause the onset of puberty in the rat fed an arginine-deficient diet.

  13. Arginine Metabolism in Bacterial Pathogenesis and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Lifeng; Teng, Jade L. L.; Botelho, Michael G.; Lo, Regina C.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial resistance to infectious diseases is a significant global concern for health care organizations; along with aging populations and increasing cancer rates, it represents a great burden for government healthcare systems. Therefore, the development of therapies against bacterial infection and cancer is an important strategy for healthcare research. Pathogenic bacteria and cancer have developed a broad range of sophisticated strategies to survive or propagate inside a host and cause infection or spread disease. Bacteria can employ their own metabolism pathways to obtain nutrients from the host cells in order to survive. Similarly, cancer cells can dysregulate normal human cell metabolic pathways so that they can grow and spread. One common feature of the adaption and disruption of metabolic pathways observed in bacterial and cancer cell growth is amino acid pathways; these have recently been targeted as a novel approach to manage bacterial infections and cancer therapy. In particular, arginine metabolism has been illustrated to be important not only for bacterial pathogenesis but also for cancer therapy. Therefore, greater insights into arginine metabolism of pathogenic bacteria and cancer cells would provide possible targets for controlling of bacterial infection and cancer treatment. This review will summarize the recent progress on the relationship of arginine metabolism with bacterial pathogenesis and cancer therapy, with a particular focus on arginase and arginine deiminase pathways of arginine catabolism. PMID:26978353

  14. Lysine and Arginine Reduce the Effects of Cerebral Ischemic Insults and Inhibit Glutamate-Induced Neuronal Activity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, Takashi; Kameishi, Makiko; Mallick, Hruda Nanda; Ono, Taketoshi; Torii, Kunio

    2010-01-01

    Intravenous administration of arginine was shown to be protective against cerebral ischemic insults via nitric oxide production and possibly via additional mechanisms. The present study aimed at evaluating the neuroprotective effects of oral administration of lysine (a basic amino acid), arginine, and their combination on ischemic insults (cerebral edema and infarction) and hemispheric brain swelling induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion in rats. Magnetic resonance imaging and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were performed 2 days after ischemia induction. In control animals, the major edematous areas were observed in the cerebral cortex and striatum. The volumes associated with cortical edema were significantly reduced by lysine (2.0 g/kg), arginine (0.6 g/kg), or their combined administration (0.6 g/kg each). Protective effects of these amino acids on infarction were comparable to the inhibitory effects on edema formation. Interestingly, these amino acids, even at low dose (0.6 g/kg), were effective to reduce hemispheric brain swelling. Additionally, the effects of in vivo microiontophoretic (juxtaneuronal) applications of these amino acids on glutamate-evoked neuronal activity in the ventromedial hypothalamus were investigated in awake rats. Glutamate-induced neuronal activity was robustly inhibited by microiontophoretic applications of lysine or arginine onto neuronal membranes. Taken together, our results demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of oral ingestion of lysine and arginine against ischemic insults (cerebral edema and infarction), especially in the cerebral cortex, and suggest that suppression of glutamate-induced neuronal activity might be the primary mechanism associated with these neuroprotective effects. PMID:20589237

  15. Thermodynamic characterization of the DmsD binding site for the DmsA twin-arginine motif.

    PubMed

    Winstone, Tara M L; Turner, Raymond J

    2015-03-24

    The system specific chaperone DmsD interacts with the twin-arginine leader peptide of its substrate, DmsA, allowing for proper folding and assembly of the DmsA catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide reductase prior to translocation by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD residues important for binding the complete 45-amino acid sequence of the DmsA leader (DmsAL) peptide were previously identified and found to cluster in a pocket of the DmsD structure. In this study, we have utilized isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to determine the dissociation constant and thermodynamic parameters of 15 single-substitution DmsD variant proteins and a synthetic DmsAL peptide consisting of 27 amino acids (DmsAL₁₅₋₄₁). The stoichiometry values were determined via ITC, and the multimeric compositions of the DmsD variants in the absence and presence of peptide were characterized via size exclusion chromatography and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. An up to 4-fold change in affinity was observed for DmsD variant proteins relative to that of wild-type DmsD, and variation of the entropic contribution to binding divided the binding site into two clusters: residues with either more or less favorable entropy. Substitution of hydrophobic residues along one helix face (helix 5) or prolines found on adjacent loops caused reduced binding affinity because of the increased entropic cost, which suggests that the twin-arginine motif of the DmsAL peptide binds to a preformed site on DmsD. Most DmsD variants were more than 90% monomeric in solution and bound a single peptide per protein molecule. The DmsD variant with the largest dimer population showed increased affinity and induced the formation of tetramers in the presence of peptide, suggesting that dimeric DmsD or an alternatively folded form of DmsD may play an as yet undefined role in binding.

  16. L-arginine destabilizes oral multi-species biofilm communities developed in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Kolderman, Ethan; Bettampadi, Deepti; Samarian, Derek; Dowd, Scot E; Foxman, Betsy; Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Rickard, Alexander H

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid L-arginine inhibits bacterial coaggregation, is involved in cell-cell signaling, and alters bacterial metabolism in a broad range of species present in the human oral cavity. Given the range of effects of L-arginine on bacteria, we hypothesized that L-arginine might alter multi-species oral biofilm development and cause developed multi-species biofilms to disassemble. Because of these potential biofilm-destabilizing effects, we also hypothesized that L-arginine might enhance the efficacy of antimicrobials that normally cannot rapidly penetrate biofilms. A static microplate biofilm system and a controlled-flow microfluidic system were used to develop multi-species oral biofilms derived from pooled unfiltered cell-containing saliva (CCS) in pooled filter-sterilized cell-free saliva (CFS) at 37° C. The addition of pH neutral L-arginine monohydrochloride (LAHCl) to CFS was found to exert negligible antimicrobial effects but significantly altered biofilm architecture in a concentration-dependent manner. Under controlled flow, the biovolume of biofilms (μm(3)/μm(2)) developed in saliva containing 100-500 mM LAHCl were up to two orders of magnitude less than when developed without LAHCI. Culture-independent community analysis demonstrated that 500 mM LAHCl substantially altered biofilm species composition: the proportion of Streptococcus and Veillonella species increased and the proportion of Gram-negative bacteria such as Neisseria and Aggregatibacter species was reduced. Adding LAHCl to pre-formed biofilms also reduced biovolume, presumably by altering cell-cell interactions and causing cell detachment. Furthermore, supplementing 0.01% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), an antimicrobial commonly used for the treatment of dental plaque, with 500 mM LAHCl resulted in greater penetration of CPC into the biofilms and significantly greater killing compared to a non-supplemented 0.01% CPC solution. Collectively, this work demonstrates that LAHCl moderates multi

  17. L-arginine destabilizes oral multi-species biofilm communities developed in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Kolderman, Ethan; Bettampadi, Deepti; Samarian, Derek; Dowd, Scot E; Foxman, Betsy; Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Rickard, Alexander H

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid L-arginine inhibits bacterial coaggregation, is involved in cell-cell signaling, and alters bacterial metabolism in a broad range of species present in the human oral cavity. Given the range of effects of L-arginine on bacteria, we hypothesized that L-arginine might alter multi-species oral biofilm development and cause developed multi-species biofilms to disassemble. Because of these potential biofilm-destabilizing effects, we also hypothesized that L-arginine might enhance the efficacy of antimicrobials that normally cannot rapidly penetrate biofilms. A static microplate biofilm system and a controlled-flow microfluidic system were used to develop multi-species oral biofilms derived from pooled unfiltered cell-containing saliva (CCS) in pooled filter-sterilized cell-free saliva (CFS) at 37° C. The addition of pH neutral L-arginine monohydrochloride (LAHCl) to CFS was found to exert negligible antimicrobial effects but significantly altered biofilm architecture in a concentration-dependent manner. Under controlled flow, the biovolume of biofilms (μm(3)/μm(2)) developed in saliva containing 100-500 mM LAHCl were up to two orders of magnitude less than when developed without LAHCI. Culture-independent community analysis demonstrated that 500 mM LAHCl substantially altered biofilm species composition: the proportion of Streptococcus and Veillonella species increased and the proportion of Gram-negative bacteria such as Neisseria and Aggregatibacter species was reduced. Adding LAHCl to pre-formed biofilms also reduced biovolume, presumably by altering cell-cell interactions and causing cell detachment. Furthermore, supplementing 0.01% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), an antimicrobial commonly used for the treatment of dental plaque, with 500 mM LAHCl resulted in greater penetration of CPC into the biofilms and significantly greater killing compared to a non-supplemented 0.01% CPC solution. Collectively, this work demonstrates that LAHCl moderates multi

  18. Structure, regulation, and putative function of the arginine deiminase system of Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Gruening, Petra; Fulde, Marcus; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important cause of infectious diseases in young pigs. Little is known about the virulence factors or protective antigens of S. suis. Recently, we have identified two proteins of the arginine deiminase system (ADS) of S. suis, which were temperature induced and expressed on the streptococcal surface (N. Winterhoff, R. Goethe, P. Gruening, M. Rohde, H. Kalisz, H. E. Smith, and P. Valentin-Weigand, J. Bacteriol. 184:6768-6776, 2002). In the present study, we analyzed the complete ADS of S. suis. Due to their homologies to the recently published S. gordonii ADS genes, the genes for arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyl-transferase, and carbamate kinase, which were previously designated adiS, octS, and ckS, respectively, were renamed arcA, arcB, and arcC, respectively. Our data revealed that arcA, arcB, and arcC of the S. suis ADS are transcribed from an operon (arcABC operon). Additionally, putative ADS-associated genes were cloned and sequenced which, however, did not belong to the arcABC operon. These were the flpS gene upstream of the arcABC operon with homology to the flp transcription regulator of S. gordonii and the arcD, arcT, arcH, and argR genes downstream of the arcABC operon with high homologies to a putative arginine-ornithine antiporter, a putative dipeptidase of S. gordonii, a putative beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase of S. pneumoniae, and a putative arginine repressor of S. gordonii, respectively. The transcriptional start point of the arcABC operon was determined, and promoter analysis provided evidence that multiple factors contribute to the regulation of the ADS. Thus, a putative binding site for a transcription regulator of the Crp/Fnr family, an ArgR-binding site, and two cis-acting catabolite response elements were identified in the promoter-operator region of the operon. Consistent with this, we could demonstrate that the ADS of S. suis is inducible by arginine and reduced O2 tension and subject to carbon catabolite

  19. L-Arginine Destabilizes Oral Multi-Species Biofilm Communities Developed in Human Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Kolderman, Ethan; Bettampadi, Deepti; Samarian, Derek; Dowd, Scot E.; Foxman, Betsy; Jakubovics, Nicholas S.; Rickard, Alexander H.

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid L-arginine inhibits bacterial coaggregation, is involved in cell-cell signaling, and alters bacterial metabolism in a broad range of species present in the human oral cavity. Given the range of effects of L-arginine on bacteria, we hypothesized that L-arginine might alter multi-species oral biofilm development and cause developed multi-species biofilms to disassemble. Because of these potential biofilm-destabilizing effects, we also hypothesized that L-arginine might enhance the efficacy of antimicrobials that normally cannot rapidly penetrate biofilms. A static microplate biofilm system and a controlled-flow microfluidic system were used to develop multi-species oral biofilms derived from pooled unfiltered cell-containing saliva (CCS) in pooled filter-sterilized cell-free saliva (CFS) at 37oC. The addition of pH neutral L-arginine monohydrochloride (LAHCl) to CFS was found to exert negligible antimicrobial effects but significantly altered biofilm architecture in a concentration-dependent manner. Under controlled flow, the biovolume of biofilms (μm3/μm2) developed in saliva containing 100-500 mM LAHCl were up to two orders of magnitude less than when developed without LAHCI. Culture-independent community analysis demonstrated that 500 mM LAHCl substantially altered biofilm species composition: the proportion of Streptococcus and Veillonella species increased and the proportion of Gram-negative bacteria such as Neisseria and Aggregatibacter species was reduced. Adding LAHCl to pre-formed biofilms also reduced biovolume, presumably by altering cell-cell interactions and causing cell detachment. Furthermore, supplementing 0.01% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), an antimicrobial commonly used for the treatment of dental plaque, with 500 mM LAHCl resulted in greater penetration of CPC into the biofilms and significantly greater killing compared to a non-supplemented 0.01% CPC solution. Collectively, this work demonstrates that LAHCl moderates multi

  20. Mitochondria: role of citrulline and arginine supplementation in MELAS syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Emrick, Lisa T; Chanprasert, Sirisak; Craigen, William J; Scaglia, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and generate most of the cellular energy. Mitochondrial disorders result from dysfunctional mitochondria that are unable to generate sufficient ATP to meet the energy needs of various organs. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a frequent maternally inherited mitochondrial disorder. There is growing evidence that nitric oxide (NO) deficiency occurs in MELAS syndrome and results in impaired blood perfusion that contributes significantly to several complications including stroke-like episodes, myopathy, and lactic acidosis. Both arginine and citrulline act as NO precursors and their administration results in increased NO production and hence can potentially have therapeutic utility in MELAS syndrome. Citrulline raises NO production to a greater extent than arginine, therefore, citrulline may have a better therapeutic effect. Controlled studies assessing the effects of arginine or citrulline supplementation on different clinical aspects of MELAS syndrome are needed.

  1. Selective determination of arginine-containing and tyrosine-containing peptides using capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Cobb, K A; Novotny, M V

    1992-01-01

    The use of two different amino acid-selective fluorogenic reagents for the derivatization of peptides is investigated. One such scheme utilizes a selective reaction of benzoin with the guanidine moiety to derivatize arginine residues occurring in a peptide. The second scheme involves the formylation of tyrosine, followed by reaction with 4-methoxy-1,2-phenylenediamine. The use of capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence detection allows enhanced efficiencies and sensitivities to be obtained for the separations of either arginine- or tyrosine-containing peptides. A helium-cadmium laser (325 nm) is ideally suited for the laser-based detection system due to a close match of the excitation maxima of derivatized peptides from both reactions. A detection limit of 270 amol is achieved for model arginine-containing peptides, while the detection limit for model tyrosine-containing peptides is measured at 390 amol. Both derivatization reactions are found to be useful for high-sensitivity peptide mapping applications in which only the peptides containing the derivatized amino acids are detected.

  2. Exchange of glutamine-217 to glutamate of Clostridium limosum exoenzyme C3 turns the asparagine-specific ADP-ribosyltransferase into an arginine-modifying enzyme.

    PubMed

    Vogelsgesang, Martin; Aktories, Klaus

    2006-01-24

    C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferaseses are produced by Clostridium species, Bacillus cereus, and various Staphylococcus aureus strains. The exoenzymes modify the low-molecular-mass GTPases RhoA, B, and C. In structural studies of C3-like exoenzymes, an ARTT-motif (ADP-ribosylating turn-turn motif) was identified that appears to be involved in substrate specificity and recognition (Han, S., Arvai, A. S., Clancy, S. B., Tainer, J. A. (2001) J. Mol. Biol. 305, 95-107). Exchange of Gln217, which is a key residue of the ARTT-motif, to Glu in C3 from Clostridium limosum results in inhibition of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity toward RhoA. The mutant protein is still capable of NAD-binding and possesses NAD+ glycohydrolase activity. Whereas recombinant wild-type C3 modifies Rho proteins specifically at an asparagine residue (Asn41), Gln217Glu-C3 is capable of ADP-ribosylation of poly-arginine but not poly-asparagine. Soybean trypsin inhibitor, a model substrate for many arginine-specific ADP-ribosyltransferases, is modified by the Gln217Glu-C3 transferase. Also in C3 ADP-ribosyltransferases from Clostridium botulinum and B. cereus, the exchange of the equivalent Gln residue to Glu blocked asparagine modification of RhoA but elicited arginine-specific ADP-ribosylation. Moreover, the Gln217Glu-C3lim transferase was able to ADP-ribosylate recombinant wild-type C3lim at Arg86, resulting in decrease in ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of the wild-type enzyme. The data indicate that the exchange of one amino acid residue in the ARTT-motif turns the asparagine-modifying ADP-ribosyltransferases of the C3 family into arginine-ADP-ribosylating transferases.

  3. A triple-arginine motif in the amino-terminal domain and oligomerization are required for HIV-1 inhibition by human MX2.

    PubMed

    Goujon, Caroline; Greenbury, Rebecca A; Papaioannou, Stelios; Doyle, Tomas; Malim, Michael H

    2015-04-01

    We have employed molecular genetic approaches to understand the domain organization of the HIV-1 resistance factor myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2). First, we describe an essential triple-arginine motif in the amino-terminal domain. Second, we demonstrate that this 91-residue domain mediates antiviral activity when appended to heterologous proteins, and we provide genetic evidence that protein oligomerization is required for MX2 function. These insights will facilitate future work aiming to elucidate MX2's mechanism of action.

  4. Phase equilibria in a system of aqueous arginine with an octane solution of sulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvaeva, Z. I.; Koval'chuk, I. V.; Vodop'yanova, L. A.; Soldatov, V. S.

    2013-05-01

    The extraction of arginine (Arg) from aqueous salt (0.1 M NaCl) solutions with a sulfo extractant in a wide range of pH values and amino acid concentrations was studied. The 0.1 M solution of dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HD) in octane was used as an extractant. The degree of extraction was found to be high at pH 0.8-9.0. This can be explained by the effect of additional intermolecular interactions in the extractant phase involving the guanidine group of Arg.

  5. Assembly of the K40 Antigen in Escherichia coli: Identification of a Novel Enzyme Responsible for Addition of l-Serine Residues to the Glycan Backbone and Its Requirement for K40 Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Paul A.; Yethon, Jeremy A.; Monteiro, Mario A.; Whitfield, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli O8:K40 coexpresses two distinct lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structures on its surface. The O8 polysaccharide is a mannose homopolymer with a trisaccharide repeat unit and is synthesized by an ABC-2 transport-dependent pathway. The K40LPS backbone structure is composed of a trisaccharide repeating unit of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and glucuronic acid (GlcA) and has an uncommon substitution, an l-serine moiety attached to glucuronic acid. The gene cluster responsible for synthesis of the K40 polysaccharide has previously been cloned and sequenced and was found to contain six open reading frames (ORFs) (P. A. Amor and C. Whitfield, Mol. Microbiol. 26:145–161, 1997). Here, we demonstrate that insertional inactivation of orf1 results in the accumulation of a semirough (SR)-K40LPS form which retains reactivity with specific polyclonal serum in Western immunoblots. Structural and compositional analysis of the SR-K40LPS reveals that it comprises a single K40 repeat unit attached to lipid A core. The lack of polymerization of the K40 polysaccharide indicates that orf1 encodes the K40 polymerase (Wzy) and that assembly of the K40 polysaccharide occurs via a Wzy-dependent pathway (in contrast to that of the O8 polysaccharide). Inactivation of orf3 also results in the accumulation of an SR-LPS form which fails to react with specific polyclonal K40 serum in Western immunoblots. Methylation linkage analysis and fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry of this SR-LPS reveals that the biological repeat unit of the K40 polysaccharide is GlcNAc-GlcA-GlcNAc. Additionally, this structure lacks the l-serine substitution of GlcA. These results show that (i) orf3 encodes the enzyme responsible for the addition of the l-serine residue to the K40 backbone and (ii) substitution of individual K40 repeats with l-serine is essential for their recognition and polymerization into the K40 polysaccharide by Wzy. PMID:9922239

  6. Identification of Small-Molecule Enhancers of Arginine Methylation Catalyzed by Coactivator-Associated Arginine Methyltransferase 1

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Sabrina; Spannhoff, Astrid; Milite, Ciro; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Cheng, Donghang; Tosco, Alessandra; Viviano, Monica; Yamani, Abdellah; Cianciulli, Agostino; Sala, Marina; Cura, Vincent; Cavarelli, Jean; Novellino, Ettore; Mai, Antonello; Bedford, Mark T.; Sbardella, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    Arginine methylation is a common post-translational modification that is crucial in modulating gene expression at multiple critical levels. The arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) are envisaged as promising druggable targets but their role in physiological and pathological pathways is far from being clear, due to the limited number of modulators reported to date. In this effort, enzyme activators can be invaluable tools useful as gain-of-function reagents to interrogate the biological roles in cells and in vivo of PRMTs. Yet the identification of such molecules is rarely pursued. Herein we describe a series of aryl ureido acetamido indole carboxylates (dubbed “uracandolates”), able to increase the methylation of histone- (H3) or non-histone (polyadenylate-binding protein 1, PABP1) substrates induced by coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1), both in in vitro and cellular settings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of compounds acting as CARM1 activators. PMID:23095008

  7. Identification of methylated proteins in the yeast small ribosomal subunit: a role for SPOUT methyltransferases in protein arginine methylation.

    PubMed

    Young, Brian D; Weiss, David I; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia I; Webb, Kristofor J; Clarke, Steven G; McBride, Anne E

    2012-06-26

    We have characterized the posttranslational methylation of Rps2, Rps3, and Rps27a, three small ribosomal subunit proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis. We found that Rps2 is substoichiometrically modified at arginine-10 by the Rmt1 methyltransferase. We demonstrated that Rps3 is stoichiometrically modified by ω-monomethylation at arginine-146 by mass spectrometric and site-directed mutagenic analyses. Substitution of alanine for arginine at position 146 is associated with slow cell growth, suggesting that the amino acid identity at this site may influence ribosomal function and/or biogenesis. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of Rps3 in S. cerevisiae shows that arginine-146 makes contacts with the small subunit rRNA. Screening of deletion mutants encoding potential yeast methyltransferases revealed that the loss of the YOR021C gene results in the absence of methylation of Rps3. We demonstrated that recombinant Yor021c catalyzes ω-monomethylarginine formation when incubated with S-adenosylmethionine and hypomethylated ribosomes prepared from a YOR021C deletion strain. Interestingly, Yor021c belongs to the family of SPOUT methyltransferases that, to date, have only been shown to modify RNA substrates. Our findings suggest a wider role for SPOUT methyltransferases in nature. Finally, we have demonstrated the presence of a stoichiometrically methylated cysteine residue at position 39 of Rps27a in a zinc-cysteine cluster. The discovery of these three novel sites of protein modification within the small ribosomal subunit will now allow for an analysis of their functional roles in translation and possibly other cellular processes.

  8. Influence of two insecticides, chlorpyrifos and quinalphos, on arginine ammonification and mineralizable nitrogen in two tropical soil types.

    PubMed

    Menon, Pramila; Gopal, Madhuban; Prasad, Rajender

    2004-12-01

    Effects of seed treatments with chlorpyrifos [5 g of active ingredient (ai) kg(-1) of seed] and quinalphos (6.25 g of ai kg(-1) of seed) and standing crop treatments with chlorpyrifos (800 g of ai ha(-1)) and quinalphos (1000 g of ai ha(-1)) on arginine deamination and mineralizable nitrogen were monitored, in the sandy loam and loamy sand soils of two tropical semiarid fields, for three consecutive crop seasons. The arginine ammonification activity of rhizospheric microbes was inhibited after seed treatment with chlorpyrifos and quinalphos and their principal metabolites, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-methoxypyridine (TMP) and 2-hydroxyquinoxaline and quinoxaline-2-thiol, respectively. Quinalphos produced transient inhibitions, whereas chlorpyrifos and its metabolites (TCP and TMP) exerted a greater inhibition in both loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Arginine ammonification by nonrhizospheric microbes was stimulated by standing crop treatments with both pesticides. In the loamy sand soil, the parent compounds stimulated rhizospheric N-mineralization, whereas the metabolites were inhibitory. However, nonrhizospheric N-mineralization was inhibited by both chlorpyrifos and quinalphos and stimulated by their metabolites. A higher magnitude of inhibition of arginine deamination in the loamy sand than in the sandy loam soil could be due to greater bioavailability of the pesticides in the former, resulting from lesser sorption of the pesticides due to alkalinity of the soil and its low content of clay and organic carbon. Although both pesticides affected mineralizable nitrogen, seed treatment with quinalphos and standing crop treatment with quinalphos and chlorpyrifos produced the most significant effects. The recommended doses of the pesticides not only efficiently controlled whitegrubs, which increased pod yields, but also left no residues in harvested kernels. They also caused no long-term inhibition of ammonification, which could have been

  9. Identification and evaluation of twin-arginine translocase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vasil, Michael L; Tomaras, Andrew P; Pritchard, Arthur E

    2012-12-01

    The twin-arginine translocase (TAT) in some bacterial pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, contributes to pathogenesis by translocating extracellular virulence determinants across the inner membrane into the periplasm, thereby allowing access to the Xcp (type II) secretory system for further export in Gram-negative organisms, or directly to the outside surface of the cell, as in M. tuberculosis. TAT-mediated secretion appreciably contributes to virulence in both animal and plant models of bacterial infection. Consequently, TAT function is an attractive target for small-molecular-weight compounds that alone or in conjunction with extant antimicrobial agents could become novel therapeutics. The TAT-transported hemolytic phospholipase C (PlcH) of P. aeruginosa and its multiple orthologs produced by the above pathogens can be detected by an accurate and reproducible colorimetric assay using a synthetic substrate that detects phospholipase C activity. Such an assay could be an effective indicator of TAT function. Using carefully constructed recombinant strains to precisely control the expression of PlcH, we developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to evaluate, in duplicate, >80,000 small-molecular-weight compounds as possible TAT inhibitors. Based on additional TAT-related functional assays, purified PlcH protein inhibition experiments, and repeat experiments of the initial screening assay, 39 compounds were selected from the 122 initial hits. Finally, to evaluate candidate inhibitors for TAT specificity, we developed a TAT titration assay that determines whether inhibition of TAT-mediated secretion can be overcome by increasing the levels of TAT expression. The compounds N-phenyl maleimide and Bay 11-7082 appear to directly affect TAT function based on this approach.

  10. Identification and Evaluation of Twin-Arginine Translocase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tomaras, Andrew P.; Pritchard, Arthur E.

    2012-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocase (TAT) in some bacterial pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, contributes to pathogenesis by translocating extracellular virulence determinants across the inner membrane into the periplasm, thereby allowing access to the Xcp (type II) secretory system for further export in Gram-negative organisms, or directly to the outside surface of the cell, as in M. tuberculosis. TAT-mediated secretion appreciably contributes to virulence in both animal and plant models of bacterial infection. Consequently, TAT function is an attractive target for small-molecular-weight compounds that alone or in conjunction with extant antimicrobial agents could become novel therapeutics. The TAT-transported hemolytic phospholipase C (PlcH) of P. aeruginosa and its multiple orthologs produced by the above pathogens can be detected by an accurate and reproducible colorimetric assay using a synthetic substrate that detects phospholipase C activity. Such an assay could be an effective indicator of TAT function. Using carefully constructed recombinant strains to precisely control the expression of PlcH, we developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to evaluate, in duplicate, >80,000 small-molecular-weight compounds as possible TAT inhibitors. Based on additional TAT-related functional assays, purified PlcH protein inhibition experiments, and repeat experiments of the initial screening assay, 39 compounds were selected from the 122 initial hits. Finally, to evaluate candidate inhibitors for TAT specificity, we developed a TAT titration assay that determines whether inhibition of TAT-mediated secretion can be overcome by increasing the levels of TAT expression. The compounds N-phenyl maleimide and Bay 11-7082 appear to directly affect TAT function based on this approach. PMID:23006747

  11. Is the serum l-arginine level during early pregnancy a predictor of pregnancy-induced hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingwen; Kotani, Tomomi; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Mano, Yukio; Sumigama, Seiji; Li, Hua; Komatsu, Koji; Miki, Rika; Maruta, Ei; Niwa, Yoshimitsu; Mitsui, Takashi; Yoshida, Shigeru; Yamashita, Mamoru; Tamakoshi, Koji; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentration of serum l-arginine in healthy pregnant women and infant cord blood and to compare them with those in patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH). The serum concentration of l-arginine in normal pregnant women at early gestation (n = 186) was determined and analyzed based on maternal factors such as the age, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), smoking and alcohol habits before pregnancy. Similarly, the concentration of cord blood of the newborns (n = 142) was also analyzed. These values were compared with those in the PIH group (n = 21). The potential risk factors for PIH were also estimated. The serum concentration of l-arginine at early gestation in normal pregnant women (88.65 ± 19.96 µM) was not affected by the maternal age and BMI before pregnancy. A lower l-arginine concentration at early gestation (<70 µM) significantly elevated PIH risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 4.26, 95% CI 1.29–14.50]. In addition, either women with large body mass before pregnancy (BMI>25 kg/m2) or primipara women also showed a significant association with PIH risk [adjusted OR = 10.55 (2.95–40.68); 5.25 (1.72–19.15), respectively]. In conclusion, a lower l-arginine concentration at early gestation, overweight before pregnancy (BMI>25 kg/m2) and primipara could predict to the development of PIH. PMID:26236104

  12. Is the serum l-arginine level during early pregnancy a predictor of pregnancy-induced hypertension?

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingwen; Kotani, Tomomi; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Mano, Yukio; Sumigama, Seiji; Li, Hua; Komatsu, Koji; Miki, Rika; Maruta, Ei; Niwa, Yoshimitsu; Mitsui, Takashi; Yoshida, Shigeru; Yamashita, Mamoru; Tamakoshi, Koji; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentration of serum l-arginine in healthy pregnant women and infant cord blood and to compare them with those in patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH). The serum concentration of l-arginine in normal pregnant women at early gestation (n = 186) was determined and analyzed based on maternal factors such as the age, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), smoking and alcohol habits before pregnancy. Similarly, the concentration of cord blood of the newborns (n = 142) was also analyzed. These values were compared with those in the PIH group (n = 21). The potential risk factors for PIH were also estimated. The serum concentration of l-arginine at early gestation in normal pregnant women (88.65 ± 19.96 µM) was not affected by the maternal age and BMI before pregnancy. A lower l-arginine concentration at early gestation (<70 µM) significantly elevated PIH risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 4.26, 95% CI 1.29-14.50]. In addition, either women with large body mass before pregnancy (BMI>25 kg/m(2)) or primipara women also showed a significant association with PIH risk [adjusted OR = 10.55 (2.95-40.68); 5.25 (1.72-19.15), respectively]. In conclusion, a lower l-arginine concentration at early gestation, overweight before pregnancy (BMI>25 kg/m(2)) and primipara could predict to the development of PIH.

  13. The Arginine/ADMA Ratio Is Related to the Prevention of Atherosclerotic Plaques in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits When Giving a Combined Therapy with Atorvastatine and Arginine

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Saskia J. H.; Wörner, Elisabeth A.; Buijs, Nikki; Richir, Milan; Cynober, Luc; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Couderc, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Supplementation with arginine in combination with atorvastatin is more efficient in reducing the size of an atherosclerotic plaque than treatment with a statin or arginine alone in homozygous Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. We evaluated the mechanism behind this feature by exploring the role of the arginine/asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) ratio, which is the substrate and inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and thereby nitric oxide (NO), respectively. Methods: Rabbits were fed either an arginine diet (group A, n = 9), standard rabbit chow plus atorvastatin (group S, n = 8), standard rabbit chow plus an arginine diet with atorvastatin (group SA, n = 8) or standard rabbit chow (group C, n = 9) as control. Blood was sampled and the aorta was harvested for topographic and histological analysis. Plasma levels of arginine, ADMA, cholesterol and nitric oxide were determined and the arginine/ADMA ratio was calculated. Results: The decrease in ADMA levels over time was significantly correlated to fewer aortic lesions in the distal aorta and total aorta. The arginine/ADMA ratio was correlated to cholesterol levels and decrease in cholesterol levels over time in the SA group. A lower arginine/ADMA ratio was significantly correlated to lower NO levels in the S and C group. Discussion: A balance between arginine and ADMA is an important indicator in the prevention of the development of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:26035753

  14. Physico-chemical changes during storage and sensory acceptance of low sodium probiotic Minas cheese added with arginine.

    PubMed

    Felicio, T L; Esmerino, E A; Vidal, V A S; Cappato, L P; Garcia, R K A; Cavalcanti, R N; Freitas, M Q; Conte Junior, C A; Padilha, M C; Silva, M C; Raices, R S L; Arellano, D B; Bollini, H M A; Pollonio, M A R; Cruz, A G

    2016-04-01

    The partial substitution of sodium chloride by potassium chloride (0%, 25%, and 50%) and addition of arginine (1% w/w) in probiotic Minas cheese was investigated. Microbiological (Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus counts, and functionality of the prebiotics L. acidophilus), physicochemical (pH, proteolysis, organic acids, fatty acids, and volatile profiles), rheological (uniaxial compression) and sensory (hedonic test with 100 consumers) characterizations were carried out. The sodium reduction and addition of arginine did not constitute a hurdle to lactic and probiotic bacteria survival, with presented values of about 9 log CFU/g, ranging from 7.11 to 9.21 log CFU/g, respectively. In addition, lower pH values, higher proteolysis, and a decrease in toughness, elasticity and firmness were observed, as well as an increase in lactic, citric, and acetic acid contents. In contrast, no change was observed in the fatty acid profile. With respect to the sensory acceptance, the probiotic low-sodium Minas cheese presented scores above 6.00 (liked slightly) for the attributes flavor and overall acceptance. The addition of arginine can be a potential alternative for the development of probiotic dairy products with reduced sodium content.

  15. Residue chemistry guidelines.

    PubMed

    Olinger, C L; Schmitt, R D; Zager, E

    1993-01-01

    Residue chemistry guidelines are designed to determine what the potential residues in food are and how much may be present as a result of pesticide application, so that a tolerance level may be established. Some requirements are established to assist in the enforcement of tolerances by the USDA, FDA, and the states. I realize I have given you a quick overview of the residue chemistry requirements. There are many documents which are available if you should require more information, such as the Subdivision O Residue Chemistry Guidelines, Standard Evaluation Procedures (which are used by reviewers when evaluating the studies), the Data Reporting Guidelines (which provide guidance on preparing final reports), and the Technical Guidance from Phase III of Reregistration. We have also released various papers on studies when additional guidance is required. Most of these documents are available from NTIS. I hope you will consider this information when auditing residue chemistry studies. As I see the efforts that you, the QA professionals, have made to educate yourselves on residue chemistry studies through programs such as this meeting, I have a little more confidence in answering the question "Do you trust them?" with a "Yes." Thank you.

  16. MoARG1, MoARG5,6 and MoARG7 involved in arginine biosynthesis are essential for growth, conidiogenesis, sexual reproduction, and pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Shi, Huanbin; Liang, Shuang; Ning, Guoao; Xu, Nanchang; Lu, Jianping; Liu, Xiaohong; Lin, Fucheng

    2015-11-01

    Arginine is one of the most versatile amino acids in eukaryote cells, which plays important roles in a multitude of processes such as protein synthesis, nitrogen metabolism, nitric oxide (NO) and urea biosynthesis. The de novo arginine biosynthesis pathway is conserved among fungal kingdom, but poorly understood in plant pathogenic fungi. Here, we characterized the functions of three synthetic enzyme-encoding genes MoARG1, MoARG5,6, and MoARG7, which involved the seventh step, second-third step and fifth step of arginine biosynthesis in Magnaporthe oryzae, respectively. Deletion of MoARG1 or MoARG5,6, resulted in arginine auxotrophic mutants, which had a strict requirement for arginine on minimal medium (MM). Both ΔMoarg1 and ΔMoarg5,6 severely reduced in aerial hyphal growth, pigmentation, conidiogenesis, sexual reproduction and pathogenicity. Interestingly, like Saccharomyces cerevisiae, deletion of MoARG7 caused a leaky arginine auxotrophy, and attenuated pathogenicity. Limited appressorium-mediated penetration and restricted invasive hyphae growth in host cells are responsible for the severely attenuated pathogenicity of the Arg(-) mutants. Additionally, we monitored the NO generation during conidial germination and appressorial formation in both Arg(-) mutants and wild type, and demonstrated that NO generation may not occur via arginine-dependent pathway in M. oryzae. In summary, MoARG1, MoARG5,6, and MoARG7 are required for growth, conidiogenesis, sexual reproduction, and pathogenicity in M. oryzae.

  17. Arginine transcriptional response does not require inositol phosphate synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Daniel; Saiardi, Adolfo

    2012-11-01

    Inositol phosphates are key signaling molecules affecting a large variety of cellular processes. Inositol-polyphosphate multikinase (IPMK) is a central component of the inositol phosphate biosynthetic routes, playing essential roles during development. IPMK phosphorylates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate to inositol tetrakisphosphate and subsequently to inositol pentakisphosphate and has also been described to function as a lipid kinase. Recently, a catalytically inactive mammalian IPMK was reported to be involved in nutrient signaling by way of mammalian target of rapamycin and AMP-activated protein kinase. In yeast, the IPMK homologue, Arg82, is the sole inositol-trisphosphate kinase. Arg82 has been extensively studied as part of the transcriptional complex regulating nitrogen sensing, in particular arginine metabolism. Whether this role requires Arg82 catalytic activity has long been a matter of contention. In this study, we developed a novel method for the real time study of promoter strength in vivo and used it to demonstrate that catalytically inactive Arg82 fully restored the arginine-dependent transcriptional response. We also showed that expression in yeast of catalytically active, but structurally very different, mammalian or plant IPMK homologue failed to restore arginine regulation. Our work indicates that inositol phosphates do not regulate arginine-dependent gene expression. PMID:22992733

  18. In vitro Methylation Assay to Study Protein Arginine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Bikkavilli, Rama Kamesh; Avasarala, Sreedevi; Van Scoyk, Michelle; Karuppusamy Rathinam, Manoj Kumar; Tauler, Jordi; Borowicz, Stanley; Winn, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is one of the most abundant post-translational modifications in the nucleus. Protein arginine methylation can be identified and/or determined via proteomic approaches, and/or immunoblotting with methyl-arginine specific antibodies. However, these techniques sometimes can be misleading and often provide false positive results. Most importantly, these techniques cannot provide direct evidence in support of the PRMT substrate specificity. In vitro methylation assays, on the other hand, are useful biochemical assays, which are sensitive, and consistently reveal if the identified proteins are indeed PRMT substrates. A typical in vitro methylation assay includes purified, active PRMTs, purified substrate and a radioisotope labeled methyl donor (S-adenosyl-L-[methyl-3H] methionine). Here we describe a step-by-step protocol to isolate catalytically active PRMT1, a ubiquitously expressed PRMT family member. The methyl transferase activities of the purified PRMT1 were later tested on Ras-GTPase activating protein binding protein 1 (G3BP1), a known PRMT substrate, in the presence of S-adenosyl-L-[methyl-3H] methionine as the methyl donor. This protocol can be employed not only for establishing the methylation status of novel physiological PRMT1 substrates, but also for understanding the basic mechanism of protein arginine methylation. PMID:25350748

  19. An arginine-aspartate network in the active site of bacterial TruB is critical for catalyzing pseudouridine formation

    PubMed Central

    Friedt, Jenna; Leavens, Fern M. V.; Mercier, Evan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Kothe, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Pseudouridine synthases introduce the most common RNA modification and likely use the same catalytic mechanism. Besides a catalytic aspartate residue, the contributions of other residues for catalysis of pseudouridine formation are poorly understood. Here, we have tested the role of a conserved basic residue in the active site for catalysis using the bacterial pseudouridine synthase TruB targeting U55 in tRNAs. Substitution of arginine 181 with lysine results in a 2500-fold reduction of TruB’s catalytic rate without affecting tRNA binding. Furthermore, we analyzed the function of a second-shell aspartate residue (D90) that is conserved in all TruB enzymes and interacts with C56 of tRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical and kinetic studies reveal that this residue is not critical for substrate binding but influences catalysis significantly as replacement of D90 with glutamate or asparagine reduces the catalytic rate 30- and 50-fold, respectively. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of TruB wild type and TruB D90N, we propose an electrostatic network composed of the catalytic aspartate (D48), R181 and D90 that is important for catalysis by fine-tuning the D48-R181 interaction. Conserved, negatively charged residues similar to D90 are found in a number of pseudouridine synthases, suggesting that this might be a general mechanism. PMID:24371284

  20. An arginine-aspartate network in the active site of bacterial TruB is critical for catalyzing pseudouridine formation.

    PubMed

    Friedt, Jenna; Leavens, Fern M V; Mercier, Evan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Kothe, Ute

    2014-04-01

    Pseudouridine synthases introduce the most common RNA modification and likely use the same catalytic mechanism. Besides a catalytic aspartate residue, the contributions of other residues for catalysis of pseudouridine formation are poorly understood. Here, we have tested the role of a conserved basic residue in the active site for catalysis using the bacterial pseudouridine synthase TruB targeting U55 in tRNAs. Substitution of arginine 181 with lysine results in a 2500-fold reduction of TruB's catalytic rate without affecting tRNA binding. Furthermore, we analyzed the function of a second-shell aspartate residue (D90) that is conserved in all TruB enzymes and interacts with C56 of tRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical and kinetic studies reveal that this residue is not critical for substrate binding but influences catalysis significantly as replacement of D90 with glutamate or asparagine reduces the catalytic rate 30- and 50-fold, respectively. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of TruB wild type and TruB D90N, we propose an electrostatic network composed of the catalytic aspartate (D48), R181 and D90 that is important for catalysis by fine-tuning the D48-R181 interaction. Conserved, negatively charged residues similar to D90 are found in a number of pseudouridine synthases, suggesting that this might be a general mechanism.

  1. Conventional univariate versus multivariate spectrophotometric assisted techniques for simultaneous determination of perindopril arginin and amlodipine besylate in presence of their degradation products.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Maha A; Abbas, Samah S; Zaazaa, Hala E; Essam, Hebatallah M

    2015-01-01

    The resolving power of spectrophotometric assisted mathematical techniques were demonstrated for the simultaneous determination of perindopril arginin (PER) and amlodipine besylate (AML) in presence of their degradation products. The conventional univariate methods include the absorptivity factor method (AFM) and absorption correction method (ACM), which were able to determine the two drugs, simultaneously, but not in the presence of their degradation products. In both methods, amlodipine was determined directly at 360 nm in the concentration range of 8-28 μg mL(-1), on the other hand perindopril was determined by AFM at 222.2 nm and by ACM at 208 nm in the concentration range of 10-70 μg mL(-1). Moreover, the applied multivariate calibration methods were able for the determination of perindopril and amlodipine in presence of their degradation products using concentration residuals augmented classical least squares (CRACLS) and partial least squares (PLS). The proposed multivariate methods were applied to 19 synthetic samples in the concentration ranges of 60-100 μg mL(-1) perindopril and 20-40 μg mL(-1) amlodipine. Commercially available tablet formulations were successfully analysed using the developed methods without interference from other dosage form additives except PLS model, which failed to determine both drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage form. PMID:26123511

  2. Residue 82 of the Chikungunya Virus E2 Attachment Protein Modulates Viral Dissemination and Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, Alison W.; Burrack, Kristina S.; Silva, Laurie A.; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Heise, Mark T.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that has reemerged to cause profound epidemics of fever, rash, and arthralgia throughout sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean. Like other arthritogenic alphaviruses, mechanisms of CHIKV pathogenesis are not well defined. Using the attenuated CHIKV strain 181/25 and virulent strain AF15561, we identified a residue in the E2 viral attachment protein that is a critical determinant of viral replication in cultured cells and pathogenesis in vivo. Viruses containing an arginine at E2 residue 82 displayed enhanced infectivity in mammalian cells but reduced infectivity in mosquito cells and diminished virulence in a mouse model of CHIKV disease. Mice inoculated with virus containing an arginine at this position exhibited reduced swelling at the site of inoculation with a concomitant decrease in the severity of necrosis in joint-associated tissues. Viruses containing a glycine at E2 residue 82 produced higher titers in the spleen and serum at early times postinfection. Using wild-type and glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines and soluble GAGs, we found that an arginine at residue 82 conferred greater dependence on GAGs for infection of mammalian cells. These data suggest that CHIKV E2 interactions with GAGs diminish dissemination to lymphoid tissue, establishment of viremia, and activation of inflammatory responses early in infection. Collectively, these results suggest a function for GAG utilization in regulating CHIKV tropism and host responses that contribute to arthritis. IMPORTANCE CHIKV is a reemerging alphavirus of global significance with high potential to spread into new, immunologically naive populations. The severity of CHIKV disease, particularly its propensity for chronic musculoskeletal manifestations, emphasizes the need for identification of genetic determinants that dictate CHIKV virulence in the host. To better understand mechanisms of

  3. Selective effects of charge on G protein activation by FSH-receptor residues 551-555 and 650-653.

    PubMed

    Grasso, P; Deziel, M R; Reichert, L E

    1995-01-01

    Two cytosolic regions of the rat testicular FSH receptor (FSHR), residues 533-555 and 645-653, have been identified as G protein-coupling domains. We localized the activity in these domains to their C-terminal sequences, residues 551-555 (KIAKR, net charge +3) and 650-653 (RKSH, net charge +3), and examined the effects of charge on G protein activation by the C-terminal peptides, using synthetic analogs containing additions, through alanine (A) linkages, of arginine (R, +), histidine (H, +) or both. RA-KIAKR (net charge +4) mimicked the effect of FSHR-(551-555) on guanine nucleotide exchange in rat testis membranes, but reduced its ability to inhibit FSH-stimulated estradiol biosynthesis in cultured rat Sertoli cells. Further increasing net charge by the addition of H (HARA-KIAKR, net charge +5) increased guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) binding, but eliminated FSHR-(551-555) effects on FSH-stimulated steroidogenesis. HA-RKSH (net charge +4) significantly inhibited guanine nucleotide exchange in rat testis membranes, but stimulated basal and potentiated FSH-induced estradiol biosynthesis in cultured rat Sertoli cells. Addition of two H residues (HAHA-RKSH, net charge +5) restored GTP binding and further potentiated basal and FSH-stimulated steroidogenesis. These results suggest that positive charges in G protein-coupling domains of the FSHR play a role in modulating G protein activation and postbinding effects of FSH, such as steroidogenesis.

  4. Structural evidence for the role of polar core residue Arg175 in arrestin activation

    PubMed Central

    Granzin, Joachim; Stadler, Andreas; Cousin, Anneliese; Schlesinger, Ramona; Batra-Safferling, Renu

    2015-01-01

    Binding mechanism of arrestin requires photoactivation and phosphorylation of the receptor protein rhodopsin, where the receptor bound phosphate groups cause displacement of the long C-tail ‘activating’ arrestin. Mutation of arginine 175 to glutamic acid (R175E), a central residue in the polar core and previously predicted as the ‘phosphosensor’ leads to a pre-active arrestin that is able to terminate phototransduction by binding to non-phosphorylated, light-activated rhodopsin. Here, we report the first crystal structure of a R175E mutant arrestin at 2.7 Å resolution that reveals significant differences compared to the basal state reported in full-length arrestin structures. These differences comprise disruption of hydrogen bond network in the polar core, and three-element interaction including disordering of several residues in the receptor-binding finger loop and the C-terminus (residues 361–404). Additionally, R175E structure shows a 7.5° rotation of the amino and carboxy-terminal domains relative to each other. Consistent to the biochemical data, our structure suggests an important role of R29 in the initial activation step of C-tail release. Comparison of the crystal structures of basal arrestin and R175E mutant provide insights into the mechanism of arrestin activation, where binding of the receptor likely induces structural changes mimicked as in R175E. PMID:26510463

  5. Corynebacterium diphtheriae HmuT: dissecting the roles of conserved residues in heme pocket stabilization.

    PubMed

    Draganova, Elizabeth B; Adrian, Seth A; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; Keutcha, Cyrianne S; Schmitt, Michael P; Rodgers, Kenton R; Dixon, Dabney W

    2016-10-01

    The heme-binding protein HmuT is part of the Corynebacterium diphtheriae heme uptake pathway and is responsible for the delivery of heme to the HmuUV ABC transporter. HmuT binds heme with a conserved His/Tyr heme axial ligation motif. Sequence alignment revealed additional conserved residues of potential importance for heme binding: R237, Y272 and M292. In this study, site-directed mutations at these three positions provided insight into the nature of axial heme binding to the protein and its effect on the thermal stability of the heme-loaded protein fold. UV-visible absorbance, resonance Raman (rR) and thermal unfolding experiments, along with collision-induced dissociation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, were used to probe the contributions of each mutated residue to the stability of ϖ HmuT. Thermal unfolding and rR experiments revealed that R237 and M292 are important residues for heme binding. Arginine 237 is a hydrogen-bond donor to the phenol side chain of Y235, which serves as an axial heme ligand. Methionine 292 serves a supporting structural role, favoring the R237 hydrogen-bond donation, which elicits a, heretofore, unobserved modulating influence on π donation by the axial tyrosine ligand in the heme carbonyl complex, HmuT-CO. PMID:27561288

  6. Functional role of glutamine 28 and arginine 39 in double stranded RNA cleavage by human pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Md Tabish; Dey, Punyatirtha; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan; Batra, Janendra K

    2011-03-08

    Human pancreatic ribonuclease (HPR), a member of RNase A superfamily, has a high activity on double stranded (ds) RNA. By virtue of this activity HPR appears to be involved in the host-defense against pathogenic viruses. To delineate the mechanism of dsRNA cleavage by HPR, we have investigated the role of glutamine 28 and arginine 39 of HPR in its activity on dsRNA. A non-basic residue glycine 38, earlier shown to be important for dsRNA cleavage by HPR was also included in the study in the context of glutamine 28 and arginine 39. Nine variants of HPR respectively containing Q28A, Q28L, R39A, G38D, Q28A/R39A, Q28L/R39A, Q28A/G38D, R39A/G38D and Q28A/G38D/R39A mutations were generated and functionally characterized. The far-UV CD-spectral analysis revealed all variants, except R39A, to have structures similar to that of HPR. The catalytic activity of all HPR variants on single stranded RNA substrate was similar to that of HPR, whereas on dsRNA, the catalytic efficiency of all single residue variants, except for the Q28L, was significantly reduced. The dsRNA cleavage activity of R39A/G38D and Q28A/G38D/R39A variants was most drastically reduced to 4% of that of HPR. The variants having reduced dsRNA cleavage activity also had reduction in their dsDNA melting activity and thermal stability. Our results indicate that in HPR both glutamine 28 and arginine 39 are important for the cleavage of dsRNA. Although these residues are not directly involved in catalysis, both arginine 39 and glutamine 28 appear to be facilitating a productive substrate-enzyme interaction during the dsRNA cleavage by HPR.

  7. Circadian variation of plasma arginine vasopressin concentration, or arginine vasopressin in enuresis.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, T; Kasahara, T; Uchiyama, M

    1999-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to determine a relationship between primary nocturnal enuresis and arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion. The first study compared 24-h AVP secretion profiles of enuretic (n = 9) and non-enuretic children (n = 8). Blood samples were collected at 1-h intervals for 24 h. In the second study, nocturnal AVP secretion in group A (n = 40)--with low urinary osmotic pressure (UOP) and large nocturnal urine output (NUO)--was compared with that in group D (n = 11) with normal UOP and small NUO. Plasma AVP levels were measured at 30-min intervals, immediately after falling asleep until 06.00 the following morning. The results of the first study showed that the plasma AVP level was significantly lower (p < 0.05-0.001) in the enuretic group between 23.00 and 04.00. The second study showed that group A had significantly lower AVP levels (p < 0.05-0.001) than group D throughout the night. The mean AVP level during night sleep was 0.64 +/- 0.23 pg/ml in group A and 1.43 +/- 0.66 pg/ml in group D. The results of the first study suggest that decreased nocturnal AVP secretion is a cause of bedwetting. However, the results of the second study suggest that nocturnal enuresis cannot be explained by a decrease in nocturnal AVP secretion alone.

  8. Crystallization of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate with presence of glutamic acid and arginine at 37 °C.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengfeng; Ge, Xiaolu; Li, Guochang; Bai, Jiahai; Ding, Rui

    2014-08-01

    The formations of non-metabolic stones, bones and teeth were seriously related to the morphology, size and surface reactivity of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD). Herein, a facile biomimetic mineralization method with presence of glutamic acid and arginine was employed to fabricate DCPD with well-defined morphology and adjustable crystallite size. In reaction solution containing more arginine, crystallization of DCPD occurred with faster rate of nucleation and higher density of stacked layers due to the generation of more OH(-) ions after hydrolysis of arginine at 37 °C. With addition of fluorescein or acetone, the consumption of OH(-) ions or desolvation reaction of Ca(2+) ions was modulated, which resulted in the fabrication of DCPD with adjustable crystallite sizes and densities of stacked layers. In comparison with fluorescein-loading DCPD, dicalcium phosphate anhydrate was prepared with enhanced photoluminescence properties due to the reduction of self-quenching effect and regular arrangement of encapsulated fluorescein molecules. With addition of more acetone, DCPD was prepared with smaller crystallite size via antisolvent crystallization. The simulated process with addition of amino acids under 37 °C would shed light on the dynamic process of biomineralization for calcium phosphate compounds.

  9. Growth and arginine metabolism of the wine lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus buchneri and Oenococcus oeni at different pH values and arginine concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mira De Orduña, R; Patchett, M L; Liu, S Q; Pilone, G J

    2001-04-01

    During malolactic fermentation (MLF) in grape must and wine, heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria may degrade arginine, leading to the formation of ammonia and citrulline, among other substances. This is of concern because ammonia increases the pH and thus the risk of growth by spoilage bacteria, and citrulline is a precursor to the formation of carcinogenic ethyl carbamate (EC). Arginine metabolism and growth of Lactobacillus buchneri CUC-3 and Oenococcus oeni strains MCW and Lo111 in wine were investigated. In contrast to L. buchneri CUC-3, both oenococci required a higher minimum pH for arginine degradation, and arginine utilization was delayed relative to the degradation of malic acid, the main aim of MLF. This allows the control of pH increase and citrulline formation from arginine metabolism by carrying out MLF with pure oenococcal cultures and inhibiting cell metabolism after malic acid depletion. MLF by arginine-degrading lactobacilli should be discouraged because arginine degradation may lead to the enhanced formation of acids from sugar degradation. A linear relationship was found between arginine degradation and citrulline excretion rates. From this data, strain-specific arginine-to-citrulline conversion ratios were calculated that ranged between 2.2 and 3.9% (wt/wt), and these ratios can be used to estimate the contribution of citrulline to the EC precursor pool from a given amount of initial arginine. Increasing arginine concentrations led to higher rates of growth of L. buchneri CUC-3 but did not increase the growth yield of either oenococcus. These results suggest the use of non-arginine-degrading oenococci for inducing MLF. PMID:11282618

  10. Mutagenesis and chemical rescue indicate residues involved in beta-aspartyl-AMP formation by Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, S K; Walworth, E S; Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    1997-05-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic studies have been employed to identify amino acid residues involved in aspartate binding and transition state stabilization during the formation of beta-aspartyl-AMP in the reaction mechanism of Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B (AS-B). Three conserved amino acids in the segment defined by residues 317-330 appear particularly crucial for enzymatic activity. For example, when Arg-325 is replaced by alanine or lysine, the resulting mutant enzymes possess no detectable asparagine synthetase activity. The catalytic activity of the R325A AS-B mutant can, however, be restored to about 1/6 of that of wild-type AS-B by the addition of guanidinium HCl (GdmHCl). Detailed kinetic analysis of the rescued activity suggests that Arg-325 is involved in stabilization of a pentacovalent intermediate leading to the formation beta-aspartyl-AMP. This rescue experiment is the second example in which the function of a critical arginine residue that has been substituted by mutagenesis is restored by GdmHCl. Mutation of Thr-322 and Thr-323 also produces enzymes with altered kinetic properties, suggesting that these threonines are involved in aspartate binding and/or stabilization of intermediates en route to beta-aspartyl-AMP. These experiments are the first to identify residues outside of the N-terminal glutamine amide transfer domain that have any functional role in asparagine synthesis.

  11. The PRMT5 arginine methyltransferase: many roles in development, cancer and beyond.

    PubMed

    Stopa, Nicole; Krebs, Jocelyn E; Shechter, David

    2015-06-01

    Post-translational arginine methylation is responsible for regulation of many biological processes. The protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5, also known as Hsl7, Jbp1, Skb1, Capsuleen, or Dart5) is the major enzyme responsible for mono- and symmetric dimethylation of arginine. An expanding literature demonstrates its critical biological function in a wide range of cellular processes. Histone and other protein methylation by PRMT5 regulate genome organization, transcription, stem cells, primordial germ cells, differentiation, the cell cycle, and spliceosome assembly. Metazoan PRMT5 is found in complex with the WD-repeat protein MEP50 (also known as Wdr77, androgen receptor coactivator p44, or Valois). PRMT5 also directly associates with a range of other protein factors, including pICln, Menin, CoPR5 and RioK1 that may alter its subcellular localization and protein substrate selection. Protein substrate and PRMT5-MEP50 post-translation modifications induce crosstalk to regulate PRMT5 activity. Crystal structures of C. elegans PRMT5 and human and frog PRMT5-MEP50 complexes provide substantial insight into the mechanisms of substrate recognition and procession to dimethylation. Enzymological studies of PRMT5 have uncovered compelling insights essential for future development of specific PRMT5 inhibitors. In addition, newly accumulating evidence implicates PRMT5 and MEP50 expression levels and their methyltransferase activity in cancer tumorigenesis, and, significantly, as markers of poor clinical outcome, marking them as potential oncogenes. Here, we review the substantial new literature on PRMT5 and its partners to highlight the significance of understanding this essential enzyme in health and disease.

  12. The PRMT5 arginine methyltransferase: many roles in development, cancer and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Stopa, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational arginine methylation is responsible for regulation of many biological processes. The protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5, also known as Hsl7, Jbp1, Skb1, Capsuleen, or Dart5) is the major enzyme responsible for mono- and symmetric dimethylation of arginine. An expanding literature demonstrates its critical biological function in a wide range of cellular processes. Histone and other protein methylation by PRMT5 regulate genome organization, transcription, stem cells, primordial germ cells, differentiation, the cell cycle, and spliceosome assembly. Metazoan PRMT5 is found in complex with the WD-repeat protein MEP50 (also known as Wdr77, androgen receptor coactivator p44, or Valois). PRMT5 also directly associates with a range of other protein factors, including pICln, Menin, CoPR5 and RioK1 that may alter its subcellular localization and protein substrate selection. Protein substrate and PRMT5–MEP50 post-translation modifications induce crosstalk to regulate PRMT5 activity. Crystal structures of C. elegans PRMT5 and human and frog PRMT5–MEP50 complexes provide substantial insight into the mechanisms of substrate recognition and procession to dimethylation. Enzymo-logical studies of PRMT5 have uncovered compelling insights essential for future development of specific PRMT5 inhibitors. In addition, newly accumulating evidence implicates PRMT5 and MEP50 expression levels and their methyltransferase activity in cancer tumorigenesis, and, significantly, as markers of poor clinical outcome, marking them as potential oncogenes. Here, we review the substantial new literature on PRMT5 and its partners to highlight the significance of understanding this essential enzyme in health and disease. PMID:25662273

  13. Identification of tropomyosin and arginine kinase as major allergens of Portunus pelagicus (blue swimming crab).

    PubMed

    Rosmilah, M; Shahnaz, M; Zailatul, H M Y; Noormalin, A; Normilah, I

    2012-09-01

    Crab is an important source of food allergen. Tropomyosin represents the main crab allergen and is responsible for IgE cross-reactivity between various species of crustaceans. Recently, other new crab allergens including arginine kinase have been identified. However, information on allergens of the local Portunidcrab is not available. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the major allergens of Portunus pelagicus (blue swimming crab) using the allergenomics approach. Raw and cooked extracts of the crab were prepared from the crab meat. Protein profile and IgE binding pattern were demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting using sera from 30 patients with crab allergy. The major allergens of the crab were then identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the peptide digests. The SDS-PAGE of raw extract revealed approximately 20 protein fractions over a wide molecular weight range, while cooked extract demonstrated fewer protein bands. The raw extract also demonstrated a higher number of IgE reactive bands than the cooked extract. A heat-resistant protein of 36 kDa has been identified as the major allergen in both raw and cooked extracts. In addition, a heat-sensitive protein of 41 kDa was also recognized as a major allergen in raw crab. The 2-DE gel profile of the raw extract demonstrated about >100 distinct proteins spots and immunoblotting of the 2-DE profile demonstrated at least 12 different major IgE reactive spots with molecular masses between 13 to 250 kDa and isoelectric point (pI) values ranging from 4.0 to 7.0. The 36 and 41 kDa proteins were identified as the crab tropomyosin and arginine kinase, respectively by mass spectrometry. Therefore, this study confirmed that tropomyosin and arginine kinase are the major allergens of the local Portunid crab, P. pelagicus.

  14. Amphipathicity Determines Different Cytotoxic Mechanisms of Lysine- or Arginine-Rich Cationic Hydrophobic Peptides in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Cao, Rui; Wang, Sha; Jia, Junli; Fei, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Cationic amphipathic peptides (CAPs) are known to be able to cause membrane destabilization and induce cell death, yet how the hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, and lysine (K)/arginine (R) composition synergistically affect the peptide activity remains incompletely understood. Here, we designed a panel of peptides based on the well-known anticancer peptide KLA. Increasing hydrophobicity enhanced the cytotoxicities of both the K- and R-rich peptides. Peptides with an intact amphipathic helical interface can cause instant cell death through a membrane lysis mechanism. Interestingly, rearranging the residue positions to minimize amphipathicity caused a great decrease of cytotoxicity to the K-rich peptides but not to the R-rich peptides. The amphipathicity-minimized R-rich peptide 6 (RL2) (RLLRLLRLRRLLRL-NH2) penetrated the cell membrane and induced caspase-3-dependent apoptotic cell death. We found that the modulation of hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, and K/R residues leads to distinct mechanisms of action of cationic hydrophobic peptides. Amphipathicity-reduced, arginine-rich cationic hydrophobic peptides (CHPs) may represent a new class of peptide therapeutics. PMID:27195657

  15. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    SciTech Connect

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  16. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of guanine nucleotides on arginine-vasotocin-sensitive adenylate cyclase in the epithelial cell membranes of the bullfrog bladder.

    PubMed

    Mishina, T; Shimada, H; Marumo, F

    1983-11-01

    The effects of arginine-vasotocin and nucleotides on the steady-state kinetics of the adenylate cyclase activity in the epithelial cell membranes of the bullfrog (Rana catesbiana) bladder were studied. Arginine-vasotocin stimulated adenylate cyclase more effectively than oxytocin or arginine-vasopressin, with respect to both the maximal hormonal activation ratio relative to basal, and the hormone concentration yielding a half-maximal response (apparent Km). Arginine-vasotocin, GTP and its analogue guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) increased the Vmax of the basal adenylate cyclase activity, but showed no effect of the apparent Km of the system for ATP. In addition, Gpp(NH)p enhanced the arginine-vasotocin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, further increasing the Vmax, while GTP showed no statistically significant effect. Dual effects of GDP were apparent: it was stimulatory at 1 x 10(-5) mol/l and inhibitory at 1 x 10(-3) mol/l, on both the basal and the arginine-vasotocin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. Guanosine 5'-monophosphate, CTP, UTP and ITP showed no apparent effect on the enzyme activity. Sodium fluoride acted in the same manner as GTP on the adenylate cyclase system, increasing only basal activity. Adenylate cyclase activities exhibited pH optima that were less distinct in the presence than in the absence of Gpp(NH)p. The Arrhenius plot of the temperature experiment showed that a high-energy step was involved for activation by Gpp(NH)p or arginine-vasotocin. When the relative activation ratios by arginine-vasotocin at different ATP concentrations were studied, a distinct activation optimum was shown at 2.5 x 10(-4) mol ATP/l, either in the absence or presence of Gpp(NH)p. The possibility that GTP, GDP nd ATP play a regulatory role in the epithelial cells of the bullfrog bladder by adjusting the responsiveness of the system to a natural hormone, arginine-vasotocin, is discussed. PMID:6606697

  17. Arginine Starvation Impairs Mitochondrial Respiratory Function in ASS1-Deficient Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiyong; Chu, Cheng-Ying; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Xu, Jinghong; Gaur, Shikha; Forman, Henry Jay; Zhang, Hang; Zheng, Shu; Yen, Yun; Huang, Jian; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Ann, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is the principal catabolic response to nutrient starvation and is necessary to clear dysfunctional or damaged organelles, but excessive autophagy can be cytotoxic or cytostatic and contributes to cell death. Depending on the abundance of enzymes involved in molecule biosynthesis, cells can be dependent on uptake of exogenous nutrients to provide these molecules. Argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) is a key enzyme in arginine biosynthesis, and its abundance is reduced in many solid tumors, making them sensitive to external arginine depletion. We demonstrated that prolonged arginine starvation by exposure to ADI-PEG20 (pegylated arginine deiminase) induced autophagy-dependent death of ASS1-deficient breast cancer cells, because these cells are arginine auxotrophs (dependent on uptake of extracellular arginine). Indeed, these breast cancer cells died in culture when exposed to ADI-PEG20 or cultured in the absence of arginine. Arginine starvation induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, which impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics and integrity. Furthermore, arginine starvation killed breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro only if they were autophagy-competent. Thus, a key mechanism underlying the lethality induced by prolonged arginine starvation was the cytotoxic autophagy that occurred in response to mitochondrial damage. Last, ASS1 was either low in abundance or absent in more than 60% of 149 random breast cancer bio-samples, suggesting that patients with such tumors could be candidates for arginine starvation therapy. PMID:24692592

  18. Arginine: New Insights into Growth Performance and Urinary Metabolomic Profiles of Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangmang; Wu, Xianjian; Jia, Gang; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Jing; Wu, Caimei; Cai, Jingyi

    2016-01-01

    Arginine regulates growth performance, nutrient metabolism and health effects, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. This study aims to investigate the effect of dietary arginine supplementation on rat growth performance and urinary metabolome through ¹H-NMR spectroscopy. Twenty rats were randomly assigned to two groups supplemented with 0% or 1.0% l-arginine for 4 weeks. Urine samples were analyzed through NMR-based metabolomics. Arginine supplementation significantly increased the urine levels of 4-aminohippurate, acetate, creatine, creatinine, ethanolamine, formate, hippurate, homogentisate, indoxyl sulfate, and phenylacetyglycine. Conversely, arginine decreased the urine levels of acetamide, β-glucose, cirtulline, ethanol, glycine, isobutyrate, lactate, malonate, methymalonate, N-acetylglutamate, N-methylnicotinamide, and propionate. Results suggested that arginine can alter common systemic metabolic processes, including energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbiota metabolism. Moreover, the results also imply a possible physiological role of the metabolism in mediating the arginine supplementation-supported growth of rats. PMID:27589702

  19. Molecular recognition of arginine by supramolecular complexation with calixarene crown ether based on surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxia; Gu, Limin; Yin, Yongmei; Koh, Kwangnak; Lee, Jaebeom

    2011-01-01

    Arginine plays an important role in cell division and the functioning of the immune system. We describe a novel method by which arginine can be identified using an artificial monolayer based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The affinity of arginine binding its recognition molecular was compared to that of lysine. In fabrication of an arginine sensing interface, a calix[4]crown ether monolayer was anchored onto a gold surface and then characterized by Fourier Transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction between arginine and its host compound was investigated by SPR. The calix[4]crown ether was found to assemble as a monolayer on the gold surface. Recognition of calix[4]crown monolayer was assessed by the selective binding of arginine. Modification of the SPR chip with the calix[4]crown monolayer provides a reliable and simple experimental platform for investigation of arginine under aqueous conditions.

  20. Arginine starvation in colorectal carcinoma cells: Sensing, impact on translation control and cell cycle distribution.

    PubMed

    Vynnytska-Myronovska, Bozhena O; Kurlishchuk, Yuliya; Chen, Oleh; Bobak, Yaroslav; Dittfeld, Claudia; Hüther, Melanie; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Stasyk, Oleh V

    2016-02-01

    Tumor cells rely on a continued exogenous nutrient supply in order to maintain a high proliferative activity. Although a strong dependence of some tumor types on exogenous arginine sources has been reported, the mechanisms of arginine sensing by tumor cells and the impact of changes in arginine availability on translation and cell cycle regulation are not fully understood. The results presented herein state that human colorectal carcinoma cells rapidly exhaust the internal arginine sources in the absence of exogenous arginine and repress global translation by activation of the GCN2-mediated pathway and inhibition of mTOR signaling. Tumor suppressor protein p53 activation and G1/G0 cell cycle arrest support cell survival upon prolonged arginine starvation. Cells with the mutant or deleted TP53 fail to stop cell cycle progression at defined cell cycle checkpoints which appears to be associated with reduced recovery after durable metabolic stress triggered by arginine withdrawal.

  1. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  2. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  3. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  4. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  5. Stimulated Nitric Oxide Production and Arginine Deficiency in Cystic Fibrosis Children with Nutritional Failure

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Mariëlle PKJ; Com, Gulnur; Luiking, Yvette C; Deutz, Nicolaas EP

    2013-01-01

    Objective Reduced nitric oxide (NO) concentrations are found in the airways of many patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and are associated with increased airflow obstruction. We determined whether upregulated whole body de novo arginine synthesis and protein breakdown are present as a compensatory mechanism to meet the increased demand for arginine and nitric oxide production in pediatric patients with CF and nutritional failure. Study design In 16 children with CF, studied at the end of antibiotic treatment for a pulmonary exacerbation, and 17 healthy controls, whole body arginine, citrulline, and protein turnover were assessed by stable isotope methodology and de novo arginine synthesis, arginine clearance, NO synthesis, protein synthesis and breakdown, and net protein balance were calculated. The plasma isotopic enrichments and amino acid concentrations were measured by LC-MS/MS. Results Increased arginine clearance was found in patients with CF (p<0.001) whereas whole body NO production rate and plasma arginine levels were not different. Whole body arginine production (P<0.001), de novo arginine synthesis, and protein breakdown and synthesis (P<0.05) were increased in patients with CF, but net protein balance was comparable. Patients with CF with nutritional failure (n=7) had significantly higher NO production (P<0.05), de novo arginine synthesis, citrulline production (P<0.001), and plasma citrulline concentration (P<0.05) and lower plasma arginine concentration (P<0.05) than those without nutritional failure (n=9). Conclusions Nutritional failure in CF is associated with increased NO production. However, upregulation of de novo arginine synthesis and citrulline production was not sufficient to meet the increased arginine needs leading to arginine deficiency. PMID:23419590

  6. Restoration of impaired nitric oxide production in MELAS syndrome with citrulline and arginine supplementation.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Hsu, Jean W; Emrick, Lisa T; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Craigen, William J; Jahoor, Farook; Scaglia, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is one of the most common mitochondrial disorders. Although the pathogenesis of stroke-like episodes remains unclear, it has been suggested that mitochondrial proliferation may result in endothelial dysfunction and decreased nitric oxide (NO) availability leading to cerebral ischemic events. This study aimed to assess NO production in subjects with MELAS syndrome and the effect of the NO precursors arginine and citrulline. Using stable isotope infusion techniques, we assessed arginine, citrulline, and NO metabolism in control subjects and subjects with MELAS syndrome before and after arginine or citrulline supplementation. The results showed that subjects with MELAS had lower NO synthesis rate associated with reduced citrulline flux, de novo arginine synthesis rate, and plasma arginine and citrulline concentrations, and higher plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) concentration and arginine clearance. We conclude that the observed impaired NO production is due to multiple factors including elevated ADMA, higher arginine clearance, and, most importantly, decreased de novo arginine synthesis secondary to decreased citrulline availability. Arginine and, to a greater extent, citrulline supplementation increased the de novo arginine synthesis rate, the plasma concentrations and flux of arginine and citrulline, and NO production. De novo arginine synthesis increased markedly with citrulline supplementation, explaining the superior efficacy of citrulline in increasing NO production. The improvement in NO production with arginine or citrulline supplementation supports their use in MELAS and suggests that citrulline may have a better therapeutic effect than arginine. These findings can have a broader relevance for other disorders marked by perturbations in NO metabolism.

  7. Cyclization increases the antimicrobial activity and selectivity of arginine- and tryptophan-containing hexapeptides.

    PubMed

    Dathe, Margitta; Nikolenko, Heike; Klose, Jana; Bienert, Michael

    2004-07-20

    Arginine- and tryptophan-rich motifs have been identified in antimicrobial peptides with various secondary structures. We synthesized a set of linear hexapeptides derived from the sequence AcRRWWRF-NH(2) by substitution of tryptophan (W) by tyrosine (Y) or naphthylalanine (Nal) and by replacement of arginine (R) by lysine (K) to investigate the role of cationic charge and aromatic residues in membrane activity and selectivity. A second set of corresponding head-to-tail cyclic analogues was prepared to analyze the role of conformational constraints. The biological activity of the linear peptides followed the order Nal- > W- > Y-containing compounds and slightly decreased upon R-K substitution. A pronounced activity-improving and bacterial selectivity-enhancing effect was found upon cyclization of the R- and W-bearing parent peptide, whereas the activity-modifying effect of cyclization of Y- and Nal-containing peptides was low. The analysis of the driving forces of peptide interaction with model membranes showed that the activities correlated with the partition coefficients and the depths of peptide insertion into neutral and negatively charged lipid bilayers. Spectroscopic studies, RP-HPLC, and titration calorimetry implied that the combination of cationic and aromatic amino acid composition and conformational rigidity afforded a membrane-active, amphipathic structure with a highly charged face opposed by a cluster of aromatic side chains. However, threshold values of low and high hydrophobicity seemed to exist beyond which the activity-enhancing effect of cyclization was negligible. The results suggest that cyclization of small peptides of an appropriate amino acid composition may serve as a promising strategy in the design of antimicrobial peptides.

  8. Arginine kinase from the Tardigrade, Macrobiotus occidentalis: molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis and enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Uda, Kouji; Ishida, Mikako; Matsui, Tohru; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2010-10-01

    Arginine kinase (AK), which catalyzes the reversible transfer of phosphate from ATP to arginine to yield phosphoarginine and ADP, is widely distributed throughout the invertebrates. We determined the cDNA sequence of AK from the tardigrade (water bear) Macrobiotus occidentalis, cloned the sequence into pET30b plasmid, and expressed it in Escherichia coli as a 6x His-tag—fused protein. The cDNA is 1377 bp, has an open reading frame of 1080 bp, and has 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions of 116 and 297 bp, respectively. The open reading frame encodes a 359-amino acid protein containing the 12 residues considered necessary for substrate binding in Limulus AK. This is the first AK sequence from a tardigrade. From fragmented and non-annotated sequences available from DNA databases, we assembled 46 complete AK sequences: 26 from arthropods (including 19 from Insecta), 11 from nematodes, 4 from mollusks, 2 from cnidarians and 2 from onychophorans. No onychophoran sequences have been reported previously. The phylogenetic trees of 104 AKs indicated clearly that Macrobiotus AK (from the phylum Tardigrada) shows close affinity with Epiperipatus and Euperipatoides AKs (from the phylum Onychophora), and therefore forms a sister group with the arthropod AKs. Recombinant 6x His-tagged Macrobiotus AK was successfully expressed as a soluble protein, and the kinetic constants (K(m), K(d), V(ma) and k(cat)) were determined for the forward reaction. Comparison of these kinetic constants with those of AKs from other sources (arthropods, mollusks and nematodes) indicated that Macrobiotus AK is unique in that it has the highest values for k(cat) and K(d)K(m) (indicative of synergistic substrate binding) of all characterized AKs.

  9. Arginine kinase from the Tardigrade, Macrobiotus occidentalis: molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis and enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Uda, Kouji; Ishida, Mikako; Matsui, Tohru; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2010-10-01

    Arginine kinase (AK), which catalyzes the reversible transfer of phosphate from ATP to arginine to yield phosphoarginine and ADP, is widely distributed throughout the invertebrates. We determined the cDNA sequence of AK from the tardigrade (water bear) Macrobiotus occidentalis, cloned the sequence into pET30b plasmid, and expressed it in Escherichia coli as a 6x His-tag—fused protein. The cDNA is 1377 bp, has an open reading frame of 1080 bp, and has 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions of 116 and 297 bp, respectively. The open reading frame encodes a 359-amino acid protein containing the 12 residues considered necessary for substrate binding in Limulus AK. This is the first AK sequence from a tardigrade. From fragmented and non-annotated sequences available from DNA databases, we assembled 46 complete AK sequences: 26 from arthropods (including 19 from Insecta), 11 from nematodes, 4 from mollusks, 2 from cnidarians and 2 from onychophorans. No onychophoran sequences have been reported previously. The phylogenetic trees of 104 AKs indicated clearly that Macrobiotus AK (from the phylum Tardigrada) shows close affinity with Epiperipatus and Euperipatoides AKs (from the phylum Onychophora), and therefore forms a sister group with the arthropod AKs. Recombinant 6x His-tagged Macrobiotus AK was successfully expressed as a soluble protein, and the kinetic constants (K(m), K(d), V(ma) and k(cat)) were determined for the forward reaction. Comparison of these kinetic constants with those of AKs from other sources (arthropods, mollusks and nematodes) indicated that Macrobiotus AK is unique in that it has the highest values for k(cat) and K(d)K(m) (indicative of synergistic substrate binding) of all characterized AKs. PMID:20887177

  10. Conformational study reveals amino acid residues essential for hemagglutinating and anti-proliferative activities of Clematis montana lectin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bangmin; Zhang, Bin; Qi, Wei; Zhu, Yanan; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Nan; Sun, Rong; Bao, Jinku; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-11-01

    Clematis montana lectin (CML), a novel mannose-binding lectin purified from C. montana Buch.-Ham stem (Ranunculaceae), has been proved to have hemagglutinating activity in rabbit erythrocytes and apoptosis-inducing activity in tumor cells. However, the biochemical properties of CML have not revealed and its structural information still needs to be elucidated. In this study, it was found that CML possessed quite good thermostability and alkaline resistance, and its hemagglutinating activity was bivalent metal cation dependent. In addition, hemagglutination test and fluorescence spectroscopy proved that GuHCl, urea, and sodium dodecyl sulfate could change the conformation of CML and further caused the loss of hemagglutination activity. Moreover, the changes of fluorescence spectrum indicated that the tryptophan (Trp) microenvironment conversion might be related to the conformation and bioactivities of CML. In addition, it was also found that Trp residues, arginine (Arg) residues, and sulfhydryl were important for the hemagglutinating activity of CML, but only Trp was proved to be crucial for the CML conformation. Furthermore, the Trp, Arg, and sulfhydryl-modified CML exhibited 97.17%, 76.99%, and 49.64% loss of its anti-proliferative activity, respectively, which was consistent with the alterations of its hemagglutinating activity. Given these findings, Trp residues on the surface of CML are essential for the active center to form substrate-accessible conformation and suitable environment for carbohydrate binding. PMID:25239139

  11. Effects of arginine vasopressin on musical working memory

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Roni Y.; Uzefovsky, Florina; Bogopolsky, Helena; Ebstein, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Previous genetic studies showed an association between variations in the gene coding for the 1a receptor of the neuro-hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) and musical working memory (WM). The current study set out to test the influence of intranasal administration (INA) of AVP on musical as compared to verbal WM using a double blind crossover (AVP—placebo) design. Two groups of 25 males were exposed to 20 IU of AVP in one session, and 20 IU of saline water (placebo) in a second session, 1 week apart. In each session subjects completed the tonal subtest from Gordon's “Musical Aptitude Profile,” the interval subtest from the “Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusias (MBEA),” and the forward and backward digit span tests. Scores in the digit span tests were not influenced by AVP. In contrast, in the music tests there was an AVP effect. In the MBEA test, scores for the group receiving placebo in the first session (PV) were higher than for the group receiving vasopressin in the first session (VP) (p < 0.05) with no main Session effect nor Group × Session interaction. In the Gordon test there was a main Session effect (p < 0.05) with scores higher in the second as compared to the first session, a marginal main Group effect (p = 0.093) and a marginal Group × Session interaction (p = 0.88). In addition we found that the group that received AVP in the first session scored higher on scales indicative of happiness, and alertness on the positive and negative affect scale, (PANAS). Only in this group and only in the music test these scores were significantly correlated with memory scores. Together the results reflect a complex interaction between AVP, musical memory, arousal, and contextual effects such as session, and base levels of memory. The results are interpreted in light of music's universal use as a means to modulate arousal on the one hand, and AVP's influence on mood, arousal, and social interactions on the other. PMID:24151474

  12. Effects of arginine vasopressin on musical working memory.

    PubMed

    Granot, Roni Y; Uzefovsky, Florina; Bogopolsky, Helena; Ebstein, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Previous genetic studies showed an association between variations in the gene coding for the 1a receptor of the neuro-hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) and musical working memory (WM). The current study set out to test the influence of intranasal administration (INA) of AVP on musical as compared to verbal WM using a double blind crossover (AVP-placebo) design. Two groups of 25 males were exposed to 20 IU of AVP in one session, and 20 IU of saline water (placebo) in a second session, 1 week apart. In each session subjects completed the tonal subtest from Gordon's "Musical Aptitude Profile," the interval subtest from the "Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusias (MBEA)," and the forward and backward digit span tests. Scores in the digit span tests were not influenced by AVP. In contrast, in the music tests there was an AVP effect. In the MBEA test, scores for the group receiving placebo in the first session (PV) were higher than for the group receiving vasopressin in the first session (VP) (p < 0.05) with no main Session effect nor Group × Session interaction. In the Gordon test there was a main Session effect (p < 0.05) with scores higher in the second as compared to the first session, a marginal main Group effect (p = 0.093) and a marginal Group × Session interaction (p = 0.88). In addition we found that the group that received AVP in the first session scored higher on scales indicative of happiness, and alertness on the positive and negative affect scale, (PANAS). Only in this group and only in the music test these scores were significantly correlated with memory scores. Together the results reflect a complex interaction between AVP, musical memory, arousal, and contextual effects such as session, and base levels of memory. The results are interpreted in light of music's universal use as a means to modulate arousal on the one hand, and AVP's influence on mood, arousal, and social interactions on the other.

  13. A Selective V1A Receptor Agonist, Selepressin, Is Superior to Arginine Vasopressin and to Norepinephrine in Ovine Septic Shock*

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinrong; Su, Fuhong; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Laporte, Régent; Kjølbye, Anne Louise; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Keliang; Moussa, Mouhamed Djahoum; Reinheimer, Torsten Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Selective vasopressin V1A receptor agonists may have advantages over arginine vasopressin in the treatment of septic shock. We compared the effects of selepressin, a selective V1A receptor agonist, arginine vasopressin, and norepinephrine on hemodynamics, organ function, and survival in an ovine septic shock model. Design: Randomized animal study. Setting: University hospital animal research laboratory. Subjects: Forty-six adult female sheep. Interventions: Fecal peritonitis was induced in the anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, fluid-resuscitated sheep, and they were randomized in two successive phases. Three late-intervention groups (each n = 6) received IV selepressin (1 pmol/kg/min), arginine vasopressin (0.25 pmol [0.1 mU]/kg/min), or norepinephrine (3 nmol [0.5 μg]/kg/min) when mean arterial pressure remained less than 70 mm Hg despite fluid challenge; study drugs were thereafter titrated to keep mean arterial pressure at 70–80 mm Hg. Three early-intervention groups (each n = 7) received selepressin, arginine vasopressin, or norepinephrine at the same initial infusion rates as for the late intervention, but already when mean arterial pressure had decreased by 10% from baseline; doses were then titrated as for the late intervention. A control group (n = 7) received saline. All animals were observed until death or for a maximum of 30 hours. Measurements and Main Results: In addition to hemodynamic and organ function assessment, plasma interleukin-6 and nitrite/nitrate levels were measured. In the late-intervention groups, selepressin delayed the decrease in mean arterial pressure and was associated with lower lung wet/dry weight ratios than in the other two groups. In the early-intervention groups, selepressin maintained mean arterial pressure and cardiac index better than arginine vasopressin or norepinephrine, slowed the increase in blood lactate levels, and was associated with less lung edema, lower cumulative fluid balance, and lower

  14. Arginine methyltransferase CARM1/PRMT4 regulates endochondral ossification

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tatsuo; Yadav, Neelu; Lee, Jaeho; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Yamashita, Satoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Taniguchi, Noboru; Hashimoto, Megumi; Tsuchiya, Megumi; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Lotz, Martin; Bedford, Mark T; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Background Chondrogenesis and subsequent endochondral ossification are processes tightly regulated by the transcription factor Sox9 (SRY-related high mobility group-Box gene 9), but molecular mechanisms underlying this activity remain unclear. Here we report that coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) regulates chondrocyte proliferation via arginine methylation of Sox9. Results CARM1-null mice display delayed endochondral ossification and decreased chondrocyte proliferation. Conversely, cartilage development of CARM1 transgenic mice was accelerated. CARM1 specifically methylates Sox9 at its HMG domain in vivo and in vitro. Arg-methylation of Sox9 by CARM1 disrupts interaction of Sox9 with beta-catenin, regulating Cyclin D1 expression and cell cycle progression of chondrocytes. Conclusion These results establish a role for CARM1 as an important regulator of chondrocyte proliferation during embryogenesis. PMID:19725955

  15. Arginine decarboxylase as the source of putrescine for tobacco alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The putrescine which forms a part of nicotine and other pyrrolidine alkaloids is generally assumed to arise through the action of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, we have previously noted that changes in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an alternate source of putrescine, parallel changes in tissue alkaloids, while changes in ODC activity do not. This led us to undertake experiments to permit discrimination between ADC and ODC as enzymatic sources of putrescine destined for alkaloids. Two kinds of evidence presented here support a major role for ADC in the generation of putrescine going into alkaloids: (a) A specific 'suicide inhibitor' of ADC effectively inhibits the biosynthesis of nicotine and nornicotine in tobacco callus, while the analogous inhibitor of ODC is less effective, and (b) the flow of 14C from uniformly labelled arginine into nicotine is much more efficient than that from ornithine.

  16. Hydrogenosome-localization of arginine deiminase in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Morada, Mary; Smid, Ondrej; Hampl, Vladimir; Sutak, Robert; Lam, Brian; Rappelli, Paola; Dessì, Daniele; Fiori, Pier L; Tachezy, Jan; Yarlett, Nigel

    2011-03-01

    The arginine dihydrolase (ADH) pathway has an analogous function to the urea cycle in mitochondria-containing cells, by removing nitrogen from amino acids and generating ATP. Subcellular localization of the ADH pathway enzymes in Trichomonas vaginalis revealed that arginine deiminase (ADI) localizes to the hydrogenosome, a mitochondrion-like organelle of anaerobic protists. However the other enzymes of the ADH pathway, ornithine carbamyltransferase and carbamate kinase localize to the cytosol. Three gene sequences of T. vaginalis ADI (ADI 1-3) were identified in the T. vaginalis genome, all having putative mitochondrial targeting sequences. The ADI sequences were cloned and used to probe T. vaginalis using a carboxyterminal di-hemogglutinin epitope tag which demonstrated co-localization with malic enzyme confirming the hydrogenosome localization of this enzyme.

  17. Melatonin attenuates Leishmania (L.) amazonensis infection by modulating arginine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira-Silva, Maria Fernanda; Zampieri, Ricardo A; Muxel, Sandra M; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria; Markus, Regina P

    2015-11-01

    Acute inflammatory responses induced by bacteria or fungi block nocturnal melatonin synthesis by rodent pineal glands. Here, we show Leishmania infection does not impair daily melatonin rhythm in hamsters. Remarkably, the attenuated parasite burden and lesion progression in hamsters infected at nighttime was impaired by blockage of melatonin receptors with luzindole, whereas melatonin treatment during the light phase attenuated Leishmania infection. In vitro studies corroborated in vivo observations. Melatonin treatment reduced macrophage expression of Cat-2b, Cat1, and ArgI, genes involved in arginine uptake and polyamine synthesis. Indeed, melatonin reduced macrophage arginine uptake by 40%. Putrescine supplementation reverted the attenuation of infectivity by melatonin indicating that its effect was due to the arrest of parasite replication. This study shows that the Leishmania/host interaction varies in a circadian manner according to nocturnal melatonin pineal synthesis. Our results provide new data regarding Leishmania infectiveness and show new approaches for applying agonists of melatonin receptors in Leishmaniasis therapy.

  18. Nomega-hydroxy-L-arginine homologues and hydroxylamine as nitric oxide-dependent vasorelaxant agents.

    PubMed

    Beranova, Petra; Chalupsky, Karel; Kleschyov, Andrei L; Schott, Christa; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Mansuy, Daniel; Munzel, Thomas; Muller, Bernard; Stoclet, Jean-Claude

    2005-06-15

    Endothelium-independent relaxant activities of N(omega)-hydroxy-L-arginine (L-NOHA) homologues and hydroxylamine, a possible intermediate in nitric oxide (NO) formation, were examined in rat aortic rings. Addition of one -CH(2)- group to the -(CH(2))(x)- chain between the alpha-amino acid and the hydroxyguanidine group (x=4) almost abolished-while deletion of one or two -CH(2)- (x=1 or 2) enhanced-the relaxant activity of L-NOHA homologues. N(omega)-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine- (x=2) and hydroxylamine-induced relaxations were blunted by a NO scavenger and by inhibitors of the guanylyl cyclase pathway, but not by NO synthase or cytochrome P(450) inhibitors (except 7-ethoxyresorufin). However, aortic NO formation was detected (using electron paramagnetic resonance) in the presence of concentrations of these compounds higher than those producing relaxation. These findings support the view that endothelium-independent vasorelaxations induced by both L-NOHA homologues with a required chain length x

  19. Synthesis of Mycoplasma arginine deiminase in E. coli using stress-responsive proteins.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Keum-Young; Lee, Boram; Han, Kyung-Yeon; Song, Jong-Am; Lee, Doo Sung; Lee, Jeewon

    2014-09-01

    We found Escherichia coli proteins, elongation factor Ts (Tsf), and malate dehydrogenase (Mdh) that can exist in the form of native and soluble proteins even under stress situation such as heat shock and protein denaturing condition. To examine their property as solubility enhancers, aggregation-prone Mycoplasma arginine deiminase (mADI), which has been suggested as anti-cancer agent, was fused to the C-terminal of each of them and cloned into pET28a to be expressed in the E. coli cytoplasm. When mADI was fused to fusion partners (Mdh, Tsf), a significant portion of the recombinant mADI was expressed in a soluble fraction (>90%) whereas the directly expressed mADI was aggregated to the inclusion body. In addition, recombinant mADI released from the fusion tag retained its soluble form and presented its specific enzymatic activity of converting l-arginine into citrulline (>10 U/mg). These results show that Tsf and Mdh could serve as effective solubility enhancers for aggregation-prone proteins (e.g. mADI in this case) when used as fusion expression partners in bacterial expression systems. PMID:25039059

  20. TatE as a Regular Constituent of Bacterial Twin-arginine Protein Translocases.

    PubMed

    Eimer, Ekaterina; Fröbel, Julia; Blümmel, Anne-Sophie; Müller, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Twin-arginine translocation (Tat) systems mediate the transmembrane translocation of completely folded proteins that possess a conserved twin-arginine (RR) motif in their signal sequences. Many Tat systems consist of three essential membrane components named TatA, TatB, and TatC. It is not understood why some bacteria, in addition, constitutively express a functional paralog of TatA called TatE. Here we show, in live Escherichia coli cells, that, upon expression of a Tat substrate protein, fluorescently labeled TatE-GFP relocates from a rather uniform distribution in the plasma membrane into a number of discrete clusters. Clustering strictly required an intact RR signal peptide and the presence of the TatABC subunits, suggesting that TatE-GFP associates with functional Tat translocases. In support of this notion, site-specific photo cross-linking revealed interactions of TatE with TatA, TatB, and TatC. The same approach also disclosed a pronounced tendency of TatE and TatA to hetero-oligomerize. Under in vitro conditions, we found that TatE replaces TatA inefficiently. Our collective results are consistent with TatE being a regular constituent of the Tat translocase in E. coli.

  1. Synthesis of Mycoplasma arginine deiminase in E. coli using stress-responsive proteins.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Keum-Young; Lee, Boram; Han, Kyung-Yeon; Song, Jong-Am; Lee, Doo Sung; Lee, Jeewon

    2014-09-01

    We found Escherichia coli proteins, elongation factor Ts (Tsf), and malate dehydrogenase (Mdh) that can exist in the form of native and soluble proteins even under stress situation such as heat shock and protein denaturing condition. To examine their property as solubility enhancers, aggregation-prone Mycoplasma arginine deiminase (mADI), which has been suggested as anti-cancer agent, was fused to the C-terminal of each of them and cloned into pET28a to be expressed in the E. coli cytoplasm. When mADI was fused to fusion partners (Mdh, Tsf), a significant portion of the recombinant mADI was expressed in a soluble fraction (>90%) whereas the directly expressed mADI was aggregated to the inclusion body. In addition, recombinant mADI released from the fusion tag retained its soluble form and presented its specific enzymatic activity of converting l-arginine into citrulline (>10 U/mg). These results show that Tsf and Mdh could serve as effective solubility enhancers for aggregation-prone proteins (e.g. mADI in this case) when used as fusion expression partners in bacterial expression systems.

  2. Effect of dietary lysine restriction and arginine supplementation in two patients with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Thomas, Amanda; Viau, Krista; Liu, Aiping; De Biase, Irene; Botto, Lorenzo D; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Pyridoxine-Dependent Epilepsy (PDE) is a recessive disorder caused by deficiency of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in the catabolic pathway of lysine. It is characterized by intractable seizures controlled by the administration of pharmacological doses of vitamin B6. Despite seizure control with pyridoxine, intellectual disability and developmental delays are still observed in some patients with PDE, likely due to the accumulation of toxic intermediates in the lysine catabolic pathway: alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AASA), delta-1-piperideine-6-carboxylate (P6C), and pipecolic acid. Here we evaluate biochemical and clinical parameters in two PDE patients treated with a lysine-restricted diet and arginine supplementation (100-150mg/kg), aimed at reducing the levels of PDE biomarkers. Lysine restriction resulted in decreased accumulation of PDE biomarkers and improved development. Plasma lysine but not plasma arginine, directly correlated with plasma levels of AASA-P6C (p<0.001, r(2)=0.640) and pipecolic acid (p<0.01, r(2)=0.484). In addition, plasma threonine strongly correlated with the levels of AASA-P6C (p<0.0001, r(2)=0.732) and pipecolic acid (p<0.005, r(2)=0.527), suggesting extreme sensitivity of threonine catabolism to pyridoxine availability. Our results further support the use of dietary therapies in combination with pyridoxine for the treatment of PDE. PMID:27324284

  3. Characterization of the activity and expression of arginine decarboxylase in human and animal Chlamydia pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bliven, Kimberly A; Fisher, Derek J; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2012-12-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae encodes a functional arginine decarboxylase (ArgDC), AaxB, that activates upon self-cleavage and converts l-arginine to agmatine. In contrast, most Chlamydia trachomatis serovars carry a missense or nonsense mutation in aaxB abrogating activity. The G115R missense mutation was not predicted to impact AaxB functionality, making it unclear whether AaxB variations in other Chlamydia species also result in enzyme inactivation. To address the impact of gene polymorphism on functionality, we investigated the activity and production of the Chlamydia AaxB variants. Because ArgDC plays a critical role in the Escherichia coli acid stress response, we studied the ability of these Chlamydia variants to complement an E. coli ArgDC mutant in an acid shock assay. Active AaxB was detected in four additional species: Chlamydia caviae, Chlamydia pecorum, Chlamydia psittaci, and Chlamydia muridarum. Of the C. trachomatis serovars, only E appears to encode active enzyme. To determine when functional enzyme is present during the chlamydial developmental cycle, we utilized an anti-AaxB antibody to detect both uncleaved and cleaved enzyme throughout infection. Uncleaved enzyme production peaked around 20 h postinfection, with optimal cleavage around 44 h. While the role ArgDC plays in Chlamydia survival or virulence is unclear, our data suggest a niche-specific function.

  4. Exogenous chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan associate with arginine-rich peptide-DNA complexes to alter their intracellular processing and gene delivery efficiency.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rangeetha J; Sharma, Rajpal; Nisakar, Daniel; Purohit, Gunjan; Ganguli, Munia

    2015-04-01

    Arginine-rich peptides have been used extensively as efficient cellular transporters. However, gene delivery with such peptides requires development of strategies to improve their efficiency. We had earlier demonstrated that addition of small amounts of exogenous glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) like heparan sulfate or chondroitin sulfate to different arginine-rich peptide-DNA complexes (polyplexes) led to an increase in their gene delivery efficiency. This was possibly due to the formation of a 'GAG coat' on the polyplex surface through electrostatic interactions which improved their extracellular stability and subsequent cellular entry. In this report, we have attempted to elucidate the differences in intracellular processing of the chondroitin sulfate (CS)-coated polyplexes in comparison to the native polyplexes by using a combination of endocytic inhibitors and co-localization with endosomal markers in various cell lines. We observed that both the native and CS-coated polyplexes are internalized by multiple endocytic pathways although in some cell lines, the coated polyplexes are taken up primarily by caveolae mediated endocytosis. In addition, the CS-coat improves the endosomal escape of the polyplexes as compared to the native polyplexes. Interestingly, during these intracellular events, exogenous CS is retained with the polyplexes until their accumulation near the nucleus. Thus we show for the first time that exogenous GAGs in small amounts improve intracellular routing and nuclear accumulation of arginine-based polyplexes. Therefore, addition of exogenous GAGs is a promising strategy to enhance the transfection efficiency of cationic arginine-rich peptides in multiple cell types.

  5. PRMT1-mediated arginine methylation controls ATXN2L localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaehler, Christian; Guenther, Anika; Uhlich, Anja; Krobitsch, Sylvia

    2015-05-15

    Arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification that is of importance in diverse cellular processes. Recent proteomic mass spectrometry studies reported arginine methylation of ataxin-2-like (ATXN2L), the paralog of ataxin-2, a protein that is implicated in the neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. Here, we investigated the methylation state of ATXN2L and its significance for ATXN2L localization. We first confirmed that ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo, and observed that the nuclear localization of ATXN2L is altered under methylation inhibition. We further discovered that ATXN2L associates with the protein arginine-N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1). Finally, we showed that neither mutation of the arginine–glycine-rich motifs of ATXN2L nor methylation inhibition alters ATXN2L localization to stress granules, suggesting that methylation of ATXN2L is probably not mandatory. - Highlights: • ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo. • ATXN2L interacts with PRMT1 under normal and stress conditions. • PRMT1-mediated dimethylation of ATXN2L controls its nuclear localization. • ATXN2L localization to stress granules appears independent of its methylation state.

  6. Changes in arginine metabolism during sepsis and critical illness in children.

    PubMed

    de Betue, Carlijn T I; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2013-01-01

    Arginine is an important amino acid during disease and healing because of functions in the immune system and as precursor of nitric oxide (NO). In critically ill adults and children, plasma arginine and citrulline concentrations are substantially decreased, indicating an arginine-deficient state. Arginine availability is reduced because of increased arginine disposal in combination with reduced de novo arginine synthesis. The latter is most likely caused by reduced citrulline availability. As a result, NO synthesis may be impaired, which might compromise microcirculation. These metabolic changes seem to be dependent on the severity of inflammation. Arginine or citrulline supplementation in severe inflammation might therefore be beneficial. Possibly, the use of protein-energy-enriched formulas may be a first step to improve arginine availability and NO synthesis. In critically ill children, arginine metabolism and supplementation is however a virtually unexplored field. Since pediatric sepsis is a significant health problem, which differs in epidemiology and pathophysiology from sepsis in adults, and because of the scarcity of data in this population, studies focused on pathophysiological mechanisms and possible interventions in arginine metabolism in pediatric critical illness are warranted.

  7. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production

    PubMed Central

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid in food and pharmaceutical industries. Until now, the main production method of L-arginine in China is the highly polluting keratin acid hydrolysis. The industrial level L-arginine production by microbial fermentation has become an important task. In previous work, we obtained a new L-arginine producing Corynebacterium crenatum (subspecies of Corynebacterium glutamicum) through screening and mutation breeding. In this work, we performed systems pathway engineering of C. crenatum for improved L-arginine production, involving amplification of L-arginine biosynthetic pathway flux by removal of feedback inhibition and overexpression of arginine operon; optimization of NADPH supply by modulation of metabolic flux distribution between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; increasing glucose consumption by strengthening the preexisting glucose transporter and exploitation of new glucose uptake system; channeling excess carbon flux from glycolysis into tricarboxylic acid cycle to alleviate the glucose overflow metabolism; redistribution of carbon flux at α-ketoglutarate metabolic node to channel more flux into L-arginine biosynthetic pathway; minimization of carbon and cofactor loss by attenuation of byproducts formation. The final strain could produce 87.3 g L−1 L-arginine with yield up to 0.431 g L-arginine g−1 glucose in fed-batch fermentation. PMID:27338253

  8. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production.

    PubMed

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang,