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Sample records for additional atherogenic risk

  1. Ezetimibe, cardiovascular risk and atherogenic dyslipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Manfredi; Battista Rini, Giovam

    2011-02-01

    Ezetimibe is a selective cholesterol absorption inhibitor with an excellent side-effect profile, able to reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by 15-25% from baseline in monotherapy and on top of statins and fibrates. Yet, it seems that ezetimibe produces quantitative rather than qualitative changes in LDL, with small net effects on atherogenic dyslipidaemia. This is supported by findings from the Ezetimibe and Simvastatin in Hypercholesterolemia Enhances Atherosclerosis Regression (ENHANCE) study on atherosclerosis progression, where the addition of ezetimibe to simvastatin in patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia did not affect the mean change in carotid intima-media thickness, although a significant reduction in LDL cholesterol levels was observed. The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study has further shown that combination treatment with simvastatin significantly reduced LDL cholesterol levels in patients with aortic stenosis, but did not affect the primary end point of aortic valve and cardiovascular events, although a significant reduction in the risk of ischaemic events was reported. Formal cardiovascular outcome trials are underway and these will provide additional insights into the long-term effects of ezetimibe on clinical events as well as on atherogenic dyslipidaemia, beyond LDL cholesterol levels. PMID:22291726

  2. Atherogenic Risk Assessment among Persons Living in Rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Wekesa, Clara; Asiki, Gershim; Kasamba, Ivan; Waswa, Laban; Reynolds, Steven J; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Newton, Rob; Kamali, Anatoli

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hypertension and dyslipidemia are independent risk factors for coronary heart disease and commonly coexist. Cardiovascular risk can be reliably predicted using lipid ratios such as the atherogenic index, a useful prognostic parameter for guiding timely interventions. Objective. We assessed the cardiovascular risk profile based on the atherogenic index of residents within a rural Ugandan cohort. Methods. In 2011, a population based survey was conducted among 7507 participants. Sociodemographic characteristics, physical measurements (blood pressure, weight, height, and waist and hip circumference), and blood sampling for nonfasting lipid profile were collected for each participant. Atherogenic risk profile, defined as logarithm base ten of (triglyceride divided by high density lipoprotein cholesterol), was categorised as low risk (<0.1), intermediate risk (0.1-0.24), and high risk (>0.24). Results. Fifty-five percent of participants were female and the mean age was 49.9 years (SD ± 20.2). Forty-two percent of participants had high and intermediate atherogenic risk. Persons with hypertension, untreated HIV infection, abnormal glycaemia, and obesity and living in less urbanised villages were more at risk. Conclusion. A significant proportion of persons in this rural population are at risk of atherosclerosis. Key identified populations at risk should be considered for future intervention against cardiovascular related morbidity and mortality. The study however used parameters from unfasted samples that may have a bearing on observed results. PMID:27418933

  3. Atherogenic Risk Assessment among Persons Living in Rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Asiki, Gershim; Kasamba, Ivan; Waswa, Laban; Reynolds, Steven J.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Newton, Rob; Kamali, Anatoli

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hypertension and dyslipidemia are independent risk factors for coronary heart disease and commonly coexist. Cardiovascular risk can be reliably predicted using lipid ratios such as the atherogenic index, a useful prognostic parameter for guiding timely interventions. Objective. We assessed the cardiovascular risk profile based on the atherogenic index of residents within a rural Ugandan cohort. Methods. In 2011, a population based survey was conducted among 7507 participants. Sociodemographic characteristics, physical measurements (blood pressure, weight, height, and waist and hip circumference), and blood sampling for nonfasting lipid profile were collected for each participant. Atherogenic risk profile, defined as logarithm base ten of (triglyceride divided by high density lipoprotein cholesterol), was categorised as low risk (<0.1), intermediate risk (0.1–0.24), and high risk (>0.24). Results. Fifty-five percent of participants were female and the mean age was 49.9 years (SD ± 20.2). Forty-two percent of participants had high and intermediate atherogenic risk. Persons with hypertension, untreated HIV infection, abnormal glycaemia, and obesity and living in less urbanised villages were more at risk. Conclusion. A significant proportion of persons in this rural population are at risk of atherosclerosis. Key identified populations at risk should be considered for future intervention against cardiovascular related morbidity and mortality. The study however used parameters from unfasted samples that may have a bearing on observed results. PMID:27418933

  4. Ramadan fasting: relation to atherogenic risk among obese Muslims.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Saneya A; El-Kemery, Talaat A; Farrag, Khaled A; Badawy, M Reda; Sarkis, Nadia N; Soliman, Fardous S H; Mangoud, Hoda

    2004-01-01

    Increased platelet aggregation as well as changes in coagulation factors have an important effect on the occurrence of atherogenicity and cardiovascular diseases. Fasting in general has been used in medicine for medical purposes when other measures fail. Since Ramadan fasting is different from total fasting, the present work was conducted to study the effect of Ramadan fasting on lipid pattern, some blood coagulation parameters, blood pressure and body mass index (BMI)--as atherosclerotic risk factors--in one hundred and three apparently healthy obese volunteers (15 men and 88 women) aged 15-52 years. The study comprised an initial visit for assessment V1 (before Ramadan) and three other follow up visits: V2 (at the end of Ramadan), V3 (4 weeks after Ramadan) and V4 (8 weeks after Ramadan), Targets were subjected to an interview questionnaire, complete physical and clinical examination, anthropometric measurements, dietary profile, and laboratory assay of complete blood picture (CBC), fasting serum glucose level (FSG), serum lipid pattern: total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high density lipoproteins (HDL-c) and low density lipoprotein (LDL-c), lipoprotein a Lp (a), apolipoprotein A1 (APA), and apolipoprotein B (APB) levels; bleeding (BT) and clotting time (CT), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen and plasma factor VII activity. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi squared, Fisher exact, Student t test, paired t test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Statistical significance was defined at P < 0.05. The study showed that by the end of Ramadan fasting, there was a significant improvement in the mean levels of hemoglobin (Hb), TC, TG, HDL-c, LDL-c, TC/HDL, LDL/HDL, Lp (a), APA, APB, PT and systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) that persisted for four weeks after fasting (P < 0.05). Ramadan fasting has not adversely affected leucocytic count or coagulation parameters (P > 0.05). There was

  5. [Atherogenic dyslipidemia and residual risk. State of the art in 2014].

    PubMed

    Millán Núñez-Cortés, Jesús; Pedro-Botet Montoya, Juan; Pintó Sala, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Pandemics of metabolic síndrome, obesity, and type 2 diabetes is a major challenge for the next years and supported the grat burden of cardiovascular diseases. The R3i (Residual Risk Reduction initiative) has previously highlighted atherogenic dyslipidaemia as an important and modifiable contributor to the lipid related residual cardiovascular risk. Atherogenic dyslipidaemia is defined as an imbalance between proatherogenic triglycerides-rich apoB-containing lipoproteins and antiatherogenic AI containing lipoproteins. To improve clinical management of atherogenic dyslipidaemia a despite of lifestyle intervention includes pharmacological approach, and fibrates is the main option for combination with a statin to further reduce non-HDL cholesterol. PMID:25450326

  6. Pre-diabetes in overweight youth and early atherogenic risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare atherogenic lipoprotein particles and vascular smooth muscle biomarkers in overweight youth with pre-diabetes (PD) vs. normal glucose tolerance (NGT). 144 adolescents (60 black, 84 white; 102 female; PD=45, NGT=99) aged 10-19 years underwent a fasting blood draw and 2-h OGTT. Lipoprotein ...

  7. Reduction of atherogenic risk in patients with type 2 diabetes by curcuminoid extract: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chuengsamarn, Somlak; Rattanamongkolgul, Suthee; Phonrat, Benjaluck; Tungtrongchitr, Rungsunn; Jirawatnotai, Siwanon

    2014-02-01

    Curcumin is a phytocompound found in the root of turmeric, a common herbal ingredient in many Asian cuisines. The compound contains anti-inflammatory activity, which is mediated through an up-regulation of adiponectin and reduction of leptin. Consumption of curcumin was shown to prevent some deteriorative conditions caused by inflammation, such as ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis and esophagitis, and so on. Inflammation-associated cardiovascular conditions such as atherosclerosis are common in diabetes patients. The anti-inflammation effect of curcumin might be beneficial to prevent such condition in these patients. We aim to evaluate an antiatherosclerosis effect of curcumin in diabetes patients. Effects of curcumin on risk factors for atherosclerosis were investigated in a 6-month randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled clinical trial that included subjects diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. An atherosclerosis parameter, the pulse wave velocity, and other metabolic parameters in patients treated with placebo and curcumin were compared. Our results showed that curcumin intervention significantly reduced pulse wave velocity, increased level of serum adiponectin and decreased level of leptin. These results are associated with reduced levels of homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, triglyceride, uric acid, visceral fat and total body fat. In summary, a 6-month curcumin intervention in type 2 diabetic population lowered the atherogenic risks. In addition, the extract helped to improve relevant metabolic profiles in this high-risk population. PMID:24445038

  8. Synergistic effects of prothrombotic polymorphisms and atherogenic factors on the risk of myocardial infarction in young males.

    PubMed

    Inbal, A; Freimark, D; Modan, B; Chetrit, A; Matetzky, S; Rosenberg, N; Dardik, R; Baron, Z; Seligsohn, U

    1999-04-01

    Several recent studies evaluated a possible effect of the prothrombotic polymorphisms such as 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) nt 677C --> T, factor V (F V) nt 1691G --> A (F V Leiden), and factor II (F II) nt 20210 G --> A on the risk of myocardial infarction. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of these prothrombotic polymorphisms, as well as apolipoprotein (Apo) E4, smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia, on the risk of myocardial infarction in young males. We conducted a case-control study of 112 young males with first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) before the age of 52 and 187 healthy controls of similar age. The prevalences of heterozygotes for F V G1691A and F II G20210A were not significantly different between cases and controls (6.3% v 6.4% and 5.9% v 3.4% among cases and controls, respectively). In contrast, the prevalence of MTHFR 677T homozygosity and the allele frequency of Apo E4 were significantly higher among patients (24.1% v 10.7% and 9.4% v 5.3% among cases and controls, respectively). Concomitant presence of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, or diabetes and one or more of the four examined polymorphisms increased the risk by almost ninefold (odds ratio [OR] = 8.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.49 to 21.5) and concomitant smoking by almost 18-fold (OR = 17.6; 95% CI, 6.30 to 48.9). When all atherogenic risk factors were analyzed simultaneously by a logistic model, the combination of prothrombotic and Apo E4 polymorphisms with current smoking increased the risk 25-fold (OR = 24.7; 95% CI, 7.17 to 84.9). The presented data suggest a synergistic effect between atherogenic and thrombogenic risk factors in the pathogenesis of AMI, as was recently found in a similar cohort of women. PMID:10090925

  9. Very low levels of atherogenic lipoproteins and risk of cardiovascular events; a meta-analysis of statin trials

    PubMed Central

    Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Hovingh, G. Kees; Mora, Samia; Arsenault, Benoit J.; Amarenco, Pierre; Pedersen, Terje R.; LaRosa, John C.; Waters, David D.; DeMicco, David A.; Simes, R. John; Keech, Antony C.; Colquhoun, David; Hitman, Graham A.; Betteridge, D. John; Clearfield, Michael B.; Downs, John R.; Colhoun, Helen M.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Ridker, Paul M.; Grundy, Scott M.; Kastelein, John J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate (1) the inter-individual variability of reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) or apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels achieved with statin therapy, (2) the proportion of patients not reaching guideline-recommended lipid levels on high-dose statin therapy, and (3) the association between very low levels of atherogenic lipoproteins achieved with statin therapy and CVD risk. Background Levels of atherogenic lipoproteins achieved with statin therapy are highly variable, but the consequence of this variability for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is not well documented. Methods Meta-analysis of individual patient data from 8 randomized controlled statin trials in which conventional lipids and apolipoproteins were determined in all study participants at baseline and at 1-year follow-up. Results Among 38,153 patients allocated to statin therapy, a total of 6,286 major cardiovascular events occurred in 5,387 study participants during follow-up. There was large inter-individual variability in the reductions of LDL-C, non-HDL-C and apoB achieved with a fixed statin dose. Over 40% of trial participants assigned to high-dose statin therapy did not reach an LDL-C target below 70 mg/dL. Compared to patients who achieved an LDL-C > 175 mg/dL, those who reached an LDL-C 75-100 mg/dL, 50-75 mg/dL and < 50 mg/dL had adjusted hazard ratios for major cardiovascular events of 0.56 (95%CI 0.46-0.67), 0.51 (95%CI 0.42-0,62) and 0.44 (95%CI 0.35-0.55), respectively. Similar associations were observed for non-HDL-C and apoB. Conclusions The reduction of LDL-C, non-HDL-C and apoB levels achieved with statin therapy displays large inter-individual variation. Among trial participants treated with high-dose statin therapy, over 40% do not reach an LDL-C target <70 mg/dL. Patients who achieve very low LDL-C levels have a lower risk of major cardiovascular events than those achieving moderately low levels

  10. Evolution of serum atherogenic risk in liver transplant recipients: Role of lipoproteins and metabolic and inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Chhatrala, Ravi; Siddiqui, M Bilal; Stravitz, R Todd; Driscoll, Carolyn; Sanyal, Arun; Sargeant, Carol; Luketic, Velimir; Sharma, Amit; Sterling, Richard; Matherly, Scott; Puri, Puneet; Siddiqui, M Shadab

    2015-05-01

    Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of long-term mortality in liver transplant recipients (LTRs), the role of recently identified biomarkers of CVD risk in liver transplantation is unknown. We aimed to evaluate an extensive CVD risk profile in LTRs. Markers of CVD risk in 65 LTRs with no known history of diabetes mellitus (DM), dyslipidemia, or ischemic heart disease were compared to age-, sex-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls with no chronic medical disease. LTRs on corticosteroids or those with graft cirrhosis (GC) were excluded. The effect of calcineurin inhibitors on the CVD risk profile was separately analyzed in LTRs receiving either tacrolimus (Tac) or cyclosporine A (CsA). To evaluate the impact of GC, a comparison was made between LTRs with and without GC. Non-DM LTRs were matched to controls with respect to age, sex, and BMI. LTRs had similar serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), and total cholesterol in comparison with BMI-matched controls. Proatherogenic small-dense (sd) LDL-C (33.6 ± 14 versus 25.9 ± 9.9 mg/dL; P < 0.001) and %sdLDL-C (30% ± 10% versus 26.4% ± 9%; P = 0.02) were significantly higher in LTRs. In comparison with controls, LTRs had higher apolipoprotein B (apoB; 98 ± 37 versus 88 ± 24 mg/dL; P < 0.01), very low density lipoprotein-particle concentration (VLDL-P; 7.7 ± 6.7 nmol/L versus 3.2 ± 9.1 nmol/L; P < 0.001), and VLDL size (51.1 ± 6.6 versus 46.5 ± 6.9 nm; P < 0.001). In LTRs, VLDL size and VLDL-P were directly related to serum CsA levels (r = 0.53, P = 0.09, and r = 0.63, P < 0.01, respectively) but not to Tac levels. In comparison with controls, LTRs had significantly lower total serum high-density lipoprotein-particle concentration. In comparison with those with preserved graft function, LTRs with GC had lower levels of serum atherogenic markers

  11. Intake of grape procyanidins during gestation and lactation impairs reverse cholesterol transport and increases atherogenic risk indexes in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Del Bas, Josep Maria; Crescenti, Anna; Arola-Arnal, Anna; Oms-Oliu, Gemma; Arola, Lluís; Caimari, Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most prevalent noncommunicable diseases in humans. Different studies have identified dietary procyanidins as bioactive compounds with beneficial properties against CVD by improving lipid homeostasis, among other mechanisms. The aim of this work was to assess whether grape seed procyanidin consumption at a physiological dose during the perinatal period could influence the CVD risk of the offspring. Wistar rat dams were treated with a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE; 25mg/kg of body weight per day) or vehicle during gestation and lactation. The adult male offspring of GSPE-treated dams presented decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, increased total cholesterol-to-HDL-C ratios and an exacerbated fasting triglyceride-to-HDL-C ratios (atherogenic index of plasma) compared to the control group. Impaired reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) was evidenced by the accumulation of cholesterol in skeletal muscle and by decreased fecal excretion of cholesterol and bile acids, which was consistent with the observed mRNA down-regulation of the rate-limiting enzyme in the hepatic bile acid synthesis pathway Cyp7A1. Conversely, GSPE programming also resulted in up-regulated gene expression of different key components of the RCT process, such as hepatic Npc1, Abcg1, Abca1, Lxra, Srebp2, Lcat, Scarb1 and Pltp, and the repression of microRNA miR-33a expression, a key negative controller of hepatic RCT at the gene expression level. Our results show that maternal intake of grape procyanidins during the perinatal period impacts different components of the RCT process, resulting in increased CVD risk in the adult offspring. PMID:26365577

  12. Atherogenic dyslipidemia and cardiovascular risk in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Alkhouri, Naim; Carter-Kent, Christine; Elias, Michael; Feldstein, Ariel E

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is now regarded as the most common form of chronic liver disease in adults and children. The close association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the metabolic syndrome has been extensively described. Moreover, a growing body of evidence suggest that NAFLD by itself confers a substantial cardiovascular risk independent of the other components of the metabolic syndrome. Given the significant potential for morbidity and mortality in these patients, and the large proportion of both pediatric and adult population affected, it is important that we clearly define the overall risk, identify early predictors for cardiovascular disease progression, and establish management strategies. In this article, we will focus on current data linking NAFLD and the severity of liver damage present in children with cardiovascular risk. PMID:22162978

  13. Remnant cholesterol as a cause of ischemic heart disease: evidence, definition, measurement, atherogenicity, high risk patients, and present and future treatment.

    PubMed

    Varbo, Anette; Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-03-01

    This review focuses on remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD), on its definition, measurement, atherogenicity, and levels in high risk patient groups; in addition, present and future pharmacological approaches to lowering remnant cholesterol levels are considered. Observational studies show association between elevated levels of remnant cholesterol and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even when remnant cholesterol levels are defined, measured, or calculated in different ways. In-vitro and animal studies also support the contention that elevated levels of remnant cholesterol may cause atherosclerosis same way as elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, by cholesterol accumulation in the arterial wall. Genetic studies of variants associated with elevated remnant cholesterol levels show that an increment of 1mmol/L (39mg/dL) in levels of nonfasting remnant cholesterol associates with a 2.8-fold increased risk of IHD, independently of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Results from genetic studies also show that elevated levels of remnant cholesterol are causally associated with both low-grade inflammation and IHD. However, elevated levels of LDL cholesterol are associated with IHD, but not with low-grade inflammation. Such results indicate that elevated LDL cholesterol levels cause atherosclerosis without a major inflammatory component, whereas an inflammatory component of atherosclerosis is driven by elevated remnant cholesterol levels. Post-hoc subgroup analyses of randomized trials using fibrates in individuals with elevated triglyceride levels, elevated remnant cholesterol levels, show a benefit of lowering triglycerides or remnant cholesterol levels; however, large randomized trials with the primary target of lowering remnant cholesterol levels are still missing. PMID:24287311

  14. Advanced Atherogenic Index for the Assessment of Consolidated Lipid Risk in Premature Coronary Artery Disease Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Sanjiv Kumar; Agarwal, Sarita; Daga, Mridul Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The high prevalence, severity, and prematurity of coronary artery disease (CAD) in the Indian population cannot be completely explained by the conventional lipid parameters and the existing lipid indices. Aims and Objectives: To calculate newly defined advanced atherogenic index (AAI) in premature CAD patients and compare it between cases and controls and Correlate its values with the existing indices. Material and Methods: One hundred and twenty premature CAD patients and an equal number of age and sex matched healthy individuals were included in this study. Lipid profile and nonconventional lipid parameters like oxidized Low density lipoprotein (OX LDL), small dense LDL (SD LDL), lipoprotein (a) apolipoprotein B (Apo B), and apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) were estimated and their values were used to define AAI and existing lipid indices like AI, lipid tetrad index (LTI) and lipid pentad index (LPI). Results: The mean age of cases and controls was 37.29 + 4.50 and 36.13 + 3.53 years, respectively. The value of AAI was highly significant in cases (3461.22 ± 45.20) as compared to controls (305.84 ± 21.80). AAI has shown better statistical significance and correlation (P < 0.0001, r = 0.737) as compared to the earlier indices such as AI (P < 0.01, r = 0.52), LTI (P < 0.001, r = 0.677) and LPI (P < 0.001, r = 0.622) in premature CAD. Kolmogorov D statistic and cumulative distribution function plot has shown that AAI can discriminate cases and controls more accurately as compared to the earlier indices. Conclusion: Statistically AAI appears to be a better marker of consolidated lipid risk in premature CAD patients as compared to the earlier indices. PMID:27365915

  15. Blood serum atherogenicity and coronary artery calcification.

    PubMed

    Sobenin, Igor A; Myasoedova, Veronica A; Anisimova, Elena V; Pavlova, Xenia N; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Schmermund, Axel; Seibel, Rainer; Berenbein, Sina; Lehmann, Nils; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, KarlHeinz; Orekhov, Alexander N; Erbel, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of blood serum atherogenicity was described as the ability of human serum to induce lipid accumulation in cultured cells. The results of recent two-year prospective study in asymptomatic men provided the evidence for association between the changes in serum atherogenicity and dynamics of carotid intima-media thickness progression. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that blood serum atherogenicity and its changes in dynamics may be associated with accumulation of coronary calcium in subclinical atherosclerosis. It was performed in 782 CHD-free participants of The Heinz Nixdorf RECALL (Risk Factors, Evaluation of Coronary Calcium and Lifestyle) Study, in whom blood samples have been taken at the baseline and at the end of 5-year follow-up. Opposite to the previous findings, the changes in serum atherogenicity did not correlate neither with the extent of coronary artery calcification, nor with the changes in Agatston CAC score. There was a moderate but significant rise in serum atherogenicity after 5-year followup period, and the same dynamics was observed for Agatston CAC score, but not for convenient lipid-related risk factors. The absence of association of the changes in serum atherogenicity with the changes in Agatston CAC score, along with previous findings, provides a point of view that serum-induced intracellular cholesterol accumulation is not related to the processes of calcium deposition in arterial wall, since the last one reflects the progression of already existing subclinical atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:24533940

  16. The metabolic basis of atherogenic dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I

    2005-01-01

    Atherogenic dyslipidemia is one of the major components of the metabolic syndrome, a complex cluster of several risk factors within a single patient that according to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III includes at least 3 of the following: large waist circumference, elevated triglyceride levels, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), hypertension, and elevated fasting glucose levels, which are directly related to the incidence of coronary heart disease. Atherogenic dyslipidemia clinically presents as elevated serum triglyceride levels, increased levels of small dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL) particles, and decreased levels of HDL-C. An important component of atherogenic dyslipidemia is central obesity, which is defined as increased waist circumference and has recently been identified as a chief predictor of the metabolic syndrome in certain patients. Another recent study found that both body mass index and waist circumference were highly predictive of eventual development of the metabolic syndrome. Because atherogenic dyslipidemia usually precedes the clinical manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, strategies to treat it are the focus of pharmacologic intervention. For example, the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase inhibitors, commonly known as statins, benefit hypercholesterolemic patients who have atherogenic dyslipidemia that is associated with the metabolic syndrome. Pioglitazone, an antidiabetic agent that acts primarily by decreasing insulin resistance, improves sensitivity to insulin in muscle and adipose tissue and inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis. Pioglitazone improves glycemic control while reducing circulating insulin levels. The investigational agent, rimonabant--a centrally and peripherally acting, selective cannabinoid type-1 receptor blocker--is the first therapy developed for managing several cardiovascular risk factors at one time. Rimonabant has shown promise in

  17. Comparison of percentage body fat and body mass index for the prediction of inflammatory and atherogenic lipid risk profiles in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Funghetto, Silvana Schwerz; de Oliveira Silva, Alessandro; de Sousa, Nuno Manuel Frade; Stival, Marina Morato; Tibana, Ramires Alsamir; Pereira, Leonardo Costa; Antunes, Marja Letícia Chaves; de Lima, Luciano Ramos; Prestes, Jonato; Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó; Dutra, Maurílio Tiradentes; Souza, Vinícius Carolino; da Cunha Nascimento, Dahan; de Oliveira Karnikowski, Margô Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical classification of the body mass index (BMI) and percentage body fat (PBF) for the prediction of inflammatory and atherogenic lipid profile risk in older women. Method Cross-sectional analytical study with 277 elderly women from a local community in the Federal District, Brazil. PBF and fat-free mass (FFM) were determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The investigated inflammatory parameters were interleukin 6 and C-reactive protein. Results Twenty-five percent of the elderly women were classified as normal weight, 50% overweight, and 25% obese by the BMI. The obese group had higher levels of triglycerides and very low-density lipoproteins than did the normal weight group (P≤0.05) and lower levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) than did the overweight group (P≤0.05). According to the PBF, 49% of the elderly women were classified as eutrophic, 28% overweight, and 23% obese. In the binomial logistic regression analyses including age, FFM, and lipid profile, only FFM (odds ratio [OR]=0.809, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.739–0.886; P<0.0005) proved to be a predictor of reaching the eutrophic state by the BMI. When the cutoff points of PBF were used for the classification, FFM (OR=0.903, CI=0.884–0.965; P=0.003) and the total cholesterol/HDL ratio (OR=0.113, CI=0.023–0.546; P=0.007) proved to be predictors of reaching the eutrophic state. Conclusion Accurate identification of obesity, systemic inflammation, and atherogenic lipid profile is key to assessing the risk of cardiometabolic diseases. Classification based on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry measures, along with biochemical and inflammatory parameters, seems to have a great clinical importance, since it allows the lipid profile eutrophic distinction in elderly overweight women. PMID:25609936

  18. [Atherogenic dyslipidemia: a multidisciplinary consensus panel].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The dyslipidaemias are conditions that are still under-diagnosed, under-treated, and poorly controlled. This condition is common to the rest of the risk factors considered fundamental. Within the dyslipidaemias, the data that we have available, generally refer to the hypercholesterolaemias or in particular to the dyslipidaemias not dependent on LDL in patients who are already being treated with statins. However, there is only limited data available on atherogenic dyslipidaemia, characterised by the elevation of triglycerides and/or a decrease in HDL-cholesterol. However, given its profile, to determine the particularities of this atherogenic dyslipidaemia could help to control this anomaly more effectively. The present study, conducted in accordance with the Delphi method, has as its purpose to demonstrate the level of agreement or disagreement of an expert group, made up from different scientific societies, on what atherogenic dyslipidaemia is and represents, as well as what is the most suitable diagnostic and therapeutic approach. It has been concluded that the level of knowledge of the epidemiological aspects, its association with cardiovascular risks, of clinical identification, and specific treatment, has reached a significant level of agreement between the experts consulted. However, some aspects have been detected that, even today, are still subject to controversy: the role of isolated hypertriglyceridaemia as a risk factor, and its consideration as a therapeutic objective both in primary and secondary prevention, the effects linked to HDL-cholesterol, and that are strictly associated with the capacity to produce cholesterol efflux, the appropriateness of the therapeutic objectives to individual particularities, as well as the need to employ - frequently - combined treatment to correctly approach the correction of the lipid profile as a whole. PMID:23747118

  19. Relative atherogenicity and predictive value of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well-established atherogenic factor for coronary heart disease, it does not completely represent the risk associated with atherogenic lipoproteins in the presence of high triglyceride (TG) levels. Constituent lipoproteins constituting non–hig...

  20. Refining Breast Cancer Risk Stratification: Additional Genes, Additional Information.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Allison W; Antoniou, Antonis C; Domchek, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic technology have enabled far more rapid, less expensive sequencing of multiple genes than was possible only a few years ago. Advances in bioinformatics also facilitate the interpretation of large amounts of genomic data. New strategies for cancer genetic risk assessment include multiplex sequencing panels of 5 to more than 100 genes (in which rare mutations are often associated with at least two times the average risk of developing breast cancer) and panels of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), combinations of which are generally associated with more modest cancer risks (more than twofold). Although these new multiple-gene panel tests are used in oncology practice, questions remain about the clinical validity and the clinical utility of their results. To translate this increasingly complex genetic information for clinical use, cancer risk prediction tools are under development that consider the joint effects of all susceptibility genes, together with other established breast cancer risk factors. Risk-adapted screening and prevention protocols are underway, with ongoing refinement as genetic knowledge grows. Priority areas for future research include the clinical validity and clinical utility of emerging genetic tests; the accuracy of developing cancer risk prediction models; and the long-term outcomes of risk-adapted screening and prevention protocols, in terms of patients' experiences and survival. PMID:27249685

  1. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  2. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  3. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  4. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  5. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  6. An experimental evaluation of the anti-atherogenic potential of the plant, Piper betle, and its active constitutent, eugenol, in rats fed an atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Venkadeswaran, Karuppasamy; Thomas, Philip A; Geraldine, Pitchairaj

    2016-05-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for systemic atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular disease. Lipoperoxidation-mediated oxidative damage is believed to contribute strongly to the progression of atherogenesis. In the current investigation, putative anti-atherogenic and antioxidative properties of an ethanolic extract of Piper betle and of its active constituent, eugenol, were sought in an experimental animal model of chronic hypercholesterolemia. Atherogenic diet-fed rats that received either Piper betle extract orally (500mg/kg b.wt) or eugenol orally (5mg/kg b.wt) for 15days (commencing 30days after the atherogenic diet had been started) exhibited the following variations in different parameters, when compared to atherogenic diet-fed rats that received only saline: (1) significantly lower mean levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol in both serum and hepatic tissue samples; (2) lower mean serum levels of aspartate amino-transferase, alanine amino-transferase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase and lipid-metabolizing enzymes (lipoprotein lipase, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase; (3) significantly lower mean levels of enzymatic antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase) and non-enzymatic antioxidants (reduced glutathione, vitamin C and vitamin E) and significantly higher mean levels of malondialdehyde in haemolysate and hepatic tissue samples. Histopathological findings suggested a protective effect of the Piper betle extract and a more pronounced protective effect of eugenol on the hepatic and aortic tissues of atherogenic diet-fed (presumed atherosclerotic) rats. These results strongly suggest that the Piper betle extract and its active constituent, eugenol, exhibit anti-atherogenic effects which may be due to their anti-oxidative properties. PMID:27133067

  7. Watermelon consumption improves inflammation and antioxidant capacity in rats fed an atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mee Young; Hartig, Nicole; Kaufman, Katy; Hooshmand, Shirin; Figueroa, Arturo; Kern, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. Watermelon, rich in antioxidants and other bioactive components, may be a viable method to improve CVD risk factors through reduced oxidative stress. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of watermelon powder consumption on lipid profiles, antioxidant capacity, and inflammation in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-treated rats fed an atherogenic diet. We hypothesized that watermelon would increase antioxidant capacity and reduce blood lipids and inflammation through modulation of related gene expression. Forty male-weanling (21 days old) Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (10 per group, total N = 40) in a 2 diets (control or 0.33% watermelon) × 2 treatments (with or without DSS) factorial design using an atherogenic diet. Watermelon-fed groups exhibited significantly lower serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P< .05). C-reactive protein levels were significantly lower in watermelon-fed rats than the control (P= .001). In addition, oxidative stress as measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances was significantly lower in watermelon groups (P= .001). Total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities were greater in watermelon groups (P< .05). Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase were significantly lower in DSS-treated rats when watermelon was consumed (P< .05). Fatty acid synthase, 3-hydroxy-3methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2, and cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression was significantly downregulated in the watermelon group without DSS (P< .05). These findings indicate that watermelon improves risk factors for CVD in rats through better lipid profiles, lower inflammation, and greater antioxidant capacity by altering gene expression for lipid

  8. Pharmacological Targeting of the Atherogenic Dyslipidemia Complex: The Next Frontier in CVD Prevention Beyond Lowering LDL Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Morgantini, Cecilia; Hegele, Robert A; Lewis, Gary F

    2016-07-01

    Notwithstanding the effectiveness of lowering LDL cholesterol, residual CVD risk remains in high-risk populations, including patients with diabetes, likely contributed to by non-LDL lipid abnormalities. In this Perspectives in Diabetes article, we emphasize that changing demographics and lifestyles over the past few decades have resulted in an epidemic of the "atherogenic dyslipidemia complex," the main features of which include hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL cholesterol levels, qualitative changes in LDL particles, accumulation of remnant lipoproteins, and postprandial hyperlipidemia. We briefly review the underlying pathophysiology of this form of dyslipidemia, in particular its association with insulin resistance, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, and the marked atherogenicity of this condition. We explain the failure of existing classes of therapeutic agents such as fibrates, niacin, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors that are known to modify components of the atherogenic dyslipidemia complex. Finally, we discuss targeted repurposing of existing therapies and review promising new therapeutic strategies to modify the atherogenic dyslipidemia complex. We postulate that targeting the central abnormality of the atherogenic dyslipidemia complex, the elevation of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles, represents a new frontier in CVD prevention and is likely to prove the most effective strategy in correcting most aspects of the atherogenic dyslipidemia complex, thereby preventing CVD events. PMID:27329952

  9. Atherogenic dyslipidemia associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Scott M

    2006-01-01

    Atherogenic dyslipidemia, a component of metabolic syndrome, is characterized by high levels of apolipoprotein B (apo B)-containing lipoproteins, including very-low-density lipoprotein remnants and small low-density lipoprotein particles, and reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III includes elevations in blood pressure and plasma glucose in the definition of metabolic syndrome, the broader scope of metabolic syndrome includes proinflammatory and prothrombotic states, which derive from the secretory activity of adipose tissue. Abdominal fat can adversely affect insulin action and the disposal of glucose through an increase in the release of free fatty acid, resulting in accumulation of triglyceride in muscle and liver, thereby depressing insulin action and increasing output of apo B-containing lipoproteins. Impaired regulation of adipokines, bioactive substances secreted from adipose tissue, likely produces systemic inflammation, which can promote atherogenesis. Insulin resistance is recognized as an important metabolic defect linking the components of metabolic syndrome. One molecule that may play an important role in metabolic syndrome to regulate metabolic and vascular pathways is the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma). Studies have established PPAR-gamma deficiency as a cause of lipodystrophy and confirmed its adipogenic role. Patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome should undergo global risk assessment for cardiovascular disease and future cardiovascular events to determine an overall treatment strategy. PMID:16903166

  10. Chemical Mixture Risk Assessment Additivity-Based Approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powerpoint presentation includes additivity-based chemical mixture risk assessment methods. Basic concepts, theory and example calculations are included. Several slides discuss the use of "common adverse outcomes" in analyzing phthalate mixtures.

  11. Atherogenic potentials of some Nigerian meals.

    PubMed

    Eyong, E U; Umoh, I B; Ogu, T I; Edet, E E; Eteng, M U; Igiri, A O

    2007-01-01

    The atherogenic potentials of peeled grated cocoyam (Xanthosoma maffafa scot) "ekpang nkukwo", pounded yam (Discorea spp) with plain soup "afia efere", and plantain porridge (Musa paradisiaca) "iwuk ukom" meals were investigated. The three meals were fed to three different groups of albino rats of Wistar strain for a period of twenty eight days. A fourth group which served as control was feed with normal rat pellet. The mean total plasma cholesterol level in the pounded yam with plain soup fed group was significantly lower [P < 0.05] when compared to the control and peeled grated cocoyam fed groups. The mean total plasma triglyceride (MTPTG) level in the pounded yam with plain soup fed group was significantly lower [P < 0.05] when compared to the control group. However the MTPTG level in the peeled grated cocoyam and plantain porridge fed groups were comparable to control. The mean HDL-cholesterol level in the peeled grated cocoyam and plantain fed groups were comparable control. The mean LDL-cholesterol level in the peeled grated cocoyam and plantain porridge fed groups was significantly lower [P < 0.05] than the control group. The LDL-cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol in the pounded yam with plain soup fed group was significantly lower [P < 0.05] when compared to control. These findings suggest low atherogenic potentials of the pounded yam with plain soup meal compared to the peeled grated cocoyam and plantain porridge meals. PMID:18379612

  12. Atherogenic Index of Plasma (AIP): A marker of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Niroumand, Shabnam; Khajedaluee, Mohammad; Khadem-Rezaiyan, Majid; Abrishami, Maryam; Juya, Mohammadreza; Khodaee, Gholamhasan; Dadgarmoghaddam, Maliheh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the cause of one third of deaths worldwide and this will progress because of increasing CVD's risk factors. The most basic task of dealing with the epidemic of CVD is primary prevention of risk factors. As Atherogenic Index of Plasma (AIP) is a strong marker to predict the risk of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease, we assessed the correlation between AIP and other important factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study was a part of national non-communicable risk factors surveillance system data that has been established since 2004 in Iran. This was done on 1000 people between 2008 and 2010. The study was approved by Ethics Committee of Mashhad University of Medical Science. Chi square, Mann-Whitney U, correlation tests were used in this study. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 11. In all calculations, p <0.05 was considered as statistically significant level. Results: The study population consisted of 500 men and 500 women with mean±SD age 41.9±14.2 years. According to the AIP category, 9.8% (98) were in low risk group, 12.7% (127) were in intermediate risk and 77.5% (775) were in increased risk of CVD. AIP was significantly correlated with waist circumference (r=0.35, p<0.001), BMI (r=0.33, p<0.001) and physical activity (r=-0.09, p<0.01). Conclusion: AIP can be used as a regular monitoring index of CVD in every day practice, especially in persons with other cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26793631

  13. Anti-atherogenic potential of jujube, saffron and barberry: anti-diabetic and antioxidant actions.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Mina; Zohoori, Elham; Mehrpour, Omid; Karamian, Mehdi; Asghari, Somaye; Zarban, Asghar; Nasouti, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Atherogenic dyslipidemia, characterized by an increased level of lipoprotein (a) and a decreased level of adiponectin, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in diabetic patients. To reduce cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients, use of agents with antidiabetic and anti-atherogenic potential is required. Using an animal model of diabetes, we investigated the antiatherogenic potential of extracts of three medicinal plants: jujube, barberry, and saffron. For this, serum level of fasting blood glucose, lipid profile, malondialdehyde, total antioxidant capacity, adiponectin and lipoprotein (a) in diabetic control and extract treated groups were measured. Statistical analysis of measurements showed that serum levels of fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, and VLDL decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in all treated groups. Treatment with all extracts reduced lipid peroxidation and increased antioxidant capacity of the experimental diabetic groups. Serum adiponectin levels increased in all treated groups, whereas lipoprotein (a) levels decreased, most markedly when treated with jujube extract. Jujube, saffron, and barberry extracts are beneficial in ameliorating oxidative stress and atherogenic risk of diabetic rats. This highlights the benefits of further investigating the cardio-protective potential of medicinal plant extracts and evaluating their usefulness as cardio protective agents in clinical practice. PMID:26600752

  14. Low carbohydrate diets improve atherogenic dyslipidemia even in the absence of weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Feinman, Richard D; Volek, Jeff S

    2006-01-01

    Because of its effect on insulin, carbohydrate restriction is one of the obvious dietary choices for weight reduction and diabetes. Such interventions generally lead to higher levels of dietary fat than official recommendations and have long been criticized because of potential effects on cardiovascular risk although many literature reports have shown that they are actually protective even in the absence of weight loss. A recent report of Krauss et al. (AJCN, 2006) separates the effects of weight loss and carbohydrate restriction. They clearly confirm that carbohydrate restriction leads to an improvement in atherogenic lipid states in the absence of weight loss or in the presence of higher saturated fat. In distinction, low fat diets seem to require weight loss for effective improvement in atherogenic dyslipidemia. PMID:16790045

  15. Effect of herbal polyphenols on atherogenic transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Deepak; Shukla, Akshay R; Sikand, Kavleen; Dhawan, Veena

    2005-10-01

    The ancient Indian system of medicine supports the antiatherogenic properties of some herbs. The crosstalk amongst the genes coding for LDLR, LXRalpha, PPARs (alpha,gamma), CD-36 and c-myc may be important in atherogenesis because these genes control lipid metabolism, cytokine production and cellular activity within the arterial wall. Hence, we attempted for the first time to explore whether or not the polyphenols extracted from medicinal herbs had any effect on the transcription of these genes. Normal human mononuclear cells were cultured in the presence of polyphenols (and their HPLC purified sub-fractions) extracted from Green tea (Camellia sinensis), Neem (Azadirachta indica) and Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum). Transcriptional expression of these genes was measured by using RT-PCR and SCION IMAGE analysis software. These polyphenolic extracts were found to have the inherent capacity to inhibit the transcriptional expression of genes having direct involvement in atherogenic process. On the basis of these results, we propose for the first time that HPLC purified polyphenolic fraction IV of Tulsi may have a profound antiatherogenic effect. PMID:16180103

  16. Additional risk of end-of-the-pipe geoengineering technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohle, Martin

    2014-05-01

    qualitatively from the known successes. They do not tackle the initial cause, namely the carbon-dioxide inputs that are too high. This is their additional specific risk. 'The acceptability of geoengineering will be determined as much by social, legal and political issues as by scientific and technical factors', conclude Adam Corner and Nick Pidgeon (2010) when reviewing social and ethical implications of geoengineering the climate. It is to debate in that context that most geoengineering technologies are 'end of the pipe technologies', what involves an additional specific risk. Should these technologies be part of the toolbox to tackle anthropogenic climate change? Adam Corner and Nick Pidgeon 2010, Geoengineering the climate: The social and ethical implications, Environment Vol. 52.

  17. 46 CFR 308.204 - Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance... OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance § 308.204 Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance. Owners or charterers may obtain, on an excess basis, additional war...

  18. 46 CFR 308.204 - Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance... OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance § 308.204 Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance. Owners or charterers may obtain, on an excess basis, additional war...

  19. 46 CFR 308.204 - Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance... OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance § 308.204 Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance. Owners or charterers may obtain, on an excess basis, additional war...

  20. 46 CFR 308.204 - Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance... OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance § 308.204 Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance. Owners or charterers may obtain, on an excess basis, additional war...

  1. 46 CFR 308.204 - Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance... OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance § 308.204 Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance. Owners or charterers may obtain, on an excess basis, additional war...

  2. Atherogenic dyslipidemia in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: therapeutic options beyond statins

    PubMed Central

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Fisman, Enrique Z; Motro, Michael; Adler, Yehuda

    2006-01-01

    Lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) is clearly efficacious in the treatment and prevention of coronary artery disease. However, despite increasing use of statins, a significant number of coronary events still occur and many of such events take place in patients presenting with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. More and more attention is being paid now to combined atherogenic dyslipidemia which typically presents in patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This mixed dyslipidemia (or "lipid quartet"): hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, a preponderance of small, dense low-density lipoprotein particles and an accumulation of cholesterol-rich remnant particles (e.g. high levels of apolipoprotein B) – emerged as the greatest "competitor" of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol among lipid risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Most recent extensions of the fibrates trials (BIP – Bezafibrate Infarction Prevention study, HHS – Helsinki Heart Study, VAHIT – Veterans Affairs High-density lipoprotein cholesterol Intervention Trial and FIELD – Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes) give further support to the hypothesis that patients with insulin-resistant syndromes such as diabetes and/or metabolic syndrome might be the ones to derive the most benefit from therapy with fibrates. However, different fibrates may have a somewhat different spectrum of effects. Other lipid-modifying strategies included using of niacin, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants and cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibition. In addition, bezafibrate as pan-peroxisome proliferator activated receptor activator has clearly demonstrated beneficial pleiotropic effects related to glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Because fibrates, niacin, ezetimibe and statins each regulate serum lipids by different mechanisms, combination therapy

  3. [Consensus for pharmacologic treatment of atherogenic dyslipidemia with statin-fenofibrate combined therapy].

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    LDLc levels are associated with increase of cardiovascular risk, and statins are currently used for their control. Nevertheless, a despite of LDLc levels at goal, a residual risk is persistent, commonly associated with persistent lipids modifications (high triglycerides and low HDLc). So, it is necessary to evaluate triglycerides and HDL to assessment cardiovascular risk. Clinical data are consistent with efficacy and safety of combination therapy with statin and other lipid lowering drugs, for instance fenofibrate. Patients with hipertriglyceridemia and low HDLc are the group with most potential improve. In that patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia, the target for therapeutic objectives related with non-HDL-cholesterol is a priority, because non-HDL-cholesterol is considered as a more accuracy measure to assessment cardiovascular risk. PMID:26811267

  4. Residual macrovascular risk in 2013: what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease poses a major challenge for the 21st century, exacerbated by the pandemics of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. While best standards of care, including high-dose statins, can ameliorate the risk of vascular complications, patients remain at high risk of cardiovascular events. The Residual Risk Reduction Initiative (R3i) has previously highlighted atherogenic dyslipidaemia, defined as the imbalance between proatherogenic triglyceride-rich apolipoprotein B-containing-lipoproteins and antiatherogenic apolipoprotein A-I-lipoproteins (as in high-density lipoprotein, HDL), as an important modifiable contributor to lipid-related residual cardiovascular risk, especially in insulin-resistant conditions. As part of its mission to improve awareness and clinical management of atherogenic dyslipidaemia, the R3i has identified three key priorities for action: i) to improve recognition of atherogenic dyslipidaemia in patients at high cardiometabolic risk with or without diabetes; ii) to improve implementation and adherence to guideline-based therapies; and iii) to improve therapeutic strategies for managing atherogenic dyslipidaemia. The R3i believes that monitoring of non-HDL cholesterol provides a simple, practical tool for treatment decisions regarding the management of lipid-related residual cardiovascular risk. Addition of a fibrate, niacin (North and South America), omega-3 fatty acids or ezetimibe are all options for combination with a statin to further reduce non-HDL cholesterol, although lacking in hard evidence for cardiovascular outcome benefits. Several emerging treatments may offer promise. These include the next generation peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα agonists, cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors and monoclonal antibody therapy targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. However, long-term outcomes and safety data are clearly needed. In conclusion, the R3i believes that ongoing trials with

  5. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  6. Atherogenic phospholipids attenuate osteogenic signaling by BMP-2 and parathyroid hormone in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Michael S; Morony, Sean; Lu, Jinxiu; Zhang, Zina; Bezouglaia, Olga; Tseng, Wendy; Tetradis, Sotirios; Demer, Linda L; Tintut, Yin

    2007-07-20

    Cardiovascular disease, such as atherosclerosis, has been associated with reduced bone mineral density and fracture risk. A major etiologic factor in atherogenesis is believed to be oxidized phospholipids. We previously found that these phospholipids inhibit spontaneous osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells, suggesting that they may account for the clinical link between atherosclerosis and osteoporosis. Currently, anabolic agents that promote bone formation are increasingly used as a new treatment for osteoporosis. It is not known, however, whether atherogenic phospholipids alter the effects of bone anabolic agents, such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Therefore we investigated the effects of oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (ox-PAPC) on osteogenic signaling induced by BMP-2 and PTH in MC3T3-E1 cells. Results showed that ox-PAPC attenuated BMP-2 induction of osteogenic markers alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Ox-PAPC also inhibited both spontaneous and BMP-induced expression of PTH receptor. Consistently, pretreatment of cells with ox-PAPC inhibited PTH-induced cAMP production and expression of immediate early genes Nurr1 and IL-6. Results from immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses showed that inhibitory effects of ox-PAPC on BMP-2 signaling were associated with inhibition of SMAD 1/5/8 but not p38-MAPK activation. These effects appear to be due to ox-PAPC activation of the ERK pathway, as the ERK inhibitor PD98059 reversed ox-PAPC inhibitory effects on BMP-2-induced alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin expression, and SMAD activation. These results suggest that atherogenic lipids inhibit osteogenic signaling induced by BMP-2 and PTH, raising the possibility that hyperlipidemia and atherogenic phospholipids may interfere with anabolic therapy. PMID:17522049

  7. Use of additive dentistry decreases risk by minimizing reduction.

    PubMed

    Palmer, K Michael

    2012-05-01

    This case required enhancement of esthetics and reduction of long-term risk of pathologic tooth wear and decay, as well as minimizing erosion caused by innate and environmental influences. The author weighed patient expectations, diet, treatment of teeth, and age to create a treatment plan that would conserve tooth structure while accomplishing the goals of the case. The patient's dentition was restored utilizing intact enamel, adhesive dentistry, and etchable ceramic materials that require less than 1 mm of occlusal reduction without a significant loss of strength. In this case, opening the vertical dimension of occlusion--which was done to increase the height of both the maxillary and mandibular arches, in keeping with the patient's esthetic desires--eliminated the need to remove excessive amounts of healthy tooth structure and facilitated treatment of the occlusal dysfunction. PMID:22616217

  8. Differential Effects of Continuous and Interval Exercise Training on the Atherogenic Index of Plasma in the Non-Obese Young Male

    PubMed Central

    Ezeukwu, Antoninus O; Agwubike, Elias O; Uadia, Patrick O

    2015-01-01

    Background The process of atherogenicity is known to be influenced by exercise. However, appropriate exercise stimulus necessary to generate the response and adaptation in sedentary non-obese individuals has not yet been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of an 8-week continuous training and corresponding interval training on the atherogenic index of plasma in sedentary Nigerian males. Methods Overall, there were 54 male university students that participated in our study, which used a pretest- posttest control group design. Participants (18 males per group) were assigned into continuous, interval and control groups respectively. During the first two weeks, training was done 3 times weekly for 30 minutes each day, and was increased by 5 minutes every 2 weeks. Continuous training was done at 70-84% of heart rate reserve. Interval training was done at 70-84%/30-39% heart rate reserve in 1:2 minutes work/rest intervals, respectively. The control group did not participate in the training. Data collected were analysed using descriptive, paired t-test, analysis of covariance and Bonferroni post-hoc analysis. Results Young sedentary non-obese males were at high risk (atherogenic index of plasma > 0.24) of cardiovascular diseases/conditions. However, continuous training led to significant reductions (p = 0.002) in the atherogenic index of plasma. In contrast, non-significant increase (p = 0.084) followed interval training. After controlling for baseline values, only continuous training still had significant effects on atherogenic index of plasma when compared with other groups. Conclusions Continuous training of vigorous intensity is better than a corresponding interval training protocol as a natural anti-atherogenic method of reducing risk of cardiovascular event in sedentary non-obese males. PMID:27122890

  9. Total serum cholesterol, atherogenic indices and their longitudinal association with depressive symptoms among US adults

    PubMed Central

    Beydoun, M A; Beydoun, H A; Dore, G A; Fanelli-Kuczmarski, M T; Evans, M K; Zonderman, A B

    2015-01-01

    Serum cholesterol, both total and lipoprotein fractions, has been associated with mid- and late-life depression. Using longitudinal data on a large and ethnically diverse sample of urban adults, the associations of serum lipid profile measured by high or low total cholesterol (TC; >200 mg dl−1; <160 mg dl−1) and by atherogenic indices, namely high total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol relative to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, with change in total and domain-specific depressive symptoms over time were examined. Findings were compared by sex. (Hypothesis 1) In addition, baseline depressive symptoms as predictors for longitudinal change in lipid profile trajectory were tested. (Hypothesis 2) Mixed-effects regression analyses stratified by sex was used. Sample sizes of participants (n) and repeated observations (n') were: Hypothesis 1 (Men: n=826 ; n'=1319; Women: n=1099 ; n'=1817); Hypothesis 2 (Men: n=738; n'=1230; Women: n=964; n'=1678). As hypothesized, a higher level of atherogenic indices was linked to faster increase in depressive symptom scores, particularly depressed affect and interpersonal problems, though this relationship was found only among women. Among men a U-shaped relationship between baseline TC and longitudinal increase in somatic complaints and a direct link between low TC and longitudinal putative improvement in positive affect was found. On excluding statin users among women, low TC was associated with slower increase in depressed affect over time, whereas high TC was associated with faster increase in interpersonal problems. In summary, atherogenic indices were directly linked to faster increase in depressive symptoms among women only. More studies are needed to explain these sex-specific associations. PMID:25734511

  10. In silico design of anti-atherogenic biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Daniel R.; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Tomasini, Michael D.; Abdelhamid, Dalia; Petersen, Latrisha K.; Welsh, William J.; Uhrich, Kathryn E.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2013-01-01

    Atherogenesis, the uncontrolled deposition of modified lipoproteins in inflamed arteries, serves as a focal trigger of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Polymeric biomaterials have been envisioned to counteract atherogenesis based on their ability to repress scavenger mediated uptake of oxidized lipoprotein (oxLDL) in macrophages. Following the conceptualization in our laboratories of a new library of amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs), assembled from sugar backbones, aliphatic chains and poly(-ethylene glycol) tails, a more rational approach is necessary to parse the diverse features such as charge, hydrophobicity, sugar composition and stereochemistry. In this study, we advance a computational biomaterials design approach to screen and elucidate anti-atherogenic biomaterials with high efficacy. AMs were quantified in terms of not only 1D (molecular formula) and 2D (molecular connectivity) descriptors, but also new 3D (molecular geometry) descriptors of AMs modeled by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) followed by all-atom MD simulations. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for anti-atherogenic activity were then constructed by screening a total of 1164 descriptors against the corresponding, experimentally measured potency of AM inhibition of oxLDL uptake in human monocyte-derived macrophages. Five key descriptors were identified to provide a strong linear correlation between the predicted and observed anti-atherogenic activity values, and were then used to correctly forecast the efficacy of three newly designed AMs. Thus, a new ligand-based drug design framework was successfully adapted to computationally screen and design biomaterials with cardiovascular therapeutic properties. PMID:23891521

  11. Silicon dioxide nanoparticles increase macrophage atherogenicity: Stimulation of cellular cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and triglycerides accumulation.

    PubMed

    Petrick, Lauren; Rosenblat, Mira; Paland, Nicole; Aviram, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticle research has focused on their toxicity in general, while increasing evidence points to additional specific adverse effects on atherosclerosis development. Arterial macrophage cholesterol and triglyceride (TG) accumulation and foam cell formation are the hallmark of early atherogenesis, leading to cardiovascular events. To investigate the in vitro atherogenic effects of silicon dioxide (SiO2 ), J774.1 cultured macrophages (murine cell line) were incubated with SiO2 nanoparticle (SP, d = 12 nm, 0-20 µg/mL), followed by cellular cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, TG and cholesterol metabolism analyses. A significant dose-dependent increase in oxidative stress (up to 164%), in cytotoxicity (up to 390% measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release), and in TG content (up to 63%) was observed in SiO2 exposed macrophages compared with control cells. A smaller increase in macrophage cholesterol mass (up to 22%) was noted. TG accumulation in macrophages was not due to a decrease in TG cell secretion or to an increased TG biosynthesis rate, but was the result of attenuated TG hydrolysis secondary to decreased lipase activity and both adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) protein expression (by 42 and 25%, respectively). Overall, SPs showed pro-atherogenic effects on macrophages as observed by cytotoxicity, increased oxidative stress and TG accumulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 713-723, 2016. PMID:25448404

  12. 42 CFR 417.442 - Risk HMO's and CMP's: Conditions for provision of additional benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Risk HMO's and CMP's: Conditions for provision of... Medicare Contract § 417.442 Risk HMO's and CMP's: Conditions for provision of additional benefits. (a) General rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a risk HMO or CMP must, during...

  13. 42 CFR 417.442 - Risk HMO's and CMP's: Conditions for provision of additional benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Risk HMO's and CMP's: Conditions for provision of... Medicare Contract § 417.442 Risk HMO's and CMP's: Conditions for provision of additional benefits. (a) General rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a risk HMO or CMP must, during...

  14. Aortic drug delivery of dexamethasone palmitate incorporated into lipid microspheres and its antiatherosclerotic effect in atherogenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio; Tauchi, Yoshihiko; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2005-08-01

    In order to confirm the efficacy of dexamethasone (DXM) palmitate incorporated into lipid microspheres (d-lipo) on atherosclerosis, the aortic drug delivery by d-lipo and its antiatherosclerotic effect were investigated. In an in vitro uptake experiment, d-lipo or DXM was added to macrophages and foam cells, and then incubated for 1, 4, 8 and 24 h at 37 degrees C. The uptake of drug by these cells after addition of d-lipo was higher than that of DXM at each time point. In an in vitro pharmacological experiment, the macrophages and foam cells were incubated with d-lipo or DXM for 24 h at 37 degrees C. The inhibitory effect of d-lipo on cellular cholesterol ester (CE) accumulation in these cells was significantly more potent than that of DXM. In an in vivo pharmacokinetic experiment, d-lipo or DXM was intravenously administered to atherogenic mice, and then aorta was collected at 1, 8, and 24 h after administration. The aortic drug concentration after administration of d-lipo to atherogenic mice was higher than that of DXM at each time point. In an in vivo pharmacological experiment, d-lipo or DXM was intravenously administered to atherogenic mice once a week for 7 weeks. The inhibitory effect of d-lipo on the aortic CE accumulation in atherogenic mice was significantly more potent than that of DXM. These findings suggest that efficient drug delivery to the atherosclerotic lesions by d-lipo produces an excellent antiatherosclerotic effect at a lower dose. Therefore, d-lipo may be useful for the development of drug delivery systems for atherosclerotic therapy. PMID:16308209

  15. Public risk perception of food additives and food scares. The case in Suzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linhai; Zhong, Yingqi; Shan, Lijie; Qin, Wei

    2013-11-01

    This study examined the factors affecting public risk perception of food additive safety and possible resulting food scares using a survey conducted in Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China. The model was proposed based on literature relating to the role of risk perception and information perception of public purchase intention under food scares. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used for data analysis. The results showed that attitude towards behavior, subjective norm and information perception exerted moderate to high effect on food scares, and the effects were also mediated by risk perceptions of additive safety. Significant covariance was observed between attitudes toward behavior, subjective norm and information perception. Establishing an effective mechanism of food safety risk communication, releasing information of government supervision on food safety in a timely manner, curbing misleading media reports on public food safety risk, and enhancing public knowledge of the food additives are key to the development and implementation of food safety risk management policies by the Chinese government. PMID:23831014

  16. Atherogenic diets exacerbate colitis in mice deficient in glutathione peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Esworthy, R. Steven; Kim, Byung-Wook; Synold, Timothy W.; Smith, David D.; Chu, Fong-Fong

    2010-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory effect of high-fat diet has been observed beyond the cardiovascular system, but there is little evidence to support its role in triggering inflammatory bowel disease. GPx1/2-double knockout (DKO) mice deficient in two intracellular glutathione peroxidases, GPx1 and GPx2, on a C57BL/6 (B6) background, have mild ileocolitis on a conventional chow. We fed B6 DKO mice two atherogenic diets to test the dietary effect on atherosclerosis and ileocolitis. Both atherogenic diets have high cholesterol, the Chol+/CA diet has cholic acid (CA) and the Chol+ diet has no CA. The Chol+/CA diet induced severe colitis, but not ileitis, in the DKO mice compared with Chol+ and a Chol- control diet. On the Chol+/CA diet, the wild-type (WT) mice had similar levels of aortic lesions and hypercholesterolemia as DKO mice did, but had no intestinal pathology. The diet-associated inflammatory responses in the DKO mice included increase of colonic pro-inflammatory serum amyloid A 3 expression, plasma lipopolysaccharide and TNF-α levels. The Chol+/CA diet has lowered the expression of unfolded protein response genes, ATF6, CHOP, unspliced XbpU and Grp78/Bip, in WT and DKO mice on the Chol- diet. Thus, we conclude that cholesterol diet weakens colon unfolded protein response, which can aggravate spontaneous colitis leading to gut barrier breakdown. GPx has no impact on atherosclerosis without ultra-hypercholesterolemia. PMID:20848490

  17. Fine-mapping in the MHC region accounts for 18% additional genetic risk for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pulit, Sara L.; Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2015-01-01

    Although dietary gluten is the trigger, celiac disease risk is strongly influenced by genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We fine-mapped the MHC association signal to identify additional risk factors independent of the HLA-DQ alleles and observed five novel associations that account for 18% of the genetic risk. Together with the 57 known non-MHC loci, genetic variation can now explain up to 48% of celiac disease heritability. PMID:25894500

  18. [The new atherogenic plasma index reflects the triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol ratio, the lipoprotein particle size and the cholesterol esterification rate: changes during lipanor therapy].

    PubMed

    Dobiásová, M; Frohlich, J

    2000-03-01

    The new atherogenic plasma index (AIP) is a logarithmic transformation of the ratio of the molar triglyceride (TG) concentration and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). AIP correlates closely with the size of LDL particles (r = 0.8) and esterification rate of plasma cholesterol devoid of apo B lipoproteins (FERHDL), r = 0.9 which are considered at present the most sensitive indicators of the atherogenic plasma profile. AIP was recommended by the authors, based on analysis of results of 11 previous studies (1156 subjects) where FERHDL and plasma lipid parameters were investigated in different groups of people who differed as to the atherogenic risk. The AIP index was moreover used for evaluation of a clinical study comprising 609 patients with hyperlipidaemia, who were treated for three months with ciprofibrate (Lipanor). The mean AIP values of non-risk groups (plasma from umbilical blood, children, healthy women etc.) equalled zero or were lower, while with an increasing atherogenic risk (men, women after the menopause) AIP reached positive values, incl. high positive values in risk groups (plasma of diabetic subjects, patients with HLP, patients with positive angiography, myocardial infarction etc.). In all groups women had lower AIP values as compared with males. In patients after Lipanor therapy the AIP declined (from 0.58 +/- 0.17 to 0.33_0.18 in men, from 0.50 +/- 0.18 to 0.21 +/- 0.19 in women). If we consider AIP values from negative ones to 0.15 as "safe" from the aspect of atherogenicity, before Lipanor treatment these "safe" levels were recorded in 1.5% men and in 5.2% women and after treatment in 32% men and 48% women. The results indicate, that AIP which reflects the plasma lipoprotein profile quantifies the relations between TG and HDL-C and thus can be an objective indicator of the atherogenic risk and effectiveness of treatment and it is useful because it can be assessed in any surgery. PMID:11048517

  19. Are major behavioral and sociodemographic risk factors for mortality additive or multiplicative in their effects?

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neil; Preston, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    All individuals are subject to multiple risk factors for mortality. In this paper, we consider the nature of interactions between certain major sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors associated with all-cause mortality in the United States. We develop the formal logic pertaining to two forms of interaction between risk factors, additive and multiplicative relations. We then consider the general circumstances in which additive or multiplicative relations might be expected. We argue that expectations about interactions among socio-demographic variables, and their relation to behavioral variables, have been stated in terms of additivity. However, the statistical models typically used to estimate the relation between risk factors and mortality assume that risk factors act multiplicatively. We examine empirically the nature of interactions among five major risk factors associated with all-cause mortality: smoking, obesity, race, sex, and educational attainment. Data were drawn from the cross-sectional NHANES III (1988-1994) and NHANES 1999-2010 surveys, linked to death records through December 31, 2011. Our analytic sample comprised 35,604 respondents and 5369 deaths. We find that obesity is additive with each of the remaining four variables. We speculate that its additivity is a reflection of the fact that obese status is generally achieved later in life. For all pairings of socio-demographic variables, risks are multiplicative. For survival chances, it is much more dangerous to be poorly educated if you are black or if you are male. And it is much riskier to be a male if you are black. These traits, established at birth or during childhood, literally result in deadly combinations. We conclude that the identification of interactions among risk factors can cast valuable light on the nature of the process being studied. It also has public health implications by identifying especially vulnerable groups and by properly identifying the proportion of deaths

  20. "The Dose Makes the Poison": Informing Consumers About the Scientific Risk Assessment of Food Additives.

    PubMed

    Bearth, Angela; Cousin, Marie-Eve; Siegrist, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intensive risk assessment is required before the approval of food additives. During this process, based on the toxicological principle of "the dose makes the poison,ˮ maximum usage doses are assessed. However, most consumers are not aware of these efforts to ensure the safety of food additives and are therefore sceptical, even though food additives bring certain benefits to consumers. This study investigated the effect of a short video, which explains the scientific risk assessment and regulation of food additives, on consumers' perceptions and acceptance of food additives. The primary goal of this study was to inform consumers and enable them to construct their own risk-benefit assessment and make informed decisions about food additives. The secondary goal was to investigate whether people have different perceptions of food additives of artificial (i.e., aspartame) or natural origin (i.e., steviolglycoside). To attain these research goals, an online experiment was conducted on 185 Swiss consumers. Participants were randomly assigned to either the experimental group, which was shown a video about the scientific risk assessment of food additives, or the control group, which was shown a video about a topic irrelevant to the study. After watching the video, the respondents knew significantly more, expressed more positive thoughts and feelings, had less risk perception, and more acceptance than prior to watching the video. Thus, it appears that informing consumers about complex food safety topics, such as the scientific risk assessment of food additives, is possible, and using a carefully developed information video is a successful strategy for informing consumers. PMID:25951078

  1. Effect of Ezetimibe on LDL-C Lowering and Atherogenic Lipoprotein Profiles in Type 2 Diabetic Patients Poorly Controlled by Statins

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kentaro; Kawamura, Mitsunobu; Kohro, Takahide; Omura, Masao; Watanabe, Takayuki; Ashidate, Keiko; Horiuchi, Toshiyuki; Hara, Hidehiko; Sekine, Nobuo; Chin, Rina; Tsujino, Motoyoshi; Hiyoshi, Toru; Tagami, Motoki; Tanaka, Akira; Mori, Yasumichi; Inazawa, Takeshi; Hirano, Tsutomu; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Shiba, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Background There exists a subpopulation of T2DM in whom first-line doses of statin are insufficient for optimally reducing LDL-C, representing a major risk of CVD. The RESEARCH study focuses on LDL-C reduction in this population along with modifications of the lipid profiles leading to residual risks. Methods Lipid changes were assessed in a randomized, multicenter, 12-week, open-label study comparing a high-potency statin (10mg of atorvastatin or 1mg of pitavastatin) plus ezetimibe (EAT: n = 53) with a double dose of statin (20mg of atorvastatin or 2mg of pitavastatin) (DST: n = 56) in DM subjects who had failed to achieve the optimal LDL-C targets. Lipid variables were compared with a primary focus on LDL-C and with secondary focuses on the percentage of patients who reached the LDL-C targets and changes in the levels of RLP-C (remnant like particle cholesterol) and sd-LDL-C, two characteristic atherogenic risks of DM. Results The reduction of LDL-C (%), the primary endpoint, differed significantly between the two groups (-24.6 in EAT vs. -10.9 in DST). In the analyses of the secondary endpoints, EAT treatment brought about significantly larger reductions in sd-LDL-C (-20.5 vs. -3.7) and RLP-C (-19.7 vs. +5.5). In total, 89.4% of the patients receiving EAT reached the optimized treatment goal compared to 51.0% of the patients receiving DST. The changes in TC (-16.3 vs. -6.3) and non-HDL-C (-20.7 vs. -8.3) differed significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Ezetimibe added to high-potency statin (10 mg of atorvastatin or 1 mg of pitavastatin) was more effective than the intensified-dose statin (20 mg of atorvastatin or 2 mg of pitavastatin) treatment not only in helping T2DM patients attain more LDL-C reduction, but also in improving their atherogenic lipid profiles, including their levels of sd-LDL-C and RLP-C. We thus recommend the addition of ezetimibe to high-potency statin as a first line strategy for T2DM patients with insufficient statin response

  2. Effects of freeze-dried cranberry powder on serum lipids and inflammatory markers in lipopolysaccharide treated rats fed an atherogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Joung; Ohn, Jeong; Kim, Jung Hee

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of freeze-dried cranberry powder on anti-inflammation and lipid profiles of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated rats fed an atherogenic diet for 6 weeks. Forty Sprague-Dawley male rats (6-weeks-old) were equally divided into the following five groups: 1) normal diet group + saline (NC); 2) atherogenic diet + saline (HFC); 3) atherogenic diet + LPS (HL); 4) atherogenic diet with 5% cranberry power + LPS (C5); 5) atherogenic diet with 10% cranberry power + LPS (C10). LPS (0.5 mg/kg) was injected into the abdominal cavities of rats 18 hours prior to sacrifice. At the end of the experimental period, we measured serum lipid profiles as well as levels of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), nitric oxide (NO), and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 as an anti-inflammatory cytokine. The mean serum high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol level in C5 rats was significantly higher than that in NC and HL rats (P < 0.05). The mean serum levels of CRP and IL-1β were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the cranberry powder groups compared to those in HL rats. Additionally, mean serum IL-6 levels tended to be lower in the cranberry groups than that in the HL group, whereas serum IL-10 and NO showed 29% and 88% higher mean values in the C5 group and 49% and 24% higher in the C10 group than those in the HL group, respectively. These results suggest that freeze-dried cranberry powder may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases by modifying serum lipids and the early inflammatory response. PMID:22125677

  3. Association between ideal cardiovascular health and the atherogenic index of plasma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shiwei; Lu, Yun; Qi, Huajin; Li, Feng; Shen, Zhenhai; Wu, Liuxin; Yang, Chengjian; Wang, Ling; Shui, Kedong; Wang, Yaping; Qiang, Dongchang; Yun, Jingting; Weng, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    The American Heart Association aims to improve cardiovascular health by encouraging the general population to meet 7 cardiovascular health behaviors and factors. The atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) is an important index. Our aim is to evaluate the relationship between ideal cardiovascular health and the atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) in middle-aged Chinese men.A cross-sectional study was performed. A total of 27,824 middle-aged Chinese men were enrolled. The association between ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors and AIP was determined. The 7 cardiovascular health metrics were scored as follows: 0, poor; 1, general; and 2, ideal. The cardiovascular health status was classified according to the total score, as follows: 0 to 4, inadequate; 5 to 9, average; and 10 to 14, optimum. Analyses assessed the prevalence of 7 cardiovascular health metrics, its association with AIP. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs), adjusting for age.All 7 cardiovascular health metrics were shown to correlate with AIP (all P values < 0.05), and the strongest correlation existed between body mass and AIP, followed by total cholesterol and AIP. The mean AIP level increased with the decrease in the score of each of the 7 cardiovascular health metrics (all P values < 0.05). The subjects with poor cardiovascular health status had a 4.982-fold increase in the high risk of developing atherosclerosis, whereas a 1-point increase in the cardiovascular health score resulted a 0.046 reduction in AIP and a 22.3% reduction in the high-risk of developing atherosclerosis (OR = 0.777, 95% CI: 0.768-0.787).The ideal cardiovascular health score correlated significantly with AIP, and a 1-point increase in the cardiovascular health score led to a 0.046 reduction in AIP and a 22.3% reduction in the high risk of developing atherosclerosis. These validated the value of ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors in the prediction of high risk of

  4. Association between ideal cardiovascular health and the atherogenic index of plasma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shiwei; Lu, Yun; Qi, Huajin; Li, Feng; Shen, Zhenhai; Wu, Liuxin; Yang, Chengjian; Wang, Ling; Shui, Kedong; Wang, Yaping; Qiang, Dongchang; Yun, Jingting; Weng, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The American Heart Association aims to improve cardiovascular health by encouraging the general population to meet 7 cardiovascular health behaviors and factors. The atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) is an important index. Our aim is to evaluate the relationship between ideal cardiovascular health and the atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) in middle-aged Chinese men. A cross-sectional study was performed. A total of 27,824 middle-aged Chinese men were enrolled. The association between ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors and AIP was determined. The 7 cardiovascular health metrics were scored as follows: 0, poor; 1, general; and 2, ideal. The cardiovascular health status was classified according to the total score, as follows: 0 to 4, inadequate; 5 to 9, average; and 10 to 14, optimum. Analyses assessed the prevalence of 7 cardiovascular health metrics, its association with AIP. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs), adjusting for age. All 7 cardiovascular health metrics were shown to correlate with AIP (all P values < 0.05), and the strongest correlation existed between body mass and AIP, followed by total cholesterol and AIP. The mean AIP level increased with the decrease in the score of each of the 7 cardiovascular health metrics (all P values < 0.05). The subjects with poor cardiovascular health status had a 4.982-fold increase in the high risk of developing atherosclerosis, whereas a 1-point increase in the cardiovascular health score resulted a 0.046 reduction in AIP and a 22.3% reduction in the high-risk of developing atherosclerosis (OR = 0.777, 95% CI: 0.768–0.787). The ideal cardiovascular health score correlated significantly with AIP, and a 1-point increase in the cardiovascular health score led to a 0.046 reduction in AIP and a 22.3% reduction in the high risk of developing atherosclerosis. These validated the value of ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors in the prediction of high

  5. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Deutsch, Aaron J.; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E.; Tsoi, Lam C.; Van Heel, David A.; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M.; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer strong risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen binding repertoires between a heterozygote’s two expressed HLA variants may result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Ncases=5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D, Ncases=5,567), psoriasis vulgaris (Ncases=3,089), idiopathic achalasia (Ncases=727), and celiac disease (Ncases=11,115). In four out of five diseases, we observed highly significant non-additive dominance effects (RA: P=2.5×1012; T1D: P=2.4×10−10; psoriasis: P=5.9×10−6; celiac disease: P=1.2×10−87). In three of these diseases, the dominance effects were explained by interactions between specific classical HLA alleles (RA: P=1.8×10−3; T1D: P=8.6×1027; celiac disease: P=6.0×10−100). These interactions generally increased disease risk and explained moderate but significant fractions of phenotypic variance (RA: 1.4%, T1D: 4.0%, and celiac disease: 4.1%, beyond a simple additive model). PMID:26258845

  6. Effect of chronic treatment with the vasopeptidase inhibitor AVE 7688 and ramipril on endothelial function in atherogenic diet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Weckler, Nadine; Leitzbach, Daniela; Kalinowski, Leszek; Malinski, Tadeusz; Busch, Andreas E; Linz, Wolfgang; Kalinowski, Ludmila

    2003-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in Western nations, although improved possibilities regarding diagnosis and therapy now exist. Endothelial dysfunction is triggered by cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, adiposity and smoking, contributing to the common endpoint of atherosclerosis. This study examined the pharmacological effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and combined ACE-neutral endopeptidase (NEP) (vasopeptidase) inhibitors on endothelial dysfunction in the model of hyperlipidaemic rabbits. The focus of the study was to assess endothelial function after treatment with the ACE-NEP inhibitor AVE 7688 (30 mg/kg/day) in comparison to the ACE inhibitor (ACE-I) ramipril (1 mg/kg/day). Different parameters, such as endothelial function, blood pressure (BP), expansion of plaques, endothelial nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2-) release and plasma levels of various lipidaemic parameters were analysed. Control groups consisted of one group fed only with normal diet, one group fed only with atherogenic diet and the direct control group fed with varied diets (six weeks atherogenic diet followed by 12 weeks normal diet). Since for the treatment of atherosclerosis, a change in feeding is absolutely necessary, in the present study, at the start of the treatments with AVE 7688 and ramipril, the rabbits food was changed to a normal diet. At the end of the study, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was measured in the anaesthetised animals. The values in standard, atherogenic and varied diet-fed rabbits were around 73 2 mmHg. Angiotensin I (Ang I) given intravenous (i.v.) induced a strong increase in MAP of about 20%. In both the treated groups Ang I-induced BP increase was inhibited. In contrast, i.v. bradykinin led to a strong reduction in MAP in both the treated groups of around 50%. Six weeks feeding with an atherogenic diet in the rabbits induced an enduring endothelial dysfunction despite the food

  7. 42 CFR 417.442 - Risk HMO's and CMP's: Conditions for provision of additional benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Risk HMO's and CMP's: Conditions for provision of additional benefits. 417.442 Section 417.442 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS,...

  8. 42 CFR 417.442 - Risk HMO's and CMP's: Conditions for provision of additional benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Risk HMO's and CMP's: Conditions for provision of additional benefits. 417.442 Section 417.442 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS,...

  9. Cardiovascular risk assessment: addition of CKD and race to the Framingham equation

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Paul E.; Baraniuk, Sarah; Davis, Barry R.; Brown, Clinton D.; Colon, Pedro J.; Cujyet, Aloysius B.; Dart, Richard A.; Graumlich, James F.; Henriquez, Mario A.; Moloo, Jamaluddin; Sakalayen, Mohammed G.; Simmons, Debra L.; Stanford, Carol; Sweeney, Mary Ellen; Wong, Nathan D.; Rahman, Mahboob

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims The value of the Framingham equation in predicting cardiovascular risk in African Americans and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unclear. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether the addition of CKD and race to the Framingham equation improves risk stratification in hypertensive patients. Methods Participants in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) were studied. Those randomized to doxazosin, age greater than 74 years, and those with a history of coronary heart disease (CHD) were excluded. Two risk stratification models were developed using Cox proportional hazards models in a two-thirds developmental sample. The first model included the traditional Framingham risk factors. The second model included the traditional risk factors plus CKD, defined by eGFR categories, and stratification by race (Black vs. Non-Black). The primary outcome was a composite of fatal CHD, nonfatal MI, coronary revascularization, and hospitalized angina. Results There were a total of 19,811 eligible subjects. In the validation cohort, there was no difference in C-statistics between the Framingham equation and the ALLHAT model including CKD and race. This was consistent across subgroups by race and gender and among those with CKD. One exception was among Non-Black women where the C-statistic was higher for the Framingham equation (0.68 vs 0.65, P=0.02). Additionally, net reclassification improvement was not significant for any subgroup based on race and gender, ranging from −5.5% to 4.4%. Conclusion The addition of CKD status and stratification by race does not improve risk prediction in high-risk hypertensive patients. PMID:23194494

  10. Characterization of Lipoprotein Composition and Function in Pediatric Psoriasis Reveals a More Atherogenic Profile

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Wynnis L.; Playford, Martin P.; Admani, Shehla; Natarajan, Balaji; Joshi, Aditya A.; Eichenfield, Lawrence F.; Mehta, Nehal N.

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults, but the risk profile of children with psoriasis remains to be fully characterized. We measured lipoprotein composition and function in 44 pediatric psoriasis patients and 44 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, using NMR spectroscopy and a validated ex vivo assay of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC). Mean age was 13.0 years and the population was ethnically diverse. Children with psoriasis had higher waist-hip ratios (0.85 vs. 0.80; p<0.002) and insulin resistance measures (log transformed HOMA-IR 0.65 vs. 0.41; p=0.07). Despite comparable traditional lipid values, having psoriasis was associated with higher apolipoprotein B concentrations (72.4 vs. 64.6; p=0.02), decreased large HDL particles (5.3 vs. 6.7; p<0.01), and reduced CEC after adjusting for age, sex, fasting glucose, HOMA-IR, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, apolipoprotein A-1, and HDL cholesterol concentration (beta -0.22, p=0.02). Pediatric psoriasis patients have a more atherogenic cardiometabolic risk profile, with evidence of insulin resistance and lipoprotein dysfunction by particle size, number, and functional assessment. These findings may provide a basis for the observed link later in life between psoriasis and CVD and support the need to screen and educate young patients to minimize later complications. PMID:26763425

  11. Improving coeliac disease risk prediction by testing non-HLA variants additional to HLA variants

    PubMed Central

    Romanos, Jihane; Rosén, Anna; Kumar, Vinod; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Szperl, Agata; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; van Diemen, Cleo C; Kanninga, Roan; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Steck, Andrea; Eisenbarth, Georges; van Heel, David A; Cukrowska, Bozena; Bruno, Valentina; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Núñez, Concepcion; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Mearin, M Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M; Ivarsson, Anneli; Boezen, H Marieke; Liu, Edwin; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of coeliac disease (CD) patients are not being properly diagnosed and therefore remain untreated, leading to a greater risk of developing CD-associated complications. The major genetic risk heterodimer, HLA-DQ2 and DQ8, is already used clinically to help exclude disease. However, approximately 40% of the population carry these alleles and the majority never develop CD. Objective We explored whether CD risk prediction can be improved by adding non-HLA-susceptible variants to common HLA testing. Design We developed an average weighted genetic risk score with 10, 26 and 57 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 2675 cases and 2815 controls and assessed the improvement in risk prediction provided by the non-HLA SNP. Moreover, we assessed the transferability of the genetic risk model with 26 non-HLA variants to a nested case–control population (n=1709) and a prospective cohort (n=1245) and then tested how well this model predicted CD outcome for 985 independent individuals. Results Adding 57 non-HLA variants to HLA testing showed a statistically significant improvement compared to scores from models based on HLA only, HLA plus 10 SNP and HLA plus 26 SNP. With 57 non-HLA variants, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve reached 0.854 compared to 0.823 for HLA only, and 11.1% of individuals were reclassified to a more accurate risk group. We show that the risk model with HLA plus 26 SNP is useful in independent populations. Conclusions Predicting risk with 57 additional non-HLA variants improved the identification of potential CD patients. This demonstrates a possible role for combined HLA and non-HLA genetic testing in diagnostic work for CD. PMID:23704318

  12. Possible effects of protracted exposure on the additivity of risks from space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. B.

    1996-01-01

    Conventional radiation risk assessments are presently based on the additivity assumption. This assumption states that risks from individual components of a complex radiation field involving many different types of radiation can be added to yield the total risk of the complex radiation field. If the assumption is not correct, the summations and integrations performed to obtain the presently quoted risk estimates are not appropriate. This problem is particularly important in the area of space radiation risk evaluation because of the many different types of high- and low-LET radiation present in the galactic cosmic ray environment. For both low- and high-LET radiations at low enough dose rates, the present convention is that the addivity assumption holds. Mathematically, the total risk, Rtot is assumed to be Rtot = summation (i) Ri where the summation runs over the different types of radiation present. If the total dose (or fluence) from each component is such that the interaction between biological lesions caused by separate single track traversals is negligible within a given cell, it is presently considered to be reasonable to accept the additivity assumption. However, when the exposure is protracted over many cell doubling times (as will be the case for extended missions to the moon or Mars), the possibility exists that radiation effects that depend on multiple cellular events over a long time period, such as is probably the case in radiation-induced carcinogenesis, may not be additive in the above sense and the exposure interval may have to be included in the evaluation procedure. It is shown, however, that "inverse" dose-rate effects are not expected from intermediate LET radiations arising from the galactic cosmic ray environment due to the "sensitive-window-in-the-cell-cycle" hypothesis.

  13. MTHFR homozygous mutation and additional risk factors for cerebral infarction in a large Italian family.

    PubMed

    Del Balzo, Francesca; Spalice, Alberto; Perla, Massimo; Properzi, Enrico; Iannetti, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Several cases with cerebral infarctions associated with the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have been reported. Given the large number of asymptomatic individuals with the MTHFR mutation, additional risk factors for cerebral infarction should be considered. This study describes a large family with the MTHFR mutation and a combination of heterozygous factor V Leiden mutations and different additional exogenous and endogenous thrombogenic risk factors. Psychomotor retardation and a left fronto-insular infarct associated with the MTHFR mutation together with diminished factor VII and low level of protein C was documented in the first patient. In the second patient, generalized epilepsy and a malacic area in the right nucleus lenticularis was associated with the MTHFR mutation and a low level of protein C. In the third patient, right hemiparesis and a left fronto-temporal porencephalic cyst were documented, together with the MTHFR mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. An extensive search of additional circumstantial and genetic thrombogenic risk factors should be useful for prophylaxis and prognosis of infants with cerebral infarctions associated with the MTHFR mutation and of their related family members. PMID:19068258

  14. Systemic Inflammatory Markers Are Closely Associated with Atherogenic Lipoprotein Subfractions in Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha; Xu, Rui-Xia; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Sun, Jing; Li, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between inflammatory markers and atherogenic lipoprotein subfractions. Methods. We studied 520 eligible subjects who were not receiving any lipid-lowering therapy. The inflammatory markers including white blood cell (WBC) count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), fibrinogen, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and D-dimer were measured. A multimarker inflammatory index was developed. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) separation processes were performed using Lipoprint System. Results. In age- and sex-adjusted analysis, several inflammatory markers (WBC count, hs-CRP, fibrinogen, and ESR) were positively related to circulating non-HDL cholesterol and remnant cholesterol (p < 0.05, all). Among lipoprotein subfractions, we observed a positive association of inflammatory markers with very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, small LDL cholesterol, and LDL score (p < 0.05, all). Meanwhile, a negative association was detected between inflammatory markers and mean LDL particle size (p < 0.05) or large HDL cholesterol (p < 0.05). Moreover, we found that the relationships between multimarker index quartiles and small LDL cholesterol, LDL score, and mean LDL particle size were slightly stronger in patients with CAD. Conclusions. Systemic inflammatory markers are positively correlated with small LDL cholesterol and LDL score while being negatively linked with mean LDL particle size and large HDL cholesterol, highlighting the potential contribution to increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:26688615

  15. Discovery of novel peptides targeting pro-atherogenic endothelium in disturbed flow regions -Targeted siRNA delivery to pro-atherogenic endothelium in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jihwa; Shim, Hyunbo; Kim, Kwanchang; Lee, Duhwan; Kim, Won Jong; Kang, Dong Hoon; Kang, Sang Won; Jo, Hanjoong; Kwon, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis occurs preferentially in arterial regions exposed to disturbed blood flow. Targeting these pro-atherogenic regions is a potential anti-atherogenic therapeutic approach, but it has been extremely challenging. Here, using in vivo phage display approach and the partial carotid ligation model of flow-induced atherosclerosis in mouse, we identified novel peptides that specifically bind to endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to disturbed flow condition in pro-atherogenic regions. Two peptides, CLIRRTSIC and CPRRSHPIC, selectively bound to arterial ECs exposed to disturbed flow not only in the partially ligated carotids but also in the lesser curvature and branching point of the aortic arch in mice as well as human pulmonary artery branches. Peptides were conjugated to branched polyethylenimine-polyethylene glycol polymer to generate polyplexes carrying siRNA targeting intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (siICAM-1). In mouse model, CLIRRTSIC polyplexes carrying si-ICAM-1 specifically bound to endothelium in disturbed flow regions, reducing endothelial ICAM-1 expression. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that non-muscle myosin heavy chain II A (NMHC IIA) is a protein targeted by CLIRRTSIC peptide. Further studies showed that shear stress regulates NMHC IIA expression and localization in ECs. The CLIRRTSIC is a novel peptide that could be used for targeted delivery of therapeutics such as siRNAs to pro-atherogenic endothelium. PMID:27173134

  16. Estimation of radiation risk in presence of classical additive and Berkson multiplicative errors in exposure doses.

    PubMed

    Masiuk, S V; Shklyar, S V; Kukush, A G; Carroll, R J; Kovgan, L N; Likhtarov, I A

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of measurement errors in exposure doses in a regression model with binary response is studied. Recently, it has been recognized that uncertainty in exposure dose is characterized by errors of two types: classical additive errors and Berkson multiplicative errors. The combination of classical additive and Berkson multiplicative errors has not been considered in the literature previously. In a simulation study based on data from radio-epidemiological research of thyroid cancer in Ukraine caused by the Chornobyl accident, it is shown that ignoring measurement errors in doses leads to overestimation of background prevalence and underestimation of excess relative risk. In the work, several methods to reduce these biases are proposed. They are new regression calibration, an additive version of efficient SIMEX, and novel corrected score methods. PMID:26795191

  17. Hypolipidemic and Antioxidative Effects of Glossogyne tenuifolia in Hamsters Fed an Atherogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Ning; Hsu, Guoo-Shyng Wang; Lin, Wan-Teng; Lu, Yi-Fa

    2016-05-01

    Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) Cassini is a special herbal tea in the Penghu Islands, Taiwan, and has a long history of being used as an antipyretic, detoxifying, and anti-inflammatory remedy in folk medicine among local residents. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hot water extracts from GT on oxidative stress and lipid metabolism in animals. Five- to 6-week-old male Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups (n = 14) for different treatments, that is: control group (C), high-fat/cholesterol (HF) group, HF diet containing 0.5% (GT0.5) and 1.5% (GT1.5) GT extracts for 4 weeks. Hamsters fed with 0.5% GT powder as well as 1.5% GT powder exhibited reduced serum total cholesterol (TC), conjugated diene of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and increased serum antioxidant capacity, but 1.5% GT powder was more potent at lowering serum LDL cholesterol and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance concentrations than 0.5% GT. GT extracts significantly lowered liver triacylglycerol (TG) concentration by diminishing activities of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH). In addition, fecal excretion of cholesterol and bile acids were increased in GT extract groups. In conclusion, GT extracts increase the antioxidative capacity, decrease serum TC, inhibit the activities of FAS and G-6-PDH, and further reduce liver TG accumulation in hamster fed on atherogenic diets. PMID:27152981

  18. Uremic Conditions Drive Human Monocytes to Pro-Atherogenic Differentiation via an Angiotensin-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Trojanowicz, Bogusz; Ulrich, Christof; Seibert, Eric; Fiedler, Roman; Girndt, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Aims Elevated expression levels of monocytic-ACE have been found in haemodialysis patients. They are not only epidemiologically linked with increased mortality and cardiovascular disease, but may also directly participate in the initial steps of atherosclerosis. To further address this question we tested the role of monocytic-ACE in promotion of atherosclerotic events in vitro under conditions mimicking those of chronic renal failure. Methods and Results Treatment of human primary monocytes or THP-1 cells with uremic serum as well as PMA-induced differentiation led to significantly up-regulated expression of ACE, further increased by additional treatment with LPS. Functionally, these monocytes revealed significantly increased adhesion and transmigration through endothelial monolayers. Overexpression of ACE in transfected monocytes or THP-1 cells led to development of more differentiated, macrophage-like phenotype with up-regulated expression of Arg1, MCSF, MCP-1 and CCR2. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFa and IL-6 were also noticeably up-regulated. ACE overexpression resulted in significantly increased adhesion and transmigration properties. Transcriptional screening of ACE-overexpressing monocytes revealed noticeably increased expression of Angiotensin II receptors and adhesion- as well as atherosclerosis-related ICAM-1 and VCAM1. Inhibition of monocyte ACE or AngII-receptor signalling led to decreased adhesion potential of ACE-overexpressing cells. Conclusions Taken together, these data demonstrate that uremia induced expression of monocytic-ACE mediates the development of highly pro-atherogenic cells via an AngII-dependent mechanism. PMID:25003524

  19. Risk assessment of additives through soft drinks and nectars consumption on Portuguese population: a 2010 survey.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Janina S G; Silva, Liliana S O; Pena, Angelina; Lino, Celeste M

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated whether the Portuguese population is at risk of exceeding ADI levels for acesulfame-K, saccharin, aspartame, caffeine, benzoic and sorbic acid through an assessment of dietary intake of additives and specific consumption of four types of beverages, traditional soft drinks and soft drinks based on mineral waters, energetic drinks, and nectars. The highest mean levels of additives were found for caffeine in energetic drinks, 293.5mg/L, for saccharin in traditional soft drinks, 18.4 mg/L, for acesulfame-K and aspartame in nectars, with 88.2 and 97.8 mg/L, respectively, for benzoic acid in traditional soft drinks, 125.7 mg/L, and for sorbic acid in soft drinks based on mineral water, 166.5 mg/L. Traditional soft drinks presented the highest acceptable daily intake percentages (ADIs%) for acesulfame-K, aspartame, benzoic and sorbic acid and similar value for saccharin (0.5%) when compared with soft drinks based on mineral water, 0.7%, 0.08%, 7.3%, and 1.92% versus 0.2%, 0.053%, 0.6%, and 0.28%, respectively. However for saccharin the highest percentage of ADI was obtained for nectars, 0.9%, in comparison with both types of soft drinks, 0.5%. Therefore, it is concluded that the Portuguese population is not at risk of exceeding the established ADIs for the studied additives. PMID:24036138

  20. Additive genetic risk from five serotonin system polymorphisms interacts with interpersonal stress to predict depression.

    PubMed

    Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Stroud, Catherine B; Mineka, Susan; Zinbarg, Richard E; Adam, Emma K; Redei, Eva E; Hammen, Constance; Craske, Michelle G

    2015-11-01

    Behavioral genetic research supports polygenic models of depression in which many genetic variations each contribute a small amount of risk, and prevailing diathesis-stress models suggest gene-environment interactions (G×E). Multilocus profile scores of additive risk offer an approach that is consistent with polygenic models of depression risk. In a first demonstration of this approach in a G×E predicting depression, we created an additive multilocus profile score from 5 serotonin system polymorphisms (1 each in the genes HTR1A, HTR2A, HTR2C, and 2 in TPH2). Analyses focused on 2 forms of interpersonal stress as environmental risk factors. Using 5 years of longitudinal diagnostic and life stress interviews from 387 emerging young adults in the Youth Emotion Project, survival analyses show that this multilocus profile score interacts with major interpersonal stressful life events to predict major depressive episode onsets (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.815, p = .007). Simultaneously, there was a significant protective effect of the profile score without a recent event (HR = 0.83, p = .030). The G×E effect with interpersonal chronic stress was not significant (HR = 1.15, p = .165). Finally, effect sizes for genetic factors examined ignoring stress suggested such an approach could lead to overlooking or misinterpreting genetic effects. Both the G×E effect and the protective simple main effect were replicated in a sample of early adolescent girls (N = 105). We discuss potential benefits of the multilocus genetic profile score approach and caveats for future research. PMID:26595467

  1. Relative Importance and Additive Effects of Maternal and Infant Risk Factors on Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; James, Kristina; Escobar, Gabriel; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Li, Sherian Xu; Carroll, Kecia N.; Walsh, Eileen; Mitchel, Edward; Das, Suman; Kumar, Rajesh; Yu, Chang; Dupont, William D.; Hartert, Tina V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental exposures that occur in utero and during early life may contribute to the development of childhood asthma through alteration of the human microbiome. The objectives of this study were to estimate the cumulative effect and relative importance of environmental exposures on the risk of childhood asthma. Methods We conducted a population-based birth cohort study of mother-child dyads who were born between 1995 and 2003 and were continuously enrolled in the PRIMA (Prevention of RSV: Impact on Morbidity and Asthma) cohort. The individual and cumulative impact of maternal urinary tract infections (UTI) during pregnancy, maternal colonization with group B streptococcus (GBS), mode of delivery, infant antibiotic use, and older siblings at home, on the risk of childhood asthma were estimated using logistic regression. Dose-response effect on childhood asthma risk was assessed for continuous risk factors: number of maternal UTIs during pregnancy, courses of infant antibiotics, and number of older siblings at home. We further assessed and compared the relative importance of these exposures on the asthma risk. In a subgroup of children for whom maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy information was available, the effect of maternal antibiotic use on the risk of childhood asthma was estimated. Results Among 136,098 singleton birth infants, 13.29% developed asthma. In both univariate and adjusted analyses, maternal UTI during pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18, 1.25; adjusted OR [AOR] 1.04, 95%CI 1.02, 1.07 for every additional UTI) and infant antibiotic use (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.20, 1.22; AOR 1.16, 95%CI 1.15, 1.17 for every additional course) were associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma, while having older siblings at home (OR 0.92, 95%CI 0.91, 0.93; AOR 0.85, 95%CI 0.84, 0.87 for each additional sibling) was associated with a decreased risk of childhood asthma, in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with vaginal

  2. HIV/HCV coinfection ameliorates the atherogenic lipoprotein abnormalities of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    WHEELER, Amber L.; SCHERZER, Rebecca; LEE, Daniel; DELANEY, Joseph A. C.; BACCHETTI, Peter; SHLIPAK, Michael G.; SIDNEY, Stephen; GRUNFELD, Carl; TIEN, Phyllis C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Higher levels of small low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The extent to which HIV infection and HIV/HCV coinfection are associated with abnormalities of lipoprotein subclasses is unknown. Methods Lipoprotein subclasses were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in plasma samples from 569 HIV-infected and 5948 control participants in the FRAM, CARDIA and MESA studies. Multivariable regression was used to estimate the association of HIV and HIV/HCV coinfection with lipoprotein measures with adjustment for demographics, lifestyle factors, and waist-to-hip ratio. Results Relative to controls, small LDL levels were higher in HIV-monoinfected persons (+381 nmol/L, p<.0001), with no increase seen in HIV/HCV coinfection (−16.6 nmol/L). Levels of large LDL levels were lower (−196 nmol/L, p<.0001) and small HDL were higher (+8.2 μmol/L, p<.0001) in HIV-monoinfection with intermediate values seen in HIV/HCV-coinfection. Large HDL levels were higher in HIV/HCV-coinfected persons relative to controls (+1.70 μmol/L, p<.0001), whereas little difference was seen in HIV-monoinfected persons (+0.33, p=0.075). Within HIV-infected participants, HCV was associated independently with lower levels of small LDL (−329 nmol/L, p<.0001) and small HDL (−4.6 μmol/L, p<.0001), even after adjusting for demographic and traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion HIV-monoinfected participants had worse levels of atherogenic LDL lipoprotein subclasses compared with controls. HIV/HCV coinfection attenuates these changes, perhaps by altering hepatic factors affecting lipoprotein production and/or metabolism. The effect of HIV/HCV coinfection on atherosclerosis and the clinical consequences of low small subclasses remain to be determined. PMID:24136113

  3. Characterization of Lipoprotein Composition and Function in Pediatric Psoriasis Reveals a More Atherogenic Profile.

    PubMed

    Tom, Wynnis L; Playford, Martin P; Admani, Shehla; Natarajan, Balaji; Joshi, Aditya A; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Mehta, Nehal N

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is associated with increased cardiovascular disease in adults, but the risk profile of children with psoriasis remains to be fully characterized. We measured lipoprotein composition and function in 44 patients with pediatric psoriasis and 44 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and a validated ex vivo assay of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol efflux capacity. The mean age of the patients was 13 years and the population was ethnically diverse. Children with psoriasis had higher waist-to-hip ratios (0.85 vs. 0.80; P < 0.002) and insulin resistance measures (log-transformed homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance 0.65 vs. 0.41; P = 0.07). Despite comparable traditional lipid values, having psoriasis was associated with higher apolipoprotein B concentrations (72.4 vs. 64.6; P = 0.02), decreased large high-density lipoprotein particles (5.3 vs. 6.7; P < 0.01), and reduced cholesterol efflux capacity after adjusting for age, sex, fasting glucose, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, apolipoprotein A-1, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (β -0.22; P = 0.02). Patients with pediatric psoriasis have a more atherogenic cardiometabolic risk profile, with evidence of insulin resistance and lipoprotein dysfunction by particle size, number, and functional assessment. These findings may provide a basis for the observed link later in life between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease, and support the need to screen and educate young patients to minimize later complications. PMID:26763425

  4. THE COMBINED CARCINOGENIC RISK FOR EXPOSURE TO MIXTURES OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS MAY BE LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Combined Carcinogenic Risk for Exposure to Mixtures of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products May be Less Than Additive

    Risk assessment methods for chemical mixtures in drinking water are not well defined. Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume...

  5. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are early onset neurodevelopmental syndromes typified by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, accompanied by restricted and repetitive behaviors. While rare and especially de novo genetic variation are known to affect liability, whether common genetic polymorphism plays a substantial role is an open question and the relative contribution of genes and environment is contentious. It is probable that the relative contributions of rare and common variation, as well as environment, differs between ASD families having only a single affected individual (simplex) versus multiplex families who have two or more affected individuals. Methods By using quantitative genetics techniques and the contrast of ASD subjects to controls, we estimate what portion of liability can be explained by additive genetic effects, known as narrow-sense heritability. We evaluate relatives of ASD subjects using the same methods to evaluate the assumptions of the additive model and partition families by simplex/multiplex status to determine how heritability changes with status. Results By analyzing common variation throughout the genome, we show that common genetic polymorphism exerts substantial additive genetic effects on ASD liability and that simplex/multiplex family status has an impact on the identified composition of that risk. As a fraction of the total variation in liability, the estimated narrow-sense heritability exceeds 60% for ASD individuals from multiplex families and is approximately 40% for simplex families. By analyzing parents, unaffected siblings and alleles not transmitted from parents to their affected children, we conclude that the data for simplex ASD families follow the expectation for additive models closely. The data from multiplex families deviate somewhat from an additive model, possibly due to parental assortative mating. Conclusions Our results, when viewed in the context of results from genome

  6. A20 Regulates Atherogenic Interferon (IFN)-γ Signaling in Vascular Cells by Modulating Basal IFNβ Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Herwig P.; Lee, Andy; Minussi, Darlan C.; da Silva, Cleide G.; Csizmadia, Eva; Bhasin, Manoj; Ferran, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    IFNγ signaling in endothelial (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) is a key culprit of pathologic vascular remodeling. The impact of NF-κB inhibitory protein A20 on IFNγ signaling in vascular cells remains unknown. In gain- and loss-of-function studies, A20 inversely regulated expression of IFNγ-induced atherogenic genes in human EC and SMC by modulating STAT1 transcription. In vivo, inadequate A20 expression in A20 heterozygote mice aggravated intimal hyperplasia following partial carotid artery ligation. This outcome uniquely associated with increased levels of Stat1 and super-induction of Ifnγ-dependent genes. Transcriptome analysis of the aortic media from A20 heterozygote versus wild-type mice revealed increased basal Ifnβ signaling as the likely cause for higher Stat1 transcription. We confirmed higher basal IFNβ levels in A20-silenced human SMC and showed that neutralization or knockdown of IFNβ abrogates heightened STAT1 levels in these cells. Upstream of IFNβ, A20-silenced EC and SMC demonstrated higher levels of phosphorylated/activated TANK-binding kinase-1 (TBK1), a regulator of IFNβ transcription. This suggested that A20 knockdown increased STAT1 transcription by enhancing TBK1 activation and subsequently basal IFNβ levels. Altogether, these results uncover A20 as a key physiologic regulator of atherogenic IFNγ/STAT1 signaling. This novel function of A20 added to its ability to inhibit nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation solidifies its promise as an ideal therapeutic candidate for treatment and prevention of vascular diseases. In light of recently discovered A20/TNFAIP3 (TNFα-induced protein 3) single nucleotide polymorphisms that impart lower A20 expression or function, these results also qualify A20 as a reliable clinical biomarker for vascular risk assessment. PMID:25217635

  7. Changes in Atherogenic Dyslipidemia Induced by Carbohydrate Restriction in Men Are Dependent on Dietary Protein Source1234

    PubMed Central

    Mangravite, Lara M.; Chiu, Sally; Wojnoonski, Kathleen; Rawlings, Robin S.; Bergeron, Nathalie; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that multiple features of atherogenic dyslipidemia are improved by replacement of dietary carbohydrate with mixed sources of protein and that these lipid and lipoprotein changes are independent of dietary saturated fat content. Because epidemiological evidence suggests that red meat intake may adversely affect cardiovascular disease risk, we tested the effects of replacing dietary carbohydrate with beef protein in the context of high- vs. low-saturated fat intake in 40 healthy men. After a 3-wk baseline diet [50% daily energy (E) as carbohydrate, 13% E as protein, 15% E as saturated fat], participants consumed for 3 wk each in a randomized crossover design two high-beef diets in which protein replaced carbohydrate (31% E as carbohydrate, 31% E as protein, with 10% E as beef protein). The high-beef diets differed in saturated fat content (8% E vs. 15% E with exchange of saturated for monounsaturated fat). Two-week washout periods were included following the baseline diet period and between the randomized diets periods. Plasma TG concentrations were reduced after the 2 lower carbohydrate dietary periods relative to after the baseline diet period and these reductions were independent of saturated fat intake. Plasma total, LDL, and non-HDL cholesterol as well as apoB concentrations were lower after the low-carbohydrate, low-saturated fat diet period than after the low-carbohydrate, high-saturated fat diet period. Given our previous observations with mixed protein diets, the present findings raise the possibility that dietary protein source may modify the effects of saturated fat on atherogenic lipoproteins. PMID:22031660

  8. Additive Genetic Variation in Schizophrenia Risk Is Shared by Populations of African and European Descent

    PubMed Central

    de Candia, Teresa R.; Lee, S. Hong; Yang, Jian; Browning, Brian L.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Hewitt, John K.; Goddard, Michael E.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Visscher, Peter M.; Wray, Naomi R.; Keller, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the extent to which the proportion of schizophrenia’s additive genetic variation tagged by SNPs is shared by populations of European and African descent, we analyzed the largest combined African descent (AD [n = 2,142]) and European descent (ED [n = 4,990]) schizophrenia case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS) data set available, the Molecular Genetics of Schizophrenia (MGS) data set. We show how a method that uses genomic similarities at measured SNPs to estimate the additive genetic correlation (SNP correlation [SNP-rg]) between traits can be extended to estimate SNP-rg for the same trait between ethnicities. We estimated SNP-rg for schizophrenia between the MGS ED and MGS AD samples to be 0.66 (SE = 0.23), which is significantly different from 0 (p(SNP-rg = 0) = 0.0003), but not 1 (p(SNP-rg = 1) = 0.26). We re-estimated SNP-rg between an independent ED data set (n = 6,665) and the MGS AD sample to be 0.61 (SE = 0.21, p(SNP-rg = 0) = 0.0003, p(SNP-rg = 1) = 0.16). These results suggest that many schizophrenia risk alleles are shared across ethnic groups and predate African-European divergence. PMID:23954163

  9. CHARACTERIZE AGGREGATE AND CUMULATIVE RISK TO MANAGE RISK TO HUMANS EXPOSED TO MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS: DOSE ADDITIVITY FOR PESTICIDE MIXTURES: BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROCHEMICAL EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SUMMARY: The Agency’s default assumption for the cumulative assessment of the risk of mixtures is additivity based on either single-chemical potency (dose addition) or single-chemical effects (effect addition). NTD is developing models to accurately predict effects of complex mix...

  10. Prediction of metabolic syndrome among postmenopausal Ghanaian women using obesity and atherogenic markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an important health problem which puts individuals at risk for cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes as well as obesity-related cancers such as colon and renal cell in men, and endometrial and oesophageal in women. Objective This study was aimed at examining how obesity indicators and related determinants influence metabolic syndrome, and how the factors can be used to predict the syndrome and its cut-offs in postmenopausal Ghanaian women. Methods Two hundred and fifty (250) Ghanaian subjects were involved in the study with one hundred and forty-three (143) being premenopausal women and one hundred and seven (107) postmenopausal women. The influence of traditional metabolic risk factors including high blood pressure, dyslipidemia and glucose intolerance on obesity and atherogenic indices i.e. body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), Waist-to-thigh ratio (WTR), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), high density lipoprotein cholesterol to total cholesterol ratio (HDL-C/TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol to low density lipoprotein ratio (HDL-C/LDL-C) and triglyceride to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (TG/HDL-C) were identified according to the Harmonization (H_MS) criterion. Results The predominant anthropometric marker that significantly influence metabolic risk factors among the pre- and postmenopausal women was waist-to-hip ratio (premenopausal: p- 0.004, 0.026 and 0.002 for systolic blood pressure (SBP), fasting blood glucose (FBG) and HDL-C; postmenopausal: p-0.012, 0.048, 0.007 and 0.0061 for diastolic blood pressure (DBP), FBG, triglyceride (TG) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) respectively). Using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the area under the curve for WC, WHR, TG/HDL-C and HDL-C/TC among postmenopausal women were estimated at 0.6, 0.6, 0.8 and 0.8 respectively. The appropriate cut-off values for WC, WHR, TG/HDL-C and HDL

  11. Mitophagy acts as a safeguard mechanism against human vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by atherogenic lipids.

    PubMed

    Swiader, Audrey; Nahapetyan, Hripsime; Faccini, Julien; D'Angelo, Romina; Mucher, Elodie; Elbaz, Meyer; Boya, Patricia; Vindis, Cécile

    2016-05-17

    Mitophagy is a critical cellular process that selectively targets damaged mitochondria for autophagosomal degradation both under baseline conditions and in response to stress preventing oxidative damage and cell death. Recent studies have linked alterations in mitochondria function and reduced autophagy with the development of age-related pathologies. However, the significance of mitochondrial autophagy in vessel wall in response to atherogenic lipid stressors is not known. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitophagy on human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) apoptosis induced by oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDL). We reported for the first time that the engulfment of defective mitochondria by autophagosomes occurred in human VSMC in response to oxidized LDL. The molecular mechanism mediating mitophagy in human VSMC involved dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1)-mediated mitochondrial fission, accumulation of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and the recruitment of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to mitochondria. Likewise, we found increased voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) and mitofusin 2 (Mnf2) mitochondrial proteins ubiquitination and LC3 association to mitochondria. Using flow cytometry in the presence of lysosomal inhibitors, we showed that PINK1 and Parkin silencing impaired mitophagy flux and enhanced oxidized LDL-induced VSMC apoptosis. In addition, overexpression of PINK1 and Parkin were protective by limiting cell death. Moreover, reduced Bax levels found in VSMC-overexpressing Parkin indicated cross talk among mitophagy and mitochondrial apoptotic signalling pathways. Altogether these data demonstrate that mitophagy is a safeguard mechanism against human VSMC apoptosis induced by atherogenic stressors and highlight mitophagy as a potential target to stabilize atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:27119505

  12. The addition of whole soy flour to cafeteria diet reduces metabolic risk markers in wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Soybean is termed a functional food because it contains bioactive compounds. However, its effects are not well known under unbalanced diet conditions. This work is aimed at evaluating the effect of adding whole soy flour to a cafeteria diet on intestinal histomorphometry, metabolic risk and toxicity markers in rats. Methods In this study, 30 male adult Wistar rats were used, distributed among three groups (n = 10): AIN-93 M diet, cafeteria diet (CAF) and cafeteria diet with soy flour (CAFS), for 56 days. The following parameters were measured: food intake; weight gain; serum concentrations of triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-c, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), aspartate (AST) and alanine (ALT) aminotransferases and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS); humidity and lipid fecal content; weight and fat of the liver. The villous height, the crypt depth and the thickness of the duodenal and ileal circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the animals were also measured. Results There was a significant reduction in the food intake in the CAF group. The CAFS showed lower serum concentrations of triglycerides and serum TBARS and a lower percentage of hepatic fat, with a corresponding increase in thickness of the intestinal muscle layers. In the CAF group, an increase in the HbA1c, ALT, lipid excretion, liver TBARS and crypt depth, was observed associated with lower HDL-c and villous height. The addition of soy did not promote any change in these parameters. Conclusions The inclusion of whole soy flour in a high-fat diet may be helpful in reducing some markers of metabolic risk; however, more studies are required to clarify its effects on unbalanced diets. PMID:24119309

  13. Risk assessment for the combinational effects of food color additives: neural progenitor cells and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Mikyung; Park, Hee Ra; Kim, So Jung; Kim, Min-Sun; Kong, Kyoung Hye; Kim, Hyun Soo; Gong, Ein Ji; Kim, Mi Eun; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Byung Mu; Lee, Jaewon

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, the Korea Food and Drug Administration reported that combinations of dietary colors such as allura red AC (R40), tartrazine (Y4), sunset yellow FCF (Y5), amaranth (R2), and brilliant blue FCF (B1) are widely used in food manufacturing. Although individual tar food colors are controlled based on acceptable daily intake (ADI), there is no apparent information available for how combinations of these additives affect food safety. In the current study, the potencies of single and combination use of R40, Y4, Y5, R2, and B1 were examined on neural progenitor cell (NPC) toxicity, a biomarker for developmental stage, and neurogenesis, indicative of adult central nervous system (CNS) functions. R40 and R2 reduced NPC proliferation and viability in mouse multipotent NPC, in the developing CNS model. Among several combinations tested in mouse model, combination of Y4 and B1 at 1000-fold higher than average daily intake in Korea significantly decreased numbers of newly generated cells in adult mouse hippocampus, indicating potent adverse actions on hippocampal neurogenesis. However, other combinations including R40 and R2 did not affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. Evidence indicates that single and combination use of most tar food colors may be safe with respect to risk using developmental NPC and adult hippocampal neurogenesis. However, the response to excessively high dose combination of Y4 and B1 is suggestive of synergistic effects to suppress proliferation of NPC in adult hippocampus. Data indicated that combinations of tar colors may adversely affect both developmental and adult hippocampal neurogenesis; thus, further extensive studies are required to assess the safety of these additive combinations. PMID:20077213

  14. Atherogenic Index of Plasma Predicts Hyperuricemia in Rural Population: A Cross-Sectional Study from Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ye; Li, Yuan; Guo, Xiaofan; Guo, Liang; Sun, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the association of atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) with hyperuricemia (HUA) in the rural population of northeast China. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the rural areas of northeast China from January 2012 to August 2013, and the final analysis included data obtained form 5253 men and 6092 women. 1104 participants (9.7%) suffered from HUA. Spearman rank test showed that AIP was positively correlated with uric acid in both sexes (r = 0.310 for men and r = 0.347 for women, both p < 0.001). AIP was classified into three groups: the low (<0.11), the intermediate (0.11-0.21) and the increased (>0.21) risk. The prevalence of HUA increased with AIP. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that, compared to the low AIP group, participants in increased AIP group had a 2.536-fold risk for HUA (2.164-fold in male and 2.960-fold in female) after adjustment for covariates. Results of receiver operating characteristic curves showed that the area under the curve (95% confidence intervals) was 0.686 (0.665-0.707) for male and 0.730 (0.706-0.755) for female. We indicated that increased AIP was associated with higher serum uric acid levels and could be identified as an independent risk factor of HUA in the rural population of northeast China. PMID:27598187

  15. Hypocholesterolemic effect of an aqueous extract of the leaves of Sansevieria senegambica Baker on plasma lipid profile and atherogenic indices of rats fed egg yolk supplemented diet

    PubMed Central

    Ikewuchi, Catherine Chidinma

    2012-01-01

    The effects of an aqueous extract of the leaves of Sansevieria senegambica on daily weight gain, lipid profile and atherogenic indices of rats fed egg yolk supplemented diet was studied. The control group was given normal feed while the other three groups received 50 g egg yolk/kg feed. The extract was orally administered daily at 150 and 200 mg/kg body weight; while the test control and control groups received appropriate volumes of water by the same route. On gas chromatographic analysis of the aqueous crude extract, the phytosterol and tannins fractions contained 100 % of β-sitosterol and tannic acid respectively. The mean daily weight gain of the test control group was higher though not significantly, than those of the other groups. The plasma total cholesterol levels, cardiac risk ratio and atherogenic coefficient of the test control group was significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of the test groups, but not significantly higher than that of the control group. The plasma low density lipoprotein and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of the test control group was significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of the control and test groups. The plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol of the test control group was significantly lower (P<0.05) than that of the control group, but not significantly lower than those of the test groups. There were no significant differences in the plasma triglyceride and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and the atherogenic index of plasma of all the groups. These results indicate a dose-dependent hypocholesterolemic effect of the extract, thus suggesting a likely protective role of the extract against the development of cardiovascular diseases. It also revealed the presence of pharmacologically active agents in the leaves. PMID:27418909

  16. Meta-analysis of comparative efficacy of increasing dose of Atorvastatin versus Rosuvastatin versus Simvastatin on lowering levels of atherogenic lipids (from VOYAGER).

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Stephen J; Brandrup-Wognsen, Gunnar; Palmer, Mike; Barter, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    Statins are the most commonly prescribed agents for lowering levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Although dose-dependent reductions in levels of atherogenic lipids are observed with all statins, the impact of increasing dose has not been fully elucidated. An individual patient data pooled analysis was performed of 32,258 patients in studies comparing the efficacy of rosuvastatin with that of atorvastatin or simvastatin. The impact of increasing dose on lowering LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B was investigated. Doubling the dose of each statin was accompanied by a 4% to 7% greater degree of lowering of all atherogenic lipids. A stronger correlation was observed between changes in LDL cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol (r = 0.92, p <0.001) or apolipoprotein B (r = 0.76, p <0.001) than triglycerides (r = 0.14, p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, baseline lipid level (p <0.0001) and increasing statin dose (p <0.0001) were strong predictors of achieving treatment goals in high-risk patients. Increasing age was a strong independent predictor of achieving goal for all atherogenic lipids (p <0.0001). Achieving LDL cholesterol goals was also more likely in women (p <0.0001), patients with diabetes (p <0.0001), and patients without atherosclerotic disease (p = 0.0002). In contrast, normal triglyceride levels were more often observed in men (p <0.0001) and patients without diabetes mellitus (p = 0.03). In conclusion, doubling statin dose was associated with greater lowering of LDL cholesterol by 4% to 6% and non-HDL cholesterol by 3% to 6%. Greater lipid goal achievement with increasing dose supports the use of high-dose statin therapy for more effective cardiovascular prevention. PMID:20102893

  17. Serum Total Bilirubin Levels Provide Additive Risk Information over the Framingham Risk Score for Identifying Asymptomatic Diabetic Patients at Higher Risk for Coronary Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Leem, Jaechan; Koh, Eun Hee; Jang, Jung Eun; Woo, Chang-Yun; Oh, Jin Sun; Lee, Min Jung; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Jung, Chang Hee; Lee, Woo Je; Park, Joong-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) is often delayed in patients with type 2 diabetes. Serum total bilirubin levels are inversely associated with CAD. However, no studies have examined whether this can be used as a biochemical marker for identifying asymptomatic diabetic patients at higher risk for having obstructive CAD. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 460 consecutive asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes. All patients underwent coronary computed tomographic angiography, and their serum total bilirubin levels were measured. Obstructive CAD was defined as ≥50% diameter stenosis in at least one coronary artery. Results Serum total bilirubin tertiles showed an inverse association with the prevalence of obstructive CAD. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio for the highest versus the lowest tertile of total bilirubin was 0.227 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.130 to 0.398), and an increment of 1 µmol/L in serum total bilirubin level was associated with a 14.6% decrease in obstructive CAD after adjustment for confounding variables. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the area under the curve for the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) plus serum total bilirubin level was 0.712 (95% CI, 0.668 to 0.753), which is significantly greater than that of the FRS alone (P=0.0028). Conclusion Serum total bilirubin level is inversely associated with obstructive CAD and provides additive risk information over the FRS. Serum total bilirubin may be helpful for identifying asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes who are at higher risk for obstructive CAD. PMID:26566499

  18. The risk of stillbirth and infant death by each additional week of expectant management stratified by maternal age

    PubMed Central

    Page, Jessica M.; Snowden, Jonathan M.; Cheng, Yvonne W.; Doss, Amy; Rosenstein, Melissa G.; Caughey, Aaron B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of the study was to examine fetal/infant mortality by gestational age at term stratified by maternal age. STUDY DESIGN A retrospective cohort study was conducted using 2005 US national birth certificate data. For each week of term gestation, the risk of mortality associated with delivery was compared with composite mortality risk of expectant management. The expectant management measure included stillbirth and infant death. This expectant management risk was calculated to estimate the composite mortality risk with remaining pregnant an additional week by combining the risk of stillbirth during the additional week of pregnancy and infant death risk following delivery at the next week. Maternal age was stratified by 35 years or more compared with women younger than 35 years as well as subgroup analyses of younger than 20, 20–34, 35–39, or 40 years old or older. RESULTS The fetal/infant mortality risk of expectant management is greater than the risk of infant death at 39 weeks’ gestation in women 35 years old or older (15.2 vs 10.9 of 10,000, P < .05). In women younger than 35 years old, the risk of expectant management also exceeded that of infant death at 39 weeks (21.3 vs 18.8 of 10,000, P < .05). For women younger than 35 years old, the overall expectant management risk is influenced by higher infant death risk and does not rise significantly until 41 weeks compared with women 35 years old or older in which it increased at 40 weeks. CONCLUSION Risk varies by maternal age, and delivery at 39 weeks minimizes fetal/infant mortality for both groups, although the magnitude of the risk reduction is greater in older women. PMID:23707677

  19. Increased Risk of Additional Cancers Among Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James D.; Ma, Grace L.; Baumgartner, Joel M.; Madlensky, Lisa; Burgoyne, Adam M.; Tang, Chih-Min; Martinez, Maria Elena; Sicklick, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are considered non-hereditary or sporadic. However, single-institution studies suggest that GIST patients develop additional malignancies with increased frequencies. We hypothesized that we could gain greater insight into possible associations between GIST and other malignancies using a national cancer database inquiry. Methods Patients diagnosed with GIST (2001–2011) in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database were included. Standardized prevalence ratios (SPRs) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to quantify cancer risks incurred by GIST patients before and after GIST diagnoses, respectively, when compared with the general U.S. population. Results Of 6,112 GIST patients, 1,047 (17.1%) had additional cancers. There were significant increases in overall cancer rates: 44% (SPR=1.44) before diagnosis and 66% (SIR=1.66) after GIST diagnoses. Malignancies with significantly increased occurrence both before/after diagnoses included other sarcomas (SPR=5.24/SIR=4.02), neuroendocrine-carcinoid tumors (SPR=3.56/SIR=4.79), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (SPR=1.69/SIR=1.76), and colorectal adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.51/SIR=2.16). Esophageal adenocarcinoma (SPR=12.0), bladder adenocarcinoma (SPR=7.51), melanoma (SPR=1.46), and prostate adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.20) were significantly more common only before GIST. Ovarian carcinoma (SIR=8.72), small intestine adenocarcinoma (SIR=5.89), papillary thyroid cancer (SIR=5.16), renal cell carcinoma (SIR=4.46), hepatobiliary adenocarcinomas (SIR=3.10), gastric adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.70), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.03), uterine adenocarcinoma (SIR=1.96), non-small cell lung cancer (SIR=1.74), and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (SIR=1.65) were significantly more common only after GIST. Conclusion This is the first population-based study to characterize the associations and temporal relationships between GIST and other cancers, both by site and

  20. Bergamot Reduces Plasma Lipids, Atherogenic Small Dense LDL, and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Subjects with Moderate Hypercholesterolemia: A 6 Months Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Peter P.; Patti, Angelo M.; Nikolic, Dragana; Giglio, Rosaria V.; Castellino, Giuseppa; Biancucci, Teresa; Geraci, Fabiana; David, Sabrina; Montalto, Giuseppe; Rizvi, Ali; Rizzo, Manfredi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some patients experience statin-induced side effects or prefer nutraceutical approaches for the treatment of dyslipidemia. This has led to a search for alternative therapeutic approaches for dyslipidemia management. In recent studies Citrus bergamia (known as Bergamot) juice was able to reduce serum levels of lipids. Such benefit may be attributed to high amounts of flavonoids contained in Bergamot fruit juice (neoeriocitrin, neohesperidin, naringin). The aim of the present study was to fully investigate the effects of a Bergamot extract on cardio-metabolic parameters, including plasma lipids, atherogenic lipoproteins and subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods: Eighty subjects (42 men and 38 women, mean age: 55 ± 13 years) with moderate hypercholesterolemia [e.g., with plasma LDL-cholesterol concentrations between 160 and 190 mg/dl (between 4.1 and 4.9 mmol/l)] were included. A Bergamot-derived extract (Bergavit R®) was given at a fixed dose daily (150 mg of flavonoids, with 16% of neoeriocitrin, 47% of neohesperidin and 37% of naringin) for 6 months. Lipoprotein subfractions were assessed by gel electrophoresis. With this methodology low density lipoprotein (LDL) subclasses are distributed as seven bands (LDL-1 and -2 as large LDL, and LDL-3 to -7 as atherogenic small, dense LDL). Subclinical atherosclerosis was assessed by carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) using B-mode ultrasound. Results: After 6 months, Bergavit R® reduced total cholesterol (from 6.6 ± 0.4 to 5.8 ± 1.1 mmol/l, p < 0.0001), triglycerides (from 1.8 ± 0.6 to 1.5 ± 0.9 mmol/l, p = 0.0020), and LDL-cholesterol (from 4.6 ± 0.2 to 3.7 ± 1.0 mmol/l, p < 0.0001), while HDL- cholesterol increased (from 1.3 ± 0.2 to 1.4 ± 0.4 mmol/l, p < 0.0007). In addition, a significant increase in LDL-1 (from 41.2 ± 0.2 to 49.6 ± 0.2%, p < 0.0001) was accompanied by decreased small, dense LDL-3, -4, and 5 particles (from 14.5 ± 0.1 to 9.0 ± 0.1% p < 0.0001; 3.2 ± 0.1 to 1.5 ± 0.1% p = 0

  1. Date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) fruit soluble phenolics composition and anti-atherogenic properties in nine Israeli varieties.

    PubMed

    Borochov-Neori, Hamutal; Judeinstein, Sylvie; Greenberg, Amnon; Volkova, Nina; Rosenblat, Mira; Aviram, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) fruit soluble phenolics composition and anti-atherogenic properties were examined in nine diverse Israeli grown varieties. Ethanol and acetone extracts of 'Amari', 'Barhi', 'Deglet Noor', 'Deri', 'Hadrawi', 'Hallawi', 'Hayani', 'Medjool', and 'Zahidi' fruit were analyzed for phenolics composition by RP-HPLC and tested for anti-atherogenicity by measuring their effects on LDL susceptibility to copper ion- and free radical-induced oxidation, and on serum-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages. The most frequently detected phenolics were hydroxybenzoates, hydroxycinnamates, and flavonols. Significant differences in phenolics composition were established between varieties as well as extraction solvents. All extracts inhibited LDL oxidation, and most extracts also stimulated cholesterol removal from macrophages. Considerable varietal differences were measured in the levels of the bioactivities. Also, acetone extracts exhibited a significantly higher anti-atherogenic potency for most varieties. The presence of soluble ingredients with anti-atherogenic capacities in dates and the possible involvement of phenolics are discussed. PMID:23587027

  2. Does Combination Therapy with Statins and Fibrates Prevent Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetic Patients with Atherogenic Mixed Dyslipidemia?

    PubMed Central

    Agouridis, Aris P.; Rizos, Christos V.; Elisaf, Moses S.; Filippatos, Theodosios D.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Statins have an established efficacy in the management of dyslipidemia primarily by decreasing the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and thus decreasing CVD risk. They also have a favorable safety profile. Despite the statin-mediated benefit of CVD risk reduction a residual CVD risk remains, especially in T2DM patients with high triglyceride (TG) and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) values. Fibrates decrease TG levels, increase HDL-C concentrations, and improve many other atherosclerosis-related variables. Fibrate/statin co-administration improves the overall lipoprotein profile in patients with mixed dyslipidemia and may reduce the residual CVD risk during statin therapy. However, limited data exists regarding the effects of statin/fibrate combination on CVD outcomes in patients with T2DM. In the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study the statin/fibrate combination did not significantly reduce the rate of CVD events compared with simvastatin/placebo in patients with T2DM. However, it did show a possible benefit in a pre-specified analysis in the subgroup of patients with high TG and low HDL-C levels. Furthermore, in the ACCORD study the simvastatin/fenofibrate combination significantly reduced the rate of progression of retinopathy compared with statin/placebo administration in patients with T2DM. The present review presents the available data regarding the effects of statin/fibrate combination in patients with T2DM and atherogenic mixed dyslipidemia. PMID:24380091

  3. [Risk hidden in the small print? : Some food additives may trigger pseudoallergic reactions].

    PubMed

    Zuberbier, Torsten; Hengstenberg, Claudine

    2016-06-01

    Some food additives may trigger pseudoallergenic reactions. However, the prevalence of such an overreaction is - despite the increasing number of food additives - rather low in the general population. The most common triggers of pseudoallergic reactions to food are naturally occurring ingredients. However, symptoms in patients with chronic urticaria should improve significantly on a pseudoallergen-free diet. In addition, some studies indicate that certain food additives may also have an impact on the symptoms of patients with neurodermatitis and asthma. PMID:27173908

  4. An Atherogenic Paigen-Diet Aggravates Nephropathy in Type 2 Diabetic OLETF Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nozako, Masanori; Koyama, Takashi; Nagano, Chifumi; Sato, Makoto; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Mitani, Kiminobu; Yasufuku, Reiko; Kohashi, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy develops in association with hyperglycemia, is aggravated by atherogenic factors such as dyslipidemia, and is sometimes initiated before obvious hyperglycemia is seen. However, the precise mechanisms of progression are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the influence of an atherogenic Paigen diet (PD) on the progression of nephropathy in spontaneous type 2 diabetic OLETF rats. Feeding PD to male OLETF rats for 12 weeks caused an extensive increase in excretion of urinary albumin and markers of tubular injury such as KIM-1 and L-FABP, accompanied by mesangial expansion and tubular atrophy. PD significantly increased plasma total cholesterol concentration, which correlates well with increases in urine albumin excretion and mesangial expansion. Conversely, PD did not change plasma glucose and free fatty acid concentrations. PD enhanced renal levels of mRNA for inflammatory molecules such as KIM-1, MCP-1, TLR4 and TNF-α and promoted macrophage infiltration and lipid accumulation in the tubulointerstitium and glomeruli in OLETF rats. Intriguingly, PD had little effect on urine albumin excretion and renal morphology in normal control LETO rats. This model may be useful in studying the complex mechanisms that aggravate diabetic nephropathy in an atherogenic environment. PMID:26606054

  5. An Atherogenic Paigen-Diet Aggravates Nephropathy in Type 2 Diabetic OLETF Rats.

    PubMed

    Nozako, Masanori; Koyama, Takashi; Nagano, Chifumi; Sato, Makoto; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Mitani, Kiminobu; Yasufuku, Reiko; Kohashi, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy develops in association with hyperglycemia, is aggravated by atherogenic factors such as dyslipidemia, and is sometimes initiated before obvious hyperglycemia is seen. However, the precise mechanisms of progression are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the influence of an atherogenic Paigen diet (PD) on the progression of nephropathy in spontaneous type 2 diabetic OLETF rats. Feeding PD to male OLETF rats for 12 weeks caused an extensive increase in excretion of urinary albumin and markers of tubular injury such as KIM-1 and L-FABP, accompanied by mesangial expansion and tubular atrophy. PD significantly increased plasma total cholesterol concentration, which correlates well with increases in urine albumin excretion and mesangial expansion. Conversely, PD did not change plasma glucose and free fatty acid concentrations. PD enhanced renal levels of mRNA for inflammatory molecules such as KIM-1, MCP-1, TLR4 and TNF-α and promoted macrophage infiltration and lipid accumulation in the tubulointerstitium and glomeruli in OLETF rats. Intriguingly, PD had little effect on urine albumin excretion and renal morphology in normal control LETO rats. This model may be useful in studying the complex mechanisms that aggravate diabetic nephropathy in an atherogenic environment. PMID:26606054

  6. The effect of aspirin on atherogenic diet-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Apoorva; Parmar, Hamendra S; Kumar, Anil

    2011-06-01

    Exploration of atherogenic diet-induced diabetes mellitus and the evaluation of antidiabetic potential of aspirin were carried out in this study. Male albino Wistar rats were divided into three groups of seven each (1, 2 and 3). Animals of groups 2 and 3 received CCT diet (normal rat chow supplemented with 4% cholesterol, 1% cholic acid and 0.5%, 2-thiouracil), whereas the animals of group 1 received normal feed and served as control. In addition to CCT, animals of group 3 (CCT + Asp) also received aspirin (8 gm/kg), commencing from day 8 till the end of study (day 15). In another experiment (exp. 2), aspirin-supplemented normal rat chow (Asp) was fed to the animals for 7 days and compared with the normal rat chow-fed control group. In experiment 3, an in vitro nitric oxide radical-scavenging potential of aspirin at three different doses (25, 50 and 100 μg/ml) was evaluated. In response to CCT diet, a decrease in serum insulin, α-amylase activity, hepatic glycogen, pancreatic calcium with a concomitant increase in serum glucose, lipid profile (except high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)), pancreatic nitrite and lipid peroxidation and the size of adipocytes along with macrophages infiltration were observed. Aspirin administration to CCT diet-fed animals (CCT + Asp) reverted all the studied biochemical and histological changes towards normality. In experiment 2, aspirin administration decreased the serum glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and VLDL-C with concomitantly increased HDL-C and insulin; however, it increased hepatic glycogen and pancreatic calcium concentration with a decrease in pancreatic and adipose lipid peroxidation. In vitro assay revealed the nitric oxide radical-scavenging potential of aspirin in all the studied doses. It is concluded that CCT diet-induced diabetes mellitus might be the outcome of nitric oxide radical-induced oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue, as well as diminished

  7. How to interpret a small increase in AUC with an additional risk prediction marker: Decision analysis comes through

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stuart G.; Schuit, Ewoud; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Pencina, Michael J.; Vickers, Andew; Moons, Karel G. M.; Mol, Ben W.J.; Lindeman, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    An important question in the evaluation of an additional risk prediction marker is how to interpret a small increase in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Many researchers believe that a change in AUC is a poor metric because it increases only slightly with the addition of a marker with a large odds ratio. Because it is not possible on purely statistical grounds to choose between the odds ratio and AUC, we invoke decision analysis, which incorporates costs and benefits. For example a timely estimate of the risk of later non-elective operative delivery can help a woman in labor decide if she wants an early elective cesarean section to avoid greater complications from possible later non-elective operative delivery. A basic risk prediction model for later non-elective operative delivery involves only antepartum markers. Because adding intrapartum markers to this risk prediction model increases AUC by 0.02, we questioned whether this small improvement is worthwhile. A key decision-analytic quantity is the risk threshold, here the risk of later non-elective operative delivery at which a patient would be indifferent between an early elective cesarean section and usual care. For a range of risk thresholds, we found that an increase in the net benefit of risk prediction requires collecting intrapartum marker data on 68 to 124 women for every correct prediction of later non-elective operative delivery. Because data collection is non-invasive, this test tradeoff of 68 to 124 is clinically acceptable, indicating the value of adding intrapartum markers to the risk prediction model. PMID:24825728

  8. Adults with type 1 diabetes eat a high fat, atherogenic diet which is associated with coronary artery calcium

    PubMed Central

    Snell-Bergeon, JK; Chartier-Logan, C; Maahs, DM; Ogden, LG; Hokanson, JE; Kinney, GL; Eckel, RH; Ehrlich, J; Rewers, M

    2010-01-01

    Aims/Hypotheses Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality among people with type 1 diabetes. Diet is an important lifestyle factor related to CHD. The aim of this study was to examine how diet and adherence to dietary guidelines differ between adults with and without type 1 diabetes, and their correlation with CHD risk factors and coronary artery calcium (CAC). Methods 571 people with type 1 diabetes and 696 controls 19 to 56 years old who were asymptomatic for CHD were studied. CAC was measured by electron beam CT. Results Adults with type 1 diabetes reported a diet higher in fat, saturated fat, and protein but lower in carbohydrates than controls. Less than half those with type 1 diabetes met dietary guidelines for fat and carbohydrate intake, and only 16% restricted saturated fat to <10% of daily calories. Adults with type 1 diabetes were significantly less likely to meet dietary guidelines than controls. Fat and saturated fat intake were positively correlated but carbohydrate intake was negatively correlated with CHD risk factors and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). A high fat diet and higher protein intake were associated with greater odds of CAC, while higher carbohydrate intake was associated with reduced odds of CAC. Conclusions/Interpretation Adults with type 1 diabetes reported consuming higher than recommended fat and saturated fat. Fat intake was associated with increased CHD risk factors, worse glycaemic control, and CAC. An atherogenic diet may contribute to the risk of CHD in adults with type 1 diabetes. PMID:19219420

  9. USING DOSE ADDITION TO ESTIMATE CUMULATIVE RISKS FROM EXPOSURES TO MULTIPLE CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) of 1996 requires the EPA to consider the cumulative risk from exposure to multiple chemicals that have a common mechanism of toxicity. Three methods, hazard index (HI), point-of-departure index (PODI), and toxicity equivalence factor (TEF), ...

  10. [Food additives and genetically modified food--a risk for allergic patients?].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B

    1999-04-01

    Adverse reactions to food and food additives must be classified according to pathogenic criteria. It is necessary to strictly differentiate between an allergy, triggered by a substance-specific immunological mechanism, and an intolerance, in which no specific immune reaction can be established. In contrast to views expressed in the media, by laymen and patients, adverse reactions to additives are less frequent than is believed. Due to frequently "alternative" methods of examination, an allergy to food additives is often wrongly blamed as the cause of a wide variety of symptoms and illness. Diagnosing an allergy or intolerance to additives normally involves carrying out double-blind, placebo-controlled oral provocation tests with food additives. Allergic reactions to food additives occur particularly against additives which are organic in origin. In principle, it is possible that during the manufacture of genetically modified plants and food, proteins are transferred which potentially create allergies. However, legislation exists both in the USA (Federal Drug Administration, FDA) and in Switzerland (Ordinance on the approval process for GM food, GM food additives and GM accessory agents for processing) which require a careful analysis before a genetically modified product is launched, particularly where foreign genes are introduced. Products containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) as additives must be declared. In addition, the source of the foreign protein must be identified. The "Round-up ready" (RR) soya flour introduced in Switzerland is no different from natural soya flour in terms of its allergenic potential. Genetically modified food can be a blessing for allergic individuals if gene technology were to succeed in removing the allergen (e.g. such possibilities exist for rice). The same caution shown towards genetically modified food might also be advisable for foreign food in our diet. Luckily, the immune system of the digestive tract in healthy people

  11. Natural cocoa consumption: Potential to reduce atherogenic factors?

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Brian K; Venable, Adam S; Henning, Andrea L; Prado, Eric A; Best Sampson, Jill N; Vingren, Jakob L; Hill, David W

    2015-06-01

    Short-term consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa has been demonstrated to improve various facets of vascular health. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of 4 weeks of natural cocoa consumption on selected cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers in young (19-35 years) women of differing body mass indices (BMI; normal, overweight or obese). Subjects (n = 24) consumed a natural cocoa-containing product (12.7 g natural cocoa, 148 kcal/serving) or an isocaloric cocoa-free placebo daily for 4 weeks in a random, double-blind manner with a 2-week washout period between treatment arms. Fasted (>8-h) blood samples were collected before and after each 4-week period. Serum was analyzed to determine lipid profile (chemistry analyzer) and CVD biomarkers (26 biomarkers). EDTA-treated blood was used to assess monocytes (CD14, CD16, v11b and CD62L), while citrate-treated blood was used to measure changes in endothelial microparticles (EMPs; CD42a-/45-/144+) by flow cytometry. Natural cocoa consumption resulted in a significant decrease in haptoglobin (P = .034), EMP concentration (P = .017) and monocyte CD62L (P = .047) in obese compared to overweight and normal-weight subjects. Natural cocoa consumption regardless of BMI group was associated with an 18% increase in high-density lipoprotein (P = .020) and a 60% decrease in EMPs (P = .047). Also, obese subjects experienced a 21% decrease in haptoglobin (P = .034) and a 24% decrease in monocyte CD62L expression in (P = .047) following 4 weeks of natural cocoa consumption. Collectively, these findings indicate that acute natural cocoa consumption was associated with decreased obesity-related disease risk. More research is needed to assess the stability of the observed short-term changes. PMID:25769436

  12. Central hemodynamics in risk assessment strategies: additive value over and above brachial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Yannoutsos, Alexandra; Rinaldi, Elisa R; Zhang, Yi; Protogerou, Athanassios D; Safar, Michel E; Blacher, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Although the clinical relevance of brachial blood pressure (BP) measurement for cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification is nowadays widely accepted, this approach can nevertheless present several limitations. Pulse pressure (PP) amplification accounts for the notable increase in PP from central to peripheral arterial sites. Target organs are more greatly exposed to central hemodynamic changes than peripheral organs. The pathophysiological significance of local BP pulsatility, which has a role in the pathogenesis of target organ damage in both the macro- and the microcirculation, may therefore not be accurately captured by brachial BP as traditionally evaluated with cuff measurements. The predictive value of central systolic BP and PP over brachial BP for major clinical outcomes has been demonstrated in the general population, in elderly adults and in patients at high CV risk, irrespective of the invasive or non-invasive methods used to assess central BP. Aortic stiffness, timing and intensity of wave reflections, and cardiac performance appear as major factors influencing central PP. Great emphasis has been placed on the role of aortic stiffness, disturbed arterial wave reflections and their intercorrelation in the pathophysiological mechanisms of CV diseases as well as on their capacity to predict target organ damage and clinical events. Comorbidities and age-related changes, together with gender-related specificities of arterial and cardiac parameters, are known to affect the predictive ability of central hemodynamics on individual CV risk. PMID:25341861

  13. Benefits and concerns associated with biotechnology-derived foods: can additional research reduce children health risks?

    PubMed

    Cantani, A

    2006-01-01

    The development of techniques devised for the genetic manipulation of foods poses new risks for children with food allergy (FA). The introduction of foreign allergenic proteins from different foods into previously tolerated foods may trigger allergic reactions, often complicating with anaphylactic shock in a subset of allergic babies. Children with FA, even if subjected to preventative diets, always challenge the risk of developing allergic manifestations after unintentional intake of a non tolerated food in restaurant settings, with relatives or schoolmates, etc, where product labelling is necessarily lacking. The introduction of potentially allergenic proteins into foods generally considered safe for allergic children can be done deliberately, by either substantially altering the food ingredients, or by genetic manipulation which change the composition or transfer allergens, or unintentionally by quality-control failures, due to contaminations in the production process, or to genetic mismanipulation. There is a controversy between multinationals often favored by governments and consumer association resistance, thus an equidistant analysis poses some unprecedented impediments. The importance of FA and the potential of transgenic plants to bring food allergens into the food supply should not be disregarded. The expression in soybeans of a Brazil nut protein resulted in a food allergen expressed in widely used infant formulas, so paving the way to an often reported multinational debacle. Genetic engineering poses innovative ethical and social concerns, as well as serious challenges to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the future of agriculture. In this paper will be emphasized practical concepts more crucial for pediatricians. PMID:16910351

  14. Benefits and concerns associated with biotechnology-derived foods: can additional research reduce children health risks?

    PubMed

    Cantani, A

    2009-01-01

    The development of techniques devised for the genetic manipulation of foods poses new risks for children with food allergy (FA). The introduction of foreign allergenic proteins from different foods into previously tolerated foods may trigger allergic reactions, often complicating with anaphylactic shock in a subset of allergic babies. Children with FA, even if subjected to preventative diets, always challenge the risk of developing allergic manifestations after unintentional intake of a non tolerated food in restaurant settings, with relatives or schoolmates, etc, where product labelling is necessarily lacking. The introduction of potentially allergenic proteins into foods generally considered safe for allergic children can be done deliberately, by either substantially altering the food ingredients, or by genetic manipulation which change the composition or transfer allergens, or unintentionally by qualitycontrol failures, due to contaminations in the production process, or to genetic mismanipulation. There is a controversy between multinationals often favored by governments and consumer association resistance, thus an equidistant analysis poses some unprecedented impediments. The importance of FA and the potential of transgenic plants to bring food allergens into the food supply should not be disregarded. The expression in soybeans of a Brazil nut protein resulted in a food allergen ex-pressed in widely used infant formulas, so paving the way to an often reported multinational debacle. Genetic engineering poses innovative ethical and social concerns, as well as serious challenges to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the future of agriculture. In this paper will be emphasized practical concepts more crucial for pediatricians. PMID:19364084

  15. Atherogenic Cytokines Regulate VEGF-A-Induced Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Ikhapoh, Izuagie Attairu; Pelham, Christopher J; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery stenting or angioplasty procedures frequently result in long-term endothelial dysfunction or loss and complications including arterial thrombosis and myocardial infarction. Stem cell-based therapies have been proposed to support endothelial regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into endothelial cells (ECs) in the presence of VEGF-A in vitro. Application of VEGF-A and MSC-derived ECs at the interventional site is a complex clinical challenge. In this study, we examined the effect of atherogenic cytokines (IL-6, TNFα, and Ang II) on EC differentiation and function. MSCs (CD44(+), CD73(+), CD90(+), CD14(-), and CD45(-)) were isolated from the bone marrow of Yucatan microswine. Naïve MSCs cultured in differentiation media containing VEGF-A (50 ng/mL) demonstrated increased expression of EC-specific markers (vWF, PECAM-1, and VE-cadherin), VEGFR-2 and Sox18, and enhanced endothelial tube formation. IL-6 or TNFα caused a dose-dependent attenuation of EC marker expression in VEGF-A-stimulated MSCs. In contrast, Ang II enhanced EC marker expression in VEGF-A-stimulated MSCs. Addition of Ang II to VEGF-A and IL-6 or TNFα was sufficient to rescue the EC phenotype. Thus, Ang II promotes but IL-6 and TNFα inhibit VEGF-A-induced differentiation of MSCs into ECs. These findings have important clinical implications for therapies intended to increase cardiac vascularity and reendothelialize coronary arteries following intervention. PMID:26106428

  16. Study of fatty acids in atheroma induced in rabbits by an atherogenic diet with or without silicon I. V. treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Loeper, J.; Goy, J.; Fragny, M.; Troniou, R.; Bedu, O.

    1988-01-01

    Fifty-two rabbits were submitted for two months to an atherogenic diet with or without addition of silicon in the form of an I.V. silicon organic compound and compared to a control group of 21 rabbits. Out of the 26 rabbits receiving cholesterol alone, 23 showed atheromatous lesions; out of the 26 rabbits receiving cholesterol + silicon, only 8 had lesions. Free fatty acids, total fatty acids and esters were studied in the plasma and in the aorta. During atheroma, saturated fatty acids decrease, in particular 18:0, unsaturated fatty acids increase, in particular 18:1, 18:2, 20:4; with added silicon the variations are less important: in free fatty acids in plasma, there is a decrease of 20:4; in cholesterol esters in plasma and aorta an increase of 18:0 and a decrease of 18:2. There is a negative correlation between atheromatous lesions and myristic and stearic acids, and a positive correlation between oleic, linoleic and arachidonic acids and atheroma. Arachidonic acid, involved in phenomena of lipid peroxidation, decreased in the silicon treated rabbits.

  17. [Epidemiology of atherogenic dyslipidemia in an urban area of the city of Barcelona].

    PubMed

    Caballero Sarmiento, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    We performed a descriptive cross-sectional epidemiological study data on lipid profile and blood glucose of sample collected in 2021 consecutive and anonymous patients. We calculated the prevalence of atherogenic dyslipidemia by sex, according to several cutoff HDL cholesterol in women, and in the whole sample, and its association with diabetes. There is in the study selection bias, as it is performed in patients attending in a Primary Care Laboratory and not in a sample of the general population. Prevalence epidemiological data are therefore approximate and provisional. PMID:24365578

  18. Arrest Histories of High-Risk Gay and Bisexual Men in Miami: Unexpected Additional Evidence For Syndemic Theory†

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven P.

    2009-01-01

    Gay and bisexual men continue to suffer the highest burden of HIV/AIDS in the U.S. Since the beginning of the epidemic, substance abuse has been shown to be one of the strongest predictors of sexual risk behaviors and seroconversion among this population. Recent research has focused on additional aspects of health risk disparities among gay and bisexual men, including depression and other mental health problems, childhood sexual abuse, and adult victimization, suggesting that these men are impacted by a syndemic of health risks. The involvement of gay and bisexual men with the criminal justice system is largely absent from the literature. This article describes the nature, extent and predictors of the arrest histories of a sample of gay and bisexual substance users at very high risk for HIV infection and/or transmission. These histories are surprisingly extensive, and are strongly associated with poverty, severe mental distress, substance abuse and dependence, and victimization. The involvement of gay and bisexual men in the criminal justice system deserves a stronger research focus because of the unique challenges facing such men and also because arrests are yet another marker for a host of health risks among them. PMID:19283955

  19. Even mildly elevated TSH is associated with an atherogenic lipid profile in postmenopausal women with subclinical hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Geng, Houfa; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Chenggang; Zhao, Meng; Yu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Bingchang; Wang, Yong; Ban, Bo; Zhao, Jiajun

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal women, a population with increased risk of atherosclerosis, also have an appreciable risk of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH). The current study sought an association between serum thyrotropin (TSH), the biomarker of SCH and atherosclerosis lipid profile changes. A total of 45 postmenopausal women with SCH and 27 healthy women matched by age and body mass index were enrolled in this observational study. Serum lipid profiles and thyroid function were assessed. Compared with healthy controls, the serum levels of TC, TG, LDL-c and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) in SCH were increased by ~22.8%, 29.6%, 30.5% and 23.2%, respectively. TSH was positively correlated with TC, LDL-c and oxLDL in all of the study subjects after adjusting for age and BMI. In particular, the positive correlation remained significant after adjusting for serum FT3 and FT4. When further stratified by TSH levels, both the subgroup of mildly elevated TSH (4.78-9.99 mU/L) and overtly elevated TSH (>10.00 mU/L) exhibited significantly higher serum levels of TC, TG, LDL-c and oxLDL compared to the normal TSH subgroup. Path analysis revealed that the total effects of TSH on TC (total effectsTC,TSH = 0.4323) included a significant direct effect (direct effectTC,TSH = 0.4932) and an indirect effect via an intermediary variable (FT3, FT4). Furthermore, TC exhibited a direct effect on LDL-c, as did LDL-c on oxLDL. In conclusion, even with a mild elevation of serum TSH, SCH is associated with atherogenic lipid profiles in postmenopausal women independent of thyroid hormones. PMID:24679183

  20. Alterations in some lipid components and Ca2+ ATPase activity in brain of rats fed an atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Oner, P; Bekpinar, S; Oz, B

    1991-06-01

    Male Wistar rats were fed an atherogenic diet for four months to investigate possible diet-induced lipid alterations and brain Ca2+ ATPase activity. Total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were found to be increased significantly in both serum and brain while the phospholipid level was decreased in both. The distribution of serum cholesterol between high-density and low-density lipoproteins was altered when compared to control rats with a decrement in HDL-cholesterol and a pronounced increment in LDL-cholesterol. The atherogenic diet resulted in about 50% depression in brain Ca2+ ATPase activity. It is concluded that alterations in ion transport and neurotransmitter release may be expected due to pronounced inhibition of brain Ca2+ ATPase activity in rats fed an atherogenic diet. PMID:1835114

  1. Ursodeoxycholic Acid (UDCA) Exerts Anti-Atherogenic Effects by Inhibiting RAGE Signaling in Diabetic Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jihwa; An, Shung Hyun; Kang, Sang Won; Kwon, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), is known to alleviate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress at the cellular level. However, the detailed action mechanisms of UDCA in atherosclerosis are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated whether UDCA exerts anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting ER stress and “receptor for advanced glycation endproduct” (RAGE) signaling. UDCA markedly reduced ER stress, RAGE expression, and pro-inflammatory responses [including NF-κB activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production] induced in endothelial cells (ECs) by high glucose (HG). In particular, UDCA inhibited HG-induced ROS production by increasing the Nrf2 level. In macrophages, UDCA also blocked HG-induced RAGE and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and inhibited foam cell formation via upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In the diabetic mouse model, UDCA inhibited atheromatous plaque formation by decreasing ER stress, and the levels of RAGE and adhesion molecules. In conclusion, UDCA exerts an anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting both ER stress and RAGE signaling. Our work implicates UDCA as a potential therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:26807573

  2. Anti-atherogenic properties of date vs. pomegranate polyphenols: the benefits of the combination.

    PubMed

    Rosenblat, Mira; Volkova, Nina; Borochov-Neori, Hamutal; Judeinstein, Sylvie; Aviram, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Hydrolysable tannin polyphenols in pomegranate and phenolic acids in date fruit and seeds are potent antioxidants and anti-atherogenic agents, and thus, in the present study we investigated the possible benefits of combining them in vivo in atherosclerotic apolipoprotein E KO (E(0)) mice, compared with the individual fruit. In vitro studies revealed that the date seed extract contains more polyphenols than Amari or Hallawi date extracts, and possesses a most impressive free radical scavenging capacity. Similarly, pomegranate juice (PJ), punicalagin, punicalain, gallic acid, and urolithins A and B are very potent antioxidants. E(0) mice consumed 0.5 μmol gallic acid equivalents (GAE) per mouse per day of PJ, Hallawi extract, date seed extract, or a combination for 3 weeks. Consumption of the combination was the most potent treatment, as it decreased serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and increased serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity. Consumption of the combination also significantly reduced mouse peritoneal macrophage (MPM) oxidative stress, MPM cholesterol content, and MPM LDL uptake. Finally, the lipid peroxide content in the aortas of the mice significantly decreased, and the PON lactonase activity of the aortas increased after treatment with the combination. We thus conclude that consumption of pomegranate, together with date fruit and date seeds, has the most beneficial anti-atherogenic effects on E(0) mice serum, macrophages, and aortas, probably due to their unique and varied structures. PMID:25811166

  3. Lipoproteins and their subfractions in psoriatic arthritis: identification of an atherogenic profile with active joint disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S; Harris, C; Lloyd, J; Stirling, C; Reckless, J; McHugh, N

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—(a) To characterise the lipid profile in psoriatic arthritis and investigate whether there are similarities to the dyslipoproteinaemia reported in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory forms of joint disease; (b) to investigate whether there is an atherogenic lipid profile in psoriatic arthritis, which may have a bearing on mortality.
METHODS—Fasting lipids, lipoproteins, and their subfractions were measured in 50 patients with psoriatic arthritis and their age and sex matched controls.
RESULTS—High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL cholesterol) and its third subfraction, HDL3 cholesterol, were significantly reduced and the most dense subfraction of low density lipoprotein (LDL), LDL3, was significantly increased in the patients with psoriatic arthritis. Twenty patients with active synovitis had significantly lower total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL3 cholesterol than their controls. 25% of the patients with psoriatic arthritis had raised Lp(a) lipoprotein levels (>300 mg/l) compared with 19% of controls, but this was not statistically significant.
CONCLUSION—Raised levels of LDL3 and low levels of HDL cholesterol are associated with coronary artery disease. Such an atherogenic profile in a chronic inflammatory form of arthritis is reported, which may be associated with accelerated mortality.

 PMID:11053070

  4. Addition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors to sulphonylureas and risk of hypoglycaemia: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Nicholas; Arnaud, Mickael; Robinson, Philip; Raschi, Emanuel; De Ponti, Fabrizio; Bégaud, Bernard; Pariente, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the risk of hypoglycaemia associated with the concomitant use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and sulphonylureas compared with placebo and sulphonylureas. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, ISI Web of Science, SCOPUS, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and clinicaltrial.gov were searched without any language restriction. Study selection Placebo controlled randomised trials comprising at least 50 participants with type 2 diabetes treated with DPP-4 inhibitors and sulphonylureas. Review methods Risk of bias in each trial was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. The risk ratio of hypoglycaemia with 95% confidence intervals was computed for each study and then pooled using fixed effect models (Mantel Haenszel method) or random effect models, when appropriate. Subgroup analyses were also performed (eg, dose of DPP-4 inhibitors). The number needed to harm (NNH) was estimated according to treatment duration. Results 10 studies were included, representing a total of 6546 participants (4020 received DPP-4 inhibitors plus sulphonylureas, 2526 placebo plus sulphonylureas). The risk ratio of hypoglycaemia was 1.52 (95% confidence interval 1.29 to 1.80). The NNH was 17 (95% confidence interval 11 to 30) for a treatment duration of six months or less, 15 (9 to 26) for 6.1 to 12 months, and 8 (5 to 15) for more than one year. In subgroup analysis, no difference was found between full and low doses of DPP-4 inhibitors: the risk ratio related to full dose DPP-4 inhibitors was 1.66 (1.34 to 2.06), whereas the increased risk ratio related to low dose DPP-4 inhibitors did not reach statistical significance (1.33, 0.92 to 1.94). Conclusions Addition of DPP-4 inhibitors to sulphonylurea to treat people with type 2 diabetes is associated with a 50% increased risk of hypoglycaemia and to one excess case of hypoglycaemia for every 17 patients in the first six months of treatment. This

  5. Additive Synergism between Asbestos and Smoking in Lung Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ngamwong, Yuwadee; Tangamornsuksan, Wimonchat; Lohitnavy, Ornrat; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Scholfield, C. Norman; Reisfeld, Brad; Lohitnavy, Manupat

    2015-01-01

    Smoking and asbestos exposure are important risks for lung cancer. Several epidemiological studies have linked asbestos exposure and smoking to lung cancer. To reconcile and unify these results, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to provide a quantitative estimate of the increased risk of lung cancer associated with asbestos exposure and cigarette smoking and to classify their interaction. Five electronic databases were searched from inception to May, 2015 for observational studies on lung cancer. All case-control (N = 10) and cohort (N = 7) studies were included in the analysis. We calculated pooled odds ratios (ORs), relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a random-effects model for the association of asbestos exposure and smoking with lung cancer. Lung cancer patients who were not exposed to asbestos and non-smoking (A-S-) were compared with; (i) asbestos-exposed and non-smoking (A+S-), (ii) non-exposure to asbestos and smoking (A-S+), and (iii) asbestos-exposed and smoking (A+S+). Our meta-analysis showed a significant difference in risk of developing lung cancer among asbestos exposed and/or smoking workers compared to controls (A-S-), odds ratios for the disease (95% CI) were (i) 1.70 (A+S-, 1.31–2.21), (ii) 5.65; (A-S+, 3.38–9.42), (iii) 8.70 (A+S+, 5.8–13.10). The additive interaction index of synergy was 1.44 (95% CI = 1.26–1.77) and the multiplicative index = 0.91 (95% CI = 0.63–1.30). Corresponding values for cohort studies were 1.11 (95% CI = 1.00–1.28) and 0.51 (95% CI = 0.31–0.85). Our results point to an additive synergism for lung cancer with co-exposure of asbestos and cigarette smoking. Assessments of industrial health risks should take smoking and other airborne health risks when setting occupational asbestos exposure limits. PMID:26274395

  6. Major histocompatibility complex harbors widespread genotypic variability of non-additive risk of rheumatoid arthritis including epistasis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Bowes, John; Plant, Darren; Viatte, Sebastien; Yarwood, Annie; Massey, Jonathan; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genotypic variability based genome-wide association studies (vGWASs) can identify potentially interacting loci without prior knowledge of the interacting factors. We report a two-stage approach to make vGWAS applicable to diseases: firstly using a mixed model approach to partition dichotomous phenotypes into additive risk and non-additive environmental residuals on the liability scale and secondly using the Levene's (Brown-Forsythe) test to assess equality of the residual variances across genotype groups per marker. We found widespread significant (P < 2.5e-05) vGWAS signals within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) across all three study cohorts of rheumatoid arthritis. We further identified 10 epistatic interactions between the vGWAS signals independent of the MHC additive effects, each with a weak effect but jointly explained 1.9% of phenotypic variance. PTPN22 was also identified in the discovery cohort but replicated in only one independent cohort. Combining the three cohorts boosted power of vGWAS and additionally identified TYK2 and ANKRD55. Both PTPN22 and TYK2 had evidence of interactions reported elsewhere. We conclude that vGWAS can help discover interacting loci for complex diseases but require large samples to find additional signals. PMID:27109064

  7. Major histocompatibility complex harbors widespread genotypic variability of non-additive risk of rheumatoid arthritis including epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Bowes, John; Plant, Darren; Viatte, Sebastien; Yarwood, Annie; Massey, Jonathan; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genotypic variability based genome-wide association studies (vGWASs) can identify potentially interacting loci without prior knowledge of the interacting factors. We report a two-stage approach to make vGWAS applicable to diseases: firstly using a mixed model approach to partition dichotomous phenotypes into additive risk and non-additive environmental residuals on the liability scale and secondly using the Levene’s (Brown-Forsythe) test to assess equality of the residual variances across genotype groups per marker. We found widespread significant (P < 2.5e-05) vGWAS signals within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) across all three study cohorts of rheumatoid arthritis. We further identified 10 epistatic interactions between the vGWAS signals independent of the MHC additive effects, each with a weak effect but jointly explained 1.9% of phenotypic variance. PTPN22 was also identified in the discovery cohort but replicated in only one independent cohort. Combining the three cohorts boosted power of vGWAS and additionally identified TYK2 and ANKRD55. Both PTPN22 and TYK2 had evidence of interactions reported elsewhere. We conclude that vGWAS can help discover interacting loci for complex diseases but require large samples to find additional signals. PMID:27109064

  8. Genetic predisposition to coronary heart disease and stroke using an additive genetic risk score: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the extent to which the risk for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) increases in relation to a genetic risk score (GRS) that additively integrates the influence of high-risk alleles in nine documented single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CHD, and to examine whether t...

  9. Anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic role of BMP receptor II in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simic, Tatjana

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of: Kim CW, Song H, Kumar S et al. Anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic role of BMP receptor II in endothelial cells. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 33, 1350-1359 (2013). Increased expression of BMPs in atherosclerosis suggested that the knockdown of the receptor mediating BMP action would prevent endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis. Based on this hypothesis, Kim et al. performed a series of experiments in which the effect of BMP receptor type II (BMPRII) knockout was tested in in vitro and in vivo models of atherogenesis. Unexpectedly, they found that the loss of BMPRII induces endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of BMPRII in endothelial cells induced monocyte adhesion through the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. The loss of BMPRII induced endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice. Besides, BMPRII expression was gradually lost over the course of atherosclerosis progression in human coronary arteries. PMID:24020661

  10. Progress in the care of common inherited atherogenic disorders of apolipoprotein B metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Katrina L; Hooper, Amanda J; Burnett, John R; Watts, Gerald F

    2016-08-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia, familial combined hyperlipidaemia (FCH) and elevated lipoprotein(a) are common, inherited disorders of apolipoprotein B metabolism that markedly accelerate the onset of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). These disorders are frequently encountered in clinical lipidology and need to be accurately identified and treated in both index patients and their family members, to prevent the development of premature ASCVD. The optimal screening strategies depend on the patterns of heritability for each condition. Established therapies are widely used along with lifestyle interventions to regulate levels of circulating lipoproteins. New therapeutic strategies are becoming available, and could supplement traditional approaches in the most severe cases, but their long-term cost-effectiveness and safety have yet to be confirmed. We review contemporary developments in the understanding, detection and care of these highly atherogenic disorders of apolipoprotein B metabolism. PMID:27199287

  11. The hyperpolarizing impact of glycine on endothelial cells may be anti-atherogenic.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-08-01

    Studies to date indicate that endothelial cells express glycine-activated chloride channels, which promote hyperpolarization of the endothelial plasma membrane. If such channels are expressed by endothelial cells lining conduit arteries, glycine is likely to have anti-atherogenic activity. This reflects the fact that endothelial hyperpolarization promotes calcium influx, activating the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase, while also down-regulating the activity of the membrane-bound NADPH oxidase, chief endothelial source of superoxide. Since macrophages express glycine-activated chloride channels that suppress production of oxidants and cytokines, glycine may also oppose atherogenesis by influencing intimal macrophage function. In rats, supplemental glycine exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects attributed to chloride channel activation. Administration of large daily doses of glycine would appear to be practical and safe, and has already been shown to inhibit protein glycation in human diabetics. PMID:19232835

  12. Genetic demonstration of intestinal NPC1L1 as a major determinant of hepatic cholesterol and blood atherogenic lipoprotein levels

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ping; Zhu, Hongling; Jia, Lin; Ma, Yinyan; Tang, Weiqing; Wang, Youlin; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang; Yu, Liqing

    2014-01-01

    Objective The correlation between intestinal cholesterol absorption values and plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels remains controversial. Niemann-Pick-C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) is essential for intestinal cholesterol absorption, and is the target of ezetimibe, a cholesterol absorption inhibitor. However, studies with NPC1L1 knockout mice or ezetimibe cannot definitively clarify this correlation because NPC1L1 expression is not restricted to intestine in humans and mice. In this study we sought to genetically address this issue. Methods and results We developed a mouse model that lacks endogenous (NPC1L1) and LDL receptor (LDLR) (DKO), but transgenically expresses human NPC1L1 in gastrointestinal tract only (DKO/L1IntOnly mice). Our novel model eliminated potential effects of non-intestinal NPC1L1 on cholesterol homeostasis. We found that human NPC1L1 was localized at the intestinal brush border membrane of DKO/L1IntOnly mice. Cholesterol feeding induced formation of NPC1L1-positive vesicles beneath this membrane in an ezetimibe-sensitive manner. Compared to DKO mice, DKO/L1IntOnly mice showed significant increases in cholesterol absorption and blood/hepatic/biliary cholesterol. Increased blood cholesterol was restricted to very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and LDL fractions, which was associated with increased secretion and plasma levels of apolipoproteins B100 and B48. Additionally, DKO/L1IntOnly mice displayed decreased fecal cholesterol excretion and hepatic/intestinal expression of cholesterologenic genes. Ezetimibe treatment virtually reversed all of the transgene-related phenotypes in DKO/L1IntOnly mice. Conclusion Our findings from DKO/L1IntOnly mice clearly demonstrate that NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol absorption is a major determinant of blood levels of apolipoprotein B-containing atherogenic lipoproteins, at least in mice. PMID:25463095

  13. Cholesterol-lowering Action of BNA-based Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting PCSK9 in Atherogenic Diet-induced Hypercholesterolemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Nakatani, Moeka; Wada, Shunsuke; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Narukawa, Keisuke; Sasaki, Kiyomi; Shibata, Masa-Aki; Torigoe, Hidetaka; Yamaoka, Tetsuji; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings in molecular biology implicate the involvement of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein regulation. The cholesterol-lowering potential of anti-PCSK9 antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) modified with bridged nucleic acids (BNA-AONs) including 2′,4′-BNA (also called as locked nucleic acid (LNA)) and 2′,4′-BNANC chemistries were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. An in vitro transfection study revealed that all of the BNA-AONs induce dose-dependent reductions in PCSK9 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels concomitantly with increases in LDLR protein levels. BNA-AONs were administered to atherogenic diet-fed C57BL/6J mice twice weekly for 6 weeks; 2′,4′-BNA-AON that targeted murine PCSK9 induced a dose-dependent reduction in hepatic PCSK9 mRNA and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C); the 43% reduction of serum LDL-C was achieved at a dose of 20 mg/kg/injection with only moderate increases in toxicological indicators. In addition, the serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels increased. These results support antisense inhibition of PCSK9 as a potential therapeutic approach. When compared with 2′,4′-BNA-AON, 2′,4′-BNANC-AON showed an earlier LDL-C–lowering effect and was more tolerable in mice. Our results validate the optimization of 2′,4′-BNANC-based anti-PCSK9 antisense molecules to produce a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:23344002

  14. Increased bioclogging and corrosion risk by sulfate addition during iodine recovery at a natural gas production plant.

    PubMed

    Lim, Choon-Ping; Zhao, Dan; Takase, Yuta; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Tomoko; Tomoe, Yasuyoshi; Tanji, Yasunori

    2011-02-01

    Iodine recovery at a natural gas production plant in Japan involved the addition of sulfuric acid for pH adjustment, resulting in an additional about 200 mg/L of sulfate in the waste brine after iodine recovery. Bioclogging occurred at the waste brine injection well, causing a decrease in well injectivity. To examine the factors that contribute to bioclogging, an on-site experiment was conducted by amending 10 L of brine with different conditions and then incubating the brine for 5 months under open air. The control case was exposed to open air but did not receive additional chemicals. When sulfate addition was coupled with low iodine, there was a drastic increase in the total amount of accumulated biomass (and subsequently the risk of bioclogging) that was nearly six times higher than the control. The bioclogging-associated corrosion rate of carbon steel was 84.5 μm/year, which is four times higher than that observed under other conditions. Analysis of the microbial communities by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that the additional sulfate established a sulfur cycle and induced the growth of phototrophic bacteria, including cyanobacteria and purple bacteria. In the presence of sulfate and low iodine levels, cyanobacteria and purple bacteria bloomed, and the accumulation of abundant biomass may have created a more conducive environment for anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria. It is believed that the higher corrosion rate was caused by a differential aeration cell that was established by the heterogeneous distribution of the biomass that covered the surface of the test coupons. PMID:20922384

  15. Meat and bone meal and mineral feed additives may increase the risk of oral prion disease transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; McKenzie, Debbie; Pedersen, Joel A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of prion-contaminated materials is postulated to be a primary route of prion disease transmission. Binding of prions to soil (micro)particles dramatically enhances peroral disease transmission relative to unbound prions, and it was hypothesized that micrometer-sized particles present in other consumed materials may affect prion disease transmission via the oral route of exposure. Small, insoluble particles are present in many substances, including soil, human foods, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds. It is known that meat and bone meal (MBM), a feed additive believed responsible for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), contains particles smaller than 20 μm and that the pathogenic prion protein binds to MBM. The potentiation of disease transmission via the oral route by exposure to MBM or three micrometer-sized mineral feed additives was determined. Data showed that when the disease agent was bound to any of the tested materials, the penetrance of disease was increased compared to unbound prions. Our data suggest that in feed or other prion-contaminated substances consumed by animals or, potentially, humans, the addition of MBM or the presence of microparticles could heighten risks of prion disease acquisition.

  16. Meat and bone meal and mineral feed additives may increase the risk of oral prion disease transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.J.; McKenzie, D.; Pedersen, J.A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of prion-contaminated materials is postulated to be a primary route of prion disease transmission. Binding of prions to soil (micro)particles dramatically enhances peroral disease transmission relative to unbound prions, and it was hypothesized that micrometer-sized particles present in other consumed materials may affect prion disease transmission via the oral route of exposure. Small, insoluble particles are present in many substances, including soil, human foods, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds. It is known that meat and bone meal (MBM), a feed additive believed responsible for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), contains particles smaller than 20 ??m and that the pathogenic prion protein binds to MBM. The potentiation of disease transmission via the oral route by exposure to MBM or three micrometer-sized mineral feed additives was determined. Data showed that when the disease agent was bound to any of the tested materials, the penetrance of disease was increased compared to unbound prions. Our data suggest that in feed or other prion-contaminated substances consumed by animals or, potentially, humans, the addition of MBM or the presence of microparticles could heighten risks of prion disease acquisition. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  17. Heat-shock protein 60 kDa and atherogenic dyslipidemia in patients with untreated mild periodontitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Manfredi; Cappello, Francesco; Marfil, Rafael; Nibali, Luigi; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Rappa, Francesca; Bonaventura, Giuseppe; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; O'Valle, Francisco; Zummo, Giovanni; Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J L; Mesa, Francisco

    2012-05-01

    Identification of predictors of cardiovascular risk can help in the prevention of pathologic episodes and the management of patients at all stages of illness. Here, we investigated the relationships between serum levels of Hsp60 and dyslipidemia in patients with periodontitis by performing a cross-sectional study of 22 patients with mild periodontitis without any prior treatment for it (i.e., drug naïve) and 22 healthy controls, matched for age and body mass index (BMI). All subjects were evaluated for periodontal status, gingival inflammation, and oral hygiene. Levels of circulating Hsp60, C-reactive protein (CRP), and plasma lipids were measured, and small, dense low-density lipoproteins (LDL) were indirectly assessed by determining the triglycerides/high-density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol ratio. We also assessed by immunohistochemistry Hsp60 levels in oral mucosa of patients and controls. No difference was found in CRP levels or plasma lipids between the two groups, but subjects with periodontitis showed, in comparison to controls, higher levels of small, dense LDL (p  = 0.0355) and circulating Hsp60 concentrations (p < 0.0001). However, levels of mucosal Hsp60 did not change significantly between groups. Correlation analysis revealed that circulating Hsp60 inversely correlated with HDL-cholesterol (r  = -0.589, p  = 0.0039), and positively with triglycerides (r  = +0.877, p < 0.0001), and small, dense LDL (r  = +0.925, p < 0.0001). Serum Hsp60 significantly correlated with the degree of periodontal disease (r  = +0.403, p  = 0.0434). In brief, untreated patients with mild periodontitis had increased small, dense LDL and serum Hsp60 concentrations, in comparison to age- and BMI-matched controls and both parameters showed a strong positive correlation. Our data indicate that atherogenic dyslipidemia and elevated circulating Hsp60 tend to be linked and associated to periodontal pathology. Thus, the road is open to

  18. Randomised Controlled Feasibility Trial of an Evidence-Informed Behavioural Intervention for Obese Adults with Additional Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sniehotta, Falko F.; Dombrowski, Stephan U.; Avenell, Alison; Johnston, Marie; McDonald, Suzanne; Murchie, Peter; Ramsay, Craig R.; Robertson, Kim; Araujo-Soares, Vera

    2011-01-01

    Background Interventions for dietary and physical activity changes in obese adults may be less effective for participants with additional obesity-related risk factors and co-morbidities than for otherwise healthy individuals. This study aimed to test the feasibility and acceptability of the recruitment, allocation, measurement, retention and intervention procedures of a randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve physical activity and dietary practices amongst obese adults with additional obesity related risk factors. Method Pilot single centre open-labelled outcome assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial of obese (Body Mass Index (BMI)≥30 kg/m2) adults (age≥18 y) with obesity related co-morbidities such as type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance or hypertension. Participants were randomly allocated to a manual-based group intervention or a leaflet control condition in accordance to a 2∶1 allocation ratio. Primary outcome was acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures, secondary outcomes included measures of body composition, physical activity, food intake and psychological process measures. Results Out of 806 potentially eligible individuals identified through list searches in two primary care general medical practices N = 81 participants (63% female; mean-age = 56.56(11.44); mean-BMI = 36.73(6.06)) with 2.35(1.47) co-morbidities were randomised. Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) was the only significant predictor of providing consent to take part in the study (higher chances of consent for invitees with lower levels of deprivation). Participant flowcharts, qualitative and quantitative feedback suggested good acceptance and feasibility of intervention procedures but 34.6% of randomised participants were lost to follow-up due to overly high measurement burden and sub-optimal retention procedures. Participants in the intervention group showed positive trends for most psychological, behavioural and body

  19. Hazard and risk assessment of a nanoparticulate cerium oxide-based diesel fuel additive - a case study.

    PubMed

    Park, Barry; Donaldson, Kenneth; Duffin, Rodger; Tran, Lang; Kelly, Frank; Mudway, Ian; Morin, Jean-Paul; Guest, Robert; Jenkinson, Peter; Samaras, Zissis; Giannouli, Myrsini; Kouridis, Haris; Martin, Patricia

    2008-04-01

    Envirox is a scientifically and commercially proven diesel fuel combustion catalyst based on nanoparticulate cerium oxide and has been demonstrated to reduce fuel consumption, greenhouse gas emissions (CO(2)), and particulate emissions when added to diesel at levels of 5 mg/L. Studies have confirmed the adverse effects of particulates on respiratory and cardiac health, and while the use of Envirox contributes to a reduction in the particulate content in the air, it is necessary to demonstrate that the addition of Envirox does not alter the intrinsic toxicity of particles emitted in the exhaust. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety in use of Envirox by addressing the classical risk paradigm. Hazard assessment has been addressed by examining a range of in vitro cell and cell-free endpoints to assess the toxicity of cerium oxide nanoparticles as well as particulates emitted from engines using Envirox. Exposure assessment has taken data from modeling studies and from airborne monitoring sites in London and Newcastle adjacent to routes where vehicles using Envirox passed. Data have demonstrated that for the exposure levels measured, the estimated internal dose for a referential human in a chronic exposure situation is much lower than the no-observed-effect level (NOEL) in the in vitro toxicity studies. Exposure to nano-size cerium oxide as a result of the addition of Envirox to diesel fuel at the current levels of exposure in ambient air is therefore unlikely to lead to pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation, which are the precursors for respiratory and cardiac health problems. PMID:18444008

  20. Hemolysate-mediated platelet aggregation: an additional risk mechanism contributing to thrombosis of continuous flow ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phat L; Pietropaolo, Maria-Grazia; Valerio, Lorenzo; Brengle, William; Wong, Raymond K; Kazui, Toshinobu; Khalpey, Zain I; Redaelli, Alberto; Sheriff, Jawaad; Bluestein, Danny; Slepian, Marvin J

    2016-07-01

    Despite the clinical success and growth in the utilization of continuous flow ventricular assist devices (cfVADs) for the treatment of advanced heart failure, hemolysis and thrombosis remain major limitations. Inadequate and/or ineffective anticoagulation regimens, combined with high pump speed and non-physiological flow patterns, can result in hemolysis which often is accompanied by pump thrombosis. An unexpected increase in cfVADs thrombosis was reported by multiple major VAD implanting centers in 2014, highlighting the association of hemolysis and a rise in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) presaging thrombotic events. It is well established that thrombotic complications arise from the abnormal shear stresses generated by cfVADs. What remains unknown is the link between cfVAD-associated hemolysis and pump thrombosis. Can hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs) contribute to platelet aggregation, thereby, facilitating prothrombotic complications in cfVADs? Herein, we examine the effect of RBC-hemolysate and selected major constituents, i.e., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and plasma free hemoglobin (pHb) on platelet aggregation, utilizing electrical resistance aggregometry. Our hypothesis is that elements of RBCs, released as a result of shear-mediated hemolysis, will contribute to platelet aggregation. We show that RBC hemolysate and pHb, but not LDH, are direct contributors to platelet aggregation, posing an additional risk mechanism for cfVAD thrombosis. PMID:26590166

  1. Ursodeoxycholic Acid (UDCA) Exerts Anti-Atherogenic Effects by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress Induced by Disturbed Flow

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jihwa; Kim, Kyoung Hwa; Lee, Seok Cheol; An, Shung Hyun; Kwon, Kihwan

    2015-01-01

    Disturbed blood flow with low-oscillatory shear stress (OSS) is a predominant atherogenic factor leading to dysfunctional endothelial cells (ECs). Recently, it was found that disturbed flow can directly induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in ECs, thereby playing a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a naturally occurring bile acid, has long been used to treat chronic cholestatic liver disease and is known to alleviate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress at the cellular level. However, its role in atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In this study, we demonstrated the anti-atherogenic activity of UDCA via inhibition of disturbed flow-induced ER stress in atherosclerosis. UDCA effectively reduced ER stress, resulting in a reduction in expression of X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) and CEBP-homologous protein (CHOP) in ECs. UDCA also inhibits the disturbed flow-induced inflammatory responses such as increases in adhesion molecules, monocyte adhesion to ECs, and apoptosis of ECs. In a mouse model of disturbed flow-induced atherosclerosis, UDCA inhibits atheromatous plaque formation through the alleviation of ER stress and a decrease in adhesion molecules. Taken together, our results revealed that UDCA exerts anti-atherogenic activity in disturbed flow-induced atherosclerosis by inhibiting ER stress and the inflammatory response. This study suggests that UDCA may be a therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:26442866

  2. Hypocholesterolemic effects of low calorie structured lipids on rats and rabbits fed on normal and atherogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Kanjilal, Sanjit; Kaki, Shiva Shanker; Rao, Bhamidipati V S K; Sugasini, Dhavamani; Rao, Yalagala Poornachandra; Prasad, Rachapudi B N; Lokesh, Belur R

    2013-01-01

    The hypocholesterolemic effects of two low calorie structured lipids (SL1 and SL2) containing essential fatty acids, prepared by lipase catalysed interesterification of ethyl behenate respectively with sunflower and soybean oils were studied in rats and rabbits. The feeding experiment conducted on rats as well as rabbits, fed on normal and atherogenic diet containing 10% of SL1 and SL2 (experimental) and sunflower oil (control) indicated no adverse effects on growth and food intake. However, the structured lipids beneficially lowered serum and liver lipids, particularly cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and also maintains the essential fatty acid status in serum and liver. The lipid deposition observed in the arteries of rabbits fed on atherogenic diets was significantly reduced when structured lipids were included in the diet. These observations coincided with reduced levels of serum cholesterol particularly LDL cholesterol observed in experimental groups. Therefore the structured lipids, designed to have low calorific value also beneficially lower serum lipids and lipid deposition in animals fed on atherogenic diets. PMID:23017421

  3. Phospholipid liposomes acquire apolipoprotein E in atherogenic plasma and block cholesterol loading of cultured macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K J; Tall, A R; Bisgaier, C; Brocia, R

    1987-01-01

    A single infusion of phospholipid liposomes promptly and persistently abolished the ability of hypercholesterolemic rabbit plasma to cause cholesteryl ester loading in cultured macrophages. This phospholipid enrichment of plasma caused moderate stimulation of cellular cholesterol efflux and, unexpectedly, almost complete inhibition of cellular uptake of beta-very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), the major cholesteryl ester-rich particle in hypercholesterolemic rabbit plasma. Cell viability and LDL receptor activity were unaffected. Incubation of liposomes with beta-VLDL resulted in transfer of apolipoprotein-E (apoE) to the liposomes; reisolated apoE-phospholipid liposomes then competed efficiently for cellular apoprotein receptors. Thus, a major mechanism by which phospholipid infusions result in diminished accumulation of cholesteryl ester in cultured macrophages is by blocking cellular uptake of beta-VLDL. The liposomes deplete beta-VLDL of apoE, then compete for receptor-mediated uptake. These results suggest a novel mechanism contributing to the known antiatherogenic effect of phospholipid infusions: infused liposomes acquire apoE, then block uptake of atherogenic lipoproteins by arterial wall macrophages. Images PMID:3571495

  4. Sesamol reduces the atherogenicity of electronegative L5 LDL in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Fang-Yu; Lee, An-Sheng; Ting, Kuan-Hsiang; Chang, Chia-Ming; Hsu, Jing-Fang; Lee, Wei-Shine; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Chen, Chu-Huang; Shen, Ming-Yi

    2015-02-27

    Highly electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) L5 induces endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis, which leads to the development of atherosclerosis. We examined the effects of sesamol (1), a natural organic component of sesame oil, on plasma L5 levels and atherosclerosis development in a rodent model and on the L5-induced apoptosis of ECs. Syrian hamsters, which have an LDL profile similar to that of humans, were fed a normal chow diet (control), a high-fat diet (HFD), or a HFD supplemented with the administration of 50 or 100 mg/kg of 1 via oral gavage (HFD+1) for 16 weeks (n = 8 per group). Hamsters in the HFD+1 groups had reduced plasma L5 levels when compared with the HFD group. Oil Red O staining showed that atherosclerotic lesion size was markedly reduced in the aortic arch of hamsters in the HFD+1 groups when compared with that in the HFD group. In human aortic ECs, 0.3-3 μM 1 blocked L5-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Further mechanistic studies showed that 1 inhibited the L5-induced lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1)-dependent phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and activation of caspase-3 and increased phosphorylation of eNOS and Akt. Our findings suggest that sesamol (1) protects against atherosclerosis by reducing L5-induced atherogenicity. PMID:25692815

  5. Cryptotanshinone inhibits TNF-α-induced early atherogenic events in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zuraini; Ng, Chin Theng; Fong, Lai Yen; Bakar, Nurul Ain Abu; Hussain, Nor Hayuti Mohd; Ang, Kok Pian; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Salvia miltiorrhiza (danshen) is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been effectively used to treat cardiovascular disease. Cryptotanshinone (CTS), a major lipophilic compound isolated from S. miltiorrhiza, has been reported to possess cardioprotective effects. However, the anti-atherogenic effects of CTS, particularly on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced endothelial cell activation, are still unclear. This study aimed to determine the effect of CTS on TNF-α-induced increased endothelial permeability, monocyte adhesion, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and impaired nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), all of which are early events occurring in atherogenesis. We showed that CTS significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced increased endothelial permeability, monocyte adhesion, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and MCP-1, and restored nitric oxide production. These observations suggest that CTS possesses anti-inflammatory properties and could be a promising treatment for the prevention of cytokine-induced early atherogenesis. PMID:26732386

  6. Biophysical and Biochemical Outcomes of Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection Promotes Pro-atherogenic Matrix Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Evani, Shankar J.; Dallo, Shatha F.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies support the hypothesis that infectious agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Chlamydia pneumoniae is strongly implicated in atherosclerosis, but the precise role has been underestimated and poorly understood due to the complexity of the disease process. In this work, we test the hypothesis that C. pneumoniae-infected macrophages lodged in the subendothelial matrix contribute to atherogenesis through pro-inflammatory factors and by cell-matrix interactions. To test this hypothesis, we used a 3D infection model with freshly isolated PBMC infected with live C. pneumoniae and chlamydial antigens encapsulated in a collagen matrix, and analyzed the inflammatory responses over 7 days. We observed that infection significantly upregulates the secretion of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, MCP-1, MMP, oxidative stress, transendothelial permeability, and LDL uptake. We also observed that infected macrophages form clusters, and substantially modify the microstructure and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix to an atherogenic phenotype. Together, our data demonstrates that C. pneumoniae-infection drives a low-grade, sustained inflammation that may predispose in the transformation to atherosclerotic foci. PMID:27582738

  7. Prevalence of LDL atherogenic phenotype in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Olusi, Samuel O; George, Sunila

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are 5–8 times more likely to develop coronary heart disease than the general population. The aim of this study was to find out the prevalence of the small dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol particle in patients with SLE. Methods: We recruited 50 consecutive patients with SLE who had no evidence of hypertension or renal failure. Fifty age- and gender-matched healthy controls were also recruited. We measured serum lipid levels and LDL particle diameters by gradient gel electrophoresis in both patients and controls. Results: Patients with SLE had significant dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated plasma triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, Apoprotein B, triglyceride:high-density (HDL) lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and decreased plasma concentrations of HDL cholesterol. The LDL particle size in SLE (24.8 ± 1.23 nm) was significantly (P < 0.01) smaller than that in controls (26.1 ± 1.31 nm). The prevalence of the LDL phenotype B (the atherogenic phenotype) was 52% in SLE but only 20% in healthy controls. Conclusion: We conclude that the high prevalence of small dense LDL in SLE may contribute to the high incidence of coronary heart disease seen in this disorder. PMID:21415920

  8. Biophysical and Biochemical Outcomes of Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection Promotes Pro-atherogenic Matrix Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Evani, Shankar J; Dallo, Shatha F; Ramasubramanian, Anand K

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies support the hypothesis that infectious agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Chlamydia pneumoniae is strongly implicated in atherosclerosis, but the precise role has been underestimated and poorly understood due to the complexity of the disease process. In this work, we test the hypothesis that C. pneumoniae-infected macrophages lodged in the subendothelial matrix contribute to atherogenesis through pro-inflammatory factors and by cell-matrix interactions. To test this hypothesis, we used a 3D infection model with freshly isolated PBMC infected with live C. pneumoniae and chlamydial antigens encapsulated in a collagen matrix, and analyzed the inflammatory responses over 7 days. We observed that infection significantly upregulates the secretion of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, MCP-1, MMP, oxidative stress, transendothelial permeability, and LDL uptake. We also observed that infected macrophages form clusters, and substantially modify the microstructure and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix to an atherogenic phenotype. Together, our data demonstrates that C. pneumoniae-infection drives a low-grade, sustained inflammation that may predispose in the transformation to atherosclerotic foci. PMID:27582738

  9. Atherogenic Dyslipidemia in Children: Evaluation of Clinical, Biochemical and Genetic Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, Fabrizio; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Ciociola, Ester; Maranghi, Marianna; Gianfagna, Francesco; Iacoviello, Licia; Strom, Roberto; Lucarelli, Marco; Arca, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The precursors of atherogenic dyslipidemia (AD) are not well defined. Therefore, we investigated 62 non-obese, non-diabetic AD and 221 normolipemic children. Anthropometric parameters, blood pressure and biochemical measures were obtained in index children, their parents and all available siblings. The heritability (h2) of anthropometric and biochemical traits was estimated by SOLAR. Rare and common variants in APOA1 and LPL genes were screened by re-sequencing. Compared to normolipemic, AD children showed increased body mass index, waist circumference, plasma glucose, insulin, ApoB, HOMA-IR, hs-CRP and lower adiponectin (p<0.001 for all). Metabolic syndrome was present in 40% of AD while absent in controls. All traits (except adiponectin and hs-CRP) showed a strong familial aggregation, with plasma glucose having the highest heritability (89%). Overall, 4 LPL loss-of-function mutations were detected (p.Asp9Asn, p.Ser45Asn, p.Asn291Ser, p.Leu365Val) and their cumulative prevalence was higher in AD than in control children (0.073 vs. 0.026; P=0.038). The LPL p.S447* gain-of-function mutation, resulted to be less frequent in AD than in control children (0.064 vs. 0.126; P=0.082). No variant in the APOA1 gene was found. Our data indicate that AD is a rather common dyslipidemia in childhood; it associates with metabolic abnormalities typical of insulin resistant state and shows a strong familial aggregation. LPL variants may contribute to the development of AD phenotype. PMID:25897955

  10. Assessment of anti-atherogenic drugs in vivo and reconstitution of lipoproteins using radioiodinated cholesteryl iopanoate

    SciTech Connect

    DeGalan, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    A nonhydrolyzable radioiodinated cholesteryl ester, 125I-cholesteryl iopanoate (125I-Cl), was found to accumulate in high concentrations in atherosclerotic aortas of cholesterol-fed rabbits after intravenous administration. Aortas from normal chow-fed rabbits did not exhibit significant 125I-Cl accumulation. When cholesterol-fed rabbits were intravenously administered Tween-solubilized 125I-Cl and simultaneously treated with either of two anti-atherogenic compounds, estradiol 17..beta..-cypionate or colestipol, the extent of aortic atherosclerosis was found to dramatically decrease. Measurement of aortic radioactivity was found to strongly correlate with the severity of atherosclerosis. Although the specificity of 125I-Cl for atheromatous lesions was very good, gamma-camera scintigraphy of the abdomens of these rabbits 6 days after cessation of 125I-Cl administration was not able to consistently predict the severity of atherosclerosis. Tissue distribution studies suggested that high blood and spinal column bone marrow radioactivity produced aorta:nontarget radioactivity ratios unfavorable with respect to imaging. To improve this ratio so as to permit noninvasive imaging, attempts were made to incorporate 125I-Cl into serum lipoproteins. Labelling of either rabbit LDL by in vivo incorporation or human LDL by transfer of 125I-Cl from liposomes using cholesteryl ester transfer protein resulted in lipoproteins with low specific activity. Higher specific activity was achieved by reconstituting delipidated human LDL with a mixture of 125I-Cl and unlabeled cholesteryl oleate. These particles were taken up in high amounts by monolayers of human fibroblasts but not by fibroblasts deficient in LDL receptors or by normal fibroblasts during competition with unlabeled native LDL.

  11. Positive autoantibodies to ZnT8 indicate elevated risk for additional autoimmune conditions in patients with Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Fichna, Marta; Rogowicz-Frontczak, Anita; Żurawek, Magdalena; Fichna, Piotr; Gryczyńska, Maria; Zozulińska-Ziółkiewicz, Dorota; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-07-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) associates with exceptional susceptibility to develop other autoimmune conditions, including type 1 diabetes (T1D), marked by positive serum autoantibodies to insulin (IAA), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) and insulinoma-associated protein 2 (IA-2A). Zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) is a new T1D autoantigen, encoded by the SLC30A8 gene. Its polymorphic variant rs13266634C/T seems associated with the occurrence of serum ZnT8 antibodies (ZnT8A). This study was designed to determine the prevalence of serum ZnT8A and their clinical implication in 140 AAD patients. Other beta cell and thyroid-specific autoantibodies were also investigated, and ZnT8A results were confronted with the rs13266634 genotype. ZnT8A were detectable in 8.5 %, GADA in 20.7 %, IA-2A in 5.7 %, IAA in 1.6 % and various anti-thyroid antibodies in 7.1-67.8 % individuals. Type 1 diabetes was found in 10 % AAD patients. ZnT8A were positive in 57.1 % of T1D patients and 3.4 % non-diabetic AAD. Analysis of ZnT8A enabled to identify autoimmunity in two (14.3 %) T1D individuals previously classified as autoantibody-negative. ZnT8A-positive patients revealed significantly higher number of autoimmune conditions (p < 0.001), increased prevalence of T1D (p < 0.001) and other beta cell-specific autoantibodies. Carriers of the rs13266634 T-allele displayed increased frequency (p = 0.006) and higher titres of ZnT8A (p = 0.002). Our study demonstrates high incidence of ZnT8A in AAD patients. ZnT8A are associated with coexisting T1D and predictive of T1D in non-diabetic subjects. Moreover, positive ZnT8A in AAD indicate elevated risk for additional autoimmune conditions. Autoantibodies to beta cell antigens, comprising ZnT8, could be included in routine screening panels in AAD. PMID:26972575

  12. A first screening and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products in waste water, sludge, recipient water and sediment from Faroe Islands, Iceland and Greenland.

    PubMed

    Huber, Sandra; Remberger, Mikael; Kaj, Lennart; Schlabach, Martin; Jörundsdóttir, Hrönn Ó; Vester, Jette; Arnórsson, Mímir; Mortensen, Inge; Schwartson, Richard; Dam, Maria

    2016-08-15

    A screening of a broad range of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products (PPCPs) in sub-arctic locations of the Faroe Islands (FO), Iceland (IS) and Greenland (GL) was conducted. In total 36 pharmaceuticals including some metabolites, and seven additives in personal care products were investigated in influent and effluent waters as well as sludge of waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) and in water and sediment of recipients. Concentrations and distribution patterns for PPCPs discharged via sewage lines (SLs) to the marine environment were assessed. Of the 36 pharmaceuticals or metabolites analysed 33 were found close to or above the limit of detection (LOD) in all or a part of the samples. All of the seven investigated additives in personal care products were detected above the LOD. Some of the analysed PPCPs occurred in every or almost every sample. Among these were diclofenac, ibuprofen, lidocaine, naproxen, metformin, citalopram, venlafaxine, amiloride, furosemide, metoprolol, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and cetrimonium salt (ATAC-C16). Additionally, the study encompasses ecotoxicological risk assessment of 2/3 of the analysed PPCPs in recipient and diluted effluent waters. For candesartan only a small margin to levels with inacceptable risks was observed in diluted effluent waters at two locations (FO). Chronical risks for aquatic organisms staying and/or living around WWTP effluent pipe-outlets were indicated for 17β-estradiol and estriol in the three countries. Additives in PCPs were found to pose the largest risk to the aquatic environment. The surfactants CAPB and ATAC-C16 were found in concentrations resulting in risk factors up to 375 for CAPB and 165 for ATAC-C16 in recipients for diluted effluents from Iggia, Nuuk (GL) and Torshavn (FO) respectively. These results demonstrates a potentially high ecological risk stemming from discharge of surfactants as used in household and industrial detergents as well as additives in personal care

  13. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Yiannakouris, Nikos; Katsoulis, Michail; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Ordovas, Jose M; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Objectives An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for several conventional cardiovascular risk factors (ConvRFs), including smoking, hypertension, type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), body mass index (BMI), physical activity and adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Design A case–control study. Setting The general Greek population of the EPIC study. Participants and outcome measures 477 patients with medically confirmed incident CHD and 1271 controls participated in this study. We estimated the ORs for CHD by dividing participants at higher or lower GRS and, alternatively, at higher or lower ConvRF, and calculated the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) as a measure of deviation from additivity. Results The joint presence of higher GRS and higher risk ConvRF was in all instances associated with an increased risk of CHD, compared with the joint presence of lower GRS and lower risk ConvRF. The OR (95% CI) was 1.7 (1.2 to 2.4) for smoking, 2.7 (1.9 to 3.8) for hypertension, 4.1 (2.8 to 6.1) for T2DM, 1.9 (1.4 to 2.5) for lower physical activity, 2.0 (1.3 to 3.2) for high BMI and 1.5 (1.1 to 2.1) for poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet. In all instances, RERI values were fairly small and not statistically significant, suggesting that the GRS and the ConvRFs do not have effects beyond additivity. Conclusions Genetic predisposition to CHD, operationalised through a multilocus GRS, and ConvRFs have essentially additive effects on CHD risk. PMID:24500614

  14. Effects of Elaeagnus angustifolia L. on Lipid Profile and Atherogenic Indices in Obese Females: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Nikniaz, Zeinab; Mahdavi, Reza; Nikniaz, Leila; Ebrahimi, Aliasghar; Ostadrahimi, Alireza

    2016-11-01

    In the present randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled study, the effect of Elaeagnus angustifolia L. (EA) whole fruit and medulla powders on anthropometric indices, serum lipid profile, and atherogenic indices in females with knee osteoarthritis (OA) was investigated. Ninety females with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned to one of three groups-medulla powder, whole fruit powder, or placebo. The subjects received 15 g/day of medulla powder of EA, whole fruit powder of EA, or placebo. Lipid profile, weight, and dietary intake were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. Body mass index and atherogenic indices were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 13.0, and Paired t tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and the Tukey post hoc test were used to compare within-group and between-group values. After 8 weeks of supplementations, compared with the baseline, significant reductions in total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein/high density lipoprotein (LDL/HDL), and TC/HDL ratios were observed in the two supplemented groups; however, the reduction of these values was not statistically significant in the placebo group. There were significant differences between the patients who received medulla powder and placebo group in the case of changes in TC/HDL and LDL/HDL ratios (p < .001). However, no significant differences were found between the two supplemented groups in the case of changes in studied values (p > .05). Generally, whole fruit and medulla powders of Elaeagnus angustifolia L. had positive effects, especially in decreasing total cholesterol and atherogenic indices in females with knee OA. PMID:26930244

  15. The benefits of an additional worker are task-dependent: assessing low-back injury risks during prefabricated (panelized) wall construction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunwook; Nussbaum, Maury A; Jia, Bochen

    2012-09-01

    Team manual material handling is a common practice in residential construction where prefabricated building components (e.g., wall panels) are increasingly used. As part of a larger effort to enable proactive control of ergonomic exposures among workers handling panels, this study explored the effects of additional workers on injury risks during team-based panel erection tasks, specifically by quantifying how injury risks are affected by increasing the number of workers (by one, above the nominal or most common number). Twenty-four participants completed panel erection tasks with and without an additional worker under different panel mass and size conditions. Four risk assessment methods were employed that emphasized the low back. Though including an additional worker generally reduced injury risk across several panel masses and sizes, the magnitude of these benefits varied depending on the specific task and exhibited somewhat high variability within a given task. These results suggest that a simple, generalizable recommendation regarding team-based panel erection tasks is not warranted. Rather, a more systems-level approach accounting for both injury risk and productivity (a strength of panelized wall systems) should be undertaken. PMID:22226545

  16. Were There "Additional Foreseeable Risks" in the SUPPORT Study? Lessons Not Learned from the ARDSnet Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Henry J; Dreyfuss, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Even though the interventions were adapted from standard clinical practice, the way they were provided meant that the care given infants in the study was distinctly different from standard care, with different risk profiles. Parents should have been informed about those differences. PMID:25530226

  17. Inaccuracy of Self-Evaluation as Additional Variable for Prediction of Students at Risk of Failing First-Year Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potgieter, Marietjie; Ackermann, Mia; Fletcher, Lizelle

    2010-01-01

    Early identification of students at risk of failing first-year chemistry allows timely intervention. Cognitive factors alone are insufficient predictors for success; however, non cognitive factors are usually difficult to measure. We have explored the use of demographic and performance variables, as well as the accuracy of self-evaluation as an…

  18. Cognitive Processes that Account for Mental Addition Fluency Differences between Children Typically Achieving in Arithmetic and Children At-Risk for Failure in Arithmetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Derek H.; Hutchinson, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether processing speed, short-term memory, and working memory accounted for the differential mental addition fluency between children typically achieving in arithmetic (TA) and children at-risk for failure in arithmetic (AR). Further, we drew attention to fluency differences in simple (e.g., 5 + 3) and complex (e.g., 16 +…

  19. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for severa...

  20. Smoking and polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolism and DNA repair genes are additive risk factors affecting bladder cancer in Northern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Rouissi, Kamel; Ouerhani, Slah; Hamrita, Bechr; Bougatef, Karim; Marrakchi, Raja; Cherif, Mohamed; Ben Slama, Mohamed Riadh; Bouzouita, Mohamed; Chebil, Mohamed; Ben Ammar Elgaaied, Amel

    2011-12-01

    Cancer epidemiology has undergone marked development since the nineteen-fifties. One of the most spectacular and specific contributions was the demonstration of the massive effect of smoking and genetic polymorphisms on the occurrence of bladder cancer. The tobacco carcinogens are metabolized by various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as the super-families of N-acetyltransferases (NAT) and glutathione S-transferases (GST). DNA repair is essential to an individual's ability to respond to damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Alterations in DNA repair genes may affect cancer risk by influencing individual susceptibility to this environmental exposure. Polymorphisms in NAT2, GST and DNA repair genes alter the ability of these enzymes to metabolize carcinogens or to repair alterations caused by this process. We have conducted a case-control study to assess the role of smoking, slow NAT2 variants, GSTM1 and GSTT1 null, and XPC, XPD, XPG nucleotide excision-repair (NER) genotypes in bladder cancer development in North Tunisia. Taken alone, each gene unless NAT2 did not appear to be a factor affecting bladder cancer susceptibility. For the NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes, the NAT2*5/*7 diplotype was found to have a 7-fold increased risk to develop bladder cancer (OR = 7.14; 95% CI: 1.30-51.41). However, in tobacco consumers, we have shown that Null GSTM1, Wild GSTT1, Slow NAT2, XPC (CC) and XPG (CC) are genetic risk factors for the disease. When combined together in susceptible individuals compared to protected individuals these risk factors give an elevated OR (OR = 61). So, we have shown a strong cumulative effect of tobacco and different combinations of studied genetic risk factors which lead to a great susceptibility to bladder cancer. PMID:21647780

  1. Treatment with pravastatin and fenofibrate improves atherogenic lipid profiles but not inflammatory markers in ACTG 5087

    PubMed Central

    Fichtenbaum, Carl J.; Yeh, Tzu-Min; Evans, Scott R.; Aberg, Judith A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Statins and fibrates alter lipids, apolipoproteins and inflammatory markers in persons without HIV. The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in lipoproteins, apolipoproteins and other markers of inflammation with the use of pravastatin and fenofibrate. Design Evaluation of participants in ACTG A5087, a randomized trial of pravastatin 40 mg/day or fenofibrate 200 mg/day for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Participants that failed single-agent therapy at week 12 were given the combination. Methods Participants with available specimens were tested for apolipoproteins A1 and B, adiponectin, plasminogen-activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), P-selectin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Results 74 participants (37 per randomized arm) received either pravastatin or fenofibrate for 12 weeks with 60 receiving combination treatment from weeks 12–48. There were no significant changes in hs-CRP, PAI-1, and P-selectin. From baseline to week 12, the median Apo B levels (−8 mg/dL, P=0.01 for fenofibrate and −27 mg/dL, P<0.01 for pravastatin) and ApoB/A1 ratios (−0.16, P<0.01 for both arms) significantly decreased. From baseline to week 48, median adiponectin (−1 ng/dL, P<0.01), Apo B (−22 mg/dL, P<0.01) and Apo B/A1 ratios (−0.2, P<0.01) all decreased in those who went on combination therapy, whereas Apo A1 (9.5 mg/dL, P=0.01) levels increased. Conclusion Treatment with pravastatin or fenofibrate improves the atherogenic lipid profile within the first 12 weeks and is sustained through 48 weeks with combination therapy. Adiponectin levels decrease with lipid-lowering therapy. However, markers of inflammation and platelet activation were not appreciably changed suggesting that the biologic properties of these agents differ in persons with HIV infection. PMID:20824151

  2. Standardized flavonoid-rich Eugenia jambolana seed extract retards in vitro and in vivo LDL oxidation and expression of VCAM-1 and P-selectin in atherogenic rats.

    PubMed

    Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Thouaojam, Menaka C; Sankhari, Jayantha M; Jain, Mahendra; Devkar, Ranjitsinh V; Ramachandran, A V

    2012-03-01

    The present inventory evaluates anti-atherogenic potential of flavonoid-rich Eugenia jambolana seed extract (EJSE) against in vitro low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, foam cell formation, and atherogenic (ATH) diet-induced experimental atherosclerosis in rats. EJSE was able to prevent in vitro LDL oxidation and oxidized LDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation. Also, EJSE supplementation to ATH rats significantly minimized increment in serum markers of LDL oxidation. The ex vivo oxidation indices were also minimized in LDL of EJSE-treated animals. Microscopic evaluation of thoracic aorta of ATH + EJSE rats recorded minimal evidence of atheromatous plaque formation, accumulation of lipid laden macrophages, calcium deposition, and expression of cell adhesion molecules (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and P-selectin). This is the first scientific report that demonstrates anti-atherogenic potential of EJSE and warrants further evaluation at clinical level. PMID:21863403

  3. Additive Effects of the Risk Alleles of PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 on Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Zhipeng; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhaowen; Sun, Xing; Zhong, Lin; Deng, Guilong; Song, Guohe; Sun, Baining; Peng, Zhihai; Liu, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified that variants in or near PNPLA3, NCAN, GCKR, LYPLAL1, and TM6SF2 are significantly associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in multiple ethnic groups. Studies on their impact on NAFLD in Han Chinese are still limited. In this study, we examined the relevance of these variants to NAFLD in a community-based Han Chinese population and further explored their potential joint effect on NAFLD. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (PNPLA3 rs738409, rs2294918, NCAN rs2228603, GCKR rs780094, LYPLAL1 rs12137855, and TM6SF2 rs58542926) previously identified in genome-wide analyses, to be associated with NAFLD were genotyped in 384 NAFLD patients and 384 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. We found two out of the six polymorphisms, PNPLA3 rs738409 (OR = 1.52, 95%CI: 1.19–1.96; P = 0.00087) and TM6SF2 rs58542926 (OR = 2.11, 95%CI: 1.34–3.39; P = 0.0016) are independently associated with NAFLD after adjustment for the effects of age, gender, and BMI. Our analysis further demonstrated the strong additive effects of the risk alleles of PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 with an overall significance between the number of risk alleles and NAFLD (OR = 1.64, 95%CI: 1.34–2.01; P = 1.4 × 10-6). The OR for NAFLD increased in an additive manner, with an average increase in OR of 1.52 per additional risk allele. Our results confirmed that the PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 variants were the most significant risk alleles for NAFLD in Chinese population. Therefore, genotyping these two genetic risk factors may help identify individuals with the highest risk of NAFLD. PMID:27532011

  4. Grape powder polyphenols attenuate atherosclerosis development in apolipoprotein E deficient (E0) mice and reduce macrophage atherogenicity.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, Bianca; Volkova, Nina; Coleman, Raymond; Aviram, Michael

    2005-04-01

    The beneficial health effects of red wine have been attributed to the antioxidant activity of its polyphenols. The present study investigated the effects of a standardized freeze-dried powder made from fresh grapes, rich in grape-specific polyphenols and free of alcohol, on oxidative stress, atherogenicity of macrophages, and the development of atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein E deficient (E(0)) mice. Thirty E(0) mice were assigned to 3 groups. Mice consumed water alone (control), 150 mug total polyphenols/d in the form of grape powder (grape powder), or the equivalent amount of glucose and fructose (placebo) in drinking water for 10 wk. Consumption of grape powder reduced the atherosclerotic lesion area by 41% (P < 0.0002) compared to the control or placebo mice. The antiatherosclerotic effect was at least partly due to a significant 8% reduction in serum oxidative stress, an up to 22% increase in serum antioxidant capacity, a significant 33% reduction in macrophage uptake of oxidized LDL, and a 25% decrease in macrophage-mediated oxidation of LDL relative to controls. Grape powder directly protected both plasma LDL and macrophages from oxidative stress in vitro. We conclude that polyphenols from fresh grape powder directly affect macrophage atherogenicity by reducing macrophage-mediated oxidation of LDL and cellular uptake of oxidized LDL. Both of these processes can eventually reduce macrophage cholesterol accumulation and foam cell formation and hence attenuate atherosclerosis development. PMID:15795424

  5. Coriandrum sativum L. seed extract mitigates lipotoxicity in RAW 264.7 cells and prevents atherogenic changes in rats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipak; Desai, Swati; Gajaria, Tejal; Devkar, Ranjitsinh; Ramachandran, A.V.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the efficacy of Coriandrum sativum L. (CS) in preventing in vitro low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation mediated macrophage modification. Further, an in vivo study was also conducted to confirm upon the efficacy of CS seed extract in alleviating pathophysiological alterations of high cholesterol diet induced atherosclerosis in rats. Copper mediated cell free oxidation of LDL accounted for elevated indices of malondialdehyde (MDA), lipid hydroperoxide (LHP)and protein carbonyl (PC) and a progressive increment in conjugate diene (CD) levels whereas, reverse set of changes were recorded in presence of CS extract. Cell mediated LDL oxidation (using RAW 264.7 cells) accounted for lowered MDA production and oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL) mediated cell death in presence of CS extract and the same was attributed to its potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging potentials. High cholesterol fed atherogenic rats showed elevated lipid indices, evidences of LDL oxidation, plaque formation in thoracic aorta. The same was further validated with immunostaining of cell adhesion molecules and hematoxylin and eosin (HXE) staining. However, co-supplementation of CS to atherogenic rats recorded significant lowering of the above mentioned parameters further strengthening the claim that CS extract is instrumental in preventing onset and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26417232

  6. Intrauterine diabetic environment confers risks for type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity in the offspring, in addition to genetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Dabelea, D; Pettitt, D J

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that offspring whose mothers had type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are more likely to develop type 2 DM, impaired glucose tolerance, and obesity at an early age than offspring whose fathers had DM. Exposure to the diabetic intrauterine environment has been shown to be an important risk factor for all these conditions. To what extent transmission of type 2 DM from mother to offspring is the effect of genetic inheritance and to what extent it is the long-term consequence of exposure to maternal hyperglycemia is still uncertain. There are, of course, interactions between the diabetic intrauterine environment and genetics. Several data in experimental animals as well as in humans suggest, however, that exposure of the fetus to the mother's DM confers a risk for type 2 DM and obesity that is above any genetically transmitted susceptibility. In the Pima Indian population much of the increase in childhood type 2 DM can be attributed to the diabetic intrauterine environment. This suggests that intensive glucose control during pregnancy might have extended beneficial effects, contributing to a decrease in the prevalence of childhood type 2 DM. PMID:11592564

  7. Child Effortful Control, Teacher-student Relationships, and Achievement in Academically At-risk Children: Additive and Interactive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Jeffrey; Chen, Qi; Hughes, Jan N.

    2009-01-01

    The joint contributions of child effortful control (using inhibitory control and task accuracy as behavioral indices) and positive teacher-student relationships at first grade on reading and mathematics achievement at second grade were examined in 761 children who were predominantly from low-income and ethnic minority backgrounds and assessed to be academically at-risk at entry to first grade. Analyses accounted for clustering effects, covariates, baselines of effortful control measures, and prior levels of achievement. Even with such conservative statistical controls, interactive effects were found for task accuracy and positive teacher-student relationships on future achievement. Results suggest that task accuracy served as a protective factor so that children with high task accuracy performed well academically despite not having positive teacher-student relationships. Further, positive teacher-student relationships served as a compensatory factor so that children with low task accuracy performed just as well as those with high task accuracy if they were paired with a positive and supportive teacher. Importantly, results indicate that the influence of positive teacher-student relationships on future achievement was most pronounced for students with low effortful control on tasks that require fine motor skills, accuracy, and attention-related skills. Study results have implications for narrowing achievement disparities for academically at-risk children. PMID:20161421

  8. Intensifying instruction: Does additional instructional time make a difference for the most at-risk first graders?

    PubMed

    Harn, Beth A; Linan-Thompson, Sylvia; Roberts, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Research is clear on the benefit of early intervention efforts and the importance of intensive instructional supports; however, understanding which features to intensify is less clear. General intervention features of group size, instructional delivery, and time are areas schools can consider manipulating to intensify instruction. Also, each of these features can vary along a continuum making them easier or more challenging for schools to implement. What is unclear is if implementing very intensive interventions early in school (first grade), which require significantly more school resources, provides accordingly accelerated student learning. This article investigates the role of intensifying instructional time for the most at-risk first graders in schools implementing research-based instructional and assessment practices within multitiered instructional support systems. Results indicate that students receiving more intensive intervention made significantly more progress across a range of early reading measures. Intervention features, limitations, recommendations for practice, and implications for treatment resisters are discussed. PMID:18354932

  9. Olive Leaf Extract Improves the Atherogenic Lipid Profile in Rats Fed a High Cholesterol Diet.

    PubMed

    Olmez, Ercument; Vural, Kamil; Gok, Sule; Ozturk, Zeynep; Kayalar, Husniye; Ayhan, Semin; Var, Ahmet

    2015-10-01

    Coronary heart disease because of atherosclerosis is still the most common cause of mortality. Elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein and total cholesterol are major risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the olive leaf extract on serum lipid profile, early changes of atherosclerosis and endothelium-dependent relaxations in cholesterol-fed rats. For this purpose, rats were fed by 2% cholesterol-enriched or standard chow for 8 weeks. Some rats in each group were also fed orally by olive leaf extract at doses of 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. Atorvastatin at dose of 20 mg/kg of body weight daily was also given as positive control. After 8 weeks, lipid profiles of rat serums were analyzed. Antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) and degree of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde levels) were also measured in the hearts isolated from rats. In addition, expression of adhesion molecules and endothelium-dependent relaxations of isolated thoracic aortas of rats were evaluated. Total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels were found to be increased in cholesterol-fed rats, and both doses of olive leaf extract and atorvastatin significantly decreased those levels. In conclusion, because the olive leaf extract attenuates the increased cholesterol levels, it may have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. PMID:26328503

  10. Soil Cd availability to Indian mustard and environmental risk following EDTA addition to Cd-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X J; Luo, Y M; Zhao, Q G; Baker, A J M; Christie, P; Wong, M H

    2003-02-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of EDTA on the extractability of Cd in the soil and uptake of Cd by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea). Twenty levels of soil Cd concentration ranging from 10 to 200 mg kg(-1) were produced by spiking aliquots of a clay loam paddy soil with Cd(NO3)2. One week before the plants were harvested EDTA was applied to pots in which the soil had been spiked with 20, 40, 60...200 mg Cd kg(-1). The EDTA was added at the rate calculated to complex with all of the Cd added at the 200 mg kg(-1) level. Control pots spiked with 10, 30, 50... 190 mg Cd kg(-1) received no EDTA. The plants were harvested after 42 days' growth. Soil water- and NH4NO3-extractable Cd fractions increased rapidly following EDTA application. Root Cd concentrations decreased after EDTA application, but shoot concentrations increased when the soil Cd levels were >130 mg kg(-1) and Cd toxicity symptoms were observed. The increases in soil solution Cd induced by EDTA did not increase plant total Cd uptake but appeared to stimulate the translocation of the metal from roots to shoots when the plants appeared to be under Cd toxicity stress. The results are discussed in relation to the possible mechanisms by which EDTA may change the solubility and bioavailability of Cd in the soil and the potential for plant uptake and environmental risk due to leaching losses to groundwater. PMID:12688496

  11. An approach towards risk assessment for the use of a synergistic metallic diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. L.; Richards, P. J.

    The motivations for legislation to set diesel emissions limits requiring the use of diesel particulate filters (DPF) are summarised. If the DPF is to be used, demonstration of regeneration (combustion of collected carbonaceous material) without additional emission problems is important. Potential metal emissions resulting from use of a synergistic Fe/Sr fuel-borne DPF regeneration catalyst are evaluated. Measurements over legislated drive cycle estimate the metals to comprise 1-2% of the solid material emitted, and the DPF to collect >99% of such material. Diesel particulate matter is used as a marker, and from existing air quality and emission inventory measurements, maximum conceivable increases of <1 ng m -3 and <250 pg m -3 for iron and strontium, respectively, are calculated. From environmental assessment levels, derived from occupational exposure limits, these are not significant. For humans, daily ingress of airborne Sr is estimated at 3.5 ng. This is small compared to the known Sr contents of lungs, blood and the daily diet. In the context of reductions of other metals, particulate matter and pollutant emissions, the overall assessment is that the use of these metals to enable use of a DPF allows significant net environmental benefit to be obtained.

  12. 14 Days of supplementation with blueberry extract shows anti-atherogenic properties and improves oxidative parameters in hypercholesterolemic rats model.

    PubMed

    Ströher, Deise Jaqueline; Escobar Piccoli, Jacqueline da Costa; Güllich, Angélica Aparecida da Costa; Pilar, Bruna Cocco; Coelho, Ritiéle Pinto; Bruno, Jamila Benvegnú; Faoro, Debora; Manfredini, Vanusa

    2015-01-01

    The effects of supplementation with blueberry (BE) extract (Vaccinium ashei Reade) for 14 consecutive days on biochemical, hematological, histopathological and oxidative parameters in hypercholesterolemic rats were investigated. After supplementation with lyophilized extract of BE, the levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were decreased. Histopathological analysis showed significant decrease (p < 0.05) of aortic lesions in hypercholesterolemic rats. Oxidative parameters showed significant reductions (p < 0.05) in oxidative damage to lipids and proteins and an increase in activities of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. The BE extract showed an important cardioprotective effect by the improvements in the serum lipid profile, antioxidant system, particularly in reducing oxidative stress associated with hypercholesterolemia and anti-atherogenic effect in rats. PMID:26171628

  13. Additive and interaction effects at three amino acid positions in HLA-DQ and HLA-DR molecules drive type 1 diabetes risk

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xinli; Deutsch, Aaron J; Lenz, Tobias L; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Han, Buhm; Chen, Wei-Min; Howson, Joanna M M; Todd, John A; de Bakker, Paul I W; Rich, Stephen S; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    Variation in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes accounts for one-half of the genetic risk in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Amino acid changes in the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ molecules mediate most of the risk, but extensive linkage disequilibrium complicates the localization of independent effects. Using 18,832 case-control samples, we localized the signal to 3 amino acid positions in HLA-DQ and HLA-DR. HLA-DQβ1 position 57 (previously known; P = 1 × 10−1,355) by itself explained 15.2% of the total phenotypic variance. Independent effects at HLA-DRβ1 positions 13 (P = 1 × 10−721) and 71 (P = 1 × 10−95) increased the proportion of variance explained to 26.9%. The three positions together explained 90% of the phenotypic variance in the HLA-DRB1–HLA-DQA1–HLA-DQB1 locus. Additionally, we observed significant interactions for 11 of 21 pairs of common HLA-DRB1–HLA-DQA1–HLA-DQB1 haplotypes (P = 1.6 × 10−64). HLA-DRβ1 positions 13 and 71 implicate the P4 pocket in the antigen-binding groove, thus pointing to another critical protein structure for T1D risk, in addition to the HLA-DQ P9 pocket. PMID:26168013

  14. New pyripyropene A derivatives, highly SOAT2-selective inhibitors, improve hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in atherogenic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Taichi; Ohtawa, Masaki; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Matsuda, Daisuke; Yagyu, Hiroaki; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L; Ishibashi, Shun; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Sterol O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2; also known as ACAT2) is considered as a new therapeutic target for the treatment or prevention of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Fungal pyripyropene A (PPPA: 1,7,11-triacyl type), the first SOAT2-selective inhibitor, proved orally active in vivo using atherogenic mouse models. The purpose of the present study was to demonstrate that the PPPA derivatives (PRDs) prove more effective in the mouse models than PPPA. Among 196 semisynthetic PPPA derivatives, potent, SOAT2-selective, and stable PRDs were selected. In vivo antiatherosclerotic activity of selected PRDs was tested in apolipoprotein E knockout (Apoe(-/-)) mice or low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Ldlr(-/-)) mice fed a cholesterol-enriched diet (0.2% cholesterol and 21% fat) for 12 weeks. During the PRD treatments, no detrimental side effects were observed. Among three PRDs, Apoe(-/-) mice treated with PRD125 (1-,11-O-benzylidene type) at 1 mg/kg/day had significantly lower total plasma cholesterol concentration by 57.9 ± 9.3%; further, the ratio of cholesteryl oleate to cholesteryl linoleate in low-density lipoprotein was lower by 55.6 ± 7.5%, respectively. The hepatic cholesteryl ester levels and SOAT2 activity in the small intestines and livers of the PRD-treated mice were selectively lowered. The atherosclerotic lesion areas in the aortae of PRD125-treated mice were significantly lower at 62.2 ± 13.1%, respectively. Furthermore, both PRDs were also orally active in atherogenic Ldlr(-/-) mice. Among the PRDs tested, PRD125 was the most potent in both mouse models. These results suggest that SOAT2-selective inhibitors such as PRD125 have a high potential as poststatin agents for treatment and/or prevention in patients with atherosclerosis and hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26338984

  15. Risk of adverse events with bevacizumab addition to therapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xi-Xi; Xu, Ren-Ai; Yu-Ping, Li; Yang, Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor ligand, has shown survival benefits in the treatment of many types of malignant tumors, including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the risk of the most clinically relevant adverse events related to bevacizumab in advanced NSCLC. Methods Databases from PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library up to August 2015, were searched to identify relevant studies. We included prospective randomized controlled Phase II/III clinical trials that compared therapy with or without bevacizumab for advanced NSCLC. Summary relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random effects or fixed effects according to the heterogeneity among included trials. Results A total of 3,745 patients from nine clinical trials were included in the meta-analysis. Summary RRs showed a statistically significant bevacizumab-associated increased risk in three of the adverse outcomes studied: proteinuria (RR =7.55), hypertension (RR =5.34), and hemorrhagic events (RR =2.61). No statistically significant differences were found for gastrointestinal perforation (P=0.60), arterial and venous thromboembolic events (P=0.35 and P=0.92, respectively), or fatal events (P=0.29). Conclusion The addition of bevacizumab to therapy in advanced NSCLC did significantly increase the risk of proteinuria, hypertension, and hemorrhagic events but not arterial/venous thromboembolic events, gastrointestinal perforation, or fatal adverse events. PMID:27143937

  16. Improving nutrient management practices in agriculture: The role of risk-based beliefs in understanding farmers' attitudes toward taking additional action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robyn S.; Howard, Gregory; Burnett, Elizabeth A.

    2014-08-01

    A recent increase in the amount of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) entering the western Lake Erie basin is likely due to increased spring storm events in combination with issues related to fertilizer application and timing. These factors in combination with warmer lake temperatures have amplified the spread of toxic algal blooms. We assessed the attitudes of farmers in northwest Ohio toward taking at least one additional action to reduce nutrient loss on their farm. Specifically, we (1) identified to what extent farm and farmer characteristics (e.g., age, gross farm sales) as well as risk-based beliefs (e.g., efficacy, risk perception) influenced attitudes, and (2) assessed how these characteristics and beliefs differ in their predictive ability based on unobservable latent classes of farmers. Risk perception, or a belief that negative impacts to profit and water quality from nutrient loss were likely, was the most consistent predictor of farmer attitudes. Response efficacy, or a belief that taking action on one's farm made a difference, was found to significantly influence attitudes, although this belief was particularly salient for the minority class of farmers who were older and more motivated by profit. Communication efforts should focus on the negative impacts of nutrient loss to both the farm (i.e., profit) and the natural environment (i.e., water quality) to raise individual perceived risk among the majority, while the minority need higher perceived efficacy or more specific information about the economic effectiveness of particular recommended practices.

  17. Lack of Benefit for the Addition of Androgen Deprivation Therapy to Dose-Escalated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Daniel; Kestin, Larry; Ye, Hong; Brabbins, Donald; Ghilezan, Michel; Gustafson, Gary; Vicini, Frank; Martinez, Alvaro

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Assessment of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) benefits for prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 2004, 1,044 patients with intermediate- (n = 782) or high-risk (n = 262) prostate cancer were treated with dose-escalated RT at William Beaumont Hospital. Patients received external-beam RT (EBRT) alone, brachytherapy (high or low dose rate), or high dose rate brachytherapy plus pelvic EBRT. Intermediate-risk patients had Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10.0-19.9 ng/mL, or Stage T2b-T2c. High-risk patients had Gleason score 8-10, PSA {>=}20, or Stage T3. Patients were additionally divided specifically by Gleason score, presence of palpable disease, and PSA level to further define subgroups benefitting from ADT. Results: Median follow-up was 5 years; 420 patients received ADT + dose-escalated RT, and 624 received dose-escalated RT alone. For all patients, no advantages in any clinical endpoints at 8 years were associated with ADT administration. No differences in any endpoints were associated with ADT administration based on intermediate- vs. high-risk group or RT modality when analyzed separately. Patients with palpable disease plus Gleason {>=}8 demonstrated improved clinical failure rates and a trend toward improved survival with ADT. Intermediate-risk patients treated with brachytherapy alone had improved biochemical control when ADT was given. Conclusion: Benefits of ADT in the setting of dose-escalated RT remain poorly defined. This question must continue to be addressed in prospective study.

  18. Apheresis and intravenous immunoglobulins used in addition to conventional therapy to treat high-risk pregnant antiphospholipid antibody syndrome patients. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ruffatti, Amelia; Favaro, Maria; Hoxha, Ariela; Zambon, Alessandra; Marson, Piero; Del Ross, Teresa; Calligaro, Antonia; Tonello, Marta; Nardelli, Giovanni B

    2016-06-01

    Pregnant women with triple antibody positive antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) who have had thrombosis or a history of early, severe pregnancy complications are generally considered at high risk of pregnancy loss. The objectives of this study were to investigate the efficacy and safety of a relatively new treatment protocol used in addition to conventional therapy in high-risk pregnant patients affected with primary APS. The study's two inclusion criteria were: (1) the presence of triple antiphospholipid positivity, (2) previous thrombosis and/or a history of one or more early, severe pregnancy complications. Eighteen pregnancies occurring between 2002 and 2015 in 14 APS patients, (mean age 34.8±3.6 SD) were monitored. All 14 (100%) patients had triple antiphospholipid positivity. In addition, six of them (42.8%) had a history of thrombosis, four (28.6%) had one or more previous early and severe pregnancy complications, and four (30.8%) met both clinical study criteria. The study protocol included weekly plasmapheresis or immunoadsorption and fortnightly 1g/kg intravenous immunoglobulins. Seventeen of the pregnancies (94.4%) produced live neonates, all born between the 26th and 37th weeks of gestation (mean 33.1±3.5 SD). One female (5.5%), born prematurely at 24 weeks, died of sepsis a week after birth. There were two cases (11.1%) of severe pregnancy complications. No treatment side effects were registered. Given the high live birth rate and the safety associated to it, the study protocol described here could be taken into consideration by medical teams treating high-risk APS pregnant patients. PMID:27088752

  19. A Risk Score with Additional Four Independent Factors to Predict the Incidence and Recovery from Metabolic Syndrome: Development and Validation in Large Japanese Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Obokata, Masaru; Negishi, Kazuaki; Ohyama, Yoshiaki; Okada, Haruka; Imai, Kunihiko; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many risk factors for Metabolic syndrome (MetS) have been reported, there is no clinical score that predicts its incidence. The purposes of this study were to create and validate a risk score for predicting both incidence and recovery from MetS in a large cohort. Methods Subjects without MetS at enrollment (n = 13,634) were randomly divided into 2 groups and followed to record incidence of MetS. We also examined recovery from it in rest 2,743 individuals with prevalent MetS. Results During median follow-up of 3.0 years, 878 subjects in the derivation and 757 in validation cohorts developed MetS. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified 12 independent variables from the derivation cohort and initial score for subsequent MetS was created, which showed good discrimination both in the derivation (c-statistics 0.82) and validation cohorts (0.83). The predictability of the initial score for recovery from MetS was tested in the 2,743 MetS population (906 subjects recovered from MetS), where nine variables (including age, sex, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, uric acid and five MetS diagnostic criteria constituents.) remained significant. Then, the final score was created using the nine variables. This score significantly predicted both the recovery from MetS (c-statistics 0.70, p<0.001, 78% sensitivity and 54% specificity) and incident MetS (c-statistics 0.80) with an incremental discriminative ability over the model derived from five factors used in the diagnosis of MetS (continuous net reclassification improvement: 0.35, p < 0.001 and integrated discrimination improvement: 0.01, p<0.001). Conclusions We identified four additional independent risk factors associated with subsequent MetS, developed and validated a risk score to predict both incident and recovery from MetS. PMID:26230621

  20. The effectiveness of power-generating complexes constructed on the basis of nuclear power plants combined with additional sources of energy determined taking risk factors into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Khrustalev, V. A.; Portyankin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The effectiveness of combining nuclear power plants equipped with water-cooled water-moderated power-generating reactors (VVER) with other sources of energy within unified power-generating complexes is analyzed. The use of such power-generating complexes makes it possible to achieve the necessary load pickup capability and flexibility in performing the mandatory selective primary and emergency control of load, as well as participation in passing the night minimums of electric load curves while retaining high values of the capacity utilization factor of the entire power-generating complex at higher levels of the steam-turbine part efficiency. Versions involving combined use of nuclear power plants with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units for generating electricity are considered. In view of the fact that hydrogen is an unsafe energy carrier, the use of which introduces additional elements of risk, a procedure for evaluating these risks under different conditions of implementing the fuel-and-hydrogen cycle at nuclear power plants is proposed. Risk accounting technique with the use of statistical data is considered, including the characteristics of hydrogen and gas pipelines, and the process pipelines equipment tightness loss occurrence rate. The expected intensities of fires and explosions at nuclear power plants fitted with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units are calculated. In estimating the damage inflicted by events (fires and explosions) occurred in nuclear power plant turbine buildings, the US statistical data were used. Conservative scenarios of fires and explosions of hydrogen-air mixtures in nuclear power plant turbine buildings are presented. Results from calculations of the introduced annual risk to the attained net annual profit ratio in commensurable versions are given. This ratio can be used in selecting projects characterized by the most technically attainable and socially acceptable safety.

  1. Contribution of Nrf2 to Atherogenic Phenotype Switching of Coronary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells Lacking CD38 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Li, Xiao-Xue; Wang, Lei; Wang, Mi; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pin-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Recent studies have indicated that CD38 gene deficiency results in dedifferentiation or transdifferentiation of arterial smooth muscle cells upon atherogenic stimulations. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this vascular smooth muscle (SMC) phenotypic switching remain unknown. Methods & Results In the present study, we first characterized the phenotypic change in the primary cultures of coronary arterial myocytes (CAMs) from CD38−/− mice. It was shown that CD38 deficiency decreased the expression of contractile marker calponin, SM22α and α-SMA but increased the expression of SMC dedifferentiation marker, vimentin, which was accompanied by enhanced cell proliferation. This phenotypic change in CD38−/− CAMs was enhanced by 7-ketocholesterol (7-Ket), an atherogenic stimulus. We further found that the CD38 deficiency decreased the expression and activity of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor sensitive to redox regulation. Similar to CD38 deletion, Nrf2 gene silencing increased CAM dedifferentiation upon 7-Ket stimulation. In contrast, the overexpression of Nrf2 gene abolished 7-Ket-induced dedifferentiation in CD38−/− CAMs. Given the sensitivity of Nrf2 to oxidative stress, we determined the role of redox signaling in the regulation of Nrf2 expression and activity associated with CD38 effect in CAM phenotype changes. It was demonstrated that in CD38−/− CAMs, 7-Ket failed to stimulate the production of O2−., while in CD38+/+ CAMs 7-Ket induced marked O2−. production and enhancement of Nrf2 activity, which was substantially attenuated by NOX4 gene silencing. Finally, we demonstrated that 7-Ket-induced and NOX4-dependent O2−. production was inhibited by 8-Br-cADPR, an antagonist of cADPR or NED-19, an antagonist of NAADP as product of CD38 ADP-ribosylcyclase, which significantly inhibited the level of cytosolic Ca2+ and the activation of Nrf2 under 7-Ket. Conclusion

  2. Red blood cell MUFAs and risk of coronary artery disease in the Physicians’ Health Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have reported beneficial effects of a Mediterranean diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) on coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. However, these findings remain inconsistent because some experimental studies have suggested atherogenic and lipotoxicity effects of long-chain...

  3. Low absolute lymphocyte count and addition of rituximab confer high risk for interstitial pneumonia in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chung; Liu, Chia-Jen; Liu, Chun-Yu; Pai, Jih-Tung; Hong, Ying-Chung; Teng, Hao-Wei; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Chao, Ta-Chung; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Chen, Po-Min; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai

    2011-10-01

    Several small-scale studies have reported pulmonary toxicity among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy, though whether the use of rituximab predisposes to interstitial pneumonia (IP) remains unclear. This retrospective study was intended to identify the characteristics and risk factors of IP in patients with DLBCL. Between 2000 and 2009, 529 consecutive patients with DLBCL receiving first-line tri-weekly COP- or CHOP-based chemotherapy with or without rituximab were enrolled as subjects. IP was defined as diffuse pulmonary interstitial infiltrates found on computed tomography scans in conjunction with respiratory symptoms. IP was observed in 26 patients (4.9%), six of whom were confirmed with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. The median number of chemotherapy courses before IP was four cycles. Using multivariate analysis, absolute lymphocyte count less than 1×10(9)/l at diagnosis [odds ratio (OR) 2.75, p=0.014] and the addition of rituximab to chemotherapy (OR 4.56, p=0.003) were identified as independent risk factors for IP. In conclusion, the incidence of IP is increased in patients with DLBCL receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy. Specific subgroups with lymphopenia at diagnosis may justify close scrutiny to detect pulmonary complications. PMID:21647583

  4. Testing the Effects of the Addition of Videos to a Website Promoting Environmental Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Practices: Are Videos Worth It?

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Evan K.; Silk, Kami J.

    2013-01-01

    Searching for ways to reach wider audiences in more comprehensible ways, health promotion agencies might add videos to their current web offerings. While potentially costly and time consuming to create, the effect of these videos on websites has not received much attention. This study translated research about the potential breast cancer risk for young girls associated with the household chemical PFOA into two websites mothers with young daughters were randomly assigned to view (website with videos vs. website without videos). Results revealed participants in the video condition found the advocated risk protective behaviors easier to perform and stated they were more likely to perform them than those in the non-video condition. Approximately 15 days after exposure, those in the video condition performed on average one more protective behavior than those in the non-video condition. Results also suggest that agencies’ efforts should focus on creating one quality video to place on a homepage, as video views declined the deeper people navigated into the site. Behaviors advocated should also be ones that can have lasting impacts with one-time actions, as effects wore away over time. Additional strategies are discussed for health promoters seeking to create videos to add to their current websites. PMID:25143661

  5. [The epidemiological relationship of periodontitis, intestinal dysbiosis, atherogenic dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Petrukhina, N B; Zorina, O A; Rabinovich, I M; Shilov, A M

    2015-01-01

    The study of risk factors for cardio-vascular continuum (CVC), the influence of the digestive tract endobiosis on lipid-carbohydrate metabolism and clinical status, a retrospective analysis of 1000 medical records of patients, suffering from various diseases of internal organs (Gastrointestinal tract, coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity) in combination with periodontitis of varying severity, aged 20 to 55 years. A statistically significant relationship is directly proportional to the severity of inflammation of periodontal tissues with body mass index (BMI), especially pronounced in patients with a BMI ≥225 kg/m2 which is the "calling card" of the metabolic syndrome - clinical model polymorbidity. PMID:26145470

  6. Apple Peel Supplemented Diet Reduces Parameters of Metabolic Syndrome and Atherogenic Progression in ApoE−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jaime; Donoso, Wendy; Sandoval, Nathalie; Reyes, María; Gonzalez, Priscila; Gajardo, Monica; Morales, Erik; Neira, Amalia; Razmilic, Iván; Yuri, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) represent about 30% of all causes of death worldwide. The development of CVD is related in many cases with the previous existence of metabolic syndrome (MS). It is known that apple consumption has a cardiovascular protecting effect, containing phenolic compounds with antioxidant effect, which are concentrated in the fruit peel. The objective of this study was to test the effect of apple peel consumption in a murine model of MS and apoE−/− mice. Apple supplemented diets reduced the biochemical parameters (glycaemia, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, ureic nitrogen, triglycerides, insulin, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)) of MS model in CF1 mice significantly. The model apoE−/− mouse was used to evaluate the capacity of the apple peel to revert the progression of the atherogenesis. FD with HAP reverts cholesterol significantly and slows down the progression of the plate diminishing the cholesterol accumulation area. With these results, it can be concluded that the consumption of apple peel reduces several MS parameters and the atherogenic progression in mice. PMID:26075004

  7. Apple Peel Supplemented Diet Reduces Parameters of Metabolic Syndrome and Atherogenic Progression in ApoE-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jaime; Donoso, Wendy; Sandoval, Nathalie; Reyes, María; Gonzalez, Priscila; Gajardo, Monica; Morales, Erik; Neira, Amalia; Razmilic, Iván; Yuri, José A; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) represent about 30% of all causes of death worldwide. The development of CVD is related in many cases with the previous existence of metabolic syndrome (MS). It is known that apple consumption has a cardiovascular protecting effect, containing phenolic compounds with antioxidant effect, which are concentrated in the fruit peel. The objective of this study was to test the effect of apple peel consumption in a murine model of MS and apoE-/- mice. Apple supplemented diets reduced the biochemical parameters (glycaemia, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, ureic nitrogen, triglycerides, insulin, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)) of MS model in CF1 mice significantly. The model apoE-/- mouse was used to evaluate the capacity of the apple peel to revert the progression of the atherogenesis. FD with HAP reverts cholesterol significantly and slows down the progression of the plate diminishing the cholesterol accumulation area. With these results, it can be concluded that the consumption of apple peel reduces several MS parameters and the atherogenic progression in mice. PMID:26075004

  8. [Estimation of action of lactoovovegetarian and vegan diets on blood level of atherogenic lipoproteins in healthy people].

    PubMed

    Medkova, I L; Mosiakina, L I; Biriukova, L S

    2002-01-01

    The biochemical status of 72 vegetarians (aged 40-60) was studied; 35 persons kept to a lactoovovegetarian diet and 37 persons followed a vegan diet (vegetable food only). As the results of the investigation showed, almost all of the biochemical parameters of blood tests in the both groups were kept to the physiological norm. A pronounced hypolipidemic effect of both the diets was observed (the total cholesterol level was 5.24 +/- 0.28 mmol/l in the vegetarian group and 3.26 +/- 0.17 mmol/l in the vegan group), some parameters of lipid metabolism in the group of vegan being lower then in the vegetarian group. Thus, the total cholesterol level in the vegan group was lower by 38.7%, the atherogenic coefficient--by 13.8%, the low density cholesterol--by 34.3%, triglicerides--by 28.3%. Although the above mentioned parameters of the vegan group seem to be more satisfactory than those of the vegetarian group, we could not recommend the vegan diet for long periods of time because of deficiency of some nutrients in it. PMID:12462949

  9. Normal human IgG prevents endothelial cell activation induced by TNFα and oxidized low-density lipoprotein atherogenic stimuli

    PubMed Central

    RONDA, N; BERNINI, F; GIACOSA, R; GATTI, R; BALDINI, N; BUZIO, C; ORLANDINI, G

    2003-01-01

    Normal human immunoglobulin G (IgG) has anti-inflammatory and immuno-regulatory properties, which are exploited in the therapy of selected diseases. A putative mechanisms of action is the direct regulation of endothelial cell function by natural antiendothelial cell antibodies. Endothelium activation is a critical event in atherosclerosis. We have verified the ability of normal human IgG to modulate endothelial responses to the atherogenic stimuli tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) in vitro. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD106) expression on endothelial cells, cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca++]i) modifications and fluorescein-coupled oxLDL internalization. Cytokine secretion was measured by ELISA on cell supernatants. IgG prevented TNFα induced CD106 membrane expression and an increase in [Ca++]i, and inhibited the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). IgG also inhibited CD106 expression induced by oxLDL and one pathway of their internalization, but were ineffective on oxLDL induced [Ca++]i rise and apoptosis. F(ab)′2 fragments from IgG, but not monoclonal IgG, reproduce IgG effects. These findings point to a regulatory role for specific antibodies included in circulating normal IgG towards proinflammatory responses of endothelial cells in atherogenesis and suggest possible development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:12869027

  10. Second Malignancies After Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Breast Cancer: Is There Increased Risk With Addition of Regional Radiation to Local Radiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Sarah Nicole; Tyldesley, Scott; Li, Dongdong; Olson, Robert; McBride, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to determine whether there was an increased risk of second malignancies (SM), particularly lung cancer, in early stage breast cancer patients treated with the addition of nodal fields to breast and/or chest wall radiation therapy (RT). Materials and Methods: Subjects were stage I/II female breast cancer patients 20 to 79 years of age, diagnosed between 1989 and 2005 and treated with adjuvant RT at our institution. Patients were included if they survived and did not have SM within 3 years of diagnosis. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to compare SM incidence to cancer incidence in the general sex- and age-matched populations. Secondary malignancy risks in patients treated with local RT (LRT) to the breast/chest wall were compared to those in patients treated with locoregional RT (LRRT) to the breast/chest wall and regional nodes, using multivariate regression analysis (MVA) to account for covariates. Results: The cohort included 12,836 patients with a median follow-up of 8.4 years. LRRT was used in 18% of patients. The SIR comparing patients treated with LRT to the general population was 1.29 (CI: 1.21-1.38). No statistically significant increased incidence of in-field malignancies (SIR, 1.04; CI: 0.87-1.23) and lung cancers (SIR, 1.06; CI: 0.88-1.26) was detected. The SIR comparing patients treated with LRRT to the general population was 1.39 (CI: 1.17-1.64). No statistically significant increased incidence of in-field malignancies (SIR, 1.26; CI: 0.77-1.94) and lung cancers (SIR, 1.27; CI: 0.76-1.98) was detected. On MVA comparing LRRT to LRT, the adjusted hazard ratio was 1.20 for in-field malignancies (CI: 0.68-2.16) and 1.26 for lung cancer (CI: 0.67-2.36). The excess attributable risk (EAR) to regional RT was 3.1 per 10,000 person years (CI: −8.7 to 9.9). Conclusions: No statistically significant increased risk of second malignancy was detected after LRRT relative to

  11. Assessing cardiovascular risk in hepatitis C: An unmet need

    PubMed Central

    Ampuero, Javier; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, as a result of the progression towards cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Additionally, HCV seems to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) due to its association with insulin resistance, diabetes and steatosis. HCV infection represents an initial step in the chronic inflammatory cascade, showing a direct role in altering glucose metabolism. After achieving sustained virological response, the incidence of insulin resistance and diabetes dramatically decrease. HCV core protein plays an essential role in promoting insulin resistance and oxidative stress. On the other hand, atherosclerosis is a common disease in which the artery wall thickens due to accumulation of fatty deposits. The main step in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques is the oxidation of low density lipoprotein particles, together with the increased production of proinflammatory markers [tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-18 or C-reactive protein]. The advent of new direct acting antiviral therapy has dramatically increased the sustained virological response rates of hepatitis C infection. In this scenario, the cardiovascular risk has emerged and represents a major concern after the eradication of the virus. Consequently, the number of studies evaluating this association is growing. Data derived from these studies have demonstrated the strong link between HCV infection and the atherogenic process, showing a higher risk of coronary heart disease, carotid atherosclerosis, peripheral artery disease and, ultimately, CVD-related mortality. PMID:26380047

  12. The GroEL protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis regulates atherogenic phenomena in endothelial cells mediated by upregulating toll-like receptor 4 expression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Yao; Shih, Chun-Ming; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Lin, Yi-Wen; Shih, Chun-Che; Chiang, Kuang-Hsing; Shyue, Song-Kun; Chang, Yu-Jia; Hsieh, Chi-Kun; Lin, Feng-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is a bacterial species that causes periodontitis. GroEL from P. gingivalis may possess biological activity and may be involved in the destruction of periodontal tissues. However, it is unclear whether P. gingivalis GroEL enhances the appearance of atherogenic phenomena in endothelial cells and vessels. Here, we constructed recombinant GroEL from P. gingivalis to investigate its effects in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) in vitro and on aortas of high-cholesterol (HC)-fed B57BL/6 and B57BL/6-Tlr4(lps-del) mice in vivo. The results showed that GroEL impaired tube-formation capacity under non-cytotoxic conditions in HCAECs. GroEL increased THP-1 cell/HCAEC adhesion by increasing the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in endothelial cells. Additionally, GroEL increased DiI-oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake, which may be mediated by elevated lectin-like oxLDL receptor (LOX)-1 but not scavenger receptor expressed by endothelial cells (SREC) and scavenger receptor class B1 (SR-B1) expression. Furthermore, GroEL interacts with toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and plays a causal role in atherogenesis in HCAECs. Human antigen R (HuR), an RNA-binding protein with a high affinity for the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of TLR4 mRNA, contributes to the up-regulation of TLR4 induced by GroEL in HCAECs. In a GroEL animal administration study, GroEL elevated ICAM-1, VCAM-1, LOX-1 and TLR4 expression in the aortas of HC diet-fed wild C57BL/6 but not C57BL/6-Tlr4(lps-del) mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that P. gingivalis GroEL may contribute to cardiovascular disorders by affecting TLR4 expression. PMID:27158334

  13. The GroEL protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis regulates atherogenic phenomena in endothelial cells mediated by upregulating toll-like receptor 4 expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Yao; Shih, Chun-Ming; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Lin, Yi-Wen; Shih, Chun-Che; Chiang, Kuang-Hsing; Shyue, Song-Kun; Chang, Yu-Jia; Hsieh, Chi-Kun; Lin, Feng-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is a bacterial species that causes periodontitis. GroEL from P. gingivalis may possess biological activity and may be involved in the destruction of periodontal tissues. However, it is unclear whether P. gingivalis GroEL enhances the appearance of atherogenic phenomena in endothelial cells and vessels. Here, we constructed recombinant GroEL from P. gingivalis to investigate its effects in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) in vitro and on aortas of high-cholesterol (HC)-fed B57BL/6 and B57BL/6-Tlr4lps-del mice in vivo. The results showed that GroEL impaired tube-formation capacity under non-cytotoxic conditions in HCAECs. GroEL increased THP-1 cell/HCAEC adhesion by increasing the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in endothelial cells. Additionally, GroEL increased DiI-oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake, which may be mediated by elevated lectin-like oxLDL receptor (LOX)-1 but not scavenger receptor expressed by endothelial cells (SREC) and scavenger receptor class B1 (SR-B1) expression. Furthermore, GroEL interacts with toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and plays a causal role in atherogenesis in HCAECs. Human antigen R (HuR), an RNA-binding protein with a high affinity for the 3’ untranslated region (3’UTR) of TLR4 mRNA, contributes to the up-regulation of TLR4 induced by GroEL in HCAECs. In a GroEL animal administration study, GroEL elevated ICAM-1, VCAM-1, LOX-1 and TLR4 expression in the aortas of HC diet-fed wild C57BL/6 but not C57BL/6-Tlr4lps-del mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that P. gingivalis GroEL may contribute to cardiovascular disorders by affecting TLR4 expression. PMID:27158334

  14. Risk.

    PubMed

    Cole, Stephen R; Hudgens, Michael G; Brookhart, M Alan; Westreich, Daniel

    2015-02-15

    The epidemiologist primarily studies transitions between states of health and disease. The purpose of the present article is to define a foundational parameter for such studies, namely risk. We begin simply and build to the setting in which there is more than 1 event type (i.e., competing risks or competing events), as well as more than 1 treatment or exposure level of interest. In the presence of competing events, the risks are a set of counterfactual cumulative incidence functions for each treatment. These risks can be depicted visually and summarized numerically. We use an example from the study of human immunodeficiency virus to illustrate concepts. PMID:25660080

  15. Design of the SHAPE-2 study: the effect of physical activity, in addition to weight loss, on biomarkers of postmenopausal breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity and overweight are two known risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. Former exercise intervention studies showed that physical activity influences sex hormone levels, known to be related to postmenopausal breast cancer, mainly when concordant loss of body weight was achieved. The question remains whether there is an additional beneficial effect of physical activity when weight loss is reached. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect attributable to exercise on postmenopausal breast cancer risk biomarkers, when equivalent weight loss is achieved compared with diet-induced weight loss. Design The SHAPE-2 study is a three-armed, multicentre trial. 243 sedentary, postmenopausal women who are overweight or obese (BMI 25–35 kg/m2) are enrolled. After a 4-6 week run-in period, wherein a baseline diet is prescribed, women are randomly allocated to (1) a diet group, (2) an exercise group or (3) a control group. The aim of both intervention groups is to lose an amount of 5–6 kg body weight in 10–14 weeks. The diet group follows an energy restricted diet and maintains the habitual physical activity level. The exercise group participates in a 16-week endurance and strength training programme of 4 hours per week. Furthermore, they are prescribed a moderate caloric restriction. The control group is asked to maintain body weight and continue the run-in baseline diet. Measurements include blood sampling, questionnaires, anthropometrics (weight, height, waist and hip circumference), maximal cycle exercise test (VO2peak), DEXA-scan (body composition) and abdominal MRI (subcutaneous and visceral fat). Primary outcomes are serum levels of oestradiol, oestrone, testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Discussion This study will give insight in the potential attributable effect of physical activity on breast cancer risk biomarkers and whether this effect is mediated by changes in body composition, in postmenopausal

  16. The proinflammatory phenotype of PECAM-1-deficient mice results in atherogenic diet-induced steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Goel, Reema; Boylan, Brian; Gruman, Lynn; Newman, Peter J; North, Paula E; Newman, Debra K

    2007-12-01

    The severity of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is determined by environmental and genetic factors, the latter of which are incompletely characterized. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is a 130-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on blood and vascular cells. In the present study, we provide data for the novel finding that genetic deficiency of PECAM-1 potentiates the development and progression of NASH. We found that the rate of development and severity of diet-induced NASH are markedly enhanced in PECAM-1-deficient [knockout (KO)] mice relative to wild-type (WT) mice, as measured by histological and biochemical evaluation. Livers from KO mice exhibited typical histological features of NASH, including macrovesicular fat accumulation, hepatocyte injury with infiltration of inflammatory cells, fibrosis, and heightened oxidative stress. Alanine aminotransferase, a marker for liver injury, was also significantly higher in KO compared with WT mice. Consistent with a role for PECAM-1 as a suppressor of proinflammatory cytokines, plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), were also significantly higher in KO compared with WT mice. These findings are the first to show that the PECAM-1-deficient mouse develops progressive nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), supporting a role for PECAM-1 as a negative regulator of NAFLD progression. Future examination of recently identified PECAM-1 allelic isoforms in humans as potential risk factors for developing NASH may be warranted. PMID:17932230

  17. Aromatase, adiposity, aging and disease. The hypogonadal-metabolic-atherogenic-disease and aging connection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, P G

    2001-06-01

    In males, aging, health and disease are processes that occur over physiologic time and involve a cascade of hormonal, biochemical and physiological changes that accompany the down-regulation of the hypothalamic-anterior pituitary-testicular axis. As aging progresses there are relative increases of body fat and decreases in muscle mass. The increased adipose tissue mass is associated with the production of a number of newly generated factors. These include aromatase, leptin, PAI-1, insulin resistance, and the dyslipidemias, all of which can lead to tissue damage. Fatty tissue becomes the focal point for study as it represents the intersection between energy storage and mobilization. The increase in adipose tissue is associated with an increase in the enzyme aromatase that converts testosterone to estradiol and leads to diminished testosterone levels that favor the preferential deposition of visceral fat. As the total body fat mass increases, hormone resistance develops for leptin and insulin. Increasing leptin fails to prevent weight gain and the hypogonadal-obesity cycle ensues causing further visceral obesity and insulin resistance. The progressive insulin resistance leads to a high triglyceride-low HDL pattern of dyslipidemia and increased cardiovascular risk. All of these factors eventually contribute to the CHAOS Complex: coronary disease, hypertension, adult-onset diabetes mellitus, obesity and/or stroke as permanent changes unfold. Other consequences of the chronic hypogonadal state include osteopenia, extreme fatigue, depression, insomnia, loss of aggressiveness and erectile dysfunction all of which develop over variable periods of time. PMID:11399122

  18. Laboratory approaches for predicting and managing the risk of cardiovascular disease: postanalytical opportunities of lipid and lipoprotein testing.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Michel R

    2012-07-01

    Abstract Lipoprotein-related risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) can be adequately predicted in subjects with elevated total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-)cholesterol using the available guidelines. However, individuals with dyslipidemia can have normal total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations. Many statin-treated patients remain at high residual risk of CVD despite achieving LDL goals. The small dense LDL phenotype, frequently presenting with hypertriglyceridemia and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL-)cholesterol (lipid triad), may contribute to failure to identify and treat high-risk individuals. Therefore, calculated non-HDL-cholesterol is recommended as secondary therapeutic target to LDL-cholesterol in patients with hypertriglyceridemia and mixed dyslipidemia. On-treatment apolipoprotein B adds prognostic information to LDL- and non-HDL-cholesterol by indicating the total number of atherogenic lipoproteins, regardless of their cholesterol content. Risk may be higher than indicated in the risk estimation systems in additional subjects with elevated lipoprotein(a) and homocysteine concentrations. To improve the (post-)post-analytical phase of lipid tests, aiming for maximal health outcome effectiveness of test interpretation and utilization, laboratory professionals should deliver clinical added value services by providing readily interpreted and guideline-adjusted test reports, interpretative commenting, proactive reflex testing or recommending additional tests, and joining multidisciplinary cooperations in guideline development and cost/benefit studies. PMID:22850050

  19. CVD-associated non-coding RNA, ANRIL, modulates expression of atherogenic pathways in VSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Congrains, Ada; Kamide, Kei; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Yasuda, Osamu; Oguro, Ryousuke; Yamamoto, Koichi; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANRIL maps in the strongest susceptibility locus for cardiovascular disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of ANRIL leads to altered expression of tissue remodeling-related genes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of ANRIL on gene expression are splicing variant specific. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANRIL affects progression of cardiovascular disease by regulating proliferation and apoptosis pathways. -- Abstract: ANRIL is a newly discovered non-coding RNA lying on the strongest genetic susceptibility locus for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the chromosome 9p21 region. Genome-wide association studies have been linking polymorphisms in this locus with CVD and several other major diseases such as diabetes and cancer. The role of this non-coding RNA in atherosclerosis progression is still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the implication of ANRIL in the modulation of gene sets directly involved in atherosclerosis. We designed and tested siRNA sequences to selectively target two exons (exon 1 and exon 19) of the transcript and successfully knocked down expression of ANRIL in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HuAoVSMC). We used a pathway-focused RT-PCR array to profile gene expression changes caused by ANRIL knock down. Notably, the genes affected by each of the siRNAs were different, suggesting that different splicing variants of ANRIL might have distinct roles in cell physiology. Our results suggest that ANRIL splicing variants play a role in coordinating tissue remodeling, by modulating the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, extra-cellular matrix remodeling and inflammatory response to finally impact in the risk of cardiovascular disease and other pathologies.

  20. Transforming growth factor-β and atherosclerosis: interwoven atherogenic and atheroprotective aspects

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Age-related progression of cardiovascular disease is by far the largest health problem in the US and involves vascular damage, progressive vascular fibrosis and the accumulation of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions. Advanced lesions can restrict flow to key organs and can trigger occlusive thrombosis resulting in a stroke or myocardial infarction. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a major orchestrator of the fibroproliferative response to tissue damage. In the early stages of repair, TGF-β is released from platelets and activated from matrix reservoirs; it then stimulates the chemotaxis of repair cells, modulates immunity and inflammation and induces matrix production. At later stages, it negatively regulates fibrosis through its strong antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on fibrotic cells. In advanced lesions, TGF-β might be important in arterial calcification, commonly referred to as “hardening of the arteries”. Because TGF-β can signal through multiple pathways, namely the SMADs, a MAPK pathway and the Rho/ROCK pathways, selective defects in TGF-β signaling can disrupt otherwise coordinated pathways of tissue regeneration. TGF-β is known to control cell proliferation, cell migration, matrix synthesis, wound contraction, calcification and the immune response, all being major components of the atherosclerotic process. However, many of the effects of TGF-β are essential to normal tissue repair and thus, TGF-β is often thought to be “atheroprotective”. The present review attempts to parse systematically the known effects of TGF-β on both the major risk factors for atherosclerosis and to isolate the role of TGF-β in the many component pathways involved in atherogenesis. PMID:21626289

  1. Relationship between particulate matter exposure and atherogenic profile in "Ground Zero" workers as shown by dynamic contrast enhanced MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Mani, Venkatesh; Wong, Stephanie K; Sawit, Simonette T; Calcagno, Claudia; Maceda, Cynara; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Fayad, Zahi A; Moline, Jacqueline; McLaughlin, Mary Ann

    2013-04-01

    In this pilot study, we hypothesize that dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has the potential to evaluate differences in atherosclerosis profiles in patients subjected to high (initial dust cloud) and low (after 13 September 2001) particulate matter (PM) exposure. Exposure to PM may be associated with adverse health effects leading to increased morbidity. Law enforcement workers were exposed to high levels of particulate pollution after working at "Ground Zero" and may exhibit accelerated atherosclerosis. 31 subjects (28 male) with high (n = 19) or low (n = 12) exposure to PM underwent DCE-MRI. Demographics (age, gender, family history, hypertension, diabetes, BMI, and smoking status), biomarkers (lipid profiles, hs-CRP, BP) and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measures (left and right) were obtained from all subjects. Differences between the high and low exposures were compared using independent samples t test. Using linear forward stepwise regression with information criteria model, independent predictors of increased area under curve (AUC) from DCE-MRI were determined using all variables as input. Confidence interval of 95 % was used and variables with p > 0.1 were eliminated. p < 0.05 was considered significant. Subjects with high exposure (HE) had significantly higher DCE-MRI AUC uptake (increased neovascularization) compared to subjects with lower exposure (LE). (AUC: 2.65 ± 0.63 HE vs. 1.88 ± 0.69 LE, p = 0.016). Except for right leg ABI, none of the other parameters were significantly different between the two groups. Regression model indicated that only HE to PM, CRP > 3.0 and total cholesterol were independently associated with increased neovascularization (in decreasing order of importance, all p < 0.026). HE to PM may increase plaque neovascularization, and thereby potentially indicate worsening atherogenic profile of "Ground Zero" workers. PMID:23179748

  2. Anti-atherogenic and anti-ischemic potentials of Croton membranaceus observed during sub-chronic toxicity studies

    PubMed Central

    Afriyie, Dan K.; Asare, George A.; Bugyei, Kwasi; Asiedu-Gyekye, Isaac; Gyan, Ben A.; Adjei, Samuel; Addo, Phyllis; Sittie, Archibald; Nyarko, Alexander K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Croton membranaceus (CM) is used for benign prostate hyperplasia treatment. Objective: Sub-chronic toxicity studies are non-existent and provided the basis for this study. Materials and Methods: 90 days oral administration of a low dose (LD) (30 mg/kg b. wt.), medium dose (MD) (150 mg/kg b. wt.), and high dose (HD) (300 mg/kg b. wt.) CM aqueous root extract to 3 groups (n=6 each) of male Sprague-Dawley rats, alongside a control group, was undertaken. Urinalysis, hepato-renal function tests, lipid profile, cardiac enzymes, and routine hematology tests were performed. Results: Triglyceride levels (C=1.05±0.19, LD=0.64±0.08, MD=0.55±0.04, HD=0.50±0.02 mmol/L) were significantly reduced (P<0.05). Very low density lipoprotein (C=0.48±0.09, LD=0.29±0.04, MD=0.25±0.02, HD=0.23±0.01 mmol/L) decreased significantly (P<0.05). Cardiac enzymes-creatinine kinase (C=568±172, LD=315±79, MD=441±209, HD=286±81 IU/L) decreased markedly (P<0.05) alongside lactate dehydrogenase (C=2675±875, LD=1667±1229, MD=1186±442, HD=855±239 IU/L) (P<0.05). Conclusion: C. membranaceus aqueous root extract is non-toxic but demonstrates anti-atherogenic and anti-ischemic potentials. PMID:23598919

  3. Resveratrol counters systemic lupus erythematosus-associated atherogenicity by normalizing cholesterol efflux.

    PubMed

    Voloshyna, Iryna; Teboul, Isaac; Littlefield, Michael J; Siegart, Nicolle M; Turi, George K; Fazzari, Melissa J; Carsons, Steven E; DeLeon, Joshua; Reiss, Allison B

    2016-08-01

    Resveratrol is a bioactive molecule used in dietary supplements and herbal medicines and consumed worldwide. Numerous investigations by our group and others have indicated cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of resveratrol. The present study explored potential atheroprotective actions of resveratrol on cholesterol efflux in cultured human macrophages exposed to plasma from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. These results were confirmed in ApoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) double knockout mice, displaying a lupus profile with accelerated atherosclerosis. Resveratrol treatment attenuated atherosclerosis in these mice. THP-1 human macrophages were exposed to 10% pooled or individual plasma from patients who met diagnostic criteria for SLE. Expression of multiple proteins involved in reverse cholesterol transport (ABCA1, ABCG1, SR-B1, and cytochrome P450 27-hydroxylase) was assessed using QRT-PCR and Western blotting techniques. Ten-week-old ApoE(-/-)Fas(-/-) double knockout mice (n = 30) were randomly divided into two equal groups of 15, one of which received 0.01% resveratrol for 10 consecutive weeks. Atherosclerosis progression was evaluated in murine aortas. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were cultured and expression of cholesterol efflux proteins was analyzed in each group of mice. Our data indicate that inhibition of cholesterol efflux by lupus plasma in THP-1 human macrophages is rescued by resveratrol. Similarly, administration of resveratrol in a lupus-like murine model reduces plaque formation in vivo and augments cholesterol efflux in BMDM. This study presents evidence for a beneficial role of resveratrol in atherosclerosis in the specific setting of SLE. Therefore, resveratrol may merit investigation as an additional resource available to reduce lipid deposition and atherosclerosis in humans, especially in such vulnerable populations as lupus patients. PMID:27190277

  4. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  5. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  6. Some arguments in favor of a Myriophyllum aquaticum growth inhibition test in a water-sediment system as an additional test in risk assessment of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Tunić, Tanja; Knežević, Varja; Kerkez, Đurđa; Tubić, Aleksandra; Šunjka, Dragana; Lazić, Sanja; Brkić, Dragica; Teodorović, Ivana

    2015-09-01

    The present study compares the practicability, reproducibility, power, and sensitivity of a Myriophyllum aquaticum growth inhibition test in a water-sediment system with the recently accepted Myriophyllum spicatum test in an equivalent testing system and the standard Lemna sp. test. Special consideration was given to endpoints based on M. aquaticum control plant growth and variability of relative growth rate and yield: shoot length, fresh weight, dry weight, and root weight. Sensitivity analysis was based on tests performed with 3,5-dichlorophenol, atrazine, isoproturon, trifluralin, 2,4-dichlorophenoloxyacetic acid, and dicamba. Growth rates for average M. aquaticum control plants were 0.119 d(-1) and 0.112 d(-1), with average estimated doubling time 6.33 d and 6.74 d for relative growth rate fresh weight and shoot length, respectively. Intrinsic variability of M. aquaticum endpoints was low: 12.9%, 12.5%, and 17.8% for relative growth rate shoot length, relative growth rate fresh weight and yield fresh weight, respectively. The power of the test was fairly high. When the most sensitive endpoints were used for comparison, the 2 Myriophyllum species were similarly sensitive, more sensitive (in the case of auxin simulators), or at least equally sensitive as Lemna minor to other tested herbicides. The M. aquaticum 10-d test with a 7-d exposure period in a water-sediment system has acceptable sensitivity and can provide repeatable, reliable, and reproducible results; therefore, it should not be disregarded as a good and representative additional test in environmental risk assessment. PMID:25943248

  7. STAT4 Associates with SLE Through Two Independent Effects that Correlate with Gene Expression and Act Additively with IRF5 to Increase Risk

    PubMed Central

    Abelson, Anna-Karin; Delgado-Vega, Angélica M.; Kozyrev, Sergey V.; Sánchez, Elena; Velázquez-Cruz, Rafael; Eriksson, Niclas; Wojcik, Jerome; Reddy, Prasad Linga; Lima, Guadalupe; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Migliaresi, Sergio; Baca, Vicente; Orozco, Lorena; Witte, Torsten; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Abderrahim, Hadi; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Gutiérrez, Carmen; Suárez, Ana; González-Escribano, Maria Francisca; Martin, Javier; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To confirm and define the genetic association of STAT4 and systemic lupus erythematosus, investigate the possibility of correlations with differential splicing and/or expression levels, and genetic interaction with IRF5. Methods 30 tag SNPs were genotyped in an independent set of Spanish cases and controls. SNPs surviving correction for multiple tests were genotyped in 5 new sets of cases and controls for replication. STAT4 cDNA was analyzed by 5’-RACE PCR and sequencing. Expression levels were measured by quantitative PCR. Results In the fine-mapping, four SNPs were significant after correction for multiple testing, with rs3821236 and rs3024866 as the strongest signals, followed by the previously associated rs7574865, and by rs1467199. Association was replicated in all cohorts. After conditional regression analyses, two major independent signals represented by SNPs rs3821236 and rs7574865, remained significant across the sets. These SNPs belong to separate haplotype blocks. High levels of STAT4 expression correlated with SNPs rs3821236, rs3024866 (both in the same haplotype block) and rs7574865 but not with other SNPs. We also detected transcription of alternative tissue-specific exons 1, indicating presence of tissue-specific promoters of potential importance in the expression of STAT4. No interaction with associated SNPs of IRF5 was observed using regression analysis. Conclusions These data confirm STAT4 as a susceptibility gene for SLE and suggest the presence of at least two functional variants affecting levels of STAT4. Our results also indicate that both genes STAT4 and IRF5 act additively to increase risk for SLE. PMID:19019891

  8. Molecular sources of residual cardiovascular risk, clinical signals, and innovative solutions: relationship with subclinical disease, undertreatment, and poor adherence: implications of new evidence upon optimizing cardiovascular patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Residual risk, the ongoing appreciable risk of major cardiovascular events (MCVE) in statin-treated patients who have achieved evidence-based lipid goals, remains a concern among cardiologists. Factors that contribute to this continuing risk are atherogenic non-low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and atherogenic processes unrelated to LDL cholesterol, including other risk factors, the inherent properties of statin drugs, and patient characteristics, ie, genetics and behaviors. In addition, providers, health care systems, the community, public policies, and the environment play a role. Major statin studies suggest an average 28% reduction in LDL cholesterol and a 31% reduction in relative risk, leaving a residual risk of about 69%. Incomplete reductions in risk, and failure to improve conditions that create risk, may result in ongoing progression of atherosclerosis, with new and recurring lesions in original and distant culprit sites, remodeling, arrhythmias, rehospitalizations, invasive procedures, and terminal disability. As a result, identification of additional agents to reduce residual risk, particularly administered together with statin drugs, has been an ongoing quest. The current model of atherosclerosis involves many steps during which disease may progress independently of guideline-defined elevations in LDL cholesterol. Differences in genetic responsiveness to statin therapy, differences in ability of the endothelium to regenerate and repair, and differences in susceptibility to nonlipid risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, hypertension, and molecular changes associated with obesity and diabetes, may all create residual risk. A large number of inflammatory and metabolic processes may also provide eventual therapeutic targets to lower residual risk. Classically, epidemiologic and other evidence suggested that raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol would be cardioprotective. When LDL cholesterol is aggressively lowered to targets, low HDL

  9. Additive benefit of higher testosterone levels and vitamin D plus calcium supplementation in regard to fall risk reduction among older men and women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both testosterone and vitamin D levels affect muscle and thus may also affect risk of falling. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between sex hormone levels and the risk of falling in older men and women. 199 men and 246 women age 65 or older living at home followed for 3 years...

  10. Comparison of Anthropometric and Atherogenic Indices as Screening Tools of Metabolic Syndrome in the Kazakh Adult Population in Xinjiang

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-Hui; Zhang, Mei; He, Jia; Yan, Yi-Zhong; Ma, Jiao-Long; Wang, Kui; Ma, Ru-Lin; Guo, Heng; Mu, La-Ti; Ding, Yu-Song; Zhang, Jing-Yu; Liu, Jia-Ming; Li, Shu-Gang; Niu, Qiang; Rui, Dong-Sheng; Guo, Shu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the screening ability of various anthropometric and atherogenic indices for Metabolic syndrome (MetS) using three common criteria and to evaluate the validity of suitable parameters in combination for the screening of MetS among a Kazakh population in Xinjiang. Methods: A total of 3752 individuals were selected using the stratified cluster random sampling method from nomadic Kazakhs (≥18 years old) in Xinyuan county, Xinjiang, China, which is approximately 4407 km away from the capital Beijing. MetS was defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) and Joint Interim Statement (JIS) criteria. The receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) was used to compare the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of each index. The sensitivity, specificity, Youden’s index and cut-offs of each index for the screening of MetS were calculated. Results: According to the IDF, ATP III and JIS criteria, 18.61%, 10.51%, and 24.83% of males and 23.25%, 14.88%, and 25.33% of females had MetS. According to the IDF criteria, the waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) was the index that most accurately identified individuals with and without MetS both in males (AUC = 0.872) and females (AUC = 0.804), with the optimal cut-offs of 0.53 and 0.52, respectively. According to both the ATP III and JIS criteria, the lipid accumulation product (LAP) was the best index to discriminate between individuals with and without MetS in males (AUC = 0.856 and 0.816, respectively) and females (AUC = 0.832 and 0.788, respectively), with optimal cut-offs of 41.21 and 34.76 in males and 28.16 and 26.49 in females, respectively. On the basis of the IDF standard, Youden’s indices of WHtR and LAP serial tests for the screening of MetS were 0.590 and 0.455 in males and females, respectively, and those of WHtR and LAP parallel tests were 0.608 and 0.479, accordingly. Conclusion: According to the IDF, ATP III and JIS

  11. Does early intensive multifactorial therapy reduce modelled cardiovascular risk in individuals with screen-detected diabetes? Results from the ADDITION-Europe cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Black, J A; Sharp, S J; Wareham, N J; Sandbæk, A; Rutten, G E H M; Lauritzen, T; Khunti, K; Davies, M J; Borch-Johnsen, K; Griffin, S J; Simmons, R K

    2014-01-01

    Aims Little is known about the long-term effects of intensive multifactorial treatment early in the diabetes disease trajectory. In the absence of long-term data on hard outcomes, we described change in 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk in the 5 years following diagnosis, and quantified the impact of intensive treatment on 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk at 5 years. Methods In a pragmatic, cluster-randomized, parallel-group trial in Denmark, the Netherlands and the UK, 3057 people with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes were randomized by general practice to receive (1) routine care of diabetes according to national guidelines (1379 patients) or (2) intensive multifactorial target-driven management (1678 patients). Ten-year modelled cardiovascular disease risk was calculated at baseline and 5 years using the UK Prospective Diabetes Study Risk Engine (version 3β). Results Among 2101 individuals with complete data at follow up (73.4%), 10-year modelled cardiovascular disease risk was 27.3% (sd 13.9) at baseline and 21.3% (sd 13.8) at 5-year follow-up (intensive treatment group difference –6.9, sd 9.0; routine care group difference –5.0, sd 12.2). Modelled 10-year cardiovascular disease risk was lower in the intensive treatment group compared with the routine care group at 5 years, after adjustment for baseline cardiovascular disease risk and clustering (–2.0; 95% CI –3.1 to –0.9). Conclusions Despite increasing age and diabetes duration, there was a decline in modelled cardiovascular disease risk in the 5 years following diagnosis. Compared with routine care, 10-year modelled cardiovascular disease risk was lower in the intensive treatment group at 5 years. Our results suggest that patients benefit from intensive treatment early in the diabetes disease trajectory, where the rate of cardiovascular disease risk progression may be slowed. PMID:24533664

  12. An analysis of the risk of introduction of additional strains of the rust puccinia psidii Winter ('Ohi'a Rust) to Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loope, Lloyd; La Rosa, Anne Marie

    2010-01-01

    In April 2005, the rust fungus Puccinia psidii (most widely known as guava rust or eucalyptus rust) was found in Hawai'i. This was the first time this rust had been found outside the Neotropics (broadly-defined, including subtropical Florida, where the rust first established in the 1970s). First detected on a nursery-grown 'ohi'a plant, it became known as ''ohi'a rust'in Hawai'i. The rust spread rapidly and by August 2005 had been found throughout the main Hawaiian Islands. The rust probably reached Hawai'i via the live plant trade or via the foliage trade. In Hawai'i, the rust has infected three native plant species and at least eight non-native species. Effects have been substantial on the endangered endemic plant Eugenia koolauensis and the introduced rose apple, Syzygium jambos. Billions of yellow, asexual urediniospores are produced on rose apple, but a complete life cycle (involving sexual reproduction) has not yet been observed. The rust is autoecious (no alternate host known) on Myrtaceae. The strain introduced into Hawai'i is found sparingly on 'ohi'a (Metrosideros polymorpha), the dominant tree of Hawai'i's forests, with sporadic damage detected to date. The introduction of a rust strain that causes widespread damage to 'ohi'a would be catastrophic for Hawai'i's native biodiversity. Most imports of material potentially contaminated with rust are shipped to Hawai'i from Florida and California (from which P. psidii was reported in late 2005 by Mellano, 2006). Florida is known to have multiple strains. The identity of the strain or strains in California is unclear, but one of them is known to infect myrtle, Myrtus communis, a species commonly imported into Hawai'i. It is important to ecosystem conservation and commercial forestry that additional rust strains or genotypes be prevented from establishing in Hawai'i. The purpose of this analysis of risk is to evaluate the need for an interim rule by the Hawai'i Department of Agriculture to regulate plant

  13. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  14. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  15. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor is related to cardiovascular risk factors in active and inactive elderly men.

    PubMed

    Zembron-Lacny, A; Dziubek, W; Rynkiewicz, M; Morawin, B; Woźniewski, M

    2016-06-20

    Regular exercise plays an important preventive and therapeutic role in heart and vascular diseases, and beneficially affects brain function. In blood, the effects of exercise appear to be very complex and could include protection of vascular endothelial cells via neurotrophic factors and decreased oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to identify the age-related changes in peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its relationship to oxidative damage and conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers, such as atherogenic index, C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL), in active and inactive men. Seventeen elderly males (61-80 years) and 17 young males (20-24 years) participated in this study. According to the 6-min Åstrand-Rhyming bike test, the subjects were classified into active and inactive groups. The young and elderly active men had a significantly better lipoprotein profile and antioxidant status, as well as reduced oxidative damage and inflammatory state. The active young and elderly men had significantly higher plasma BDNF levels compared to their inactive peers. BDNF was correlated with VO2max (r=0.765, P<0.001). In addition, we observed a significant inverse correlation of BDNF with atherogenic index (TC/HDL), hsCRP and oxLDL. The findings demonstrate that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness reflected in VO2max was associated with a higher level of circulating BDNF, which in turn was related to common CVD risk factors and oxidative damage markers in young and elderly men. PMID:27332774

  16. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor is related to cardiovascular risk factors in active and inactive elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Zembron-Lacny, A.; Dziubek, W.; Rynkiewicz, M.; Morawin, B.; Woźniewski, M.

    2016-01-01

    Regular exercise plays an important preventive and therapeutic role in heart and vascular diseases, and beneficially affects brain function. In blood, the effects of exercise appear to be very complex and could include protection of vascular endothelial cells via neurotrophic factors and decreased oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to identify the age-related changes in peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its relationship to oxidative damage and conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers, such as atherogenic index, C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL), in active and inactive men. Seventeen elderly males (61-80 years) and 17 young males (20-24 years) participated in this study. According to the 6-min Åstrand-Rhyming bike test, the subjects were classified into active and inactive groups. The young and elderly active men had a significantly better lipoprotein profile and antioxidant status, as well as reduced oxidative damage and inflammatory state. The active young and elderly men had significantly higher plasma BDNF levels compared to their inactive peers. BDNF was correlated with VO2max (r=0.765, P<0.001). In addition, we observed a significant inverse correlation of BDNF with atherogenic index (TC/HDL), hsCRP and oxLDL. The findings demonstrate that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness reflected in VO2max was associated with a higher level of circulating BDNF, which in turn was related to common CVD risk factors and oxidative damage markers in young and elderly men. PMID:27332774

  17. Additional Evidence for the Reliability and Validity of the Student Risk Screening Scale at the High School Level: A Replication and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Oakes, Wendy P.; Ennis, Robin Parks; Cox, Meredith Lucille; Schatschneider, Christopher; Lambert, Warren

    2013-01-01

    This study reports findings from a validation study of the Student Risk Screening Scale for use with 9th- through 12th-grade students (N = 1854) attending a rural fringe school. Results indicated high internal consistency, test-retest stability, and inter-rater reliability. Predictive validity was established across two academic years, with Spring…

  18. Waist-to-Height Ratio and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Elderly Individuals at High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Bulló, Mònica; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Corella, Dolores; Estruch, Ramon; Covas, María-Isabel; Arós, Fernando; Wärnberg, Julia; Fiol, Miquel; Lapetra, José; Muñoz, Miguel Ángel; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Pintó, Xavier; Babio, Nancy; Díaz-López, Andrés; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Several anthropometric measurements have been associated with cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes mellitus and other cardiovascular risk conditions, such as hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Waist-to-height-ratio has been proposed as a useful tool for assessing abdominal obesity, correcting other measurements for the height of the individual. We compared the ability of several anthropometric measurements to predict the presence of type-2 diabetes, hyperglycemia, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia or metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods In our cross-sectional analyses we included 7447 Spanish individuals at high cardiovascular risk, men aged 55–80 years and women aged 60–80 years, from the PREDIMED study. Logistic regression models were fitted to evaluate the odds ratio of presenting each cardiovascular risk factor according to various anthropometric measures. The areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) were used to compare the predictive ability of these measurements. Results In this relatively homogeneous cohort with 48.6% of type-2 diabetic individuals, the great majority of the studied anthropometric parameters were significantly and positively associated with the cardiovascular risk factors. No association was found between BMI and body weight and diabetes mellitus. The AUCs for the waist-to-height ratio and waist circumference were significantly higher than the AUCs for BMI or weight for type-2 diabetes, hyperglycemia, atherogenic dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome. Conversely, BMI was the strongest predictor of hypertension. Conclusions We concluded that measures of abdominal obesity showed higher discriminative ability for diabetes mellitus, high fasting plasma glucose, atherogenic dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome than BMI or weight in a large cohort of elderly Mediterranean individuals at high cardiovascular risk. No significant differences were found between the predictive abilities of waist

  19. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  20. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  1. Effects of glucomannan/spirulina-surimi on liver oxidation and inflammation in Zucker rats fed atherogenic diets.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Velasco, Miguel; González-Torres, Laura; López-Gasco, Patricia; Bastida, Sara; Benedí, Juana; González-Muñoz, María José; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2015-12-01

    Cholesterolemia is associated with pro-oxidative and proinflammatory effects. Glucomannan- or glucomannan plus spirulina-enriched surimis were included in cholesterol-enriched high-saturated diets to test the effects on lipemia; antioxidant status (glutathione status, and antioxidant enzymatic levels, expressions and activities); and inflammation biomarkers (endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)) in Zucker fa/fa rats. Groups of eight rats each received diet containing squid-surimi (C), squid-surimi cholesterol-enriched diet (HC), glucomannan-squid-surimi cholesterol-enriched diet (HG), or glucomannan-spirulina-squid-surimi cholesterol-enriched diet (HGS) over a period of 7 weeks. HC diet induced severe hyperlipemia, hepatomegalia, increased inflammation markers, and impaired antioxidant status significantly (at least p < 0.05) vs. C diet. HG diet decreased lipemia and liver size and normalized antioxidant status to C group levels, but increased TNF-α with respect to HC diet (p < 0.05). In general terms, 3 g/kg of spirulina in diet maintained the positive results observed in the HG diet but, in addition, increased inflammation index [eNOS/(eNOS + iNOS)] and decreased plasma TNF-α (both p < 0.05). In conclusion, glucomannan plus a small amount of spirulina blocks negative effects promoted by hypercholesterolemic diets. Although more studies are needed, present results suggest the utility of including glucomannan and/or spirulina as functional ingredients into fish derivates to be consumed by people on metabolic syndrome risk. PMID:26239810

  2. A risk haplotype of STAT4 for systemic lupus erythematosus is over-expressed, correlates with anti-dsDNA and shows additive effects with two risk alleles of IRF5

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Nordmark, Gunnel; Garnier, Sophie; Grundberg, Elin; Kwan, Tony; Nilsson, Olof; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Gunnarsson, Iva; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Bengtsson, Anders A.; Jönsen, Andreas; Truedsson, Lennart; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Eriksson, Catharina; Alm, Gunnar; Göring, Harald H.H.; Pastinen, Tomi; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Rönnblom, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototype autoimmune disease where genes regulated by type I interferon (IFN) are over-expressed and contribute to the disease pathogenesis. Because signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) plays a key role in the type I IFN receptor signaling, we performed a candidate gene study of a comprehensive set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in STAT4 in Swedish patients with SLE. We found that 10 out of 53 analyzed SNPs in STAT4 were associated with SLE, with the strongest signal of association (P = 7.1 × 10−8) for two perfectly linked SNPs rs10181656 and rs7582694. The risk alleles of these 10 SNPs form a common risk haplotype for SLE (P = 1.7 × 10−5). According to conditional logistic regression analysis the SNP rs10181656 or rs7582694 accounts for all of the observed association signal. By quantitative analysis of the allelic expression of STAT4 we found that the risk allele of STAT4 was over-expressed in primary human cells of mesenchymal origin, but not in B-cells, and that the risk allele of STAT4 was over-expressed (P = 8.4 × 10−5) in cells carrying the risk haplotype for SLE compared with cells with a non-risk haplotype. The risk allele of the SNP rs7582694 in STAT4 correlated to production of anti-dsDNA (double-stranded DNA) antibodies and displayed a multiplicatively increased, 1.82-fold risk of SLE with two independent risk alleles of the IRF5 (interferon regulatory factor 5) gene. PMID:18579578

  3. Pro- and anti-atherogenic effects of a dominant negative P465L mutation of PPARγ in apolipoprotein E-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Pendse, Avani A.; Johnson, Lance A.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; McNair, Marcus; Nipp, C. Taylor; Wilhelm, Carolyn; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2012-01-01

    Objective The dominant-negative mutation, P467L, in Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor gamma (PPARγ) affects adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and blood pressure in heterozygous humans. We hypothesized that the equivalent mutation, PPARγ-P465L, in mice will worsen atherosclerosis. Methods and Results ApolipoproteinE-null mice with and without PPARγ-P465L mutation were bred in 129S6 inbred genetic background. Mild hypertension and lipodystrophy of PPARγ-P465L persisted in the apoE-null background. Glucose homeostasis was normal, but plasma adiponectin was significantly lower and resistin was higher in PPARγ-P465L mice. Plasma cholesterol and lipoprotein distribution were not different, but plasma triglycerides tended to be reduced. Surprisingly, there were no overall changes in the atherosclerotic plaque size or composition. PPARγ-P465L macrophages had a small decrease in CD-36 mRNA and a small yet significant reduction in VLDL uptake in culture. In unloaded apoE-null macrophages with PPARγ-P465L, cholesterol uptake was reduced while apoAI-mediated efflux was increased. However, when cells were cholesterol loaded in presence of acetylated LDL, no genotype difference in uptake or efflux was apparent. A reduction of VCAM1 expression in aorta suggests a relatively anti-atherogenic vascular environment in mice with PPARγ-P465L. Conclusions Small, competing pro- and anti-atherogenic effects of PPARγ-P465L mutation result in unchanged plaque development in apoE-deficient mice. PMID:22539598

  4. IL-17 Blockade in Psoriasis: Friend or Foe in Cardiovascular Risk?

    PubMed

    Torres, Tiago; Raposo, Inês; Selores, Manuela

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disorder associated with systemic inflammation and a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Common pathologic mechanisms are likely involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and atherosclerosis, including similar inflammatory cytokine profiles and proinflammatory cell types. The hypothesis that aggressive treatment of skin inflammation may decrease the risk of developing atherosclerosis and consequently cardiovascular disease is currently a focus of major attention. Interleukin (IL)-17 may be an important cytokine linking skin disease to vascular disease/inflammation. However, the role of IL-17 in atherosclerosis is still controversial, as IL-17 may exhibit pro-atherogenic or anti-atherogenic effects depending on the specific tissue, cellular, and immune context. Given the development of several IL-17 inhibitors, the investigation of IL-17 inhibition impact on cardiovascular outcome is extremely important. PMID:26596991

  5. Circulating Thrombotic Risk Factors in Young Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Who Are on Statins and Anti-platelet Drugs.

    PubMed

    George, Reema; Sivadasanpillai, Harikrishnan; Jayakumari, Narayani; Bhatt, Anugya; Thulaseedharan, Jissa V; Tharakan, Jaganmohan A

    2016-07-01

    Thrombotic risk factors may contribute to premature coronary artery disease (CAD), in addition to the conventional risk factors. There is paucity of data on studies evaluating the role of thrombotic factors in premature CAD in Indian patients. Thus a case-control study was performed to evaluate the role of thrombotic and atherogenic factors in young patients with angiographically proven CAD who are on treatment with statins and anti-platelet drugs. 152 patients (≤55 years) with angiographically proven CAD and 102 asymptomatic controls were recruited. Clinical and biochemical data were obtained in both groups. Blood levels of thrombotic factors-fibrinogen, antithrombin-III, tissue-plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), von-Willebrand factor (v-WF), lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and homocysteine were analyzed. Patients had high levels of conventional CAD risk factors (diabetes mellitus, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia and positive family history) compared to controls. Logistic regression analysis revealed that low antithrombin-III (odds ratio/OR 11.2; 95 % confidence interval/CI 2.29-54.01), high fibrinogen (OR 6.04; 95 % CI 1.09-33.21) and high Lp(a) (OR 4.54; 95 % CI 0.92-22.56), as important, independent risk factors in patients. PAI-1(OR 0.15; 95 % CI 0.03-0.69) levels were significantly lower in patients. But other thrombotic risk factors studied (t-PA, v-WF and homocysteine) were comparable among patients and controls. The treatment using statins and anti-platelet drugs might be contributing to the control of some of the thrombotic risk factors. The strategies aiming at lowering the levels of thrombotic risk factors along with conventional risk factors may be useful in primary and secondary prevention of CAD. PMID:27382201

  6. A Randomized Study of the Effects of Additional Fruit and Nuts Consumption on Hepatic Fat Content, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Basal Metabolic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Romu, Thobias; Dahlqvist-Leinhard, Olof; Borga, Magnus; Leandersson, Per; Nystrom, Fredrik H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Fruit has since long been advocated as a healthy source of many nutrients, however, the high content of sugars in fruit might be a concern. Objectives To study effects of an increased fruit intake compared with similar amount of extra calories from nuts in humans. Methods Thirty healthy non-obese participants were randomized to either supplement the diet with fruits or nuts, each at +7 kcal/kg bodyweight/day for two months. Major endpoints were change of hepatic fat content (HFC, by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), basal metabolic rate (BMR, with indirect calorimetry) and cardiovascular risk markers. Results Weight gain was numerically similar in both groups although only statistically significant in the group randomized to nuts (fruit: from 22.15±1.61 kg/m2 to 22.30±1.7 kg/m2, p = 0.24 nuts: from 22.54±2.26 kg/m2 to 22.73±2.28 kg/m2, p = 0.045). On the other hand BMR increased in the nut group only (p = 0.028). Only the nut group reported a net increase of calories (from 2519±721 kcal/day to 2763±595 kcal/day, p = 0.035) according to 3-day food registrations. Despite an almost three-fold reported increased fructose-intake in the fruit group (from 9.1±6.0 gram/day to 25.6±9.6 gram/day, p<0.0001, nuts: from 12.4±5.7 gram/day to 6.5±5.3 gram/day, p = 0.007) there was no change of HFC. The numerical increase in fasting insulin was statistical significant only in the fruit group (from 7.73±3.1 pmol/l to 8.81±2.9 pmol/l, p = 0.018, nuts: from 7.29±2.9 pmol/l to 8.62±3.0 pmol/l, p = 0.14). Levels of vitamin C increased in both groups while α-tocopherol/cholesterol-ratio increased only in the fruit group. Conclusions Although BMR increased in the nut-group only this was not linked with differences in weight gain between groups which potentially could be explained by the lack of reported net caloric increase in the fruit group. In healthy non-obese individuals an increased fruit intake seems safe from cardiovascular risk perspective, including

  7. Risk-based approach to developing a national residue sampling plan for testing under European Union regulation for veterinary medicinal products and coccidiostat feed additives in domestic animal production.

    PubMed

    Danaher, Martin; Shanahan, Conor; Butler, Francis; Evans, Rhodri; O'Sullivan, Dan; Glynn, Denise; Camon, Tim; Lawlor, Peadar; O'Keeffe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    A ranking system for veterinary medicinal products and coccidiostat feed additives has been developed as a tool to be applied in a risk-based approach to the residue testing programme for foods of animal origin in the Irish National Residue Control Plan (NRCP). Three characteristics of substances that may occur as residues in food are included in the developed risk ranking system: Potency, as measured by the acceptable daily intake assigned by the European Medicines Agency Committee for Medicinal Products for Veterinary Use, to each substance; Usage, as measured by the three factors of Number of Doses, use on Individual animals or for Group treatment, and Withdrawal Period; and Residue Occurrence, as measured by the number of Non-Compliant Samples in the NRCP. For both Number of Doses and Non-Compliant Samples, data for the 5-year period 2008-12 have been used. The risk ranking system for substances was developed for beef cattle, sheep and goats, pigs, chickens and dairy cattle using a scoring system applied to the various parameters described above to give an overall score based on the following equation: Potency × Usage (Number of Doses + Individual/Group Use + Withdrawal Period) × Residue Occurrence. Applying this risk ranking system, the following substances are ranked very highly: antimicrobials such as amoxicillin (for all species except pigs), marbofloxacillin (for beef cattle), oxytetracycline (for all species except chickens), sulfadiazine with trimethoprim (for pigs and chickens) and tilmicosin (for chickens); antiparasitic drugs, such as the benzimidazoles triclabendazole (for beef and dairy cattle), fenbendazole/oxfendazole (for sheep/goats and dairy cattle) and albendazole (for dairy cattle), the avermectin ivermectin (for beef cattle), and anti-fluke drugs closantel and rafoxanide (for sheep/goats); the anticoccidials monensin, narasin, nicarbazin and toltrazuril (for chickens). The risk ranking system described is a relatively simple system

  8. Additional mutations in SRSF2, ASXL1 and/or RUNX1 identify a high-risk group of patients with KIT D816V(+) advanced systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Jawhar, M; Schwaab, J; Schnittger, S; Meggendorfer, M; Pfirrmann, M; Sotlar, K; Horny, H-P; Metzgeroth, G; Kluger, S; Naumann, N; Haferlach, C; Haferlach, T; Valent, P; Hofmann, W-K; Fabarius, A; Cross, N C P; Reiter, A

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with KIT D816V(+) advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM) are characterized by somatic mutations in additional genes. We sought to clarify the prognostic impact of such mutations. Genotype and clinical characteristics of 70 multi-mutated KIT D816V(+) advanced SM patients were included in univariate and multivariate analyses. The most frequently identified mutated genes were TET2 (n=33 of 70 patients), SRSF2 (n=30), ASXL1 (n=20), RUNX1 (n=16) and JAK2 (n=11). In univariate analysis, overall survival (OS) was adversely influenced by mutations in SRSF2 (P<0.0001), ASXL1 (P=0.002) and RUNX1 (P=0.03), but was not influenced by mutations in TET2 or JAK2. In multivariate analysis, SRSF2 and ASXL1 remained the most predictive adverse indicators concerning OS. Furthermore, we found that inferior OS and adverse clinical characteristics were significantly influenced by the number of mutated genes in the SRSF2/ASXL1/RUNX1 (S/A/R) panel (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the presence and number of mutated genes within the S/A/R panel are adversely associated with advanced disease and poor survival in KIT D816V(+) SM. On the basis of these findings, inclusion of molecular markers should be considered in upcoming prognostic scoring systems for patients with SM. PMID:26464169

  9. Higher TSH can be used as an additional risk factor in prediction of malignancy in euthyroid thyroid nodules evaluated by cytology based on Bethesda system.

    PubMed

    Baser, Husniye; Topaloglu, Oya; Tam, Abbas Ali; Evranos, Berna; Alkan, Afra; Sungu, Nuran; Dumlu, Ersin Gurkan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2016-08-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that thyrotropin (TSH) concentration can be used as a marker for prediction of thyroid malignancy. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between TSH levels and prediction of malignancy in euthyroid patients with different Bethesda categories. The data of 1433 euthyroid patients with 3206 thyroid nodules who underwent thyroidectomy were screened retrospectively. The preoperative cytology results, thyroid function tests, thyroid autoantibodies, and presence of histopathological Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) were recorded. Of the 1433 patients, 585 (40.8 %) had malignant and 848 (59.2 %) had benign histopathology. Malignant group had smaller nodule size, elevated TSH levels, and higher rate of presence of HT compared to benign group (p < 0.001, all). Cytology results of 3206 nodules were as follows: 832 nondiagnostic (ND), 1666 benign, 392 atypia of undetermined significance/follicular lesion of undetermined significance (AUS/FLUS), 68 follicular neoplasm/suspicious for follicular neoplasm (FN/SFN), 133 suspicious for malignancy (SM), and 115 malignant. Both SM and malignant cytology groups had higher TSH levels than other 4 Bethesda categories (p < 0.05, all). Benign cytology group had significantly lower TSH levels compared to other cytology groups (p < 0.05, all). Patients with malignant final histopathology in ND and AUS/FLUS cytology groups had significantly higher TSH levels compared to patients with benign final histopathology (p < 0.05, all). Moreover, TSH levels showed to increase from Bethesda categories II to VI. In addition to cytology, higher TSH levels can be used as a supplementary marker in prediction of malignancy in certain Bethesda categories. PMID:26972701

  10. Advantage of tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil regimen for cytotoxic T cell-mediated defence and its inhibition by additive steroid administration in high-risk liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, S; Ozawa, K; Kaido, T; Mori, A; Fujimoto, Y

    2016-04-01

    Our previous work revealed that the recipients with the highest pre-existing numbers of CD8(+) effector T cells (TE ) [hyperparathyroidism (HPT)E recipients] occupied approximately 30% of adult transplant recipients performed in our hospital. HPTE recipients demonstrated very poor clinical outcome compared with the remaining 70% of recipients with the lowest pre-existing TE (LPTE recipient). This study aimed to clarify the best combined immunosuppressive regimen related to function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for HPTE recipients. Eighty-one HPTE recipients were classified into three types, according to the immunosuppressive regimens: type 1, tacrolimus (Tac)/glucocorticoid (GC); type 2, Tac/mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)/GC; and type 3, Tac/MMF. Frequencies of severe infection, rejection and hospital death were the highest in types 1 and 2, whereas the lowest occurred in type 3. The survival rate in type 3 was the highest (100%) during follow-up until post-operative day 2000. Regarding the immunological mechanism, in type 1 TE perforin and interferon (IFN)-γ were generated through the self-renewal of CD8(+) central memory T cells (TCM ), but decreased in the early post-transplant period due to marked down-regulation of interleukin (IL)-12 receptor beta-1 of TCM. In type 2, the self-renewal TCM did not develop, and the effector function could not be increased. In type 3, in contrast, the effectors and cytotoxicity were correlated inversely with IL-12Rβ1(+) TCM levels, and increased at the highest level around the pre-transplant levels of IL-12Rβ1(+) TCM . However, the immunological advantage of Tac/MMF therapy was inhibited strongly by additive steroid administration. PMID:26560892

  11. Small oxidative changes in atherogenic LDL concentrations irreversibly regulate adhesiveness of human endothelial cells: effect of the lazaroid U74500A.

    PubMed

    Colomé, C; Martínez-González, J; Vidal, F; de Castellarnau, C; Badimon, L

    2000-04-01

    The adherence of monocytes to the endothelium is an early event in atherogenesis which is modulated by low density lipoproteins (LDL). We analyzed the effect of atherogenic LDL levels (180 mg cholesterol/dl, for 24 h) with minimal oxidative modifications (thiobarbituric-acid-reactive-substances (TBARS) concentration between 1.2+/-0.1 and 2.5+/-0.3 nmol of malonaldehyde bis-diethyl acetal (MDA) per mg protein) on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) adhesive properties. We used native LDL (n-LDL), and LDL exposed to spontaneous oxidation without antioxidants (mox-LDL) or with 20 micromol/l of the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT-LDL) or 10 micromol/l U74500A (U74500A-LDL), a scavenger of free radicals. Thiobarbituric-acid-reactive-substances (TBARS) levels were significantly higher in mox-LDL (2.5+/-0.3 nmol MDA/mg protein) than in BHT-LDL (1.6+/-0.2), U74500A-LDL (1.2+/-0.1) or in n-LDL (1.3+/-0.1). mox-LDL induced the greatest adhesion of U937 cells to HUVEC (103+/-9% over controls) followed by BHT-LDL (75+/-10%), U74500A-LDL (36+/-9%) and n-LDL (35+/-3%). The lazaroid U74500A efficiently protected U74500A-LDL against oxidative damage and prevented endothelial adhesiveness associated with this LDL modification, inducing adhesion effects similar to those of n-LDL. However, U74500A could not reverse the adhesion induced by previously oxidized LDL (mox-LDL). LDL did not induce the expression of the intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) or E-selectin, but it produced a downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS III) mRNA levels. Thus, adhesiveness of human endothelial cells (EC) exposed to atherogenic concentrations of LDL is closely modulated by minimal changes in LDL oxidative state, and could be related to a downregulation of NOS III. PMID:10729379

  12. Effects of Methanol Extract of Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) on Atherogenic Indices and Redox Status of Cellular System of Hypercholesterolemic Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Akanni, Olubukola Oyebimpe

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of methanol extract of Artocarpus altilis (AA) on atherogenic indices and redox status of cellular system of rats fed with dietary cholesterol while Questran (QUE) served as standard. Biochemical indices such as total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low- and high-density lipoproteins-cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C), aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST and ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), reduced glutathione, glutathione-s-transferase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were assessed. Hypercholesterolemic (HC) rats had significantly increased relative weight of liver and heart. Dietary cholesterol caused a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the levels of serum, hepatic, and cardiac TC by 110%, 70%, and 85%, LDL-C by 79%, 82%, and 176%, and TG by 68%, 96%, and 62%, respectively. Treatment with AA significantly reduced the relative weight of the organs and lipid parameters. There were beneficial increases in serum and cardiac HDL-C levels in HC rats treated with AA. In HC rats, serum LDH, ALT, and AST activities and levels of LPO were increased, whereas hepatic and cardiac SOD, CAT, and GPx were reduced. All biochemical and histological alterations were ameliorated upon treatment with AA. Extract of AA had protective effects against dietary cholesterol-induced hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24592277

  13. Postnatal testosterone exposure results in insulin resistance, enlarged mesenteric adipocytes, and an atherogenic lipid profile in adult female rats: comparisons with estradiol and dihydrotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Alexanderson, Camilla; Eriksson, Elias; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Lystig, Theodore; Gabrielsson, Britt; Lönn, Malin; Holmäng, Agneta

    2007-11-01

    Postnatal events contribute to features of the metabolic syndrome in adulthood. In this study, postnatally administered testosterone reduced insulin sensitivity and increased the mesenteric fat depot, the size of mesenteric adipocytes, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, and the atherogenic index in adult female rats. To assess the involvement of estrogen and androgen receptors in these programming effects, we compared testosterone-exposed rats to rats exposed to estradiol or dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Estradiol-treated rats had lower insulin sensitivity than testosterone-treated rats and, like those rats, had enlarged mesenteric adipocytes and increased triglyceride levels. DHT also reduced insulin sensitivity but did not mimic the other metabolic effects of testosterone. All treated rats were probably anovulatory, but only those treated with testosterone had reduced testosterone levels. This study confirms our previous finding that postnatal administration of testosterone reduces insulin sensitivity in adult female rats and shows that this effect is accompanied by unfavorable changes in mesenteric fat tissue and in serum lipid levels. The findings in the estradiol and DHT groups suggest that estrogen receptors exert stronger metabolic programming effects than androgen receptors. Thus, insults such as sex hormone exposure in early life may have long-lasting effects, thereby creating a predisposition to disturbances in insulin sensitivity, adipose tissue, and lipid profile in adulthood. PMID:17656458

  14. Effects of Methanol Extract of Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) on Atherogenic Indices and Redox Status of Cellular System of Hypercholesterolemic Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Akanni, Olubukola Oyebimpe

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of methanol extract of Artocarpus altilis (AA) on atherogenic indices and redox status of cellular system of rats fed with dietary cholesterol while Questran (QUE) served as standard. Biochemical indices such as total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low- and high-density lipoproteins-cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C), aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST and ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), reduced glutathione, glutathione-s-transferase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were assessed. Hypercholesterolemic (HC) rats had significantly increased relative weight of liver and heart. Dietary cholesterol caused a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the levels of serum, hepatic, and cardiac TC by 110%, 70%, and 85%, LDL-C by 79%, 82%, and 176%, and TG by 68%, 96%, and 62%, respectively. Treatment with AA significantly reduced the relative weight of the organs and lipid parameters. There were beneficial increases in serum and cardiac HDL-C levels in HC rats treated with AA. In HC rats, serum LDH, ALT, and AST activities and levels of LPO were increased, whereas hepatic and cardiac SOD, CAT, and GPx were reduced. All biochemical and histological alterations were ameliorated upon treatment with AA. Extract of AA had protective effects against dietary cholesterol-induced hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24592277

  15. Different Effects of Eicosapentaenoic and Docosahexaenoic Acids on Atherogenic High-Fat Diet-Induced Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Kemuriyama, Noriko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kuba, Motoko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Han, Song-Iee; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Isaka, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Yatoh, Shigeru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Nakae, Dai; Yahagi, Naoya; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Sone, Hirohito; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, can progress to steatohepatitis (NASH) and advanced liver damage, such as that from liver cirrhosis and cancer. Recent studies have shown the benefits of consuming n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for the treatment of NAFLD. In the present study, we investigated and compared the effects of the major n-3 PUFAs-eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6)-in preventing atherogenic high-fat (AHF) diet-induced NAFLD. Mice were fed the AHF diet supplemented with or without EPA or DHA for four weeks. Both EPA and DHA reduced the pathological features of AHF diet-induced NASH pathologies such as hepatic lobular inflammation and elevated serum transaminase activity. Intriguingly, EPA had a greater hepatic triacylglycerol (TG)-reducing effect than DHA. In contrast, DHA had a greater suppressive effect than EPA on AHF diet-induced hepatic inflammation and ROS generation, but no difference in fibrosis. Both EPA and DHA could be effective for treatment of NAFLD and NASH. Meanwhile, the two major n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids might differ in a relative contribution to pathological intermediate steps towards liver fibrosis. PMID:27333187

  16. Different Effects of Eicosapentaenoic and Docosahexaenoic Acids on Atherogenic High-Fat Diet-Induced Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Kemuriyama, Noriko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kuba, Motoko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Han, Song-iee; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Isaka, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Yatoh, Shigeru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Nakae, Dai; Yahagi, Naoya; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Sone, Hirohito; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, can progress to steatohepatitis (NASH) and advanced liver damage, such as that from liver cirrhosis and cancer. Recent studies have shown the benefits of consuming n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for the treatment of NAFLD. In the present study, we investigated and compared the effects of the major n-3 PUFAs—eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6)—in preventing atherogenic high-fat (AHF) diet-induced NAFLD. Mice were fed the AHF diet supplemented with or without EPA or DHA for four weeks. Both EPA and DHA reduced the pathological features of AHF diet-induced NASH pathologies such as hepatic lobular inflammation and elevated serum transaminase activity. Intriguingly, EPA had a greater hepatic triacylglycerol (TG)-reducing effect than DHA. In contrast, DHA had a greater suppressive effect than EPA on AHF diet-induced hepatic inflammation and ROS generation, but no difference in fibrosis. Both EPA and DHA could be effective for treatment of NAFLD and NASH. Meanwhile, the two major n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids might differ in a relative contribution to pathological intermediate steps towards liver fibrosis. PMID:27333187

  17. Softness of atherogenic lipoproteins: a comparison of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS).

    PubMed

    Mikl, Christian; Peters, Judith; Trapp, Marcus; Kornmueller, Karin; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Prassl, Ruth

    2011-08-31

    Apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100)-containing plasma lipoproteins (LDL and VLDL) supply tissues and cells with cholesterol and fat. During lipolytic conversion from VLDL to LDL the size and chemical composition of the particles change, but the apoB100 molecule remains bound to the lipids and regulates the receptor mediated uptake. The molecular physical parameters which control lipoprotein remodeling and enable particle stabilization by apoB100 are largely unknown. Here, we have compared the molecular dynamics and elasticities of VLDL and LDL derived by elastic neutron scattering temperature scans. We have determined thermal motions, dynamical transitions, and molecular fluctuations, which reflect the temperature-dependent motional coupling between lipid and protein. Our results revealed that lipoprotein particles are extremely soft and flexible. We found substantial differences in the molecular resiliences of lipoproteins, especially at higher temperatures. These discrepancies not only can be explained in terms of lipid composition and mobility but also suggest that apoB100 displays different dynamics dependent on the lipoprotein it is bound to. Hence, we suppose that the inherent conformational flexibility of apoB100 permits particle stabilization upon lipid exchange, whereas the dynamic coupling between protein and lipids might be a key determinant for lipoprotein conversion and atherogenicity. PMID:21790144

  18. Dyslipidemia, Hypertension and Diabetes Metaflammation. A Unique Mechanism for 3 Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Morales-Villegas, E

    2014-07-01

    The main current threat to the human race is the correlation and synergy between two determining triumvirates of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and death. The first triumvirate is constituted by obesity, metaflammation and insulin resistance; the second triumvirate is constituted by atherogenic dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The etiopathogenic driving force for both triumvirates is the global epidemic of obesity. Metaflammation and insulin resistance are associated with obesity; in turn, insulin resistance determines a high risk for the development of atherogenic dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus, the three of them being factors responsible for vascular endothelial injury and substrates involved in the genesis of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and death. The present chapter will address both triumvirates. Firstly, the current concepts of obesity, metaflammation and insulin resistance will be reviewed; emphasizing the second (metaflammation) for being a concept that has revolutionized and integrated our understanding of the harmful effects of obesity. Secondly, the impact of insulin resistance in the regulation of intermediary metabolism and endothelial function will be addressed; this will facilitate the understanding of the inextricable link between atherogenic dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Thus, this chapter aims to present to the clinician the best knowledge to link epidemics of obesity and cardiovascular death, through the sequence of metaflammation, insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors (mixed dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus). PMID:24993281

  19. Lifestyle and cardiometabolic risk in adults with type 1 diabetes: a review.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Catherine; Brazeau, Anne-Sophie; Gingras, Véronique; Desjardins, Katherine; Strychar, Irene; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2014-02-01

    Over the past decades, there has been a major upward shift in the prevalence of cardiometabolic risk (CMR) factors (central obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia) in patients with type 1 diabetes, which could have either an additive or a synergistic effect on risk for cardiovascular disease. These metabolic changes are occurring in parallel to the worldwide obesity epidemic and the widespread use of intensive insulin therapy. Poor lifestyle habits (poor diet quality, sedentary behaviours and smoking) are known to be driving factors for increased CMR factors in the general population. The objective of this review is to explore the lifestyle habits of adults with type 1 diabetes and its potential association with CMR factors. Evidence suggests that adherence to dietary guidelines is low in subjects with type 1 diabetes with a high prevalence of patients consuming an atherogenic diet. Sedentary habits are also more prevalent than in the general population, possibly because of the additional contribution of exercise-induced hypoglycemic fear. Moreover, the prevalence of smokers is still significant in the population with type 1 diabetes. All of these behaviours could trigger a cascade of metabolic anomalies that may contribute to increased CMR factors in patients with type 1 diabetes. The intensification of insulin treatment leading to new daily challenges (e.g. carbohydrates counting, increase of hypoglycemia) could contribute to the adoption of poor lifestyle habits. Preventive measures, such as identification of patients at high risk and promotion of lifestyle changes, should be encouraged. The most appropriate therapeutic measures remain to be established. PMID:24485215

  20. Families with familial combined hyperlipidemia and families enriched for coronary artery disease share genetic determinants for the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Allayee, H.; Aouizerat, B.E.; Lusis, A.J.; Cantor, R.M.; Lanning, C.D.; Rotter, J.I.; Dallinga-Thie, G.M.; Krauss, R.M.; Bruin, T.W.A. de

    1998-08-01

    Small, dense LDL particles consistently have been associated with hypertriglyceridemia, premature coronary artery disease (CAD), and familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH). Previously, the authors have observed linkage of LDL particle size with four separate candidate-gene loci in a study of families enriched for CAD. These loci contain the genes for manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), on chromosome 6q; for apolipoprotein AI-CIII-AIV, on chromosome 11q; for cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyl-transferase (LCAT), on chromosome 16q; and for the LDL receptor (LDLR), on chromosome 19p. The authors have now tested whether these loci also contribute to LDL particle size in families ascertained for FCH. The members of 18 families (481 individuals) were typed for genetic markers at the four loci, and linkage to LDL particle size was assessed by nonparametric sib-pair linkage analysis. The presence of small, dense LDL (pattern B) was much more frequent in the FCH probands than in the spouse controls. Evidence for linkage was observed at the MnSOD (P = .02), CETP/LCAT (P = .03), and apolipoprotein AI0CIII0AIV loci (P = .005) but not at the LDLR locus. The authors conclude that there is a genetically based association between FCH and small, dense LDL and that the genetic determinants for LDL particle size are shared, at least in part, among FCH families and the more general population at risk for CAD.

  1. Adenoviral gene delivery of elafin and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor attenuates NF-kappa B-dependent inflammatory responses of human endothelial cells and macrophages to atherogenic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Peter A; Hitt, Mary; Xing, Zhou; Wang, Jun; Haslett, Chris; Riemersma, Rudolph A; Webb, David J; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2004-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting arterial vessels. Strategies to reduce the inflammatory responses of endothelial cells and macrophages may slow lesion development and prevent complications such as plaque rupture. The human protease human neutrophil elastase (HNE), oxidized low density lipoprotein, LPS, and TNF-alpha were chosen as model stimuli of arterial wall inflammation and led to production of the chemokine IL-8 in endothelial cells. To counteract the activity of HNE, we have examined the effects of adenoviral gene delivery of the anti-elastases elafin, previously demonstrated within human atheroma, and murine secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), a related molecule, on the inflammatory responses of human endothelial cells and macrophages to atherogenic stimuli. We developed a technique of precomplexing adenovirus with cationic lipid to augment adenoviral infection efficiency in endothelial cells and to facilitate infection in macrophages. Elafin overexpression protected endothelial cells from HNE-induced IL-8 production and cytotoxicity. Elafin and murine SLPI also reduced endothelial IL-8 release in response to oxidized low density lipoprotein, LPS, and TNF-alpha and macrophage TNF-alpha production in response to LPS. This effect was associated with reduced activation of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB, through up-regulation of IkappaBalpha, in both cell types. Our work suggests a novel and extended anti-inflammatory role for these HNE inhibitors working as effectors of innate immunity to protect tissues against maladaptive inflammatory responses. Our findings indicate that elafin and SLPI may be gene therapy targets for the treatment of atheroma. PMID:15034071

  2. Anti-atherogenic effect of trivalent chromium-loaded CPMV nanoparticles in human aortic smooth muscle cells under hyperglycemic conditions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Rituparna; Wen, Amy M; Myer, Ashley B; Czech, Tori; Sahu, Soumyadip; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Raman, Priya

    2016-03-28

    Atherosclerosis, a major macrovascular complication associated with diabetes, poses a tremendous burden on national health care expenditure. Despite extensive efforts, cost-effective remedies are unknown. Therapies for atherosclerosis are challenged by a lack of targeted drug delivery approaches. Toward this goal, we turn to a biology-derived drug delivery system utilizing nanoparticles formed by the plant virus, Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV). The aim herein is to investigate the anti-atherogenic potential of the beneficial mineral nutrient, trivalent chromium, loaded CPMV nanoparticles in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) under hyperglycemic conditions. A non-covalent loading protocol is established yielding CrCl3-loaded CPMV (CPMV-Cr) carrying 2000 drug molecules per particle. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we show that CPMV-Cr is readily taken up by HASMC in vitro. In glucose (25 mM)-stimulated cells, 100 nM CPMV-Cr inhibits HASMC proliferation concomitant to attenuated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, proliferation marker) expression. This is accompanied by attenuation in high glucose-induced phospho-p38 and pAkt expression. Moreover, CPMV-Cr inhibits the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), in glucose-stimulated HASMCs. Finally glucose-stimulated lipid uptake is remarkably abrogated by CPMV-Cr, revealed by Oil Red O staining. Together, these data provide key cellular evidence for an atheroprotective effect of CPMV-Cr in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) under hyperglycemic conditions that may promote novel therapeutic ventures for diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:26935414

  3. Relationship between particulate matter exposure and atherogenic profile in “Ground Zero” workers as shown by dynamic contrast enhanced MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stephanie K.; Sawit, Simonette T.; Calcagno, Claudia; Maceda, Cynara; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Fayad, Zahi A.; Moline, Jacqueline; McLaughlin, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    In this pilot study, we hypothesize that dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has the potential to evaluate differences in atherosclerosis profiles in patients subjected to high (initial dust cloud) and low (after 13 September 2001) particulate matter (PM) exposure. Exposure to PM may be associated with adverse health effects leading to increased morbidity. Law enforcement workers were exposed to high levels of particulate pollution after working at “Ground Zero” and may exhibit accelerated atherosclerosis. 31 subjects (28 male) with high (n = 19) or low (n = 12) exposure to PM underwent DCE-MRI. Demographics (age, gender, family history, hypertension, diabetes, BMI, and smoking status), biomarkers (lipid profiles, hs-CRP, BP) and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measures (left and right) were obtained from all subjects. Differences between the high and low exposures were compared using independent samples t test. Using linear forward stepwise regression with information criteria model, independent predictors of increased area under curve (AUC) from DCE-MRI were determined using all variables as input. Confidence interval of 95 % was used and variables with p > 0.1 were eliminated. p < 0.05 was considered significant. Subjects with high exposure (HE) had significantly higher DCE-MRI AUC uptake (increased neovascularization) compared to subjects with lower exposure (LE). (AUC: 2.65 ± 0.63 HE vs. 1.88 ± 0.69 LE, p = 0.016). Except for right leg ABI, none of the other parameters were significantly different between the two groups. Regression model indicated that only HE to PM, CRP > 3.0 and total cholesterol were independently associated with increased neovascularization (in decreasing order of importance, all p < 0.026). HE to PM may increase plaque neovascularization, and thereby potentially indicate worsening atherogenic profile of “Ground Zero” workers. PMID:23179748

  4. Myeloid Cell-Specific ABCA1 Deletion Has Minimal Impact on Atherogenesis in Atherogenic Diet-Fed LDL Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xin; Zhu, Xuewei; Gao, Chuan; Shewale, Swapnil; Cao, Qiang; Liu, Mingxia; Boudyguina, Elena; Gebre, Abraham K.; Wilson, Martha D.; Brown, Amanda L.; Parks, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transplantation studies suggest that bone marrow (BM) cell ABCA1 protects against atherosclerosis development. However, the in vivo impact of macrophage ABCA1 expression on atherogenesis is not fully understood because BM contains other leukocytes and hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Myeloid-specific ABCA1 knockout (MSKO) mice in the LDL receptor knockout (LDLrKO) C57BL/6 background were developed to address this question. Approach and Results Chow-fed MSKO/LDLrKO (DKO) vs. LDLrKO (SKO) mice had similar plasma lipid concentrations, but atherogenic diet (AD)-fed DKO mice had reduced plasma VLDL/LDL concentrations resulting from decreased hepatic VLDL triglyceride secretion. Resident peritoneal macrophages from AD-fed DKO vs. SKO mice had significantly higher cholesterol content, but similar proinflammatory gene expression. Atherosclerosis extent was similar between genotypes after 10–16 wks of AD, but increased modestly in DKO mice by 24 wks of AD. Lesional macrophage content was similar, likely due to higher monocyte flux through aortic root lesions in DKO vs. SKO mice. After transplantation of DKO or SKO BM into SKO mice and 16 wk of AD feeding, atherosclerosis extent was similar and plasma apoB lipoproteins was reduced in mice receiving DKO BM. When differences in plasma VLDL/LDL concentrations were minimized by maintaining mice on chow for 24 wks, DKO mice had modest, but significantly more, atherosclerosis compared to SKO mice. Conclusions Myeloid cell ABCA1 increases hepatic VLDL triglyceride secretion and plasma VLDL/LDL concentrations in AD-fed LDLrKO mice, offsetting its atheroprotective role in decreasing macrophage cholesterol content, resulting in minimal increase in atherosclerosis. PMID:24833800

  5. MEK1/2 inhibitors activate macrophage ABCG1 expression and reverse cholesterol transport-An anti-atherogenic function of ERK1/2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Yuanli; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Jie; Cao, Xingyue; Li, Xiaoju; Li, Luyuan; Miao, Qing Robert; Hajjar, David P; Duan, Yajun; Han, Jihong

    2016-09-01

    Expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1), a molecule facilitating cholesterol efflux to HDL, is activated by liver X receptor (LXR). In this study, we investigated if inhibition of ERK1/2 can activate macrophage ABCG1 expression and functions. MEK1/2 inhibitors, PD98059 and U0126, increased ABCG1 mRNA and protein expression, and activated the natural ABCG1 promoter but not the promoter with the LXR responsive element (LXRE) deletion. Inhibition of ABCG1 expression by ABCG1 siRNA did enhance the formation of macrophage/foam cells and it attenuated the inhibitory effect of MEK1/2 inhibitors on foam cell formation. MEK1/2 inhibitors activated macrophage cholesterol efflux to HDL in vitro, and they enhanced reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in vivo. ApoE deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice receiving U0126 treatment had reduced sinus lesions in the aortic root which was associated with activated macrophage ABCG1 expression in the lesion areas. MEK1/2 inhibitors coordinated the RXR agonist, but not the LXR agonist, to induce ABCG1 expression. Furthermore, induction of ABCG1 expression by MEK1/2 inhibitors was associated with activation of SIRT1, a positive regulator of LXR activity, and inactivation of SULT2B1 and RIP140, two negative regulators of LXR activity. Taken together, our study suggests that MEK1/2 inhibitors activate macrophage ABCG1 expression/RCT, and inhibit foam cell formation and lesion development by multiple mechanisms, supporting the concept that ERK1/2 inhibition is anti-atherogenic. PMID:27365310

  6. L-Arginine and vitamin C attenuate pro-atherogenic effects of high-fat diet on biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Bogdański, Paweł; Suliburska, Joanna; Szulińska, Monika; Sikora, Marta; Walkowiak, Jarosław; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2015-12-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) is known to cause endothelial dysfunction and contribute to atherosclerosis progression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of L-arginine (L-Arg) and vitamin C supplementation as a potentially useful strategy for modulation of serum homocysteine (Hcy) levels, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), oxidative stress, and insulin resistance induced by HFD in rats. Six weeks-old female and male Wistar rats were divided into five groups of twelve rats each and treated for six weeks with: group 1, standard diet; group 2, HFD; group 3, HFD supplemented with L-Arg (20g/kg diet); group 4, HFD supplemented with L-Arg (20g/kg diet) plus vitamin C (100mg/kg diet); group 5, HFD supplemented with vitamin C (100mg/kg diet). HFD significantly elevated TNF-α, reduced total antioxidant status (TAS), and increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Significant increases of total cholesterol (TCH), LDL cholesterol (LDL), triglyceride (TG) and a decrease of HDL cholesterol (HDL) were observed in HFD rats. Supplementation with l-Arg prevented the decrease of TAS and the increases in HOMA-IR, LDL, and TG levels. Moreover, Hcy and TNF-α levels were reduced in L-Arg supplemented group. Supplementation with vitamin C significantly atenuated TAS decrease and lowered LDL levels. L-Arg plus vitamin C enhanced L-Arg effect on TAS and protected against TNF-α increase. Western blot analysis showed that l-Arg supplementation of HFD rats reduced the level of protein carbonyls. Taken together, these findings indicate that supplemental l-arginine and/or vitamin C, by their abilities to modulate biomarkers of HFD-induced endothelial dysfunction, are anti-atherogenic. PMID:26653556

  7. Anti-atherogenic effect of trivalent chromium-loaded CPMV nanoparticles in human aortic smooth muscle cells under hyperglycemic conditions in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rituparna; Wen, Amy M.; Myer, Ashley B.; Czech, Tori; Sahu, Soumyadip; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Raman, Priya

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis, a major macrovascular complication associated with diabetes, poses a tremendous burden on national health care expenditure. Despite extensive efforts, cost-effective remedies are unknown. Therapies for atherosclerosis are challenged by a lack of targeted drug delivery approaches. Toward this goal, we turn to a biology-derived drug delivery system utilizing nanoparticles formed by the plant virus, Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV). The aim herein is to investigate the anti-atherogenic potential of the beneficial mineral nutrient, trivalent chromium, loaded CPMV nanoparticles in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) under hyperglycemic conditions. A non-covalent loading protocol is established yielding CrCl3-loaded CPMV (CPMV-Cr) carrying 2000 drug molecules per particle. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we show that CPMV-Cr is readily taken up by HASMC in vitro. In glucose (25 mM)-stimulated cells, 100 nM CPMV-Cr inhibits HASMC proliferation concomitant to attenuated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, proliferation marker) expression. This is accompanied by attenuation in high glucose-induced phospho-p38 and pAkt expression. Moreover, CPMV-Cr inhibits the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), in glucose-stimulated HASMCs. Finally glucose-stimulated lipid uptake is remarkably abrogated by CPMV-Cr, revealed by Oil Red O staining. Together, these data provide key cellular evidence for an atheroprotective effect of CPMV-Cr in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) under hyperglycemic conditions that may promote novel therapeutic ventures for diabetic atherosclerosis.

  8. A-FABP Concentration Is More Strongly Associated with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and the Occurrence of Metabolic Syndrome in Premenopausal Than in Postmenopausal Middle-Aged Women

    PubMed Central

    Ponikowska, Irena; Sypniewska, Grazyna

    2014-01-01

    We aimed at the evaluation of the relationship between adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) and cardiometabolic risk factors in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Additionally, we compared A-FABP with adipokines related to metabolic syndrome (MetS) such as leptin and adiponectin. 94 premenopausal and 90 early postmenopausal middle-aged Caucasian women were subject to examinations. Postmenopausal women had higher A-FABP than premenopausal; this difference became insignificant after controlling for age. We found significantly higher correlation coefficients between A-FABP and TC/HDL-C ratio and number of MetS components in premenopausal women, compared to postmenopausal. Each 1 ng/dL increase in A-FABP concentration significantly increased the probability of occurrence of atherogenic lipid profile in premenopausal women, even after multivariate adjustment. All odds ratios became insignificant after controlling for BMI in postmenopausal women. A-FABP was more strongly associated with MetS than leptin and adiponectin in premenopausal women. Adiponectin concentration was a better biomarker for MetS after menopause. Our results suggest that the A-FABP is more strongly associated with some cardiometabolic risk factors in premenopausal than in postmenopausal women. Higher values of A-FABP after menopause are mainly explained by the fact that postmenopausal women are older. Because of the limitation of study, these results should be interpreted with caution. PMID:24971341

  9. A-FABP concentration is more strongly associated with cardiometabolic risk factors and the occurrence of metabolic syndrome in premenopausal than in postmenopausal middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Stefanska, Anna; Ponikowska, Irena; Sypniewska, Grazyna

    2014-01-01

    We aimed at the evaluation of the relationship between adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) and cardiometabolic risk factors in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Additionally, we compared A-FABP with adipokines related to metabolic syndrome (MetS) such as leptin and adiponectin. 94 premenopausal and 90 early postmenopausal middle-aged Caucasian women were subject to examinations. Postmenopausal women had higher A-FABP than premenopausal; this difference became insignificant after controlling for age. We found significantly higher correlation coefficients between A-FABP and TC/HDL-C ratio and number of MetS components in premenopausal women, compared to postmenopausal. Each 1 ng/dL increase in A-FABP concentration significantly increased the probability of occurrence of atherogenic lipid profile in premenopausal women, even after multivariate adjustment. All odds ratios became insignificant after controlling for BMI in postmenopausal women. A-FABP was more strongly associated with MetS than leptin and adiponectin in premenopausal women. Adiponectin concentration was a better biomarker for MetS after menopause. Our results suggest that the A-FABP is more strongly associated with some cardiometabolic risk factors in premenopausal than in postmenopausal women. Higher values of A-FABP after menopause are mainly explained by the fact that postmenopausal women are older. Because of the limitation of study, these results should be interpreted with caution. PMID:24971341

  10. Patient-centred care, health behaviours and cardiovascular risk factor levels in people with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes: 5-year follow-up of the ADDITION-Plus trial cohort

    PubMed Central

    Dambha-Miller, Hajira; Cooper, Andrew J M; Simmons, Rebecca K; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Griffin, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between the experience of patient-centred care (PCC), health behaviours and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor levels among people with type 2 diabetes. Design Population-based prospective cohort study. Setting 34 general practices in East Anglia, UK, delivering organised diabetes care. Participants 478 patients recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes aged between 40 and 69 years enrolled in the ADDITION-Plus trial. Main outcome measures Self-reported and objectively measured health behaviours (diet, physical activity, smoking status), CVD risk factor levels (blood pressure, lipid levels, glycated haemoglobin, body mass index, waist circumference) and modelled 10-year CVD risk. Results Better experiences of PCC early in the course of living with diabetes were not associated with meaningful differences in self-reported physical activity levels including total activity energy expenditure (β-coefficient: 0.080 MET h/day (95% CI 0.017 to 0.143; p=0.01)), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (β-coefficient: 5.328 min/day (95% CI 0.796 to 9.859; p=0.01)) and reduced sedentary time (β-coefficient: −1.633 min/day (95% CI −2.897 to −0.368; p=0.01)). PCC was not associated with clinically meaningful differences in levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (β-coefficient: 0.002 mmol/L (95% CI 0.001 to 0.004; p=0.03)), systolic blood pressure (β-coefficient: −0.561 mm Hg (95% CI −0.653 to −0.468; p=0.01)) or diastolic blood pressure (β-coefficient: −0.565 mm Hg (95% CI −0.654 to −0.476; p=0.01)). Over an extended follow-up of 5 years, we observed no clear evidence that PCC was associated with self-reported, clinical or biochemical outcomes, except for waist circumference (β-coefficient: 0.085 cm (95% CI 0.015 to 0.155; p=0.02)). Conclusions We found little evidence that experience of PCC early in the course of diabetes was associated with clinically important changes in health

  11. The anti-atherogenic effects of berberine on foam cell formation are mediated through the upregulation of sirtuin 1.

    PubMed

    Chi, Liyi; Peng, Lijing; Pan, Na; Hu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yanhai

    2014-10-01

    Berberine (BBR) is a botanical alkaloid that has been reported to have effects in cardiovascular diseases; however, the mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood. In the present study, the protective effects of BBR were evaluated, and the underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated. The effects of a combination of atorvastatin and BBR on foam cell formation were also investigated. THP-1-derived macrophages were pre-treated with BBR (5, 10 and 20 mg/l) for 2 h prior to the addition of oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL; 50 mg/l). Small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and the adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor, compound C, were used to investigate the mechanisms through which BBR exerts its effects. To determine the effect of a combination of atorvastatin and BBR, the macrophages were treated with atorvastatin and BBR separately or jointly for 2 h, and then treated with ox-LDL (50 mg/l) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 µM) for 12 h. Oil Red O staining was used to detect foam cell formation. Lipid amounts were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Gene and protein expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) carried out separately or jointly. The results from Oil Red O staining and HPLC revealed that BBR effectively suppressed foam cell formation and lipid and cholesterol accumulation. Furthermore, BBR upregulated the expression of SIRT1 and AMPK and downregulated the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ). Pre-treatment of the cells with SIRT1-siRNA or compound C attenuated the anti-atherosclerotic effects of BBR. The results obtained in the present study demonstrate that the combination of atorvastatin and BBR is more effective in inhibiting foam cell formation than using atorvastatin alone. These data suggest that BBR suppresses foam cell formation by activating the AMPK-SIRT1-PPAR

  12. [Triglycerides--a long known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Subgroup analysis shows the importance after acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Olsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    An increased blood concentration of triglycerides (TG) has long been recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Through competition from HDL cholesterol and the arrival of statin treatment for high LDL cholesterol the importance of TG as risk factor was largely forgotten. A high concentration of TG indicates high blood levels of TG-rich lipoproteins including cholesterol rich remnant particles. Studies using Mendelian randomizations have demonstrated that a low HDL cholesterol does not carry a direct atherogenic function and that remnant particles do so. New efforts should be exercised in order to diminish residual cardiovascular risk during statin treatment through decreasing TG rich lipoproteins. PMID:26371484

  13. ADDITIVITY ASSESSMENT OF TRIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES BY PROPORTIONAL RESPONSE ADDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    If additivity is known or assumed, the toxicity of a chemical mixture may be predicted from the dose response curves of the individual chemicals comprising the mixture. As single chemical data are abundant and mixture data sparse, mixture risk methods that utilize single chemical...

  14. Pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level is a risk factor for para-aortic lymph node recurrence in addition to squamous cell carcinoma antigen following definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To identify pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels as a risk factor for para-aortic lymph node (PALN) recurrence following concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for cervical cancer. Methods From March 1995 to January 2008, 188 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix were analyzed retrospectively. No patient received PALN irradiation as the initial treatment. CEA and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) were measured before and after radiotherapy. PALN recurrence was detected by computer tomography (CT) scans. We analyzed the actuarial rates of PALN recurrence by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Multivariate analyses were carried out with Cox regression models. We stratified the risk groups based on the hazard ratios (HR). Results Both pretreatment CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL and SCC-Ag levels < 10 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 8.838), SCC-Ag levels ≥ 40 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 12.551), and SCC-Ag levels of 10-40 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 4.2464) were significant factors for PALN recurrence. The corresponding 5-year PALN recurrence rates were 51.5%, 84.8%, and 27.5%, respectively. The 5-year PALN recurrence rate for patients with both low (< 10 ng/mL) SCC and CEA was only 9.6%. CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL or SCC-Ag levels ≥ 10 ng/mL at PALN recurrence were associated with overall survival after an isolated PALN recurrence. Pretreatment CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL were also associated with survival after an isolated PALN recurrence. Conclusions Pretreatment CEA ≥ 10 ng/mL is an additional risk factor of PALN relapse following definitive CCRT for SCC of the uterine cervix in patients with pretreatment SCC-Ag levels < 10 ng/mL. More comprehensive examinations before CCRT and intensive follow-up schedules are suggested for early detection and salvage in patients with SCC-Ag or CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL. PMID:22289572

  15. Structure and lipid interactions of an anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic 10 residue Class G* Apolipoprotein J peptide using solution NMR#

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vinod K.; Palgunachari, Mayakonda N.; Hudson, Jason S.; Shin, Ronald; Keenum, Tamara D.; Rama Krishna, N.; Anantharamaiah, G. M.

    2010-01-01

    The surprising observation that a 10 residue class G* peptide from apolipoprotein J, [113-122]apoJ, possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties prompted us to delineate its structural characteristics in the presence of normal and oxidized lipid. Towards this, we have determined high resolution structure of [113-122]apoJ in solution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and studied its interaction with lipids, including oxidized lipids, using a number of biophysical methods. Circular dichroism and NMR studies established that in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelle this peptide adopts amphipathic α helical structure. The observed Nuclear Overhauser effects indicate that the amphipathic helical structure of the peptide is stabilized by the N-terminal acetyl and C-terminal amide blocking groups. We used isothermal titration calorimetry to measure binding enthalpy of the peptide with DPC micelle, an oxidized lipid, 1-(palmitoyl)-2-(5-keto-6-octene-dioyl) phosphatidylcholine (KOdiA-PC), and the mixture of these two lipids (5mol% KOdiA-PC in DPC micelle). We find that the peptide binding with DPC micelle is associated with an enthalpy change (-16.75±0.16 Kcal/mol) much larger than that resulting from the binding with KodiA-PC (-3.67±0.13 Kcal/mol). Incorporation of a small amount of KOdiA-PC (5mol %) in DPC micelle also results in the lowering of peptide binding enthalpy (-13.43±0.18 Kcal/mol). These results are consistent with overall negative charge and altered conformational properties of oxidized sn-2 chain of KOdiA-PC. Our results have unambiguously established the amphipathic α helical structure of [113-122]apoJ peptide in the presence of DPC micelle as well as its ability to bind oxidized lipid. These in vitro results help explain the previously observed anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic properties of this peptide. PMID:20970404

  16. 46 CFR 308.502 - Additional insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional insurance. 308.502 Section 308.502 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance I-Introduction § 308.502 Additional insurance. The assured may place increased value...

  17. 46 CFR 308.502 - Additional insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional insurance. 308.502 Section 308.502 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance I-Introduction § 308.502 Additional insurance. The assured may place increased value...

  18. 46 CFR 308.502 - Additional insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional insurance. 308.502 Section 308.502 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance I-Introduction § 308.502 Additional insurance. The assured may place increased value...

  19. Inhibition of LDL oxidation and oxidized LDL-induced foam cell formation in RAW 264.7 cells show anti-atherogenic properties of a foliar methanol extract of Scoparia dulcis

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Sinjitha S.; Shetty, Nandini Prasad; Bhatt, Praveena; Neelwarne, Bhagyalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidation of low density lipoproteins and their further uptake by macrophages is known to result in the formation of foam cells, which are critical in the initiation of atherosclerosis through activation of inflammatory signalling cascades. Thus, powerful dietary antioxidants are receiving attention for the reversal of such pathological states. Materials and Methods: Extracts of Scoparia dulcis have been used as tea and health drinks with various health promoting effects. In the present study, we examined the reactive oxygen scavenging potential as well as anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic efficacies, using leaf extracts obtained after successive extraction with various solvents. Results: A methanol extract showed potent antioxidant activity with an IC50 value of 570 μg/ml, caused hydrogen peroxide scavenging (28.9 µg/ml) and anti-inflammatory effects by improving human erythrocyte membrane stabilisation (about 86%). The methanol extract also efficiently inhibited lipid peroxidation and oxidation of low density lipoproteins, thus preventing foam cell formation in cultured RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, phytochemical screening of the extracts showed high accumulation of flavonoids. Conclusions: The foliar methanol extract of Scoparia dulcis has a strong anti-atherogenic potential and this property could be attributed maybe due to presence of flavonoids since HPLC analysis showed high concentrations of myricetin and rutin in the methanol extract. PMID:24991098

  20. [Dyslipidaemia and vascular risk. A new evidence based review].

    PubMed

    Pallarés-Carratalá, V; Pascual-Fuster, V; Godoy-Rocatí, D

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidaemia is one of the major risk factors for ischaemic heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. Early detection and therapeutic intervention are key elements in the adequate prevention of cardiovascular disease. It is essential to have knowledge of the therapeutic arsenal available for their appropriate use in each of the clinical situations that might be presented in our patients. In the past 3 years, there has been a proliferation of multiple guidelines for the clinical management of patients with dyslipidaemia, with apparent contradictory messages regarding the achievement of the control objectives, which are confusing clinicians. This review aims to provide an updated overview of the situation as regards dyslipidaemia, based on the positioning of both European and American guidelines, through different risk situations and ending with the concept of atherogenic dyslipidaemia as a recognized cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:25559484

  1. Reduced risk of hypoglycemia with once-daily glargine versus twice-daily NPH and number needed to harm with NPH to demonstrate the risk of one additional hypoglycemic event in type 2 diabetes: Evidence from a long-term controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstock, Julio; Fonseca, Vivian; Schinzel, Stefan; Dain, Marie-Paule; Mullins, Peter; Riddle, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Aims This analysis evaluated HbA1c-adjusted hypoglycemia risk with glargine versus neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) over a 5-year study in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Clinical significance was assessed using number needed to harm (NNH) to demonstrate the risk of one additional patient experiencing at least one hypoglycemic event. Methods Individual patient-level data for symptomatic documented hypoglycemia and HbA1c values from a 5-year randomized study comparing once-daily glargine (n = 513) with twice-daily NPH (n = 504) were analyzed. Symptomatic hypoglycemia was categorized according to concurrent self-monitoring blood glucose levels and need for assistance. Hypoglycemic events per patient-year as a function of HbA1c were fitted by negative binomial regression using treatment and HbA1c at endpoint as independent variables. An estimate of NNH was derived from logistic regression models. Results The cumulative number of symptomatic hypoglycemia events was consistently lower with glargine compared with NPH over 5 years. Compared with twice-daily NPH, once-daily glargine treatment resulted in significantly lower adjusted odds ratios (OR) for all daytime hypoglycemia (OR 0.74; p = 0.030) and any severe event (OR 0.64; p = 0.035), representing a 26% and 36% reduction in the odds of daytime and severe hypoglycemia, respectively. Our model predicts that, if 25 patients were treated with NPH instead of glargine, then one additional patient would experience at least one severe hypoglycemic event. Conclusions This analysis of long-term insulin treatment confirms findings from short-term studies and demonstrates that glargine provides sustained, clinically meaningful reductions in risk of hypoglycemia compared with NPH in patients with T2DM. PMID:24856612

  2. Reducing cardiovascular disease risk in patients with type 2 diabetes and concomitant macrovascular disease: can insulin be too much of a good thing?

    PubMed

    Rensing, K L; Reuwer, A Q; Arsenault, B J; von der Thüsen, J H; Hoekstra, J B L; Kastelein, J J P; Twickler, Th B

    2011-12-01

    Despite improvement of microvascular outcomes as a consequence of optimal glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes, prevention of macrovascular complications is still a major challenge. Of interest, large-scale intervention studies (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes, Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease-Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation and Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial) comparing standard therapy versus more intensive glucose-lowering therapy failed to report beneficial impacts on macrovascular outcomes. Consequently, it is currently under debate whether the high doses of exogenous insulin that were administered in these trials to achieve strict target glucose levels could be responsible for these unexpected outcomes. Additionally, a potential role for plasma insulin levels in predicting macrovascular outcomes has emerged in patients with or without type 2 diabetes. These observations, combined with evidence from in vitro and animal experiments, suggest that insulin might have intrinsic atherogenic effects. In this review, we summarize clinical trials, population-based studies as well as data emerging from basic science experiments that point towards the hypothesis that the administration of high insulin doses might not be beneficial in patients with type 2 diabetes and established macrovascular disease. PMID:21736687

  3. Evaluation of the in Vitro Anti-Atherogenic Properties of Lipid Fractions of Olive Pomace, Olive Pomace Enriched Fish Feed and Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Fed with Olive Pomace Enriched Fish Feed

    PubMed Central

    Nasopoulou, Constantina; Gogaki, Vassiliki; Stamatakis, Giorgos; Papaharisis, Leonidas; Demopoulos, Constantinos A.; Zabetakis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Given the pivotal role of Platelet-Activating-Factor (PAF) in atherosclerosis and the cardio-protective role of PAF-inhibitors derived from olive pomace, the inclusion of olive pomace in fish feed has been studied for gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata). The aim of the current research was to elucidate the anti-atherogenic properties of specific HPLC lipid fractions obtained from olive pomace, olive pomace enriched fish feed and fish fed with the olive pomace enriched fish feed, by evaluating their in vitro biological activity against washed rabbit platelets. This in vitro study underlines that olive pomace inclusion in fish feed improves the nutritional value of both fish feed and fish possibly by enriching the marine lipid profile of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) with specific bioactive lipid compounds of plant origin. PMID:24084786

  4. Different Functional and Structural Characteristics between ApoA-I and ApoA-4 in Lipid-Free and Reconstituted HDL State: ApoA-4 Showed Less Anti-Atherogenic Activity.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Eun-Young; Park, Ji Yoon; Lee, Seung-Taek; Ham, Sihyun; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I and A-IV are protein constituents of high-density lipoproteins although their functional difference in lipoprotein metabolism is still unclear. To compare anti-atherogenic properties between apoA-I and apoA-4, we characterized both proteins in lipid-free and lipid-bound state. In lipid-free state, apoA4 showed two distinct bands, around 78 and 67 Å on native gel electrophoresis, while apoA-I showed scattered band pattern less than 71 Å. In reconstituted HDL (rHDL) state, apoA-4 showed three major bands around 101 Å and 113 Å, while apoA-I-rHDL showed almost single band around 98 Å size. Lipid-free apoA-I showed 2.9-fold higher phospholipid binding ability than apoA-4. In lipid-free state, BS3-crosslinking revealed that apoA-4 showed less multimerization tendency upto dimer, while apoA-I showed pentamerization. In rHDL state (95:1), apoA-4 was existed as dimer as like as apoA-I. With higher phospholipid content (255:1), five apoA-I and three apoA-4 were required to the bigger rHDL formation. Regardless of particle size, apoA-I-rHDL showed superior LCAT activation ability than apoA-4-rHDL. Uptake of acetylated LDL was inhibited by apoA-I in both lipid-free and lipid-bound state, while apoA-4 inhibited it only lipid-free state. ApoA-4 showed less anti-atherogenic activity with more sensitivity to glycation. In conclusion, apoA-4 showed inferior physiological functions in lipid-bound state, compared with those of apoA-I, to induce more pro-atherosclerotic properties. PMID:25997739

  5. Different Functional and Structural Characteristics between ApoA-I and ApoA-4 in Lipid-Free and Reconstituted HDL State: ApoA-4 Showed Less Anti-Atherogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Eun-Young; Park, Ji Yoon; Lee, Seung-Taek; Ham, Sihyun; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I and A-IV are protein constituents of high-density lipoproteins although their functional difference in lipoprotein metabolism is still unclear. To compare anti-atherogenic properties between apoA-I and apoA-4, we characterized both proteins in lipid-free and lipid-bound state. In lipid-free state, apoA4 showed two distinct bands, around 78 and 67 Å on native gel electrophoresis, while apoA-I showed scattered band pattern less than 71 Å. In reconstituted HDL (rHDL) state, apoA-4 showed three major bands around 101 Å and 113 Å, while apoA-I-rHDL showed almost single band around 98 Å size. Lipid-free apoA-I showed 2.9-fold higher phospholipid binding ability than apoA-4. In lipid-free state, BS3-crosslinking revealed that apoA-4 showed less multimerization tendency upto dimer, while apoA-I showed pentamerization. In rHDL state (95:1), apoA-4 was existed as dimer as like as apoA-I. With higher phospholipid content (255:1), five apoA-I and three apoA-4 were required to the bigger rHDL formation. Regardless of particle size, apoA-I-rHDL showed superior LCAT activation ability than apoA-4-rHDL. Uptake of acetylated LDL was inhibited by apoA-I in both lipid-free and lipid-bound state, while apoA-4 inhibited it only lipid-free state. ApoA-4 showed less anti-atherogenic activity with more sensitivity to glycation. In conclusion, apoA-4 showed inferior physiological functions in lipid-bound state, compared with those of apoA-I, to induce more pro-atherosclerotic properties. PMID:25997739

  6. Mutagenesis and cardiovascular diseases Molecular mechanisms, risk factors, and protective factors.

    PubMed

    De Flora, Silvio; Izzotti, Alberto

    2007-08-01

    Although no generalization can be made, it is of interest that cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and other chronic conditions often share common risk factors and common protective factors as well as common pathogenetic determinants, such as DNA damage, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. Atherosclerosis is the most important cause of vascular forms representing the major cause of death in the population of many geographical areas. A great deal of studies support the "response-to-injury" theory. A variety of experimental and epidemiological findings are also in favor of the somatic mutation theory, which maintains that the earliest event in the atherogenic process is represented by mutations in arterial smooth muscle cells, akin to formation of a benign tumor. These two theories can be harmonized, also taking into account the highly diversified nature of atherosclerotic lesions. Molecular epidemiology studies performed in our laboratory and other laboratories have shown that DNA adducts are systematically present in arterial smooth muscle cells, and their levels are correlated with atherogenic risk factors known from traditional epidemiology. Oxidative DNA damage was also consistently detected in these cells. The role of glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms on the frequency of the above molecular alterations and of arterial diseases is rather controversial. Prevention of both cancer and atherosclerosis is based on avoidance of exposure to risk factors and on fortification of the host defense mechanisms by means of dietary principles and chemopreventive drugs. PMID:17383689

  7. The importance of hyperhomocysteinemia as a risk factor for diseases: an overview.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, W

    2001-08-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is the result of a disturbed methionine metabolism. It results from enzyme and/or vitamin deficiency. Epidemiological studies have proven, that hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, stroke, peripheral arterial occlusive disease and venous thrombosis. Conflicting results come from prospective studies. Trials which are now in progress may clarify the "causality" of high homocysteine concentrations and will assess the value of homocysteine-lowering therapy. The induction of the atherogenic process by hyperhomocysteinemia seems to be associated with an alteration of endothelial and smooth muscle cell function leading to an accelerated formation of reactive oxygen species. An increased endothelial expression of adhesion molecules will then lead to an enhanced deposition of oxidized LDL in the vessel wall with the formation of foam cells. Additionally, hyperhomocysteinemia interferes with the coagulation system and thus also has prothrombotic effects. There is a high prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia as a sign of a vitamin deficiency in elderly subjects which strongly increases with age. Elderly people have a high frequency of vitamin B12 deficiency which can be diagnosed more reliably by the measurement of serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) level than by serum vitamin B12. Subjects following a strict vegetarian diet also have a high prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia caused by functional vitamin B12 deficiency (increased MMA level). Last but not least, hyperhomocysteinemia is a factor in the pathogenesis of neural tube defects and pre-eclampsia. An early diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is important for the prevention of neurological damages. Homocysteine should be measured in patients with a history of atherothrombotic vessel diseases, in patients with diabetes or hyperlipidemia, in renal patients, in obese subjects, in elderly people, in postmenopausal women, and in early pregnancy. A specific diagnosis

  8. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  9. Measuring additive interaction using odds ratios

    PubMed Central

    Kalilani, Linda; Atashili, Julius

    2006-01-01

    Interaction measured on the additive scale has been argued to be better correlated with biologic interaction than when measured on the multiplicative scale. Measures of interaction on the additive scale have been developed using risk ratios. However, in studies that use odds ratios as the sole measure of effect, the calculation of these measures of additive interaction is usually performed by directly substituting odds ratios for risk ratios. Yet assessing additive interaction based on replacing risk ratios by odds ratios in formulas that were derived using the former may be erroneous. In this paper, we evaluate the extent to which three measures of additive interaction – the interaction contrast ratio (ICR), the attributable proportion due to interaction (AP), and the synergy index (S), estimated using odds ratios versus using risk ratios differ as the incidence of the outcome of interest increases in the source population and/or as the magnitude of interaction increases. Our analysis shows that the difference between the two depends on the measure of interaction used, the type of interaction present, and the baseline incidence of the outcome. Substituting odds ratios for risk ratios, when calculating measures of additive interaction, may result in misleading conclusions. Of the three measures, AP appears to be the most robust to this direct substitution. Formulas that use stratum specific odds and odds ratios to accurately calculate measures of additive interaction are presented. PMID:16620385

  10. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  11. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  12. Recent Additions for 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    December 8, 1999
    Summary Of The U.S. EPA Colloquium On a Framework for Human Health Risk Assessment
    EPA/600/R-99/001 and EPA/600/R-98/155
    The U.S. ...

  13. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  14. [Risk and risk perception].

    PubMed

    de Vries, N K

    2002-06-01

    After having delineated the concept of risk and having described the type of risks that are relevant to dental practice, an overview of empirical and theoretical work on risk perception is given. The perception of risks is determined both by the actual magnitude and by perceptual bias, originating from either general perceptual phenomena such as (cognitive) availability or the ego-relevance of risks: persons in general underestimate risks for themselves as compared to the risks for others (unrealistic optimism). PMID:12092334

  15. Interactive and additive influences of Gender, BMI and Apolipoprotein 4 on cognition in children chronically exposed to high concentrations of PM2.5 and ozone. APOE 4 females are at highest risk in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Jewells, Valerie; Galaz-Montoya, Carolina; van Zundert, Brigitte; Pérez-Calatayud, Angel; Ascencio-Ferrel, Eric; Valencia-Salazar, Gildardo; Sandoval-Cano, Marcela; Carlos, Esperanza; Solorio, Edelmira; Acuña-Ayala, Hilda; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2016-10-01

    Children's air pollution exposures are associated with systemic and brain inflammation and the early hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The Apolipoprotein E (APOE) 4 allele is the most prevalent genetic risk for AD, with higher risk for women. We assessed whether gender, BMI, APOE and metabolic variables in healthy children with high exposures to ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) influence cognition. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-R) was administered to 105 Mexico City children (12.32±5.4 years, 69 APOE 3/3 and 36 APOE 3/4). APOE 4v 3 children showed decrements on attention and short-term memory subscales, and below-average scores in Verbal, Performance and Full Scale IQ. APOE 4 females had higher BMI and females with normal BMI between 75-94% percentiles had the highest deficits in Total IQ, Performance IQ, Digit Span, Picture Arrangement, Block Design and Object Assembly. Fasting glucose was significantly higher in APOE 4 children p=0.006, while Gender was the main variable accounting for the difference in insulin, HOMA-IR and leptin (p<.05). Gender, BMI and APOE influence children's cognitive responses to air pollution and glucose is likely a key player. APOE 4 heterozygous females with >75% to <94% BMI percentiles are at the highest risk of severe cognitive deficits (1.5-2SD from average IQ). Young female results highlight the urgent need for gender-targeted health programmes to improve cognitive responses. Multidisciplinary intervention strategies could provide paths for prevention or amelioration of female air pollution targeted cognitive deficits and possible long-term AD progression. PMID:27376929

  16. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  17. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  18. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  19. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  20. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  1. An 8-Month Systems Toxicology Inhalation/Cessation Study in Apoe−/− Mice to Investigate Cardiovascular and Respiratory Exposure Effects of a Candidate Modified Risk Tobacco Product, THS 2.2, Compared With Conventional Cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Blaine; Veljkovic, Emilija; Boué, Stéphanie; Schlage, Walter K.; Vuillaume, Gregory; Martin, Florian; Titz, Bjoern; Leroy, Patrice; Buettner, Ansgar; Elamin, Ashraf; Oviedo, Alberto; Cabanski, Maciej; De León, Héctor; Guedj, Emmanuel; Schneider, Thomas; Talikka, Marja; Ivanov, Nikolai V.; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Smoking cigarettes is a major risk factor in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) are being developed to reduce smoking-related health risks. The goal of this study was to investigate hallmarks of COPD and CVD over an 8-month period in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice exposed to conventional cigarette smoke (CS) or to the aerosol of a candidate MRTP, tobacco heating system (THS) 2.2. In addition to chronic exposure, cessation or switching to THS2.2 after 2 months of CS exposure was assessed. Engaging a systems toxicology approach, exposure effects were investigated using physiology and histology combined with transcriptomics, lipidomics, and proteomics. CS induced nasal epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia, lung inflammation, and emphysematous changes (impaired pulmonary function and alveolar damage). Atherogenic effects of CS exposure included altered lipid profiles and aortic plaque formation. Exposure to THS2.2 aerosol (nicotine concentration matched to CS, 29.9 mg/m3) neither induced lung inflammation or emphysema nor did it consistently change the lipid profile or enhance the plaque area. Cessation or switching to THS2.2 reversed the inflammatory responses and halted progression of initial emphysematous changes and the aortic plaque area. Biological processes, including senescence, inflammation, and proliferation, were significantly impacted by CS but not by THS2.2 aerosol. Both, cessation and switching to THS2.2 reduced these perturbations to almost sham exposure levels. In conclusion, in this mouse model cessation or switching to THS2.2 retarded the progression of CS-induced atherosclerotic and emphysematous changes, while THS2.2 aerosol alone had minimal adverse effects. PMID:26609137

  2. An 8-Month Systems Toxicology Inhalation/Cessation Study in Apoe-/- Mice to Investigate Cardiovascular and Respiratory Exposure Effects of a Candidate Modified Risk Tobacco Product, THS 2.2, Compared With Conventional Cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Blaine; Veljkovic, Emilija; Boué, Stéphanie; Schlage, Walter K; Vuillaume, Gregory; Martin, Florian; Titz, Bjoern; Leroy, Patrice; Buettner, Ansgar; Elamin, Ashraf; Oviedo, Alberto; Cabanski, Maciej; De León, Héctor; Guedj, Emmanuel; Schneider, Thomas; Talikka, Marja; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-02-01

    Smoking cigarettes is a major risk factor in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) are being developed to reduce smoking-related health risks. The goal of this study was to investigate hallmarks of COPD and CVD over an 8-month period in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice exposed to conventional cigarette smoke (CS) or to the aerosol of a candidate MRTP, tobacco heating system (THS) 2.2. In addition to chronic exposure, cessation or switching to THS2.2 after 2 months of CS exposure was assessed. Engaging a systems toxicology approach, exposure effects were investigated using physiology and histology combined with transcriptomics, lipidomics, and proteomics. CS induced nasal epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia, lung inflammation, and emphysematous changes (impaired pulmonary function and alveolar damage). Atherogenic effects of CS exposure included altered lipid profiles and aortic plaque formation. Exposure to THS2.2 aerosol (nicotine concentration matched to CS, 29.9 mg/m(3)) neither induced lung inflammation or emphysema nor did it consistently change the lipid profile or enhance the plaque area. Cessation or switching to THS2.2 reversed the inflammatory responses and halted progression of initial emphysematous changes and the aortic plaque area. Biological processes, including senescence, inflammation, and proliferation, were significantly impacted by CS but not by THS2.2 aerosol. Both, cessation and switching to THS2.2 reduced these perturbations to almost sham exposure levels. In conclusion, in this mouse model cessation or switching to THS2.2 retarded the progression of CS-induced atherosclerotic and emphysematous changes, while THS2.2 aerosol alone had minimal adverse effects. PMID:26609137

  3. New Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Their Use for an Accurate Cardiovascular Risk Assessment in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    TAUTU, Oana-Florentina; DARABONT, Roxana; ONCIUL, Sebastian; DEACONU, Alexandru; COMANESCU, Ioana; ANDREI, Radu Dan; DRAGOESCU, Bogdan; CINTEZA, Mircea; DOROBANTU, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the predictive value of new cardiovascular (CV) risk factors for CV risk assessment in the adult Romanian hypertensive (HT) population. Methods: Hypertensive adults aged between 40-65 years of age, identified in national representative SEPHAR II survey were evaluated by anthropometric, BP and arterial stiffness measurements: aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVao), aortic augmentation index (AIXao), revers time (RT) and central systolic blood pressure (SBPao), 12 lead ECGs and laboratory workup. Values above the 4th quartile of mean SBP' standard deviation (s.d.) defined increased BP variability. Log(TG/HDL-cholesterol) defined atherogenic index of plasma (AIP). Serum uric acid levels above 5.70 mg/dl for women and 7.0 mg/dl for males defined hyperuricemia (HUA). CV risk was assessed based on SCORE chart for high CV risk countries. Binary logistic regression using a stepwise likelihood ratio method (adjustments for major confounders and colliniarity analysis) was used in order to validate predictors of high and very high CV risk class. Results: The mean SBP value of the study group was 148.46±19.61 mmHg. Over forty percent of hypertensives had a high and very high CV risk. Predictors of high/very high CV risk category validated by regression analysis were: increased visit-to-visit BP variability (OR: 2.49; 95%CI: 1.67-3.73), PWVao (OR: 1.12; 95%CI: 1.02-1.22), RT (OR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.93-0.98), SBPao (OR: 1.01; 95%CI: 1.01-1.03) and AIP (OR: 7.08; 95%CI: 3.91-12.82). Conclusion: The results of our study suggests that the new CV risk factors such as increased BP variability, arterial stiffness indices and AIP are useful tools for a more accurate identification of hypertensives patients at high and very high CV risk. PMID:25705267

  4. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  5. Sevelamer revisited: pleiotropic effects on endothelial and cardiovascular risk factors in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction underlies multiple cardiovascular consequences of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and antecedent diabetes or hypertension. Endothelial insults in CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients include uremic toxins, serum uric acid, hyperphosphatemia, reactive oxygen species, and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Sevelamer carbonate, a calcium-free intestinally nonabsorbed polymer, is approved for hyperphosphatemic dialysis patients in the US and hyperphosphatemic stage 3–5 CKD patients in many other countries. Sevelamer has been observed investigationally to reduce absorption of AGEs, bacterial toxins, and bile acids, suggesting that it may reduce inflammatory, oxidative, and atherogenic stimuli in addition to its on-label action of lowering serum phosphate. Some studies also suggest that noncalcium binders may contribute less to vascular calcification than calcium-based binders. Exploratory sevelamer carbonate use in patients with stages 2–4 diabetic CKD significantly reduced HbA1c, AGEs, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23, and total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol versus calcium carbonate; inflammatory markers decreased and defenses against AGEs increased. Sevelamer has also been observed to reduce circulating FGF-23, potentially reducing risk of left ventricular hypertrophy. Sevelamer but not calcium-based binders in exploratory studies increases flow-mediated vasodilation, a marker of improved endothelial function, in patients with CKD. In contrast, lanthanum carbonate and calcium carbonate effects on FMV did not differ in hemodialysis recipients. The recent INDEPENDENT-CKD randomized trial compared sevelamer versus calcium carbonate in predialysis CKD patients (investigational in the US, on-label in European participants); sevelamer reduced 36-month mortality and the composite endpoint of mortality or dialysis inception. Similarly, INDEPENDENT-HD in incident dialysis patients showed improved survival with 24 months

  6. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  7. Greater Total Antioxidant Capacity from Diet and Supplements Is Associated with a Less Atherogenic Blood Profile in U.S. Adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kijoon; Vance, Terrence M; Chun, Ock K

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from epidemiologic studies has shown that total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the diet might be inversely associated with stroke, heart failure, and inflammatory biomarkers. However, studies on the association of TAC from both diet and supplements with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in the U.S. population are lacking. This cross-sectional population-based study aimed to investigate the association of TAC with both diet and supplements with CVD risk factors among 4039 U.S. adults in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2012. TAC from both food sources and dietary supplements was estimated from two 24-h dietary recalls using the NHANES supplement ingredient database, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) proanthocyanidin, flavonoid, and isoflavone databases. Top contributors to TAC were tea, antioxidant supplements, vegetable mixture, orange juice, berries, and wine. Antioxidant supplement users had 1.6 times higher TAC than non-users. Greater TAC was associated with reduced triglycerides (TG) (-1.39% change; 95% CI = -2.56 to -0.21), TG to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio (-2.03% change; 95% CI = -3.45 to -0.60), HDL-C (0.65% change; 95% CI = 0.07 to 1.23), insulin (-1.37% change; 95% CI = -2.64 to -0.09), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (-1.57% change; 95% CI = -3.02 to -0.09) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (-0.83% change; 95% CI = -1.29 to -0.38) after adjusting for potential confounders. There was no significant association between TAC and waist circumference, BMI, blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), and fasting glucose. The findings of this study support the hypothesis that an antioxidant-rich diet and intake of supplements are beneficial to reduce CVD risk. PMID:26742057

  8. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  9. AIRTRAQ8 OPTICAL LARYNGOSCOPE FOR TRACHEAL INTUBATION IN A PATIENT WITH AN UNCOMMON GIANT LIPOMA ON THE POSTERIOR ASPECT OF NECK AND ADDITIONAL RISK FACTORS OF ANTICIPATED DIFFICULT AIRWAY: A CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Vassilios; El Kouny, Amr; Al Harbi, Mohammed; Wambi, Freddie; Tawfeeq, Nasser; Tanweer, Aziz; Al Atassi, Abdulallem; Geldhof, Georges

    2015-10-01

    Patients with restricted neck movement present a difficult airway situation because of improper positioning and inadequate extension of the atlanto-occipital joint. The Airtraq optical laryngoscope is a new single use device that permits an indirect view of the glottis without the need to achieve a direct line of sight by conventional use of the 'sniffing position'. We present and discuss a case of uncommon giant lipoma (16 x 12 x 10 cm) in the posterior aspect of the neck in addition with other independent factors of anticipated difficult airway, intubated successfully in the semi-lateral position with the use of Airtraq. PMID:26860029

  10. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  11. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  12. Greater Total Antioxidant Capacity from Diet and Supplements Is Associated with a Less Atherogenic Blood Profile in U.S. Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kijoon; Vance, Terrence M.; Chun, Ock K.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from epidemiologic studies has shown that total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the diet might be inversely associated with stroke, heart failure, and inflammatory biomarkers. However, studies on the association of TAC from both diet and supplements with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in the U.S. population are lacking. This cross-sectional population-based study aimed to investigate the association of TAC with both diet and supplements with CVD risk factors among 4039 U.S. adults in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2012. TAC from both food sources and dietary supplements was estimated from two 24-h dietary recalls using the NHANES supplement ingredient database, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) proanthocyanidin, flavonoid, and isoflavone databases. Top contributors to TAC were tea, antioxidant supplements, vegetable mixture, orange juice, berries, and wine. Antioxidant supplement users had 1.6 times higher TAC than non-users. Greater TAC was associated with reduced triglycerides (TG) (−1.39% change; 95% CI = −2.56 to −0.21), TG to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio (−2.03% change; 95% CI = −3.45 to −0.60), HDL-C (0.65% change; 95% CI = 0.07 to 1.23), insulin (−1.37% change; 95% CI = −2.64 to −0.09), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (−1.57% change; 95% CI = −3.02 to −0.09) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (−0.83% change; 95% CI = −1.29 to −0.38) after adjusting for potential confounders. There was no significant association between TAC and waist circumference, BMI, blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), and fasting glucose. The findings of this study support the hypothesis that an antioxidant-rich diet and intake of supplements are beneficial to reduce CVD risk. PMID:26742057

  13. The use of the reverse shock index to identify high-risk trauma patients in addition to the criteria for trauma team activation: a cross-sectional study based on a trauma registry system

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Spencer C H; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The presentation of decrease blood pressure with tachycardia is usually an indicator of significant blood loss. In this study, we used the reverse shock index (RSI), a ratio of systolic blood pressure (SBP) to heart rate (HR), to evaluate the haemodynamic status of trauma patients. As an SBP lower than the HR (RSI<1) may indicate haemodynamic instability, the objective of this study was to assess whether RSI<1 can help to identify high-risk patients with potential shock and poor outcome, even though these patients do not yet meet the criteria for multidisciplinary trauma team activation (TTA). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Taiwan. Participants We retrospectively reviewed the data of 20 106 patients obtained from the trauma registry system of a level I trauma centre for trauma admissions from January 2009 through December 2014. Patients for whom a trauma team was not activated (regular patients) and who had RSI<1 were compared with regular patients with RSI≥1. The ORs of the associated conditions and injuries were calculated with 95% CIs. Main outcome measures In-hospital mortality. Results Among regular patients with RSI<1, significantly more patients had an Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥25 (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.58 to 3.62; p<0.001) and the mortality rate was also higher (2.1% vs 0.5%; OR 3.9, 95% CI 2.10 to 7.08; p<0.001) than in regular patients with RSI≥1. The intensive care unit length of stay was longer in regular patients with RSI<1 than in regular patients with RSI≥1. Conclusions Among patients who did not reach the criteria for TTA, RSI<1 indicates a potentially worse outcome and a requirement for more attention and aggressive care in the emergency department. PMID:27329440

  14. Effectiveness of personalized face-to-face and telephone nursing counseling interventions for cardiovascular risk factors: a controlled clinical trial 1

    PubMed Central

    Vílchez Barboza, Vivian; Klijn, Tatiana Paravic; Salazar Molina, Alide; Sáez Carrillo, Katia Lorena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to evaluate the effect and gender differences of an innovative intervention involving in-person and telephone nursing counseling to control cardiovascular risk factors (arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, and overweight), improve health-related quality of life and strengthen self-efficacy and social support in persons using the municipal health centers' cardiovascular health program. Method: a randomized controlled clinical trial involving participants randomized into the intervention group who received traditional consultation plus personalized and telephone nursing counseling for 7 months (n = 53) and the control group (n = 56). The study followed the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials Statement. Results: women in the intervention group presented a significant increase in the physical and mental health components compared to the control group, with decreases in weight, abdominal circumference, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the atherogenic index. The effects attributable to the intervention in the men in the intervention group were increased physical and emotional roles and decreased systolic and diastolic pressure, waist circumference, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, atherogenic index, cardiovascular risk factor, and 10-year coronary risk. Conclusion: this intervention is an effective strategy for the control of three cardiovascular risk factors and the improvement of health-related quality of life. PMID:27508917

  15. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  16. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  17. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  18. [Biologically active food additives].

    PubMed

    Velichko, M A; Shevchenko, V P

    1998-07-01

    More than half out of 40 projects for the medical science development by the year of 2000 have been connected with the bio-active edible additives that are called "the food of XXI century", non-pharmacological means for many diseases. Most of these additives--nutricevtics and parapharmacevtics--are intended for the enrichment of food rations for the sick or healthy people. The ecologicaly safest and most effective are combined domestic adaptogens with immuno-modulating and antioxidating action that give anabolic and stimulating effect,--"leveton", "phytoton" and "adapton". The MKTs-229 tablets are residue discharge means. For atherosclerosis and general adiposis they recommend "tsar tablets" and "aiconol (ikhtien)"--on the base of cod-liver oil or "splat" made out of seaweed (algae). All these preparations have been clinically tested and received hygiene certificates from the Institute of Dietology of the Russian Academy of Medical Science. PMID:9752776

  19. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  20. Hydrocarbon fuel additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogio, S.

    1989-02-28

    This patent describes the method of fuel storage or combustion, wherein the fuel supply contains small amounts of water, the step of adding to the fuel supply an additive comprising a blend of a hydrophilic agent chosen from the group of ethylene glycol, n-butyl alcohol, and cellosolve in the range of 22-37% by weight; ethoxylated nonylphenol in the range of 26-35% by weight; nonylphenol polyethylene glycol ether in the range of 32-43% by weight.

  1. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  2. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  3. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  4. Statin action favors normalization of the plasma lipidome in the atherogenic mixed dyslipidemia of MetS: potential relevance to statin-associated dysglycemia.

    PubMed

    Meikle, Peter J; Wong, Gerard; Tan, Ricardo; Giral, Philippe; Robillard, Paul; Orsoni, Alexina; Hounslow, Neil; Magliano, Dianna J; Shaw, Jonathan E; Curran, Joanne E; Blangero, John; Kingwell, Bronwyn A; Chapman, M John

    2015-12-01

    The impact of statin treatment on the abnormal plasma lipidome of mixed dyslipidemic patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a group at increased risk of developing diabetes, was evaluated. Insulin-resistant hypertriglyceridemic hypertensive obese males (n = 12) displaying MetS were treated with pitavastatin (4 mg/day) for 180 days; healthy normolipidemic age-matched nonobese males (n = 12) acted as controls. Statin treatment substantially normalized triglyceride (-41%), remnant cholesterol (-55%), and LDL-cholesterol (-39%), with minor effect on HDL-cholesterol (+4%). Lipidomic analysis, normalized to nonHDL-cholesterol in order to probe statin-induced differences in molecular composition independently of reduction in plasma cholesterol, revealed increment in 132 of 138 lipid species that were subnormal at baseline and significantly shifted toward the control group on statin treatment. Increment in alkyl- and alkenylphospholipids (plasmalogens) was prominent, and consistent with significant statin-induced increase in plasma polyunsaturated fatty acid levels. Comparison of the statin-mediated lipidomic changes in MetS with the abnormal plasma lipidomic profile characteristic of prediabetes and T2D in the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study and San Antonio Family Heart Study cohorts by hypergeometric analysis revealed a significant shift toward the lipid profile of controls, indicative of a marked trend toward a normolipidemic phenotype. Pitavastatin attenuated the abnormal plasma lipidome of MetS patients typical of prediabetes and T2D. PMID:26486974

  5. Anti-atherogenic properties of high-density lipoproteins in psychiatric patients before and after two months of atypical anti-psychotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Osamah; Izikson, Lidia; Bathish, Yunis; Dabur, Enas; Hanna, Alaa; Zidan, Jamal

    2015-12-01

    Some of the medications used for the management of schizophrenia are associated with clinically significant increases in weight and adverse alterations in serum lipid levels. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of short-term (two months) treatment with atypical anti-psychotics on coronary heart disease risk factors, including the functional properties of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), in psychiatric patients. Nineteen patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and bipolar disorder and ten healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. In the present study blood was drawn at baseline and after two months of atypical anti-psychotic treatment. Wilcoxon non-parametric-test was used to examine differences in the psychotic group before and two months after treatment.Waist circumference and oxidative stress in psychiatric patients were higher compared with the control group. Serum-mediated cholesterol efflux capacity was lower in psychotic patients compared to controls. Two months of anti-psychotic therapy was associated with increased abdominal obesity, decreased paraoxonase lactonase activity, but with no further change in serum-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages. Psychotic patients have low serum-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages as a parameter of HDL functionality. Atypical anti-psychotic treatment for two months increased metabolic derangements in these patients but without further decrement in serum-mediated cholesterol efflux. PMID:26253619

  6. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  7. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  8. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  9. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  10. Development risks

    SciTech Connect

    Riedy, M.; Desai, S.

    1996-04-01

    Risks associated with hydropower production development in India are discussed in this article. A project prospectus for the development of India`s estimated 84,044 MW(e) hydropower potential is given which accounts for environmental and regulatory concerns. Regulations issued by the Government of Industry regarding private investment in hydropower are outlined, and additional policies which are expected to be instituted are discussed.

  11. 42 CFR 417.592 - Additional benefits requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional benefits requirement. 417.592 Section... PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Medicare Payment: Risk Basis § 417.592 Additional benefits...) Additional benefits. Provide its Medicare enrollees with additional benefits in accordance with paragraph...

  12. Consumption of polyphenol-rich peach and plum juice prevents risk factors for obesity-related metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease in Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Noratto, Giuliana; Martino, Hercia S D; Simbo, Sunday; Byrne, David; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2015-06-01

    Polyphenols from fruits have been implied in the prevention of risk factors for cardiometabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the consumption of peach and plum juice has a protective effect against obesity and metabolic disorders that promote the development of cardiovascular diseases. Obese Zucker and lean rats were fed with peach, plum juice ad libitum or placebo. Body weight gain, biochemical markers and molecular markers for inflammation and cardiovascular disease in heart tissue were quantified. Results show that peach and plum juice consumption protected against a combination of obesity-induced metabolic disorders including hyperglycemia, insulin and leptin resistance, dyslipidemia and low-density lipoprotein oxidation. This was accompanied by a decreased expression of pro-atherogenic and pro-inflammatory biomarkers in plasma and heart tissues including intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, NF-κB and foam cell adherence to aortic arches. In addition, peach and plum juice consumption decreased the levels of angiotensin II in plasma and its receptor Agtr1 in heart tissues, suggesting a role of peach and plum polyphenols as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists. Furthermore, only plum juice significantly prevented body weight gain and increased the ratio high-density lipoprotein cholesterol/total cholesterol in plasma. This effect is most likely attributed to the plum's higher content of polyphenols (three times that of peach). Altogether, these results imply that cardioprotective effects can be achieved by replacing drinks high in sugar content with fruit juice rich in polyphenols in a diet. PMID:25801980

  13. Postnatal exposure to voluntary exercise but not the antioxidant catechin protects the vasculature after a switch to an atherogenic environment in middle-age mice

    PubMed Central

    Leblond, Francois; Nguyen, Albert; Bolduc, Virginie; Lambert, Jean; Yu, Carol; Duquette, Natacha

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the lasting functional imprinting of exercise (EX) and catechin (CAT) on the vascular function of middle-age mice switched to a proatherogenic environment. C57BL/6J mice (n=10–15 in each group) fed a regular diet (RD) were exposed from the age of 1 to 9 months either to EX (voluntary running; 2.7± 0.2 km/day), to the polyphenol CAT (30 mg/kg/day in drinking water), or to physical inactivity (PI). At 9 months of age, EX and CAT were stopped and mice either remained on the RD or were fed a Western diet (WD) for an additional 3 months. At 12 months of age, mice from all groups fed a WD had similar body mass, systolic blood pressure, and plasma total cholesterol, glucose, insulin, and isoprostane. Compared to the RD, the WD induced an indomethacin-sensitive aortic endothelium-dependent and independent dysfunction in PI mice (p<0.05) that was prevented by both EX and CAT; this benefit was associated with a higher (p< 0.05) non-nitric oxide/non-prostacyclin endothelium-dependent relaxation. While EX, but not PI or CAT, prevented vascular dysfunction induced by the WD in cerebral arteries, it had no effect in femoral arteries. The profiles of activity of antioxidant enzymes and of proinflammatory gene expression in the aorta suggest a better adaptation of EX>CAT>PI mice to stress. In conclusion, our data suggest that a postnatal exposure to EX, but not to CAT, imprints an adaptive defense capacity in the vasculature against a deleterious change in lifestyle. PMID:23291710

  14. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The Committee also evaluated the risk posed by two food contaminants, with the aim of deriving tolerable intakes where appropriate and advising on risk management options for the purpose of public health protection. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives and contaminants. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for certain food additives (aluminium-containing food additives, Benzoe Tonkinensis, glycerol ester of gum rosin, glycerol ester of tall oil rosin, glycerol ester of wood rosin, octenyl succinic acid modified gum arabic, polydimethyl siloxane, Ponceau 4R, pullulan, pullulanase from Bacillus deromificans expressed in Bacillus licheniformis, Quinoline Yellow and Sunset Yellow FCF) and two food contaminants (cyanogenic glycosides and fumonisins). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: aluminium lakes of colouring matters; beta-apo-8'-carotenal; beta-apo-8'-carotenoic acid ethyl ester; beta-carotene, synthetic; hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose; magnesium silicate, synthetic; modified starches; nitrous oxide; sodium carboxymethyl cellulose; and sucrose monoesters of lauric, palmitic or stearic acid. Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of the food additives and contaminants considered. PMID:22519244

  15. Effect of combination therapy of fatty acids, calcium, vitamin D and boron with regular physical activity on cardiovascular risk factors in rat.

    PubMed

    Naghii, M R; Darvishi, P; Ebrahimpour, Y; Ghanizadeh, G; Mofid, M; Hedayati, M; Asgari, A R

    2012-01-01

    The effect of consumption of fatty acids and selected nutrients, along with regular physical activity, on cardiovascular risk factors in rats was investigated.Male rats were divided into the seven groups: Group 1: regular food and drinking water, Group 2: same as Group. 1 + physical activity (whole body vibration; WBV), Group 3: same as Group. 2 + calcium, vitamin D, boron, Group 4: same as Group. 3 + canola oil, Group 5: same as Group. 3 + sunflower oil, Group 6: same as Group. 3 + mix of sunflower oil and canola oil, Group 7: same as Group. 3 + coconut oil. Rats were treated for 8 weeks, and analysis of the frozen plasmas was performed. A- Analysis between the treatment groups and control revealed that vibration training in Group 2 increased body weight (P = 0.04), plasma creatin kinase (CK), (P = 0.02), and estradiol (E2), (P = 0.03). Rats in Group 5 consumed less food and plasma levels of cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) increased significantly (P = 0.02) in Group 6 and in Group 7 (p<0.05). B- Analysis of data among Group 4 - 7 (the oil consuming groups) and Group 3 revealed significant differences in cholesterol (Chol), LDL-C, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), C- reactive protein (hs-CRP), estradiol (E2), atherogenic index (AI), and risk factor (RF), (p<0.05). In addition, plasma levels of testosterone (T) and free testosterone (FT) in Group 7 had a remarkable but non-significant increase. As a result of vibration training, a similar trend was observed for vitamin D in Group 2-7. The findings show that WBV is effective in improving health status by influencing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Moreover, canola oil and sunflower oil, separately, showed beneficial impacts on CVD risk factors; whereas their combination had negative impacts on lipid profile. Coconut oil revealed to be efficient to provide health benefits in terms of CVD treatments. PMID:22277894

  16. Effects of palm oil on cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Chong, Y H; Ng, T K

    1991-03-01

    A major public health concern of affluent nations is the excessive consumption of dietary fats which are now closely linked to coronary heart disease. Against this scenario, the tropical oils and palm oil in particular, have been cast as major villains in the U.S.A., despite the fact that palm oil consumption there is negligible. The unsuspecting public may not realise that the call to avoid palm oil is nothing more than a trade ploy since in recent years palm oil has been very competitive and has gained a major share of the world's edible oils and fats market. Many also lose sight of the fact that, palm oil, like other edible oils and fats, is an important component of the diet. The allegation that palm oil consumption leads to raised blood cholesterol levels and is therefore atherogenic is without scientific foundation. Examination of the chemical and fatty acid composition of palm oil or its liquid fraction should convince most nutritionists that the oil has little cholesterol-raising potential. The rationale for these are: it is considered cholesterol free. its major saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid (16:0) has recently been shown to be neutral in its cholesterolaemic effect, particularly in situations where the LDL receptors have not been down-regulated by dietary means or through a genetic effect. palm oil contains negligible amounts (less than 1.5%) of the hypercholesterolemic saturated fatty acids, namely lauric acid (12:0) and myristic acid (14:0). it has moderately rich amounts of the hypocholesterolaemic, monounsaturated oleic acid (18:1, omega-9) and adequate amounts of linoleic acid. (18:2, omega-6). It contains minor components such as the vitamin E tocotrienols which are not only powerful antioxidants but are also natural inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis. Feeding experiments in various animal species and humans also do not support the allegation that palm oil is atherogenic. On the contrary, palm oil consumption reduces blood cholesterol in

  17. 42 CFR 417.592 - Additional benefits requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional benefits requirement. 417.592 Section... HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Medicare Payment: Risk Basis § 417.592 Additional benefits requirement. (a... benefits. Provide its Medicare enrollees with additional benefits in accordance with paragraph (c) of...

  18. Threat to occupational status control and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, J; Peter, R

    1996-01-01

    Individuals exposed to chronically stressful social contexts were show n to suffer from increased cardiovascular risk. High effort at work in combination with low reward, and especially with low control over one's occupational status, defines one such stressful social context. In this study an association between high effort, low occupational status control and hypertension as well as the co-manifestation of hypertension and elevated atherogenic lipids [coronary high risk (CHR) status] is explored in a group of 179 middle-aged (48.5+/-6.5 years) male managers. After adjustment for relevant covariates, logistic regression analysis showed independent effects of indicators of high extrinsic effort [time pressure: odds radio (OR)=5.31 95% confidence intervals (95%-C1): 1.10-25.57; severe problems: OR = 4.64 95% Cl: 1.37-15.68] and of low status control (forced job change: OR = 3.92 95% Cl: 1.29-11.92) on CHR. Similar, but less powerful effects were observed with respect to the criterion of hypertension. In conclusion, our findings indicate that effort-reward imbalance at work, and especially threatened status control, defines an independent psychosocial risk constellation with relevance to cardiovascular disease. PMID:8606132

  19. Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lloyd

    1998-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the identification of risk management, risk management processes such as: quantification and prioritization; mitigation planning; implementation of risk reduction; and tracking process. It develops examples and answers questions about Risk Management.

  20. EXPLORING THE LIMITS OF ADDITIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA has published several documents describing methods to perform health risk assessment of chemical mixtures (U.S. EPA, 1986; 2000) in which three approaches (i.e, actual mixture, similar mixture or component-based) to quantifying health risk for a chemical mixture are recom...

  1. Defining Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tholkes, Ben F.

    1998-01-01

    Defines camping risks and lists types and examples: (1) objective risk beyond control; (2) calculated risk based on personal choice; (3) perceived risk; and (4) reckless risk. Describes campers to watch ("immortals" and abdicators), and several "treatments" of risk: avoidance, safety procedures and well-trained staff, adequate insurance, and a…

  2. Risk Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, L. Nathan

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" presents an overview of risk management for school districts. The chapter first discusses four fundamental elements of risk management: (1) identifying and measuring risks; (2) reducing or eliminating risks; (3) transferring unassumable risks; and (4) assuming remaining risks. The chapter…

  3. Microbiological Quantitative Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Silvia; Schaffner, Donald W.

    The meat and poultry industry faces ongoing challenges due to the natural association of pathogens of concern (e.g., Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7) with a variety of domesticated food animals. In addition, pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes pose a significant cross-contamination risk during further meat and poultry processing, distribution, and storage. Furthermore, the meat and poultry industries are constantly changing with the addition of new products, use of new raw materials, and targeting of new consumer populations, each of which may give rise to potential new risks. National and international regulations are increasingly using a “risk-based” approach to food safety (where the regulatory focus is driven by the magnitude of the risk), so risk assessment is becoming a valuable tool to systematically organize and evaluate the potential public health risk posed by food processing operations.

  4. Multidimensional Risk Analysis: MRISK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollum, Raymond; Brown, Douglas; O'Shea, Sarah Beth; Reith, William; Rabulan, Jennifer; Melrose, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional Risk (MRISK) calculates the combined multidimensional score using Mahalanobis distance. MRISK accounts for covariance between consequence dimensions, which de-conflicts the interdependencies of consequence dimensions, providing a clearer depiction of risks. Additionally, in the event the dimensions are not correlated, Mahalanobis distance reduces to Euclidean distance normalized by the variance and, therefore, represents the most flexible and optimal method to combine dimensions. MRISK is currently being used in NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project o assess risk and prioritize scarce resources.

  5. Adverse reactions to the sulphite additives

    PubMed Central

    Misso, Neil LA

    2012-01-01

    Sulphites are widely used as preservative and antioxidant additives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Exposure to sulphites has been reported to induce a range of adverse clinical effects in sensitive individuals, ranging from dermatitis, urticaria, flushing, hypotension, abdominal pain and diarrhoea to life-threatening anaphylactic and asthmatic reactions. Exposure to the sulphites arises mainly from the consumption of foods and drinks that contain these additives; however exposure may also occur through the use of pharmaceutical products, as well as in occupational settings. Most studies report a prevalence of sulphite sensitivity of 3 to 10% among asthmatic subjects who ingest these additives. However, the severity of these reactions varies, and steroid-dependent asthmatics, those with marked airway hyperresponsiveness, and children with chronic asthma, appear to be at greater risk. Although a number of potential mechanisms have been proposed, the precise mechanisms underlying sulphite sensitivity remain unclear. PMID:24834193

  6. Estimated Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Adolescents with and without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Brian J; Wadwa, R Paul; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Nadeau, Kristen J; Bishop, Franziska K; Maahs, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors are similar in adolescents with and without diabetes (T1D) in the most insulin sensitive (IS) tertile and CVD risk factors are more atherogenic with decreasing IS in adolescents with T1D. Study design Adolescents with IS T1D (n=292; age=15.4±2.1 years; duration=8.8±3.0 years, HbA1c=8.9±1.6%) and non-diabetic (non-DM) controls (n=89; age=15.4±2.1 years) was estimated using the model: logeIS=4.64725 – 0.02032(waist, cm) – 0.09779(HbA1c, %) – 0.00235(triglycerides, mg/dl). CVD risk factors (blood pressure, fasting total, LDL and HDL-cholesterol, hs-CRP, and BMI Z-score) were compared between all non-DM adolescents and those with T1D in the most IS tertile, and then examined for a linear trend by IS tertile in adolescents with T1D, adjusted for sex, race/ethnicity and Tanner Stage. Results Estimated IS was significantly lower in adolescents with T1D compared with those without (T1D=7.8±2.4, non-DM=11.5±2.9; p<0.0001). CVD risk factors were similar for non-DM compared with the adolescents with most IS T1D, except for higher HDL-c and DBP in adolescents with T1D (p<0.05). Among adolescents with T1D, all CVD risk factors except for HDL-c, were more atherogenic across decreasing IS tertiles in linear regression analysis (p<0.05). Conclusion Adolescents with T1D who are the most IS have similar CVD risk factors compared with non-DM adolescents. CVD risk factors are inversely associated with adolescents with IS T1D. IS may be an important therapeutic target for reducing CVD risk factors in adolescents with T1D. PMID:22921593

  7. Additive effect of linseed oil supplementation on the lipid profiles of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Avelino, Ana Paula A; Oliveira, Gláucia MM; Ferreira, Célia CD; Luiz, Ronir R; Rosa, Glorimar

    2015-01-01

    Background Linseed oil has been investigated as a rich source of n-3 series polyunsaturated fatty acids, which mainly produce a non-atherogenic lipid profile. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of linseed oil supplementation associated with nutritional guidelines on the lipid profiles of older adults, according to the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Methods We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with 110 older adults randomized in two groups: placebo and linseed oil. The linseed oil group received supplementation with 3 g of linseed oil. Both groups received nutritional guidance and were supplemented for 90 days with monthly blood collection for biochemical analysis. The dietary intake of saturated fat was subdivided into low (<7% SFA/day of the total energy value) and high consumption groups (>7% SFA/day of the total energy value). Results Low SFA (<7% SFA/day of total energy value) consumption was associated with lower total cholesterol concentrations. However, we observed that the linseed oil group, including older adults who consumed >7% SFA/day, had a greater reduction in total cholesterol than the placebo group (P=0.020). The same was observed for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P<0.050), suggesting an additive effect of linseed oil and diet. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations were increased significantly in only the linseed group, suggesting that the nutritional intervention alone did not improve HDL cholesterol. Conclusion The results suggest that the nutritional intervention was effective, but linseed oil showed notable effects by increasing the HDL cholesterol concentration. In addition, consumption of <7% SFA/day of the total energy value increased the effect of linseed oil, demonstrating the importance of reducing the consumption of saturated fat. PMID:26543357

  8. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  9. Additively Manufactured Metals in Oxygen Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Metals produced by additive manufacturing methods, such as Powder Bed Fusion Technology, are now mature enough to be considered for qualification in human spaceflight oxygen systems. The mechanical properties of metals produced through AM processes are being systematically studied. However, it is unknown whether AM metals in oxygen applications may present an increased risk of flammability or ignition as compared to wrought metals of the same metallurgical composition due to increased porosity. Per NASA-STD-6001B materials to be used in oxygen system applications shall be based on flammability and combustion test data, followed by a flammability assessment. Without systematic flammability and ignition testing in oxygen there is no credible method for NASA to accurately evaluate the risk of using AM metals in oxygen systems.

  10. Deciphering the roles of multiple additives in organocatalyzed Michael additions.

    PubMed

    Günler, Z Inci; Companyó, Xavier; Alfonso, Ignacio; Burés, Jordi; Jimeno, Ciril; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2016-05-21

    The synergistic effects of multiple additives (water and acetic acid) on the asymmetric Michael addition of acetone to nitrostyrene catalyzed by primary amine-thioureas (PAT) were precisely determined. Acetic acid facilitates hydrolysis of the imine intermediates, thus leading to catalytic behavior, and minimizes the formation of the double addition side product. In contrast, water slows down the reaction but minimizes catalyst deactivation, eventually leading to higher final yields. PMID:27128165

  11. Health risks.

    PubMed

    Longstreth, J; de Gruijl, F R; Kripke, M L; Abseck, S; Arnold, F; Slaper, H I; Velders, G; Takizawa, Y; van der Leun, J C

    1998-10-01

    that only squamous cell carcinoma risk is related to total exposure. In the cases of both basal cell carcinoma and melanoma, new information suggests that increases in risk are tied to early exposures (before about age 15), particularly those leading to severe sunburns. Testing of a number of the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) alternatives indicates that most of these chemicals have low acute toxicity, and low to moderate chronic toxicity. Some chemicals that were originally proposed as alternatives have been dropped from consideration because these tests raised concerns about toxicity and/or manufacturing difficulties. In one instance, high accidental occupational exposure was associated with liver damage, underlining the need for care in the use of these substitutes. Recent quantitative risk estimates have been developed for cataract, melanoma, and all skin cancers combined. These estimates indicate that under the Montreal Adjustments, cataract and skin-cancer incidence will peak mid-century at additional incidences of just under 3 per 100,000 and about 7 per 100,000, respectively. PMID:9894351

  12. [Residual risk: The roles of triglycerides and high density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Grammer, Tanja; Kleber, Marcus; Silbernagel, Günther; Scharnagl, Hubert; März, Winfried

    2016-06-01

    In clinical trials, the reduction of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) with statins reduces the incidence rate of cardiovascular events by approximately one third. This means, that a sizeable "residual risk" remains. Besides high lipoprotein (a), disorders in the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and high density liproteins have been implicated as effectors of the residual risk. Both lipoprotein parameters correlate inversely with each other. Therefore, the etiological contributions of triglycerides and / or of HDL for developing cardiovascular disease can hardly be estimated from either observational studies or from intervention studies. The largely disappointing results of intervention studies with inhibitors of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein and in particular the available set of genetically-epidemiological studies suggest that in the last decade, the importance of HDL cholesterol has been overvalued, while the importance of triglycerides has been underestimated. High triglycerides not always atherogenic, but only if they are associated with the accumulation relatively cholesterol-enriched, incompletely catabolized remnants of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins (familial type III hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus). The normalization of the concentration of triglycerides and remnants by inhibiting the expression of apolipoprotein C3 is hence a new, promising therapeutic target. PMID:27305303

  13. HbA1c Alone Is a Poor Indicator of Cardiometabolic Risk in Middle-Aged Subjects with Pre-Diabetes but Is Suitable for Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Seán R.; Perry, Ivan J.; Phillips, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement is recommended as an alternative to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for the diagnosis of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. However, evidence suggests discordance between HbA1c and FPG. In this study we examine a range of metabolic risk features, pro-inflammatory cytokines, acute-phase response proteins, coagulation factors and white blood cell counts to determine which assay more accurately identifies individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving a random sample of 2,047 men and women aged 46-73 years. Binary and multinomial logistic regression were employed to examine risk feature associations with pre-diabetes [either HbA1c levels 5.7-6.4% (39-46 mmol/mol) or impaired FPG levels 5.6-6.9 mmol/l] and type 2 diabetes [either HbA1c levels >6.5% (>48 mmol/mol) or FPG levels >7.0 mmol/l]. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to evaluate the ability of HbA1c to discriminate pre-diabetes and diabetes defined by FPG. Results Stronger associations with diabetes-related phenotypes were observed in pre-diabetic subjects diagnosed by FPG compared to those detected by HbA1c. Individuals with type 2 diabetes exhibited cardiometabolic profiles that were broadly similar according to diagnosis by either assay. Pre-diabetic participants classified by both assays displayed a more pro-inflammatory, pro-atherogenic, hypertensive and insulin resistant profile. Odds ratios of having three or more metabolic syndrome features were also noticeably increased (OR: 4.0, 95% CI: 2.8-5.8) when compared to subjects diagnosed by either HbA1c (OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.2-1.8) or FPG (OR: 3.0, 95% CI: 1.7-5.1) separately. Conclusions In middle-aged Caucasian-Europeans, HbA1c alone is a poor indicator of cardiometabolic risk but is suitable for diagnosing diabetes. Combined use of HbA1c and FPG may be of additional benefit for detecting individuals at highest odds of

  14. Topographical Risk Assessment

    2002-09-24

    TRA was developed as a computer tool for the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) that will provides the capability to visualize and rapidly understand information about the risks associated with the River protection Project (RPP). Previously, technical and programmatic risk management within ORP had relied heavily on risk lists and other techniques that presented risk information but did not place it in perspective of the overall project. This made it difficult for ORP seniormore » management to understand the risk information presented, prioritize their activities, and provide direction to ORP staff and contractors about how to manage specific risk events. The TRA visualization tool, provides the appropriate context and perspective that allows senior management to effectively manage risks. Basically, the TRA overlays information about risks associated with specific activities and their magnitudes on top of the project baseline schedule. this provides senior management with information about the magnitudes of specific risk events as well as their timing, and allows them to focus their attention and resources on the risks that merit attention and possible further action. The TRA tool can also be used to display other types of information associated with scheduled activities, such as cost to date, technical performance, schedule performance, etc. Additionally, the base of the 3-dimensional representation can be changed to other types of graphics, such as maps, process flow diagrams, etc., which allows the display of other types of informatio, such as hazards, health and safety risks, and system availability.« less

  15. Risk Assessment Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prassinos, Peter G.; Lyver, John W., IV; Bui, Chinh T.

    2011-01-01

    Risk assessment is used in many industries to identify and manage risks. Initially developed for use on aeronautical and nuclear systems, risk assessment has been applied to transportation, chemical, computer, financial, and security systems among others. It is used to gain an understanding of the weaknesses or vulnerabilities in a system so modification can be made to increase operability, efficiency, and safety and to reduce failure and down-time. Risk assessment results are primary inputs to risk-informed decision making; where risk information including uncertainty is used along with other pertinent information to assist management in the decision-making process. Therefore, to be useful, a risk assessment must be directed at specific objectives. As the world embraces the globalization of trade and manufacturing, understanding the associated risk become important to decision making. Applying risk assessment techniques to a global system of development, manufacturing, and transportation can provide insight into how the system can fail, the likelihood of system failure and the consequences of system failure. The risk assessment can identify those elements that contribute most to risk and identify measures to prevent and mitigate failures, disruptions, and damaging outcomes. In addition, risk associated with public and environment impact can be identified. The risk insights gained can be applied to making decisions concerning suitable development and manufacturing locations, supply chains, and transportation strategies. While risk assessment has been mostly applied to mechanical and electrical systems, the concepts and techniques can be applied across other systems and activities. This paper provides a basic overview of the development of a risk assessment.

  16. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  17. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  18. 40 CFR 141.154 - Required additional health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Required additional health information... Required additional health information. (a) All reports must prominently display the following language... from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk...

  19. 40 CFR 141.154 - Required additional health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Required additional health information... Required additional health information. (a) All reports must prominently display the following language... from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk...

  20. 40 CFR 141.154 - Required additional health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Required additional health information... Required additional health information. (a) All reports must prominently display the following language... from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk...

  1. 40 CFR 141.154 - Required additional health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Required additional health information... Required additional health information. (a) All reports must prominently display the following language... from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk...

  2. 40 CFR 141.154 - Required additional health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Required additional health information... Required additional health information. (a) All reports must prominently display the following language... from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk...

  3. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2: a novel marker of cardiovascular risk and potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Macphee, Colin; Benson, G Martin; Shi, Yi; Zalewski, Andrew

    2005-06-01

    Although the clinical benefit of statins is well established, these agents reduce the risk of cardiovascular events by only 20 - 40%, and the residual risk for high-risk patients is considerable. The recognition of atherosclerosis as an inflammatory disease has opened the door to numerous complementary therapeutic approaches to further reduce risk and the overall burden of cardiovascular disease. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) is a novel inflammatory marker of cardiovascular risk that is being evaluated as a potential therapeutic target. The biological function of this enzyme in atherosclerosis has been controversial but recent evidence supports its pro-atherogenic role. The enzyme is predominantly bound to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol particles in humans, and its activity produces bioactive lipid mediators that promote inflammatory processes present at every stage of atherogenesis, from atheroma initiation to plaque destabilisation and rupture. Initial clinical studies suggest that the inhibitors of Lp-PLA(2) can block enzyme activity in plasma and within atherosclerotic plaques. However, more studies are needed to determine the potential clinical benefits of inhibiting Lp-PLA(2). PMID:16004595

  4. Communicating the risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmotte, R. M.

    1971-01-01

    The balance between benefits and risk is discussed from the standpoint of the decision or policy making process. The basic premise of the discussion is that applied technology may be divided into two parts: (1) benefit oriented technology which includes design, development, manufacturing or construction, and operations; and (2) risk or uncertainty technology which includes safety, reliability, quality assurance, test, and maintenance. Whereas the primary emphasis of the discussion is placed on the importance of a balance in the application of these technologies, arguments are presented which indicate that risk technologies lag far behind benefit technologies. In addition, existing conditions and pressures are described which lead to underestimating risk. The importance is stressed of developing a better sense of the advantages that knowledge of risk could provide via the decision making process. It is suggested that by experiment and analysis on the effects of increasing the contribution of risk technologies, a better understanding of their potentiality and limitations would result.

  5. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  6. 75 FR 27313 - Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED PROCUREMENT LIST Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the... or Severely Disabled, Jefferson Plaza 2, Suite 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway,...

  7. Fetal Risks, Relative Risks, and Relatives' Risks.

    PubMed

    Minkoff, Howard; Marshall, Mary Faith

    2016-01-01

    Several factors related to fetal risk render it more or less acceptable in justifying constraints on the behavior of pregnant women. Risk is an unavoidable part of pregnancy and childbirth, one that women must balance against other vital personal and family interests. Two particular issues relate to the fairness of claims that pregnant women are never entitled to put their fetuses at risk: relative risks and relatives' risks. The former have been used-often spuriously-to advance arguments against activities, such as home birth, that may incur risk; the latter implicate the nature of relationships in determining the acceptability of coercing or precluding activities. Motivated reasoning by clinicians and judges leads to inaccurate risk assessments, and judgments based on false claims to objectivity. Such judgments undermine the moral and legal standing of pregnant women and do not advance the interests of fetuses, pregnant women, families, or states. PMID:26832079

  8. GAR Global Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskrey, Andrew; Safaie, Sahar

    2015-04-01

    Disaster risk management strategies, policies and actions need to be based on evidence of current disaster loss and risk patterns, past trends and future projections, and underlying risk factors. Faced with competing demands for resources, at any level it is only possible to priorities a range of disaster risk management strategies and investments with adequate understanding of realised losses, current and future risk levels and impacts on economic growth and social wellbeing as well as cost and impact of the strategy. The mapping and understanding of the global risk landscape has been greatly enhanced by the latest iteration of the GAR Global Risk Assessment and the objective of this submission is to present the GAR global risk assessment which contributed to Global Assessment Report (GAR) 2015. This initiative which has been led by UNISDR, was conducted by a consortium of technical institutions from around the world and has covered earthquake, cyclone, riverine flood, and tsunami probabilistic risk for all countries of the world. In addition, the risks associated with volcanic ash in the Asia-Pacific region, drought in various countries in sub-Saharan Africa and climate change in a number of countries have been calculated. The presentation will share thee results as well as the experience including the challenges faced in technical elements as well as the process and recommendations for the future of such endeavour.

  9. Neural correlates of anticipation risk reflect risk preferences.

    PubMed

    Rudorf, Sarah; Preuschoff, Kerstin; Weber, Bernd

    2012-11-21

    Individual risk preferences have a large influence on decisions, such as financial investments, career and health choices, or gambling. Decision making under risk has been studied both behaviorally and on a neural level. It remains unclear, however, how risk attitudes are encoded and integrated with choice. Here, we investigate how risk preferences are reflected in neural regions known to process risk. We collected functional magnetic resonance images of 56 human subjects during a gambling task (Preuschoff et al., 2006). Subjects were grouped into risk averters and risk seekers according to the risk preferences they revealed in a separate lottery task. We found that during the anticipation of high-risk gambles, risk averters show stronger responses in ventral striatum and anterior insula compared to risk seekers. In addition, risk prediction error signals in anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate indicate that risk averters do not dissociate properly between gambles that are more or less risky than expected. We suggest this may result in a general overestimation of prospective risk and lead to risk avoidance behavior. This is the first study to show that behavioral risk preferences are reflected in the passive evaluation of risky situations. The results have implications on public policies in the financial and health domain. PMID:23175822

  10. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  11. Perceived risk, dread, and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, R. ); Mendelsohn, R. )

    1993-06-01

    This paper uses regression techniques to take a second look at a classic risk-perception data set originally collected by Paul Slovic, Sarah Lichtenstein, and Baruch Fischhoff. As discussed in earlier studies, the attributes expected mortality, effects on future generations, immediacy, and catastrophic potential all significantly affect risk ratings. However, the authors find that perceived risk and dread show different regression patterns; most importantly, only perceived risk ratings correlate with expected mortality. In addition, average risk ratings are found to be significantly affected by perceived individual benefits, which suggests that perceptions of risk are net rather than gross indicators of harm. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Calculators and Computers: Graphical Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is presented that generates problem sets involving sketching graphs of trigonometric functions using graphical addition. The students use calculators to sketch the graphs and a computer solution is used to check it. (MP)

  13. Polyolefins as additives in plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Deanin, R.D.

    1993-12-31

    Polyolefins are not only major commodity plastics - they are also very useful as additives, both in other polyolefins and also in other types of plastics. This review covers ethylene, propylene, butylene and isobutylene polymers, in blends with each other, and as additives to natural rubber, styrene/butadiene rubber, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, polymethyl methacrylate, polyphenylene oxide, polycarbonate, thermoplastic polyesters, polyurethanes, polyamides, and mixed automotive plastics recycling.

  14. Evaluation of certain food additive and contaminants.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The Committee also evaluated the risk posed by two food contaminants, with the aim of deriving tolerable intakes where appropriate and advising on risk management options for the purpose of public health protection. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives (particularly flavouring agents) and contaminants. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for 12 groups of flavouring agents (alicyclic ketones, secondary alcohols and related esters; alicyclic primary alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic acyclic and alicyclic alpha-diketones and related alpha-hydroxyketones; aliphatic acyclic and alicyclic terpenoid tertiary alcohols and structurally related substances; aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic lactones; aliphatic primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, acetals and esters containing additional oxygenated functional groups; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters and acetals; aromatic substituted secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; benzyl derivatives; phenol and phenol derivatives; and simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols) and two food contaminants (cadmium and lead). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: activated carbon, cassia gum, indigotine, steviol glycosides, sucrose esters of fatty acids, sucrose monoesters of lauric, palmitic or stearic acid and titanium dioxide. Specifications for the following flavouring agents were revised: 4-carvomenthol and 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinoxaline. Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the

  15. Hypovitaminosis D and Associated Cardiometabolic Risk in Women with PCOS

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ashok Kumar; Das, Swarnalata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) frequently suffer from metabolic disturbances like insulin resistance, hypertension and atherogenic dyslipidemia. Accumulating evidences suggest that Vitamin D deficiency is common in PCOS and may be associated with metabolic and endocrinal dysfunctions in PCOS. Thus women with PCOS may be at elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. Aim Present study aims to evaluate Vitamin D status and to assess its association with metabolic and endocrinal dysregulations in women with PCOS, which might help in early identification and prevention of future symptomatic cardiac disease. Materials and Methods A total of 44 women with PCOS, diagnosed by Rotterdam criteria and 45 healthy control without PCOS, were evaluated for Vitamin D and cardiometabolic risk factors, including fasting plasma glucose, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hs-CRP. That apart, several endocrinal parameters of hyperandrogenism were also examined. Several correlation studies were determined to establish the role of Vitamin D as a cardiometabolic risk factor in PCOS. Results Results were expressed as mean±SD and were statistically analysed using SPSS software version 16, unpaired student’s t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. We found lower levels of Vitamin D, which was statistically significant as compared to healthy controls. Hyperinsulinemia, rise in insulin resistance and marked dyslipidemia was observed in the present study. Another relevant finding was significant correlation of Vitamin D with insulin and Homeostatic Model of Assessment- Insulin Resistance Index (HOMA-IR). Conclusion Hypovitaminosis D was prevalent in PCOS. This was related to metabolic and hormonal disorders in PCOS. Possibly this combined with impaired fasting glucose, IR and dyslipidemia, could account for Cardio vascular risks in PCOS. Further prospective observational studies and randomized control trials are required to explore the above hypothesis. PMID

  16. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  17. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting. PMID:26118220

  18. Quantitative environmental risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klovning, J.; Nilsen, E.F.

    1995-12-31

    According to regulations relating to implementation and rise of risk analysis in the petroleum activities issued by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate, it is mandatory for an operator on the Norwegian Continental Shelf to establish acceptance criteria for environmental risk in the activities and carry out environmental risk analysis. This paper presents a {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} method for environmental risk analysis developed by the company. The objective has been to assist the company to meet rules and regulations and to assess and describe the environmental risk in a systematic manner. In the environmental risk analysis the most sensitive biological resource in the affected area is used to assess the environmental damage. The analytical method is based on the methodology for quantitative risk analysis related to loss of life. In addition it incorporates the effect of seasonal fluctuations in the environmental risk evaluations. The paper is describing the function of the main analytical sequences exemplified through an analysis of environmental risk related to exploration drilling in an environmental sensitive area on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

  19. Food additives and contaminants. An update.

    PubMed

    Newberne, P M; Conner, M W

    1986-10-15

    Food additives continue to be a source of benefits to the consuming public but there are also perceived risks. Concern for the latter in the last decade has produced a society afflicted with cancer phobia. The intentional additives including sugars, salt, corn syrup, and dextrose make up 90% of the direct additives. These, along with a limited number of familiar items make up a large proportion of the remainder of the additives. Such common ingredients as nitrates and nitrites, solanine, cyanogenetic compounds, arsenic, etc., are unavoidably consumed in the diet and with little if any evidence for public health consequences. Major concern on the part of the public in recent years has been focused on man-made chemicals which are intentionally added to foods to enhance flavors and acceptability, nutrient value, shelf life and increased availability. These include food colors, nonnutritive and low-nutrient sweeteners, (saccharin, cyclamate, aspartame); antioxidants; and nitrites. Contaminants, sometimes incorrectly included in lists of food additives, present the greatest potential threat to public health. Such contaminants as mycotoxins, nitrosamines, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, among others, provide a continuing challenge to our regulatory agencies and to public health authorities. Evidence to date indicate that these responsible for food safety are doing an admirable job, and as a society, our food supply has never been better, or safer, and, as a population, we have never been healthier. Aside from contaminants, major concerns relate to an excess of good food and to obesity. These comments should not be taken to infer that we should relax our concern and surveillance; instead more concern and surveillance should be exerted toward those uncontrolled substances such as natural plant products and alleged natural nutrients, roots, herbs, etc., which are given much credit for positive health effects, without meeting the high standards of our

  20. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants.

    PubMed

    Bend, J; Bolger, M; Knaap, A G A C; Kuznesof, P M; Larsen, J C; Mattia, A; Meylan, I; Pitt, J I; Resnik, S; Schlatter, J; Vavasour, E; Rao, M Veerabhadra; Verger, P; Walker, R; Wallin, H; Whitehouse, B; Abbott, P J; Adegoke, G; Baan, R; Baines, J; Barlow, S; Benford, D; Bruno, A; Charrondiere, R; Chen, J; Choi, M; DiNovi, M; Fisher, C E; Iseki, N; Kawamura, Y; Konishi, Y; Lawrie, S; Leblanc, J C; Leclercq, C; Lee, H M; Moy, G; Munro, I C; Nishikawa, A; Olempska-Beer, Z; de Peuter, G; Pronk, M E J; Renwick, A G; Sheffer, M; Sipes, I G; Tritscher, A; Soares, L Valente; Wennberg, A; Williams, G M

    2007-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The Committee also evaluated the risk posed by two food contaminants, with the aim of advising on risk management options for the purpose of public health protection. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular flavouring agents) and contaminants. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (acidified sodium chlorite, asparaginase from Aspergillus oryzae expressed in Aspergillus oryzae, carrageenan and processed Eucheuma seaweed, cyclotetraglucose and cyclotetraglucose syrup, isoamylase from Pseudomonas amyloderamosa, magnesium sulfate, phospholipase A1 from Fusarium venenatum expressed in Aspergillus oryzae, sodium iron(III) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and steviol glycosides); eight groups of related flavouring agents (linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic acyclic and alicyclic terpenoid tertiary alcohols and structurally related substances; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; aliphatic acyclic dials, trials and related substances; aliphatic acetals; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; and aliphatic alicyclic linear alpha, beta -unsaturated di- and trienals and related alcohols, acids and esters); and two food contaminants (aflatoxin and ochratoxin A). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: maltol and ethyl maltol, nisin preparation, pectins, polyvinyl alcohol, and sucrose esters of fatty acids. Specifications

  1. Manipulating crystallization with molecular additives.

    PubMed

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Lee, Stephanie S; Kahr, Bart; Ward, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of organic crystals in a wide range of industrial applications, the chemistry, biology, materials science, and chemical engineering communities have focused considerable attention on developing methods to control crystal structure, size, shape, and orientation. Tailored additives have been used to control crystallization to great effect, presumably by selectively binding to particular crystallographic surfaces and sites. However, substantial knowledge gaps still exist in the fundamental mechanisms that govern the formation and growth of organic crystals in both the absence and presence of additives. In this review, we highlight research discoveries that reveal the role of additives, either introduced by design or present adventitiously, on various stages of formation and growth of organic crystals, including nucleation, dislocation spiral growth mechanisms, growth inhibition, and nonclassical crystal morphologies. The insights from these investigations and others of their kind are likely to guide the development of innovative methods to manipulate crystallization for a wide range of materials and applications. PMID:24579880

  2. Additive Manufacturing of Hybrid Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron C.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2016-07-01

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. Finally, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  3. Tougher Addition Polyimides Containing Siloxane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Maudgal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Laminates show increased impact resistances and other desirable mechanical properties. Bismaleamic acid extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic dianhydride. Bismaleamic acid also extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:2 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic diamine (Michael-addition reaction). Impact resistances improved over those of unmodified bismaleimide, showing significant increase in toughness. Aromatic addition polyimides developed as both matrix and adhesive resins for applications on future aircraft and spacecraft.

  4. Landslide risk assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lessing, P.; Messina, C.P.; Fonner, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    Landslide risk can be assessed by evaluating geological conditions associated with past events. A sample of 2,4 16 slides from urban areas in West Virginia, each with 12 associated geological factors, has been analyzed using SAS computer methods. In addition, selected data have been normalized to account for areal distribution of rock formations, soil series, and slope percents. Final calculations yield landslide risk assessments of 1.50=high risk. The simplicity of the method provides for a rapid, initial assessment prior to financial investment. However, it does not replace on-site investigations, nor excuse poor construction. ?? 1983 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  5. Biosafety Risk Assessment Model

    SciTech Connect

    2011-05-27

    Software tool based on a structured methodology for conducting laboratory biosafety risk assessments by biosafety experts. Software is based upon an MCDA scheme and uses peer reviewed criteria and weights. The software was developed upon Microsoft’s .net framework. The methodology defines likelihood and consequence of a laboratory exposure for thirteen unique scenarios and provides numerical relative risks for each of the relevant thirteen. The software produces 2-d graphs reflecting the relative risk and a sensitivity analysis which highlights the overall importance of each factor. The software works as a set of questions with absolute scales and uses a weighted additive model to calculate the likelihood and consequence.

  6. Chronic vitamin C deficiency increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Ginter, E

    2007-01-01

    The studies on experimental animals (guinea pigs, monkeys, fish) have confirmed the important role of ascorbic acid deficiency in the development of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis, but the clinical experience is not quite uniform. Metaanalyses of randomized controlled trials performed on subjects without established vitamin C-deficiency conclud that the evidence of the presence or absence of benefits derived from the ability of ascorbic acid to prevent cardiovascular diseases is not sufficient. This review is an outline of numerous clinical, epidemiological and prospective studies that have found a positive role of vitamin C in the prevention of atherosclerosis. If we admit the possibility that vitamin C deficiency is a significant risk factor of atherogenesis, due to ethical reasons it is impossible to perform long-term controlled trials on subjects with proved vitamin C deficiency, to recommend them not to change their nutrition and lifestyle, and to administer placebo to the control group. Therefore the proof of atherogenic effect of chronic vitamin C deficiency is limited to indirect evidence only. In this review many new data on the positive effects of ascorbic acid on human cardiovascular system are summarized and the mechanisms of its protective influence on blood vessels are discussed (Fig.5, Ref. 45). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk. PMID:18225482

  7. 75 FR 4523 - Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on Food Additives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... for food additives and processing aids in codex standards. Draft and proposed draft food additive... Food Additives AGENCY: Office of the Acting Under Secretary for Food Safety, USDA. ACTION: Notice of... of food additives for risk assessment by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives...

  8. Promoting Additive Acculturation in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    A study focusing on 113 ninth graders of Mexican descent indicates that most students and their parents adhere to a strategy of additive acculturation (incorporating skills of the new culture and language), but that the school curriculum and general school climate devalue Mexican culture. (SLD)

  9. Individualized Additional Instruction for Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takata, Ken

    2010-01-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the…

  10. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan R.

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  11. The Additive Property of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaoussis, Dimitris S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents exercises that analyze the additive property of energy. Concludes that if a body has more than one component of energy depending on the same physical quantity, the body's total energy will be the algebraic sum of the components if a linear relationship exists between the energy components and that physical quantity. (JRH)

  12. Tinkertoy Color-Addition Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Joe L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes construction and use of a simple home-built device, using an overhead projector, for use in demonstrations of the addition of various combinations of red, green, and blue light. Useful in connection with discussions of color, color vision, or color television. (JRH)

  13. Silage Additives and Management Issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculants are the most common silage additives in the United States. These products contain lactic acid bacteria to supplement the lactic acid bacteria naturally on the crop and help insure a consistent fermentation in the silo. There are three types of inoculants: homofermentative lactic acid bact...

  14. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  15. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  16. Risk Love.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asch, Peter; Quandt, Richard E.

    1990-01-01

    Notes that attitudes toward risk comprise an important topic in economics courses, whereas risk love receives limited attention, perhaps because of the lack of clear and appealing examples for teaching. Provides a definition for the term risk love and includes illustrations drawn from empirical studies of racetrack betting for teaching this…

  17. Incorporating Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hihn, Jairus

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is about cost risk identification and estimation which is only a part of risk management. The purpose of this step is to identify common software risks, to assess their impact on the cost estimate, and to make revisions to the estimate based on these impacts.

  18. Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS). Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    In the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization(MAWS) concept, actual waste streams are utilized as additive resources for vitrification, which may contain the basic components (glass formers and fluxes) for making a suitable glass or glassy slag. If too much glass former is present, then the melt viscosity or temperature will be too high for processing; while if there is too much flux, then the durability may suffer. Therefore, there are optimum combinations of these two important classes of constituents depending on the criteria required. The challenge is to combine these resources in such a way that minimizes the use of non-waste additives yet yields a processable and durable final waste form for disposal. The benefit to this approach is that the volume of the final waste form is minimized (waste loading maximized) since little or no additives are used and vitrification itself results in volume reduction through evaporation of water, combustion of organics, and compaction of the solids into a non-porous glass. This implies a significant reduction in disposal costs due to volume reduction alone, and minimizes future risks/costs due to the long term durability and leach resistance of glass. This is accomplished by using integrated systems that are both cost-effective and produce an environmentally sound waste form for disposal. individual component technologies may include: vitrification; thermal destruction; soil washing; gas scrubbing/filtration; and, ion-exchange wastewater treatment. The particular combination of technologies will depend on the waste streams to be treated. At the heart of MAWS is vitrification technology, which incorporates all primary and secondary waste streams into a final, long-term, stabilized glass wasteform. The integrated technology approach, and view of waste streams as resources, is innovative yet practical to cost effectively treat a broad range of DOE mixed and low-level wastes.

  19. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  20. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  1. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  2. Risks of Large Portfolios

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Shi, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    The risk of a large portfolio is often estimated by substituting a good estimator of the volatility matrix. However, the accuracy of such a risk estimator is largely unknown. We study factor-based risk estimators under a large amount of assets, and introduce a high-confidence level upper bound (H-CLUB) to assess the estimation. The H-CLUB is constructed using the confidence interval of risk estimators with either known or unknown factors. We derive the limiting distribution of the estimated risks in high dimensionality. We find that when the dimension is large, the factor-based risk estimators have the same asymptotic variance no matter whether the factors are known or not, which is slightly smaller than that of the sample covariance-based estimator. Numerically, H-CLUB outperforms the traditional crude bounds, and provides an insightful risk assessment. In addition, our simulated results quantify the relative error in the risk estimation, which is usually negligible using 3-month daily data. PMID:26195851

  3. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  4. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  5. Risk management.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2010-01-01

    Every plan contains risk. To proceed without planning some means of managing that risk is to court failure. The basic logic of risk is explained. It consists in identifying a threshold where some corrective action is necessary, the probability of exceeding that threshold, and the attendant cost should the undesired outcome occur. This is the probable cost of failure. Various risk categories in dentistry are identified, including lack of liquidity; poor quality; equipment or procedure failures; employee slips; competitive environments; new regulations; unreliable suppliers, partners, and patients; and threats to one's reputation. It is prudent to make investments in risk management to the extent that the cost of managing the risk is less than the probable loss due to risk failure and when risk management strategies can be matched to type of risk. Four risk management strategies are discussed: insurance, reducing the probability of failure, reducing the costs of failure, and learning. A risk management accounting of the financial meltdown of October 2008 is provided. PMID:21314051

  6. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Obese Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Manal; Nassef, Yasser E.; Shady, Mones Abu; Aziz, Ali Abdel; Malt, Heba A. El

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood and adolescent obesity is associated with insulin resistance, abnormal glucose metabolism, hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation, liver disease, and compromised vascular function. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factor abnormalities and metabolic syndrome in a sample of obese adolescent as prevalence data might be helpful in improving engagement with obesity treatment in future. The high blood lipid levels and obesity are the main risk factors for cardio vascular diseases. Atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. AIM: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between obesity in adolescent and their blood lipids levels and blood glucose level. METHODS: This study was conducted with 100 adolescents of both gender age 12-17 years and body mass index (BMI) greater than 95th percentiles and 100 normal adolescents as control group. The blood samples were collected from all adolescents after overnight fasting (10 hours) to analyze blood lipids (Total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein) and hematological profile (Hemoglobin, platelets and red blood cell, C reactive protein and fasting blood glucose. RESULTS: There were statistical difference between the two groups for red blood cells (P<0.001), Hemoglobin (P < 0.001) and platelets (P = 0.002), CRP (P = 0.02). Positive correlation was found between the two groups as regards total cholesterol (P = 0.0001), P value was positive for HDL (P = 0.005 and Atherogenic index P value was positive (P = 0.002). Positive correlation was found between the two group as regards fasting blood glucose (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Saturated fat was associated with elevated lipid levels in obese children. These results reinforce the importance of healthy dietary habits since child-hood in order to reduce the risks of cardiovascular diseases in adulthood.

  7. Additional evidence of Mercurian volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trask, N.J.; Strom, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence concerned with (1) the character and distribution of terrain surrounding fresh basins, (2) albedo, color and temporal differences between a basin rim and smooth plains on its floor, and (3) the stratigraphic relations and local distribution of smooth plains in the hilly and lineated terrain are cited as additional evidence for an internal origin of much of the Mercurian smooth plains. Altough the question of Mercurian volcanism should be kept open, this evidence together with that presented in an earlier paper suggests that volcanism occurred on Mercury early in its history. ?? 1976.

  8. Individualized additional instruction for calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Ken

    2010-10-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the student's performance. Our study compares two calculus classes, one taught with mandatory remedial IAI and the other without. The class with mandatory remedial IAI did significantly better on comprehensive multiple-choice exams, participated more frequently in classroom discussion and showed greater interest in theorem-proving and other advanced topics.

  9. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  10. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  11. Is vitamin B12 deficiency a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in vegetarians?

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Roman

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in cardiovascular disease development among vegetarians. Vegetarians have a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Deficiency of this vitamin is associated with a variety of atherogenic processes that are mainly, but not exclusively, due to vitamin B12 deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. Each 5-μmol/L increase above 10 μmol/L of serum homocysteine is associated with a 20% increased risk of circulatory health problems. Mean homocysteine concentration >10 μmol/L among vegetarians was reported in 32 of 34 reports. Macrocytosis associated with vitamin B12 deficiency is also associated with fatal and non-fatal coronary disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, and other circulatory health problems. Compared with non-vegetarians, vegetarians have an improved profile of the traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, including serum lipids, blood pressure, serum glucose concentration, and weight status. However, not all studies that assessed cardiovascular disease incidence among vegetarians reported a protective effect. Among studies that did show a lower prevalence of circulatory health problems, the effect was not as pronounced as expected, which may be a result of poor vitamin B12 status due to a vegetarian diet. Vitamin B12 deficiency may negate the cardiovascular disease prevention benefits of vegetarian diets. In order to further reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, vegetarians should be advised to use vitamin B12 supplements. PMID:25998928

  12. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  13. High Flow Addition Curing Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Ansari, Irfan; Cerny, Lawrence L.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    A new series of high flow PMR-type addition curing polyimides was developed, which employed the substitution of 2,2'-bis (trifluoromethyl) -4,4'-diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) for p-phenylenediamine (p -PDA) in a PMR-IL formulation. These thermoset polyimides, designated as 12F resins, were prepared from BTDB and the dimethyl ester of 4,4'- (hexafluo- roisopropylidene) -diphthalic acid (HFDE) with either nadic ester (NE) or p-aminostyrene (PAS) as the endcaps for addition curing. The 12F prepolymers displayed lower melting temperatures in DSC analysis, and higher melt flow in rheological studies than the cor- responding PMR-11 polyimides. Long-term isothermal aging studies showed that BTDB- based 12F resins exhibited comparable thermo-oxidative stability to P-PDA based PMR-11 polyimides. The noncoplanar 2- and 2'-disubstituted biphenyldiamine (BTDB) not only lowered the melt viscosities of 12F prepolymers, but also retained reasonable thermal sta- bility of the cured resins. The 12F polyimide resin with p-aminostyrene endcaps showed the best promise for long-term, high-temperature application at 343 C (650 F).

  14. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  15. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed

    Barker, R H

    1975-06-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  16. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  17. Risk Factors and Levels of Risk for High School Dropouts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Suhyun; Suh, Jingyo

    2007-01-01

    The study in this article identifies three major risk categories of high school dropouts and evaluates the impact of possible prevention strategies. As students accumulate these risks, they became more likely to drop out and prevention programs become less effective. Additionally, it was found that factors influencing the decision to drop out vary…

  18. Testing a Gender Additive Model: The Role of Body Image in Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearman, Sarah Kate; Stice, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Despite consistent evidence that adolescent girls are at greater risk of developing depression than adolescent boys, risk factor models that account for this difference have been elusive. The objective of this research was to examine risk factors proposed by the "gender additive" model of depression that attempts to partially explain the increased…

  19. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  20. Optics of progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, J E; Buri, M; Bailey, I L; Azus, J; Borish, I M

    1987-02-01

    The optical characteristics of the major progressive addition lenses were measured using an automated lensometer with a specially designed lens holder to simulate eye rotation. Measurements were made every 3 degrees (about 1.5 mm) and graphs of isospherical equivalent lines and isocylinder lines were developed. Generally the near zone of these lenses is narrower and lower than in bifocal or trifocal lenses. Distinct differences exist between the various progressive lenses. The width of the near zone, rate of power progression, amount of unwanted cylinder (level with the distance center), and clarity of the distance zone are compared for the various lenses. The optical measurements demonstrate an apparent trade-off between the size of the cylinder-free area of the lens and the amount of the cylinder. PMID:3826294

  1. Addition polyimide end cap study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The characterization of addition polyimides with various end caps for adhesive applications at 120-250 C environments is discussed. Oligometric polyimides were prepared from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,3'-methylenedianiline which were end-capped with functionally reactive moities which cause crosslinking when the oligomers are heated to 200-400 C. The syntheses of the oligomers are outlined. The thermolysis of the oligomers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the resulting polymers were characterized by differential thermal analysis and adhesive performance. The adhesive data include lap shear strengths on titanium 6-4 adherends both before and after aging for 1000 hours at 121 C and/or 232 C.

  2. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  3. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  4. SIPSEY WILDERNESS AND ADDITIONS, ALABAMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Mory, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mineral surveys the Sipsey Wilderness and additions are deemed to have little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Although limestone, shale, and sandstone resources that occur in the area are physically suitable for a variety of uses, similar materials are available outside the area closer to transportation routes and potential markets. A small amount of coal has been identified in the area, occurring as nonpersistent beds less than 28 in. thick. Oil and (or) natural gas resources may be present if suitable structural traps exist in the subsurface. Therefore, the area has a probable oil and gas potential. Small amounts of asphaltic sandstone and limestone, commonly referred to as tar sands, may also occur in the subsurface. 5 refs.

  5. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate. PMID:3302664

  6. Environmental risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonell, M.M.

    1997-10-01

    This paper presents a current overview of the basic elements of environmental risk assessment within the basic four-step process of hazard identification, exposure assessment, toxicity assessment, and risk characterization. These general steps have been applied to assess both human and ecological risks from environmental exposures. Approaches used to identify hazards and exposures are being refined, including the use of optimized field sampling and more representative, rather than conservative,upper-bound estimates. In addition, toxicity data are being reviewed more rigorously as US and European harmonization initiatives gain strength, and the classification of chemicals has become more qualitative to more flexibly accommodate new dose-response information as it is developed. Finally, more emphasis is being placed on noncancer end points, and human and ecological risks are being weighed against each other more explicitly at the risk characterization phase. Recent advances in risk-based decision making reflect the increased transparency of the overall process, with more explicit incorporation of multiple trade-offs. The end result is a more comprehensive life-cycle evaluation of the risks associated with environmental exposures at contaminated sites.

  7. Being a Living Donor: Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... for blood transfusions side effects associated with allergic reactions to the anesthesia death The best source of information about risks and expected donor outcomes is your transplant team. In addition, it’s important to take an active role in ...

  8. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect

    John Collins

    2009-09-01

    To facilitate the implementation of the Risk Management Plan, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project has developed and employed an analytical software tool called the NGNP Risk Management System (RMS). A relational database developed in Microsoft® Access, the RMS provides conventional database utility including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. Additionally, the tool’s design provides a number of unique capabilities specifically designed to facilitate the development and execution of activities outlined in the Risk Management Plan. Specifically, the RMS provides the capability to establish the risk baseline, document and analyze the risk reduction plan, track the current risk reduction status, organize risks by reference configuration system, subsystem, and component (SSC) and Area, and increase the level of NGNP decision making.

  9. 77 FR 5483 - Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on Food Additives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Food Additives AGENCY: Office of the Under Secretary for Food Safety, USDA. ACTION: Notice of public....) positions that will be discussed at the 44th Session of the Codex Committee on Food Additives (CCFA) of the... individual additives; prepares priority lists of food additives for risk assessment by the Joint...

  10. Background risk information to assist in risk management decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Hammonds, J.S.; Hoffman, F.O.; White, R.K.; Miller, D.B.

    1992-10-01

    The evaluation of the need for remedial activities at hazardous waste sites requires quantification of risks of adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem resulting from the presence of chemical and radioactive substances at these sites. The health risks from exposure to these substances are in addition to risks encountered because of the virtually unavoidable exposure to naturally occurring chemicals and radioactive materials that are present in air, water, soil, building materials, and food products. To provide a frame of reference for interpreting risks quantified for hazardous waste sites, it is useful to identify the relative magnitude of risks of both a voluntary and involuntary nature that are ubiquitous throughout east Tennessee. In addition to discussing risks from the ubiquitous presence of background carcinogens in the east Tennessee environment, this report also presents risks resulting from common, everyday activities. Such information should, not be used to discount or trivialize risks from hazardous waste contamination, but rather, to create a sensitivity to general risk issues, thus providing a context for better interpretation of risk information.

  11. Application of Additively Manufactured Components in Rocket Engine Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, Marty, Jr.; Hanks, Andrew; Schmauch, Preston; Delessio, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The use of additive manufacturing technology has the potential to revolutionize the development of turbopump components in liquid rocket engines. When designing turbomachinery with the additive process there are several benefits and risks that are leveraged relative to a traditional development cycle. This topic explores the details and development of a 90,000 RPM Liquid Hydrogen Turbopump from which 90% of the parts were derived from the additive process. This turbopump was designed, developed and will be tested later this year at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  12. Risk management frameworks for human health and environmental risks.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Cindy; Hrudey, Steve; Shortreed, John; Craig, Lorraine; Krewski, Daniel; Furgal, Chris; McColl, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical review of the risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication approaches currently being undertaken by key national, provincial/state, territorial, and international agencies was conducted. The information acquired for review was used to identify the differences, commonalities, strengths, and weaknesses among the various approaches, and to identify elements that should be included in an effective, current, and comprehensive approach applicable to environmental, human health and occupational health risks. More than 80 agencies, organizations, and advisory councils, encompassing more than 100 risk documents, were examined during the period from February 2000 until November 2002. An overview was made of the most important general frameworks for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication for human health and ecological risk, and for occupational health risk. In addition, frameworks for specific applications were reviewed and summarized, including those for (1)contaminated sites; (2) northern contaminants; (3) priority substances; (4) standards development; (5) food safety; (6) medical devices; (7) prescription drug use; (8) emergency response; (9) transportation; (10) risk communication. Twelve frameworks were selected for more extensive review on the basis of representation of the areas of human health, ecological, and occupational health risk; relevance to Canadian risk management needs; representation of comprehensive and well-defined approaches; generalizability with their risk areas; representation of "state of the art" in Canada, the United States, and/or internationally; and extent of usage of potential usage within Canada. These 12 frameworks were: 1. Framework for Environmental Health Risk Management (US Presidential/Congressional Commission on Risk Assessment and Risk Management, 1997). 2. Health Risk Determination: The Challenge of Health Protection (Health and Welfare Canada, 1990). 3. Health Canada Decision

  13. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly porous pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the porous structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the porous tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical porous Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open porous tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting. PMID:25500631

  14. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, SK

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  15. Additive Transforms Paint into Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tech Traders Inc. sought assistance developing low-cost, highly effective coatings and paints that created useful thermal reflectance and were safe and non-toxic. In cooperation with a group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center., Tech Traders created Insuladd, a powder additive made up of microscopic, inert gas-filled, ceramic microspheres that can be mixed into ordinary interior or exterior paint, allowing the paint to act like a layer of insulation. When the paint dries, this forms a radiant heat barrier, turning the ordinary house paint into heat-reflecting thermal paint. According to Tech Traders, the product works with all types of paints and coatings and will not change the coverage rate, application, or adhesion of the paint. Other useful applications include feed storage silos to help prevent feed spoilage, poultry hatcheries to reduce the summer heat and winter cold effects, and on military vehicles and ships. Tech Traders has continued its connection to the aerospace community by recently providing Lockheed Martin Corporation with one of its thermal products for use on the F-22 Raptor.

  16. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, S K

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  17. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.

  18. Prudent Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklin, Julie L.

    1995-01-01

    Despite recent substantial losses through an investment adviser, mid-size universities are reducing their traditional low-risk investments and engaging in investments that are higher-risk but potentially higher-yielding. For some institutions, this translates into more investment in the domestic stock market and some ventures into foreign markets.…

  19. Embracing risk.

    PubMed

    Cagan, Ross

    2015-08-01

    I entered the science field because I imagined that scientists were society's "professional risk takers", that they like surfing out on the edge. I understood that a lot of science - perhaps even most science - has to be a solid exploration of partly understood phenomena. But any science that confronts a difficult problem has to start with risk. Most people are at least a bit suspicious of risk, and scientists such as myself are no exception. Recently, risk-taking has been under attack financially, but this Editorial is not about that. I am writing about the long view and the messages we send to our trainees. I am Senior Associate Dean of the graduate school at Mount Sinai and have had the privilege to discuss these issues with the next generation of scientists, for whom I care very deeply. Are we preparing you to embrace risk? PMID:26203124

  20. Embracing risk

    PubMed Central

    Cagan, Ross

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT I entered the science field because I imagined that scientists were society's “professional risk takers”, that they like surfing out on the edge. I understood that a lot of science – perhaps even most science – has to be a solid exploration of partly understood phenomena. But any science that confronts a difficult problem has to start with risk. Most people are at least a bit suspicious of risk, and scientists such as myself are no exception. Recently, risk-taking has been under attack financially, but this Editorial is not about that. I am writing about the long view and the messages we send to our trainees. I am Senior Associate Dean of the graduate school at Mount Sinai and have had the privilege to discuss these issues with the next generation of scientists, for whom I care very deeply. Are we preparing you to embrace risk? PMID:26203124

  1. Space Radiation Cancer Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    cancer risk relies on the three assumptions of linearity, additivity, and scaling along with the use of population averages. We describe uncertainty estimates for this model, and new experimental data that sheds light on the accuracy of the underlying assumptions. These methods make it possible to express risk management objectives in terms of quantitative metrics, i.e., the number of days in space without exceeding a given risk level within well defined confidence limits. The resulting methodology is applied to several human space exploration mission scenarios including lunar station, deep space outpost, and a Mars mission. Factors that dominate risk projection uncertainties and application of this approach to assess candidate mitigation approaches are described.

  2. Criteria for deviation from predictions by the concentration addition model.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Jun-Ichi; Seki, Masanori; Kamo, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    Loewe's additivity (concentration addition) is a well-known model for predicting the toxic effects of chemical mixtures under the additivity assumption of toxicity. However, from the perspective of chemical risk assessment and/or management, it is important to identify chemicals whose toxicities are additive when present concurrently, that is, it should be established whether there are chemical mixtures to which the concentration addition predictive model can be applied. The objective of the present study was to develop criteria for judging test results that deviated from the predictions by the concentration addition chemical mixture model. These criteria were based on the confidence interval of the concentration addition model's prediction and on estimation of errors of the predicted concentration-effect curves by toxicity tests after exposure to single chemicals. A log-logit model with 2 parameters was assumed for the concentration-effect curve of each individual chemical. These parameters were determined by the maximum-likelihood method, and the criteria were defined using the variances and the covariance of the parameters. In addition, the criteria were applied to a toxicity test of a binary mixture of p-n-nonylphenol and p-n-octylphenol using the Japanese killifish, medaka (Oryzias latipes). Consequently, the concentration addition model using confidence interval was capable of predicting the test results at any level, and no reason for rejecting the concentration addition was found. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1806-1814. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26660330

  3. Dioxin-like pollutants increase hepatic flavin containing monooxygenase (FMO3) expression to promote synthesis of the pro-atherogenic nutrient biomarker trimethylamine N-oxide from dietary precursors.

    PubMed

    Petriello, Michael C; Hoffman, Jessie B; Sunkara, Manjula; Wahlang, Banrida; Perkins, Jordan T; Morris, Andrew J; Hennig, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    The etiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is impacted by multiple modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors including dietary choices, genetic predisposition, and environmental exposures. However, mechanisms linking diet, exposure to pollutants, and CVD risk are largely unclear. Recent studies identified a strong link between plasma levels of nutrient-derived Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and coronary artery disease. Dietary precursors of TMAO include carnitine and phosphatidylcholine, which are abundant in animal-derived foods. Dioxin-like pollutants can upregulate a critical enzyme responsible for TMAO formation, hepatic flavin containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3), but a link between dioxin-like PCBs, upregulation of FMO3, and increased TMAO has not been reported. Here, we show that mice exposed acutely to dioxin-like PCBs exhibit increased hepatic FMO3 mRNA, protein, as well as an increase in circulating levels of TMAO following oral administration of its metabolic precursors. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 5μmol PCB 126/kg mouse weight (1.63mg/kg). At 48h post-PCB exposure, mice were subsequently given a single gavage of phosphatidylcholine dissolved in corn oil. Exposure to 5 μmole/kg PCB 126 resulted in greater than 100-fold increase in FMO3 mRNA expression, robust induction of FMO3 protein, and a 5-fold increase in TMAO levels compared with vehicle treated mice. We made similar observations in mice exposed to PCB 77 (49.6mg/kg twice); stable isotope tracer studies revealed increased formation of plasma TMAO from an orally administered precursor trimethylamine (TMA). Taken together, these observations suggest a novel diet-toxicant interaction that results in increased production of a circulating biomarker of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:27155921

  4. Nuclear risk

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, M.

    1989-01-01

    The title of our session, Nuclear Risk Versus Other Power Options, is provocative. It is also a title with different meanings to different people. To the utility chief executive officer, nuclear power is a high-risk financial undertaking because of political and economic barriers to cost recovery. To the utility dispatcher, it is a high-risk future power source since plant completion and start-up dates can be delayed for very long times due to uncertain legal and political issues. To the environmentalist, concerned about global effects such as greenhouse and acid rain, nuclear power is a relatively low risk energy source. To the financial people, nuclear power is a cash cow turned sour because of uncertainties as to what new plants will cost and whether they will even be allowed to operate. The statistics on risk are known and the results of probability risk assessment calculations of risks are known. The challenge is not to make nuclear power safer, it is already one of the safest, if not the safest, source of power currently available. The challenge is to find a way to communicate this to the public.

  5. RISK ASSESSMENT AND RISK MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment of mixtures of environmental pollutants has become a subject of increasing public and regulatory concern. ypically, assessment of mixtures has been based on aggregating the risks associated with the individual constituents of the mixture. his approach does not con...

  6. Risk Assessment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    FEAT, a software system for evaluating risks, was developed by Lockheed and later enhanced under NASA funding. FEAT uses directed graph - or digraph - models to provide information on cause and effect if a set of failure events occurs. James Miller, the program designer at Lockheed, formed DiGraphics, Inc. to market the software that has evolved from FEAT. The Diquest Analyzer, the company's flagship product, assists product designers in identifying the redundancies and weaknesses of a system. The software has applications in the chemical industry for risk assessment, design evaluation, and change management. Additional markets have been found in operations monitoring diagnostics and training of new personnel.

  7. Sufficient dimension reduction with additional information.

    PubMed

    Hung, Hung; Liu, Chih-Yen; Horng-Shing Lu, Henry

    2016-07-01

    Sufficient dimension reduction is widely applied to help model building between the response [Formula: see text] and covariate [Formula: see text] In some situations, we also collect additional covariate [Formula: see text] that has better performance in predicting [Formula: see text], but has a higher obtaining cost, than [Formula: see text] While constructing a predictive model for [Formula: see text] based on [Formula: see text] is straightforward, this strategy is not applicable since [Formula: see text] is not available for future observations in which the constructed model is to be applied. As a result, the aim of the study is to build a predictive model for [Formula: see text] based on [Formula: see text] only, where the available data is [Formula: see text] A naive method is to conduct analysis using [Formula: see text] directly, but ignoring [Formula: see text] can cause the problem of inefficiency. On the other hand, it is not trivial to utilize the information of [Formula: see text] to infer [Formula: see text], either. In this article, we propose a two-stage dimension reduction method for [Formula: see text] that is able to utilize the information of [Formula: see text] In the breast cancer data, the risk score constructed from the two-stage method can well separate patients with different survival experiences. In the Pima data, the two-stage method requires fewer components to infer the diabetes status, while achieving higher classification accuracy than the conventional method. PMID:26704765

  8. Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications. PMID:24587651

  9. Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been linked to some cancers: Links between air pollution and cancer risk have been found. These include ... between lung cancer and secondhand tobacco smoke , outdoor air pollution, and asbestos . Drinking water that contains a large ...

  10. Estimating risk.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    A free mobile phone app has been launched providing nurses and other hospital clinicians with a simple way to identify high-risk surgical patients. The app is a phone version of the Surgical Outcome Risk Tool (SORT), originally developed for online use with computers by researchers from the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death and the University College London Hospital Surgical Outcomes Research Centre. SORT uses information about patients' health and planned surgical procedures to estimate the risk of death within 30 days of an operation. The percentages are only estimates, taking into account the general risks of the procedures and some information about patients, and should not be confused with patient-specific estimates in individual cases. PMID:27369709

  11. Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease and stroke. However, certain groups—including African Americans and older individuals—are at higher risk ... life expectancy found among minorities. As of 2007, African American men were 30% more likely to die ...

  12. Biosafety Risk Assessment Model

    2011-05-27

    Software tool based on a structured methodology for conducting laboratory biosafety risk assessments by biosafety experts. Software is based upon an MCDA scheme and uses peer reviewed criteria and weights. The software was developed upon Microsoft’s .net framework. The methodology defines likelihood and consequence of a laboratory exposure for thirteen unique scenarios and provides numerical relative risks for each of the relevant thirteen. The software produces 2-d graphs reflecting the relative risk and a sensitivitymore » analysis which highlights the overall importance of each factor. The software works as a set of questions with absolute scales and uses a weighted additive model to calculate the likelihood and consequence.« less

  13. Advising pregnant women on miminising travel risks.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Rosemary

    Pregnant women may face additional risks when travelling overseas, which must be considered with assessment and travel health advice before they decide to travel. A careful risk assessment should be completed to identify the key risks and strategies for staying safe while travelling. PMID:24772798

  14. Risks of tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    Secondhand smoke - risks; Cigarette smoking - risks; Smoking and smokeless tobacco - risks ... tobacco that are known to cause cancer. HEALTH RISKS OF SMOKING OR USING SMOKELESS TOBACCO Knowing the ...

  15. Injury Risk Estimation Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Petushek, Erich J.; Ward, Paul; Cokely, Edward T.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    injury risk estimation exist. The relatively profound differences in injury risk estimation accuracy and their potential implications for risk screening suggest the need for additional training and outreach (see http://www.ACL-IQ.org). Clinical Relevance: Parents and sport coaches would likely benefit from training or use of decision support tools such as the ACL nomogram to assess ACL injury risk. In addition, physicians and other sports medicine professionals may also benefit from improving risk estimation performance to reach clinical biomechanical standards. PMID:26740951

  16. Immunosuppressive agents and metabolic factors of cardiovascular risk in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sessa, A; Esposito, A; Giliberti, A; Iavicoli, G; Costa, C; Bergallo, M; Lettieri, E; Rossano, R; Capuano, M

    2009-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for 35% to 50% of deaths among renal transplant recipients. Beside the atherogenic risk factors related to hemodialysis, renal function, and use of immunosuppressive agents, other relevant risk factors for CVD include acute rejection episodes, microalbuminuria (muAlb), diabetes, arterial hypertension, lipid disorders, inflammatory triggers, hyperhomocysteinemia, anemia, erythrocytosis, obesity, and hyperuricemia. We studied the prevalence of risk factors and the impact of various drugs on CVD among 103 renal transplant recipients with measured glomerular filtration rates showing values >45 mL/min. We measured uric acid, triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) LDL/HDL ratio, homocysteine (HOMO), insulin resistance, muAlb, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen. Subsequently, patients were divided into 8 groups based on the immunosuppressive protocol to evaluate its impact on CVD risk factors. Insulin resistance and hyperhomocysteinemia were present in >2/3 of patients. Considering the impact of protocols, the combination of cyclosporine (CsA) + everolimus (EVL) resulted in the most favorable profile in terms of reduction of hyperuricemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperhomocysteinemia. Insulin resistance tended to be more frequent among patients treated with protocols including calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) and steroids. The prevalence of hyperhomocyteinemia was similar among patients on CsA and on tacrolimus (Tac). Sirolimus (SRL) was associated with higher levels of HOMO. The combination of CNI and proliferative signal inhibitors (PSI) seemed to be the most promising one to reduce the impact of CVD risk factors. The reduction in CVD morbidity can improve expectancy and quality of life, as well as graft function and survival among renal transplant patients. PMID:19460510

  17. [Indications for the combination of pravastatin and fenofibrate according to the cardiovascular risk level. Common clinical situations].

    PubMed

    Pintó, Xavier

    2014-07-01

    In diabetes, metabolic syndrome, some types of familial dyslipidemia, ischemic pathology of atheromatous origin and renal failure, the presence of mixed dyslipidemia is common. In other words, there is an excess of cholesterol and triglycerides, associated or not with HDL-c deficiency. These clinical conditions are associated with high to very high cardiovascular risk. It is appropriate when treating these conditions to achieve an overall control of lipid metabolism abnormalities, in terms of excess cholesterol carried by atherogenic lipoproteins (LDL-c and non-HDL-c) and triglyceride excess and deficit of HDL-c. To achieve this overall control is necessary to correct the potential causes of secondary dyslipidemia, improve lifestyle habits and use a drug from the statin family, and it is often necessary to combine a drug from the fibrate family. This combination has been shown to be effective and safe in the overall control of dyslipidemia and the cardiovascular risk prevention in patients at high risk. This combination has been shown to have a favorable eff ect in the population with diabetes and microangiopathy, both in the retina and in the glomerulus. For patients with moderate renal failure, the use of fibrates is controversial, and there are marked disagreements between the recommendations issued by various organizations and expert consensus groups. PMID:25043546

  18. Hypertriglyceridemia: a too long unfairly neglected major cardiovascular risk factor.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Klempfner, Robert; Fisman, Enrique Z

    2014-01-01

    The existence of an independent association between elevated triglyceride (TG) levels, cardiovascular (CV) risk and mortality has been largely controversial. The main difficulty in isolating the effect of hypertriglyceridemia on CV risk is the fact that elevated triglyceride levels are commonly associated with concomitant changes in high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and other lipoproteins. As a result of this problem and in disregard of the real biological role of TG, its significance as a plausible therapeutic target was unfoundedly underestimated for many years. However, taking epidemiological data together, both moderate and severe hypertriglyceridaemia are associated with a substantially increased long term total mortality and CV risk. Plasma TG levels partially reflect the concentration of the triglyceride-carrying lipoproteins (TRL): very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), chylomicrons and their remnants. Furthermore, hypertriglyceridemia commonly leads to reduction in HDL and increase in atherogenic small dense LDL levels. TG may also stimulate atherogenesis by mechanisms, such excessive free fatty acids (FFA) release, production of proinflammatory cytokines, fibrinogen, coagulation factors and impairment of fibrinolysis. Genetic studies strongly support hypertriglyceridemia and high concentrations of TRL as causal risk factors for CV disease. The most common forms of hypertriglyceridemia are related to overweight and sedentary life style, which in turn lead to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Intensive lifestyle therapy is the main initial treatment of hypertriglyceridemia. Statins are a cornerstone of the modern lipids-modifying therapy. If the primary goal is to lower TG levels, fibrates (bezafibrate and fenofibrate for monotherapy, and in combination with statin; gemfibrozil only for monotherapy) could be the preferable drugs. Also ezetimibe has mild positive effects in lowering TG

  19. Microbial Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. M.; Mena, K. D.; Nickerson, C.A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, microbiological spaceflight requirements have been established in a subjective manner based upon expert opinion of both environmental and clinical monitoring results and the incidence of disease. The limited amount of data, especially from long-duration missions, has created very conservative requirements based primarily on the concentration of microorganisms. Periodic reevaluations of new data from later missions have allowed some relaxation of these stringent requirements. However, the requirements remain very conservative and subjective in nature, and the risk of crew illness due to infectious microorganisms is not well defined. The use of modeling techniques for microbial risk has been applied in the food and potable water industries and has exceptional potential for spaceflight applications. From a productivity standpoint, this type of modeling can (1) decrease unnecessary costs and resource usage and (2) prevent inadequate or inappropriate data for health assessment. In addition, a quantitative model has several advantages for risk management and communication. By identifying the variable components of the model and the knowledge associated with each component, this type of modeling can: (1) Systematically identify and close knowledge gaps, (2) Systematically identify acceptable and unacceptable risks, (3) Improve communication with stakeholders as to the reasons for resource use, and (4) Facilitate external scientific approval of the NASA requirements. The modeling of microbial risk involves the evaluation of several key factors including hazard identification, crew exposure assessment, dose-response assessment, and risk characterization. Many of these factors are similar to conditions found on Earth; however, the spaceflight environment is very specialized as the inhabitants live in a small, semi-closed environment that is often dependent on regenerative life support systems. To further complicate modeling efforts, microbial dose

  20. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  1. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  2. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  3. Considering risk.

    PubMed

    Reichman, G

    1999-01-01

    Medical device manufacturers have to go to a lot of effort before they can bring a new product to market. Even when the product is on the market there are many things to consider to keep it there. These efforts are deemed worth making, because they believe that there will be a "return on investment." In many cases this expectation proves to be right, sometimes it does not. They must be prepared to take some risk. This article discusses the regulated environment in which research into (new) medical devices takes place and the management of regulatory risk. PMID:10623346

  4. Risk factors, endothelial cell turnover and lipid transport in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, S J

    1996-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain to be the 4th rank of top ten causes of mortality in Taiwan in recent years. Atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, which often culminating in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure, are responsible for the majority of these death. One of the prominent features of atherosclerotic lesion is local accumulation of lipids, mainly in the forms of cholesteryl ester and free cholesterol, either within cells or extracellularly in matrix. Repeated endothelial injury and enhanced lipid infiltration are critical events in the development of atherosclerosis. Plasma lipoproteins may enter the arterial wall through endothelium, either transcellularly via vesicular transport or paracellularly via intercellular junction. Our previous studies have demonstrated that most of the arterial endothelial cells in mitosis are associated with the leakage of fluorescently labeled albumin and low density lipoproteins. Subsequently, such transendothelial leakage of macromolecules is also shown to be associated with endothelial cell death as assessed by immunocytochemical staining for IgG. These findings suggested that transiently leaky junctions occurring during endothelial cell turnover may provide potentially important pathways for increasing transport or leakage of macromolecules, including atherogenic LDL, across the vascular endothelium. Electron microscopic study using horseradish peroxidase as a tracer revealed markedly widening of intercellular junctions around endothelial cells in mitosis providing direct evidence in support of "cell turnover-leaky junction" theory for the localization of atherogenesis. Hypertension, smoking, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia are well-known major risk factors for atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. In a series of investigations, we examined the hypothesis that hypertension smoking, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia increase the arterial endothelial cell turnover and hence

  5. Initial Risk Analysis and Decision Making Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, David W.

    2012-02-01

    Commercialization of new carbon capture simulation initiative (CCSI) technology will include two key elements of risk management, namely, technical risk (will process and plant performance be effective, safe, and reliable) and enterprise risk (can project losses and costs be controlled within the constraints of market demand to maintain profitability and investor confidence). Both of these elements of risk are incorporated into the risk analysis subtask of Task 7. Thus far, this subtask has developed a prototype demonstration tool that quantifies risk based on the expected profitability of expenditures when retrofitting carbon capture technology on a stylized 650 MW pulverized coal electric power generator. The prototype is based on the selection of specific technical and financial factors believed to be important determinants of the expected profitability of carbon capture, subject to uncertainty. The uncertainty surrounding the technical performance and financial variables selected thus far is propagated in a model that calculates the expected profitability of investments in carbon capture and measures risk in terms of variability in expected net returns from these investments. Given the preliminary nature of the results of this prototype, additional work is required to expand the scope of the model to include additional risk factors, additional information on extant and proposed risk factors, the results of a qualitative risk factor elicitation process, and feedback from utilities and other interested parties involved in the carbon capture project. Additional information on proposed distributions of these risk factors will be integrated into a commercial implementation framework for the purpose of a comparative technology investment analysis.

  6. Risk Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakich, Ronald

    1982-01-01

    Beginning on the front page, this article explains ways of establishing a sound risk management insurance program that can improve a school district's financial position. Organizations that can help are listed. Available from the American Association of School Administrators, 1801 North Moore Street, Arlington, VA 22209. (MLF)

  7. Unnecessary Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sievers, Dennis

    1984-01-01

    Provides safety considerations related to chemistry experiments and demonstrations. Includes procedures for a volcano demonstration (which does not use ammonium dichromate) and three clock reactions, a list of hazardous chemicals, and a list of questions to help decide whether the risk of an experiment is acceptable for a class. (JN)

  8. Managing Risks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Colleges and universities face a wide range of environmental risk. In spite of this, with proper planning, they can avoid emergencies or surprises. Advanced planning, coupled with strategic, technical environmental and legal advice, enable higher-education institutions to keep their environmental budgets under control and predictable. This article…

  9. 40 CFR 79.31 - Additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.31 Additives. (a) All additives produced or sold for use in motor vehicle gasoline and/or motor vehicle diesel fuel are hereby designated... persons or property on a street or highway. For purposes of this registration, however,...

  10. 40 CFR 79.31 - Additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.31 Additives. (a) All additives produced or sold for use in motor vehicle gasoline and/or motor vehicle diesel fuel are hereby designated... persons or property on a street or highway. For purposes of this registration, however,...

  11. 40 CFR 79.31 - Additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.31 Additives. (a) All additives produced or sold for use in motor vehicle gasoline and/or motor vehicle diesel fuel are hereby designated... persons or property on a street or highway. For purposes of this registration, however,...

  12. 40 CFR 79.31 - Additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.31 Additives. (a) All additives produced or sold for use in motor vehicle gasoline and/or motor vehicle diesel fuel are hereby designated... persons or property on a street or highway. For purposes of this registration, however,...

  13. 40 CFR 79.31 - Additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Designation of Fuels and Additives § 79.31 Additives. (a) All additives produced or sold for use in motor vehicle gasoline and/or motor vehicle diesel fuel are hereby designated... persons or property on a street or highway. For purposes of this registration, however,...

  14. Evaluation of the Performance of Smoothing Functions in Generalized Additive Models for Spatial Variation in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siangphoe, Umaporn; Wheeler, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Generalized additive models (GAMs) with bivariate smoothing functions have been applied to estimate spatial variation in risk for many types of cancers. Only a handful of studies have evaluated the performance of smoothing functions applied in GAMs with regard to different geographical areas of elevated risk and different risk levels. This study evaluates the ability of different smoothing functions to detect overall spatial variation of risk and elevated risk in diverse geographical areas at various risk levels using a simulation study. We created five scenarios with different true risk area shapes (circle, triangle, linear) in a square study region. We applied four different smoothing functions in the GAMs, including two types of thin plate regression splines (TPRS) and two versions of locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (loess). We tested the null hypothesis of constant risk and detected areas of elevated risk using analysis of deviance with permutation methods and assessed the performance of the smoothing methods based on the spatial detection rate, sensitivity, accuracy, precision, power, and false-positive rate. The results showed that all methods had a higher sensitivity and a consistently moderate-to-high accuracy rate when the true disease risk was higher. The models generally performed better in detecting elevated risk areas than detecting overall spatial variation. One of the loess methods had the highest precision in detecting overall spatial variation across scenarios and outperformed the other methods in detecting a linear elevated risk area. The TPRS methods outperformed loess in detecting elevated risk in two circular areas. PMID:25983545

  15. Familial Vulnerability to ADHD Affects Activity in the Cerebellum in Addition to the Prefrontal Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Martijn J.; Baeyens, Dieter; Davidson, Matthew C.; Casey, B. J.; Van Den Ban, Els; Van Engeland, Herman; Durston, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    The study examines whether cerebellar systems are sensitive to familial risk for ADHD in addition to frontostriatal circuitry. The results conclude that familial vulnerability to ADHD affects activity in both the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum.

  16. A Four Step Approach to Evaluate Mixtures for Consistency with Dose Addition

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a four step approach for evaluating chemical mixture data for consistency with dose addition for use in environmental health risk assessment. Following the concepts in the U.S. EPA mixture risk guidance (EPA 2000a,b), toxicological interaction for a defined mixture (...

  17. Low Fruit/Vegetable Consumption in the Home: Cumulative Risk Factors in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Wendy L.; Swindle, Taren M.; Kyzer, Angela L.; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Cumulative risk theory suggests that a variety of social risk factors would have an additive effect on obesity risk. Multiple studies have suggested that obesity is related to basic resources such as transportation and financial resources. Additional research points to parental engagement and parental monitoring as additional sources of risk. This…

  18. [Irrationality and risk--a problem analysis].

    PubMed

    Bergler, R

    1995-04-01

    The way one experiences risks and one's risk behaviour is not centrally the result of rational considerations and decisions. Contradictions and incompatibilities can be proved empirically: (1) General paranoiac hysterical fear of risks, (2) complete repression of health risks, (3) unsureness and inability in dealing with risks, (4) prejudice against risks, (5) admiring risk behaviour, (6) seeking dangerous ways to test one's own limits, (7) readiness for aggression by not subjectively being able to control the risk, (8) naively assessing a risk positively thus intensifying pleasurable sensation, (9) increased preparedness to take risks in groups, (10) increased preparedness to take risk in anonymity, (11) accepting risks as a creative challenge for achievement motivation, (12) loss of innovation when avoiding risks. The awareness and assessment of risk factors is dependent on (1) personality factors (achievement-motivated persons experience risk as a creative challenge; risk behaviour being a variation in stimulus and exploration of one's environment), (2) the social back-ground (booster function), (3) the culture-related assessment of being able to control risks and (4) age (youthful risk behaviour being a way of coping with developmental exercises, e.g. purposely breaking parent's rules, provocatively demonstrating adult behaviour, a means to solve frustrating performance failures, advantages through social acceptance). The way one copes with risk factors is based on subjective estimation of risk; this assessment is made anew for each area of behaviour according to the specific situation. Making a decision and acting upon it is the result of simultaneously assessing the possible psychological benefit-cost factors of taking risks. The extent, to which the threat of risk factors is felt, depends on the importance one attaches to certain needs and benefits of quality of life and, in addition to this, what the subjective probabilities are that one is likely to be

  19. Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Grady, Joseph E.; Carter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities on additive manufacturing of aerospace propulsion components, which included rocket propulsion and gas turbine engines. Future opportunities on additive manufacturing of hybrid electric propulsion components will be discussed.

  20. Body Mass Index Genetic Risk Score and Endometrial Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jennifer; Setiawan, Veronica W.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Schumacher, Fredrick; Yu, Herbert; Delahanty, Ryan; Bernstein, Leslie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Chu; Cook, Linda S.; Friedenreich, Christine; Garcia-Closas, Monserrat; Haiman, Christopher A.; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Olson, Sara H.; Risch, Harvey A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ursin, Giske; Yang, Hannah P.; Kraft, Peter; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common variants that predispose individuals to a higher body mass index (BMI), an independent risk factor for endometrial cancer. Composite genotype risk scores (GRS) based on the joint effect of published BMI risk loci were used to explore whether endometrial cancer shares a genetic background with obesity. Genotype and risk factor data were available on 3,376 endometrial cancer case and 3,867 control participants of European ancestry from the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium GWAS. A BMI GRS was calculated by summing the number of BMI risk alleles at 97 independent loci. For exploratory analyses, additional GRSs were based on subsets of risk loci within putative etiologic BMI pathways. The BMI GRS was statistically significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk (P = 0.002). For every 10 BMI risk alleles a woman had a 13% increased endometrial cancer risk (95% CI: 4%, 22%). However, after adjusting for BMI, the BMI GRS was no longer associated with risk (per 10 BMI risk alleles OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.07; P = 0.78). Heterogeneity by BMI did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06), and no effect modification was noted by age, GWAS Stage, study design or between studies (P≥0.58). In exploratory analyses, the GRS defined by variants at loci containing monogenic obesity syndrome genes was associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk independent of BMI (per BMI risk allele OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.96; P = 2.1 x 10−5). Possessing a large number of BMI risk alleles does not increase endometrial cancer risk above that conferred by excess body weight among women of European descent. Thus, the GRS based on all current established BMI loci does not provide added value independent of BMI. Future studies are required to validate the unexpected observed relation between monogenic obesity syndrome genetic variants and endometrial cancer risk. PMID:26606540

  1. Relationship of blood pressure with some cardiovascular disease risk factors in a rural population of Plateau State, North Central Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okeahialam, Basil N.; Ogbonna, Chikaike; Joseph, Dele E.; Chuhwak, Evelyn K.; Isiguzoro, Ikechukwu O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is associated with certain cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors which vary from one place to the other depending on community sophistication. We decided to obtain the situation as it affects this rural Nigerian community to be in an evidence-based position to initiate individual and group prevention strategies. Design: Cross-sectional population survey. Materials and Methods: We surveyed for CVD risk factors among subjects 15 years and above in this rural community using a questionnaire requesting personal, medical and anthropometric information. One in three of them were randomly assigned to laboratory investigations. Results: Of the 840 subjects studied, 25% were males. The population mean age was 45.5 (18.2) standard deviation (SD), with 1.8% smokers and 4.1% using alcohol. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) correlated with age, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol (TC) and uric acid (UA); while diastolic blood pressure (DBP) correlated with age, BMI, TC, UA and atherogenic index (AI). SBP and DBP improved with exercise but not salt intake. The local seasonings used in cooking had no impact on blood pressure. Conclusion: To reduce cardiovascular morbidity in this and probably other rural sub-Saharan African communities, BMI, TC, UA and salt intake in diet should be targeted for reduction. Physical activity should be encouraged. Interestingly, these fall into the sphere of healthy lifestyle which should be encouraged and re-inforced. PMID:26229231

  2. Is the Ratio of Antibodies Against Oxidized LDL to Oxidized LDL an Indicator of Cardiovascular Risk in Psoriasis?

    PubMed Central

    Rajappa, Medha; Mohan Thappa, Devinder; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Munisamy, Malathi; Revathy, G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Chronic inflammation results in increased oxidative stress and oxidizes lipoproteins, increasing their atherogenicity. This study sought to estimate the levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and antibodies against oxidized LDL (anti-ox-LDL) and compute the ratio of anti-ox-LDL/ox-LDL as a single composite parameter to assess the oxidative lipoprotein burden as an indicator of cardiovascular risk in patients with psoriasis. Methods This cross-sectional study included 45 patients with psoriasis. All patients were given a psoriasis severity index score and their ox-LDL and anti-ox-LDL estimated using ELISA. Results The results of this study show an elevation in the ratio of anti-ox-LDL to ox-LDL in patients with psoriasis, which initiate and perpetuate the pathogenesis of psoriasis and its comorbidity, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conclusions Our results suggest that an elevated ratio of anti-ox-LDL/ox-LDL can serve as a composite parameter reflecting the total oxidative lipoprotein burden and cardiovascular risk in psoriasis patients. PMID:27602197

  3. LDL particle heterogeneity, and its association with other established cardiovascular risk factors in a young Indian industrial population

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Dorairaj, Prabhakaran; Tarik, Mohamad; Gupta, Ruby; Reddy, Kolli Srinath

    2012-01-01

    Objective Low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles are heterogeneous in terms of size, density, chemical composition and electric charge with certain particle of LDL being more atherogenic than the others. The present study aimed to look at the LDL particle heterogeneity, particle size and association with other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in young Indian industrial population. Methodology 600 employees of an industry of Delhi, aged 20-39 years were selected for the study. Data on demographics, individual characteristics associated with major risk factors of CVD, past medical history, clinical and anthropometric profile was collected. Fasting glucose, lipid profile, apolipoprotein (A1, B, and E), lipoprotein (a), high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and insulin were estimated. LDL particle size was determined in ethylenediamminetetraacetate (EDTA) plasma by 3% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Result We found a prevalence of small dense LDL phenotype (LDL size ≤ 26.3) in 27.4% of males and 24.0% of females. The mean waist circumference, blood pressure, triglycerides (TAG), cholesterol, hsCRP, apolipoprotein (A1, B and E) and insulin were higher in males whereas mean high density lipoprotein was higher in females. Females also had a significantly higher mean LDL particle diameter as compared to males. Conclusion TAG, physical activity and lipoprotein (a) correlated with small dense LDL in this young Indian population.

  4. 47 CFR 25.111 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional information. 25.111 Section 25.111... Applications and Licenses General Application Filing Requirements § 25.111 Additional information. (a) The Commission may request from any party at any time additional information concerning any application, or...

  5. 20 CFR 901.72 - Additional rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Additional rules. 901.72 Section 901.72... Additional rules. The Joint Board may, in notice or other guidance of general applicability, provide additional rules regarding the enrollment of actuaries. Effective Date Note: At 76 FR 17776, Mar. 31,...

  6. 17 CFR 48.10 - Additional contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional contracts. 48.10... FOREIGN BOARDS OF TRADE § 48.10 Additional contracts. (a) Generally. A registered foreign board of trade that wishes to make an additional futures, option or swap contract available for trading by...

  7. 17 CFR 48.10 - Additional contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Additional contracts. 48.10...) REGISTRATION OF FOREIGN BOARDS OF TRADE § 48.10 Additional contracts. (a) Generally. A registered foreign board of trade that wishes to make an additional futures, option or swap contract available for trading...

  8. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  9. 20 CFR 802.215 - Additional briefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Additional briefs. 802.215 Section 802.215 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Prereview Procedures Initial Processing § 802.215 Additional briefs. Additional briefs may be filed or ordered in...

  10. 77 FR 49783 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 6/15/2012 (77 FR 35942-35944) and 6/22/2012 (77 FR 37659-37660), the Committee for... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  11. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  12. 20 CFR 802.215 - Additional briefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional briefs. 802.215 Section 802.215 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Prereview Procedures Initial Processing § 802.215 Additional briefs. Additional briefs may be filed or ordered in...

  13. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to determine... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section...

  14. 78 FR 9386 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 11/30/2012 (77 FR 71400-71401), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  15. 78 FR 45183 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 5/31/2013 (78 FR 32631-32632); 6/7/2013 (78 FR 34350-34351); and 6/14/2013 (78 FR... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  16. 34 CFR 75.231 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additional information. 75.231 Section 75.231 Education... Make A Grant § 75.231 Additional information. After selecting an application for funding, the Secretary may require the applicant to submit additional information. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1221e-3 and 3474)...

  17. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The... activity to submit additional information....

  18. 10 CFR 725.13 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional information. 725.13 Section 725.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Applications § 725.13 Additional information. The... and before the termination of the permit, require additional information in order to enable the...

  19. 10 CFR 725.13 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional information. 725.13 Section 725.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Applications § 725.13 Additional information. The... and before the termination of the permit, require additional information in order to enable the...

  20. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  1. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  2. 12 CFR 1249.19 - Additional provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional provisions. 1249.19 Section 1249.19 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY ENTERPRISES BOOK-ENTRY PROCEDURES § 1249.19 Additional provisions. (a) Additional requirements. In any case or any class of cases arising under this part, an Enterprise may require such...

  3. 75 FR 33269 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 4/9/2010 (75 FR 18164-18165), the Committee for Purchase From People Who... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  4. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  5. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  6. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  7. 7 CFR 1944.545 - Additional grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional grants. 1944.545 Section 1944.545...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants § 1944.545 Additional grants. An additional grant may be made to an applicant that has previously received a TSA grant and...

  8. 76 FR 18189 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 1/28/2011 (76 FR 5142-5143), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  9. 75 FR 4784 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 11/16/2009 (74 FR 58949-58950), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  10. 75 FR 54114 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 7/2/2010 (75 FR 38467-38468) and 7/9/2010 (75 FR 39497-39499), the... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  11. 77 FR 53180 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 6/15/2012 (77 FR 35942-35944) and 6/29/2012 (77 FR 38775-38776), the Committee for... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase from People who are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  12. 76 FR 19751 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 1/28/2011 (76 FR 5142-5143), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This...

  13. 17 CFR 48.10 - Additional contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Additional contracts. 48.10... FOREIGN BOARDS OF TRADE § 48.10 Additional contracts. (a) Generally. A registered foreign board of trade that wishes to make an additional futures, option or swap contract available for trading by...

  14. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition to those established in...

  15. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  16. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  17. 14 CFR 27.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional tests. 27.927 Section 27.927... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  18. 14 CFR 29.927 - Additional tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional tests. 29.927 Section 29.927... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.927 Additional tests. (a) Any additional dynamic, endurance, and operational tests, and vibratory investigations necessary to...

  19. 46 CFR 355.5 - Additional material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional material. 355.5 Section 355.5 Shipping... STATES CITIZENSHIP § 355.5 Additional material. If additional material is determined to be essential to clarify or support the evidence of U.S. citizenship, such material shall be furnished by...

  20. 28 CFR 80.16 - Additional requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additional requests. 80.16 Section 80.16 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.16 Additional requests. Additional requests for FCPA Opinions may be filed with the...