Science.gov

Sample records for additional basic research

  1. Fluency with Basic Addition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza-Kling, Gina

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, learning basic facts has focused on rote memorization of isolated facts, typically through the use of flash cards, repeated drilling, and timed testing. However, as many experienced teachers have seen, "drill alone does not develop mastery of single-digit combinations." In contrast, a fluency approach to learning basic addition…

  2. Basic research for environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a major environmental restoration effort to reduce the health and environmental risks resulting from past waste management and disposal practices at DOE sites. This report describes research needs in environmental restoration and complements a previously published document, DOE/ER-0419, Evaluation of Mid-to-Long Term Basic Research for Environmental Restoration. Basic research needs have been grouped into five major categories patterned after those identified in DOE/ER-0419: (1) environmental transport and transformations; (2) advanced sampling, characterization, and monitoring methods; (3) new remediation technologies; (4) performance assessment; and (5) health and environmental effects. In addition to basic research, this document deals with education and training needs for environmental restoration. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. [Basic research in pulmonology].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim

    2008-11-01

    This is a review of the articles dealing with basic science published in recent issues of Archivos de Bronconeumología. Of particular interest with regard to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were an article on extrapulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress and another on bronchial remodeling. The articles relating to asthma included a review on the use of drugs that block free immunoglobulin-E and an article about the contribution of experimental models to our knowledge of this disease. Two of the most interesting articles on the topic of lung cancer dealt with gene therapy and resistance to chemotherapy. Also notable were 2 studies that investigated ischemia-reperfusion injury. One evaluated tissue resistance to injury while the other analyzed the role played by interleukin-8 in this process. On the topic of pulmonary fibrosis, an article focused on potential biomarkers of progression and prognosis; others dealt with the contribution of experimental models to our understanding of this disorder and the fibrogenic role of transforming growth factor b. In the context of both sleep apnea syndrome and pulmonary infection, studies investigating the role of oxidative stress were published. Finally, 2 studies analyzed the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis and other pulmonary infections. PMID:19007569

  4. Science versus Basic Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelmann, Siegfried

    2008-01-01

    One goal of basic research in education is to identify the variables of effective instruction. As this pursuit has been conceived, however, its theoretical problems make it unlikely that the effort will provide a clear picture of instructional variables, their interactions, or the kind of teacher training that is implied by instructional variables.

  5. Basic research 1996 results (Gas Research Institute)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Recent results of the Gas Research Institute (GRI) Basic Research program are documented in this report with the purpose to account for the success of the past project. GRI Basic Research program is described as being mission directed because it focuses exclusively on improving gas technology and results oriented because all elements of the research program have defined goals and the performance of the research is judged in terms of these goals. Results are defined as technology transfers, that is, knowledge or procedures that are used outside the basic research arena, either in applied research and development (R&D) or in commercial practice. Beginning from 1981, 176 results have been documented. They are listed in Appendix A to this report. In 1996, GRI`s Basic research documented 16 results: five results were used in GRI`s applied R&D program, six in other applied R&D, and five in commercial practice. They support all three sectors of the gas industry: gas producers (nine results), pipelines (one result), and distributors (four results). Two results support all three sectors. This report describes the known direct uses of the Basic Research program results.

  6. 32 CFR 37.1240 - Basic research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Basic research. 37.1240 Section 37.1240 National... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1240 Basic research. Efforts..., Development, Test and Evaluation programs in Budget Activity 1, Basic Research (also known informally...

  7. 32 CFR 37.1240 - Basic research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Basic research. 37.1240 Section 37.1240 National... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1240 Basic research. Efforts..., Development, Test and Evaluation programs in Budget Activity 1, Basic Research (also known informally...

  8. 32 CFR 37.1240 - Basic research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Basic research. 37.1240 Section 37.1240 National... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1240 Basic research. Efforts..., Development, Test and Evaluation programs in Budget Activity 1, Basic Research (also known informally...

  9. Vacuum pyrolysis of waste tires with basic additives

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xinghua; Wang Tiejun Ma Longlong; Chang Jie

    2008-11-15

    Granules of waste tires were pyrolyzed under vacuum (3.5-10 kPa) conditions, and the effects of temperature and basic additives (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH) on the properties of pyrolysis were thoroughly investigated. It was obvious that with or without basic additives, pyrolysis oil yield increased gradually to a maximum and subsequently decreased with a temperature increase from 450 deg. C to 600 deg. C, irrespective of the addition of basic additives to the reactor. The addition of NaOH facilitated pyrolysis dramatically, as a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 48 wt% was achieved at 550 deg. C without the addition of basic additives, while a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 50 wt% was achieved at 480 deg. C by adding 3 wt% (w/w, powder/waste tire granules) of NaOH powder. The composition analysis of pyrolytic naphtha (i.b.p. (initial boiling point) {approx}205 deg. C) distilled from pyrolysis oil showed that more dl-limonene was obtained with basic additives and the maximal content of dl-limonene in pyrolysis oil was 12.39 wt%, which is a valuable and widely-used fine chemical. However, no improvement in pyrolysis was observed with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition. Pyrolysis gas was mainly composed of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Pyrolytic char had a surface area comparable to commercial carbon black, but its proportion of ash (above 11.5 wt%) was much higher.

  10. Synthesis of basic and overbasic sulfonate detergent additives

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El Naga, H.H.; Abd El-Azim, W.M.; Bendary, S.A.; Awad, N.G.

    1993-12-01

    Heavy alkylbenzene, which accumulates as a by-product from linear alkylbenzene synthesis, is evaluated as a starting material for preparation of basic and over basic sulfonate detergent additives. Chemical structure analysis showed that this by-product contains several components in different proportions. Most of these components, as traced via mass spectrometry, showed the presence of paraffinic side chains within the carbon range C{sub 11}--C{sub 22}. Accordingly, sulfonation conditions for it were adjusted to optimize the reaction yield and sulfonic quality. Neutralization of the sulfonic acid was carried out by adding CaO in the presence of methanol as a promoter. Preparation of over basic sulfonate was run via a carbonation process at 55--60 C. Evaluations of synthesized basic calcium sulfonate in comparison to a commercial additive is supported by its efficiency as a detergent additive. The synthesized product has a higher total base number and Ca content than those for the commercial one. On the other hand, evaluation of the synthesized overbasic calcium sulfonate compared with overbasic commercial additives with medium and high alkalinity indicated that the synthesized product can be classified as overbasic calcium sulfonate with medium alkalinity, good dispersive power, and detergent efficiency.

  11. Basic research in electronics (JSEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliner, A. A.

    1984-12-01

    This report presents a summary of the scientific progress and accomplishments on research projects funded by the Joint Services Electronics Program (JSEP) for the contract period from 1 April 1984 through 31 December 1984. It does not contain information regarding accomplishments on research projects funded in other ways. The Joint Services Electronics Program at the Polytechnic is the core of interdisciplinary research in electronics encompassing programs in the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Physics under the aegis of the Microwave Research Institute. The research encompassed by this program is grouped under three broad categories: Electromagnetics, Solid State Electronics and Information Electronics. The detailed projects (research units) comprising the complete program are listed in the Table of Contents.

  12. 32 CFR 37.1240 - Basic research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Basic research. 37.1240 Section 37.1240 National... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1240 Basic research. Efforts directed toward increasing knowledge and understanding in science and engineering, rather than...

  13. 32 CFR 37.1240 - Basic research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Basic research. 37.1240 Section 37.1240 National... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1240 Basic research. Efforts directed toward increasing knowledge and understanding in science and engineering, rather than...

  14. Basic Research and Progress against Pediatric Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An infographic about the importance of basic research for making progress against childhood cancers. The graphic shows the research milestones that led to the development and approval of Unituxin to treat neuroblastoma, a cancer seen mainly in children.

  15. Why Invest in Basic Cancer Research?

    Cancer.gov

    Image Description: An infographic about the importance of basic research for making progress against childhood cancers. The graphic shows the research milestones that led to the development and approval of the pediatric cancer treatment, Unituxin.

  16. The Basic Research Review Checklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Lynn; O'Conner, Mary; Shinkle, Susann; Thomas, Melissa K.

    2000-01-01

    Provides a checklist to help clinical nurses critique research in order to use findings in practice. Categories include purpose of study, statement of problem, literature review, methodology, results and conclusions, and overall concerns (objectivity, ethics, readability). (SK)

  17. Basic research in solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    heated at a 'basal' rate that is also found in the centers of solar supergranules, and using the Doppler-imaging technique to measure the position, size, and brightness of stellar active regions. We are computing multi-component models for solar and stellar atmospheres, and models for coronal loops and for the transition-region down flows. The study of solar and stellar flares permits us to assess the role of turbulent energy transport, to pinpoint the mechanism behind Type I radio bursts, to determine whether plasma radiation or cyclotron maser is responsible for microwave flares on M dwarfs, and to extend our knowledge of the basic physics pertinent to cyclotron-maser processes operating on the Sun.

  18. A Synthesis of Research in Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gow, Doris T.

    In this monograph research results of studies on the teaching of basic skills in elementary schools is synthesized with emphasis on the practical implications for actual practice in the classroom. Development of skills in reading and mathematics in the early grades is the focus. Four major factors in basic instruction are discussed. The importance…

  19. Effectiveness of the Touch Math Technique in Teaching Basic Addition to Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yikmis, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to reveal whether the touch math technique is effective in teaching basic addition to children with autism. The dependent variable of this study is the children's skills to solve addition problems correctly, whereas teaching with the touch math technique is the independent variable. Among the single-subject research models, a…

  20. Basic Research and Nuclear Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, G. E.

    2013-12-01

    We will address areas of new research that may be important to meeting current and anticipated future monitoring needs. We will highlight outstanding problems whose solutions would benefit monitoring, and new scientific results and applications that have advanced understanding and/or capability and provide a basis for further efforts. In the area of seismic source physics, field and laboratory experiments, numerical and theoretical work, and analyses of historical data have significantly advanced our understanding, although there is still not consensus regarding the mechanisms of seismic wave generation, especially shear waves, by explosions. Further advances may come from research that focuses on distinguishing between competing mechanisms and from innovative experiments that take advantage of new technology and methods, such as the use of massive numbers of sensors and the use of ambient noise correlations to better evaluate damage. Significant advances in signal and array processing methods have been made, yet more are needed, as magnitude thresholds decrease, since that leads to an exponential increase in the number of events that must be screened despite having fewer recordings and lower signal-to-noise ratios, with signals at predominantly at higher frequencies that are not coherent across regional arrays. This also drives the need for more accurate and higher resolution velocity, attenuation, and full waveform modeling as those feed into location, discrimination, and yield estimation. Better location algorithms and uncertainty estimates have been enabled by both theoretical advances and increased computing capacity. New approaches to separating source, path, and site effects and to the use of ambient noise have improved signal loss prediction, but that remains especially challenging for upper mantle phases, as insufficient sampling prevents straightforward separation of geometric spreading, intrinsic attenuation, and scattering effects. Finite frequency

  1. Basic Research in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handler, Philip

    1979-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the development of basic research in the U.S. since World War II. Topics include the creation of the federal agencies, physics and astronomy, chemistry, earth science, life science, the environment, and social science. (BB)

  2. Basic Research Needs for Countering Terrorism

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, W.; Michalske, T.; Trewhella, J.; Makowski, L.; Swanson, B.; Colson, S.; Hazen, T.; Roberto, F.; Franz, D.; Resnick, G.; Jacobson, S.; Valdez, J.; Gourley, P.; Tadros, M.; Sigman, M.; Sailor, M.; Ramsey, M.; Smith, B.; Shea, K.; Hrbek, J.; Rodacy, P.; Tevault, D.; Edelstein, N.; Beitz, J.; Burns, C.; Choppin, G.; Clark, S.; Dietz, M.; Rogers, R.; Traina, S.; Baldwin, D.; Thurnauer, M.; Hall, G.; Newman, L.; Miller, D.; Kung, H.; Parkin, D.; Shuh, D.; Shaw, H.; Terminello, L.; Meisel, D.; Blake, D.; Buchanan, M.; Roberto, J.; Colson, S.; Carling, R.; Samara, G.; Sasaki, D.; Pianetta, P.; Faison, B.; Thomassen, D.; Fryberger, T.; Kiernan, G.; Kreisler, M.; Morgan, L.; Hicks, J.; Dehmer, J.; Kerr, L.; Smith, B.; Mays, J.; Clark, S.

    2002-03-01

    To identify connections between technology needs for countering terrorism and underlying science issues and to recommend investment strategies to increase the impact of basic research on efforts to counter terrorism.

  3. Basic Energy Sciences FY 2011 Research Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    This report provides a collection of research abstracts for more than 1,300 research projects funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) in Fiscal Year 2011 at some 180 institutions across the U.S. This volume is organized along the three BES divisions: Materials Sciences and Engineering; Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences; and Scientific User Facilities.

  4. Basic Energy Sciences FY 2014 Research Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a collection of research abstracts and highlights for more than 1,200 research projects funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) in Fiscal Year 2014 at some 200 institutions across the U.S. This volume is organized along the three BES Divisions: Materials Sciences and Engineering; Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences; and Scientific User Facilities.

  5. Basic Energy Sciences FY 2012 Research Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a collection of research abstracts and highlights for more than 1,400 research projects funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) in Fiscal Year 2012 at some 180 institutions across the U.S. This volume is organized along the three BES Divisions: Materials Sciences and Engineering; Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences; and Scientific User Facilities.

  6. Basic and applied research on choice responding.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, W W; Mazur, J E

    1997-01-01

    Choice responding refers to the manner in which individuals allocate their time or responding among available response options. In this article, we first review basic investigations that have identified and examined variables that influence choice responding, such as response effort and reinforcement rate, immediacy, and quality. We then describe recent bridge and applied studies that illustrate how the results of basic research on choice responding can help to account for human behavior in natural environments and improve clinical assessments and interventions. PMID:9316255

  7. Peer review, basic research, and engineering: Defining a role for QA professionals in basic research environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1989-02-01

    Within the context of doing basic research, this paper seeks to answer four major questions: (1) What is the authority structure of science. (2) What is peer review. (3) Where is the interface between basic physics research and standard engineering. and (4) Given the conclusions to the first three questions, what is the role of the QA professional in a basic research environment like Fermilab. 23 refs.

  8. Basic and Applied Research on Environmental Decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, D. H.

    2006-12-01

    Societal use of well-understood physical or biological science generally involves social processes, including dissemination of the knowledge across society and modification of public policy and of group and individual behavior. The social processes are often poorly understood, from the standpoint of social science; thus, questions in applied natural science often give rise to fundamental questions within social science. For example, problems concerning communication of uncertain scientific information give rise to basic research about how conceptual frameworks (of both the recipients and the providers of such information) change, over the course of repeated attempts at communication. Our Center has been exposed to such communication problems, in several field projects, and this exposure has suggested fruitful new directions for our laboratory research on decision making. For example, we noted (as others have) that communication is often more effective when presented to a group of peers gathered in a familiar setting than to individuals. Among other observations, Orlove and his collaborators noted that Ugandan villagers gather in groups to hear radio broadcasts of climate forecasts together. What behavioral processes lead to more effective communication to groups? Does the social setting enhance individual learning? Does the group frame decision problems differently from the average individual member? Are individual goals modified by the group setting? All three of these processes may be important; we have results concerning each from our current laboratory experiments. I argue that these ideas also require major modification of current theories of decision making, and so are particularly fruitful for basic research in the Decision Sciences. Our experience has led us to emphasize the very close relation between basic and applied social research. We also believe that social-science students need much stronger education in natural sciences and/or engineering, in order

  9. Basic Skills in the Workplace: A Research Review. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, John

    This report analyzes recent English-language research on basic skills in the workplace. Part A, a thematic guide to the field, includes detailed references to publications listed in Part B. Section A1 indicates the scope. It defines basic skills and underlines the importance of other terms, especially key skills, information and communications…

  10. Basic research and Clinton's Technology Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Valerie

    References made by the Clinton administration to a National Technology Policy coupled with talk of technology transfer, manufacturing consortiums, and benchmarking have made many scientists uneasy about the security of basic research funding under the new regime. Adding to this uncertainty have been the efforts by the Senate and the House in both the 102nd and 103rd sessions of Congress to pass a Competitiveness Bill that includes a large increase in funding for commercialization programs administered by the U.S. Department of Commerce.The proposed large increase in R&D funding for the National Institute of Standards and Technology would probably mean flat funding or cuts for the R&D budgets of most other federally funded research programs (reminiscent of fiscal year 1993). Despite these unsubtle messages that applied research and planned development will be favored over fundamental scientific research, both George Brown (D-Calif.), chairman of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee, and Jack Gibbons, the president's new science and technology advisor, stated on February 23 that none of their proposed programs are in any way meant to detract from the country's basic scientific research efforts.

  11. 32 CFR 272.3 - Definition of basic research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Definition of basic research. 272.3 Section 272...) MISCELLANEOUS ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT OF BASIC RESEARCH BY THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE § 272.3 Definition of basic research. Basic research is systematic study directed toward greater knowledge or understanding...

  12. 32 CFR 272.3 - Definition of basic research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Definition of basic research. 272.3 Section 272...) MISCELLANEOUS ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT OF BASIC RESEARCH BY THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE § 272.3 Definition of basic research. Basic research is systematic study directed toward greater knowledge or understanding...

  13. 32 CFR 272.3 - Definition of basic research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definition of basic research. 272.3 Section 272...) MISCELLANEOUS ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT OF BASIC RESEARCH BY THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE § 272.3 Definition of basic research. Basic research is systematic study directed toward greater knowledge or understanding...

  14. 32 CFR 272.3 - Definition of basic research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definition of basic research. 272.3 Section 272...) MISCELLANEOUS ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT OF BASIC RESEARCH BY THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE § 272.3 Definition of basic research. Basic research is systematic study directed toward greater knowledge or understanding...

  15. Basic Science Research and the Protection of Human Research Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiseman, Elisa

    2001-03-01

    Technological advances in basic biological research have been instrumental in recent biomedical discoveries, such as in the understanding and treatment of cancer, HIV/AIDS, and heart disease. However, many of these advances also raise several new ethical challenges. For example, genetic research may pose no physical risk beyond that of obtaining the initial blood sample, yet it can pose significant psychological and economic risks to research participants, such as stigmatization, discrimination in insurance and employment, invasion of privacy, or breach of confidentiality. These harms may occur even when investigators do not directly interact with the person whose DNA they are studying. Moreover, this type of basic research also raises broader questions, such as what is the definition of a human subject, and what kinds of expertise do Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) need to review the increasingly diverse types of research made possible by these advances in technology. The National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC), a presidentially appointed federal advisory committee, has addressed these and other ethical, scientific and policy issues that arise in basic science research involving human participants. Two of its six reports, in particular, have proposed recommendations in this regard. "Research Involving Human Biological Materials: Ethical and Policy Guidance" addresses the basic research use of human tissues, cells and DNA and the protection of human participants in this type of research. In "Ethical and Policy Issues in the Oversight of Human Research" NBAC proposes a definition of research involving human participants that would apply to all scientific disciplines, including physical, biological, and social sciences, as well as the humanities and related professions, such as business and law. Both of these reports make it clear that the protection of research participants is key to conducting ethically sound research. By ensuring that all participants in

  16. Alternatives to animal experimentation in basic research.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Franz P; Hartung, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to animal testing required by law to guarantee minimum safety standards for the licensing of drugs and chemicals, there are no regulations in basic research forcing scientists to perform animal tests. By (usually) free choice, questions are posed and hypotheses are examined which, in many cases, can only be answered by means of animal tests. Just as easily, different questions could be asked or different hypotheses could be examined which do not require animal tests. The only criterion for the choice of a topic is its relevance which cannot necessarily be judged in the short-term. Thus, it is up to the individual scientist to judge what is worth studying and therefore worth animal consumption. The educated mind will consider ethical aspects of this choice. However, on the other hand, this decision is largely influenced by questions of efficacy or (in a negative sense) by the obstacles posed to an animal consuming approach. Here, peer review and general attitude will strongly influence the methodology chosen. Availability and awareness of adequate in vitro techniques represent the prerequisites for the use of alternative methods. The least one can do in basic research is to avoid tests which cause severe suffering to animals, as is required in Switzerland and other European countries by binding ethical principles and guidelines. The increasing standard of approval and control procedures has improved the situation over the years. There are many examples of successful alternative methods in basic research. But, the application of such methods is in most cases limited to the laboratories in which they were developed, calling for technology transfer. Exceptions are procedures that are used worldwide, like the production of monoclonal antibodies, which instead of using the ascites mouse can also be performed in vitro with some good will. In these cases, commercialisation of the techniques has aided their spread within the scientific community. Sadly, many

  17. [Basic research overview in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease with a prevalence of 0.5-1.0% worldwide. Although advances in understanding the pathogenesis of RA have led to new therapeutics with good outcomes, the real cause of the disease is still unknown. RA is characterized by synovial inflammation and hyperplasia, which erodes cartilage and bone, and autoantibody production (rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)). There are many critical questions on the mechanism of the disease onset and progression: How genetic and environmental factors interact with each other? Why does the inflammatory response localize in joints? What are the key players to perpetuate synovial inflammation? In this review, we summarize pathogenetic advances in these issues especially from the point of view of basic research.

  18. Basic research challenges in crystalline silicon photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, J.H.

    1995-08-01

    Silicon is abundant, non-toxic and has an ideal band gap for photovoltaic energy conversion. Experimental world record cells of 24 % conversion efficiency with around 300 {mu}m thickness are only 4 % (absolute) efficiency points below the theoretical Auger recombination-limit of around 28 %. Compared with other photovoltaic materials, crystalline silicon has only very few disadvantages. The handicap of weak light absorbance may be mastered by clever optical designs. Single crystalline cells of only 48 {mu}m thickness showed 17.3 % efficiency even without backside reflectors. A technology of solar cells from polycrystalline Si films on foreign substrates arises at the horizon. However, the disadvantageous, strong activity of grain boundaries in Si could be an insurmountable hurdle for a cost-effective, terrestrial photovoltaics based on polycrystalline Si on foreign substrates. This talk discusses some basic research challenges related to a Si based photovoltaics.

  19. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 9, Issue A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is a publication of the US Division of World Education, Inc. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. "Focus on Basics" is dedicated to connecting research with practice, to…

  20. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 9, Issue B

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is a publication of the U.S. Division of World Education, Inc. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. "Focus on Basics" is dedicated to connecting research with practice, to…

  1. The Committee on Basic Research in Education: A Four Year Tryout of Basic Science Funding Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, John B.; Suppes, Patrick

    1974-01-01

    Describes a Committee on Basic Research in Education that was formed in 1968 and that worked for four years in cooperation with the U. S. Office of Education to identify problems to be attacked by basic research in education and to develop and try out plans and procedures for stimulating and supporting such research. (Author/JM)

  2. Assuring both quality and creativity in basic research

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1990-04-12

    How does one assure that both quality and creativity are obtained in basic research environments QA theoreticians have attempted to develop workable definitions of quality, but in more reflective moments, these definitions often fail to capture the deeper essence of the idea of quality.'' This paper asserts that creativity (as a product of the human mind) is a concrete interface between perfunctory definitions of quality (conformance to specifications) and more philosophical speculations about the nature of quality- related ultimates'' like elegance or beauty. In addition, we describe the distinction between creative ideas and creative acts and highlight one of the major inhibitors of creativity, fear. Finally we show that highly creative people often have an irreverent attitude toward boundaries and established authority, and discuss how one can allow for this when designing a QA program in a basic research environment.

  3. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 6, Issue A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is the quarterly publication of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. "Focus on Basics" is dedicated to…

  4. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 8, Issue D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Learning disabilities is the theme of the latest issue of "Focus on Basics," the World Education publication that brings together research, policy, and practice in adult basic education. Starting with an update on research on neurobiology and dyslexia, this issue also examines how the adult basic education system supports students with learning…

  5. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 8, Issue A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is the quarterly publication of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. "Focus on Basics" is dedicated to…

  6. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 7, Issue D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is the quarterly publication of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. "Focus on Basics" is dedicated to…

  7. Is the use of sentient animals in basic research justifiable?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Animals can be used in many ways in science and scientific research. Given that society values sentient animals and that basic research is not goal oriented, the question is raised: "Is the use of sentient animals in basic research justifiable?" We explore this in the context of funding issues, outcomes from basic research, and the position of society as a whole on using sentient animals in research that is not goal oriented. We conclude that the use of sentient animals in basic research cannot be justified in light of society's priorities. PMID:20825676

  8. The Relationship between Basic and Applied Research in Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Peter James; Gulbrandsen, Magnus; Kyvik, Svein

    2015-01-01

    What is the central research activity in modern universities? This paper uses a comprehensive survey among individuals from 15 countries to map differences in orientation towards basic/fundamental research, applied/practical research and a combination of the two. Despite some claims in the literature that basic research is no longer a…

  9. Some Basic Techniques in Bioimpedance Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsen, Ørjan G.

    2004-09-01

    Any physiological or anatomical changes in a biological material will also change its electrical properties. Hence, bioimpedance measurements can be used for diagnosing or classification of tissue. Applications are numerous within medicine, biology, cosmetics, food industry, sports, etc, and different basic approaches for the development of bioimpedance techniques are discussed in this paper.

  10. Continued Viability of Universities as Centers for Basic Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lisle C., Jr.; And Others

    The findings and 13 recommendations of a NSF Advisory Council task force that evaluated universities as centers of basic research are presented. Listed are the major strengths of universities as centers for basic research (including continuity and tradition, freedom of research, interactions among disciplines) and such threats to their viability…

  11. Getting Back to the Basics of Survey Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbach, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    Because surveys now can be implemented with relative ease and little cost, many researchers are overlooking the basic principles of survey research. This chapter discusses sources of error that researchers should consider when conducting a survey, and gives readers basic suggestions for reducing error. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

  12. COBRE and the Dilemmas of Basic Research in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron

    1974-01-01

    Evaluates the activities of the Committee on Basic Research in Education (COBRE), pointing out that its work was based on the premises that basic research is oriented to the academic disciplines, that its outcomes are scientific knowledge as opposed to products or solutions, and that its outcomes are unpredictable. (Author/JM)

  13. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 8, Issue C

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is the quarterly publication of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. Articles appearing in this issue are: (1)…

  14. Engaging basic scientists in translational research: identifying opportunities, overcoming obstacles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This report is based on the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology’s symposium, “Engaging basic Scientists in Translational Research: Identifying Opportunities, Overcoming Obstacles,” held in Chevy Chase, MD, March 24–25, 2011. Meeting participants examined the benefits of engaging basic scientists in translational research, the challenges to their participation in translational research, and the roles that research institutions, funding organizations, professional societies, and scientific publishers can play to address these challenges. PMID:22500917

  15. Basic Research in Esthetic Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Frank

    This report reviews five current research projects in aesthetic education. Chapter 2 describes recent studies at the Institute of Personality Assessment and Research (IPAR) which relate aesthetics and creativity. Chapter 3 reviews measures of perceptual and cognitive performance; perceptual and aesthetic preference; and aesthetic interests,…

  16. Basic Research in Information Science in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambaud, S.; Le Coadic, Y. F.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the goals of French academic research policy in the field of information science, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of the field. Areas of research highlighted include communication, telecommunications, co-word analysis in scientific and technical documents, media, and statistical methods for the study of social sciences. (LRW)

  17. Basic Research: The Key to Economic Competitiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Erich

    Sustained investment in science and engineering research and education in universities in the United States is advocated as a means of progressing economically. Information related to economic advancement is provided through summaries of recent trends in research, education, and economics. Ideas and data are reviewed in reference to: (1) the need…

  18. Basic research supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.D.

    1995-08-01

    This presentation will outline the basic research activities of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) of the U.S. Department of Energy. The BES mission is to develop understanding and to stimulate innovative thinking needed to fortify the Department`s mission. Of particular focus in the presentation are the research programs, amounting to about $10 million, supported by the Materials Sciences Division and the Chemical Sciences Division which are fairly directly related to electrochemical technologies.

  19. Quality of life returns from basic research

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Assessing the consequences of research is an increasingly important task in research and innovation policy. This paper takes a broader view of those consequences than the conventional economic approach, placing researchers and their activities in the centre of the assessment process and examining results for professional practice and general education as well as contributions to knowledge. Methods The paper uses historical and documentary analysis to illustrate the approach, focusing on U.S. biomedicine over the past century. At aggregate level, the analysis attributes portions of the change in aggregate health indicators to research and research-based institutions, through several available types of logic: either through correlations between timing of institutional changes and changes in the indicators or through direct or indirect causal connections. Results The analysis shows that while biomedical research has certainly contributed to improved health in the United States, other factors have also contributed. In some ways the institutional structure of science-based medicine has worked against creating benefits for some groups in U.S. society. Conclusions The paper concludes with a call for more strategic attention to dimensions of impact other than knowledge outcomes and for participatory planning for research. PMID:20529279

  20. [Platforms are needed for innovative basic research in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-qiang

    2012-07-01

    Basic research poses the cornerstone of technical innovation in all lines including medical sciences. Currently, there are shortages of professional scientists as well as technical supporting teams and facilities in the field of basic research of ophthalmology and visual science in China. Evaluation system and personnel policies are not supportive for innovative but high-risk-of-failure research projects. Discussion of reasons and possible solutions are given here to address these problems, aiming at promoting buildup of platforms hosting novel and important basic research in eye science in this country.

  1. Basic research for the geodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Ivan I.

    1988-01-01

    Additional results are presented concerning a study that considers improvements over present Earth Rotation Parameter (ERP) determination methods by directly combining observations from various space geodetic systems in one adjustment. Earlier results are extended, showing that in addition to slight improvements in accuracy, substantial (a factor of three or more) improvements in precision and significant reductions in correlations between various parameters can be obtained (by combining Lunar Laser Ranging - LLR, Satellite Laser Ranging - SLR to Lageos, and Very Long Baseline Interferometry - VLBI data in one adjustment) as compared to results from individual systems. Smaller improvements are also seen over the weighted means of the individual system results. Although data transmission would not be significantly reduced, negligible additional computer time would be required if (standardized) normal equations were available from individual solutions. Suggestions for future work and implications for the New Earth Rotation Service (IERS) are also presented.

  2. Basic research for the geodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Laser systems deployed in satellite tracking were upgraded to accuracy levels where biases from systematic unmodelled effects constitute the basic factor that prohibits extraction of the full amount of information contained in the observations. Taking into consideration that the quality of the instrument advances at a faster pace compared to the understanding and modeling of the physical processes involved, one can foresee that in the near future when all lasers are replaced with third generation ones the limiting factor for the estimated accuracies will be the aforementioned biases. Therefore, for the reduction of the observations, methods should be deployed in such a way that the effect of the biases will be kept well below the noise level. Such a method was proposed and studied. This method consists of using the observed part of the satellite pass and converting the laser ranges into range differences in hopes that they will be less affected by biases in the orbital models, the reference system, and the observations themselves.

  3. Basic research for the geodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, I. I.

    1982-01-01

    Work performed and data obtained in geodynamic research is reported. The purpose was to obtain utilization of: (1) laser and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI); (2) range difference observation in geodynamics; (3) development of models for ice sheet and crustal deformations. The effects of adopting new precession, nutation and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame are investigated.

  4. Basic Project Management Methodologies for Survey Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Robert H.

    To be effective, project management requires a heavy dependence on the document, list, and computational capability of a computerized environment. Now that microcomputers are readily available, only the rediscovery of classic project management methodology is required for improved resource allocation in small research projects. This paper provides…

  5. Research on Basic Design Education: An International Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucharenc, C. G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a survey and qualitative analysis on the teaching of "Basic Design" in schools of design and architecture located in 22 countries. In the context of this research work, Basic Design means the teaching and learning of design fundamentals that may also be commonly referred to as the Principles of Two- and…

  6. The Effect Counting Speed Has on Developing a Reliance on Retrieval in Basic Addition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Sarah L.; Lawson, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    The inability to develop, strengthen, and access associations in memory that allow for the rapid and accurate retrieval of answers to basic addition problems is a distinguishing characteristic of a mathematics learning difficulty. The "two-factor theory of math fact learning" (Robinson, Menchetti, & Torgesen, 2002) proposes that a weakness in…

  7. What is Basic Research? Insights from Historical Semantics.

    PubMed

    Schauz, Désirée

    2014-01-01

    For some years now, the concept of basic research has been under attack. Yet although the significance of the concept is in doubt, basic research continues to be used as an analytical category in science studies. But what exactly is basic research? What is the difference between basic and applied research? This article seeks to answer these questions by applying historical semantics. I argue that the concept of basic research did not arise out of the tradition of pure science. On the contrary, this new concept emerged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a time when scientists were being confronted with rising expectations regarding the societal utility of science. Scientists used the concept in order to try to bridge the gap between the promise of utility and the uncertainty of scientific endeavour. Only after 1945, when United States science policy shaped the notion of basic research, did the concept revert to the older ideals of pure science. This revival of the purity discourse was caused by the specific historical situation in the US at that time: the need to reform federal research policy after the Second World War, the new dimension of ethical dilemmas in science and technology during the atomic era, and the tense political climate during the Cold War. PMID:25165404

  8. Carter Budget Tilts "Back to Basics" for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Allen L.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews the proposed 1979 federal budget for basic research for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Science Foundation (NSF), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Defense, and Department of Energy. (SL)

  9. Basic Research: Behavioral and Social Sciences. 1984 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Research Inst. for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, Alexandria, VA.

    This is the second annual report of the Army Research Institute's (ARI) basic research program. It describes the current focus of the program and the individual research efforts sponsored within each of the four principal thrust areas: ability assessment; instructional technology; cognitive processing limitations; and intelligent systems. In…

  10. Effect of basic and acidic additives on the separation of some basic drug enantiomers on polysaccharide-based chiral columns with acetonitrile as mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Gogaladze, Khatuna; Chankvetadze, Lali; Tsintsadze, Maia; Farkas, Tivadar; Chankvetadze, Bezhan

    2015-03-01

    The separation of enantiomers of 16 basic drugs was studied using polysaccharide-based chiral selectors and acetonitrile as mobile phase with emphasis on the role of basic and acidic additives on the separation and elution order of enantiomers. Out of the studied chiral selectors, amylose phenylcarbamate-based ones more often showed a chiral recognition ability compared to cellulose phenylcarbamate derivatives. An interesting effect was observed with formic acid as additive on enantiomer resolution and enantiomer elution order for some basic drugs. Thus, for instance, the enantioseparation of several β-blockers (atenolol, sotalol, toliprolol) improved not only by the addition of a more conventional basic additive to the mobile phase, but also by the addition of an acidic additive. Moreover, an opposite elution order of enantiomers was observed depending on the nature of the additive (basic or acidic) in the mobile phase.

  11. Boosting the U.S. economy with basic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    How healthy is U.S. basic research, and how can research improve the country's position in the global marketplace? Such questions were explored at a hearing held on June 20 by the House Science Committtee's subcommittee on science. Much of the outside witnesses' testimony called for better links between government, industry, and universities to improve the research enterprise.Erich Bloch, former director of the National Science Foundation and currently a Council on Competitiveness fellow, testified that the United States is slipping as a technological leader not because it lags in science and basic research, but because “we are trailing badly in our ability to translate basic research results and insights into commercial products.”

  12. Geographical and temporal distribution of basic research experiments in homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Jürgen; van Wijk, Roeland; Albrecht, Henning

    2014-07-01

    The database HomBRex (Homeopathy Basic Research experiments) was established in 2002 to provide an overview of the basic research already done on homeopathy (http://www.carstens-stiftung.de/hombrex). By this means, it facilitates the exploration of the Similia Principle and the working mechanism of homeopathy. Since 2002, the total number of experiments listed has almost doubled. The current review reports the history of basic research in homeopathy as evidenced by publication dates and origin of publications. In July 2013, the database held 1868 entries. Most publications were reported from France (n = 267), followed by Germany (n = 246) and India (n = 237). In the last ten years, the number of publications from Brazil dramatically increased from n = 13 (before 2004) to n = 164 (compared to n = 251 published in France before 2004, and n = 16 between 2004 and 2013). The oldest database entry was from Germany (1832).

  13. A case for more curiosity-driven basic research

    PubMed Central

    Amon, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Having been selected to be among the exquisitely talented scientists who won the Sandra K. Masur Senior Leadership Award is a tremendous honor. I would like to take this opportunity to make the case for a conviction of mine that I think many will consider outdated. I am convinced that we need more curiosity-driven basic research aimed at understanding the principles governing life. The reasons are simple: 1) we need to learn more about the world around us; and 2) a robust and diverse basic research enterprise will bring ideas and approaches essential for developing new medicines and improving the lives of humankind. PMID:26515972

  14. Basic research needed for stimulating the development of behavioral technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mace, F. Charles

    1994-01-01

    The costs of disconnection between the basic and applied sectors of behavior analysis are reviewed, and some solutions to these problems are proposed. Central to these solutions are collaborations between basic and applied behavioral scientists in programmatic research that addresses the behavioral basis and solution of human behavior problems. This kind of collaboration parallels the deliberate interactions between basic and applied researchers that have proven to be so profitable in other scientific fields, such as medicine. Basic research questions of particular relevance to the development of behavioral technologies are posed in the following areas: response allocation, resistance to change, countercontrol, formation and differentiation/discrimination of stimulus and response classes, analysis of low-rate behavior, and rule-governed behavior. Three interrelated strategies to build connections between the basic and applied analysis of behavior are identified: (a) the development of nonhuman animal models of human behavior problems using operations that parallel plausible human circumstances, (b) replication of the modeled relations with human subjects in the operant laboratory, and (c) tests of the generality of the model with actual human problems in natural settings. PMID:16812734

  15. Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J; DePaolo, Donald J.; Pietraß, Tanja

    2015-05-22

    From beneath the surface of the earth, we currently obtain about 80-percent of the energy our nation consumes each year. In the future we have the potential to generate billions of watts of electrical power from clean, green, geothermal energy sources. Our planet’s subsurface can also serve as a reservoir for storing energy produced from intermittent sources such as wind and solar, and it could provide safe, long-term storage of excess carbon dioxide, energy waste products and other hazardous materials. However, it is impossible to underestimate the complexities of the subsurface world. These complexities challenge our ability to acquire the scientific knowledge needed for the efficient and safe exploitation of its resources. To more effectively harness subsurface resources while mitigating the impacts of developing and using these resources, the U.S. Department of Energy established SubTER – the Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D Crosscut team. This DOE multi-office team engaged scientists and engineers from the national laboratories to assess and make recommendations for improving energy-related subsurface engineering. The SubTER team produced a plan with the overall objective of “adaptive control of subsurface fractures and fluid flow.”This plan revolved around four core technological pillars—Intelligent Wellbore Systems that sustain the integrity of the wellbore environment; Subsurface Stress and Induced Seismicity programs that guide and optimize sustainable energy strategies while reducing the risks associated with subsurface injections; Permeability Manipulation studies that improve methods of enhancing, impeding and eliminating fluid flow; and New Subsurface Signals that transform our ability to see into and characterize subsurface systems. The SubTER team developed an extensive R&D plan for advancing technologies within these four core pillars and also identified several areas where new technologies would require additional basic research

  16. Basic Research Needs for Carbon Capture: Beyond 2020

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, Paul; Buchanan, Michelle

    2010-03-04

    mimic those encountered in actual separation processes. Such tools are needed to examine interfaces and thin films at the atomic and molecular levels, achieving an atomic/molecular-scale understanding of gas–host structures, kinetics, and dynamics, and understanding and control of nanoscale synthesis in multiple dimensions. A second major crosscutting theme was the development of new computational tools for theory, modeling, and simulation of separation processes. Computational techniques can be used to elucidate mechanisms responsible for observed separations, predict new desired features for advanced separations materials, and guide future experiments, thus complementing synthesis and characterization efforts. These two crosscut areas underscored the fact that the challenge for future carbon capture technologies will be met only with multidisciplinary teams of scientists and engineers. In addition, it was noted that success in this fundamental research area must be closely coupled with successful applied research to ensure the continuing assessment and maturation of new technologies as they undergo scale-up and deployment. Carbon capture is a very rich scientific problem, replete with opportunity for basic researchers to advance the frontiers of science as they engage on one of the most important technical challenges of our times. This workshop report outlines an ambitious agenda for addressing the very difficult problem of carbon capture by creating foundational new basic science. This new science will in turn pave the way for many additional advances across a broad range of scientific disciplines and technology sectors.

  17. Basic introduction to research: how not to do research.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    In this didactic article, I review some prevalent "myths" about clinical research: anyone can do research; you can learn how to do research from a book or journal articles; all you need to do statistics is the right software (although Excel will also do); you can do good-quality research at your kitchen sink; and what is important is that you did your best. These myths appear to be particularly prevalent in the complementary and alternative medicine communities. They are based on a clear double standard: most clinicians would express shock and horror at the very thought that someone without appropriate clinical training and qualifications might treat a patient; meanwhile, many clinicians do research with no research qualifications whatsoever. But clinical research can guide clinical decisions that affect the health and well-being of millions of people: it is therefore arguable that poorly conducted research is potentially far more harmful than poor medical practice. As such, it is doubly important that clinical research is conducted by those with appropriate training, statistical help, and institutional support. PMID:18544288

  18. Applications of Functional Protein Microarrays in Basic and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The protein microarray technology provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds of thousands of proteins in a highly parallel and high-throughput manner. It is viewed as a new tool that overcomes the limitation of DNA microarrays. On the basis of its application, protein microarrays fall into two major classes: analytical and functional protein microarrays. In addition, tissue or cell lysates can also be directly spotted on a slide to form the so-called “reverse-phase” protein microarray. In the last decade, applications of functional protein microarrays in particular have flourished in studying protein function and construction of networks and pathways. In this chapter, we will review the recent advancements in the protein microarray technology, followed by presenting a series of examples to illustrate the power and versatility of protein microarrays in both basic and clinical research. As a powerful technology platform, it would not be surprising if protein microarrays will become one of the leading technologies in proteomic and diagnostic fields in the next decade. PMID:22989767

  19. The Idea of "Basic Research" in Language and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Today, there is increasing concern about the health of "basic research", yet considerable disagreement about its definition. This paper examines the way in which the term is used in everyday practice. Drawing upon interviews with British and American scientists and policy-makers, we identify six different definitions currently in use. Given the…

  20. Reducing Inequities by Linking Basic Research and Political Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehan, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    In this comment, on Terri McCarty's Presidential Address, I focus on her dynamic approach to investigation that contributes to a vibrant and constructively critical exploration of the place of basic research, critical policy analysis, and activism in the anthropology of education and the social sciences more broadly.

  1. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 272 - Principles for the Conduct and Support of Basic Research

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT OF BASIC RESEARCH BY THE... Research 1. Basic research is an investment. The DoD Components are to view and manage basic research... expectation that every individual research effort will succeed because basic research essentially is...

  2. The nuclear frontier; Cornell's program of basic and applied research

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.D. . Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the Program in Nuclear Science and Engineering at Cornell, an interdisciplinary field that encompasses a wide range of research. Some faculty members and graduate students are working on the basic physics of nuclei, plasmas, and atoms, while other are investigating the interaction of radiation with matter and the basic mechanisms of radiation-induced failure in microelectronic devices. Some are developing new research techniques based on nuclear and atomic interactions, and others are adapting nuclear methods such as activation analysis to research in geology, biology, and archaeology. Some are investigating advanced types of ion and electron beams, while yet others are improving the generation of power from fission and seeking to generate it from fusion.

  3. Basic Solar Energy Research in Japan (2011 EFRC Forum)

    ScienceCinema

    Domen, Kazunari (University of Tokyo)

    2016-07-12

    Kazunari Domen, Chemical System Engineering Professor at the University of Tokyo, was the second speaker in the May 26, 2011 EFRC Forum session, "Global Perspectives on Frontiers in Energy Research." In his presentation, Professor Domen talked about basic solar energy research in Japan. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  4. Basic Solar Energy Research in Japan (2011 EFRC Forum)

    SciTech Connect

    Domen, Kazunari

    2011-05-26

    Kazunari Domen, Chemical System Engineering Professor at the University of Tokyo, was the second speaker in the May 26, 2011 EFRC Forum session, "Global Perspectives on Frontiers in Energy Research." In his presentation, Professor Domen talked about basic solar energy research in Japan. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  5. JPL basic research review. [research and advanced development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Current status, projected goals, and results of 49 research and advanced development programs at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are reported in abstract form. Areas of investigation include: aerodynamics and fluid mechanics, applied mathematics and computer sciences, environment protection, materials science, propulsion, electric and solar power, guidance and navigation, communication and information sciences, general physics, and chemistry.

  6. Editorial - Proceedings on Basic Research on Ionic-Covalent Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-05-01

    The third symposium on Basic Research on Ionic-Covalent Materials for Nuclear Applications, originally initiated at the EMRS in Nice (May 2011), attracted 80 registered participants. During 4 days, 54 oral talks and 22 posters were presented. The overall high quality of the majority of the contributions was appreciated, in particular the great efforts of the invited speakers to convey their expertise in an excellent tutorial way.

  7. US nuclear reaction data program in support of basic research

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, M.R.; Chadwick, M.B.; Smith, M.S.

    1997-06-01

    Information about the US Nuclear Reaction Data Network (USNRDN) such as its members, work in progress, summaries of meetings, and organizational details may be found in its WWW Homepage. This paper is an overview of the data support provided by the network for basic research in nuclear astrophysics, radioactive ion beams, high energy heavy-ion and electron interactions and related activities involving all aspects of data stewardship.

  8. Asphalt and asphalt additives. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Contents: use of asphalt emulsions for in-place recycling: oregon experience; gap-graded cold asphalt concrete: benefits of polymer-modified asphalt cement and fibers; cold in-place recycling for rehabilitation and widening of low-volume flexible pavements in indiana; in situ cold recycling of bituminous pavements with polymer-modified high float emulsions; evaluation of new generation of antistripping additives; correlation between performance-related characteristics of asphalt cement and its physicochemical parameters using corbett's fractions and hpgc; reaction rates and hardening susceptibilities as determined from pressure oxygen vessel aging of asphalts; evaluation of aging characteristics of asphalts by using tfot and rtfot at different temperature levels; summary of asphalt additive performance at selected sites; relating asphalt absorption to properties of asphalt cement and aggregate; study of the effectiveness of styrene-butadiene rubber latex in hot mix asphalt mixes; stability of straight and polymer-modified asphalts.

  9. [Basic theory and research method of urban forest ecology].

    PubMed

    He, Xingyuan; Jin, Yingshan; Zhu, Wenquan; Xu, Wenduo; Chen, Wei

    2002-12-01

    With the development of world economy and the increment of urban population, the urban environment problem hinders the urban sustainable development. Now, more and more people realized the importance of urban forests in improving the quality of urban ecology. Therefore, a new subject, urban forest ecology, and correlative new concept frame in the field formed. The theoretic foundation of urban forest ecology derived from the mutual combination of theory relating to forest ecology, landscape ecology, landscape architecture ecology and anthrop-ecology. People survey the development of city from the view of ecosystem, and regard the environment, a colony of human, animals and plants, as main factors of the system. The paper introduces systematically the urban forest ecology as follows: 1) the basic concept of urban forest ecology; 2) the meaning of urban forest ecology; 3) the basic principle and theoretic base of urban forest ecology; 4) the research method of urban forest ecology; 5) the developmental expectation of urban forest ecology.

  10. The benefits of basic research: advances in reproductive physiology.

    PubMed

    1995-06-01

    At the Population Council's Center for Biomedical Research basic research is being conducted on the reproductive system with a view to develop new contraceptive and reproductive health technologies. Research in the Reproductive Physiology Program at the Center is carried out by reproductive endocrinologists, molecular biologists, and biochemists working in eight laboratories. In several of the laboratories the function of hormones that regulate spermatogenesis is studied. Scientists in Milan Bagchi's laboratory have developed a model system, composed of cellular components in a test tube, that allows them to study the full sequence of events involved in signal transduction. In James Catterall's laboratory, scientists study how androgens regulate sexual development at the molecular level. The steroid hormones cortisol and corticosterone play critical roles in mammalian fetal development. Scientists in several laboratories study the function of two specialized testicular cells: the Leydig and Sertoli cells. The Leydig cell synthesizes and secretes testosterone, an androgen that regulates spermatogenesis. The Sertoli cell maintains the environment in which spermatogenesis occurs. Researchers in Glen Gunsalus's laboratory study an androgen-binding protein secreted by the Sertoli cell. In collaboration with scientists at the Shanghai Research Center of Biotechnology, they used advanced genetic techniques to create a biologically active form of the protein in silk worm larvae. Scientists in Patricia Morris's laboratory recently identified molecular signals that control the interactions between developing sperm and Sertoli and Leydig cells. In the laboratory of David Phillips, scientists are investigating how the HIV virus penetrates the outer layer of cells in the genital tract and infects underlying cells. In 1994 a vaginally applied microbicide was developed that may inhibit infection by sexually transmitted diseases including HIV. Applications of basic research such

  11. TMS-EEG: From basic research to clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Pavon, Julio C.; Sarvas, Jukka; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.

    2014-11-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) combined with electroencephalography (EEG) is a powerful technique for non-invasively studying cortical excitability and connectivity. The combination of TMS and EEG has widely been used to perform basic research and recently has gained importance in different clinical applications. In this paper, we will describe the physical and biological principles of TMS-EEG and different applications in basic research and clinical applications. We will present methods based on independent component analysis (ICA) for studying the TMS-evoked EEG responses. These methods have the capability to remove and suppress large artifacts, making it feasible, for instance, to study language areas with TMS-EEG. We will discuss the different applications and limitations of TMS and TMS-EEG in clinical applications. Potential applications of TMS are presented, for instance in neurosurgical planning, depression and other neurological disorders. Advantages and disadvantages of TMS-EEG and its variants such as repetitive TMS (rTMS) are discussed in comparison to other brain stimulation and neuroimaging techniques. Finally, challenges that researchers face when using this technique will be summarized.

  12. Tissue fluid pressures - From basic research tools to clinical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Akeson, Wayne H.; Mubarak, Scott J.; Owen, Charles A.; Gershuni, David H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes clinical applications of two basic research tools developed and refined in the past 20 years: the wick catheter (for measuring tissue fluid pressure) and the colloid osmometer (for measuring osmotic pressure). Applications of the osmometer include estimations of the reduced osmotic pressure of sickle-cell hemoglobin with deoxygenation, and of reduced swelling pressure of human nucleus pulposus with hydration or upon action of certain enzymes. Clinical uses of the wick-catheter technique include an improvement of diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic compartment syndromes, the elucidation of the tissue pressure thresholds for neuromuscular dysfunction, and the development of a better tourniquet for orthopedics.

  13. SCIENCE INTERVIEW: China's Leader Commits to Basic Research, Global Science.

    PubMed

    2000-06-16

    SCIENCE INTERVIEW:China's Leader Commits to Basic Research, Global Science In an exclusive interview with Science, President Jiang Zemin offers a glimpse of a new China that is encouraging young scientists to use the Internet for their work--and reveals his secret past as a nuclear engineer. Alternately tough, charming, charismatic, and personally warm, Jiang makes clear in this interview that he is a pragmatist and is committed to major structural change. His comments are edited for brevity and include written answers to questions submitted prior to the interview. PMID:17835103

  14. Basic statistical tools in research and data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Zulfiqar; Bhaskar, S Bala

    2016-01-01

    Statistical methods involved in carrying out a study include planning, designing, collecting data, analysing, drawing meaningful interpretation and reporting of the research findings. The statistical analysis gives meaning to the meaningless numbers, thereby breathing life into a lifeless data. The results and inferences are precise only if proper statistical tests are used. This article will try to acquaint the reader with the basic research tools that are utilised while conducting various studies. The article covers a brief outline of the variables, an understanding of quantitative and qualitative variables and the measures of central tendency. An idea of the sample size estimation, power analysis and the statistical errors is given. Finally, there is a summary of parametric and non-parametric tests used for data analysis. PMID:27729694

  15. Hijacking of Basic Research: The Case of Synthetic Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Marusich, Julie A.; Huffman, John W.; Balster, Robert L.; Thomas, Brian F.

    2012-01-01

    Gathering and communicating knowledge are important aspects of the scientific endeavor. Yet presentation of data in public forums such as scientific meetings and publications makes it available not only to scientists, but also to others who may have different ideas about how to use research findings. A recent example of this type of hijacking is the introduction of synthetic cannabinoids that are sprayed on herbal products and subsequently smoked for their marijuana-like intoxicating properties. Originally developed for the legitimate research purpose of furthering understanding of the cannabinoid system, these synthetic cannabinoids are being abused worldwide, creating issues for regulatory and law enforcement agencies that are struggling to keep up with the growing number of compounds of various structural motifs. Basic and clinical scientists need to provide advice now to facilitate decision-making about the health threats posed by this emerging problem. PMID:23397508

  16. Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Gibala, R.; Zinkle, S.; Miller, J.R.; Pimblott, S.; Burns, C.; Raymond, K.; Grimes, R.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Clark, S.; Ewing, R.; Wagner, A.; Yip, S.; Buchanan, M.; Crabtree, G.; Hemminger, J.; Poate, J.; Miller, J.C.; Edelstein, N.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Gruzalski, G.; Michaels, G.; Morss, L.; Peters, M.; Talamini, K.

    2006-10-01

    The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularly related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X

  17. Assessment of basic research needs for greenhouse gas control technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.M.; Chandler, W.; Edmonds, J.; Houghton, J.; Levine, M.; Bates, L.; Chum, H.; Dooley, J.; Grether, D.; Logan, J.; Wiltsee, G.; Wright, L.

    1998-09-01

    This paper is an outgrowth of an effort undertaken by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research to assess the fundamental research needs to support a national program in carbon management. Five topics were identified as areas where carbon management strategies and technologies might be developed: (1) capture of carbon dioxide, decarbonization strategies, and carbon dioxide disposal and utilization; (2) hydrogen development and fuel cells; (3) enhancement of the natural carbon cycle; (4) biomass production and utilization; and (5) improvement of the efficiency of energy production, conversion, and utilization. Within each of these general areas, experts came together to identify targets of opportunity for fundamental research likely to lead to the development of mid- to long-term solutions for stabilizing or decreasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Basic research to support the options outlined above are far reaching-from understanding natural global processes such as the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles to development of new materials and concepts for chemical separation. Examples of fundamental research needs are described in this paper.

  18. Measuring Basic Needs Satisfaction: Evaluating Previous Research and Conducting New Psychometric Evaluations of the Basic Needs Satisfaction in General Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Mary M.; Finney, Sara J.

    2010-01-01

    Self-Determination Theory specifies the existence of three basic psychological needs: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. The current set of studies (a) provides a narrative review of past research on the Basic Needs Satisfaction in General Scale, (b) examines its dimensionality which has been assumed but not empirically studied, and (c)…

  19. Undergraduate Student Researchers, Preferred Learning Styles, and Basic Science Research: A Winning Combination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woeste, Lori A.; Barham, Beverly J.

    2007-01-01

    In basic science research, student researchers are often challenged with not only the technical portion of the research design but also the team dynamic. Understanding how a student prefers to learn can provide an advantage for mentors to better meet these challenges. In this article, the authors describe the experience of working with student…

  20. Bling My Research! A Mock Grant Panel Activity Illustrating the Importance of Basic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leander, Celeste A.; Whitton, Jeannette

    2010-01-01

    First-year university students have misconceptions about the source and dynamics of publicly funded research money. We designed an activity in which students take part in a mock grant panel. The results indicated a strong tendency toward student funding of applied medical research at the expense of basic research. Exposure to a few examples of…

  1. Connecting Science and Society: Basic Research in the Service of Social Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnert, Gerhard

    2007-03-01

    A flawed dichotomy of basic versus applied science (or of ``curiosity-driven'' vs. ``mission-oriented'' science) pervades today's thinking about science policy. This talk argues for the addition of a third mode of scientific research, called Jeffersonian science. Whereas basic science, as traditionally understood, is a quest for the unknown regardless of societal needs, and applied science is known science applied to known needs, Jeffersonian science is the quest for the unknown in the service of a known social need. It is research in an identified area of basic scientific ignorance that lies at the heart of a social problem. The talk discusses the conceptual foundations and then provides some case examples of Jeffersonian-type science initiatives, such as the Lewis and Clark Expedition, initiated by Thomas Jefferson (which led us to call this mode of research Jeffersonian), research conducted under the auspices of the National Institutes of Health, and a science policy project by President Jimmy Carter and his Science Adviser, Frank Press, in the late 1970s. Because the concept of Jeffersonian science explicitly ties basic research to the social good, one of the potential benefits of adding a Jeffersonian dimension to our thinking about science is that it might make science careers more attractive to women and underrepresented minorities.

  2. Gene Silencing in Crustaceans: From Basic Research to Biotechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Sagi, Amir; Manor, Rivka; Ventura, Tomer

    2013-01-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) is gaining momentum for crustaceans, both in basic research and for commercial development. RNAi has proven instrumental in a growing number of crustacean species, revealing the functionality of novel crustacean genes essential among others to development, growth, metabolism and reproduction. Extensive studies have also been done on silencing of viral transcripts in crustaceans, contributing to the understanding of the defense mechanisms of crustaceans and strategies employed by viruses to overcome these. The first practical use of gene silencing in aquaculture industry has been recently achieved, through manipulation of a crustacean insulin-like androgenic gland hormone. This review summarizes the advancements in the use of RNAi in crustaceans, and assesses the advantages of this method, as well as the current hurdles that hinder its large-scale practice. PMID:24705266

  3. CD30: from basic research to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Muta, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    The FDA recently approved an agonistic anti-CD30 drug conjugate, Brentuximab vedotin, for the treatment for CD30-positive lymphomas. The potent clinical activity of Brentuximab vedotin in Hodgkin’s lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma was greeted with great enthusiasm by oncologists as it provided a new treatment modality for these diseases. In this review, we will describe how we obtained the hybridoma by pursuing a basic research experiment unrelated to CD30. I will also review what we know about the normal biological functions of CD30 that were studied primarily in murine models of disease but also in patients. The picture emerging is that one of the primary functions of CD30 is the control of memory cells providing costimulation and trafficking information or inducing apoptosis in a microenvironment and cytokine milieu-dependent manner. PMID:24233555

  4. Science Serving the Nation: The Impact of Basic Research

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-01-01

    Impacts: The BES program supports basic research that underpins a broad range of energy technologies. Research in materials sciences and engineering leads to the development of materials that improve the efficiency, economy, environmental acceptability, and safety of energy generation, conversion, transmission, storage, and use. For example, advances in superconductivity have been introduced commercially in a number of demonstration projects around the country. Improvements in alloy design for high temperature applications are used in commercial furnaces and in green technologies such as lead-free solder. Research in chemistry has led to advances such as efficient combustion systems with reduced emissions of pollutants; new solar photoconversion processes; improved catalysts for the production of fuels and chemicals; and better separations and analytical methods for applications in energy processes, environmental remediation, and waste management. Research in geosciences results in advanced monitoring and measurement techniques for reservoir definition and an understanding of the fluid dynamics of complex fluids through porous and fractured subsurface rock. Research in the molecular and biochemical nature of photosynthesis aids the development of solar photo-energy conversion. The BES program also plays a major role in enabling the nanoscale revolution. The importance of nanoscience to future energy technologies is clearly reflected by the fact that all of the elementary steps of energy conversion (e.g., charge transfer, molecular rearrangement, and chemical reactions) take place on the nanoscale. The development of new nanoscale materials, as well as the methods to characterize, manipulate, and assemble them, create an entirely new paradigm for developing new and revolutionary energy technologies.

  5. Basic Requirements for Systems Software Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuszmaul, Chris; Nitzberg, Bill

    1996-01-01

    Our success over the past ten years evaluating and developing advanced computing technologies has been due to a simple research and development (R/D) model. Our model has three phases: (a) evaluating the state-of-the-art, (b) identifying problems and creating innovations, and (c) developing solutions, improving the state- of-the-art. This cycle has four basic requirements: a large production testbed with real users, a diverse collection of state-of-the-art hardware, facilities for evalua- tion of emerging technologies and development of innovations, and control over system management on these testbeds. Future research will be irrelevant and future products will not work if any of these requirements is eliminated. In order to retain our effectiveness, the numerical aerospace simulator (NAS) must replace out-of-date production testbeds in as timely a fashion as possible, and cannot afford to ignore innovative designs such as new distributed shared memory machines, clustered commodity-based computers, and multi-threaded architectures.

  6. Aluminum bioavailability from basic sodium aluminum phosphate, an approved food additive emulsifying agent, incorporated in cheese.

    PubMed

    Yokel, Robert A; Hicks, Clair L; Florence, Rebecca L

    2008-06-01

    Oral aluminum (Al) bioavailability from drinking water has been previously estimated, but there is little information on Al bioavailability from foods. It was suggested that oral Al bioavailability from drinking water is much greater than from foods. The objective was to further test this hypothesis. Oral Al bioavailability was determined in the rat from basic [26Al]-sodium aluminum phosphate (basic SALP) in a process cheese. Consumption of approximately 1g cheese containing 1.5% or 3% basic SALP resulted in oral Al bioavailability (F) of approximately 0.1% and 0.3%, respectively, and time to maximum serum 26Al concentration (Tmax) of 8-9h. These Al bioavailability results were intermediate to previously reported results from drinking water (F approximately 0.3%) and acidic-SALP incorporated into a biscuit (F approximately 0.1%), using the same methods. Considering the similar oral bioavailability of Al from food vs. water, and their contribution to the typical human's daily Al intake ( approximately 95% and 1.5%, respectively), these results suggest food contributes much more Al to systemic circulation, and potential Al body burden, than does drinking water. These results do not support the hypothesis that drinking water provides a disproportionate contribution to total Al absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract.

  7. Effective poultry programming in the next century. Poultry research: basic versus applied.

    PubMed

    Beard, C W

    1999-05-01

    The debate over the relative merit of basic vs applied research has been going on for as long as there has been research. This debate could be resolved in many instances by better communication so that those who question the need for basic studies can see how basic findings can contribute directly and indirectly to the resolution of real problems. Applied research directed at problem-solving is usually dependent upon those facts that have been revealed by basic researchers. This is a debate that should be set aside. The poultry industry must have contributions from both the basic and applied researchers to remain competitive and produce those products society depends upon.

  8. Neurostimulation in Alzheimer's disease: from basic research to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Tezzon, Frediano; Christova, Monica; Schwenker, Kerstin; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen; Brigo, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The development of different methods of brain stimulation provides a promising therapeutic tool with potentially beneficial effects on subjects with impaired cognitive functions. We performed a systematic review of the studies published in the field of neurostimulation in Alzheimer's disease (AD), from basic research to clinical applications. The main methods of non-invasive brain stimulation are repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. Preliminary findings have suggested that both techniques can enhance performances on several cognitive functions impaired in AD. Another non-invasive emerging neuromodulatory approach, the transcranial electromagnetic treatment, was found to reverse cognitive impairment in AD transgenic mice and even improves cognitive performance in normal mice. Experimental studies suggest that high-frequency electromagnetic fields may be critically important in AD prevention and treatment through their action at mitochondrial level. Finally, the application of a widely known invasive technique, the deep brain stimulation (DBS), has increasingly been considered as a therapeutic option also for patients with AD; it has been demonstrated that DBS of fornix/hypothalamus and nucleus basalis of Meynert might improve or at least stabilize cognitive functioning in AD. Initial encouraging results provide support for continuing to investigate non-invasive and invasive brain stimulation approaches as an adjuvant treatment for AD patients. PMID:25721941

  9. Muscle wasting: an overview of recent developments in basic research.

    PubMed

    Palus, Sandra; von Haehling, Stephan; Springer, Jochen

    2014-10-20

    The syndrome of cachexia, i.e. involuntary weight loss in patients with underlying diseases, sarcopenia, i.e. loss of muscle mass due to ageing, and general muscle atrophy from disuse and/or prolonged bed rest have received more attention over the last decades. All lead to a higher morbidity and mortality in patients and therefore, they represent a major socio-economic burden for the society today. This mini-review looks at recent developments in basic research that are relevant to the loss of skeletal muscle. It aims to cover the most significant publication of last three years on the causes and effects of muscle wasting, new targets for therapy development and potential biomarkers for assessing skeletal muscle mass. The targets include 1) E-3 ligases: TRIM32, SOCS1 and SOCS3 by involving the elongin BC ubiquitin-ligase, Cbl-b, culling 7, Fbxo40, MG53 (TRIM72) and the mitochondrial Mul1, 2) the kinase MST1 and 3) the G-protein Gαi2. D(3)-creatine has the potential to be used as a novel biomarker that allows to monitor actual change in skeletal muscle mass over time. In conclusion, significant development efforts are being made by academic groups as well as numerous pharmaceutical companies to identify new targets and biomarkers muscle, as muscle wasting represents a great medical need, but no therapies have been approved in the last decades. PMID:25205489

  10. Muscle wasting: an overview of recent developments in basic research.

    PubMed

    Palus, Sandra; von Haehling, Stephan; Springer, Jochen

    2014-09-01

    The syndrome of cachexia, i.e., involuntary weight loss in patients with underlying diseases, sarcopenia, i.e., loss of muscle mass due to aging, and general muscle atrophy from disuse and/or prolonged bed rest have received more attention over the last decades. All lead to a higher morbidity and mortality in patients, and therefore, they represent a major socio-economic burden for the society today. This mini-review looks at recent developments in basic research that are relevant to the loss of skeletal muscle. It aims to cover the most significant publication of last 3 years on the causes and effects of muscle wasting, new targets for therapy development, and potential biomarkers for assessing skeletal muscle mass. The targets include the following: (1) E-3 ligases TRIM32, SOCS1, and SOCS3 by involving the elongin BC ubiquitin-ligase, Cbl-b, culling 7, Fbxo40, MG53 (TRIM72), and the mitochondrial Mul1; (2) the kinase MST1; and (3) the G-protein Gαi2. D(3)-creatine has the potential to be used as a novel biomarker that allows to monitor actual change in skeletal muscle mass over time. In conclusion, significant development efforts are being made by academic groups as well as numerous pharmaceutical companies to identify new target and biomarker muscles, as muscle wasting represents a great medical need, but no therapies have been approved in the last decades. PMID:25163459

  11. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research and Practice. Volume 6, Issue D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL), Harvard University, 2004

    2004-01-01

    "Focus on Basics" is the quarterly publication of the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy. It presents best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policymakers. "Focus on Basics" is dedicated to…

  12. To a young basic scientist, about to embark on a program of translational research.

    PubMed

    Critchfield, Thomas S

    2011-01-01

    From recent commentaries about the role of basic behavior scientists in translational research, I distill some advice to young investigators who seek to apply their basic science training to translational studies. Among the challenges are (a) devising use-inspired research programs that complement, and are not redundant with, existing efforts in basic and applied behavior analysis; and (b) making tactical decisions, such as the selection of methods and collaborators, based on the research topic rather than, necessarily, the existing traditions in behavioral research. Finally, it must be recognized that although use-inspired basic research has the potential to attract support to basic laboratories and contribute to "saving the world," neither of these outcomes is guaranteed. I discuss the relative risks for basic scientists who proceed with use-inspired basic research rather than ignore such translational questions.

  13. Our Natural Resources: Basic Research Needs in Forestry and Renewable Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Task Force on Basic Research in Forestry and Renewable Natural Resources.

    This report examines basic research needs in forestry and renewable natural resources and determines benefits to be gained from greater investments in basic research. It was prepared by a group of 17 research scientists, each an accomplished investigator in one or more fields. Each contributor reflected on research needs within his own discipline…

  14. Curricular Approaches to Connecting Subtraction to Addition and Fostering Fluency with Basic Differences in Grade 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroody, Arthur J.

    2016-01-01

    Six widely used US Grade 1 curricula do not adequately address the following three developmental prerequisites identified by a proposed learning trajectory for the meaningful learning of the subtraction-as-addition strategy (e.g., for 13-8 think "what + 8 = 13?"): (a) reverse operations (adding 8 is undone by subtracting 8); (b) common…

  15. Materials Issues in Advanced Nuclear Systems: Executive Summary of DOE Basic Research Needs Workshop, "Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems"

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, James B; Diaz de la Rubia, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    This article is reproduced from excerpts from the Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, U.S. Department of Energy, October 2006, www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/files/ANES_rpt.pdf.

  16. Increasing the public health potential of basic research and the scientist satisfaction. An international survey of bioscientists.

    PubMed

    Scita, Giorgio; Sorrentino, Carmen; Boggio, Andrea; Hemenway, David; Ballabeni, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Basic scientific research generates knowledge that has intrinsic value which is independent of future applications. Basic research may also lead to practical benefits, such as a new drug or diagnostic method.  Building on our previous study of basic biomedical and biological researchers at Harvard, we present findings from a new survey of similar scientists from three countries.  This survey asked about the scientists' motivations, goals and perspectives along with their attitudes concerning  policies designed to increase both the practical (i.e. public health) benefits of basic research as well as their own personal satisfaction. Close to 900 basic investigators responded to the survey; results corroborate the main findings from the previous survey of Harvard scientists.  In addition, we find that most bioscientists disfavor present policies that require a discussion of the public health potential of their proposals in grants but generally favor softer policies aimed at increasing the quality of work and the potential practical benefits of basic research. In particular, bioscientists are generally supportive of those policies entailing the organization of more meetings between scientists and the general public, the organization of more academic discussion about the role of scientists in the society, and the implementation of a "basic bibliography" for each new approved drug.

  17. Increasing the public health potential of basic research and the scientist satisfaction. An international survey of bioscientists.

    PubMed

    Scita, Giorgio; Sorrentino, Carmen; Boggio, Andrea; Hemenway, David; Ballabeni, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Basic scientific research generates knowledge that has intrinsic value which is independent of future applications. Basic research may also lead to practical benefits, such as a new drug or diagnostic method.  Building on our previous study of basic biomedical and biological researchers at Harvard, we present findings from a new survey of similar scientists from three countries.  This survey asked about the scientists' motivations, goals and perspectives along with their attitudes concerning  policies designed to increase both the practical (i.e. public health) benefits of basic research as well as their own personal satisfaction. Close to 900 basic investigators responded to the survey; results corroborate the main findings from the previous survey of Harvard scientists.  In addition, we find that most bioscientists disfavor present policies that require a discussion of the public health potential of their proposals in grants but generally favor softer policies aimed at increasing the quality of work and the potential practical benefits of basic research. In particular, bioscientists are generally supportive of those policies entailing the organization of more meetings between scientists and the general public, the organization of more academic discussion about the role of scientists in the society, and the implementation of a "basic bibliography" for each new approved drug. PMID:27347372

  18. Increasing the public health potential of basic research and the scientist satisfaction. An international survey of bioscientists

    PubMed Central

    Scita, Giorgio; Sorrentino, Carmen; Boggio, Andrea; Hemenway, David; Ballabeni, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Basic scientific research generates knowledge that has intrinsic value which is independent of future applications. Basic research may also lead to practical benefits, such as a new drug or diagnostic method.  Building on our previous study of basic biomedical and biological researchers at Harvard, we present findings from a new survey of similar scientists from three countries.  This survey asked about the scientists’ motivations, goals and perspectives along with their attitudes concerning  policies designed to increase both the practical (i.e. public health) benefits of basic research as well as their own personal satisfaction. Close to 900 basic investigators responded to the survey; results corroborate the main findings from the previous survey of Harvard scientists.  In addition, we find that most bioscientists disfavor present policies that require a discussion of the public health potential of their proposals in grants but generally favor softer policies aimed at increasing the quality of work and the potential practical benefits of basic research. In particular, bioscientists are generally supportive of those policies entailing the organization of more meetings between scientists and the general public, the organization of more academic discussion about the role of scientists in the society, and the implementation of a “basic bibliography” for each new approved drug. PMID:27347372

  19. Citation Analysis May Severely Underestimate the Impact of Clinical Research as Compared to Basic Research

    PubMed Central

    van Eck, Nees Jan; Waltman, Ludo; van Raan, Anthony F. J.; Klautz, Robert J. M.; Peul, Wilco C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Citation analysis has become an important tool for research performance assessment in the medical sciences. However, different areas of medical research may have considerably different citation practices, even within the same medical field. Because of this, it is unclear to what extent citation-based bibliometric indicators allow for valid comparisons between research units active in different areas of medical research. Methodology A visualization methodology is introduced that reveals differences in citation practices between medical research areas. The methodology extracts terms from the titles and abstracts of a large collection of publications and uses these terms to visualize the structure of a medical field and to indicate how research areas within this field differ from each other in their average citation impact. Results Visualizations are provided for 32 medical fields, defined based on journal subject categories in the Web of Science database. The analysis focuses on three fields: Cardiac & cardiovascular systems, Clinical neurology, and Surgery. In each of these fields, there turn out to be large differences in citation practices between research areas. Low-impact research areas tend to focus on clinical intervention research, while high-impact research areas are often more oriented on basic and diagnostic research. Conclusions Popular bibliometric indicators, such as the h-index and the impact factor, do not correct for differences in citation practices between medical fields. These indicators therefore cannot be used to make accurate between-field comparisons. More sophisticated bibliometric indicators do correct for field differences but still fail to take into account within-field heterogeneity in citation practices. As a consequence, the citation impact of clinical intervention research may be substantially underestimated in comparison with basic and diagnostic research. PMID:23638064

  20. Michael Additions of Highly Basic Enolates to ortho-Quinone Methides

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Robert S.; Garza, Christopher J.; Dang, Ann T.; Pedro, Te Kie A.; Chain, William J.

    2015-01-01

    A protocol by which ketone or ester enolates and ortho-quinone methides (o-QMs) are generated in situ in a single reaction flask from silylated precursors under the action of anhydrous fluoride is reported. The reaction partners are joined to give a variety of β-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-carbonyl compounds in 32–94% yield in a single laboratory operation. The intermediacy of o-QMs is supported by control experiments utilizing enolate precursors and conventional alkyl halides as competitive alkylating agents and the isolation of 1,5-dicarbonyl products resulting from conjugate additions that do not restore the aromatic system. PMID:25906358

  1. Michael Additions of Highly Basic Enolates to ortho-Quinone Methides.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Robert S; Garza, Christopher J; Dang, Ann T; Pedro, Te Kie A; Chain, William J

    2015-05-01

    A protocol by which ketone or ester enolates and ortho-quinone methides (o-QMs) are generated in situ in a single reaction flask from silylated precursors under the action of anhydrous fluoride is reported. The reaction partners are joined to give a variety of β-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-carbonyl compounds in 32-94% yield in a single laboratory operation. The intermediacy of o-QMs is supported by control experiments utilizing enolate precursors and conventional alkyl halides as competitive alkylating agents and the isolation of 1,5-dicarbonyl products resulting from conjugate additions that do not restore the aromatic system.

  2. Cluster: Drafting. Course: Basic Technical Drafting. Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford - Lee County Schools, NC.

    The set of six units is designed for use with an instructor in basic technical drafting and is also keyed to other texts. Each unit contains several task packages specifying prerequisites, rationale for learning, objectives, learning activities to be supervised by the instructor, and learning practice. The units cover: pictorial drawing; screw…

  3. Information Sources for Research in Urbanology: A Basic Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmack, Norma J.

    This annotated bibliography lists basic reference sources in the Urban Studies field contained in the library of Trinity University. Materials are divided into seven categories: (1) indexes and abstracts; (2) bibliographies; (3) dissertations and theses; (4) atlases, encyclopedias, and dictionaries; (5) directories, handbooks, and guides; (6)…

  4. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 272 - Principles for the Conduct and Support of Basic Research

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... those agencies' investments as appropriate. 5. Merit review is used to select basic research projects... Research A Appendix A to Part 272 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT OF BASIC RESEARCH BY...

  5. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 272 - Principles for the Conduct and Support of Basic Research

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... those agencies' investments as appropriate. 5. Merit review is used to select basic research projects... Research A Appendix A to Part 272 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT OF BASIC RESEARCH BY...

  6. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 272 - Principles for the Conduct and Support of Basic Research

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... those agencies' investments as appropriate. 5. Merit review is used to select basic research projects... Research A Appendix A to Part 272 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT OF BASIC RESEARCH BY...

  7. "New Basic Education" and Me--Retrospective Notes from the Past Ten Years of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Lan

    2009-01-01

    Initiated in September 1994, "New Basic Education" first underwent a five-year Exploratory Research phase from September 1994 to May 1999, which was followed by a second five-year Developmental Research phase from September 1999 to May 2004. Thus during the past ten years, "New Basic Education" has undergone a complete research process, including…

  8. The mismatch negativity (MMN) in basic research of central auditory processing: a review.

    PubMed

    Näätänen, R; Paavilainen, P; Rinne, T; Alho, K

    2007-12-01

    In the present article, the basic research using the mismatch negativity (MMN) and analogous results obtained by using the magnetoencephalography (MEG) and other brain-imaging technologies is reviewed. This response is elicited by any discriminable change in auditory stimulation but recent studies extended the notion of the MMN even to higher-order cognitive processes such as those involving grammar and semantic meaning. Moreover, MMN data also show the presence of automatic intelligent processes such as stimulus anticipation at the level of auditory cortex. In addition, the MMN enables one to establish the brain processes underlying the initiation of attention switch to, conscious perception of, sound change in an unattended stimulus stream.

  9. Biobased Polyamides: Recent Advances in Basic and Applied Research.

    PubMed

    Winnacker, Malte; Rieger, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Polyamides represent a very important class of polymers for a wide range of applications. After establishing in the 1930s with Nylon and Perlon, their impact on many branches has been continuously growing. In the context of developing sustainable polymers from renewable resources, many polyamides have meanwhile been described, which are based on natural building blocks. In addition to their sustainability, these biobased starting materials can provide special structural features to the resulting polymers and their properties, e.g., side groups, functionalities, or stereoinformation. While some biopolyamides are known for decades and well established (e.g., PA-11, Rilsan), many other promising candidates have been described in fundamental research studies, which have high potential but whose capability-especially for large scale and/or high-performance materials-will have to be proved in the future. Other candidates are very interesting from a scientific point of view, but with less potential for a market establishment due to price and/or feasibility reasons. This article aims at collating the recent developments in the field of biopolyamides and elucidating their properties and potential for different applications. PMID:27457825

  10. AB017. Basic research progress in microenergy medicine

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Zhongcheng

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, the convergence of life sciences, physical sciences, and engineering has brought a host of opportunities and innovations for biomedical informatics and health care in microenergy medicine, and it is called the third revolution in the field of life science research. Low-energy shock wave therapy (LESWT), a form of physical therapy in energy medicine, was shown to markedly improve erectile function in patients with organic ED, as well as in diabetic rats. In addition, LESWT has been demonstrated to facilitate elongation of myelinated axons, with consequent neurologic functional recovery in a rat model. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is a form of ultrasound that delivered at a much lower intensity than traditional ultrasound energy and output in the mode of pulse wave. LIPUS have been demonstrated to have a rage of biological effects on tissues, including promoting bone-fracture healing, accelerating soft-tissue regeneration, inhibiting inflammatory responses and so on. Recent studies showed that biological effects of LIPUS in healing morbid body tissues may be mainly associated with the upregulation of cell proliferation and promoting multilineage differentiation of mesenchyme stem/progenitor cell lines. Therapeutic magnetic field, a good paradigm of convergence medicine, has been demonstrated to have beneficial results in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), human breast carcinoma, peripheral nerve regeneration, hand osteoarthritis, osteonecrosis, and nucleic acid delivery. Magnetic field has been proven to be a safe, non-invasive method for numerous cell and tissue modifications, especially in musculoskeletal system.

  11. Basic Research in Orbital Debris Detection and Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culp, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    The research conducted under NASA Research Grant has been reported periodically throughout the duration of this grant. This research has been coordinated with the work supported by NASA Graduate Student Research Grant awarded to further the graduate doctoral program of Kira Jorgensen. This work will continue through the completion of Kira Jorgensen's Ph.D. program in May, 2000.

  12. An international basic science and clinical research summer program for medical students.

    PubMed

    Ramjiawan, Bram; Pierce, Grant N; Anindo, Mohammad Iffat Kabir; Alkukhun, Abedalrazaq; Alshammari, Abdullah; Chamsi, Ahmad Talal; Abousaleh, Mohannad; Alkhani, Anas; Ganguly, Pallab K

    2012-03-01

    An important part of training the next generation of physicians is ensuring that they are exposed to the integral role that research plays in improving medical treatment. However, medical students often do not have sufficient time to be trained to carry out any projects in biomedical and clinical research. Many medical students also fail to understand and grasp translational research as an important concept today. In addition, since medical training is often an international affair whereby a medical student/resident/fellow will likely train in many different countries during his/her early training years, it is important to provide a learning environment whereby a young medical student experiences the unique challenges and value of an international educational experience. This article describes a program that bridges the gap between the basic and clinical research concepts in a unique international educational experience. After completing two semester curricula at Alfaisal University in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, six medical students undertook a summer program at St. Boniface Hospital Research Centre, in Winnipeg, MB, Canada. The program lasted for 2 mo and addressed advanced training in basic science research topics in medicine such as cell isolation, functional assessment, and molecular techniques of analysis and manipulation as well as sessions on the conduct of clinical research trials, ethics, and intellectual property management. Programs such as these are essential to provide a base from which medical students can decide if research is an attractive career choice for them during their clinical practice in subsequent years. An innovative international summer research course for medical students is necessary to cater to the needs of the medical students in the 21st century.

  13. An international basic science and clinical research summer program for medical students.

    PubMed

    Ramjiawan, Bram; Pierce, Grant N; Anindo, Mohammad Iffat Kabir; Alkukhun, Abedalrazaq; Alshammari, Abdullah; Chamsi, Ahmad Talal; Abousaleh, Mohannad; Alkhani, Anas; Ganguly, Pallab K

    2012-03-01

    An important part of training the next generation of physicians is ensuring that they are exposed to the integral role that research plays in improving medical treatment. However, medical students often do not have sufficient time to be trained to carry out any projects in biomedical and clinical research. Many medical students also fail to understand and grasp translational research as an important concept today. In addition, since medical training is often an international affair whereby a medical student/resident/fellow will likely train in many different countries during his/her early training years, it is important to provide a learning environment whereby a young medical student experiences the unique challenges and value of an international educational experience. This article describes a program that bridges the gap between the basic and clinical research concepts in a unique international educational experience. After completing two semester curricula at Alfaisal University in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, six medical students undertook a summer program at St. Boniface Hospital Research Centre, in Winnipeg, MB, Canada. The program lasted for 2 mo and addressed advanced training in basic science research topics in medicine such as cell isolation, functional assessment, and molecular techniques of analysis and manipulation as well as sessions on the conduct of clinical research trials, ethics, and intellectual property management. Programs such as these are essential to provide a base from which medical students can decide if research is an attractive career choice for them during their clinical practice in subsequent years. An innovative international summer research course for medical students is necessary to cater to the needs of the medical students in the 21st century. PMID:22383409

  14. Science for Energy Technology: Strengthening the Link Between Basic Research and Industry

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-01

    out a broad view of the basic and grand challenge science needs for the development of future clean energy technologies in a series of comprehensive 'Basic Research Needs' workshops and reports (inside front cover and http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/list.html) and has structured its programs and launched initiatives to address the challenges. The basic science needs of industry, however, are often more narrowly focused on solving specific nearer-term roadblocks to progress in existing and emerging clean energy technologies. To better define these issues and identify specific barriers to progress, the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) sponsored the Workshop on Science for Energy Technology, January 18-21, 2010. A wide cross-section of scientists and engineers from industry, universities, and national laboratories delineated the basic science Priority Research Directions most urgently needed to address the roadblocks and accelerate the innovation of clean energy technologies. These Priority Research Directions address the scientific understanding underlying performance limitations in existing but still immature technologies. Resolving these performance limitations can dramatically improve the commercial penetration of clean energy technologies. A key conclusion of the Workshop is that in addition to the decadal challenges defined in the 'Basic Research Needs' reports, specific research directions addressing industry roadblocks are ripe for further emphasis. Another key conclusion is that identifying and focusing on specific scientific challenges and translating the results to industry requires more direct feedback and communication and collaboration between industrial and BES-supported scientists. BES-supported scientists need to be better informed of the detailed scientific issues facing industry, and industry more aware of BES capabilities and how to utilize them. An important capability is the suite of BES scientific user facilities, which are seen

  15. China: forward to the green pesticides via a basic research program.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xuhong; Lee, Philip W; Cao, Song

    2010-03-10

    The 973 Program is China's keystone national research program established to support basic research in natural and physical sciences. In addition to promoting the development of core technology and scientific infrastructure needed to enable China to meet the social and economic challenges of the 21st century, the training and mentoring of the new generation of China's young scientists are also important objectives of this national program. The green chemical pesticide research program is a part of the 973 Program. The main objectives of stage 1 of the green chemical pesticide research program (2003-2008) are to establish China's capability to conduct basic research in the discovery of "green" crop protection chemicals that are not only novel in mode of action and highly selective to pest species that are unique to China's agricultural situation but also possess favorable environmental and human hazard and risk potentials. The target-based discovery strategy was selected as the main discovery platform. This strategy not only provided this research program the best chance to discover new products but also provided members of this research team opportunities to establish core technologies in chemoinformatics/computation-aided pesticide design using QSAR, QAAR, sensitive and selective bioassay methodology, combinatorial synthesis, hit to lead optimization, and biological targets that were derived from resistance-AChE, IGR, nAChR, etc. On the basis of the learning from stage 1, stage 2 (2010-2014) of this program will focus on the molecular target-oriented innovation of green chemical pesticides. This commentary presents key learnings and accomplishments from the stage 1 of China's green chemical pesticide research program. It is hoped that this information will stimulate further constructive collaborations between pesticide scientists from China and abroad. PMID:20128592

  16. China: forward to the green pesticides via a basic research program.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xuhong; Lee, Philip W; Cao, Song

    2010-03-10

    The 973 Program is China's keystone national research program established to support basic research in natural and physical sciences. In addition to promoting the development of core technology and scientific infrastructure needed to enable China to meet the social and economic challenges of the 21st century, the training and mentoring of the new generation of China's young scientists are also important objectives of this national program. The green chemical pesticide research program is a part of the 973 Program. The main objectives of stage 1 of the green chemical pesticide research program (2003-2008) are to establish China's capability to conduct basic research in the discovery of "green" crop protection chemicals that are not only novel in mode of action and highly selective to pest species that are unique to China's agricultural situation but also possess favorable environmental and human hazard and risk potentials. The target-based discovery strategy was selected as the main discovery platform. This strategy not only provided this research program the best chance to discover new products but also provided members of this research team opportunities to establish core technologies in chemoinformatics/computation-aided pesticide design using QSAR, QAAR, sensitive and selective bioassay methodology, combinatorial synthesis, hit to lead optimization, and biological targets that were derived from resistance-AChE, IGR, nAChR, etc. On the basis of the learning from stage 1, stage 2 (2010-2014) of this program will focus on the molecular target-oriented innovation of green chemical pesticides. This commentary presents key learnings and accomplishments from the stage 1 of China's green chemical pesticide research program. It is hoped that this information will stimulate further constructive collaborations between pesticide scientists from China and abroad.

  17. Basic science research in pediatric radiology - how to empower the leading edge of our field.

    PubMed

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E

    2014-08-01

    Basic science research aims to explore, understand and predict phenomena in the natural world. It spurs the discovery of fundamentally new principles and leads to new knowledge and new concepts. By comparison, applied research employs basic science knowledge toward practical applications. In the clinical realm, basic science research and applied research should be closely connected. Basic science discoveries can build the foundation for a broad range of practical applications and thereby bring major benefits to human health, education, environment and economy. This article explains how basic science research impacts our field, it describes examples of new research directions in pediatric imaging and it outlines current challenges that we need to overcome in order to enable the next groundbreaking discovery.

  18. Can an Understanding of Basic Research Facilitate the Effectiveness of Practitioners? Reflections and Personal Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidman, Murray

    2011-01-01

    I have written before about the importance of applied behavior analysis to basic researchers. That relationship is, however, reciprocal; it is also critical for practitioners to understand and even to participate in basic research. Although applied problems are rarely the same as those investigated in the laboratory, practitioners who understand…

  19. 26 CFR 1.41-5A - Basic research for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1987.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... was for basic research performed in the United States). (2) Research in the social sciences or humanities. Basic research does not include research in the social sciences or humanities, within the...

  20. The Logic and the Basic Principles of Scientific Based Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feuer, Michael; Towne, Lisa

    A study was sponsored by the U.S. National Educational Research Policy and Priorities Board of the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) amid the enthusiasm for bringing the power of rigorous, objective, scientific understanding to bear on improving decisions about educational programming and thus student achievement. There is…

  1. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  2. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Richard; Wasserman, Harvey

    2011-03-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility supporting research within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC provides high-performance computing (HPC) resources to approximately 4,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. In addition to hosting large-scale computing facilities, NERSC provides the support and expertise scientists need to effectively and efficiently use HPC systems. In February 2010, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BES research through 2013. The workshop was part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users future needs and deploying the necessary resources to meet these demands. Workshop participants reached a consensus on several key findings, in addition to achieving the workshop's goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The key requirements for scientists conducting research in BES are: (1) Larger allocations of computational resources; (2) Continued support for standard application software packages; (3) Adequate job turnaround time and throughput; and (4) Guidance and support for using future computer architectures. This report expands upon these key points and presents others. Several 'case studies' are included as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BES. Research teams scientific goals, computational methods of solution, current and 2013 computing requirements, and special software and support needs are summarized in these case studies. Also included are researchers strategies for computing in the highly parallel, 'multi-core' environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. NERSC has strategic plans and initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings. This report includes a brief summary of those relevant to issues

  3. 2011 Vascular Research Initiatives Conference: basic foundations of translational research in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Kenneth R; Dardik, Alan

    2011-07-01

    The Vascular Research Initiatives Conference (VRIC) is an annual conference organized by the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS). The 2011 VRIC was held in Chicago (IL, USA) to precede and coincide with the first day of the meeting of the Council on Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology (ATVB) of the American Heart Association. The event is designed to present world class vascular research results, encourage collaboration between vascular surgeons and basic scientists in related disciplines, as well as to stimulate interest in research among aspiring academic vascular surgeons. The 2011 VRIC featured plenary sessions addressing peripheral arterial disease, vascular endothelium and thrombosis, aneurysms, and stem cells and tissue engineering. Recipients of the SVS partner grants with the National Institutes of Health K08 awardees presented their progress reports, and keynote addresses were given by Linda Graham and Frank LoGerfo.

  4. 2011 Vascular Research Initiatives Conference: basic foundations of translational research in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Kenneth R; Dardik, Alan

    2011-07-01

    The Vascular Research Initiatives Conference (VRIC) is an annual conference organized by the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS). The 2011 VRIC was held in Chicago (IL, USA) to precede and coincide with the first day of the meeting of the Council on Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology (ATVB) of the American Heart Association. The event is designed to present world class vascular research results, encourage collaboration between vascular surgeons and basic scientists in related disciplines, as well as to stimulate interest in research among aspiring academic vascular surgeons. The 2011 VRIC featured plenary sessions addressing peripheral arterial disease, vascular endothelium and thrombosis, aneurysms, and stem cells and tissue engineering. Recipients of the SVS partner grants with the National Institutes of Health K08 awardees presented their progress reports, and keynote addresses were given by Linda Graham and Frank LoGerfo. PMID:21809965

  5. Mind the Gap: Sex Bias in Basic Skin Research

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Betty Y.; Haugh, Isabel M.; Schlosser, Bethanee J.; Getsios, Spiro; Paller, Amy S.

    2016-01-01

    Given the recent National Institutes of Health proposal for balanced use of male and female cells and animals in preclinical studies, we explored whether sex bias exists in skin research. We surveyed 802 dermatological research articles from 2012 through 2013. No information about the sex of studied cells or animals was provided in 60% of papers. Among keratinocytes of known sex, 70% were male. Few studies compared male versus female cells or animals. Disclosure of sex and comparative studies contribute to our understanding of the biologic basis of sex differences. Addressing sex-specific differences in preclinical research informs subsequent clinical trial design and promotes individualized therapy. PMID:26763418

  6. Mind the Gap: Sex Bias in Basic Skin Research.

    PubMed

    Kong, Betty Y; Haugh, Isabel M; Schlosser, Bethanee J; Getsios, Spiro; Paller, Amy S

    2016-01-01

    Given the recent National Institutes of Health proposal for balanced use of male and female cells and animals in preclinical studies, we explored whether sex bias exists in skin research. We surveyed 802 dermatological research articles from 2012 through 2013. No information about the sex of studied cells or animals was provided in 60% of papers. Among keratinocytes of known sex, 70% were male. Few studies compared male versus female cells or animals. Disclosure of sex and comparative studies contribute to our understanding of the biologic basis of sex differences. Addressing sex-specific differences in preclinical research informs subsequent clinical trial design and promotes individualized therapy.

  7. Development of a New Hypersonic Shock Tunnel Facility to Investigate Electromagnetic Energy Addition for Flow Control and Basic Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, P. G. P.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Chanes, J. B.; Pereira, A. L.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    2006-05-01

    A new 0.6-m. diameter Hypersonic Shock Tunnel is been designed, fabricated and will be installed at the Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics IEAv-CTA, Brazil. The brand new hypersonic facility, designated as T3, is primarily intended to be used as an important tool in the investigation of supersonic combustion management and of electromagnetic energy addition for flow control. The design of the runnel enables relatively long test times, 2-10 milliseconds, suitable for basic supersonic combustion and energy addition by laser experiments. Free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25 can be produced and stagnation pressures and temperatures of 200 atm. and 5,500 K, respectively, can be generated. Shadowgraph and schlieren optical techniques will be used for flow visualization and the new facility is expected to be commissioned by the end of 2006.

  8. Why our patients (and we) need basic science research.

    PubMed

    Schor, Nina F

    2013-05-28

    In times of fiscal austerity, the tendency is to seek instant, inexpensive gratification. In the case of biomedical research, this means the shortest path to practical clinical implementation. But fueling the translational pipeline with discovery depends critically on allowing the biomedical research community to follow their science where it takes them. Fiscal constraints carry with them the risk of squelching creativity and forfeiting the power of serendipity to provide the substrate for the translational engine in the future. PMID:23713087

  9. The application of 10CFR830. 120 in a basic research environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1991-04-01

    In this paper, I describe the process of applying the 10 basic criteria of the proposed 10CFR830.120 to a basic research environment like Fermilab and discuss some of the issues associated with the implementation of such a program. I will also discuss some of the differences and similarities between the 18 basic elements of NQA-1 and the 10 criteria of 10CFR830.120 along with the more philosophical'' issues associated with performance versus process- based approach to quality in basic research.

  10. CAN AN UNDERSTANDING OF BASIC RESEARCH FACILITATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PRACTITIONERS? REFLECTIONS AND PERSONAL PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, Murray

    2011-01-01

    I have written before about the importance of applied behavior analysis to basic researchers. That relationship is, however, reciprocal; it is also critical for practitioners to understand and even to participate in basic research. Although applied problems are rarely the same as those investigated in the laboratory, practitioners who understand their basic research background are often able to place their particular problem in a more general context and thereby deal with it successfully. Also the procedures of applied behavior analysis are often the same as those that characterize basic research; the scientist-practitioner will appreciate the relation between what he or she is doing and what basic experimenters do, and as a consequence, will be able to apply therapeutic techniques more creatively and effectively. PMID:22219551

  11. Melodic intonation therapy: back to basics for future research.

    PubMed

    Zumbansen, Anna; Peretz, Isabelle; Hébert, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    We present a critical review of the literature on melodic intonation therapy (MIT), one of the most formalized treatments used by speech-language therapist in Broca's aphasia. We suggest basic clarifications to enhance the scientific support of this promising treatment. First, therapeutic protocols using singing as a speech facilitation technique are not necessarily MIT. The goal of MIT is to restore propositional speech. The rationale is that patients can learn a new way to speak through singing by using language-capable regions of the right cerebral hemisphere. Eventually, patients are supposed to use this way of speaking permanently but not to sing overtly. We argue that many treatment programs covered in systematic reviews on MIT's efficacy do not match MIT's therapeutic goal and rationale. Critically, we identified two main variations of MIT: the French thérapie mélodique et rythmée (TMR) that trains patients to use singing overtly as a facilitation technique in case of speech struggle and palliative versions of MIT that help patients with the most severe expressive deficits produce a limited set of useful, readymade phrases. Second, we distinguish between the immediate effect of singing on speech production and the long-term effect of the entire program on language recovery. Many results in the MIT literature can be explained by this temporal perspective. Finally, we propose that MIT can be viewed as a treatment of apraxia of speech more than aphasia. This issue should be explored in future experimental studies. PMID:24478754

  12. Decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels: In basic research and preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Raymond M; Christman, Karen L

    2016-01-15

    A variety of decellularized materials have been developed that have demonstrated potential for treating cardiovascular diseases and improving our understanding of cardiac development. Of these biomaterials, decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels have shown great promise for creating cellular microenvironments representative of the native cardiac tissue and treating the heart after a myocardial infarction. Decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels derived from porcine cardiac tissue form a nanofibrous hydrogel once thermally induced at physiological temperatures. Use of isolated cardiac extracellular matrix in 2D and 3D in vitro platforms has demonstrated the capability to provide tissue specific cues for cardiac cell growth and differentiation. Testing of the myocardial matrix hydrogel as a therapy after myocardial infarction in both small and large animal models has demonstrated improved left ventricular function, increased cardiac muscle, and cellular recruitment into the treated infarct. Based on these results, steps are currently being taken to translate these hydrogels into a clinically used injectable biomaterial therapy. In this review, we will focus on the basic science and preclinical studies that have accelerated the development of decellularized myocardial matrix hydrogels into an emerging novel therapy for treating the heart after a myocardial infarction.

  13. Basic research needs and opportunities on interfaces in solar materials

    SciTech Connect

    Czanderna, A. W.; Gottschall, R. J.

    1981-04-01

    The workshop on research needs and recommended research programs on interfaces in solar energy conversion devices was held June 30-July 3, 1980. The papers deal mainly with solid-solid, solid-liquid, and solid-gas interfaces, sometimes involving multilayer solid-solid interfaces. They deal mainly with instrumental techniques of studying these interfaces so they can be optimized, so they can be fabricated with quality control and so changes with time can be forecast. The latter is required because a long lifetime (20 yrs is suggested) is necessary for economic reasons. Fifteen papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  14. Teaching Medical Students Basic Neurotransmitter Pharmacology Using Primary Research Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, Amy C.; Devonshire, Ian M.; Greenfield, Susan A.; Dommett, Eleanor J.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We…

  15. Using Calibrated Peer Review to Teach Basic Research Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracke, Marianne S.; Graveel, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) is an online tool being used in the class Introduction to Agriculture and Purdue University (AGR 10100) to integrate a writing and research component (http://cpr.molsci.ucla.edu/Home.aspx). Calibrated Peer Review combines the ability to create writing intensive assignments with an introduction to the peer-review…

  16. HIV research in Australia: linking basic research findings with clinical and public health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Sharon R; Kaldor, John M; Cooper, David A

    2006-01-01

    Despite a population of only 20 million and sustained low prevalence of HIV infection in Australia, Australian researchers have provided many substantial original findings to the fields of HIV pathogenesis, treatment and prevention. More recently, Australian clinicians and scientists have turned their attention to assisting other countries in developing effective responses, particularly within the Asia-Pacific region. It is therefore fitting that the 4th International AIDS Society (IAS) Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention will be held in Sydney in July 2007. The meeting is expected to attract over 5000 participants and will have a dynamic and innovative programme within the three major themes of HIV basic science, clinical research and biomedical prevention. PMID:17140433

  17. Building Networks for Global Clinical Research: The Basics.

    PubMed

    Shearer, David W; Volberding, Paul A; Schemitsch, Emil H; Cook, Gillian E; Slobogean, Gerard P; Morshed, Saam

    2015-12-01

    Over the last several decades, interest in global health across all fields of medicine, including orthopaedic surgery, has grown markedly. Cross-national collaborations are an effective means of conducting high-quality clinical research and offer many advantages over single-center investigations. Successful collaboration requires a well-designed research protocol, development of an effective team structure, and the funding to ensure the project is sustained to completion. Equally important, investigators must consider the social, linguistic, and cultural context in which the study is being undertaken. Although randomized clinical trials are the highest level of evidence, study designs may have to be adapted to accommodate available resources, expertise, and local contextual factors. With appropriate planning, these collaborative endeavors can generate changes in clinical practice and positively impact health policy. PMID:26584260

  18. Crystallography for university research: some basic case studies.

    PubMed

    Crochet, Aurelien

    2014-01-01

    An overview of commonly available, state-of-the-art diffraction techniques for university research is presented based on some chemical case studies. Examples from the Fribourg crystallography service are presented, aimed at scientists who would like to learn about the principal possibilities that X-ray powder and single-crystal diffraction can offer, how these methods can serve to determine the structure of a given material, and how they can help to identify polymorphs, surface coatings and enantiomers.

  19. Simultaneous separation of acidic and basic proteins using gemini pyrrolidinium surfactants and hexafluoroisopropanol as dynamic coating additives in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Li, Yunfang; Mei, Jie; Cai, Bo; Dong, Jinfeng; Shi, Zhiguo; Xiao, Yuxiu

    2015-09-18

    The separation of acidic and basic proteins using CE has been limited in part due to the adsorption of proteins onto the capillary wall. In this work, the efficient control of EOF and the simultaneous separation of acidic and basic proteins are achieved by use of C18-4-C18PB as a dynamic coating additive, which is a representative surfactant for 1,1'-(butane-1,s-alkyl)bis(1-alkylpyrrolidinium) bromide (Cn-4-CnPB, n=10, 12, 14, 16 and 18). C18-4-C18PB exhibits a powerful capability in the reversal of EOF, and a low concentration even less than 0.001 mM is sufficient to reverse EOF at the tested pH values (3.0-9.0). Baseline separation of eight proteins with sharp peaks and high efficiencies (54,000-297,000 plates/m) is obtained with 30 mM NaH2PO4 buffer (pH 5.0) containing 4 mM C18-4-C18PB. At the same buffer condition, the Cn-4-CnPB with shorter alkyl chain (n=10, 12, 14, 16) cannot achieve the same effective protein separation as C18-4-C18PB. However, the combined use of small amounts (≤0.5%, v/v) of hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and Cn-4-CnPB (n=10, 12, 14, 16) as additives can completely separate all eight proteins with high efficiencies of 81,000-318,000 plates/m. The RSDs of migration time are less than 0.80% and 5.84% for run-to-run and day-to-day assays (n=5), respectively, and the protein recoveries are larger than 90.15%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the simultaneous separation of acidic and basic proteins using Cn-4-CnPB surfactants or Cn-4-CnPB surfactants combined with HFIP as dynamic coating additives.

  20. Basic research in HIV vaccinology is hampered by reductionist thinking

    PubMed Central

    Van Regenmortel, Marc H. V.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the structure-based reverse vaccinology approach aimed at developing vaccine immunogens capable of inducing antibodies that broadly neutralize HIV-1. Some basic principles of protein immunochemistry are reviewed and the implications of the extensive polyspecificity of antibodies for vaccine development are underlined. Although it is natural for investigators to want to know the cause of an effective immunological intervention, the classic notion of causality is shown to have little explanatory value for a system as complex as the immune system, where any observed effect always results from many interactions between a large number of components. Causal explanations are reductive because a single factor is singled out for attention and given undue explanatory weight on its own. Other examples of the negative impact of reductionist thinking on HIV vaccine development are discussed. These include (1) the failure to distinguish between the chemical nature of antigenicity and the biological nature of immunogenicity, (2) the belief that when an HIV-1 epitope is reconstructed by rational design to better fit a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (nMab), this will produce an immunogen able to elicit Abs with the same neutralizing capacity as the Ab used as template for designing the antigen, and (3) the belief that protection against infection can be analyzed at the level of individual molecular interactions although it has meaning only at the level of an entire organism. The numerous unsuccessful strategies that have been used to design HIV-1 vaccine immunogens are described and it is suggested that the convergence of so many negative experimental results justifies the conclusion that reverse vaccinology is unlikely to lead to the development of a preventive HIV-1 vaccine. Immune correlates of protection in vaccines have not yet been identified because this will become feasible only retrospectively once an effective vaccine exists. The finding that

  1. 26 CFR 1.41-5A - Basic research for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1987.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... was for basic research performed in the United States). (2) Research in the social sciences or humanities. Basic research does not include research in the social sciences or humanities, within the meaning... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Basic research for taxable years beginning...

  2. Basic and clinical research in the AMC Renal Transplant Unit.

    PubMed

    ten Berge, Ineke J M; Bemelman, Fréderike J

    2014-10-01

    Our research is aimed at characterization of the antiviral and allo-immune responses in kidney transplant recipients. In particular, we are interested in the differentiation, effector function and memory formation of T cells specific for the latent viruses cytomegalovirus (CMV) and BK virus (BKV) and in the impact of virus-specific immune responses on alloimmunity. Furthermore, we perform studies towards the most optimal, tailor-made immunosuppressive drug regimen and towards the impact of immunosuppression on infectious diseases; cognitive function and cardiovascular status of kidney transplant recipients.

  3. Basics of case report form designing in clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Bellary, Shantala; Krishnankutty, Binny; Latha, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Case report form (CRF) is a specialized document in clinical research. It should be study protocol driven, robust in content and have material to collect the study specific data. Though paper CRFs are still used largely, use of electronic CRFs (eCRFS) are gaining popularity due to the advantages they offer such as improved data quality, online discrepancy management and faster database lock etc. Main objectives behind CRF development are preserving and maintaining quality and integrity of data. CRF design should be standardized to address the needs of all users such as investigator, site coordinator, study monitor, data entry personnel, medical coder and statistician. Data should be organized in a format that facilitates and simplifies data analysis. Collection of large amount of data will result in wasted resources in collecting and processing it and in many circumstances, will not be utilized for analysis. Apart from that, standard guidelines should be followed while designing the CRF. CRF completion manual should be provided to the site personnel to promote accurate data entry by them. These measures will result in reduced query generations and improved data integrity. It is recommended to establish and maintain a library of templates of standard CRF modules as they are time saving and cost-effective. This article is an attempt to describe the methods of CRF designing in clinical research and discusses the challenges encountered in this process. PMID:25276625

  4. Adult Basic Skills: Innovations in Measurement and Policy Analysis. Series on Literacy: Research, Policy, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuijnman, Albert C., Ed.; Kirsch, Irwin S., Ed.; Wagner, Daniel A., Ed.

    This book contains 13 papers examining innovations in measuring adults' basic skills and analyzing adult literacy policy. The following papers are included: "Series Preface" (Daniel A. Wagner); "Foreword" (Torsten Husen); "Introduction" (Albert Tuijnman); "Adult Basic Skills: Policy Issues and a Research Agenda" (David Stern, Albert Tuijnman);…

  5. Characterization and basic research investigations at PEFC electrodes and MEA

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, M.; Wagner, N.; Steinhilber, G.

    1996-12-31

    For the study of electrochemical and transport mechanisms in polymere electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) electrodes and for a further development of PEFC electrodes it is important to characterize these electrodes. The characterization of the electrodes was performed by electrochemical analytical as well as physical methods on both single electrodes and electrode-membrane assemblies (NEA). In addition to voltage-current characteristics the electrodes were electrochemically measured by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronopotentiometry. To determine the pore systems nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry were used. Chemical composition and microstructure of the electrodes were studied by surface science methods like scanning electron microscopy or X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopy. The results of characterization are the base for theoretical simulation of fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

  6. NSF FY1982 update: Support for basic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    When the Appropriation Committees of the House of Representatives and the Senate meet in conference this month, discussion of the Astronomical, Atmospheric, Earth, and Ocean Sciences (AAEO) sections of the National Science Foundation (NSF) will be limited. Both the House and the Senate committees made some slight increases to the Office of Management and Budget requests, and the program by program agreement between the two was unusual.The House appropriation bill, H.R. 4034, provides $70 million over the administration request of $1033.5 million. Of the increase, $44.9 million was added in the area of research and related activities and $25.1 million for science and engineering education.

  7. Basic Histopathological Methods and Breast Lesion Types for Research.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Nengtai; Wang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The in situ observation on the tissues, such as histopathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF), and in situ hybridization (ISH), is one of the most important methods in the biomedical scientific research. In this chapter we introduce the most often used methods-hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and double IF staining. H&E staining is used for general morphology by which the different pathological types of breast lesions are identified. The double IF staining is often used to study the protein-protein interaction on tissues for signaling mechanisms. This chapter also includes the histopathology of primary or simplified breast lesion types that is essential for applying the above methods and the reclassification of breast cancers by molecular markers.

  8. Basic research needs to assure a secure energy future. A report from the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    This report has highlighted many of the possible fundamental research areas that will help our country avoid a future energy crisis. The report may not have adequately captured the atmosphere of concern that permeated the discussions at the workshop. The difficulties facing our nation and the world in meeting our energy needs over the next several decades are very challenging. It was generally felt that traditional solutions and approaches will not solve the total energy problem. Knowledge that does not exist must be obtained to address both the quantity of energy needed to increase the standard of living world-wide and the quality of energy generation needed to preserve the environment. In terms of investments, it was clear that there is no single research area that will secure the future energy supply. A diverse range of economic energy sources will be required--and a broad range of fundamental research is needed to enable these. Many of the issues fall into the traditional materials and chemical sciences research areas, but with specific emphasis on understanding mechanisms, energy related phenomena, and pursuing novel directions in, for example, nanoscience and integrated modeling. An important result from the discussions, which is hopefully apparent from the brief presentations above, is that the problems that must be dealt with are truly multidisciplinary. This means that they require the participation of investigators with different skill sets. Basic science skills have to be complemented by awareness of the overall nature of the problem in a national and world context, and with knowledge of the engineering, design, and control issues in any eventual solution. It is necessary to find ways in which this can be done while still preserving the ability to do first-class basic science. The traditional structure of research, with specific disciplinary groupings, will not be sufficient. This presents great challenges and opportunities for the funders of the

  9. Basic Research Needs for Clean and Efficient Combustion of 21st Century Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McIlroy, A.; McRae, G.; Sick, V.; Siebers, D. L.; Westbrook, C. K.; Smith, P. J.; Taatjes, C.; Trouve, A.; Wagner, A. F.; Rohlfing, E.; Manley, D.; Tully, F.; Hilderbrandt, R.; Green, W.; Marceau, D.; O'Neal, J.; Lyday, M.; Cebulski, F.; Garcia, T. R.; Strong, D.

    2006-11-01

    To identify basic research needs and opportunities underlying utilization of evolving transportation fuels, with a focus on new or emerging science challenges that have the potential for significant long-term impact on fuel efficiency and emissions.

  10. Lost in Translation—Basic Science in the Era of Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The concept of translational research, which aims to facilitate the application of basic scientific discoveries in clinical and community settings, is currently in vogue. While there are powerful forces driving this trend, support for translational research must be accompanied by a robust investment in basic science, which provides the essential raw material for translation and continues to represent humanity's best hope to meet a wide range of public health challenges. PMID:20038540

  11. Basic science and neurobiological research: potential relevance to sexual compulsivity.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Fred S

    2008-12-01

    A unique challenge posed by advancing scientific knowledge about the biology of human behavior is how to integrate that understanding with the desire to hold ourselves--and one another--morally accountable. As human beings, we are something more than just passive agents whose behavior is the sum product of biologic determinism. Because of the existence of the mind, we are also active agents with the capacity to influence, at least to some extent, our own destinies. Behavior may be determined, but it is not predetermined. We are one of its determinants. Misconduct by a person of sound mind should not be attributed improperly to brain pathology. On the other hand, suffering, legitimate mental disorder, and associated impairments should not be trivialized. Historically, persons who once were labeled "lazy" are often more appropriately understood by modern standards as clinically depressed. Frequently they are more in need of pharmacologic treatments that alter brain chemistry than "a kick in the behind." Gluttony, one of the original cardinal sins, is often more properly understood as morbid obesity, a condition that deserves appropriate medical care. Persons who have alcoholism, once judged morally as "bums in the gutter," are more frequently referred to treatment facilities, such as The Betty Ford Clinic. One should not approach the issue of human sexual behavior without at least some appreciation of moral values and scientific research. Although clearly some persons choose to act in a sexually selfish and self-indulgent fashion with wanton disregard, others seem to be more genuinely burdened and struggle to integrate their sexual desires into an otherwise healthy and fully responsible lifestyle. When a person, whether male or female, seems to be so driven that it becomes difficult to master erotic desires and he or she experiences difficulty serving his or her own best longterm interests, the concept of sexual compulsivity seems to be relevant. Ultimately, a better

  12. Basic science and energy research sector profile: Background for the National Energy Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    March, F.; Ashton, W.B.; Kinzey, B.R.; McDonald, S.C.; Lee, V.E.

    1990-11-01

    This Profile report provides a general perspective on the role of basic science in the spectrum of research and development in the United States, and basic research's contributions to the goals of the National Energy Strategy (NES). It includes selected facts, figures, and analysis of strategic issues affecting the future of science in the United States. It is provided as background for people from government, the private sector, academia, and the public, who will be reviewing the NES in the coming months; and it is intended to serve as the basis for discussion of basic science issues within the context of the developing NES.

  13. Brown Superfund Basic research Program: a multistakeholder partnership addresses real-world problems in contaminated communities.

    PubMed

    Senier, Laura; Hudson, Benjamin; Fort, Sarah; Hoover, Elizabeth; Tillson, Rebecca; Brown, Phil

    2008-07-01

    The NIEHS funds several basic and applied research programs, many of which also require research translation or outreach. This paper reports on a project by the Brown University Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP), in which outreach and research translation teams collaborated with state regulatory agency personnel and community activists on a legislative initiative to mitigate the financial impacts of living in a contaminated community. The Environmentally Compromised Home Ownership (ECHO) program makes home equity loans of up to $25,000 available to qualified applicants. This collaboration provides a case study in community engagement and demonstrates how research translation and outreach activities that are clearly differentiated yet well-integrated can improve a suite of basic and applied research. Although engaging diverse constituencies can be difficult community-engaged translation and outreach have the potential to make research findings more useful to communities, address some of the social impacts of contamination, and empower stakeholders to pursue their individual and collectively held goals for remediation. The NIEHS has recently renewed its commitment to community-engaged research and advocacy, making this an optimal time to reflect on how basic research programs that engage stakeholders through research translation and outreach can add value to the overall research enterprise. PMID:18677987

  14. The basic-applied continuum and the possible evolution of human operant social and verbal research

    PubMed Central

    Hake, Don F.

    1982-01-01

    Human operant research is typically viewed as fitting somewhere between the end points of a basic-to-applied continuum. Viewed in this way, the major role of human operant research is to determine the conditions under which principles discovered with animals also hold with humans. Relative to the basic and applied end points, which have defined the major journals and graduate training programs in Behavior Analysis, the human operant area has not been strong since the late 1950's when a scientifically based application was only an exciting possibility. However, application quickly became a reality and to some extent it replaced the major role of human operant research. After about 15 years of focusing on the basic and applied end points, an increasing number of behavior analysts are concerned about the large content of psychology (e.g., social and verbal behavior) between the end points and the continued growth of Behavior Analysis. Basic research in social and verbal behavior should ordinarily begin with the human instead of a lower animal, because the human is the most qualified and prepared subject in the sense that most complex social and verbal behaviors are more accessible in humans. This new role for basic human research of initiating rather than only replicating, could result in a rebuilding of the “bridge” between basic and applied, and contribute to the growth of Behavior Analysis in terms of extensions to new content areas, methods, and the followers it would reach in these areas. PMID:22478554

  15. Basic research in crystalline and noncrystalline ceramic systems. Annual report, August 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sempolinski, D. R.; Kingery, W. D.; Tuller, H. L.; Diear, J. M.; Dudney, N. J.; Coble, R. L.; French, R.; Cheng, K. W.; Giraldez, E.; Henriksen, A. F.; Kijima, K.; Gattuso, T. R.; Dolhert, L.; Gambino, J.; Yager, T. A.; Chiang, Y. M.; Tajima, Y.; Dynys, J. M.; Cannon, Jr., R. M.; Kuo-Wen, Tsui; Hong, W.; Handwerker, C. A.; Schneibel, J. H.; Zelinski, B.

    1980-01-01

    The Basic Research Programs in Ceramics supports a significant fraction of the research effort and graduate student training in ceramics at M.I.T. The importance of basic research programs in ceramics processing and properties is becoming widely recognized as the critical role of improved ceramic materials for energy systems is acknowledged. The needs identified in the 1977 series of workshops on DOE programs in energy-related materials research and by the ongoing efforts of the DOE Council on Materials Science are being translated into the basic and applied research necessary to fulfill the established objectives in the effort to solve the nation's energy problems. Present indications are that ceramics in numerous applications will be critical in meeting national energy requirements.

  16. A roadmap for bridging basic and applied research in forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Tomberlin, J K; Mohr, R; Benbow, M E; Tarone, A M; VanLaerhoven, S

    2011-01-01

    The National Research Council issued a report in 2009 that heavily criticized the forensic sciences. The report made several recommendations that if addressed would allow the forensic sciences to develop a stronger scientific foundation. We suggest a roadmap for decomposition ecology and forensic entomology hinging on a framework built on basic research concepts in ecology, evolution, and genetics. Unifying both basic and applied research fields under a common umbrella of terminology and structure would facilitate communication in the field and the production of scientific results. It would also help to identify novel research areas leading to a better understanding of principal underpinnings governing ecosystem structure, function, and evolution while increasing the accuracy of and ability to interpret entomological evidence collected from crime scenes. By following the proposed roadmap, a bridge can be built between basic and applied decomposition ecology research, culminating in science that could withstand the rigors of emerging legal and cultural expectations.

  17. Systematic Review: The Association and Impact of Financial Conflicts of Interest in Basic Science Research

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L.; Boyle, Simone N.; Kuykendal, Adam; Fisher, Matthew J.; Samaras, Athena T.; Barnato, Sara E.; Wagner, Robin L.; Goldstein, Carolyn E.; Tallman, Jacob; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Henke, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background No prior study has evaluated financial relationships of investigators with pharmaceutical manufacturers for basic science. An example of the importance and impact of such relationships is in the evaluation of erythropoietin receptors’(EpoRs) effects on cancer cell lines, since studies have reported increased mortality when cancer patients receive erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs). Purpose To assess the disclosed association that exist between pharmaceutical industry support and EpoRs effects on solid cancer cell lines. Data Sources MEDLINE and EMBASE (1988- July 2008) and two EpoR conferences sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Study Selection All publications investigating EpoRs that met inclusion criteria were identified and included. Data Extraction Data were extracted on detection of EpoRs, presence of erythropoietin-induced signaling events, presence of erythropoietin-induced changes in cellular function, nature of qualitative conclusions, and sources of funding for all 74 studies. Data Synthesis In comparison to studies of academic investigators with no disclosed funding support from ESA manufacturers (n=64), the studies from academic investigators with funding support from ESA manufacturers (n= 7) and the laboratories directed by investigators employed by ESA manufacturers (n=3) were both less likely to identify: EpoR presence on solid tumor cells; erythropoietin-induced signaling events; erythropoietin-induced changes in cellular function; and less likely to conclude that their research had identified potentially harmful effects of erythropoietin on cancer cells. Additionally, presentations from industry-based investigator teams at NIH conferences were less likely to report EpoRs on cancer cell lines, downstream effects of erythropoietin, and cell proliferation and migration effects following EpoR administration. Conclusion Financial conflicts of interest impact the outcomes and presentation of basic science research data as

  18. Information-seeking behavior of basic science researchers: implications for library services

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Laura L.; Light, Jeanene; O'Malley, Donna; Delwiche, Frances A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined the information-seeking behaviors of basic science researchers to inform the development of customized library services. Methods: A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted on a sample of basic science researchers employed at a university medical school. Results: The basic science researchers used a variety of information resources ranging from popular Internet search engines to highly technical databases. They generally relied on basic keyword searching, using the simplest interface of a database or search engine. They were highly collegial, interacting primarily with coworkers in their laboratories and colleagues employed at other institutions. They made little use of traditional library services and instead performed many traditional library functions internally. Conclusions: Although the basic science researchers expressed a positive attitude toward the library, they did not view its resources or services as integral to their work. To maximize their use by researchers, library resources must be accessible via departmental websites. Use of library services may be increased by cultivating relationships with key departmental administrative personnel. Despite their self-sufficiency, subjects expressed a desire for centralized information about ongoing research on campus and shared resources, suggesting a role for the library in creating and managing an institutional repository. PMID:20098658

  19. The ACEE program and basic composites research at Langley Research Center (1975 to 1986): Summary and bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Marvin B.

    1987-01-01

    Composites research conducted at the Langley Research Center during the period from 1975 to 1986 is described, and an annotated bibliography of over 600 documents (with their abstracts) is presented. The research includes Langley basic technology and the composite primary structures element of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Program. The basic technology documents cited in the bibliography are grouped according to the research activity such as design and analysis, fatigue and fracture, and damage tolerance. The ACEE documents cover development of composite structures for transport aircraft.

  20. Practitioners Speak: Contributing to a Research Agenda for Adult Basic Education. NCSALL Reports #4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Mary Beth; Smith, Cristine; Stewart, Kimberly; Burnett, Anne; Devereux, Helena; Gooden, Judy; Hayes, David; LaChance, Arthur; LaMachia, Joan; Meader, Pam; Tate, Alan; Tiedeman, Kristin

    To obtain practitioner input on the research agenda for adult basic education (ABE), practitioner leaders from the Practitioner Dissemination and Research Network (PRDN) conducted nine focus groups with ABE practitioners in their states. The focus groups examined three topics: issues that concern practitioners in ABE; ways practitioners see their…

  1. Basic Scientific and Engineering Research at U.S. Universities. AAU Data & Policy Brief. No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2015

    2015-01-01

    "Discovery," wrote William Press in a 2013 article in "Science," "leads to technology and invention, which lead to new products, jobs, and industries." Basic, curiosity-driven research continually expands the boundaries of knowledge across fields, providing insights that enrich lives. Such research helps drive the…

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A THEORY OF EDUCATION FROM PSYCHOLOGICAL AND OTHER BASIC RESEARCH FINDINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TAYLOR, CALVIN W.; AND OTHERS

    A BROAD EXPLORATORY AND THEORETICAL STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE IN A FUNDAMENTAL SENSE THE IMPLICATIONS AND IMPACT WHICH NEW RESEARCH IN THE BASIC BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE FIELDS HAD ON EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE AND THEORY. THE TOTAL TASK WAS TO BUILD A NEW EDUCATIONAL THEORY USING SAMPLINGS FROM ALL BEHAVIORAL RESEARCH AND TO INVESTIGATE WAYS TO REDUCE…

  3. Making Life Easier with Effort: Basic Findings and Applied Research on Response Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friman, Patrick C.; Poling, Alan

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes basic research on response effort in diverse applied areas including deceleration of aberrant behavior, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, oral habits, littering, and problem solving. The paper concludes that response effort as an independent variable has potent effects, and research exploring the applied benefits of…

  4. G. Stanley Hall: Neither Psychology Alone nor Basic Research Is Sufficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youniss, James

    2005-01-01

    In his monumental work, "Adolescence", G. Stanley Hall showed the value of interdisciplinary scholarship and respect for research, which had a policy orientation. Over the course of the 20th century these two characteristics faded in adolescent studies as psychology took dominance and basic research was given priority over policy considerations.…

  5. From Structure to Solutions: The Role of Basic Research in Developing Anthrax Countermeasures

    PubMed Central

    Hardiman, Camille A.

    2012-01-01

    Dr. John Collier traced the discoveries that elucidated the structure and function of the anthrax toxin in his talk “Anthrax Toxin,” which was part of the Microbiology Graduate Program Seminar Series at Yale School of Medicine on February 23, 2012. Dr. Collier, Professor of Microbiology and Immunobiology at Harvard University, began by noting the advantages to studying anthrax pathogenesis in a biosafety level-1 lab. This designation does not merely facilitate his research, but also reflects a larger trend of basic research being leveraged to develop translational applications. Basic research on toxin structure has led to the development of a vaccine by Dr. Collier’s group. Next-generation prophylactics also may stem from recent discoveries uncovering a role for cellular cofactors that mediate toxin function. Finally, basic research into the toxin substructure has facilitated efforts to change the receptor tropism to target dysregulated cells for therapeutic purposes. The urgency around biodefense agents makes the choice of research priorities a salient issue. As such, this author submits that basic research occupies a unique and lucrative niche driving clinical applications. PMID:22737057

  6. Bioethical aspects of basic research and medical applications of human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Santos, Manuel J; Ventura-Juncá, Patricio

    2012-01-01

    The new discoveries, the extraordinary dynamism in human stem cell (SC) research, and the great expectations of the benefits in clinical treatment of many diseases are on the edge of unparalleled advances in both: 1) the understanding of basic mechanisms of cell differentiation and development and 2) the translation from basic research to new clinical therapies. Human stem cells are obtained from different sources, such as embryo, fetal, and adult tissues, in vitro induction (iPS cells) or transdifferentiation. The evidence that these cells are pluripotent (or multipotent), meaning they have the ability to differentiate into all body tissues or tissues of the same lineage, raises the possibility that they could regenerate diseased or damaged tissue in diseases that until now have had no effective treatments. Human stem cell research and therapy raise important bioethical considerations because of the human nature of these cells and their peculiar characteristics. Here we discuss the bioethical aspects of basic human SC research and the conditions necessary for the translation of basic preclinical research into clinical use of SC.

  7. The NUTRA-SNACKS project: basic research and biotechnological programs on nutraceutics.

    PubMed

    Rea, Giuseppina; Antonacci, Amina; Lambreva, Maya; Margonelli, Andrea; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The Nutra-Snacks project aims at creating novel high quality ready-to-eat foods with functional activity, useful for promoting public health. The team is composed of seven research institutes and three SMEs from different countries whose activities span from basic to applied research providing the right technological transfer to small and medium industries involved in the novel food production chain. Strategic objectives include the application of plant cell and in vitro culture systems to create very large amounts of high-value plant secondary metabolites with recognized anticancer, antilipidemic, anticholesterol, antimicrobial, antiviral, antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory properties and to include them in specific food products. To this end, the screening of a vast number of working organisms capable of accumulating the desired compounds and the characterization of their expression profiles represent fundamental steps in the research program. The information allows the identification of plant species hyper-producing metabolites and selection of those metabolites capable of specifically counteracting the oxidative stress that underlies the development of important pathologies and diseases. In addition, devising safe metabolite extraction procedures is also crucial in order to provide nutraceutical-enriched extracts compatible with human health. New biotechnological approaches are also undertaken including the exploitation of photosynthetic algal strains in bio-farms to enhance the synthesis ofantioxidant compounds and the design of novel bioreactors for small and large scale biomass production. Further outstanding objectives include the development of (i) safety and quality control protocols (ii) biosensor techniques for the analysis of the emerging ready-to-eat food and (iii) a contribution to define a standard for new regulations on nutraceutics.

  8. The Fruition of 4f Discovery, The interplay of basic and applied research

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Gschneidner, Jr

    2004-09-30

    A broad base of knowledge is necessary for the successful solution to applied problems, but on the other hand, developing such practical solutions can open the door to new and exciting adventures in basic research. Several such synergistic events are briefly described. These include the design and development of magnetic refrigerant materials (1) for the liquefaction of H{sub 2} gas, and (2) for near-room temperature cooling and refrigeration; and (3) the design and development of cryocooler regenerator materials. The first led to the discovery of both supercooling and superheating in the same substance (Dy and Er); the second to the discovery of the giant magnetocaloric effect, the colossal magnetostriction, and the giant magnetoresistance in the same substance [Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}{sub 4})]; and the third the disappearance of three of the four magnetically ordered phases in Er by Pr additions in both high purity Er and commercial grade Er.

  9. Research on Youth Violence: Progress by Replacement, Not Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the need to concentrate more educational research into efficacy studies on the effectiveness of specific preventive and treatment interventions targeted at disruptive behavior disorders. Other research needs are highlighted such as underlying mechanisms by which aggressive behavior develops, involvement in gangs, positive…

  10. Current Research on Parallel Measures of Interests and Confidence for Basic Dimensions of Vocational Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, Nancy E.; Rottinghaus, Patrick J.

    2006-01-01

    This article begins with a rationale for and review of parallel measures of self-efficacy (confidence) and interests for basic dimensions of vocational activity. Recent development of and research on the Expanded Skills Confidence Inventory, Campbell Interest and Skills Survey, Kuder Skills Assessment, and Inventory of Work-Relevant Abilities are…

  11. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 272 - Principles for the Conduct and Support of Basic Research

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Research A Appendix A to Part 272 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Pt. 272, App. A Appendix A to Part 272—Principles for the Conduct and Support of Basic... investments as a portfolio, with assessments of program success based on aggregate returns. There should be...

  12. Basic Reference Tools for Nursing Research. A Workbook with Explanations and Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, Topsy N.

    This workbook is designed to introduce nursing students to basic concepts and skills needed for searching the literatures of medicine, nursing, and allied health areas for materials relevant to specific information needs. The workbook introduces the following research tools: (1) the National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE searches, including a…

  13. From Research to Practice: Basic Mathematics Skills and Success in Introductory Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, M. Leigh; Poplin, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Based on previous research of Johnson and Kuennen (2006), we conducted a study to determine factors that would possibly predict student success in an introductory statistics course. Our results were similar to Johnson and Kuennen in that we found students' basic mathematical skills, as measured on a test created by Johnson and Kuennen, were a…

  14. Advances in circulating tumor cells (ACTC): from basic research to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The first 'Advances in Circulating Tumor Cells (ACTC): from Basic Research to Clinical Practice' meeting was held in Athens, Greece, September 26–29, 2012 (abstracts, presentations and a more detailed meeting report are freely available online: http://www.actc2012.org). We summarize in this report most major findings presented and the main conclusions derived during the expert panel sessions. PMID:24314311

  15. Fostering First Graders' Fluency with Basic Subtraction and Larger Addition Combinations via Computer-Assisted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroody, Arthur J.; Purpura, David J.; Eiland, Michael D.; Reid, Erin E.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving fluency with basic subtraction and add-with-8 or -9 combinations is difficult for primary grade children. A 9-month training experiment entailed evaluating the efficacy of software designed to promote such fluency via guided learning of reasoning strategies. Seventy-five eligible first graders were randomly assigned to one of three…

  16. Culturing Human Pluripotent and Neural Stem Cells in an Enclosed Cell Culture System for Basic and Preclinical Research.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alexander E; Herculian, Siranush; Banuelos, Maria G; Navarro, Samantha L; Jenkins, Michael P; Schwartz, Philip H

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how to use a custom manufactured, commercially available enclosed cell culture system for basic and preclinical research. Biosafety cabinets (BSCs) and incubators have long been the standard for culturing and expanding cell lines for basic and preclinical research. However, as the focus of many stem cell laboratories shifts from basic research to clinical translation, additional requirements are needed of the cell culturing system. All processes must be well documented and have exceptional requirements for sterility and reproducibility. In traditional incubators, gas concentrations and temperatures widely fluctuate anytime the cells are removed for feeding, passaging, or other manipulations. Such interruptions contribute to an environment that is not the standard for cGMP and GLP guidelines. These interruptions must be minimized especially when cells are utilized for therapeutic purposes. The motivation to move from the standard BSC and incubator system to a closed system is that such interruptions can be made negligible. Closed systems provide a work space to feed and manipulate cell cultures and maintain them in a controlled environment where temperature and gas concentrations are consistent. This way, pluripotent and multipotent stem cells can be maintained at optimum health from the moment of their derivation all the way to their eventual use in therapy. PMID:27341536

  17. Culturing Human Pluripotent and Neural Stem Cells in an Enclosed Cell Culture System for Basic and Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Alexander E.; Herculian, Siranush; Banuelos, Maria G.; Navarro, Samantha L.; Jenkins, Michael P.; Schwartz, Philip H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how to use a custom manufactured, commercially available enclosed cell culture system for basic and preclinical research. Biosafety cabinets (BSCs) and incubators have long been the standard for culturing and expanding cell lines for basic and preclinical research. However, as the focus of many stem cell laboratories shifts from basic research to clinical translation, additional requirements are needed of the cell culturing system. All processes must be well documented and have exceptional requirements for sterility and reproducibility. In traditional incubators, gas concentrations and temperatures widely fluctuate anytime the cells are removed for feeding, passaging, or other manipulations. Such interruptions contribute to an environment that is not the standard for cGMP and GLP guidelines. These interruptions must be minimized especially when cells are utilized for therapeutic purposes. The motivation to move from the standard BSC and incubator system to a closed system is that such interruptions can be made negligible. Closed systems provide a work space to feed and manipulate cell cultures and maintain them in a controlled environment where temperature and gas concentrations are consistent. This way, pluripotent and multipotent stem cells can be maintained at optimum health from the moment of their derivation all the way to their eventual use in therapy. PMID:27341536

  18. Regulating tissue research: do we need additional rules to protect research participants?

    PubMed

    Wright, Jessica; Ploem, Corrette; Sliwka, Marcin; Gevers, Sjef

    2010-12-01

    This article explores whether additional rules are needed for the regulation of tissue research in Europe. A human rights-based approach (referring to international documents and illustrative examples from national legislation) is taken to address the question: what is so special about tissue, in particular when compared to personal data? The existing regimes in Europe on data protection and clinical trials are presented and examined for their suitability to govern tissue research, taking into account the differences between data and tissue. Six recommendations are outlined, highlighting important points future legislation on tissue research must take into account.

  19. Reinforcement contingencies and social reinforcement: some reciprocal relations between basic and applied research.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T R; Hackenberg, T D

    2001-01-01

    Reinforcement contingencies and social reinforcement are ubiquitous phenomena in applied behavior analysis. This discussion paper is divided into two sections. In the first section, reinforcement contingencies are discussed in terms of the necessary and sufficient conditions for reinforcement effects. Response-stimulus dependencies, conditional probabilities, and contiguity are discussed as possible mechanisms of, and arrangements for, reinforcement effects. In the second section, social reinforcement is discussed in terms of its functional subtypes and reinforcement context effects. Two underlying themes run throughout the discussion: (a) Applied research would benefit from a greater understanding of existing basic research, and (b) basic research could be designed to specifically address some of the issues about reinforcement that are central to effective application.

  20. Glycan Arrays: From Basic Biochemical Research to Bioanalytical and Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Geissner, Andreas; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-06-12

    A major branch of glycobiology and glycan-focused biomedicine studies the interaction between carbohydrates and other biopolymers, most importantly, glycan-binding proteins. Today, this research into glycan-biopolymer interaction is unthinkable without glycan arrays, tools that enable high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate interaction partners. Glycan arrays offer many applications in basic biochemical research, for example, defining the specificity of glycosyltransferases and lectins such as immune receptors. Biomedical applications include the characterization and surveillance of influenza strains, identification of biomarkers for cancer and infection, and profiling of immune responses to vaccines. Here, we review major applications of glycan arrays both in basic and applied research. Given the dynamic nature of this rapidly developing field, we focus on recent findings. PMID:27306309

  1. Glycan Arrays: From Basic Biochemical Research to Bioanalytical and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissner, Andreas; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2016-06-01

    A major branch of glycobiology and glycan-focused biomedicine studies the interaction between carbohydrates and other biopolymers, most importantly, glycan-binding proteins. Today, this research into glycan-biopolymer interaction is unthinkable without glycan arrays, tools that enable high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate interaction partners. Glycan arrays offer many applications in basic biochemical research, for example, defining the specificity of glycosyltransferases and lectins such as immune receptors. Biomedical applications include the characterization and surveillance of influenza strains, identification of biomarkers for cancer and infection, and profiling of immune responses to vaccines. Here, we review major applications of glycan arrays both in basic and applied research. Given the dynamic nature of this rapidly developing field, we focus on recent findings.

  2. Commercialization of basic research from within the university and return of value to the public

    PubMed Central

    Hammerstedt, Roy H; Blach, Edward L

    2008-01-01

    The responsibility to return “value” to those who support basic research is an obligatory part of accepting funds to support the research. This reality should, but now does not, impact planning and execution of all basic research from its earliest stages. Universities are becoming ever more important in their role in the accelerating quest of a national goal of transition to a “knowledge based economy.” As such, the complex organizational format of a university, laden with entrenched procedures of questionable utility, should be adjusted to identify the means to commercialize the small subset of projects that appear suitable for further development. Of special concern is the growing tendency to encourage academic “innovators” to develop spin-out companies “on the side.” While seductive in perceived simplicity, this is a difficult step and we believe that most such individuals are ill-suited to these activities. Not because of technical ability but because of lack of relevant management experience. We attempt to address that situation through a brief listing of some reasons why people “do research” and outline phases (steps) in moving from concept to application, including an overview of start-up and funding early-stage spin-outs. A discussion of the limits to applying results of basic research to enhancing sperm fertility in commodity and companion animals and humans is provided. Hurdles are so daunting that there is concern as to why anyone would attempt to translate basic observations into practical solutions; which in turn raises the question of why funding agencies should fund basic studies in the first place. PMID:18164880

  3. First steps for integrating sex and gender considerations into basic experimental biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Stacey A; Antle, David M; Côté, Julie; Deroy, Kathy; Fraleigh, Nya; Messing, Karen; Parent, Lise; St-Pierre, Joey; Vaillancourt, Cathy; Mergler, Donna

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades there has been an increasing recognition of the need to account for sex and gender in biology and medicine, in order to develop a more comprehensive understanding of biological phenomena and to address gaps in medical knowledge that have arisen due to a generally masculine bias in research. We have noted that as basic experimental biomedical researchers, we face unique challenges to the incorporation of sex and gender in our work, and that these have remained largely unarticulated, misunderstood, and unaddressed in the literature. Here, we describe some of the specific challenges to the incorporation of sex and gender considerations in research involving cell cultures and laboratory animals. In our view, the mainstreaming of sex and gender considerations in basic biomedical research depends on an approach that will allow scientists to address these issues in ways that do not undermine our ability to pursue our fundamental scientific interests. To that end, we suggest a number of strategies that allow basic experimental researchers to feasibly and meaningfully take sex and gender into account in their work.

  4. Integrating basic and applied research and the utility of Lattal and Perone's Handbook of research methods in human operant behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Stromer, R

    2000-01-01

    Lattal and Perone's Handbook of methods used in human operant research on behavioral processes will be a valuable resource for researchers who want to bridge laboratory developments with applied study. As a supplemental resource, investigators are also encouraged to examine the series of papers in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis that discuss basic research and its potential for application. Increased knowledge of behavioral processes in laboratory research could lead to innovative solutions to practical problems addressed by applied behavior analysts in the home, classroom, clinic, and community. PMID:10738963

  5. Integrating basic and applied research and the utility of Lattal and Perone's Handbook of research methods in human operant behavior.

    PubMed

    Stromer, R

    2000-01-01

    Lattal and Perone's Handbook of methods used in human operant research on behavioral processes will be a valuable resource for researchers who want to bridge laboratory developments with applied study. As a supplemental resource, investigators are also encouraged to examine the series of papers in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis that discuss basic research and its potential for application. Increased knowledge of behavioral processes in laboratory research could lead to innovative solutions to practical problems addressed by applied behavior analysts in the home, classroom, clinic, and community.

  6. [Basic symptoms in schizophrenia, their clinical study and relevance in research].

    PubMed

    Miret, Salvador; Fatjó-Vilas, Mar; Peralta, Víctor; Fañanás, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Basic symptoms consist of subtle sub-clinical disturbances subjectively experienced by schizophrenia patients. These are mainly related to drive, affect, thinking and language, perception, memory, motor action, central vegetative functions, control of cognitive processes, and stress tolerance. Initially described by Huber, from a phenomenological approach, basic symptoms are part of the earliest features of schizophrenia, and they can evolve along the course of the disorder. Their assessment during the prodromal phase of the disease (together with ultra-high risk criteria) is one of the 2 main approaches that allow the definition of states of clinical risk for the development of psychosis. The present review provides an updated view of the concept of basic symptoms, highlighting its potential value in establishing neurobiological correlates of interest in aetiopathogenic research.

  7. [Basic symptoms in schizophrenia, their clinical study and relevance in research].

    PubMed

    Miret, Salvador; Fatjó-Vilas, Mar; Peralta, Víctor; Fañanás, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Basic symptoms consist of subtle sub-clinical disturbances subjectively experienced by schizophrenia patients. These are mainly related to drive, affect, thinking and language, perception, memory, motor action, central vegetative functions, control of cognitive processes, and stress tolerance. Initially described by Huber, from a phenomenological approach, basic symptoms are part of the earliest features of schizophrenia, and they can evolve along the course of the disorder. Their assessment during the prodromal phase of the disease (together with ultra-high risk criteria) is one of the 2 main approaches that allow the definition of states of clinical risk for the development of psychosis. The present review provides an updated view of the concept of basic symptoms, highlighting its potential value in establishing neurobiological correlates of interest in aetiopathogenic research. PMID:26774677

  8. The CounterACT Research Network: basic mechanisms and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Jett, David A; Yeung, David T

    2010-07-01

    The National Institutes of Health has developed a comprehensive research program that includes research centers of excellence, individual research projects, small business projects, contracts, and interagency agreements to conduct basic, translational, and clinical research aimed at the discovery and/or identification of better medical countermeasures against chemical threat agents. Chemical threats include chemical warfare agents, toxic industrial and agricultural chemicals, and toxins and other chemicals that could be used intentionally as an act of terror or by large-scale accidents or natural disasters. The overarching goal of this research program is to enhance our medical response capabilities during an emergency. The program is named Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT). It supports translational research, applying ideas, insights, and discoveries generated through basic scientific inquiry to the treatment or prevention of mortality and morbidity caused by chemical threat agents. The categories of research supported under this program include creation and development of screening assays and animal models for therapy development, identification of candidate therapeutics, obtaining preliminary proof-of-principle data on the efficacy of candidate therapeutics, advanced efficacy and preclinical safety studies with appropriate animal models using Good Laboratory Practices (GLP), and clinical studies, including clinical trials with new drugs. Special consideration is given to research relevant to people who are particularly vulnerable, including the young, the elderly, and individuals with pre-existing medical conditions. PMID:20601628

  9. U.S. National Science Foundation Budget Proposal Focuses on Basic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2008-03-01

    The budget request of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) for fiscal year (FY) 2009 focuses attention on basic research, establishes and supports several cross-foundation investment projects designed to have a transformative impact across science and engineering, and puts foundation activities back on track to double their research budgets by the next decade. The foundation's total proposed budget is US$6.85 billion, an increase of 13% over that enacted for FY 2008. Most of this funding increase goes to NSF's Research and Related Activities (R&RA) account, which, at $5.59 billion, is $772.5 million above the FY 2008 enacted amount.

  10. Basic research needs and priorities in solar energy. Volume II. Technology crosscuts for DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, J S; Roessner, D

    1980-01-01

    Priorities for basic research important to the future developments of solar energy are idenified, described, and recommended. SERI surveyed more than 120 leading scientists who were engaged in or knowledgeable of solar-related research. The result is an amalgam of national scientific opinion representing the views of key researchers in relevant disciplines and of SERI staff members. The scientific disciplines included in the report are: chemistry, biology, materials sciences, engineering and mathematics, and the social and behavioral sciences. Each discipline is subdivided into two to five topical areas-and, within each topical area, research needs are described and ranked according to the priorities suggested in the survey. Three categories of priority were established: crucial, important, and needed. A narrative accompanying the description of research needs in each topical area discusses the importance of research in the area for solar energy development and presents the bases for the priority rankings recommended.

  11. Mixed-methods research in pharmacy practice: basics and beyond (part 1).

    PubMed

    Hadi, Muhammad Abdul; Alldred, David Phillip; Closs, S José; Briggs, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    This is the first of two papers which explore the use of mixed-methods research in pharmacy practice. In an era of evidence-based medicine and policy, high-quality research evidence is essential for the development of effective pharmacist-led services. Over the past decade, the use of mixed-methods research has become increasingly common in healthcare, although to date its use has been relatively limited in pharmacy practice research. In this article, the basic concepts of mixed-methods research including its definition, typologies and advantages in relation to pharmacy practice research are discussed. Mixed-methods research brings together qualitative and quantitative methodologies within a single study to answer or understand a research problem. There are a number of mixed-methods designs available, but the selection of an appropriate design must always be dictated by the research question. Importantly, mixed-methods research should not be seen as a 'tool' to collect qualitative and quantitative data, rather there should be some degree of 'integration' between the two data sets. If conducted appropriately, mixed-methods research has the potential to generate quality research evidence by combining strengths and overcoming the respective limitations of qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

  12. Basic and Applied Materials Science Research Efforts at MSFC Germane to NASA Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Presently, a number of investigations are ongoing that blend basic research with engineering applications in support of NASA goals. These include (1) "Pore Formation and Mobility (PFMI) " An ISS Glovebox Investigation" NASA Selected Project - 400-34-3D; (2) "Interactions Between Rotating Bodies" Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) Project - 279-62-00-16; (3) "Molybdenum - Rhenium (Mo-Re) Alloys for Nuclear Fuel Containment" TD Collaboration - 800-11-02; (4) "Fabrication of Alumina - Metal Composites for Propulsion Components" ED Collaboration - 090-50-10; (5) "Radiation Shielding for Deep-Space Missions" SD Effort; (6) "Other Research". In brief, "Pore Formation and Mobility" is an experiment to be conducted in the ISS Microgravity Science Glovebox that will systematically investigate the development, movement, and interactions of bubbles (porosity) during the controlled directional solidification of a transparent material. In addition to promoting our general knowledge of porosity physics, this work will serve as a guide to future ISS experiments utilizing metal alloys. "Interactions Between Rotating Bodies" is a CDDF sponsored project that is critically examining, through theory and experiment, claims of "new" physics relating to gravity modification and electric field effects. "Molybdenum - Rhenium Alloys for Nuclear Fuel Containment" is a TD collaboration in support of nuclear propulsion. Mo-Re alloys are being evaluated and developed for nuclear fuel containment. "Fabrication of Alumina - Metal Composites for Propulsion Components" is an ED collaboration with the intent of increasing strength and decreasing weight of metal engine components through the incorporation of nanometer-sized alumina fibers. "Radiation Shielding for Deep-Space Missions" is an SD effort aimed at minimizing the health risk from radiation to human space voyagers; work to date has been primarily programmatic but experiments to develop hydrogen-rich materials for shielding are

  13. Recent advances in experimental basic research on graphene and graphene-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-06-01

    The present work is a review of the results achieved in the experimental basic research on following rapidly developing modern topics of nanoscience and nanotechnology related to graphene and graphene-based nanosystems: reduction of graphene oxide and investigation of physical properties of reduced graphene oxide; fabrication and investigation of graphene quantum dots; study of light emission from excited graphene; fabrication and investigation of graphene nanopores; preparation and investigation of graphene oxide-liquid crystals as well as aqueous graphene oxide dispersions. Besides presenting the scientific content of the above-mentioned five topics in detail, we briefly mention promising and interesting works, demonstrating that the area of basic research on graphene and graphene-based nanostructures is still being enlarged.

  14. Making life easier with effort: Basic findings and applied research on response effort.

    PubMed

    Friman, P C

    1995-01-01

    Early basic research showed that increases in required response effort (or force) produced effects that resembled those produced by punishment. A recent study by Alling and Poling determined some subtle differences between the two behavior-change strategies, but also confirmed that increasing required effort is an effective response-reduction procedure with enduring effects. In this paper we summarize basic research on response effort and explore the role of effort in diverse applied areas including deceleration of aberrant behavior, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oral habits, health care appointment keeping, littering, indexes of functional disability, and problem solving. We conclude that renewed interest in response effort as an independent variable is justified because of its potent effects and because the political constraints imposed on punishment- and reinforcement-based procedures have yet to be imposed on procedures that entail manipulations of response effort.

  15. Making life easier with effort: Basic findings and applied research on response effort

    PubMed Central

    Friman, Patrick C.; Poling, Alan

    1995-01-01

    Early basic research showed that increases in required response effort (or force) produced effects that resembled those produced by punishment. A recent study by Alling and Poling determined some subtle differences between the two behavior-change strategies, but also confirmed that increasing required effort is an effective response-reduction procedure with enduring effects. In this paper we summarize basic research on response effort and explore the role of effort in diverse applied areas including deceleration of aberrant behavior, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oral habits, health care appointment keeping, littering, indexes of functional disability, and problem solving. We conclude that renewed interest in response effort as an independent variable is justified because of its potent effects and because the political constraints imposed on punishment- and reinforcement-based procedures have yet to be imposed on procedures that entail manipulations of response effort. PMID:16795886

  16. U.S. nuclear reaction data program in support of basic research

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, M.R.; Chadwick, M.B.; Smith, M.S.

    1998-03-01

    Information about the US Nuclear Reaction Data Network (USNRDN) such as its members, work in progress, summaries of meetings, and organizational details may be found in its WWW Homepage. This paper is an overview of the data support provided by the network for basic research in nuclear astrophysics, radioactive ion beams, high energy heavy ion and electron interactions and related activities involving all aspects of data stewardship.

  17. Effect of Spinal Cord Injury on the Respiratory System: Basic Research and Current Clinical Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, M. Beth; Nantwi, Kwaku; Goshgarian, Harry G

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Spinal cord injury (SCI) often leads to an impairment of the respiratory system. The more rostral the level of injury, the more likely the injury will affect ventilation. In fact, respiratory insufficiency is the number one cause of mortality and morbidity after SCI. This review highlights the progress that has been made in basic and clinical research, while noting the gaps in our knowledge. Basic research has focused on a hemisection injury model to examine methods aimed at improving respiratory function after SCI, but contusion injury models have also been used. Increasing synaptic plasticity, strengthening spared axonal pathways, and the disinhibition of phrenic motor neurons all result in the activation of a latent respiratory motor pathway that restores function to a previously paralyzed hemidiaphragm in animal models. Human clinical studies have revealed that respiratory function is negatively impacted by SCI. Respiratory muscle training regimens may improve inspiratory function after SCI, but more thorough and carefully designed studies are needed to adequately address this issue. Phrenic nerve and diaphragm pacing are options available to wean patients from standard mechanical ventilation. The techniques aimed at improving respiratory function in humans with SCI have both pros and cons, but having more options available to the clinician allows for more individualized treatment, resulting in better patient care. Despite significant progress in both basic and clinical research, there is still a significant gap in our understanding of the effect of SCI on the respiratory system. PMID:17853653

  18. Fourth annual workshop on management in basic and applied research environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.W.

    1993-11-01

    The struggle to develop quality management concepts that ``map`` onto the cultural and work practices found in basic and applied research environments has been (for better or for worse) an attempt to differentiate basic and applied research from the nuclear industry. In the first (1990) edition of this ``Music Book`` proceedings, almost every laboratory that participated had a quality program that was traceable to, based on, influenced by, or in reaction to the nuclear quality standard ASME-NQA-1. This 1993 edition of the ``Music Book`` is very different in that almost every laboratory has developed a quality program that is based on, traceable to, or heavily influenced by DOE 5700.6C (Quality Assurance) and the DOE Standard; Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research (DOE-ER-STD-6001-92). In order to construct a context for what follows and properly introduce the contents of this book, we want to briefly recount some of the highlights of the events that brought about this change, from the perspective of one who participated in the process.

  19. Additional Research Needs to Support the GENII Biosphere Models

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Arimescu, Carmen

    2013-11-30

    In the course of evaluating the current parameter needs for the GENII Version 2 code (Snyder et al. 2013), areas of possible improvement for both the data and the underlying models have been identified. As the data review was implemented, PNNL staff identified areas where the models can be improved both to accommodate the locally significant pathways identified and also to incorporate newer models. The areas are general data needs for the existing models and improved formulations for the pathway models. It is recommended that priorities be set by NRC staff to guide selection of the most useful improvements in a cost-effective manner. Suggestions are made based on relatively easy and inexpensive changes, and longer-term more costly studies. In the short term, there are several improved model formulations that could be applied to the GENII suite of codes to make them more generally useful. • Implementation of the separation of the translocation and weathering processes • Implementation of an improved model for carbon-14 from non-atmospheric sources • Implementation of radon exposure pathways models • Development of a KML processor for the output report generator module data that are calculated on a grid that could be superimposed upon digital maps for easier presentation and display • Implementation of marine mammal models (manatees, seals, walrus, whales, etc.). Data needs in the longer term require extensive (and potentially expensive) research. Before picking any one radionuclide or food type, NRC staff should perform an in-house review of current and anticipated environmental analyses to select “dominant” radionuclides of interest to allow setting of cost-effective priorities for radionuclide- and pathway-specific research. These include • soil-to-plant uptake studies for oranges and other citrus fruits, and • Development of models for evaluation of radionuclide concentration in highly-processed foods such as oils and sugars. Finally, renewed

  20. The Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel - A facility dedicated to code validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, William L., III; Kjelgaard, Scott O.

    1988-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics code validation requirements are discussed together with the need for close interaction between experiment and code development. Code validation experiments require a great deal of data and for the experiments to be successful, a highly-productive research facility is required. A description is provided of the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART); especially the instrumentation and experimental techniques that make the facility ideally suited to code validation experiments. Results are presented from recent tests which illustrate the techniques used in BART.

  1. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Current perspectives from basic research to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Renzo; Navarro, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive degeneration of upper and lower motoneurons, leading to muscle weakness and paralysis, and finally death. Considerable recent advances have been made in basic research and preclinical therapeutic attempts using experimental models, leading to increasing clinical and translational research in the context of this disease. In this review we aim to summarize the most relevant findings from a variety of aspects about ALS, including evaluation methods, animal models, pathophysiology, and clinical findings, with particular emphasis in understanding the role of every contributing mechanism to the disease for elucidating the causes underlying degeneration of motoneurons and the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  2. Bridging the Gap between Basic and Applied Research by an Integrative Research Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Robin; Mandl, Heinz

    2007-01-01

    The discussion of the gap between theory and practice has a long tradition in educational psychology and especially in research on learning and instruction. Starting with a short analysis of more or less elaborated approaches focusing on this problem, a complex procedure called "integrative research approach", specialized in reducing the gap…

  3. MaizeGDB: The Maize Model Organism Database for Basic, Translational, and Applied Research

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Carolyn J.; Harper, Lisa C.; Schaeffer, Mary L.; Sen, Taner Z.; Seigfried, Trent E.; Campbell, Darwin A.

    2008-01-01

    In 2001 maize became the number one production crop in the world with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations reporting over 614 million tonnes produced. Its success is due to the high productivity per acre in tandem with a wide variety of commercial uses. Not only is maize an excellent source of food, feed, and fuel, but also its by-products are used in the production of various commercial products. Maize's unparalleled success in agriculture stems from basic research, the outcomes of which drive breeding and product development. In order for basic, translational, and applied researchers to benefit from others' investigations, newly generated data must be made freely and easily accessible. MaizeGDB is the maize research community's central repository for genetics and genomics information. The overall goals of MaizeGDB are to facilitate access to the outcomes of maize research by integrating new maize data into the database and to support the maize research community by coordinating group activities. PMID:18769488

  4. 26 CFR 1.41-5 - Basic research for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1986. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Basic research for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1986. 1.41-5 Section 1.41-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.41-5 Basic research for taxable years...

  5. 26 CFR 1.41-5 - Basic research for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1986. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Basic research for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1986. 1.41-5 Section 1.41-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.41-5 Basic research for taxable years...

  6. Microgravity: A New Tool for Basic and Applied Research in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This brochure highlights selected aspects of the NASA Microgravity Science and Applications program. So that we can expand our understanding and control of physical processes, this program supports basic and applied research in electronic materials, metals, glasses and ceramics, biological materials, combustion and fluids and chemicals. NASA facilities that provide weightless environments on the ground, in the air, and in space are available to U.S. and foreign investigators representing the academic and industrial communities. After a brief history of microgravity research, the text explains the advantages and methods of performing microgravity research. Illustrations follow of equipment used and experiments preformed aboard the Shuttle and of prospects for future research. The brochure concludes be describing the program goals and the opportunities for participation.

  7. Defense, basic, and industrial research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Longshore, A.; Salgado, K.

    1995-10-01

    The Workshop on Defense, Basic, and Industrial Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss the use of neutrons in science-based stockpile stewardship, The workshop began with presentations by government officials, senior representatives from the three weapons laboratories, and scientific opinion leaders. Workshop participants then met in breakout sessions on the following topics: materials science and engineering; polymers, complex fluids, and biomaterials; fundamental neutron physics; applied nuclear physics; condensed matter physics and chemistry; and nuclear weapons research. They concluded that neutrons can play an essential role in science-based stockpile stewardship and that there is overlap and synergy between defense and other uses of neutrons in basic, applied, and industrial research from which defense and civilian research can benefit. This proceedings is a collection of talks and papers from the plenary, technical, and breakout session presentations. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Basic research on pulsed power for narrowband high-power microwave sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamiloglu, Edl; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Vidmar, Robert

    2002-06-01

    Relativistic, intense beam-driven High Power Microwave (HPM) sources emerged as consequence of the development of pulsed power. In this context, pulsed power refers to components of a system following the prime power source, and before the load, which is typically an electron beam diode. Progress in fielding HPM sources on mobile platforms requires developing more compact pulsed power drivers. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research is sponsoring, using resources allocated by DDR&E, a Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) program to study basic phenomena and processes that can lead to the design of more compact pulsed power systems. The University of New Mexico is leading a consortium, uniting researchers at Old Dominion University and the University of Nevada-Reno, to study basic phenomena relating to breakdown in solid and liquid dielectrics, high dielectric constant ceramics for use in compact, folded Blumlein transmission lines, gas switches, thermal management in compact pulsed power systems, among other topics. This paper describes the research activities on this program that are being performed in the initial year.

  9. Temporal discounting: basic research and the analysis of socially important behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Critchfield, T S; Kollins, S H

    2001-01-01

    Recent basic research on human temporal discounting is reviewed to illustrate procedures, summarize key findings, and draw parallels with both nonhuman animal research and conceptual writings on self-control. Lessons derived from this research are then applied to the challenge of analyzing socially important behaviors such as drug abuse, eating and exercise, and impulsiveness associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Attending to the broader temporal context in which behavior occurs may aid in the analysis of socially important behavior. Applying this perspective to the study of behavior in natural environments also highlights the importance of combining methodological flexibility with conceptual rigor to promote the extension of applied behavior analysis to a broader array of socially important behaviors. PMID:11317983

  10. Deep drilling basic research program shear bit design. Final report, March 1990-October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.H.; Deskins, W.G.; Maurer, W.C.; Cooper, G.; Lee, J.

    1996-02-01

    Maurer Engineering Inc., under contract with the Gas Research Institute, evaluated drilling of deep gas wells to determine future research projects. The candidates providing the best possibility of success and maximum savings are PDC/TSP shear bits, slim-hole drilling, roller-cone bits, and downhole motors; of these, improvements in shear bits have the best opportunity for near-term results. Significant RD&D was conducted to optimize TSP bit design and efficiency for improved performance in deep drilling. Results of the Deep Drilling Basic Research Program showed that: Improvements in shear bits are the best way to reduce costs and increase efficiency of deep drilling. Changes in cutter size, density, and orientation significantly impact the penetration rate and life of TSP shear bits. Power delivered to the rock controls penetration rate. Higher power rates mean faster drilling. Correctly designed TSP shear bits can deliver more power to the rock.

  11. Use of the National Ignition Facility for defense, energy, and basic research science

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.

    1994-07-15

    On January 15, 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved the Justification for Mission Need (JMN) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This action (Key Decision Zero, or KD0) commenced the conceptual design for the facility, which has resulted in a recently completed Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The JMN document defined the NIF mission elements to include laboratory fusion ignition and energy gain, weapons physics, and nuclear weapons effects testing research (NWET). NIF has a dual benefit by contributing to inertial fusion energy (IFE), industrial technology development, new basic science areas applying high power lasers, and training young scientists for future stewardship activities. For consideration of the next DOE action, Key Decision One (KD1), all mission elements of the NIF as stated in the JMN are consistent with and important to the US stockpile stewardship program, and are expected to continue to be in the vital interest of the United States for the long term. This document provides further information on the utility of NIF for stockpile stewardship, including support for a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and specific findings of four national workshops on the NIF utility for weapons physics, NWET, IFE and basic science research. The role of NIF for stockpile stewardship has been refined since a DOE meeting in Albuquerque, NM Feb. 1--2, 1994. The possible compliance of NIF research with anticipated CTBT and NPT limitations was discussed at the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation in Washington, DC on March 8, 1994.

  12. Low-cost USB interface for operant research using Arduino and Visual Basic.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Rogelio; Pérez-Herrera, Carlos A

    2015-03-01

    This note describes the design of a low-cost interface using Arduino microcontroller boards and Visual Basic programming for operant conditioning research. The board executes one program in Arduino programming language that polls the state of the inputs and generates outputs in an operant chamber. This program communicates through a USB port with another program written in Visual Basic 2010 Express Edition running on a laptop, desktop, netbook computer, or even a tablet equipped with Windows operating system. The Visual Basic program controls schedules of reinforcement and records real-time data. A single Arduino board can be used to control a total of 52 inputs/output lines, and multiple Arduino boards can be used to control multiple operant chambers. An external power supply and a series of micro relays are required to control 28-V DC devices commonly used in operant chambers. Instructions for downloading and using the programs to generate simple and concurrent schedules of reinforcement are provided. Testing suggests that the interface is reliable, accurate, and could serve as an inexpensive alternative to commercial equipment. PMID:25649099

  13. Low-cost USB interface for operant research using Arduino and Visual Basic.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Rogelio; Pérez-Herrera, Carlos A

    2015-03-01

    This note describes the design of a low-cost interface using Arduino microcontroller boards and Visual Basic programming for operant conditioning research. The board executes one program in Arduino programming language that polls the state of the inputs and generates outputs in an operant chamber. This program communicates through a USB port with another program written in Visual Basic 2010 Express Edition running on a laptop, desktop, netbook computer, or even a tablet equipped with Windows operating system. The Visual Basic program controls schedules of reinforcement and records real-time data. A single Arduino board can be used to control a total of 52 inputs/output lines, and multiple Arduino boards can be used to control multiple operant chambers. An external power supply and a series of micro relays are required to control 28-V DC devices commonly used in operant chambers. Instructions for downloading and using the programs to generate simple and concurrent schedules of reinforcement are provided. Testing suggests that the interface is reliable, accurate, and could serve as an inexpensive alternative to commercial equipment.

  14. The challenge in translating basic research discoveries to treatment of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Disatnik, Marie-Helene; Qi, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease is a rare neurodegenerative disease resulting from insertion and/or expansion of a polyglutamine repeats close to the N-terminal of the huntingtin protein. Although unequivocal genetic tests have been available for about 20 years, current pharmacological treatments do not prevent or slow down disease progression. Recent basic research identified potential novel drug targets for the treatment of Huntington disease. However, there are clear challenges in translating these discoveries into treatment strategies for these patients. The following is a brief discussion of these challenges using our recent experience as an example.

  15. [Between bench and bedside: examples of clinically oriented basic surgery research].

    PubMed

    Hotz, H G; Foitzik, T; Runkel, N; Buhr, H J

    1997-01-01

    Animal experimental studies are an effective modality for testing new therapeutic strategies, provided that the animal model and the study protocol simulate the clinical situation. This is exemplified by various animal experimental studies on the therapy of infectious complications in acute necrotizing pancreatitis that were performed preliminary or supplementary to clinical studies. The results show that basic surgical research with close clinical orientation can be usefully and fruitfully combined with clinical studies and enables the academically active young surgeon to overcome the dualism between laboratory work and clinical practice.

  16. Implementing 'translational' biomedical research: convergence and divergence among clinical and basic scientists.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Myfanwy; Barry, Christine A; Donovan, Jenny L; Sandall, Jane; Wolfe, Charles D A; Boaz, Annette

    2011-10-01

    Universities are increasingly regarded as key actors in the new 'knowledge economy', with requirements to produce market-oriented knowledge and engage in commercialization. This is of particular significance in the biomedical field, reflecting the perceived gap between success in terms of scientific discoveries and its transformation into products. The dominant discourse attributes this situation to 'blocks' in the translational pathway from 'bench to bedside', leading to policies to 'reengineer' the research enterprise. This study examines a pilot initiative established by the UK's Medical Research Council (MRC). This involved employing a change agent (Research Translator) supported by a small amount of translational funding to promote the culture and practice of translational research at a university/hospital site in England. An ethnographically informed case study involving semi-structured and open exploratory interviews, observation and document review, was conducted in 2008. Analysis and interpretation were informed by Bourdieu's logic of practice applied to science. The requirements of translational research promoted by the Research Translator and its sources of capital (authority, prestige etc) were largely congruent with the 'field' of clinical science. In contrast, translational research diverged from perceptions of 'legitimate' science and requirements for capital accumulation held by the majority of basic scientists who often described this research as 'high risk' and were resistant to the Research Translator's advice. However some differences in motivations and practices were identified within groups of scientists associated with career stage, work environment and specialty. We argue that there are convergent and divergent forces that influence scientists' readiness to adopt a market-oriented translational research model and in turn facilitate or constrain the effectiveness of a knowledge broker. We also identify ways in which current structures and

  17. Implementing 'translational' biomedical research: convergence and divergence among clinical and basic scientists.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Myfanwy; Barry, Christine A; Donovan, Jenny L; Sandall, Jane; Wolfe, Charles D A; Boaz, Annette

    2011-10-01

    Universities are increasingly regarded as key actors in the new 'knowledge economy', with requirements to produce market-oriented knowledge and engage in commercialization. This is of particular significance in the biomedical field, reflecting the perceived gap between success in terms of scientific discoveries and its transformation into products. The dominant discourse attributes this situation to 'blocks' in the translational pathway from 'bench to bedside', leading to policies to 'reengineer' the research enterprise. This study examines a pilot initiative established by the UK's Medical Research Council (MRC). This involved employing a change agent (Research Translator) supported by a small amount of translational funding to promote the culture and practice of translational research at a university/hospital site in England. An ethnographically informed case study involving semi-structured and open exploratory interviews, observation and document review, was conducted in 2008. Analysis and interpretation were informed by Bourdieu's logic of practice applied to science. The requirements of translational research promoted by the Research Translator and its sources of capital (authority, prestige etc) were largely congruent with the 'field' of clinical science. In contrast, translational research diverged from perceptions of 'legitimate' science and requirements for capital accumulation held by the majority of basic scientists who often described this research as 'high risk' and were resistant to the Research Translator's advice. However some differences in motivations and practices were identified within groups of scientists associated with career stage, work environment and specialty. We argue that there are convergent and divergent forces that influence scientists' readiness to adopt a market-oriented translational research model and in turn facilitate or constrain the effectiveness of a knowledge broker. We also identify ways in which current structures and

  18. Effect of basic additives on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for CO and propylene oxidation under oxygen-deficient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Chen, Y.W.

    1997-05-01

    Pt catalysts supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared and characterized with respect to surface area, CO chemisorption, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO{sub 2}, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) of H{sub 2}. The effects of basic additives on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for CO and propylene oxidation were investigated. The addition of basic additives slightly decreases the surface area of the catalyst and does not significantly change Pt dispersion. The basicity of the catalyst is in the order Pt-K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pt-Na{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pt-CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The promoted Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts are much more active than the unpromoted one for CO and propylene oxidation under the stoichiometric point. Under oxygen-deficient conditions and in the absence of water, propylene conversions on all catalysts studied herein increase with increasing reaction temperature. Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits the highest propylene conversion and the lowest CO conversion among these catalysts, and the addition of CeO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, and K{sub 2}O on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} can promote the CO conversion. Under oxygen-deficient conditions and in the presence of water, the water-gas shift and steam re-forming reactions can take place and result in increases of CO and propylene conversions. Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the most active catalyst for the steam reforming reaction and the least active catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction among these catalysts. However, the addition of basic additives on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst can significantly enhance the water-gas shift reaction that can reduce CO emission. The promotional effect is in the order K{sub 2}O > Na{sub 2}O > CeO{sub 2}. K{sub 2}O could be a promising additive to a catalytic converter of a two-stroke motorcycle since it can enhance CO conversion.

  19. Basic research needs and priorities in solar energy. Volume I. Executive summary. Technology crosscuts for DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, T S; Roessner, D

    1980-01-01

    This report identifies, describes, and recommends priorities for basic research important to the future development of solar energy. In response to a request from the US Department of Energy, SERI surveyed more than 120 leading scientists who were engaged in or knowledgeable of solar-related research. SERI scientists relied heavily on the opinions of scientists polled, but weighted their own recommendations and opinions equally. The result is an amalgam of national scientific opinion representing the views of key researchers in relevant disciplines and of SERI staff members. The Scientific disciplines included in the report are: chemistry, biology, materials sciences, engineering and mathematics, and the social and behavioral sciences. Each discipline is subdivided into two to five topical areas and, wintin each topical area, research needs are described and ranked according to the priorities suggested in the survey. Three categories of priority were established: Crucial, important, and needed. A narrative accompanying the descripton of research needs in each topical area discusses the importance of research in the area for solar energy development and presents the bases for the priority rankings recommended.

  20. Structure, function and five basic needs of the global health research system

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Igor; Sridhar, Devi

    2016-01-01

    Background Two major initiatives that were set up to support and co–ordinate global health research efforts have been largely discontinued in recent years: the Global Forum for Health Research and World Health Organization's Department for Research Policy and Cooperation. These developments provide an interesting case study into the factors that contribute to the sustainability of initiatives to support and co–ordinate global health research in the 21st century. Methods We reviewed the history of attempts to govern, support or co–ordinate research in global health. Moreover, we studied the changes and shifts in funding flows attributed to global health research. This allowed us to map the structure of the global health research system, as it has evolved under the increased funding contributions of the past decade. Bearing in mind its structure, core functions and dynamic nature, we proposed a framework on how to effectively support the system to increase its efficiency. Results Based on our framework, which charted the structure and function of the global health research system and exposed places and roles for many stakeholders within the system, five basic needs emerged: (i) to co–ordinate funding among donors more effectively; (ii) to prioritize among many research ideas; (iii) to quickly recognize results of successful research; (iv) to ensure broad and rapid dissemination of results and their accessibility; and (v) to evaluate return on investments in health research. Conclusion The global health research system has evolved rapidly and spontaneously. It has not been optimally efficient, but it is possible to identify solutions that could improve this. There are already examples of effective responses for the need of prioritization of research questions (eg, the CHNRI method), quick recognition of important research (eg, systems used by editors of the leading journals) and rapid and broadly accessible publication of the new knowledge (eg, PLoS One

  1. Basic Blue Skies Research in the UK: Are we losing out?

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Belinda

    2008-01-01

    Background The term blue skies research implies a freedom to carry out flexible, curiosity-driven research that leads to outcomes not envisaged at the outset. This research often challenges accepted thinking and introduces new fields of study. Science policy in the UK has given growing support for short-term goal-oriented scientific research projects, with pressure being applied on researchers to demonstrate the future application of their work. These policies carry the risk of restricting freedom, curbing research direction, and stifling rather than stimulating the creativity needed for scientific discovery. Methods This study tracks the tortuous routes that led to three major discoveries in cardiology. It then investigates the constraints in current research, and opportunities that may be lost with existing funding processes, by interviewing selected scientists and fund providers for their views on curiosity-driven research and the freedom needed to allow science to flourish. The transcripts were analysed using a grounded theory approach to gather recurrent themes from the interviews. Results The results from these interviews suggest that scientists often cannot predict the future applications of research. Constraints such as lack of scientific freedom, and a narrow focus on relevance and accountability were believed to stifle the discovery process. Although it was acknowledged that some research projects do need a clear and measurable framework, the interviewees saw a need for inquisitive, blue skies research to be managed in a different way. They provided examples of situations where money allocated to 'safe' funding was used for more innovative research. Conclusion This sample of key UK scientists and grant providers acknowledge the importance of basic blue skies research. Yet the current evaluation process often requires that scientists predict their likely findings and estimate short-term impact, which does not permit freedom of research direction. There is

  2. Metabolomics and Type 2 Diabetes: Translating Basic Research into Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthias S.; Shearer, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and its comorbidities have reached epidemic proportions, with more than half a billion cases expected by 2030. Metabolomics is a fairly new approach for studying metabolic changes connected to disease development and progression and for finding predictive biomarkers to enable early interventions, which are most effective against T2D and its comorbidities. In metabolomics, the abundance of a comprehensive set of small biomolecules (metabolites) is measured, thus giving insight into disease-related metabolic alterations. This review shall give an overview of basic metabolomics methods and will highlight current metabolomics research successes in the prediction and diagnosis of T2D. We summarized key metabolites changing in response to T2D. Despite large variations in predictive biomarkers, many studies have replicated elevated plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids and their derivatives, aromatic amino acids and α-hydroxybutyrate ahead of T2D manifestation. In contrast, glycine levels and lysophosphatidylcholine C18:2 are depressed in both predictive studies and with overt disease. The use of metabolomics for predicting T2D comorbidities is gaining momentum, as are our approaches for translating basic metabolomics research into clinical applications. As a result, metabolomics has the potential to enable informed decision-making in the realm of personalized medicine. PMID:26636104

  3. Human induced pluripotent stem cells from basic research to potential clinical applications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Teresa de Souza; de Souza Fernandez, Cecilia; Mencalha, André Luiz

    2013-01-01

    The human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are derived from a direct reprogramming of human somatic cells to a pluripotent stage through ectopic expression of specific transcription factors. These cells have two important properties, which are the self-renewal capacity and the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the human body. So, the discovery of hiPSCs opens new opportunities in biomedical sciences, since these cells may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of diseases in the production of new diseases models, in drug development/drug toxicity tests, gene therapies, and cell replacement therapies. However, the hiPSCs technology has limitations including the potential for the development of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities leading to tumorigenicity. Nowadays, basic research in the hiPSCs field has made progress in the application of new strategies with the aim to enable an efficient production of high-quality of hiPSCs for safety and efficacy, necessary to the future application for clinical practice. In this review, we show the recent advances in hiPSCs' basic research and some potential clinical applications focusing on cancer. We also present the importance of the use of statistical methods to evaluate the possible validation for the hiPSCs for future therapeutic use toward personalized cell therapies.

  4. In vitro platforms for tissue engineering: implications for basic research and clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Rouwkema, Jeroen; Gibbs, Susan; Lutolf, Matthias P; Martin, Ivan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Malda, Jos

    2011-08-01

    Clinical translation of engineered tissues into regenerative medicine applications, and the effort to reduce the use of animals for the screening of drugs and other compounds, result in an increasing demand for human tissues engineered in vitro for implantation, in vitro screening systems and basic research. Further development and optimization of in vitro models for quantitative studies of biophysical stimulation and mass transport in engineered tissues is seen as one of the high research priorities. A recent international symposium held in The Netherlands discussed the state of the art and key challenges in the development of bioreactor platforms and microscale technologies. Here we summarize the current status and future development of in vitro tissue models, based on the findings presented at this symposium.

  5. Cognitive Factors and Residual Speech Errors: Basic Science, Translational Research, and Some Clinical Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Catherine Torrington

    2015-11-01

    This article explores the theoretical and empirical relationships between cognitive factors and residual speech errors (RSEs). Definitions of relevant cognitive domains are provided, as well as examples of formal and informal tasks that may be appropriate in assessment. Although studies to date have been limited in number and scope, basic research suggests that cognitive flexibility, short- and long-term memory, and self-monitoring may be areas of weakness in this population. Preliminary evidence has not supported a relationship between inhibitory control, attention, and RSEs; however, further studies that control variables such as language ability and temperament are warranted. Previous translational research has examined the effects of self-monitoring training on residual speech errors. Although results have been mixed, some findings suggest that children with RSEs may benefit from the inclusion of this training. The article closes with a discussion of clinical frameworks that target cognitive skills, including self-monitoring and attention, as a means of facilitating speech sound change.

  6. Bayesian networks for knowledge discovery in large datasets: basics for nurse researchers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Abbott, Patricia A

    2003-01-01

    The growth of nursing databases necessitates new approaches to data analyses. These databases, which are known to be massive and multidimensional, easily exceed the capabilities of both human cognition and traditional analytical approaches. One innovative approach, knowledge discovery in large databases (KDD), allows investigators to analyze very large data sets more comprehensively in an automatic or a semi-automatic manner. Among KDD techniques, Bayesian networks, a state-of-the art representation of probabilistic knowledge by a graphical diagram, has emerged in recent years as essential for pattern recognition and classification in the healthcare field. Unlike some data mining techniques, Bayesian networks allow investigators to combine domain knowledge with statistical data, enabling nurse researchers to incorporate clinical and theoretical knowledge into the process of knowledge discovery in large datasets. This tailored discussion presents the basic concepts of Bayesian networks and their use as knowledge discovery tools for nurse researchers.

  7. Genome Elimination: Translating Basic Research into a Future Tool for Plant Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Comai, Luca

    2014-01-01

    During the course of our history, humankind has been through different periods of agricultural improvement aimed at enhancing our food supply and the performance of food crops. In recent years, it has become apparent that future crop improvement efforts will require new approaches to address the local challenges of farmers while empowering discovery across industry and academia. New plant breeding approaches are needed to meet this challenge to help feed a growing world population. Here I discuss how a basic research discovery is being translated into a potential future tool for plant breeding, and share the story of researcher Simon Chan, who recognized the potential application of this new approach—genome elimination—for the breeding of staple food crops in Africa and South America. PMID:24915001

  8. [Use of the in vivo microdialysis technique in basic and clinical research].

    PubMed

    Nedvídková, J; Nedvídek, J; Koska, J; Ksinantová, L; Vigas, M; Kvetnanský, R; Pacák, K

    2003-01-01

    Microdialysis is in vivo technique that permits monitoring of local concentrations of metabolites and drugs at specific sites in the body that makes it an attractive tool for the basic and clinical research. Microdialysis entered the experimental studies of the brain, and later also of the peripheral tissues such as adipose and muscle tissues, kidney, lung, eye, skin, and blood. There are several critical factors in the experimental implementations of microdialysis: the probe, the perfusion solution, tissue integrity, and the sensitivity of microdialysate analysis method. When the experimental conditions are optimised to give valid results, microdialysis can provide numerous data from the relatively small number of individual subjects. It can bring about detailed clinical information reflecting free metabolite and drug concentrations in studied tissues and/or in plasma. With the progress of analytical methods, applications and importance of the microdialysis technique in clinical and pharmacokinetic research and diagnostics will increase. PMID:12920798

  9. N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1,3-butanediamine as effective running electrolyte additive for efficient electrophoretic separation of basic proteins in bare fused-silica capillaries.

    PubMed

    Corradini, D; Cannarsa, G

    1995-04-01

    The effect of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1,3-butanediamine (TMBD) in the running electrolyte on the electroosmotic flow and the migration behavior of four standard basic proteins in bare fused-silica capillaries was examined at pH 4.0, 5.5, and 6.5. Depending on the electrolyte pH and additive concentration the electroosmotic flow was either cathodic or anodic. A similar Langmuirian-type dependence of the electroosmotic flow on the concentration of TMBD in the running electrolyte was found at the three experimented pH values, which may be indicative of the specific adsorption of the additive in the immobilized region of the electric double layer at the interface between the capillary wall and the electrolyte solution. Electrophoretic separations of the four standard basic proteins performed at the three above pH values, showed well-resolved, efficient and symmetric peaks, demonstrating the utility of this additive for protein electrophoresis in bare fused-silica capillaries. The variations in separation efficiency, peak capacity, resolution and reproducibility of migration times as a function of the additive concentration at pH 6.5 were also examined.

  10. America's Basic Research: Prosperity Through Discovery. A Policy Statement by the Research and Policy Committee of the Committee for Economic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee for Economic Development, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This policy statement looks at America's basic research enterprise and lays out the processes and systematic reforms needed to meet emerging risks to the outcomes from investments in basic research. The Committee for Economic Development (CED) undertook this project in the belief that significant progress with many of society's problems and new…

  11. Preparation of nickel oxide powder by decomposition of basic nickel carbonate in microwave field with nickel oxide seed as a microwave absorbing additive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Ke, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) powder is prepared by decomposition of basic nickel carbonate (mNi(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}nNiCO{sub 3}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O) in microwave field with NiO seed as a microwave absorbing additive. Basic nickel carbonate (BNC) can decompose completely to NiO powder in a short time. Firstly, the heat for BNC decomposition is provided by NiO seed which absorbs microwave and then by NiO product which also absorbs microwave. The decomposition process of BNC can be accelerated by increasing the amount of BNC, the amount of NiO seed or the microwave field power. The size of NiO powder product is about 180nm when the size of BNC used is about 160nm.

  12. The Path to Sustainable Nuclear Energy. Basic and Applied Research Opportunities for Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Finck, P.; Edelstein, N.; Allen, T.; Burns, C.; Chadwick, M.; Corradini, M.; Dixon, D.; Goff, M.; Laidler, J.; McCarthy, K.; Moyer, B.; Nash, K.; Navrotsky, A.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Peterson, P.; Sackett, J.; Sickafus, K. E.; Tulenko, J.; Weber, W.; Morss, L.; Henry, G.

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this report is to identify new basic science that will be the foundation for advances in nuclear fuel-cycle technology in the near term, and for changing the nature of fuel cycles and of the nuclear energy industry in the long term. The goals are to enhance the development of nuclear energy, to maximize energy production in nuclear reactor parks, and to minimize radioactive wastes, other environmental impacts, and proliferation risks. The limitations of the once-through fuel cycle can be overcome by adopting a closed fuel cycle, in which the irradiated fuel is reprocessed and its components are separated into streams that are recycled into a reactor or disposed of in appropriate waste forms. The recycled fuel is irradiated in a reactor, where certain constituents are partially transmuted into heavier isotopes via neutron capture or into lighter isotopes via fission. Fast reactors are required to complete the transmutation of long-lived isotopes. Closed fuel cycles are encompassed by the Department of Energy?s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), to which basic scientific research can contribute. Two nuclear reactor system architectures can meet the AFCI objectives: a ?single-tier? system or a ?dual-tier? system. Both begin with light water reactors and incorporate fast reactors. The ?dual-tier? systems transmute some plutonium and neptunium in light water reactors and all remaining transuranic elements (TRUs) in a closed-cycle fast reactor. Basic science initiatives are needed in two broad areas: ? Near-term impacts that can enhance the development of either ?single-tier? or ?dual-tier? AFCI systems, primarily within the next 20 years, through basic research. Examples: Dissolution of spent fuel, separations of elements for TRU recycling and transmutation Design, synthesis, and testing of inert matrix nuclear fuels and non-oxide fuels Invention and development of accurate on-line monitoring systems for chemical and nuclear species in the nuclear

  13. Incorporation of basic research and service components in a field environmental geochemistry course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senko, J.

    2015-12-01

    "Application-based service learning" (ABSL) refers to an approach to formal course instruction that integrates service and research components into the course. An ABSL approach was employed in a field-based environmental chemistry course, whose goal was to evaluate and monitor the aqueous geochemistry of coal mine-derived acid mine drainage (AMD) in the Appalachia basin. In this course, students conducted literature reviews on the geochemistry and environmental impacts of AMD, participated in a field sampling campaign of several AMD treatment systems, and conducted chemical analyses of the samples that they retrieved. The remainder of the course was dedicated to "lab meetings," during which data was analyzed, conclusions were drawn from the data, and a manuscript was drafted that described the findings of the field analyses, and made recommendations regarding the performance of the AMD treatment systems. The service component of the course focused on socioeconomic impacts of coal mining and the Appalachian region, with the final manuscript distributed to AMD treatment practitioners and state regulatory agencies. A comparison of pre- and post-course questionnaires that included Likert scale questions revealed that students' attitudes toward basic research improved over the period or the course. Based on the questionnaires attitudes toward service diminished, but "open-ended" questionnaires indicated an improved attitude toward both research and service, with an emphasis on the benefits of research that serves the community. Ultimately, we hope to develop approaches to compare the effectiveness of ABSL-based across disciplines.

  14. The Rise of Basic Research at tha Bell Labs: Young Turks and Younger Turks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Philip

    2004-03-01

    ABSTRACT Even before World War II, a certain amount of fundamental physics research came out of the Bell Labs. Already in the 20's, before the Labs were five years old, the discoveries of electron diffraction by Davisson and Germer, and of thermal noise by Johnson and Nyquist, had come as byproducts of wide-ranging technological studies. By the late '30's, there was a small group of broadly-trained scientists who formed a nucleus around which the "young turks" in management --J B Fisk, M J Kelly, W Shockley, perhaps others--formed the postwar physical research department, comprising at first perhaps 50 people with a mandate to do exploratory but "relevant" research. This talk will diiscuss how some of the generation of postwar hires, with the cooperation of enlightened managers like W O Baker and A H White, further tested and enlarged their freedom to do basic, curiosity-driven research in an academic atmosphere. I call this group, consisting of individuals like B T Matthias, G H Wannier, R G Shulman, P A Wolff, myself , and a number of others, the "younger Turks".

  15. Meta-Analysis of Interventions for Basic Mathematics Computation in Single-Case Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Methe, Scott A.; Kilgus, Stephen P.; Neiman, Cheryl; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris

    2012-01-01

    This study examined interventions for addition and subtraction that were implemented through single-case design (SCD) research studies. We attempted to extend prior SCD meta-analyses by examining differences in effect sizes across several moderating variables and by including a novel index of effect, improvement rate difference (IRD). We also…

  16. Comparison of the performance of non-ionic and anionic surfactants as mobile phase additives in the RPLC analysis of basic drugs.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ángel, María J; García-Álvarez-Coque, María C

    2011-03-01

    Surfactants added to the mobile phases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) give rise to a modified stationary phase, due to the adsorption of surfactant monomers. Depending on the surfactant nature (ionic or non-ionic), the coated stationary phase can exhibit a positive net charge, or just change its polarity remaining neutral. Also, micelles in the mobile phase introduce new sites for solute interaction. This affects the chromatographic behavior, especially in the case of basic compounds. Two surfactants of different nature, the non-ionic Brij-35 and the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) added to water or aqueous-organic mixtures, are here compared in the separation of basic compounds (β-blockers and tricyclic antidepressants). The reversible/irreversible adsorption of the monomers of both surfactants on the stationary phase was examined. The changes in the nature of the chromatographic system using different columns and chromatographic conditions were followed based on the changes in retention and peak shape. The study revealed that Brij-35 is suitable for analyzing basic compounds of intermediate polarity, using "green chemistry", since the addition of an organic solvent is not needed and Brij-35 is a biodegradable surfactant. In contrast, RPLC with hydro-organic mixtures or mobile phases containing SDS required high concentrations of organic solvents. PMID:21328695

  17. Fundamentos, Orientaciones, Areas Basicas y Procedimientos para la Investigacion Educativa (Bases, Guidelines, Basic Areas, and Procedures for Educational Research).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerio de Educacion Nacional, Bogota (Colombia). Instituto Colombiano de Pedagogia.

    This document establishes the bases, general guidelines, basic areas, and procedures for educational research conducted in Colombia. The philosophy underlying research objectives is explained. There is special interest in social research concerning the condition of man and of the social groups that will be the targets of education, and in research…

  18. Basic Research Needs for Superconductivity. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Superconductivity, May 8-11, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrao, J.; Kwok, W-K; Bozovic, I.; Mazin, I.; Seamus, J. C.; Civale, L.; Christen, D.; Horwitz, J.; Kellogg, G.; Finnemore, D.; Crabtree, G.; Welp, U.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Shapard, L.; Nault, R. M.

    2006-05-11

    codes. Unlike traditional grid technology, superconducting fault current limiters are smart. They increase their resistance abruptly in response to overcurrents from faults in the system, thus limiting the overcurrents and protecting the grid from damage. They react fast in both triggering and automatically resetting after the overload is cleared, providing a new, self-healing feature that enhances grid reliability. Superconducting reactive power regulators further enhance reliability by instantaneously adjusting reactive power for maximum efficiency and stability in a compact and economic package that is easily sited in urban grids. Not only do superconducting motors and generators cut losses, weight, and volume by a factor of two, but they are also much more tolerant of voltage sag, frequency instabilities, and reactive power fluctuations than their conventional counterparts. The challenge facing the electricity grid to provide abundant, reliable power will soon grow to crisis proportions. Continuing urbanization remains the dominant historic demographic trend in the United States and in the world. By 2030, nearly 90% of the U.S. population will reside in cities and suburbs, where increasingly strict permitting requirements preclude bringing in additional overhead access lines, underground cables are saturated, and growth in power demand is highest. The power grid has never faced a challenge so great or so critical to our future productivity, economic growth, and quality of life. Incremental advances in existing grid technology are not capable of solving the urban power bottleneck. Revolutionary new solutions are needed ? the kind that come only from superconductivity.

  19. The RCSB Protein Data Bank: views of structural biology for basic and applied research and education

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter W.; Prlić, Andreas; Bi, Chunxiao; Bluhm, Wolfgang F.; Christie, Cole H.; Dutta, Shuchismita; Green, Rachel Kramer; Goodsell, David S.; Westbrook, John D.; Woo, Jesse; Young, Jasmine; Zardecki, Christine; Berman, Helen M.; Bourne, Philip E.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    The RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB, http://www.rcsb.org) provides access to 3D structures of biological macromolecules and is one of the leading resources in biology and biomedicine worldwide. Our efforts over the past 2 years focused on enabling a deeper understanding of structural biology and providing new structural views of biology that support both basic and applied research and education. Herein, we describe recently introduced data annotations including integration with external biological resources, such as gene and drug databases, new visualization tools and improved support for the mobile web. We also describe access to data files, web services and open access software components to enable software developers to more effectively mine the PDB archive and related annotations. Our efforts are aimed at expanding the role of 3D structure in understanding biology and medicine. PMID:25428375

  20. Improvement of Subsonic Basic Research Tunnel Flow Quality as Applied to Wall Mounted Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.

    1995-01-01

    A survey to determine the characteristics of a boundary layer that forms on the wall of the Subsonic Basic Research Tunnel has been performed. Early results showed significant differences in the velocity profiles as measured spanwise across the wall. An investigation of the flow in the upstream contraction revealed the presence of a separation bubble at the beginning of the contraction which caused much of the observed unsteadiness. Vortex generators were successfully applied to the contraction inlet to alleviate the separation. A final survey of the wall boundary layer revealed variations in the displacement and momentum thicknesses to be less than +/- 5% for all but the most upper portion of the wall. The flow quality was deemed adequate to continue the planned follow-on tests to help develop the semi-span test technique.

  1. Biomaterials for Abrogating Metastasis: Bridging the Gap between Basic and Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Conde, João; Shomron, Noam; Artzi, Natalie

    2016-09-01

    Herein lies the issue of how to best approach cancer metastasis therapeutics in a focused, directed and efficacious manner. The lack of standardized means to efficiently deliver therapeutic cargo to metastatic sites calls for a paradigm shift in the way we view and treat metastasis. It is crucial to leverage the potential of nanomedicine to differentially combat cancer spread at each stage of the disease (primary tumor growth and formation of metastases) while considering the optimal administration route. We propose to implement three possible strategies to treat cancer as a function of disease type and state, while leveraging the advancement in materials design and in particular nanotechnology: (1) local primary tumor abrogation; (2) primary tumor re-programming to prevent metastasis; and (3) combination (local and systemic) therapy when metastasis has already transpired. Herein, we highlight potential means to bridge the gap between basic and translational research as related to metastasis therapy. PMID:27457877

  2. Simulation research of the tire Basic Relaxation Model in conditions of the wheel cornering angle oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luty, W.

    2016-09-01

    - A description of the tire Basic Relaxation Model (BRM) is presented in this paper. Simulation research of the tire BRM model in conditions of oscillatory changes of the wheel cornering angle were performed. During the simulation tests the courses of changes in the value of lateral reaction force, transmitted by the wheel, as a response to the sinusoidal changes in the value of the wheel cornering angle have been presented. There have been compared the simulation results obtained for the model of tire-road interaction in two modes: including and not including the BRM. The simulation results allowed to verify prepared BRM and also to determine the influence of the tire relaxation process on the tire behavior in conditions of dynamic changes of the wheel cornering angle.

  3. Basic Research on a Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage by Direct Contact Melting and Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akihiro; Saito, Akio; Utaka, Yoshio; Okuda, Kenichi; Katayama, Kozo

    A basic experimental research on a latent heat thermal energy storage system, utilizing a simple and effective heat exchange mechanism by a direct contact between the phase change material (PCM) and the heat transfer fluid (HTF) , was shown. In this report, authors proposed the direct contact latent heat thermal energy storage system using industrial paraffin and n-Eicosane as the PCM, and using water as the HTF. The observations were performed concerning the HTF separation from the solid PCM in the solidification process (heat discharging process), and concerning the water pass formation within the solid PCM. Then, it was confirmed that the system worked effectively by using n-Eicosane as the PCM. And authors discussed the mechanism of direct contact solidification process from experimental results.

  4. Basic Research on a Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage by Direct Contact Melting and Soldification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akihiro; Saito, Akio; Utaka, Yoshio; Okuda, Kenichi; Katayama, Kozo

    A basic experimental research on a latent heat thermal energy storage system , utilizing a simple and effective heat exchange mechanism by a direct contact between the phase change material (PCM) and the heat transfer fluid (HTF), was shown. Discharging experiments on direct contact latent heat thermal energy reservoir using n-Eicosane as the PCM and water as the HTF, were performed, based on the conditions obtained in previous report. Then, operating conditions for suitable discharging process were searched from the experimental results (outlet water temperature response and local temperature response in the reservoir). Moreover, solidification mechanisms of PCM, which had been presumed in previous report, were confirmed from these experimental results, and the simple physical model on direct contact heat exchange in the reservoir was proposed. Then, the outlet water temperature response by this model was compared with the experimental results.

  5. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels: a basic research joint program in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutard, J.-L.; Badjeck, V.; Barguet, L.; Barouh, C.; Bhattacharya, A.; Colignon, Y.; Hatzoglou, C.; Loyer-Prost, M.; Rouffié, A. L.; Sallez, N.; Salmon-Legagneur, H.; Schuler, T.

    2014-12-01

    AREVA, CEA, CNRS, EDF and Mécachrome are funding a joint program of basic research on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels (ODISSEE), in support to the development of oxide dispersion strengthened 9-14% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels for the fuel element cladding of future Sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors. The selected objectives and the results obtained so far will be presented concerning (i) physical-chemical characterisation of the nano-clusters as a function of ball-milling process, metallurgical conditions and irradiation, (ii) meso-scale understanding of failure mechanisms under dynamic loading and creep, and, (iii) kinetic modelling of nano-clusters nucleation and α/α‧ unmixing.

  6. The RCSB Protein Data Bank: views of structural biology for basic and applied research and education.

    PubMed

    Rose, Peter W; Prlić, Andreas; Bi, Chunxiao; Bluhm, Wolfgang F; Christie, Cole H; Dutta, Shuchismita; Green, Rachel Kramer; Goodsell, David S; Westbrook, John D; Woo, Jesse; Young, Jasmine; Zardecki, Christine; Berman, Helen M; Bourne, Philip E; Burley, Stephen K

    2015-01-01

    The RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB, http://www.rcsb.org) provides access to 3D structures of biological macromolecules and is one of the leading resources in biology and biomedicine worldwide. Our efforts over the past 2 years focused on enabling a deeper understanding of structural biology and providing new structural views of biology that support both basic and applied research and education. Herein, we describe recently introduced data annotations including integration with external biological resources, such as gene and drug databases, new visualization tools and improved support for the mobile web. We also describe access to data files, web services and open access software components to enable software developers to more effectively mine the PDB archive and related annotations. Our efforts are aimed at expanding the role of 3D structure in understanding biology and medicine.

  7. The Brown Superfund Basic Research Program: A Multistakeholder Partnership Addresses Real-World Problems in Contaminated Communities

    PubMed Central

    Senier, Laura; Hudson, Benjamin; Fort, Sarah; Hoover, Elizabeth; Tillson, Rebecca; Brown, Phil

    2008-01-01

    The NIEHS funds several basic and applied research programs, many of which also require research translation or outreach. This paper reports on a project by the Brown University Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP), in which outreach and research translation teams collaborated with state regulatory agency personnel and community activists on a legislative initiative to mitigate the financial impacts of living in a contaminated community. The Environmentally Compromised Home Ownership (ECHO) program makes home equity loans of up to $25,000 available to qualified applicants. This collaboration provides a case study in community engagement and demonstrates how research translation and outreach activities that are clearly differentiated yet well integrated can improve a suite of basic and applied research. Although engaging diverse constituencies can be difficult, community-engaged translation and outreach have the potential to make research findings more useful to communities, address some of the social impacts of contamination, and empower stakeholders to pursue their individual and collectively-held goals for remediation. The NIEHS has recently renewed its commitment to community-engaged research and advocacy, making this an optimal time to reflect on how basic research programs that engage stakeholders through research translation and outreach can add value to the overall research enterprise. PMID:18677987

  8. Clinical pharmacology of analgesics assessed with human experimental pain models: bridging basic and clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Bruno Georg; Lötsch, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    The medical impact of pain is such that much effort is being applied to develop novel analgesic drugs directed towards new targets and to investigate the analgesic efficacy of known drugs. Ongoing research requires cost-saving tools to translate basic science knowledge into clinically effective analgesic compounds. In this review we have re-examined the prediction of clinical analgesia by human experimental pain models as a basis for model selection in phase I studies. The overall prediction of analgesic efficacy or failure of a drug correlated well between experimental and clinical settings. However, correct model selection requires more detailed information about which model predicts a particular clinical pain condition. We hypothesized that if an analgesic drug was effective in an experimental pain model and also a specific clinical pain condition, then that model might be predictive for that particular condition and should be selected for development as an analgesic for that condition. The validity of the prediction increases with an increase in the numbers of analgesic drug classes for which this agreement was shown. From available evidence, only five clinical pain conditions were correctly predicted by seven different pain models for at least three different drugs. Most of these models combine a sensitization method. The analysis also identified several models with low impact with respect to their clinical translation. Thus, the presently identified agreements and non-agreements between analgesic effects on experimental and on clinical pain may serve as a solid basis to identify complex sets of human pain models that bridge basic science with clinical pain research. PMID:23082949

  9. Elevated incidence of childhood leukemia in Woburn, Massachusetts: NIEHS Superfund Basic Research Program searches for causes.

    PubMed

    Durant, J L; Chen, J; Hemond, H F; Thilly, W G

    1995-09-01

    Between 1966 and 1986, the childhood leukemia rate in Woburn, Massachusetts, was 4-fold higher than the national average. A multidisciplinary research team from MIT, which is being supported by the NIEHS Superfund Basic Research Program, has explored the possible importance of a temporal correlation between the period of elevated leukemia and a previously unrecognized mobilization of toxic metals from a waste disposal site in north Woburn. Residents of Woburn may have been exposed to arsenic (70 micrograms/l) and chromium (240 micrograms/l) at levels in excess of federal drinking water standards (50 micrograms/l for each metal) by consuming municipal groundwater contaminated with these metals. Research is currently underway a) to elucidate the mechanisms and the pathways by which these metals were transported from the waste disposal site to the drinking water supply; b) to determine the identity of the principal human cell mutagens in samples of aquifer materials collected from the site of the municipal supply wells; and c) to measure the extent of exposure and genetic change in residents who consumed the contaminated well water.

  10. It Started in a GE Freezer: Basic Precipitation Research Triggers the Business of Weather Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, K.

    2015-12-01

    At the end of World War II, Nobel Prize-winning chemist Irving Langmuir and his team at the General Electric Research Laboratory in Schenectady, New York, were doing advanced research on cloaking smokes and aircraft icing for the US military. Trying to determine why some clouds precipitated while others did not, Langmuir concluded that non-precipitating clouds were lacking "ice nuclei" that would gather up cloud droplets until they became large enough to fall out of the cloud. If they could find an artificial substitute, it would be possible to modify clouds and the weather. Dry ice particles did the trick, military funding followed, and cloud busting commenced. But a handful of entrepreneurial meteorologists saw a different purpose: enhancing precipitation and preventing hail damage. The commercialization of weather modification was underway, with cloud seeding enhancing rainfall east of the Cascades, in the Desert Southwest, and even in the watersheds serving New York City. Hail busting took off in the Dakotas, and snowpack enhancement got a boost in Montana. Basic cloud physics research very quickly became commercial weather modification, fulfilling a postwar desire to use science and technology to control nature and creating an opening for meteorologists to provide a variety of specialized services to businesses whose profits depend on the weather.

  11. Elevated incidence of childhood leukemia in Woburn, Massachusetts: NIEHS Superfund Basic Research Program searches for causes.

    PubMed Central

    Durant, J L; Chen, J; Hemond, H F; Thilly, W G

    1995-01-01

    Between 1966 and 1986, the childhood leukemia rate in Woburn, Massachusetts, was 4-fold higher than the national average. A multidisciplinary research team from MIT, which is being supported by the NIEHS Superfund Basic Research Program, has explored the possible importance of a temporal correlation between the period of elevated leukemia and a previously unrecognized mobilization of toxic metals from a waste disposal site in north Woburn. Residents of Woburn may have been exposed to arsenic (70 micrograms/l) and chromium (240 micrograms/l) at levels in excess of federal drinking water standards (50 micrograms/l for each metal) by consuming municipal groundwater contaminated with these metals. Research is currently underway a) to elucidate the mechanisms and the pathways by which these metals were transported from the waste disposal site to the drinking water supply; b) to determine the identity of the principal human cell mutagens in samples of aquifer materials collected from the site of the municipal supply wells; and c) to measure the extent of exposure and genetic change in residents who consumed the contaminated well water. Images Figure 8. PMID:8549500

  12. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  13. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  14. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  15. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  16. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  17. Translating Basic Behavioral and Social Science Research to Clinical Application: The EVOLVE Mixed Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Janey C.; Czajkowski, Susan; Charlson, Mary E.; Link, Alissa R.; Wells, Martin T.; Isen, Alice M.; Mancuso, Carol A.; Allegrante, John P.; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Jobe, Jared B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe a mixed-methods approach to develop and test a basic behavioral science-informed intervention to motivate behavior change in three high-risk clinical populations. Our theoretically-derived intervention comprised a combination of positive affect and self-affirmation (PA/SA) which we applied to three clinical chronic disease populations. Methods We employed a sequential mixed methods model (EVOLVE) to design and test the PA/SA intervention in order to increase physical activity in people with coronary artery disease (post-percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI]) or asthma (ASM), and to improve medication adherence in African Americans with hypertension (HTN). In an initial qualitative phase, we explored participant values and beliefs. We next pilot tested and refined the intervention, and then conducted three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with parallel study design. Participants were randomized to combined PA/SA vs. an informational control (IC) and followed bimonthly for 12 months, assessing for health behaviors and interval medical events. Results Over 4.5 years, we enrolled 1,056 participants. Changes were sequentially made to the intervention during the qualitative and pilot phases. The three RCTs enrolled 242 PCI, 258 ASM and 256 HTN participants (n=756). Overall, 45.1% of PA/SA participants versus 33.6% of IC participants achieved successful behavior change (p=0.001). In multivariate analysis PA/SA intervention remained a significant predictor of achieving behavior change (p<0.002, OR=1.66, 95% CI 1.22–2.27), controlling for baseline negative affect, comorbidity, gender, race/ethnicity, medical events, smoking and age. Conclusions The EVOLVE method is a means by which basic behavioral science research can be translated into efficacious interventions for chronic disease populations. PMID:22963594

  18. Can Basic Risk Research Help in the Prevention of Childhood and Adolescent Depression? Examining a Cognitive and Emotional Regulation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Frances; Rawal, Adhip

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to highlight ways in which basic research findings in the field of childhood and adolescent depression can help to inform and refine preventive intervention efforts. We selectively review basic research evidence from community, clinical, and high-risk populations that identifies cognitive mechanisms (thought processes and reactions to negative affect) and emotional regulation as key processes involved in the onset and maintenance of depression. We focus on cognitive and emotional mechanisms in order to allow comparability with the majority of current preventive interventions. A range of basic research strategies and studies are then suggested that could be employed to help the development and refinement of prevention strategies. These include the need for prospective longitudinal studies to identify causal risk and protective factors, an integration of research approaches and methods, and a focus on understanding potential aetiological heterogeneity between childhood and adolescent depression. PMID:21197099

  19. Developing a Technology for the Use of Operant Extinction in Clinical Settings: An Examination of Basic and Applied Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Iwata, Brian A.

    1996-01-01

    Basic and applied research on variables that influence the extinction of operant behaviors is reviewed and applied to the treatment of behavior disorders. The potential value of a general technology for the use of behavioral extinction is discussed. The paper concludes that current research findings are not sufficient for the development of a…

  20. Why Flies? Inexpensive Public Engagement Exercises to Explain the Value of Basic Biomedical Research on "Drosophila melanogaster"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulver, Stefan R.; Cognigni, Paola; Denholm, Barry; Fabre, Caroline; Gu, Wendy X. W.; Linneweber, Gerit; Prieto-Godino, Lucia; Urbancic, Vasja; Zwart, Maarten; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate model organisms are powerful systems for uncovering conserved principles of animal biology. Despite widespread use in scientific communities, invertebrate research is often severely undervalued by laypeople. Here, we present a set of simple, inexpensive public outreach exercises aimed at explaining to the public why basic research on…

  1. Basic versus applied research: Julius Sachs (1832–1897) and the experimental physiology of plants

    PubMed Central

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The German biologist Julius Sachs was the first to introduce controlled, accurate, quantitative experimentation into the botanical sciences, and is regarded as the founder of modern plant physiology. His seminal monograph Experimental-Physiologie der Pflanzen (Experimental Physiology of Plants) was published 150 y ago (1865), when Sachs was employed as a lecturer at the Agricultural Academy in Poppelsdorf/Bonn (now part of the University). This book marks the beginning of a new era of basic and applied plant science. In this contribution, I summarize the achievements of Sachs and outline his lasting legacy. In addition, I show that Sachs was one of the first biologists who integrated bacteria, which he considered to be descendants of fungi, into the botanical sciences and discussed their interaction with land plants (degradation of wood etc.). This “plant-microbe-view” of green organisms was extended and elaborated by the laboratory botanist Wilhelm Pfeffer (1845–1920), so that the term “Sachs-Pfeffer-Principle of Experimental Plant Research” appears to be appropriate to characterize this novel way of performing scientific studies on green, photoautotrophic organisms (embryophytes, algae, cyanobacteria). PMID:26146794

  2. Basic research on auditory-visual interaction and listening in rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Zahorik, Pavel A.

    2001-05-01

    Attending a live concert is a multisensory experience. In some cases it could be argued that hearing is the primary sense involved, but it is never the only one. Vision, smell, and even touch make important contributions to the overall experience. Moreover, the senses interact such that what one hears, for example, is influenced by what one sees, and vice-versa. This talk will address primarily the auditory aspects of the concert experience, focusing on the results of basic studies of human spatial hearing in reverberant environments, and how these results may help us understand the concert experience. The topics will include sound localization in anechoic and reverberant environments, the precedence effect, the cocktail party effect, the perception of distance, and the impact of room acoustics on loudness perception. Also discussed will be what has been learned from empirical research on auditory-visual interactions. In this area the focus will be on the visual capture effects, the best known of which is the ventriloquism effect. Finally, the limitations of modern psychoacoustics will be addressed in connection with the problem of fully revealing the complexities of the concert experience, especially individual differences in subjective impression.

  3. Observing Ben Wyckoff: From Basic Research to Programmed Instruction and Social Issues

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Rogelio; Lattal, Kennon A

    2011-01-01

    L. Benjamin Wyckoff's seminal contributions to both psychological theory and application are the subject of this review. Wyckoff started his academic career as a graduate student at Indiana University, where he developed the observing-response procedure under the guidance of B. F. Skinner and C. J. Burke. At the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Wyckoff refined his mathematical theory of secondary reinforcement. This theory was the impetus for his creation of an electronic simulation of a rat running a T maze, one of the first “computer models” of learning. Wyckoff next went to Emory University, leaving there to help create two of the most successful companies dedicated to the advancement of programmed instruction and teaching machines: Teaching Machines, Inc. and the Human Development Institute. Wyckoff's involvement in these companies epitomizes the application of basic behavior-analytic principles in the development of technology to improve education and human relationships. The emergent picture of Wyckoff is that of a man who, through his research, professional work in educational applications of behavioral principles, and active involvement in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, was strongly committed to applying behavioral science to positively influence human behavior change. PMID:22532737

  4. Ion Beam Facility at the University of Chile; Applications and Basic Research

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, P. A.; Morales, J. R.; Cancino, S.; Dinator, M. I.; Donoso, N.; Sepulveda, A.; Ortiz, P.; Rojas, S.

    2010-08-04

    The main characteristics of the ion beam facility based on a 3.75 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Chile are described at this work. Current activities are mainly focused on the application of the Ion Beam Analysis techniques for environmental, archaeological, and material science analysis. For instance, Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) is applied to measure thin gold film thickness which are used to determine their resistivity and other electrical properties. At this laboratory the Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) and Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis (PESA) methodologies are extensively used for trace element analysis of urban aerosols (Santiago, Ciudad de Mexico). A similar study is being carried out at the Antarctica Peninsula. Characterization studies on obsidian and vitreous dacite samples using PIXE has been also perform allowing to match some of these artifacts with geological source sites in Chile.Basic physics research is being carried out by measuring low-energy cross section values for the reactions {sup 63}Cu(d,p){sup 64}Cu and {sup Nat}Zn(p,x){sup 67}Ga. Both radionuclide {sup 64}Cu and {sup 67}Ga are required for applications in medicine. Ongoing stopping power cross section measurements of proton and alphas on Pd, Cu, Bi and Mylar are briefly discussed.

  5. Observing ben wyckoff: from basic research to programmed instruction and social issues.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Rogelio; Lattal, Kennon A

    2011-01-01

    L. Benjamin Wyckoff's seminal contributions to both psychological theory and application are the subject of this review. Wyckoff started his academic career as a graduate student at Indiana University, where he developed the observing-response procedure under the guidance of B. F. Skinner and C. J. Burke. At the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wyckoff refined his mathematical theory of secondary reinforcement. This theory was the impetus for his creation of an electronic simulation of a rat running a T maze, one of the first "computer models" of learning. Wyckoff next went to Emory University, leaving there to help create two of the most successful companies dedicated to the advancement of programmed instruction and teaching machines: Teaching Machines, Inc. and the Human Development Institute. Wyckoff's involvement in these companies epitomizes the application of basic behavior-analytic principles in the development of technology to improve education and human relationships. The emergent picture of Wyckoff is that of a man who, through his research, professional work in educational applications of behavioral principles, and active involvement in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, was strongly committed to applying behavioral science to positively influence human behavior change.

  6. Observing ben wyckoff: from basic research to programmed instruction and social issues.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Rogelio; Lattal, Kennon A

    2011-01-01

    L. Benjamin Wyckoff's seminal contributions to both psychological theory and application are the subject of this review. Wyckoff started his academic career as a graduate student at Indiana University, where he developed the observing-response procedure under the guidance of B. F. Skinner and C. J. Burke. At the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wyckoff refined his mathematical theory of secondary reinforcement. This theory was the impetus for his creation of an electronic simulation of a rat running a T maze, one of the first "computer models" of learning. Wyckoff next went to Emory University, leaving there to help create two of the most successful companies dedicated to the advancement of programmed instruction and teaching machines: Teaching Machines, Inc. and the Human Development Institute. Wyckoff's involvement in these companies epitomizes the application of basic behavior-analytic principles in the development of technology to improve education and human relationships. The emergent picture of Wyckoff is that of a man who, through his research, professional work in educational applications of behavioral principles, and active involvement in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, was strongly committed to applying behavioral science to positively influence human behavior change. PMID:22532737

  7. Pain-relief learning in flies, rats, and man: basic research and applied perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Bertram; Yarali, Ayse; Diegelmann, Sören; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Pauli, Paul; Fendt, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Memories relating to a painful, negative event are adaptive and can be stored for a lifetime to support preemptive avoidance, escape, or attack behavior. However, under unfavorable circumstances such memories can become overwhelmingly powerful. They may trigger excessively negative psychological states and uncontrollable avoidance of locations, objects, or social interactions. It is therefore obvious that any process to counteract such effects will be of value. In this context, we stress from a basic-research perspective that painful, negative events are “Janus-faced” in the sense that there are actually two aspects about them that are worth remembering: What made them happen and what made them cease. We review published findings from fruit flies, rats, and man showing that both aspects, respectively related to the onset and the offset of the negative event, induce distinct and oppositely valenced memories: Stimuli experienced before an electric shock acquire negative valence as they signal upcoming punishment, whereas stimuli experienced after an electric shock acquire positive valence because of their association with the relieving cessation of pain. We discuss how memories for such punishment- and relief-learning are organized, how this organization fits into the threat-imminence model of defensive behavior, and what perspectives these considerations offer for applied psychology in the context of trauma, panic, and nonsuicidal self-injury. PMID:24643725

  8. Engineering plastid genomes: methods, tools, and applications in basic research and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Bock, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The small bacterial-type genome of the plastid (chloroplast) can be engineered by genetic transformation, generating cells and plants with transgenic plastid genomes, also referred to as transplastomic plants. The transformation process relies on homologous recombination, thereby facilitating the site-specific alteration of endogenous plastid genes as well as the precisely targeted insertion of foreign genes into the plastid DNA. The technology has been used extensively to analyze chloroplast gene functions and study plastid gene expression at all levels in vivo. Over the years, a large toolbox has been assembled that is now nearly comparable to the techniques available for plant nuclear transformation and that has enabled new applications of transplastomic technology in basic and applied research. This review describes the state of the art in engineering the plastid genomes of algae and land plants (Embryophyta). It provides an overview of the existing tools for plastid genome engineering, discusses current technological limitations, and highlights selected applications that demonstrate the immense potential of chloroplast transformation in several key areas of plant biotechnology. PMID:25494465

  9. Ion Beam Facility at the University of Chile; Applications and Basic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, P. A.; Morales, J. R.; Cancino, S.; Dinator, M. I.; Donoso, N.; Sepúlveda, A.; Ortiz, P.; Rojas, S.

    2010-08-01

    The main characteristics of the ion beam facility based on a 3.75 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Chile are described at this work. Current activities are mainly focused on the application of the Ion Beam Analysis techniques for environmental, archaeological, and material science analysis. For instance, Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) is applied to measure thin gold film thickness which are used to determine their resistivity and other electrical properties. At this laboratory the Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) and Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis (PESA) methodologies are extensively used for trace element analysis of urban aerosols (Santiago, Ciudad de Mexico). A similar study is being carried out at the Antarctica Peninsula. Characterization studies on obsidian and vitreous dacite samples using PIXE has been also perform allowing to match some of these artifacts with geological source sites in Chile. Basic physics research is being carried out by measuring low-energy cross section values for the reactions 63Cu(d,p)64Cu and NatZn(p,x)67Ga. Both radionuclide 64Cu and 67Ga are required for applications in medicine. Ongoing stopping power cross section measurements of proton and alphas on Pd, Cu, Bi and Mylar are briefly discussed.

  10. Pain-relief learning in flies, rats, and man: basic research and applied perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Bertram; Yarali, Ayse; Diegelmann, Sören; Wotjak, Carsten T; Pauli, Paul; Fendt, Markus

    2014-03-18

    Memories relating to a painful, negative event are adaptive and can be stored for a lifetime to support preemptive avoidance, escape, or attack behavior. However, under unfavorable circumstances such memories can become overwhelmingly powerful. They may trigger excessively negative psychological states and uncontrollable avoidance of locations, objects, or social interactions. It is therefore obvious that any process to counteract such effects will be of value. In this context, we stress from a basic-research perspective that painful, negative events are "Janus-faced" in the sense that there are actually two aspects about them that are worth remembering: What made them happen and what made them cease. We review published findings from fruit flies, rats, and man showing that both aspects, respectively related to the onset and the offset of the negative event, induce distinct and oppositely valenced memories: Stimuli experienced before an electric shock acquire negative valence as they signal upcoming punishment, whereas stimuli experienced after an electric shock acquire positive valence because of their association with the relieving cessation of pain. We discuss how memories for such punishment- and relief-learning are organized, how this organization fits into the threat-imminence model of defensive behavior, and what perspectives these considerations offer for applied psychology in the context of trauma, panic, and nonsuicidal self-injury.

  11. Engineering plastid genomes: methods, tools, and applications in basic research and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Bock, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The small bacterial-type genome of the plastid (chloroplast) can be engineered by genetic transformation, generating cells and plants with transgenic plastid genomes, also referred to as transplastomic plants. The transformation process relies on homologous recombination, thereby facilitating the site-specific alteration of endogenous plastid genes as well as the precisely targeted insertion of foreign genes into the plastid DNA. The technology has been used extensively to analyze chloroplast gene functions and study plastid gene expression at all levels in vivo. Over the years, a large toolbox has been assembled that is now nearly comparable to the techniques available for plant nuclear transformation and that has enabled new applications of transplastomic technology in basic and applied research. This review describes the state of the art in engineering the plastid genomes of algae and land plants (Embryophyta). It provides an overview of the existing tools for plastid genome engineering, discusses current technological limitations, and highlights selected applications that demonstrate the immense potential of chloroplast transformation in several key areas of plant biotechnology.

  12. Increasing Student Achievement for Basic Skills Students. Research Report Number 08-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe basic skills students in relation to their participation in basic skills and their success in transitioning to college-level classes, and the momentum they gain towards college success from this participation. In the period of time covered by the data used for this analysis, 24 colleges offered I-BEST…

  13. From structure to solutions: the role of basic research in developing anthrax countermeasures: Microbiology Graduate Program Seminar: Anthrax toxin.

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Camille A

    2012-06-01

    Dr. John Collier traced the discoveries that elucidated the structure and function of the anthrax toxin in his talk "Anthrax Toxin," which was part of the Microbiology Graduate Program Seminar Series at Yale School of Medicine on February 23, 2012. Dr. Collier, Professor of Microbiology and Immunobiology at Harvard University, began by noting the advantages to studying anthrax pathogenesis in a biosafety level-1 lab. This designation does not merely facilitate his research, but also reflects a larger trend of basic research being leveraged to develop translational applications. Basic research on toxin structure has led to the development of a vaccine by Dr. Collier's group. Next-generation prophylactics also may stem from recent discoveries uncovering a role for cellular cofactors that mediate toxin function. Finally, basic research into the toxin substructure has facilitated efforts to change the receptor tropism to target dysregulated cells for therapeutic purposes. The urgency around biodefense agents makes the choice of research priorities a salient issue. As such, this author submits that basic research occupies a unique and lucrative niche driving clinical applications.

  14. Marine research in Greece and the additional Greek marine research centres: Progress and present situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonidis, S.

    1995-03-01

    Greece, as is known, has a coastline of 17 000 km, and over 2000 small and large islands. As expected, the quest of humankind for new sources of matter and energy has been focussed on the sea, with fishery being its primary interest. A number of philosophers and scientists have been involved in the study of this vast ecosystem since ancient times (Aristotle). The political, social and geographical upheavals witnessed in the Greek area, have, however resulted in bringing all these activities to a halt. The first contemporary research work commenced at the end of the 18th century/beginning of the 19th — with marine flora and fauna as its starting point. The first investigations had, of course, been limited to random collections of marine material done in the frame of international exploratory expeditions. Studies became more systematic by the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century, with priority being given to the animal kingdom (fish, molluscs, etc.). Investigation of the marine phytobenthos (macrophyceae, phytoplankton) was to follow. The past 40 years research has been more extensive, not limited only to biogeographical evaluations, but also having expanded to physiological and ecological levels. The relevant institutes of Greek universities have all the while watched and contributed to this effort. Today, this kind of research is being supported by the N.M.R.C., the Center of Marine Research, University of Crete, and two research boats which sail the Greek seas. In the ever-changing world, the study of marine flora and fauna has certainly made great progress; however, there are still two big problems to be faced. The first deals with increasing pollution of the seas, the second, with the difficulties in finding and affording adequate financial resources that would enable a more detailed and complete execution of this research work.

  15. Active microorganisms as drivers of dynamic processes in soil: integration of basic teaching into research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2013-04-01

    Traditionally lecture courses, seminars and even practical training are disconnected from real experimental studies and from ongoing research projects. As a result students passively participate in lectures and are helpless when they come to the laboratory to prepare their BSc or MSc theses. We introduce a training course, which is developed for Bachelor students to integrate the basic knowledge on soil microbiology and modern microbiological methods in ecological studies. The training course is focused on the importance of active microbial biomass as biogeochemical driver of soil processes. According to our concept soil functioning is closely related to and depends on the microbial activities, and only active microorganisms drive all processes. Despite this importance of active microorganisms, the most of methods are focused on the estimation of the total microbial biomass and fail to evaluate its activity. Our course demonstrates how the active physiological state of soil microorganisms can be related to the activity indicators such as respiration, molecular biomarkers and viable cell compartments (ATP, PLFA, RNA) determined in situ in soil. Each lecture begins with the set of provocative questions "What is wrong?" which help students to activate their knowledge from previous lectures. Information on on-going soil incubation experiments is integrated in the lectures as a special block. The students are required not only to learn the existing methods but to compare them and to evaluate critically the applicability of these methods to explain the results of on-going experiments. The seminars foreseen within training course are focused on critical discussions of the protocols and their adaptations to current experimental tasks. During practical part of training courses the students are associated in small research groups with a certain ecological tasks. Each group uses soil sub-samples from ongoing experiments and thus, the experimental data obtaining during the

  16. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Boron Removal from Metallurgical Grade Silicon by Addition of High Basic Potassium Carbonate to Calcium Silicate Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jijun; Wang, Fanmao; Ma, Wenhui; Lei, Yun; Yang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the thermodynamics and kinetics of boron removal from metallurgical grade silicon (MG-Si) using a calcium silicate slag containing a high basic potassium carbonate. The distribution of boron between slag and silicon was theoretically derived and the distribution coefficients ( L B) of boron with different compositions of CaO, SiO2, and K2CO3 in slag reagents were determined. The maximal value of L B reached 2.08 with a high basicity slag of 40 pctCaO-40 pctSiO2-20 pctK2CO3 (Λ = 0.73). The boron removal rates from MG-Si using CaO-SiO2 and CaO-SiO2-K2CO3 slags at 1823 K (1550 °C) were investigated in an electromagnetic induction furnace. The results showed that the boron concentration in MG-Si can be reduced from 22 to 1.8 ppmw at 1823 K (1550 °C) with 20 pct K2CO3 addition to calcium silicate slag, where the removal efficiency of boron reached 91.8 pct. The mass transfer coefficient ( β S) of boron in binary 50 pctCaO-50 pctSiO2 slag was 3.16 × 10-6 m s-1 at 1823 K (1550 °C) and was 2.43 × 10-5 m s-1 in ternary 40 pctCaO-40 pctSiO2-20 pctK2CO3 slag.

  17. The value of basic research insights into atrial fibrillation mechanisms as a guide to therapeutic innovation: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Heijman, Jordi; Algalarrondo, Vincent; Voigt, Niels; Melka, Jonathan; Wehrens, Xander H T; Dobrev, Dobromir; Nattel, Stanley

    2016-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an extremely common clinical problem associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Current antiarrhythmic options include pharmacological, ablation, and surgical therapies, and have significantly improved clinical outcomes. However, their efficacy remains suboptimal, and their use is limited by a variety of potentially serious adverse effects. There is a clear need for improved therapeutic options. Several decades of research have substantially expanded our understanding of the basic mechanisms of AF. Ectopic firing and re-entrant activity have been identified as the predominant mechanisms for arrhythmia initiation and maintenance. However, it has become clear that the clinical factors predisposing to AF and the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved are extremely complex. Moreover, all AF-promoting and maintaining mechanisms are dynamically regulated and subject to remodelling caused by both AF and cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, the initial presentation and clinical progression of AF patients are enormously heterogeneous. An understanding of arrhythmia mechanisms is widely assumed to be the basis of therapeutic innovation, but while this assumption seems self-evident, we are not aware of any papers that have critically examined the practical contributions of basic research into AF mechanisms to arrhythmia management. Here, we review recent insights into the basic mechanisms of AF, critically analyse the role of basic research insights in the development of presently used anti-AF therapeutic options and assess the potential value of contemporary experimental discoveries for future therapeutic innovation. Finally, we highlight some of the important challenges to the translation of basic science findings to clinical application.

  18. Formative research on the primo vascular system and acceptance by the korean scientific community: the gap between creative basic science and practical convergence technology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon Gi

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to trace the formative process of primo vascular system (PVS) research over the past decade and to describe the characteristics of the Korean scientific community. By publishing approximately 30 papers in journals ranking in the Science Citation Index (Expanded), the PVS research team actively convinced domestic and international scientists of the anatomical existence of the PVS and its possible application to Korean and Western medicine. In addition, by sharing the PVS observation technique, the team promoted the dissemination and further pursuit of the research. In 2012, however, PVS researchers performed smaller scale research without advancing to a higher level as compared to the early days. The main reasons were found to be the Korean Research and Development policy of supporting creative, small-scale basic research and applied research of Western scientific fields that promised potentially greater success on an extensive scale; the indifference concerning, and the disbelief in, the existence of a new circulatory system were shown by the Western medical community. In addition, the Oriental medical community was apathetic about working with the PVS team. Professors Kwang-Sup Soh and Byung-Cheon Lee were the prime movers of PVS research under difficult conditions. Spurred by their belief in the existence and significance of the PVS, they continued with their research despite insufficient experimental data. The Korean scientific community is not ready to promote the Korea-oriented creative field of the PVS team.

  19. Formative research on the primo vascular system and acceptance by the korean scientific community: the gap between creative basic science and practical convergence technology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon Gi

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to trace the formative process of primo vascular system (PVS) research over the past decade and to describe the characteristics of the Korean scientific community. By publishing approximately 30 papers in journals ranking in the Science Citation Index (Expanded), the PVS research team actively convinced domestic and international scientists of the anatomical existence of the PVS and its possible application to Korean and Western medicine. In addition, by sharing the PVS observation technique, the team promoted the dissemination and further pursuit of the research. In 2012, however, PVS researchers performed smaller scale research without advancing to a higher level as compared to the early days. The main reasons were found to be the Korean Research and Development policy of supporting creative, small-scale basic research and applied research of Western scientific fields that promised potentially greater success on an extensive scale; the indifference concerning, and the disbelief in, the existence of a new circulatory system were shown by the Western medical community. In addition, the Oriental medical community was apathetic about working with the PVS team. Professors Kwang-Sup Soh and Byung-Cheon Lee were the prime movers of PVS research under difficult conditions. Spurred by their belief in the existence and significance of the PVS, they continued with their research despite insufficient experimental data. The Korean scientific community is not ready to promote the Korea-oriented creative field of the PVS team. PMID:24290796

  20. Exploratory basic energy research conducted at Standord University in the period September, 1979-August, 1983. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    In September, 1978, the Department of Energy awarded a contract to Stanford for Exploratory Basic Research. Projects to be supported were to be chosen by Stanford, with emphasis being placed on exploratory research likely to lead to full-scale research programs under support of appropriate agencies. Funding was provided for three years, as follows: FY 1979, $150K; FY 1980, 200K; and FY 1981, 250K for a total of $600K. The DOE funds provided through this contract were used, in combination with the IES industrial funds, to support exploratory basic energy research in three ways: (1) Funding of faculty members for the initial phases of research. Most of the funding was used in this manner. (2) Support of the Energy Information Center, a small special document center that holds information pertinent to energy research, both as related to energy policy and energy technology and to the supporting basic sciences. Approximately 12% of the funding was used in this manner. (3) Through support for seminars, occasional visitors, and program administration. Approximately 6% of the funding was used for this general support of the energy ambiance at Stanford.

  1. Is basic science disappearing from medicine? The decline of biomedical research in the medical literature.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Benjamin E; Goldenberg, Neil M; Fairn, Gregory D; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Slutsky, Arthur S; Lee, Warren L

    2016-02-01

    Explosive growth in our understanding of genomics and molecular biology have fueled calls for the pursuit of personalized medicine, the notion of harnessing biologic variability to provide patient-specific care. This vision will necessitate a deep understanding of the underlying pathophysiology in each patient. Medical journals play a pivotal role in the education of trainees and clinicians, yet we suspected that the amount of basic science in the top medical journals has been in decline. We conducted an automated search strategy in PubMed to identify basic science articles and calculated the proportion of articles dealing with basic science in the highest impact journals for 8 different medical specialties from 1994 to 2013. We observed a steep decline (40-60%) in such articles over time in almost all of the journals examined. This rapid decline in basic science from medical journals is likely to affect practitioners' understanding of and interest in the basic mechanisms of disease and therapy. In this Life Sciences Forum, we discuss why this decline may be occurring and what it means for the future of science and medicine.

  2. The Bad Taste of Medicines: Overview of Basic Research on Bitter Taste

    PubMed Central

    Mennella, Julie A.; Spector, Alan C.; Reed, Danielle R.; Coldwell, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Many active pharmaceutical ingredients taste bitter and thus are aversive to children, as well as many adults. Encapsulation of the medicine in pill or tablet form, an effective method for adults to avoid the unpleasant taste, is problematic for children. Many children cannot or will not swallow solid dosage forms. Objective This review highlights basic principles of gustatory function, with a special focus on the science of bitter taste, derived from studies of animal models and human psychophysics. We focus on the set of genes that encode the proteins that function as bitter receptors, as well as the cascade of events that lead to multidimensional aspects of taste function, highlighting the role that animal models played in these discoveries. We also summarize psychophysical approaches to studying bitter taste in adult and pediatric populations, highlighting evidence of the similarities and differences in bitter taste perception and acceptance between adults and children and drawing on useful strategies from animal models. Results Medicine often tastes bitter, and because children are more bitter sensitive than are adults, this creates problems with compliance. Bitter arises from stimulating receptors in taste receptor cells, with signals processed in the taste bud and relayed to the brain. However, there are many gaps in our understanding of how best to measure bitterness and how to ameliorate it, including whether it is more efficiently addressed at the level of receptor and sensory signaling, at the level of central processing, or by masking techniques. All methods of measuring responsiveness to bitter ligands—in animal models, through human psychophysics, or with “electronic tongues”—have limitations. Conclusions Better-tasting medications may enhance pediatric adherence to drug therapy. Sugars, acids, salt, and other substances reduce perceived bitterness of several pharmaceuticals, and although pleasant flavorings may help children

  3. Facts, fallacies, and politics of comparative effectiveness research: Part I. Basic considerations.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Falco, Frank J E; Boswell, Mark V; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2010-01-01

    While the United States leads the world in many measures of health care innovation, it has been suggested that it lags behind many developed nations in a variety of health outcomes. It has also been stated that the United States continues to outspend all other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries by a wide margin. Spending on health goods and services per person in the United States, in 2007, increased to $7,290 - almost 2(1/2) times the average of all OECD countries. Rising health care costs in the United States have been estimated to increase to 19.1% of gross domestic product (GDP) or $4.4 trillion by 2018. The increases are illustrated in both public and private sectors. Higher health care costs in the United States are implied from the variations in the medical care from area to area around the country, with almost 50% of medical care being not evidence-based, and finally as much as 30% of spending reflecting medical care of uncertain or questionable value. Thus, comparative effectiveness research (CER) has been touted by supporters with high expectations to resolve most ill effects of health care in the United States and provide high quality, less expensive, universal health care. CER is defined as the generation and synthesis of evidence that compares the benefits and harms of alternate methods to prevent, diagnose, treat, and monitor a clinical condition or to improve the delivery of care. The efforts of CER in the United States date back to the late 1970's even though it was officially born with the Medicare Modernization Act (MMA) and has been rejuvenated with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 with an allocation of $1.1 billion. CER has been the basis for health care decision-making in many other countries. According to the International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessments (INAHTA), many industrialized countries have bodies that are charged with health technology assessments

  4. Inflation Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Dan

    2014-03-01

    The last few years have yielded remarkable discoveries in physics. In particle physics it appears that a fundamental scalar field exists. The Higgs boson is measured to have a mass of about 126 GeV and to have spin zero and positive parity. The Higgs field is the first fundamental scalar to be discovered in physics. The Cosmic Microwave Background, CMB, is known to have a uniform temperature to parts per 105 but has well measured fluctuations which are thought to evolve gravitationally to provide the seeds of the current structure of the Universe. In addition, the Universe appears to contain, at present, an unknown “dark energy” which is presently the majority energy density of the Universe, larger than either matter or radiation. This may, indeed, be a fundamental scalar field like the Higgs. “Big Bang” (BB) cosmology is a very successful “standard model” in cosmology. However, it cannot explain the uniformity of the CMB because the CMB consists of many regions not causally connected in the context of the BB model. In addition, the Universe appears to be spatially flat. However in BB cosmology the present spatial curvature is not stable so that the initial conditions for BB cosmology would need to be fantastically fine-tuned in order to successfully predict the presently small value of the observed curvature. These issues for BB cosmology have led to the hypothesis of “inflation” which postulates an unknown scalar field, not presumably the Higgs field or the dark energy, which causes an exponential expansion of the Universe at very early times. This attractive hypothesis can account for the problems in BB cosmology of flatness and causal CMB connectivity. In addition, the quantum fluctuations of this postulated field provide a natural explanation of the CMB fluctuations which are the seeds of the structure of galaxies. Researchers are now searching for gravitational waves imprinted on the CMB. These would be a “smoking gun” for

  5. Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization, April 18-21, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, N. S.; Crabtree, G.; Nozik, A. J.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Alivisatos, P.; Kung, H.; Tsao, J.; Chandler, E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Spitler, M.; Ellingson, R.; Overend, R.; Mazer, J.; Gress, M.; Horwitz, J.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Shapard, L.; Nault, R. M.

    2005-04-21

    World demand for energy is projected to more than double by 2050 and to more than triple by the end of the century. Incremental improvements in existing energy networks will not be adequate to supply this demand in a sustainable way. Finding sufficient supplies of clean energy for the future is one of society?s most daunting challenges. Sunlight provides by far the largest of all carbon-neutral energy sources. More energy from sunlight strikes the Earth in one hour (4.3 ? 1020 J) than all the energy consumed on the planet in a year (4.1 ? 1020 J). We currently exploit this solar resource through solar electricity ? a $7.5 billion industry growing at a rate of 35?40% per annum ? and solar-derived fuel from biomass, which provides the primary energy source for over a billion people. Yet, in 2001, solar electricity provided less than 0.1% of the world's electricity, and solar fuel from modern (sustainable) biomass provided less than 1.5% of the world's energy. The huge gap between our present use of solar energy and its enormous undeveloped potential defines a grand challenge in energy research. Sunlight is a compelling solution to our need for clean, abundant sources of energy in the future. It is readily available, secure from geopolitical tension, and poses no threat to our environment through pollution or to our climate through greenhouse gases. This report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization identifies the key scientific challenges and research directions that will enable efficient and economic use of the solar resource to provide a significant fraction of global primary energy by the mid 21st century. The report reflects the collective output of the workshop attendees, which included 200 scientists representing academia, national laboratories, and industry in the United States and abroad, and the U.S. Department of Energy?s Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  6. Centro de Biologia Molecular "Severo Ochoa": a center for basic research into Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jesus; Hernandez, Felix; Wandosell, Francisco; Lucas, Jose J; Esteban, Jose A; Ledesma, M Dolores; Bullido, Maria J

    2010-01-01

    One important aspect of studies carried out at the Center for Molecular Biology "Severo Ochoa" is focused on basic aspects of Alzheimer's disease, mainly the search for suitable therapeutic targets for this disorder. Several groups at the Center are involved in these studies, and, in this spotlight, the work they are carrying out will be described.

  7. Integration of Basic Skills into Vocational Education: Expert Systems in Electronics Technology. Vocational Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette.

    A student who plans to enter the field of technology education must be especially motivated to incorporate computer technology into the theories of learning. Evaluation prior to the learning process establishes a frame of reference for students. After preparing students with the basic concepts of resistors and the mental tools, the expert system…

  8. Translating Basic Behavioral and Social Science Research to Clinical Application: The EVOLVE Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Janey C.; Czajkowski, Susan; Charlson, Mary E.; Link, Alissa R.; Wells, Martin T.; Isen, Alice M.; Mancuso, Carol A.; Allegrante, John P.; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Jobe, Jared B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe a mixed-methods approach to develop and test a basic behavioral science-informed intervention to motivate behavior change in 3 high-risk clinical populations. Our theoretically derived intervention comprised a combination of positive affect and self-affirmation (PA/SA), which we applied to 3 clinical chronic disease…

  9. China's Basic Education Reform: An Account of an International Collaborative Research and Development Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Janette; Kang, Changyun; Mitchell, Ian; Erickson, Gaalen

    2009-01-01

    The current round of basic education curriculum reform in China is considered by many to be the most radical and wide-reaching. However, very little is known about education reform at the school level. Here we document and discuss some of the challenges and opportunities that the reform programme is providing for teachers and schools. We describe…

  10. Personality Characteristics and Learning Style Preferences of Adult Basic Education Students. Research Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Anthony V.; And Others

    The study described in the report identifies personality characteristics and learning styles of adult basic education (ABE) students on the basis of three instruments: the Luscher Color Test, the Manzo Bestiary Inventory, and the Learning Preference Inventory. The volunteer sample consisted of 83 ABE students. Subsample comparison groups consisted…

  11. Focus on Basics Connecting Research & Practice: Modes of Delivery, Volume 7, Issue C

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This issue contains 12 articles on modes of delivery in adult basic education. They include: "Teaching for Communicative Competence" (Donna Moss); "Sustained Silent Reading: A Useful Model" (Susanne Campagna); " A Slow Conversion to Reading Groups" (Susan Watson); "Differentiated Instruction" (Mary Ann Corley); "Differentiating Instruction for a…

  12. Financing Basic Education in Bangladesh. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Samarrai, Samer

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents education finance trends for Bangladesh since 2000. It shows that while government spending on education as a proportion of national income has stagnated, it has increased in real terms. Real increases in education spending have resulted in substantial increases in per student spending in basic education. At primary, enrolment…

  13. Research and Practice on Basic Composition and Cultivation Pattern of College Students' Innovative Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Zhenhui; Chen, Hanlin

    2010-01-01

    Facing the increasingly fierce international competition, it has been the core of higher education to explore how to cultivate college students with innovative ability. College students' innovative ability is mainly composed of basic ability, innovative thinking and innovative actions. In conformity to the above composition, the cultivation…

  14. A Review of Research on the Literacy of Students with Visual Impairments and Additional Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Amy T.; Pogrund, Rona L.

    2009-01-01

    Research on the development of literacy in children with visual impairments and additional disabilities is minimal even though these children make up approximately 65% of the population of children with visual impairments. This article reports on emerging themes that were explored after a review of the literature revealed nine literacy studies…

  15. A Track Record on SHOX: From Basic Research to Complex Models and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Antonio; Ogata, Tsutomu; Rappold, Gudrun A

    2016-08-01

    SHOX deficiency is the most frequent genetic growth disorder associated with isolated and syndromic forms of short stature. Caused by mutations in the homeobox gene SHOX, its varied clinical manifestations include isolated short stature, Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, and Langer mesomelic dysplasia. In addition, SHOX deficiency contributes to the skeletal features in Turner syndrome. Causative SHOX mutations have allowed downstream pathology to be linked to defined molecular lesions. Expression levels of SHOX are tightly regulated, and almost half of the pathogenic mutations have affected enhancers. Clinical severity of SHOX deficiency varies between genders and ranges from normal stature to profound mesomelic skeletal dysplasia. Treatment options for children with SHOX deficiency are available. Two decades of research support the concept of SHOX as a transcription factor that integrates diverse aspects of bone development, growth plate biology, and apoptosis. Due to its absence in mouse, the animal models of choice have become chicken and zebrafish. These models, therefore, together with micromass cultures and primary cell lines, have been used to address SHOX function. Pathway and network analyses have identified interactors, target genes, and regulators. Here, we summarize recent data and give insight into the critical molecular and cellular functions of SHOX in the etiopathogenesis of short stature and limb development.

  16. 2015 update of erectile dysfunction management following radical prostatectomy: from basic research to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Gur, Serap; Sikka, Suresh C; Kadowitz, Philip J; Silberstein, Jonathan; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2015-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) is the most commonly employed curative intervention for the treatment of prostate cancer. However, due to the proximity of the cavernous nerves (CN) to the prostate, RP results in transient and/often permanent erectile dysfunction (ED). While the prevention of traction injuries during the RP is critical for the preservation of erectile function, several preclinical studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of neuroprotective (or neuroregenerative) agents in mitigating neuronal injuries sustained during RP. The maintenance or restoration of erectile function after injury may be enhanced in the postoperative period by the stimulation of neurogenesis to protect and restore injured nerves from further deterioration. The present review aims to evaluate and summarize research of these treatment strategies as published in the National Library of Medicine (Pubmed) from 2000 to 2015. The keywords used for the search were ED, RP, CN injury, immunophilin ligands, neurotrophins and phosphodiesterase (PDE)5 inhibitors, and animal models. Current guidelines for treatment targeting CN recovery recommend the use of immunophilin ligands, neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor, sonic hedgehog (Shh), Rho-kinase, PDE5 inhibitors, erythropoietin (EPO), hyperbaric oxygen, gene, stem cells, and triiodothyronine (T3) therapy. Additionally, this review identifies remaining gaps in general knowledge and recent updates recognizing the need for further preclinical and clinical trials.

  17. A Track Record on SHOX: From Basic Research to Complex Models and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Antonio; Ogata, Tsutomu; Rappold, Gudrun A

    2016-08-01

    SHOX deficiency is the most frequent genetic growth disorder associated with isolated and syndromic forms of short stature. Caused by mutations in the homeobox gene SHOX, its varied clinical manifestations include isolated short stature, Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, and Langer mesomelic dysplasia. In addition, SHOX deficiency contributes to the skeletal features in Turner syndrome. Causative SHOX mutations have allowed downstream pathology to be linked to defined molecular lesions. Expression levels of SHOX are tightly regulated, and almost half of the pathogenic mutations have affected enhancers. Clinical severity of SHOX deficiency varies between genders and ranges from normal stature to profound mesomelic skeletal dysplasia. Treatment options for children with SHOX deficiency are available. Two decades of research support the concept of SHOX as a transcription factor that integrates diverse aspects of bone development, growth plate biology, and apoptosis. Due to its absence in mouse, the animal models of choice have become chicken and zebrafish. These models, therefore, together with micromass cultures and primary cell lines, have been used to address SHOX function. Pathway and network analyses have identified interactors, target genes, and regulators. Here, we summarize recent data and give insight into the critical molecular and cellular functions of SHOX in the etiopathogenesis of short stature and limb development. PMID:27355317

  18. A Track Record on SHOX: From Basic Research to Complex Models and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Antonio; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    SHOX deficiency is the most frequent genetic growth disorder associated with isolated and syndromic forms of short stature. Caused by mutations in the homeobox gene SHOX, its varied clinical manifestations include isolated short stature, Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, and Langer mesomelic dysplasia. In addition, SHOX deficiency contributes to the skeletal features in Turner syndrome. Causative SHOX mutations have allowed downstream pathology to be linked to defined molecular lesions. Expression levels of SHOX are tightly regulated, and almost half of the pathogenic mutations have affected enhancers. Clinical severity of SHOX deficiency varies between genders and ranges from normal stature to profound mesomelic skeletal dysplasia. Treatment options for children with SHOX deficiency are available. Two decades of research support the concept of SHOX as a transcription factor that integrates diverse aspects of bone development, growth plate biology, and apoptosis. Due to its absence in mouse, the animal models of choice have become chicken and zebrafish. These models, therefore, together with micromass cultures and primary cell lines, have been used to address SHOX function. Pathway and network analyses have identified interactors, target genes, and regulators. Here, we summarize recent data and give insight into the critical molecular and cellular functions of SHOX in the etiopathogenesis of short stature and limb development. PMID:27355317

  19. 2015 update of erectile dysfunction management following radical prostatectomy: from basic research to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Gur, Serap; Sikka, Suresh C; Kadowitz, Philip J; Silberstein, Jonathan; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2015-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) is the most commonly employed curative intervention for the treatment of prostate cancer. However, due to the proximity of the cavernous nerves (CN) to the prostate, RP results in transient and/often permanent erectile dysfunction (ED). While the prevention of traction injuries during the RP is critical for the preservation of erectile function, several preclinical studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of neuroprotective (or neuroregenerative) agents in mitigating neuronal injuries sustained during RP. The maintenance or restoration of erectile function after injury may be enhanced in the postoperative period by the stimulation of neurogenesis to protect and restore injured nerves from further deterioration. The present review aims to evaluate and summarize research of these treatment strategies as published in the National Library of Medicine (Pubmed) from 2000 to 2015. The keywords used for the search were ED, RP, CN injury, immunophilin ligands, neurotrophins and phosphodiesterase (PDE)5 inhibitors, and animal models. Current guidelines for treatment targeting CN recovery recommend the use of immunophilin ligands, neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor, sonic hedgehog (Shh), Rho-kinase, PDE5 inhibitors, erythropoietin (EPO), hyperbaric oxygen, gene, stem cells, and triiodothyronine (T3) therapy. Additionally, this review identifies remaining gaps in general knowledge and recent updates recognizing the need for further preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:25354178

  20. Cancer Control Research Training for Native Researchers: A Model for Development of Additional Native Researcher Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Thomas M.; Dunn, Esther; Tom-Orme, Lillian; Joe, Jennie

    2005-01-01

    Several social and biological scientists who have Native status are engaged in productive research careers, but the encouragement that has been offered to Native students to formulate career goals devoted to cancer etiology or cancer control in Native peoples has had limited success. Hence, the Native Researchers' Cancer Control Training Program…

  1. Increasing access to learning for the adult basic education learner with learning disabilities: evidence-based accommodation research.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Noel

    2012-01-01

    Accommodating adult basic education (ABE) learners with learning disabilities (LD) is common practice across many instructional, testing, and work settings. However, the results from this literature search indicate that very few empirically based studies are available to support or reject the effectiveness of a great deal of accommodation implementation. In addition, in light of the profound changes to literacy taking place in today's digital, networked, and multimodal world, technology is redefining traditional concepts of accessibility and accommodation. PMID:22064949

  2. Increasing access to learning for the adult basic education learner with learning disabilities: evidence-based accommodation research.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Noel

    2012-01-01

    Accommodating adult basic education (ABE) learners with learning disabilities (LD) is common practice across many instructional, testing, and work settings. However, the results from this literature search indicate that very few empirically based studies are available to support or reject the effectiveness of a great deal of accommodation implementation. In addition, in light of the profound changes to literacy taking place in today's digital, networked, and multimodal world, technology is redefining traditional concepts of accessibility and accommodation.

  3. DOS basics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    DOS is an acronym for Disk Operating System. It is actually a set of programs that allows you to control your personal computer. DOS offers the capabilities to create and manage files; organize and maintain information placed on disks; use application programs such as WordPerfect, Lotus 123, Excel, Windows, etc. In addition, DOS provides the basic utilities needed to copy files from one area to another, delete files and list files. The latest version of DOS also offers more advanced features that include hard disk compression and memory management. Basic DOS commands are discussed.

  4. Use of portable blood physiology point-of-care devices for basic and applied research on vertebrates: a review.

    PubMed

    Stoot, Lauren J; Cairns, Nicholas A; Cull, Felicia; Taylor, Jessica J; Jeffrey, Jennifer D; Morin, Félix; Mandelman, John W; Clark, Timothy D; Cooke, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Non-human vertebrate blood is commonly collected and assayed for a variety of applications, including veterinary diagnostics and physiological research. Small, often non-lethal samples enable the assessment and monitoring of the physiological state and health of the individual. Traditionally, studies that rely on blood physiology have focused on captive animals or, in studies conducted in remote settings, have required the preservation and transport of samples for later analysis. In either situation, large, laboratory-bound equipment and traditional assays and analytical protocols are required. The use of point-of-care (POC) devices to measure various secondary blood physiological parameters, such as metabolites, blood gases and ions, has become increasingly popular recently, due to immediate results and their portability, which allows the freedom to study organisms in the wild. Here, we review the current uses of POC devices and their applicability to basic and applied studies on a variety of non-domesticated species. We located 79 individual studies that focused on non-domesticated vertebrates, including validation and application of POC tools. Studies focused on a wide spectrum of taxa, including mammals, birds and herptiles, although the majority of studies focused on fish, and typical variables measured included blood glucose, lactate and pH. We found that calibrations for species-specific blood physiology values are necessary, because ranges can vary within and among taxa and are sometimes outside the measurable range of the devices. In addition, although POC devices are portable and robust, most require durable cases, they are seldom waterproof/water-resistant, and factors such as humidity and temperature can affect the performance of the device. Overall, most studies concluded that POC devices are suitable alternatives to traditional laboratory devices and eliminate the need for transport of samples; however, there is a need for greater emphasis on rigorous

  5. Use of portable blood physiology point-of-care devices for basic and applied research on vertebrates: a review

    PubMed Central

    Stoot, Lauren J.; Cairns, Nicholas A.; Cull, Felicia; Taylor, Jessica J.; Jeffrey, Jennifer D.; Morin, Félix; Mandelman, John W.; Clark, Timothy D.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-human vertebrate blood is commonly collected and assayed for a variety of applications, including veterinary diagnostics and physiological research. Small, often non-lethal samples enable the assessment and monitoring of the physiological state and health of the individual. Traditionally, studies that rely on blood physiology have focused on captive animals or, in studies conducted in remote settings, have required the preservation and transport of samples for later analysis. In either situation, large, laboratory-bound equipment and traditional assays and analytical protocols are required. The use of point-of-care (POC) devices to measure various secondary blood physiological parameters, such as metabolites, blood gases and ions, has become increasingly popular recently, due to immediate results and their portability, which allows the freedom to study organisms in the wild. Here, we review the current uses of POC devices and their applicability to basic and applied studies on a variety of non-domesticated species. We located 79 individual studies that focused on non-domesticated vertebrates, including validation and application of POC tools. Studies focused on a wide spectrum of taxa, including mammals, birds and herptiles, although the majority of studies focused on fish, and typical variables measured included blood glucose, lactate and pH. We found that calibrations for species-specific blood physiology values are necessary, because ranges can vary within and among taxa and are sometimes outside the measurable range of the devices. In addition, although POC devices are portable and robust, most require durable cases, they are seldom waterproof/water-resistant, and factors such as humidity and temperature can affect the performance of the device. Overall, most studies concluded that POC devices are suitable alternatives to traditional laboratory devices and eliminate the need for transport of samples; however, there is a need for greater emphasis on rigorous

  6. NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology Summer Workshop. Volume 10: Basic research panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Possible research experiments using the space transportation system are identified based on user requirements. Opportunity driven research areas include quantum electronics, cryogenics system technology, superconducting devices and detectors, and photo-induced reactions. Mission driven research requirements were examined and ranked based on inputs from the user group.

  7. Statistical Significance Testing in Second Language Research: Basic Problems and Suggestions for Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditions of statistical significance testing in second language (L2) quantitative research are strongly entrenched in how researchers design studies, select analyses, and interpret results. However, statistical significance tests using "p" values are commonly misinterpreted by researchers, reviewers, readers, and others, leading to…

  8. Optimising Translational Research Opportunities: A Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis of Basic and Clinician Scientists' Perspectives of Factors Which Enable or Hinder Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Euan; Fisher, Helen R.; Maher, John; Wolfe, Charles D. A.; McKevitt, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Translational research is central to international health policy, research and funding initiatives. Despite increasing use of the term, the translation of basic science discoveries into clinical practice is not straightforward. This systematic search and narrative synthesis aimed to examine factors enabling or hindering translational research from the perspective of basic and clinician scientists, a key stakeholder group in translational research, and to draw policy-relevant implications for organisations seeking to optimise translational research opportunities. Methods and Results We searched SCOPUS and Web of Science from inception until April 2015 for papers reporting scientists’ views of the factors they perceive as enabling or hindering the conduct of translational research. We screened 8,295 papers from electronic database searches and 20 papers from hand searches and citation tracking, identifying 26 studies of qualitative, quantitative or mixed method designs. We used a narrative synthesis approach and identified the following themes: 1) differing concepts of translational research 2) research processes as a barrier to translational research; 3) perceived cultural divide between research and clinical care; 4) interdisciplinary collaboration as enabling translation research, but dependent on the quality of prior and current social relationships; 5) translational research as entrepreneurial science. Across all five themes, factors enabling or hindering translational research were largely shaped by wider social, organisational, and structural factors. Conclusion To optimise translational research, policy could consider refining translational research models to better reflect scientists’ experiences, fostering greater collaboration and buy in from all types of scientists. Organisations could foster cultural change, ensuring that organisational practices and systems keep pace with the change in knowledge production brought about by the

  9. How Asking a Very Basic Research Question Led Us to a Model for at Least Three Diseases | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Howard Young Editor’s note: This article is adapted from Dr. Young’s January 12, 2015, post to the I am Intramural Blog of the Intramural Research Program. When I started this project, it was not my objective to develop a model for any specific disease, nor did I even suspect that the ultimate result would be some insight into autoimmune disease. The basic research question I was asking was why there are sequences in the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA that are more highly conserved than in the coding region of the gene.

  10. Developing a technology for the use of operant extinction in clinical settings: an examination of basic and applied research.

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, D C; Iwata, B A

    1996-01-01

    Extinction of operant behavior, which involves terminating the reinforcement contingency that maintains a response, is important to the development, generalization, and reduction of behavior in clinical settings. We review basic and applied research findings on variables that influence the direct and indirect effects of extinction and discuss the potential value of a general technology for the use of extinction. We suggest that current research findings are not sufficient for the development of a comprehensive, applied technology of extinction and provide extensive guidelines for further studies on factors that may affect the course of extinction in clinical settings. PMID:8926226

  11. Performance-driven facial animation: basic research on human judgments of emotional state in facial avatars.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, A A; Neumann, U; Enciso, R; Fidaleo, D; Noh, J Y

    2001-08-01

    three-dimensional avatar using a performance-driven facial animation (PDFA) system developed at the University of Southern California Integrated Media Systems Center. PDFA offers a means for creating high-fidelity visual representations of human faces and bodies. This effort explores the feasibility of sensing and reproducing a range of facial expressions with a PDFA system. In order to test concordance of human ratings of emotional expression between video and avatar facial delivery, we first had facial model subjects observe stimuli that were designed to elicit naturalistic facial expressions. The emotional stimulus induction involved presenting text-based, still image, and video clips to subjects that were previously rated to induce facial expressions for the six universals2 of facial expression (happy, sad, fear, anger, disgust, and surprise), in addition to attentiveness, puzzlement and frustration. Videotapes of these induced facial expressions that best represented prototypic examples of the above emotional states and three-dimensional avatar animations of the same facial expressions were randomly presented to 38 human raters. The raters used open-end, forced choice and seven-point Likert-type scales to rate expression in terms of identification. The forced choice and seven-point ratings provided the most usable data to determine video/animation concordance and these data are presented. To support a clear understanding of this data, a website has been set up that will allow readers to view the video and facial animation clips to illustrate the assets and limitations of these types of facial expression-rendering methods (www. USCAvatars.com/MMVR). This methodological first step in our research program has served to provide valuable human user-centered feedback to support the iterative design and development of facial avatar characteristics for expression of emotional communication.

  12. Bringing basic research on early experience and stress neurobiology to bear on preventive interventions for neglected and maltreated children.

    PubMed

    Gunnar, Megan R; Fisher, Philip A

    2006-01-01

    A major focus in developmental psychopathology is on understanding developmental mechanisms and, armed with this information, intervening to improve children's outcomes. Translational research attempts to bridge the distance between understanding and intervention. In the collaborations that have formed the core of our research network on early experience, stress, and prevention science, we have focused on translating basic research on early experiences and stress neurobiology into preventive interventions for neglected and abused children. Our experiences in attempting to move from bench to bedside have led us to recognize the many challenges that face translational researchers. This review provides a brief synopsis of the animal model literature on early experience and stress neurobiology from which we glean several key bridging issues. We then review what is currently known about the impact of childhood neglect and abuse on stress neurobiology in human adults and children. Next, we describe how this work has informed the evaluation of our preventive interventions with maltreated children. Finally, we discuss several considerations that should facilitate a more complete integration of basic research on early experience and stress neurobiology into preventive intervention strategies. PMID:17152395

  13. Effects of reinforcer quality on behavioral momentum: coordinated applied and basic research.

    PubMed

    Mace, F C; Mauro, B C; Boyajian, A E; Eckert, T L

    1997-01-01

    The high-probability (high-p) instructional sequence has been an effective treatment for noncompliance. However, treatment failures have also been reported. We hypothesized that the efficacy of the high-p treatment may be improved by using higher quality reinforcers for compliance to high-p instructions. The resistance of compliance to change was tested by varying reinforcer quality in two applied studies and a basic laboratory experiment. Experiment 1 tested the hypothesis that an increase in reinforcer quality for high-p compliance will increase the effectiveness of the high-p treatment when it fails to increase compliance. Experiment 2 assessed the effects of reinforcer quality on resistance of compliance to change by presenting successive low-p requests following the high-p treatment. A basic laboratory study (Experiment 3) was conducted to further isolate the relation between reinforcer quality and behavioral momentum. Two different liquid reinforcers (sucrose and citric acid solutions) were presented in a two-component multiple variable-interval variable-interval schedule followed by a single extinction test session. Results of all three experiments showed a generally consistent relationship between reinforcer quality and behavioral momentum. PMID:9157095

  14. [Genetic Cell Reprogramming: A New Technology for Basic Research and Applied Usage].

    PubMed

    Bogomazova, A N; Vassina, E M; Kiselev, S I; Lagarkova, M A; Lebedeva, O S; Nekrasov, E D; Panova, A V; Philonenko, E S; Khomyakova, E A; Tskhovrebova, L V; Chestkov, I V; Shutova, M V

    2015-04-01

    Gene function disclosure and the development of modern technologies of genetic manipulations offered the possibility of genetic reprogramming application to alter cell specialization. With the involvement of a gene set that encodes the transcription factors responsible for the pluripotent state, any cell of an adult body could be reprogrammed into the embryonal.state and pluripotency could be induced in this cell. Such reprogrammed cells were called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and they are capable of again passing through all developmental stages. This provides new possibilities for studies of the basic mechanisms of developmental biology, the formation of specific cell types, and the whole body. In culture, iPSCs could be maintained permanently in a nontransformed state and permit genetic manipulations while maintaining their pluripotent properties. Such a unique combination of their properties makes them an attractive tool for studies of various pathologies and for the delineation of treatment approaches. This review discusses the basic and applied aspects of iPSCs biology.

  15. Establishing a successful basic science research program in colon and rectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Ira; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2014-06-01

    Although at first glance, the surgeon-scientist appears to be a rare breed in today's clinical revenue-driven world, with careful planning and mentorship this is still a vibrant career path. If one is considering this avenue, it is important to seize even small opportunities to pursue laboratory work during training-summers in college and medical school, rotation blocks, and dedicated time in the middle of residency. Publications and small grants during these times will lay the ground work for future success. When considering a faculty position, it is essential to identify a mentorship environment that has a track record for success-either in the department of surgery or anywhere in the university. Ensuring adequate support from the department of surgery chair and division leader is essential. Basic science careers take years for the return in investment to be manifested! Also critical is to secure extramural funding early in the faculty stint-first foundation grants and then National Institutes of Health-mentored scientist funding. Surgeons provide a unique perspective in basic science work and it is critical that we continue to support young surgeons in this career path.

  16. Periodontal Research: Basics and beyond – Part II (Ethical issues, sampling, outcome measures and bias)

    PubMed Central

    Avula, Haritha

    2013-01-01

    A good research beginning refers to formulating a well-defined research question, developing a hypothesis and choosing an appropriate study design. The first part of the review series has discussed these issues in depth and this paper intends to throw light on other issues pertaining to the implementation of research. These include the various ethical norms and standards in human experimentation, the eligibility criteria for the participants, sampling methods and sample size calculation, various outcome measures that need to be defined and the biases that can be introduced in research. PMID:24174747

  17. Thinking science with thinking machines: The multiple realities of basic and applied knowledge in a research border zone.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Steve G

    2015-04-01

    Some scholars dismiss the distinction between basic and applied science as passé, yet substantive assumptions about this boundary remain obdurate in research policy, popular rhetoric, the sociology and philosophy of science, and, indeed, at the level of bench practice. In this article, I draw on a multiple ontology framework to provide a more stable affirmation of a constructivist position in science and technology studies that cannot be reduced to a matter of competing perspectives on a single reality. The analysis is grounded in ethnographic research in the border zone of Artificial Intelligence science. I translate in-situ moments in which members of neighboring but differently situated labs engage in three distinct repertoires that render the reality of basic and applied science: partitioning, flipping, and collapsing. While the essences of scientific objects are nowhere to be found, the boundary between basic and applied is neither illusion nor mere propaganda. Instead, distinctions among scientific knowledge are made real as a matter of course.

  18. Guide to Library Research. A Basic Text for the Undergraduate. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Marie E.

    Intended for use by undergraduate students in a required course, Bibliography 101, at the University of North Carolina at Asheville, this manual is designed to teach the fundamentals of doing research in the library. A brief preface and a glossary of useful terms are followed by an introduction to library research which discusses strategies and…

  19. MaizeGDB: enabling access to basic, translational, and applied research information

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB is the Maize Genetics and Genomics Database (available online at http://www.maizegdb.org). The MaizeGDB project is not simply an online database and website but rather an information service to maize researchers that supports customized data access and analysis needs to individual research...

  20. Basic Behavioral Science Research for Mental Health. Social Influence and Social Cognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses social influence and social cognition's effect on health and social well-being, and examines the efficacy of public health campaigns, the effects of negative stereotyping, and why some teenagers resist drug use and others do not as part of the social problems addressed by behavioral science research. Future directions for research on…

  1. Colloquium on Selected Topics in Behavioral Science Basic Research. (Alexandria, Virginia, April 23-25, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nogami, Glenda Y., Ed.; And Others

    The 21 summaries of research programs, funded by the United States Army Research Institute (ARI) for the Behavioral and Social Sciences which are presented are grouped in five broad topic areas: computer-based systems; information processing; learning, memory and transfer; human relations; and related issues and trends. Papers presented include:…

  2. Basics, common errors and essentials of statistical tools and techniques in anesthesiology research

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-01-01

    The statistical portion is a vital component of any research study. The research methodology and the application of statistical tools and techniques have evolved over the years and have significantly helped the research activities throughout the globe. The results and inferences are not accurately possible without proper validation with various statistical tools and tests. The evidencebased anesthesia research and practice has to incorporate statistical tools in the methodology right from the planning stage of the study itself. Though the medical fraternity is well acquainted with the significance of statistics in research, there is a lack of in-depth knowledge about the various statistical concepts and principles among majority of the researchers. The clinical impact and consequences can be serious as the incorrect analysis, conclusions, and false results may construct an artificial platform on which future research activities are replicated. The present tutorial is an attempt to make anesthesiologists aware of the various aspects of statistical methods used in evidence-based research and also to highlight the common areas where maximum number of statistical errors are committed so as to adopt better statistical practices. PMID:26702217

  3. An International Basic Science and Clinical Research Summer Program for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramjiawan, Bram; Pierce, Grant N.; Anindo, Mohammad Iffat Kabir; AlKukhun, Abedalrazaq; Alshammari, Abdullah; Chamsi, Ahmad Talal; Abousaleh, Mohannad; Alkhani, Anas; Ganguly, Pallab K.

    2012-01-01

    An important part of training the next generation of physicians is ensuring that they are exposed to the integral role that research plays in improving medical treatment. However, medical students often do not have sufficient time to be trained to carry out any projects in biomedical and clinical research. Many medical students also fail to…

  4. Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  5. Osteoarthritis year in review 2014: highlighting innovations in basic research and clinical applications in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    van Osch, G J V M

    2014-12-01

    Regenerative medicine is an emerging area that will influence the treatment of joint diseases in the future. It involves the use of biomaterials, cell therapy, and bioactive factors such as growth factors, drugs and small molecules, to regenerate damaged tissues. This "year in review" highlights a personal selection of promising studies published between March 2013 and March 2014 that inform on the direction in which this field is moving. This multidisciplinary field has been very active, with rapid development of new technologies that emerge from basic sciences such as the possibility to generate pluripotent stem cells without genetic modification and genetic engineering of growth factors to enhance their capacity to induce tissue repair. The increasing knowledge of the interaction between all tissues in the joint, such as the effect of bone remodeling and synovial inflammation on cartilage repair, will eventually make tissue regeneration in a compromised joint environment possible.

  6. Translating Birdsong: Songbirds as a model for basic and applied medical research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Songbirds, long of interest to basic neuroscientists, have great potential as a model system for translational neuroscience. Songbirds learn their complex vocal behavior in a manner that exemplifies general processes of perceptual and motor skill learning, and more specifically resembles human speech learning. Song is subserved by circuitry that is specialized for vocal learning and production, but that has strong similarities to mammalian brain pathways. The combination of a highly quantifiable behavior and discrete neural substrates facilitates understanding links between brain and behavior, both normally and in disease. Here we highlight 1) behavioral and mechanistic parallels between birdsong and aspects of speech and social communication, including insights into mirror neurons, the function of auditory feedback, and genes underlying social communication disorders, and 2) contributions of songbirds to understanding cortical-basal ganglia circuit function and dysfunction, including the possibility of harnessing adult neurogenesis for brain repair. PMID:23750515

  7. [Lay emphasis on the basic research in the field of burn surgery in China].

    PubMed

    Hu, D H; Tao, K

    2016-07-20

    The therapeutic methods and effects have been improved greatly in burn care and management with several important advancements in the past few decades, resulting in more effective patient stabilization and significantly decreased mortality in China. However, the challenging clinical problems still exist, such as a lack of ideally efficient scheme and drugs to protect damaged tissue and internal organs after severe burn, the limited functional cosmetic outcomes of current treatment techniques and synthetic skin substitutes for deep burn wound repair and reconstruction, the high mortality of severe sepsis accompanying with burn injury patients, and the uncontrolled scar formation and modification or potential regeneration in burn wound healing, a further exploration into both underling mechanisms and curable therapies. This article emphasizes the important roles of the basic study in exploration of above clinical issues in the viewpoint of the advanced development of modern life sciences and relevant techniques. PMID:27464627

  8. How to produce personality neuroscience research with high statistical power and low additional cost.

    PubMed

    Mar, Raymond A; Spreng, R Nathan; Deyoung, Colin G

    2013-09-01

    Personality neuroscience involves examining relations between cognitive or behavioral variability and neural variables like brain structure and function. Such studies have uncovered a number of fascinating associations but require large samples, which are expensive to collect. Here, we propose a system that capitalizes on neuroimaging data commonly collected for separate purposes and combines it with new behavioral data to test novel hypotheses. Specifically, we suggest that groups of researchers compile a database of structural (i.e., anatomical) and resting-state functional scans produced for other task-based investigations and pair these data with contact information for the participants who contributed the data. This contact information can then be used to collect additional cognitive, behavioral, or individual-difference data that are then reassociated with the neuroimaging data for analysis. This would allow for novel hypotheses regarding brain-behavior relations to be tested on the basis of large sample sizes (with adequate statistical power) for low additional cost. This idea can be implemented at small scales at single institutions, among a group of collaborating researchers, or perhaps even within a single lab. It can also be implemented at a large scale across institutions, although doing so would entail a number of additional complications.

  9. Basic Research for Better Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... including structural genomics, trauma and burn research, systems biology, and biomedical technology. It also supports centers that ... make up NIGMS: Biomedical Technology, Bioinformatics, and Computational Biology; Cell Biology and Biophysics; Extramural Activities; Genetics and ...

  10. From basic to applied research to improve outcomes for individuals who require augmentative and alternative communication: potential contributions of eye tracking research methods.

    PubMed

    Light, Janice; McNaughton, David

    2014-06-01

    In order to improve outcomes for individuals who require AAC, there is an urgent need for research across the full spectrum--from basic research to investigate fundamental language and communication processes, to applied clinical research to test applications of this new knowledge in the real world. To date, there has been a notable lack of basic research in the AAC field to investigate the underlying cognitive, sensory perceptual, linguistic, and motor processes of individuals with complex communication needs. Eye tracking research technology provides a promising method for researchers to investigate some of the visual cognitive processes that underlie interaction via AAC. The eye tracking research technology automatically records the latency, duration, and sequence of visual fixations, providing key information on what elements attract the individual's attention (and which ones do not), for how long, and in what sequence. As illustrated by the papers in this special issue, this information can be used to improve the design of AAC systems, assessments, and interventions to better meet the needs of individuals with developmental and acquired disabilities who require AAC (e.g., individuals with autism spectrum disorders, Down syndrome, intellectual disabilities of unknown origin, aphasia).

  11. From basic to applied research to improve outcomes for individuals who require augmentative and alternative communication: potential contributions of eye tracking research methods.

    PubMed

    Light, Janice; McNaughton, David

    2014-06-01

    In order to improve outcomes for individuals who require AAC, there is an urgent need for research across the full spectrum--from basic research to investigate fundamental language and communication processes, to applied clinical research to test applications of this new knowledge in the real world. To date, there has been a notable lack of basic research in the AAC field to investigate the underlying cognitive, sensory perceptual, linguistic, and motor processes of individuals with complex communication needs. Eye tracking research technology provides a promising method for researchers to investigate some of the visual cognitive processes that underlie interaction via AAC. The eye tracking research technology automatically records the latency, duration, and sequence of visual fixations, providing key information on what elements attract the individual's attention (and which ones do not), for how long, and in what sequence. As illustrated by the papers in this special issue, this information can be used to improve the design of AAC systems, assessments, and interventions to better meet the needs of individuals with developmental and acquired disabilities who require AAC (e.g., individuals with autism spectrum disorders, Down syndrome, intellectual disabilities of unknown origin, aphasia). PMID:24898931

  12. How to create innovation by building the translation bridge from basic research into medicinal drugs: an industrial perspective.

    PubMed

    Germann, Paul G; Schuhmacher, Alexander; Harrison, Juan; Law, Ronald; Haug, Kevin; Wong, Gordon

    2013-03-05

    The global healthcare industry is undergoing substantial changes and adaptations to the constant decline of approved new medical entities. This decrease in internal research productivity is resulting in a major decline of patent-protected sales (patent cliff) of most of the pharmaceutical companies. Three major global adaptive trends as driving forces to cope with these challenges are evident: cut backs of internal research and development jobs in the western hemisphere (Europe and USA), following the market growth potential of Asia by building up internal or external research and development capabilities there and finally, 'early innovation hunting' with an increased focus on identifying and investing in very early innovation sources within academia and small start-up companies. Early innovation hunting can be done by different approaches: increased corporate funding, establishment of translational institutions to bridge innovation, increasing sponsored collaborations and formation of technology hunting groups for capturing very early scientific ideas and concepts. This emerging trend towards early innovation hunting demands special adaptations from both the pharmaceutical industry and basic researchers in academia to bridge the translation into new medicines which deliver innovative medicines that matters to the patient. This opinion article describes the different modalities of cross-fertilisation between basic university or publicly funded institutional research and the applied research and development activities within the pharmaceutical industry. Two key factors in this important translational bridge can be identified: preparation of both partnering organisations to open up for new and sometime disruptive ideas and creation of truly trust-based relationships between the different groups allowing long-term scientific collaborations while acknowledging that value-creating differences are an essential factor for successful collaboration building.

  13. Training the translational research teams of the future: UC Davis-HHMI Integrating Medicine into Basic Science program.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Anne A; Rainwater, Julie A; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Bonham, Ann C; Robbins, John A; Henderson, Stuart; Meyers, Frederick J

    2013-10-01

    There is a need for successful models of how to recruit, train, and retain bench scientists at the earliest stages of their careers into translational research. One recent, promising model is the University of California Davis Howard Hughes Medical Institute Integrating Medicine into Basic Science (HHMI-IMBS) program, part of the HHMI Med into Grad initiative. This paper outlines the HHMI-IMBS program's logic, design, and curriculum that guide the goal of research that moves from bedside to bench. That is, a curriculum that provides graduate students with guided translational training, clinical exposure, team science competencies, and mentors from diverse disciplines that will advance the students careers in clinical translational research and re-focusing of research to answer clinical dilemmas. The authors have collected data on 55 HHMI-IMBS students to date. Many of these students are still completing their graduate work. In the current study the authors compare the initial two cohorts (15 students) with a group of 29 control students to examine the program success and outcomes. The data indicate that this training program provides an effective, adaptable model for training future translational researchers. HHMI-IMBS students showed improved confidence in conducting translational research, greater interest in a future translational career, and higher levels of research productivity and collaborations than a comparable group of predoctoral students.

  14. Training the translational research teams of the future: UC Davis-HHMI Integrating Medicine into Basic Science program.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Anne A; Rainwater, Julie A; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Bonham, Ann C; Robbins, John A; Henderson, Stuart; Meyers, Frederick J

    2013-10-01

    There is a need for successful models of how to recruit, train, and retain bench scientists at the earliest stages of their careers into translational research. One recent, promising model is the University of California Davis Howard Hughes Medical Institute Integrating Medicine into Basic Science (HHMI-IMBS) program, part of the HHMI Med into Grad initiative. This paper outlines the HHMI-IMBS program's logic, design, and curriculum that guide the goal of research that moves from bedside to bench. That is, a curriculum that provides graduate students with guided translational training, clinical exposure, team science competencies, and mentors from diverse disciplines that will advance the students careers in clinical translational research and re-focusing of research to answer clinical dilemmas. The authors have collected data on 55 HHMI-IMBS students to date. Many of these students are still completing their graduate work. In the current study the authors compare the initial two cohorts (15 students) with a group of 29 control students to examine the program success and outcomes. The data indicate that this training program provides an effective, adaptable model for training future translational researchers. HHMI-IMBS students showed improved confidence in conducting translational research, greater interest in a future translational career, and higher levels of research productivity and collaborations than a comparable group of predoctoral students. PMID:24127920

  15. Rho Kinases in Health and Disease: From Basic Science to Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Loirand, Gervaise

    2015-10-01

    Rho-associated kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 are key regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics downstream of Rho GTPases that participate in the control of important physiologic functions, S including cell contraction, migration, proliferation, adhesion, and inflammation. Several excellent review articles dealing with ROCK function and regulation have been published over the past few years. Although a brief overview of general molecular, biochemical, and functional properties of ROCKs is included, an effort has been made to produce an original work by collecting and synthesizing recent studies aimed at translating basic discoveries from cell and experimental models into knowledge of human physiology, pathophysiological mechanisms, and medical therapeutics. This review points out the specificity and distinct roles of ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms highlighted in the last few years. Results obtained from genetically modified mice and genetic analysis in humans are discussed. This review also addresses the involvement of ROCKs in human diseases and the potential use of ROCK activity as a biomarker or a pharmacological target for specific inhibitors. PMID:26419448

  16. User Facilities of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences: A National Resource for Scientific Research

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The BES user facilities provide open access to specialized instrumentation and expertise that enable scientific users from universities, national laboratories, and industry to carry out experiments and develop theories that could not be done at their home institutions. These forefront research facilities require resource commitments well beyond the scope of any non-government institution and open up otherwise inaccessible facets of Nature to scientific inquiry. For approved, peer-reviewed projects, instrument time is available without charge to researchers who intend to publish their results in the open literature. These large-scale user facilities have made significant contributions to various scientific fields, including chemistry, physics, geology, materials science, environmental science, biology, and biomedical science. Over 16,000 scientists and engineers.pdf file (27KB) conduct experiments at BES user facilities annually. Thousands of other researchers collaborate with these users and analyze the data measured at the facilities to publish new scientific findings in peer-reviewed journals.

  17. Programme Implementation in Social and Emotional Learning: Basic Issues and Research Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durlak, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamental importance of achieving quality implementation when assessing the impact of social and emotional learning interventions. Recent findings in implementation science are reviewed that include a definition of implementation, its relation to programme outcomes, current research on the factors that affect…

  18. Historical perspective on Chlamydomonas as a model for basic research: 1950-1970.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Ursula

    2015-05-01

    During the period 1950-1970, groundbreaking research on the genetic mapping of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the use of mutant strains to analyze photosynthesis was conducted in the laboratory of R. Paul Levine at Harvard University. An account of this era, based in part on interviews with Levine, is presented.

  19. Basic Research Needs for Geosciences: Facilitating 21st Century Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, D. J.; Orr, F. M.; Benson, S. M.; Celia, M.; Felmy, A.; Nagy, K. L.; Fogg, G. E.; Snieder, R.; Davis, J.; Pruess, K.; Friedmann, J.; Peters, M.; Woodward, N. B.; Dobson, P.; Talamini, K.; Saarni, M.

    2007-06-01

    To identify research areas in geosciences, such as behavior of multiphase fluid-solid systems on a variety of scales, chemical migration processes in geologic media, characterization of geologic systems, and modeling and simulation of geologic systems, needed for improved energy systems.

  20. Translating Basic Psychopathology Research to Preventive Interventions: A Tribute to John R. Z. Abela

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Judy; Korelitz, Katherine; Samanez-Larkin, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights how the many important contributions of John R. Z. Abela's research program can inform the development and implementation of interventions for preventing depression in youth. Abela provided evidence of multiple vulnerabilities to depression including cognitive (e.g., inferential style, dysfunctional attitudes, ruminative…

  1. Derivation of Performance Statements for the Automotive Mechanics Basic Trade Course: Research Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, A. P.; Kuhl, D. H.

    A project was conducted to derive a comprehensive list of the performances of a competence mechanic to satisfy the planning needs of automotive engineering lecturers, curriculum committees, researchers, course designers, and staff developers. A list of 127 tasks together with information about their relative importance and the frequency with which…

  2. Higher Education and Research: The Basic Functions of the Modern University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer-Appelt, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Research appeared as a central function of the university only in 1810 with the foundation of the University of Berlin. Today, the scientist's responsibility is to understand and control the process of discovery within the social context, especially through international dialog and cooperation. (MSE)

  3. The Translation of Basic Behavioral Research to School Psychology: A Citation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Derek D.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, school psychology has become increasingly grounded in data-based decision making and intervention design, based upon behavior analytic principles. This paradigm shift has occurred in part by recent federal legislation, as well as through advances in experimental research replicating laboratory based studies. Translating basic…

  4. Research programs for Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    A chemical sciences review meeting was held in which research programs in chemistry were discussed. Major topics included: chemistry of actinides and fission products, interactions of solvents, solutes and surfaces in supercritical extraction, chemical and physical principles in multiphase separations, and chemical kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  5. Obligations of a Pharmaceutical Scientist to Help Bridge the Gap Between Basic Research and Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benet, Leslie Z.

    1980-01-01

    A chairman of pharmacy in a state university outlines obligations in reducing tensions within the profession: making teaching relevant to the product of the school--clinical pharmacists; making one's own expertise available to faculty to develop research projects; and insuring highest scientific quality of services. (MSE)

  6. Formally acknowledging donor-cadaver-patients in the basic and clinical science research arena.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Brion

    2013-10-01

    Historically, in the healthcare profession, cadaveric tissue has been predominantly used for teaching the architecture of the human body. It is respectful practice in scientific writing to acknowledge colleagues who have helped to collect/analyze data and prepare manuscripts; however, it appears that we have omitted to thank those that have donated themselves for any of these projects to occur. The objective of this study was to investigate the formal acknowledgment thanking those who have given the amazing gift of themselves to science. A literature search was conducted on printed and electronic anatomical and clinical journals. Anatomical and clinical conferences were attended between 2008 and 2012; posters utilizing cadaveric tissue were examined for acknowledgment. University/private institutions were contacted to ascertain if memorial services were held. Literature revealed only one journal that required acknowledgment when donor-cadaver's (DC's) were used. Poster examination revealed very few acknowledgments of DC tissue at clinical conferences. While all university programs (n = 20) held memorial services, only 6 of 20 private procurement organizations had any such event. Our surgical anatomist forefathers faced awkward conditions because cadaveric tissue was not readily available. Contemporarily, anatomists and researchers have ready access to DC's. Socially, these donations are recognized as unparalleled educational tools and gifts, yet often they are not given the appropriate recognition and are overlooked in the publishing and scientific research arena. This research suggests editors, researchers, IRB committees, nonprofit body willed programs, and for-profit procurement organizations formally recognize and/or require recognition of those who donate their bodies for research.

  7. [From basic research to the clinic. Obstacles and options for stem cell therapies].

    PubMed

    Hescheler, J; Hauskeller, C

    2008-09-01

    Translation from the laboratory to the clinic is one of the key problems of stem cell research. One reason for this is that stem cell science is ethically charged and therefore its successful therapeutic application would support its social legitimacy and further funding. We discuss translation both theoretically and with reference to an example, namely efforts regarding the creation of cardiomyocytes from embryonic stem cell lines with the aim to regenerate a patient's myocardium post trauma. Using this case we explain the facts that need to be established scientifically and the subsequent steps that need to be taken in order to develop and implement clinical application. We also discuss aspects of current scientific development related to the moral charge of the research, in particular emerging methods aimed at the derivation of pluripotent cells, such as the hybridization of human DNA and animal egg cells, or the genetic modification of adult somatic cell nuclei in culture to induce pluripotency.

  8. Basic research in homeopathy and ultra-high dilutions: what progress is being made?

    PubMed

    Betti, Lucietta; Trebbi, Grazia; Olioso, Debora; Marzotto, Marta; Bellavite, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    This report summarises the latest research developments in the field of high dilutions and homeopathy, as presented at the GIRI symposium of the leading international organisation of scientists in this field, in Florence, Italy in September 2012. The scientific community's early scepticism concerning the possible biological and pharmacological activity of highly diluted solutions, is giving way to a more open-minded attitude that no longer obstructs critical and experimental investigations in this emerging field of biomedicine.

  9. Progress report to the Department of Energy in support of basic energy and policy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-07-01

    Research areas include: light path of carbon reduction in photosynthesis: heat transfer in coal-ash slags; mechanism of plant cell enlargement in Gymnosperms; emulsion stability in enhanced oil recovery; selective transfer phenomenon in friction and wear; conceptual design of the Purdue Compact Torus/Passive Liner Fusion Reactor; integration of farm level alcohol production consistent with the economic and labor constraints of a farming operation, and newsmedia coverage of selected energy policy proposals.

  10. Compound facial expressions of emotion: from basic research to clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shichuan; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2015-01-01

    Emotions are sometimes revealed through facial expressions. When these natural facial articulations involve the contraction of the same muscle groups in people of distinct cultural upbringings, this is taken as evidence of a biological origin of these emotions. While past research had identified facial expressions associated with a single internally felt category (eg, the facial expression of happiness when we feel joyful), we have recently studied facial expressions observed when people experience compound emotions (eg, the facial expression of happy surprise when we feel joyful in a surprised way, as, for example, at a surprise birthday party). Our research has identified 17 compound expressions consistently produced across cultures, suggesting that the number of facial expressions of emotion of biological origin is much larger than previously believed. The present paper provides an overview of these findings and shows evidence supporting the view that spontaneous expressions are produced using the same facial articulations previously identified in laboratory experiments. We also discuss the implications of our results in the study of psychopathologies, and consider several open research questions. PMID:26869845

  11. Compound facial expressions of emotion: from basic research to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Du, Shichuan; Martinez, Aleix M

    2015-12-01

    Emotions are sometimes revealed through facial expressions. When these natural facial articulations involve the contraction of the same muscle groups in people of distinct cultural upbringings, this is taken as evidence of a biological origin of these emotions. While past research had identified facial expressions associated with a single internally felt category (eg, the facial expression of happiness when we feel joyful), we have recently studied facial expressions observed when people experience compound emotions (eg, the facial expression of happy surprise when we feel joyful in a surprised way, as, for example, at a surprise birthday party). Our research has identified 17 compound expressions consistently produced across cultures, suggesting that the number of facial expressions of emotion of biological origin is much larger than previously believed. The present paper provides an overview of these findings and shows evidence supporting the view that spontaneous expressions are produced using the same facial articulations previously identified in laboratory experiments. We also discuss the implications of our results in the study of psychopathologies, and consider several open research questions.

  12. Basic research for the future: Opportunities in microbiology for the coming decade

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, W.J.

    1996-12-31

    Not since Leeuwenhoek reported finding {open_quotes}animalcules{close_quotes} in a variety of natural materials have research opportunities in microbiology looked so promising. Researchers have developed methods to analyze the historic and evolutionary progression of bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The significance of the remarkable diversity found in the microbial realm is just beginning to emerge. Biotechnology companies are exploiting microorganisms in remarkable ways. Seemingly new, devastating pathogens have appeared and {open_quotes}old{close_quotes} pathogens have become resistant to antiobiotics. All these factors serve to invigorate interest in microbiology. Seldom have the challenges seemed more intense or more exciting. Recognizing the significance of these issues, the American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium of experts in the microbiological sciences May 4-7, 1996, in Washington, D.C. The colloquim sought primarily to identify those research areas most clearly deserving future attention, those most likely to provide optimal return on scientific and monetary investment, and those offering the greatest promise for solving critical problems over the coming decade.

  13. Basic Research of Intrinsic Tamper Indication Markings Defined by Pulsed Laser Irradiation (Quad Chart).

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Neville R.

    2015-08-01

    Objective: We will research how short (ns) and ultrashort (fs) laser pulses interact with the surfaces of various materials to create complex color layers and morphological patterns. Method: We are investigating the site-specific, formation of microcolor features. Also, research includes a fundamental study of the physics underlying periodic ripple formation during femtosecond laser irradiation. Status of effort: Laser induced color markings were demonstrated on an increased number of materials (including metal thin films) and investigated for optical properties and microstructure. Technology that allows for marking curved surfaces (and large areas) has been implemented. We have used electro-magnetic solvers to model light-solid interactions leading to periodic surface ripple patterns. This includes identifying the roles of surface plasmon polaritons. Goals/Milestones: Research corrosion resistance of oxide color markings (salt spray, fog, polarization tests); Through modeling, investigate effects of multi-source scattering and interference on ripple patterns; Investigate microspectrophotometry for mapping color; and Investigate new methods for laser color marking curved surfaces and large areas.

  14. A practical approach to instrument selection, evaluation, basic financial management and implementation in pathology and research.

    PubMed

    Mina, Ashraf; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Koutts, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    In response to increasingly complex demands in terms of productivity and budgets, there is a critical need to avoid mistakes during instrument selection that will be financially costly, and adversely affect customers, staff, productivity and test turnaround time. As there is no "one size fits all", guidelines must be appropriate to permit informed decision making. A Medline search was conducted to assess background knowledge in this area, using the terms "laboratory instrument selection" and "laboratory instrument evaluation". Searches returned over 800 articles, of which only seven were directly related to the topic of the search, with most outdated, and suggesting a paucity of appropriate information. Additional resources used included the American Association of Clinical Chemistry (AACC) website and the Internet. Appropriate criteria for instrument selection were established in the current report based on subjective and objective (technical) evaluations. Additionally, a sound and simple financial approach is also suggested to help in making informed decisions and avoid costly mistakes. We propose that such a process as outlined in our report will protect laboratories from making costly and avoidable mistakes in the acquisition of major equipment. PMID:18611106

  15. A practical approach to instrument selection, evaluation, basic financial management and implementation in pathology and research.

    PubMed

    Mina, Ashraf; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Koutts, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    In response to increasingly complex demands in terms of productivity and budgets, there is a critical need to avoid mistakes during instrument selection that will be financially costly, and adversely affect customers, staff, productivity and test turnaround time. As there is no "one size fits all", guidelines must be appropriate to permit informed decision making. A Medline search was conducted to assess background knowledge in this area, using the terms "laboratory instrument selection" and "laboratory instrument evaluation". Searches returned over 800 articles, of which only seven were directly related to the topic of the search, with most outdated, and suggesting a paucity of appropriate information. Additional resources used included the American Association of Clinical Chemistry (AACC) website and the Internet. Appropriate criteria for instrument selection were established in the current report based on subjective and objective (technical) evaluations. Additionally, a sound and simple financial approach is also suggested to help in making informed decisions and avoid costly mistakes. We propose that such a process as outlined in our report will protect laboratories from making costly and avoidable mistakes in the acquisition of major equipment.

  16. Overview of fundamental geochemistry basic research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, L.M.; Benezeth, P.; Blencoe, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    Researchers in ORNL`s Geochemistry and High Temperature Aqueous Chemistry groups are conducting detailed experimental studies of physicochemical properties of the granite-melt-brine system; sorption of water on rocks from steam-dominated reservoirs; partitioning of salts and acid volatiles between brines and steam; effects of salinity on H and O isotope partitioning between brines, minerals, and steam; and aqueous geochemistry of Al. These studies contribute in many ways to cost reductions and improved efficiency in the discovery, characterization, and production of energy from geothermal resources.

  17. Mitochondrial replacement: from basic research to assisted reproductive technology portfolio tool-technicalities and possible risks.

    PubMed

    Cree, Lynsey; Loi, Pasqualino

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are a relatively common cause of progressive disorders that can be severe or even life-threatening. There is currently no cure for these disorders; therefore recent research has been focused on attempting to prevent the transmission of these maternally inherited mutations. Here we highlight the challenges of understanding the transmission of mtDNA diseases, discuss current genetic management options and explore the use of germ-line reconstruction technologies to prevent mtDNA diseases. In particular we discuss their potential, indications, limitations and possible safety concerns.

  18. [Asthma Update 2015--What Cell Biology in Basic Pulmonary Research Can Offer to the Pneumologist].

    PubMed

    Wegmann, M; Fehrenbach, H; Krauss-Etschmann, S

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial asthma is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases world-wide causing an enormous socio-economic burden especially in industrialized countries. Currently, asthma is increasingly considered to be a poly-symptomatic disease comprising a variety of different asthma phenotypes and endotypes. This heterogeneity of asthma explains why the standard treatment with corticosteroids and β-agonists cannot achieve full symptom control in all cases, especially not during acute exacerbations. Therefore, current asthma research focuses on primary prevention of asthma as well as on novel approaches towards a phenotype- and endotype-specific asthma therapy.

  19. Basic Research and Development Effort to Design a Micro Nuclear Power Plant for Brazilian Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimares, L. N. F.; Camillo, G. P.; Placco, G. M.; Barrios, G., A., Jr.; Do Nascimento, J. A.; Borges, E. M.; De Castro Lobo, P. D.

    For some years the Nuclear Energy Division of the Institute for Advanced Studies is conducting the TERRA (Portuguese abbreviation for advanced fast reactor technology) project. This project aims at research and development of the key issues related with nuclear energy applied to space technology. The purpose of this development is to allow future Brazilian space explorers the access of a good and reliable heat, power and/or propulsion system based on nuclear energy. Efforts are being made in fuel and nuclear core design, designing and building a closed Brayton cycle loop for energy conversion, heat pipe systems research for passive space heat rejection, developing computational programs for thermal loop safety analysis and other technology that may be used to improve efficiency and operation. Currently there is no specific mission that requires these technology development efforts; therefore, there is a certain degree of freedom in the organization and development efforts. This paper will present what has been achieved so far, what is the current development status, where efforts are heading and a proposed time table to meet development objectives.

  20. Deep-drilling basic research. Volume 1. Summary report. Final report, November 1988-August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, W.C.; Andersen, E.E.; Hood, M.; Cooper, G.; Cook, N.

    1990-06-01

    Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) under contract with the Gas Research Institute (GRI), evaluated drilling of deep gas wells to determine future research projects. Three major areas were covered: (1) typical performance figures and procedures for wells exceeding 15,000 ft; (2) capabilities and limitations of alternative drilling mechanisms; and (3) a review of the rock mechanics involved in drilling and wellbore stability. Results of the study showed, that in deep wells seventy percent of the time is spent drilling or tripping due to slow penetration rates and reduced bit life. This is caused by changes in rock properties that are the result of high over burden and drilling fluid pressures. An economic and qualitative analysis evaluated and queued technologies that could increase penetration rates and extend bit life. The candidates providing the best possibility of success and maximum savings are PDC/TSD shear bits, slimhole drilling, roll-cone bits, and downhole motors; of these, improvements in shear bits have the best opportunity for near-term results. The report will serve many readers as a convenient reference for descriptions of deep drilling systems currently used in the U.S., typical performance data, mechanisms of wellbore stability, and descriptions of the entire variety of mechanism used to comminute rock.

  1. Grants4Targets - an innovative approach to translate ideas from basic research into novel drugs.

    PubMed

    Lessl, Monika; Schoepe, Stefanie; Sommer, Anette; Schneider, Martin; Asadullah, Khusru

    2011-04-01

    Collaborations between industry and academia are steadily gaining importance. To combine expertises Bayer Healthcare has set up a novel open innovation approach called Grants4Targets. Ideas on novel drug targets can easily be submitted to http://www.grants4targets.com. After a review process, grants are provided to perform focused experiments to further validate the proposed targets. In addition to financial support specific know-how on target validation and drug discovery is provided. Experienced scientists are nominated as project partners and, depending on the project, tools or specific models are provided. Around 280 applications have been received and 41 projects granted. According to our experience, this type of bridging fund combined with joint efforts provides a valuable tool to foster drug discovery collaborations.

  2. Basic research needs and opportunities at the solid-solid interface - Adhesion, abrasion and polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowkes, F. M.; Butler, B. L.; Schissel, P.; Butler, G. B.; Hartman, J. S.; Hoffman, R. W.; Inal, O. T.; Miller, W. G.; Tompkins, H. G.; Delollis, N. J.

    1982-04-01

    Solid-solid interfaces in solar technologies such as photovoltaics, mirrored surfaces, and absorbers in flate plate collectors are examined theoretically along with degradation and protective measures. The energetics of adhesion are modeled in terms of intermolecular forces such as covalent and electrostatic bonds. Finite element analyses are noted to be useful for calculating the stress fields in layered solar cells, although inclusion of plastic flow and relaxation processes is not yet possible. The effects of physical degradation of protective coatings and front surfaces of reflectors are outlined, and research in abrasion-erosion resistance, particulate deposition resistance, and detergents for washing solar surfaces is indicated. Finally, polymeric coatings are discussed for solar cells and for wind turbine blades for providing environmental protection.

  3. [Psychoanalysis and early childhood research. Some basic topics of the debate].

    PubMed

    Dornes, M

    1993-12-01

    In Dornes' view it is time for psychoanalytic development psychology to stand back from its preoccupation with the reconstructed child and gain access to the real child via direct observation, thus re-establishing contact with the state of research in neighbouring disciplines. Such direct observation would both stimulate a review of the cogency of the symbiosis and borderline theories of normal early development and question the assumption of lack of psychic differentiation in newborn children. So far, the author contends, psychoanalytic theory has both underestimated and overestimated the abilities of infants, ascribing to them in the latter case the capacity for complicated psychic operations (hallucinatory wish fulfillment, grandeur fantasies, projective identifications) which are in fact beyond their powers.

  4. Basics of Fusion-Fissison Research Facility (FFRF) as a Fusion Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Leonid E. Zakharov

    2011-06-03

    FFRF, standing for the Fusion-Fission Research Facility represents an option for the next step project of ASIPP (Hefei, China) aiming to a first fusion-fission multifunctional device [1]. FFRF strongly relies on new, Lithium Wall Fusion plasma regimes, the development of which has already started in the US and China. With R/a=4/1m/m, Ipl=5 MA, Btor=4-6 T, PDT=50- 100 MW, Pfission=80-4000MW, 1 m thick blanket, FFRF has a unique fusion mission of a stationary fusion neutron source. Its pioneering mission of merging fusion and fission consists in accumulation of design, experimental, and operational data for future hybrid applications.

  5. [Basic research for development of pinhole camera using a Geiger Mueller counter].

    PubMed

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Ikuma; Konishi, Yuki; Hanamitsu, Hiroki; Hashizume, Takuya; Murakami, Jun; Mitani, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    To visualize the scattered X-ray distribution in the diagnosis domain, we examined whether a Geiger Mueller (GM) counter could be applied to a pinhole camera as an X-ray detector. The GM counter detects radiation at certain detection points. To obtain two-dimensional images using the GM counter, the detector needs to be moved two-dimensionally. We constructed an apparatus using industrial actuators to move the detector. To investigate the usability of the developed apparatus, the scattered X-rays from the phantom were measured using the GM counter. The images obtained were then compared with those measured using the phosphor plate. Our results demonstrated that the GM counter can detect low count-rate radiation, but further research will be needed to obtain clear two-dimensional images. In this paper, we propose that the GM counter can be used as a complementary detector to a phosphor plate.

  6. Awareness of hormesis will enhance future research in basic and applied neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Mark P

    2008-01-01

    Hormesis is defined operationally as responses of cells or organisms to an exogenous or intrinsic factor (chemical, temperature, psychological challenge, etc.) in which the factor induces stimulatory or beneficial effects at low doses and inhibitory or adverse effects at high doses. The compendium of articles by Calabrese entitled "Neuroscience and Hormesis" provides a broad range of examples of neurobiological processes and responses to environmental factors that exhibit biphasic dose responses, the signature of hormesis. Nerve cell networks are the "first responders" to environmental challenges--they perceive the challenge and orchestrate coordinated adaptive responses that typically involve autonomic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral changes. In addition to direct adaptive responses of neurons to environmental stressors, cells subjected to a stressor produce and release molecules such as growth factors, cytokines, and hormones that alert adjacent and even distant cells to impending danger. The discoveries that some molecules (e.g., carbon monoxide and nitric oxide) and elements (e.g., selenium and iron) that are toxic at high doses play fundamental roles in cellular signaling or metabolism suggest that during evolution, organisms (and their nervous systems) co-opted environmental toxins and used them to their advantage. Neurons also respond adaptively to everyday stressors, including physical exercise, cognitive challenges, and dietary energy restriction, each of which activates pathways linked to the production of neurotrophic factors and cellular stress resistance proteins. The development of interventions that activate hormetic signaling pathways in neurons is a promising new approach for the preventation and treatment of a range of neurological disorders.

  7. Translational research for injectable tissue-engineered bone regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma: from basic research to clinical case study.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoichi; Ueda, Minoru; Hibi, Hideharu; Nagasaka, Tetsuro

    2004-01-01

    Translational research involves application of basic scientific discoveries into clinically germane findings and, simultaneously, the generation of scientific questions based on clinical observations. At first, as basic research we investigated tissue-engineered bone regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in a dog mandible model. We also confirmed the correlation between osseointegration in dental implants and the injectable bone. Bone defects made with a trephine bar were implanted with graft materials as follows: PRP, dog MSCs (dMSCs) and PRP, autogenous particulate cancellous bone and marrow (PCBM), and control (defect only). Two months later, dental implants were installed. According to the histological and histomorphometric observations at 2 months after implants, the amount of bone-implant contact at the bone-implant interface was significantly different between the PRP, PCBM, dMSCs/ PRP, native bone, and control groups. Significant differences were also found between the dMSCs/PRP, native bone, and control groups in bone density. These findings indicate that the use of a mixture of dMSCs/ PRP will provide good results in implant treatment compared with that achieved by autogenous PCBM. We then applied this injectable tissue-engineered bone to onlay plasty in the posterior maxilla or mandible in three human patients. Injectable tissue-engineered bone was grafted and, simultaneously, 2-3 threaded titanium implants were inserted into the defect area. The results of this investigation indicated that injectable tissue-engineered bone used for the plasty area with simultaneous implant placement provided stable and predictable results in terms of implant success. We regenerated bone with minimal invasiveness and good plasticity, which could provide a clinical alternative to autogenous bone grafts. This might be a good case of translational research from basic research to clinical application. PMID:15468676

  8. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics, basic research, and clinical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorf, Joerg; Jansson, Volkmar; Maier, Markus; Delius, Michael

    2005-04-01

    The molecular events following shock wave treatment of bone are widely unknown. Nevertheless patients with osteonecrosis and non unions are already treated partly successful with shock waves. Concerning the first indication, the question of the permeation of the shock wave into the bone was addressed. Therefore shockwaves were applied to porcine femoral heads and the intraosseous pressure was measured. A linear correlation of the pressure to the intraosseous distance was found. Approximately 50% of the pressure are still measurable 10 mm inside the femoral head. These findings should encourage continued shock wave research on this indication. Concerning the second indication (non union), osteoblasts were subjected to 250 or 500 shock waves at 25 kV. After 24, 48, and 72 h the levels of the bone and vascular growth factors bFGF, TGFbeta1, and VEGF were examined. After 24 h there was a significant increase in bFGF levels (p<0.05) with significant correlation (p<0.05) to the number of impulses. TGFbeta1, and VEGF showed no significant changes. This may be one piece in the cascade of new bone formation following shock wave treatment and may lead to a more specific application of shock waves in orthopedic surgery.

  9. Review of experimental animal models of biliary acute pancreatitis and recent advances in basic research.

    PubMed

    Wan, Mei H; Huang, Wei; Latawiec, Diane; Jiang, Kun; Booth, David M; Elliott, Victoria; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Xia, Qing

    2012-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a formidable disease, which, in severe forms, causes significant mortality. Biliary AP, or gallstone obstruction-associated AP, accounts for 30-50% of all clinical cases of AP. In biliary AP, pancreatic acinar cell (PAC) death (the initiating event in the disease) is believed to occur as acinar cells make contact with bile salts when bile refluxes into the pancreatic duct. Recent advances have unveiled an important receptor responsible for the major function of bile acids on acinar cells, namely, the cell surface G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 (Gpbar1), located in the apical pole of the PAC. High concentrations of bile acids induce cytosolic Ca(2+) overload and inhibit mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, resulting in cell injury to both PACs and pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Various bile salts are employed to induce experimental AP, most commonly sodium taurocholate. Recent characterization of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulphate on PACs has led researchers to focus on this bile salt because of its potency in causing acinar cell injury at relatively low, sub-detergent concentrations, which strongly implicates action via the receptor Gpbar1. Improved surgical techniques have enabled the infusion of bile salts into the pancreatic duct to induce experimental biliary AP in mice, which allows the use of these transgenic animals as powerful tools. This review summarizes recent findings using transgenic mice in experimental biliary AP. PMID:22221567

  10. [Basic Research on Neurotrophic Factors and Its Application to Medical Uses].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Shoei

    2015-01-01

    The author has studied nerve growth factor (NGF) and its family of neurotrophic factors (neurotrophins) for over 40 years. During the first 20 years, my laboratory established a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay for NGF and analyzed the regulatory mechanism of NGF synthesis in cultured primary cells. Fibroblast cells cultured from peripheral organs such as the heart and astrocytes from the brain produced a substantial amount of NGF in a growth-dependent manner. Furthermore, synthesis of NGF in these cells could be upregulated by catechol compounds including catecholamines. This observation might explain a physiological relation between the level of NGF mRNA and the density of innervation in the peripheral sympathetic nervous systems. Over the subsequent 20 years, my laboratory investigated the physiological functions of neurotrophic factors, including neurotrophins, during development or post-injury and found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in the formation of the laminar structure of the cerebral cortex. In addition, my laboratory discovered that endogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) contributes to the amelioration of motor activity after spinal cord injury. Therefore we aimed to develop low-molecular weight compounds that generate neurotrophic factor-like intracellular signals to protect or ameliorate neurological/psychiatric diseases. 2-Decenoic acid derivatives and other similar molecules could protect or ameliorate in animal models of mood disorders such as depression and enhance recovery from spinal cord injury-induced motor paralysis. Compounds that can generate neurotrophin-like signals in neurons are expected to be developed as therapeutic drugs for certain neurological or psychiatric disorders.

  11. Workshop on body composition in basic and clinical research and the emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.

    2000-12-14

    A special one-day workshop was held to review the status, the need for, and the future role of BNL in the Body Composition Analysis Program (BCAP). Two speakers succinctly outlined the status and future new developments using gamma nuclear resonance technology as it applies to BCAP. Seven speakers from three institutions outlined the continued need for BCAP and presented new clinical applications of BCAP in theirs respective fields of expertise. Extensive increase in the use of surrogate instrumentation, e.g., DXA and BIA, in BCAP was recognized as a significant contributing factor to the growth in BCAP. The growing role of MRI in BCAP was also emphasized. In light of these developments BCAP at BNL, with its specialized In Vivo Neutron Activation (IVNA) facilities, was recognized as a unique user oriented resource that may serve the community hospitals in the area. Three regional large institutions expressed their desire to use these facilities. In addition, IVNA provides direct measure of the human compartments in vivo, thus providing a gold standard for the surrogate methodologies that are in use or to be developed. It was strongly felt that there is a need for a calibration center with a national stature for the different methodologies for in vivo measurements, a role that befits very well a national laboratory. This offers an exquisite justification for DOE to support this orphan technology and to develop BCAP at BNL to, 1, provide a user oriented regional resource, 2, provide a national reference laboratory, and 3, develop new advanced technologies for BCAP.

  12. Sites of Retroviral DNA Integration: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most crucial steps in the life cycle of a retrovirus is the integration of the viral DNA (vDNA) copy of the RNA genome into the genome of an infected host cell. Integration provides for efficient viral gene expression as well as for the segregation of the viral genomes to daughter cells upon cell division. Some integrated viruses are not well expressed, and cells latently infected with HIV-1 can resist the action of potent antiretroviral drugs and remain dormant for decades. Intensive research has been dedicated to understanding the catalytic mechanism of integration, as well as the viral and cellular determinants that influence integration site distribution throughout the host genome. In this review we summarize the evolution of techniques that have been used to recover and map retroviral integration sites, from the early days that first indicated that integration could occur in multiple cellular DNA locations, to current technologies that map upwards of millions of unique integration sites from single in vitro integration reactions or cell culture infections. We further review important insights gained from the use of such mapping techniques, including the monitoring of cell clonal expansion in patients treated with retrovirus-based gene therapy vectors, or AIDS patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). These insights span from integrase (IN) enzyme sequence preferences within target DNA (tDNA) at the sites of integration, to the roles of host cellular proteins in mediating global integration distribution, to the potential relationship between genomic location of vDNA integration site and retroviral latency. PMID:26508664

  13. Clinical application of basic research on continuous passive motion for disorders and injuries of synovial joints: a preliminary report of a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Salter, R B; Hamilton, H W; Wedge, J H; Tile, M; Torode, I P; O'Driscoll, S W; Murnaghan, J J; Saringer, J H

    1984-01-01

    Since 1970, when the concept of continuous passive motion (CPM) was originated by one of the authors (R.B.S.), he and a succession of his research fellows have investigated its biological effects on the healing and regeneration of articular tissues in a wide variety of experimental models in rabbits. From this basic research he concluded that CPM is well tolerated, seems to be painless, stimulates the healing and regeneration of articular tissues, prevents joint stiffness, and permits the normal healing of arthrotomy incisions. Beginning in 1975, one of the authors (H.W.H.), and in 1978, the remaining authors, (from two additional Canadian cities) applied the knowledge from the basic research on CPM to the orthopaedic care of human patients. The CPM devices for humans (CPM Mobilimbs), which have been designed in collaboration with University of Toronto engineers, include, to date, devices for the ankle-knee-hip, the elbow, and the finger. Indications for CPM in patients have been the immediate postoperative management following such operative procedures as open reduction and internal fixation of fractures, arthrotomy and arthrolysis for post-traumatic arthritis, synovectomy, surgical drainage for septic arthritis, release of extraarticular contractures, metaphyseal osteotomies, total joint replacement, and ligamentous reconstruction. The case reports of nine selected patients are presented as examples of the clinical application of CPM. These patients have been relatively free of pain, have maintained the increased motion gained at operation, and have accepted the application of CPM well. There have been no complications of CPM; the operative wounds have healed well and the period of hospitalization has not been prolonged. The authors believe that the clinical application of CPM is feasible and that the clinical and radiographic results of CPM in these patients are encouraging. Long-term, prospective clinical investigations (including control patients in whom CPM

  14. The importance of integrating basic and clinical research toward the development of new therapies for Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Bates, Gillian P.

    2011-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder that results from expansion of the polyglutamine repeat in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. There are currently no effective treatments for this devastating disease. Given its monogenic nature, disease modification therapies for HD should be theoretically feasible. Currently, pharmacological therapies aimed at disease modification by altering levels of HTT protein are in late-stage preclinical development. Here, we review current efforts to develop new treatments for HD based on our current understanding of HTT function and the main pathological mechanisms. We emphasize the need to enhance translational efforts and highlight the importance of aligning the clinical and basic research communities to validate existing hypotheses in clinical studies. Human and animal therapeutic trials are presented with an emphasis on cellular and molecular mechanisms relevant to disease progression. PMID:21285520

  15. Class A β-Lactamases as Versatile Scaffolds to Create Hybrid Enzymes: Applications from Basic Research to Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Matagne, André; Galleni, Moreno; Dumoulin, Mireille

    2013-01-01

    Designing hybrid proteins is a major aspect of protein engineering and covers a very wide range of applications from basic research to medical applications. This review focuses on the use of class A β-lactamases as versatile scaffolds to design hybrid enzymes (referred to as β-lactamase hybrid proteins, BHPs) in which an exogenous peptide, protein or fragment thereof is inserted at various permissive positions. We discuss how BHPs can be specifically designed to create bifunctional proteins, to produce and to characterize proteins that are otherwise difficult to express, to determine the epitope of specific antibodies, to generate antibodies against nonimmunogenic epitopes, and to better understand the structure/function relationship of proteins. PMID:24066299

  16. Basic research and data analysis for the National Geodetic Satellite program and for the Earth Surveys program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Current research is reported on precise and accurate descriptions of the earth's surface and gravitational field and on time variations of geophysical parameters. A new computer program was written in connection with the adjustment of the BC-4 worldwide geometric satellite triangulation net. The possibility that an increment to accuracy could be transferred from a super-control net to the basic geodetic (first-order triangulation) was investigated. Coordinates of the NA9 solution were computed and were transformed to the NAD datum, based on GEOS 1 observations. Normal equations from observational data of several different systems and constraint equations were added and a single solution was obtained for the combined systems. Transformation parameters with constraints were determined, and the impact of computers on surveying and mapping is discussed.

  17. Current Knowledge and Future Research on Infant Feeding in the Context of HIV: Basic, Clinical, Behavioral, and Programmatic Perspectives12

    PubMed Central

    Young, Sera L.; Mbuya, Mduduzi N. N.; Chantry, Caroline J.; Geubbels, Eveline P.; Israel-Ballard, Kiersten; Cohan, Deborah; Vosti, Stephen A.; Latham, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, between 129,000 and 194,000 of the 430,000 pediatric HIV infections worldwide were attributable to breastfeeding. Yet in many settings, the health, economic, and social consequences of not breastfeeding would have dire consequences for many more children. In the first part of this review we provide an overview of current knowledge about infant feeding in the context of HIV. Namely, we describe the benefits and risks of breastmilk, the evolution of recommended infant feeding modalities in high-income and low-income countries in the last two decades, and contextualize the recently revised guidelines for infant feeding in the context of HIV current knowledge. In the second section, we suggest areas for future research on the postnatal prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) in developing and industrialized countries. We suggest two shifts in perspective. The first is to evaluate PMTCT interventions more holistically, to include the psychosocial and economic consequences as well as the biomedical ones. The second shift in perspective should be one that contextualizes postnatal PMTCT efforts in the cascade of maternal health services. We conclude by discussing basic, clinical, behavioral, and programmatic research questions pertaining to a number of PMTCT efforts, including extended postnatal ARV prophylaxis, exclusive breastfeeding promotion, counseling, breast milk pasteurization, breast milk banking, novel techniques for making breast milk safer, and optimal breastfeeding practices. We believe the research efforts outlined here will maximize the number of healthy, thriving, HIV-free children around the world. PMID:22332055

  18. Effect of (+) or (-) camphorsulfonic acid additives to the mobile phase on enantioseparations of some basic drugs on a Chiralcel OD column.

    PubMed

    Bielejewska, A; Duszczyk, K; Zukowski, J

    2005-08-12

    This paper describes the modification of Chiralcel OD column properties by adsorption of (+) or (-) camphorsulfonic acids (CSAs) used as additives to the mobile phase. The effects on retention, selectivity and efficiency, of adsorption of (+) and (-) CSAs on a Chiralcel OD column were examined. Racemic anti-histamines, anti-malarial and anti-fungal drugs, namely doxylamine, miconazole, sulconazole, hydroxyzine, homochlorcyclizine, methoxypheniramine, cyclopentolate and ephedrine were investigated as chiral tested compounds. All the studied drugs have an amino nitrogen atom in their structure. Only the enantioseparation of ephedrine enantiomers with CSAs alone was studied on the Nucleosil stationary phase, and these results were compared with the results obtained on the Chiralcel OD phase. A new dynamically generated stationary phase, with very good enantioseparation ability towards the studied compounds, was obtained by the adsorption of (-) CSA on the Chiralcel OD column. PMID:16078699

  19. Basic Research Needs for Electrical Energy Storage. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electrical Energy Storage, April 2-4, 2007

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Goodenough, J. B.; Abruna, H. D.; Buchanan, M. V.

    2007-04-04

    To identify research areas in geosciences, such as behavior of multiphase fluid-solid systems on a variety of scales, chemical migration processes in geologic media, characterization of geologic systems, and modeling and simulation of geologic systems, needed for improved energy systems.

  20. PowerPoint Presentations: A Creative Addition to the Research Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Alan E.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that the requirement of a PowerPoint presentation as part of the research process would benefit students in the following ways: learning how to conduct research; starting their research project sooner; honing presentation and public speaking skills; improving cooperative and social skills; and enhancing technology skills. Outlines the…

  1. 40 CFR 26.304 - Additional protections for pregnant women and fetuses involved in observational research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... research. The provisions of 45 CFR 46.204 are applicable to this section. ... women and fetuses involved in observational research. 26.304 Section 26.304 Protection of Environment... Protections for Pregnant Women and Fetuses Involved as Subjects in Observational Research Conducted...

  2. 40 CFR 26.304 - Additional protections for pregnant women and fetuses involved in observational research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... research. The provisions of 45 CFR 46.204 are applicable to this section. ... women and fetuses involved in observational research. 26.304 Section 26.304 Protection of Environment... Protections for Pregnant Women and Fetuses Involved as Subjects in Observational Research Conducted...

  3. 40 CFR 26.304 - Additional protections for pregnant women and fetuses involved in observational research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... research. The provisions of 45 CFR 46.204 are applicable to this section. ... women and fetuses involved in observational research. 26.304 Section 26.304 Protection of Environment... Protections for Pregnant Women and Fetuses Involved as Subjects in Observational Research Conducted...

  4. 40 CFR 26.304 - Additional protections for pregnant women and fetuses involved in observational research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... research. The provisions of 45 CFR 46.204 are applicable to this section. ... women and fetuses involved in observational research. 26.304 Section 26.304 Protection of Environment... Protections for Pregnant Women and Fetuses Involved as Subjects in Observational Research Conducted...

  5. 40 CFR 26.304 - Additional protections for pregnant women and fetuses involved in observational research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... research. The provisions of 45 CFR 46.204 are applicable to this section. ... women and fetuses involved in observational research. 26.304 Section 26.304 Protection of Environment... Protections for Pregnant Women and Fetuses Involved as Subjects in Observational Research Conducted...

  6. Partnering with Community Stakeholders: Engaging Rural African American Families in Basic Research and the Strong African American Families Preventive Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murry, Velma McBride; Brody, Gene H.

    2004-01-01

    The Center for Family Research has implemented the first family-community preventive intervention program designed specifically for rural African American families and youths. Basic information garnered during a decade of research in rural African American communities formed the theoretical and empirical foundations for the program, which focuses…

  7. Conceiving "personality": Psychologist's challenges and basic fundamentals of the Transdisciplinary Philosophy-of-Science Paradigm for Research on Individuals.

    PubMed

    Uher, Jana

    2015-09-01

    Scientists exploring individuals, as such scientists are individuals themselves and thus not independent from their objects of research, encounter profound challenges; in particular, high risks for anthropo-, ethno- and ego-centric biases and various fallacies in reasoning. The Transdisciplinary Philosophy-of-Science Paradigm for Research on Individuals (TPS-Paradigm) aims to tackle these challenges by exploring and making explicit the philosophical presuppositions that are being made and the metatheories and methodologies that are used in the field. This article introduces basic fundamentals of the TPS-Paradigm including the epistemological principle of complementarity and metatheoretical concepts for exploring individuals as living organisms. Centrally, the TPS-Paradigm considers three metatheoretical properties (spatial location in relation to individuals' bodies, temporal extension, and physicality versus "non-physicality") that can be conceived in different forms for various kinds of phenomena explored in individuals (morphology, physiology, behaviour, the psyche, semiotic representations, artificially modified outer appearances and contexts). These properties, as they determine the phenomena's accessibility in everyday life and research, are used to elaborate philosophy-of-science foundations and to derive general methodological implications for the elementary problem of phenomenon-methodology matching and for scientific quantification of the various kinds of phenomena studied. On the basis of these foundations, the article explores the metatheories and methodologies that are used or needed to empirically study each given kind of phenomenon in individuals in general. Building on these general implications, the article derives special implications for exploring individuals' "personality", which the TPS-Paradigm conceives of as individual-specificity in all of the various kinds of phenomena studied in individuals.

  8. Statement Summarizing Research Findings on the Issue of the Relationship Between Food-Additive-Free Diets and Hyperkinesis in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipton, Morris; Wender, Esther

    The National Advisory Committee on Hyperkinesis and Food Additives paper summarized some research findings on the issue of the relationship between food-additive-free diets and hyperkinesis in children. Based on several challenge studies, it is concluded that the evidence generally refutes Dr. B. F. Feingold's claim that artificial colorings in…

  9. Tabulated pressure measurements of a NASA supercritical-wing research airplane model with and without fuselage area-rule additions at Mach 0.25 to 1.00

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. D.; Bartlett, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Basic pressure measurements were made on a 0.087-scale model of a supercritical wing research airplane in the Langley 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 1.00 to determine the effects on the local aerodynamic loads over the wing and rear fuselage of area-rule additions to the sides of the fuselage. In addition, pressure measurements over the surface of the area-rule additions themselves were obtained at angles of sideslip of approximately - 5 deg, 0 deg, and 5 deg to aid in the structural design of the additions. Except for representative figures, results are presented in tabular form without analysis.

  10. 34 CFR 660.32 - What additional selection criteria does the Secretary use for an application for a research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... use for an application for a research project, a survey, or a study? 660.32 Section 660.32 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AND STUDIES PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a Grant... project, a survey, or a study? In addition to the criteria referred to in § 660.31, the...

  11. Basic Research Needs for Solid-State Lighting. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solid-State Lighting, May 22-24, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J. M.; Burrows, P. E.; Davis, R. F.; Simmons, J. A.; Malliaras, G. G.; So, F.; Misewich, J.A.; Nurmikko, A. V.; Smith, D. L.; Tsao, J. Y.; Kung, H.; Crawford, M. H.; Coltrin, M. E.; Fitzsimmons, T. J.; Kini, A.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Kitts, S.; Shapard, L.; Brittenham, P. W.; Vittitow, M. P.

    2006-05-24

    The workshop participants enthusiastically concluded that the time is ripe for new fundamental science to beget a revolution in lighting technology. SSL sources based on organic and inorganic materials have reached a level of efficiency where it is possible to envision their use for general illumination. The research areas articulated in this report are targeted to enable disruptive advances in SSL performance and realization of this dream. Broad penetration of SSL technology into the mass lighting market, accompanied by vast savings in energy usage, requires nothing less. These new ?good ideas? will be represented not by light bulbs, but by an entirely new lighting technology for the 21st century and a bright, energy-efficient future indeed.

  12. Measurement of Separated Flow Structures Using a Multiple-Camera DPIV System. [conducted in the Langley Subsonic Basic Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.

    2001-01-01

    A novel multiple-camera system for the recording of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) images acquired in a two-dimensional separating/reattaching flow is described. The measurements were performed in the NASA Langley Subsonic Basic Research Tunnel as part of an overall series of experiments involving the simultaneous acquisition of dynamic surface pressures and off-body velocities. The DPIV system utilized two frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers to generate two coplanar, orthogonally polarized light sheets directed upstream along the horizontal centerline of the test model. A recording system containing two pairs of matched high resolution, 8-bit cameras was used to separate and capture images of illuminated tracer particles embedded in the flow field. Background image subtraction was used to reduce undesirable flare light emanating from the surface of the model, and custom pixel alignment algorithms were employed to provide accurate registration among the various cameras. Spatial cross correlation analysis with median filter validation was used to determine the instantaneous velocity structure in the separating/reattaching flow region illuminated by the laser light sheets. In operation the DPIV system exhibited a good ability to resolve large-scale separated flow structures with acceptable accuracy over the extended field of view of the cameras. The recording system design provided enhanced performance versus traditional DPIV systems by allowing a variety of standard and non-standard cameras to be easily incorporated into the system.

  13. The Effects of Stress Exposure on Prefrontal Cortex: Translating Basic Research into Successful Treatments for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Arnsten, Amy F T; Raskind, Murray A; Taylor, Fletcher B; Connor, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Research on the neurobiology of the stress response in animals has led to successful new treatments for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in humans. Basic research has found that high levels of catecholamine release during stress rapidly impair the top-down cognitive functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), while strengthening the emotional and habitual responses of the amygdala and basal ganglia. Chronic stress exposure leads to dendritic atrophy in PFC, dendritic extension in the amygdala, and strengthening of the noradrenergic (NE) system. High levels of NE release during stress engage low affinity alpha-1 adrenoceptors, (and likely beta-1 adrenoceptors), which rapidly reduce the firing of PFC neurons, but strengthen amygdala function. In contrast, moderate levels of NE release during nonstress conditions engage higher affinity alpha-2A receptors, which strengthen PFC, weaken amygdala, and regulate NE cell firing. Thus, either alpha-1 receptor blockade or alpha-2A receptor stimulation can protect PFC function during stress. Patients with PTSD have signs of PFC dysfunction. Clinical studies have found that blocking alpha-1 receptors with prazosin, or stimulating alpha-2A receptors with guanfacine or clonidine can be useful in reducing the symptoms of PTSD. Placebo-controlled trials have shown that prazosin is helpful in veterans, active duty soldiers and civilians with PTSD, including improvement of PFC symptoms such as impaired concentration and impulse control. Open label studies suggest that guanfacine may be especially helpful in treating children and adolescents who have experienced trauma. Thus, understanding the neurobiology of the stress response has begun to help patients with stress disorders.

  14. The effects of stress exposure on prefrontal cortex: Translating basic research into successful treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Arnsten, Amy F.T.; Raskind, Murray A.; Taylor, Fletcher B.; Connor, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the neurobiology of the stress response in animals has led to successful new treatments for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in humans. Basic research has found that high levels of catecholamine release during stress rapidly impair the top-down cognitive functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), while strengthening the emotional and habitual responses of the amygdala and basal ganglia. Chronic stress exposure leads to dendritic atrophy in PFC, dendritic extension in the amygdala, and strengthening of the noradrenergic (NE) system. High levels of NE release during stress engage low affinity alpha-1 adrenoceptors, (and likely beta-1 adrenoceptors), which rapidly reduce the firing of PFC neurons, but strengthen amygdala function. In contrast, moderate levels of NE release during nonstress conditions engage higher affinity alpha-2A receptors, which strengthen PFC, weaken amygdala, and regulate NE cell firing. Thus, either alpha-1 receptor blockade or alpha-2A receptor stimulation can protect PFC function during stress. Patients with PTSD have signs of PFC dysfunction. Clinical studies have found that blocking alpha-1 receptors with prazosin, or stimulating alpha-2A receptors with guanfacine or clonidine can be useful in reducing the symptoms of PTSD. Placebo-controlled trials have shown that prazosin is helpful in veterans, active duty soldiers and civilians with PTSD, including improvement of PFC symptoms such as impaired concentration and impulse control. Open label studies suggest that guanfacine may be especially helpful in treating children and adolescents who have experienced trauma. Thus, understanding the neurobiology of the stress response has begun to help patients with stress disorders. PMID:25436222

  15. Supporting Non-State Providers in Basic Education Service Delivery. Create Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Pauline

    2007-01-01

    Basic education is commonly regarded as a state responsibility. However, in reality, non-state providers (NSPs) have always been involved in basic education service delivery, and there is often a blurring of boundaries between state and non-state roles with respect to financing, ownership, management, and regulation. In recent years, the focus on…

  16. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Betancor, K.; Ritz, C.; Fernández-Piñas, F.; Leganés, F.; Rodea-Palomares, I.

    2015-01-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differential maximal effects among analytes and response inhibition beyond the maximum permissive concentrations. This allows a multivariate extension of Loewe additivity, enabling direct application in a biphasic dose-response framework. The proposed additivity definition was validated, and its applicability illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition, the approach also allowed identification and quantification of departures from additivity (interactions) among analytes. The biosensor was found to respond in a near additive way to heavy metal mixtures except when Hg, Co and Ag were present, in which case strong interactions occurred. The method is a useful contribution for the whole cell biosensors discipline and related areas allowing to perform appropriate assessment of mixture effects in non-monotonic dose-response frameworks PMID:26606975

  17. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Betancor, K.; Ritz, C.; Fernández-Piñas, F.; Leganés, F.; Rodea-Palomares, I.

    2015-11-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differential maximal effects among analytes and response inhibition beyond the maximum permissive concentrations. This allows a multivariate extension of Loewe additivity, enabling direct application in a biphasic dose-response framework. The proposed additivity definition was validated, and its applicability illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition, the approach also allowed identification and quantification of departures from additivity (interactions) among analytes. The biosensor was found to respond in a near additive way to heavy metal mixtures except when Hg, Co and Ag were present, in which case strong interactions occurred. The method is a useful contribution for the whole cell biosensors discipline and related areas allowing to perform appropriate assessment of mixture effects in non-monotonic dose-response frameworks

  18. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors.

    PubMed

    Martin-Betancor, K; Ritz, C; Fernández-Piñas, F; Leganés, F; Rodea-Palomares, I

    2015-01-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differential maximal effects among analytes and response inhibition beyond the maximum permissive concentrations. This allows a multivariate extension of Loewe additivity, enabling direct application in a biphasic dose-response framework. The proposed additivity definition was validated, and its applicability illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition, the approach also allowed identification and quantification of departures from additivity (interactions) among analytes. The biosensor was found to respond in a near additive way to heavy metal mixtures except when Hg, Co and Ag were present, in which case strong interactions occurred. The method is a useful contribution for the whole cell biosensors discipline and related areas allowing to perform appropriate assessment of mixture effects in non-monotonic dose-response frameworks. PMID:26606975

  19. Potential Risks in the Paradigm of Basic to Translational Research: A Critical Evaluation of qPCR Telomere Size Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Arthur J

    2015-01-01

    Real time qPCR has become the method of choice for rapid large-scale telomere length measurements. Large samples sizes are critical for clinical trials, and epidemiological studies. QPCR has become such routine procedure that it is often used with little critical analysis. With proper controls, the mean telomere size can be derived from the data and even the size can be estimated. But there is a need for more consistent and reliable controls that will provide closer to the actual mean size can be obtained with uniform consensus controls. Although originating at the level of basic telomere research, many researchers less familiar with telomeres often misunderstand the source and significance of the qPCR metric. These include researchers and clinicians who are interested in having a rapid tool to produce exciting results in disease prognostics and diagnostics than in the multiple characteristics of telomeres that form the basis of the measurement. But other characteristics of the non-bimodal and heterogeneous telomeres as well as the complexities of telomere dynamics are not easily related to qPCR mean telomere values. The qPCR metric does not reveal the heterogeneity and dynamics of telomeres. This is a critical issue since mutations in multiple genes including telomerase can cause telomere dysfunction and a loss of repeats. The smallest cellular telomere has been shown to arrest growth of the cell carrying the dysfunction telomere. A goal for the future is a simple method that takes into account the heterogeneity by measuring the highest and lowest values as part of the scheme to compare. In the absence of this technique, Southern blots need to be performed in a subset of qPCR samples for both mean telomere size and the upper and lower extremes of the distribution. Most importantly, there is a need for greater transparency in discussing the limitations of the qPCR data. Given the potentially exciting qPCR telomere size results emerging from clinical studies that

  20. Value of water mazes for assessing spatial and egocentric learning and memory in rodent basic research and regulatory studies.

    PubMed

    Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Maneuvering safely through the environment is central to survival of all animals. The ability to do this depends on learning and remembering locations. This capacity is encoded in the brain by two systems: one using cues outside the organism (distal cues), allocentric navigation, and one using self-movement, internal cues and sometimes proximal cues, egocentric navigation. Allocentric navigation involves the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and surrounding structures (e.g., subiculum); in humans this system encodes declarative memory (allocentric, semantic, and episodic, i.e., memory for people, places, things, and events). This form of memory is assessed in laboratory animals by many methods, but predominantly the Morris water maze (MWM). Egocentric navigation involves the dorsal striatum and connected structures; in humans this system encodes routes and integrated paths and when over-learned becomes implicit or procedural memory. Several allocentric methods for rodents are reviewed and compared with the MWM with particular focus on the Cincinnati water maze (CWM). MWM advantages include minimal training, no food deprivation, ease of testing, reliable learning, insensitivity to differences in body weight and appetite, absence of non-performers, control methods for performance effects, repeated testing capability and other factors that make this test well-suited for regulatory studies. MWM limitations are also reviewed. Evidence-based MWM design and testing methods are presented. On balance, the MWM is arguably the preferred test for assessing learning and memory in basic research and regulatory studies and the CWM is recommended if two tests can be accommodated so that both allocentric (MWM) and egocentric (CWM) learning and memory can be effectively and efficiently assessed.

  1. Un Modelo Basico de Instruccion Directa Para la Ensenanza de la Metodologia de la Investigacion (Using the Basic Direct Model of Instruction To Teach an Introductory Research Model).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This study examined the application of the Basic Direct Instruction Model (BDIM), a methodology designed to maximize student interest in instrumental and methodological courses, to graduate level educational leadership students. The research used qualitative techniques and a participatory approach with a sample of 92 beginning level Masters…

  2. Research on and Guidelines for Effective Use of Assessment Instruments and Strategies for Adult Learners Enrolled in Adult Basic and Literacy Education Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park. Inst. for the Study of Adult Literacy.

    The goal of this research project was to create a guide on the effective use of assessment instruments and methodologies, related resources, and guidelines for measuring adult learners' attainment of basic skills and competencies to document educational gains and demonstrate program quality. The project focused on confirming current use of…

  3. Exponentiation: A New Basic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Brent

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, the basic operations of school mathematics have been identified as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Notably, these operations are "basic," not because they are foundational to mathematics knowledge, but because they were vital to a newly industrialized and market-driven economy several hundred years…

  4. BASIC Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Carol Ann

    Designed for use by both secondary- and postsecondary-level business teachers, this curriculum guide consists of 10 units of instructional materials dealing with Beginners All-Purpose Symbol Instruction Code (BASIC) programing. Topics of the individual lessons are numbering BASIC programs and using the PRINT, END, and REM statements; system…

  5. Synthesis of a stationary phase based on silica modified with branched octadecyl groups by Michael addition and photoinduced thiol-yne click chemistry for the separation of basic compounds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guang; Ou, Junjie; Wang, Hongwei; Ji, Yongsheng; Wan, Hao; Zhang, Zhang; Peng, Xiaojun; Zou, Hanfa

    2016-04-01

    A novel silica-based stationary phase with branched octadecyl groups was prepared by the sequential employment of the Michael addition reaction and photoinduced thiol-yne click chemistry with 3-aminopropyl-functionalized silica microspheres as the initial material. The resulting stationary phase denoted as SiO2 -N(C18)4 was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, demonstrating the existence of branched octadecyl groups in silica microspheres. The separations of benzene homologous compounds, acid compounds and amine analogues were conducted, demonstrating mixed-mode separation mechanism on SiO2 -N(C18)4 . Baseline separation of basic drugs mixture was acquired with the mobile phase of acetonitrile/H2 O (5%, v/v). SiO2 -N(C18)4 was further applied to separate Corydalis yanhusuo Wang water extracts, and more baseline separation peaks were obtained for SiO2 -N(C18)4 than those on Atlantis dC18 column. It can be expected that this new silica-based stationary phase will exhibit great potential in the analysis of basic compounds. PMID:26910263

  6. Heat tolerant fungi and applied research: Addition to the previously treated group of strictly thermotolerant species.

    PubMed

    Mouchacca, Jean

    2007-12-01

    Heat tolerant fungi are organisms that may perform bioconversion processes and produce industrially important metabolites. They may either be obligate thermophiles or simple thermotolerants. The present document is the continuation of a critical note on thermotolerant fungi erroneously reported in the literature as possessing thermophilic attributes. Fifty strictly thermotolerant taxa are here considered. Some of their binomials have only recently been introduced in the scientific literature. The reported thermotolerant species are grouped according to broad taxonomic categories. The nomenclature of zygomycetous taxa and anamorphic fungi is straightforward, as usually only one binomial is available or only one state is produced in culture respectively. For Ascomycetes regularly producing in culture a conidial state, the name of the sexual state (teleomorph) should be used to designate the organism even when a binomial is available for the anamorph; this prevents the practice of interchangeably using the name of either states of the same fungus. When ascomycetous taxa produce the anamorph regularly and the teleomorph only under specific cultural conditions, the name of the anamorph could be preferentially selected. The goal is to introduce uniformity in name citations of fungi, particularly in the literature of applied research. Each species is reported under its taxonomically correct name, either the original binomial or the latest combined binomial after generic transfer(s). Known synonyms are also specified. Maximum efforts were undertaken to trace updated information on the taxonomic position of these fifty strict thermotolerant species. For each, information on the type material, morphological features distinguishing it from related members of the genus (and when necessary a generic taxonomic assessment) and, finally, salient ecological features including heat tolerance levels are given. For some information on their biotechnological use is also provided

  7. Basic poster discussion: summary.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, John

    2011-06-01

    Twelve posters were presented in the section on Basic Research. They were discussed in a session chaired by Paul Davenport (Gainesville, US) and Marian Kollarik (Boston, US), with each poster presenter first briefly describing his/her poster.

  8. New visions for basic research and primary prevention of pediatric allergy: an iPAC summary and future trends.

    PubMed

    Hamelmann, Eckard; Herz, Udo; Holt, Pat; Host, Arne; Lauener, Roger P; Matricardi, Paolo M; Wahn, Ulrich; Wickman, Magnus

    2008-08-01

    Hydrolyzed formula feeding, delayed introduction of solid food, indoor allergen avoidance, smoke and pollutants avoidance have been applied for several decades as primary preventive measures for allergic diseases. Unfortunately, some of these strategies have had no or modest success. Therefore, resources need to be focused on better understanding of the early allergic events and on interventional studies to investigate new strategies of primary and secondary prevention. Accordingly, this review summarizes the state-of-the-art of genetic, immunological and clinical aspects of primary prevention of allergic diseases. Studies investigating gene-by-gene and gene-by-environment interactions suggest that prevention of allergic diseases must be tailored to the individual genetic susceptibilities ('gene profiling') and environmental exposures. The expanding knowledge on new T cell populations (Th17, TSLP (thymic stromal derived lymphopoietin)-dependent 'inflammatory Th2 cells') is also inspiring new concepts on the origins of allergic diseases. The old concept of 'blocking immunoglobulin G antibodies' has been re-appraised and it is likely to generate novel preventive and therapeutic strategies. The major task for future clinical research is to clearly define the timing of optimal exposure to potential allergens. In addition, the role of microbial products such as certain bacteria, or their components, and of helminths or their larvae at different times in early life, alone or with potential allergens, definitely need to be further investigated. The benefit of efficient allergy prevention, based on focusing resources on novel and promising research lines, will be of prime importance to both affluent countries and other parts of the world where allergy is only currently emerging. PMID:18665959

  9. Research on the Countermeasures Based on TTPM Theory for the Improvement of the Basic Education Teachers Training Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huabai, Bu; Dengyu, Zhang; Xiuying, Shen; Hao, Tu

    2012-01-01

    Many elements of the basic education teachers' training performance are embedded in the training interaction and sharing, so the enhancement of the training performance needs a whole process management and control. Based on TTPM theory, this paper has put forward four measures that must be pay attention to during the management of the basic…

  10. Revisions and Research Design for a Computer-Based Criterion-Referenced Testing Program, Model for Improving Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueve, Mary H.; Grate, John H.

    This paper describes the methods used for revising the Cincinnati Mathematics Inventories, a battery of criterion-referenced tests of basic skills used in the Cincinnati Title III program and other city-wide special programs. Each of these tests is designed to cover a half-year of work; items are included to sample skills listed in the Catalog of…

  11. Basic Need Satisfaction and Identity Formation: Bridging Self-Determination Theory and Process-Oriented Identity Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyckx, Koen; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Goossens, Luc; Duriez, Bart

    2009-01-01

    The fulfillment of the basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness as postulated within self-determination theory was hypothesized to play an energizing role in identity formation, conceptualized as multiple dimensions of exploration and commitment. Two studies among high school and college students (N = 714) were conducted…

  12. Research Report: The Holt Basic Reading System (HBRS) Field Study (1976-1977). Study Phase: Student Interest Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Eileen

    Questionnaires were distributed to 6,354 elementary school students participating in the Holt Basic Reading System Field Study. Primary students reported that their favorite activity is watching television; intermediate students, playing sports. Approximately 25% of the students did not have a pet; 46% reported having a dog; 15%, a cat. Almost 48%…

  13. Research on the basic understanding of high efficiency in silicon solar cells. Annual report, 1 December 1982-30 November 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents results of research designed to develop a basic understanding of high-efficiency silicon solar cells and achieve cell efficiencies greater than 17% by employing innovative concepts of material preparation, cell design, and fabrication technology. The research program consisted of a theoretical effort to develop models for very high-efficiency cell designs, experimental verification of the designs, and improved understanding of efficiency-limiting mechanisms such as heavy doping effects and bulk and surface recombination. Research was performed on high-lifetime float-zone silicon, the baseline materials, low-resistivity gallium-doped czochralski silicon, and boron-doped float-zone silicon.

  14. Schizophrenia Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... I know with schizophrenia? For More Information Share Schizophrenia Basics Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy What is schizophrenia? Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder that affects ...

  15. The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indrisano, Roselmina; And Others

    1976-01-01

    These articles are presented as an aide in teaching basic subjects. This issue examines reading diagnosis, food preservation, prime numbers, electromagnets, acting out in language arts, self-directed spelling activities, and resources for environmental education. (Editor/RK)

  16. Fluoridation Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... because of tooth decay. History of Fluoride in Water In the 1930s, scientists examined the relationship between ...

  17. Basic Finance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of the basic measures of corporate financial strength, and the sources of the information is reported. Considered are: balance sheet, income statement, funds and cash flow, and financial ratios.

  18. Basic Employability Skills: A Triangular Design Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Stuart; Heimler, Ronald; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine the basic employability skills needed for job performance, the reception of these skills in college, and the need for additional training in these skills after graduation. Design/methodology/approach: The research was based on a triangular design approach, in which the attitudes of three distinct groups--recent…

  19. Data Mining as a Powerful Tool for Creating Novel Drugs in Cardiovascular Medicine: The Importance of a "Back-and-Forth Loop" Between Clinical Data and Basic Research.

    PubMed

    Kitakaze, Masafumi; Asakura, Masanori; Nakano, Atsushi; Takashima, Seiji; Washio, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, which lead to cardiovascular events including death, progress with many deleterious pathophysiological sequels. If a cause-and-effect relationship follows a one-to-one relation, we can focus on a cause to treat an effect, but such a relation cannot be applied in cardiovascular diseases. To identify novel drugs in the cardiovascular field, we generally adopt two different strategies: induction and deduction. In the cardiovascular field, it is difficult to use deduction because cardiovascular diseases are caused by many factors, leading us to use induction. In this method, we consider all clinical data, such as medical records or genetic data, and identify a few candidates. Recent computational and mathematical advances enable us to use data-mining methods to uncover hidden relationships between many parameters and clinical outcomes. However, because these candidates are not identified as promoting or inhibiting factors, or as causal or consequent factors of cardiovascular diseases, we need to test them in basic research, and bring them back to the clinical field to test their efficacy in clinical trials. With such a "back-and-forth loop" between clinical observation and basic research, data-mining methods may provide novel strategies leading to new tools for clinicians, basic findings for researchers, and better outcomes for patients.

  20. Why Practice Recommendations Are Important in Use-Inspired Basic Research and Why Too Much Caution Is Dysfunctional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renkl, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Robinson et al. ("Educ Psychol Rev" 25:291-302, 2013) have suggested refraining from practice and policy recommendations in primary educational research articles, in particular because primary research journals are not the appropriate outlet for such recommendations, the evidence provided by one research article is usually not…

  1. Ethanol Basics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  2. Body Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... more about how the body works, what basic human anatomy is, and what happens when parts of the body don't function properly. Blood Bones, Muscles, and Joints Brain and Nervous System Digestive System Endocrine System Eyes Female Reproductive System ...

  3. Basic brownfields

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, B.L.

    1997-12-31

    This article is a basic guide to the brownfields problem. It will define the problem and will attempt to identify the various causes thereof. It also will review federal brownfields initiatives and state brownfields reforms in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia.

  4. Armchair BASIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Annie; Fox, David

    1983-01-01

    A first lesson in learning the computer programing language BASIC, this article explains how to give instructions to the computer; the commands PRINT, NEW, LIST, and RUN; and how to do simple line editing. There is a short quiz at the end. (EAO)

  5. Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Virginia, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This issue of "Basic Education" is devoted to the arts in education as a concern that should be addressed in a time of new priorities for the curriculum. Five articles and a book review are included. The opening article, "The State of the Arts in Education: Envisioning Active Participation By All" (Virginia Robinson), emphasizes that the study of…

  6. Basic Backwardness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingartner, Charles

    This paper argues that the "back to basics" movement is regressive and that regression is the characteristic mode of fear-ridden personalities. It is argued that many people in American society today have lost their ability to laugh and do not have the sense of humor which is crucial to a healthy mental state. Such topics as necrophilia, mental…

  7. Basic Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Barbra Farabough

    This learning packet contains teaching suggestions and student learning materials for a course in basic horticulture aimed at preparing students for employment in a number of horticulture areas. The packet includes nine sections and twenty instructional units. Following the standard format established for Oklahoma vocational education materials in…

  8. Basic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    Instructional materials are provided for a course that covers basic concepts of physics and chemistry. Designed for use in a workplace literacy project developed by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey) and its partners, the course describes applications of these concepts to real-life situations, with an emphasis on applications of…

  9. Focus on Basics, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focus on Basics, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Together, these four newsletters contain 36 articles devoted to adult literacy research and practice and the relationship between them. The following articles are included: "A Productive Partnership" (Richard J. Murnane, Bob Bickerton); "Welcome to 'Focus on Basics'" (Barbara Garner); "Applying Research on the Last Frontier" (Karen Backlund, Kathy…

  10. The Administration's American Competitiveness Initiative: Providing Federal Funding for Basic Research in the Physical Sciences. BHEF Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business-Higher Education Forum (NJ1), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Investing in research, which drives industrial development and innovation, is essential to ensuring America's economic prosperity, national security, and leadership in a global economy. Although U.S. commitment to research and development (R&D) has traditionally been strong and sustained, federal funding of R&D as a share of U.S. gross domestic…

  11. Basic research needs in seven energy-related technologies, conservation, conversion, transmission and storage, environmental fission, fossil, geothermal, and solar

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    This volume comprises seven studies performed by seven groups at seven national laboratories. The laboratories were selected because of their assigned lead roles in research pertaining to the respective technologies. Researches were requested to solicit views of other workers in the fields.

  12. The three avenues of gerontology: from basic research to clinical gerontology and anti-aging medicine. Another French paradox.

    PubMed

    Robert, Leslie

    2004-06-01

    This is a contribution to the debate raised by the position statement on aging ( 1) and comments ( 2) concerning the rapid increase of anti-aging medicine. After a short summary of the history of social attitude to aging and the emergence of experimental gerontology, the French situation is described, emphasizing the economic basis of this phenomenon: increasing insurance fees and tightly controlled honoraria push an increasing number of physicians to this new discipline. No lack of communication seems to be involved between basic gerontologists and physicians ( 2). Anti-aging medicine profits of the increasing population of seniors who want to remain healthy, look young and dislike to consult geriatricians. And also of the fact that no over-the-counter delivery of drugs is available in France. For these reasons there is no serious hope to stop it otherwise than by state legislation. PMID:15215259

  13. Education: The Basics. The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Everyone knows that education is important, we are confronted daily by discussion of it in the media and by politicians, but how much do we really know about education? "Education: The Basics" is a lively and engaging introduction to education as an academic subject, taking into account both theory and practice. Covering the schooling system, the…

  14. Commentary: a practical guide for translating basic research on affective science to implementing physiology in clinical child and adolescent assessments.

    PubMed

    Aldao, Amelia; De Los Reyes, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health recently launched the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC). RDoC is a framework that facilitates the dimensional assessment and classification of processes relevant to mental health (e.g., affect, regulation, cognition, social affiliation), as reflected in measurements across multiple units of analysis (e.g., physiology, circuitry, genes, self-reports). A key focus of RDoC involves opening new lines of research examining patients' responses on biological measures, with the key goal of developing new therapeutic techniques that effectively target mechanisms of mental disorders. Yet applied researchers and practitioners rarely use biological measures within mental health assessments, which may present challenges in translating RDoC-guided research into improvements in patient care. Thus, if RDoC is to result in research that yields clinical tools that reduce the burden of mental illness and improve public health, we ought to develop strategies for effectively implementing biological measures in the context of clinical assessments. In this special issue, we sought to provide an initial step in this direction by assembling a collection of articles from leading research teams carrying out pioneering work on implementing multimodal assessments (biological, subjective, behavioral) of affective processes in applied settings. In this commentary, we expand upon the work presented in this special issue by making a series of suggestions for how to most parsimoniously conduct multimodal assessments of affective processes in applied research and clinical settings. We hope that this approach will facilitate translations of the RDoC framework into applied research and clinic settings.

  15. Research on Process Models of Basic Arithmetic Skills, Technical Report No. 303. Psychology and Education Series - Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppes, Patrick; And Others

    This report presents a theory of eye movement that accounts for main features of the stochastic behavior of eye-fixation durations and direction of movement of saccades in the process of solving arithmetic exercises of addition and subtraction. The best-fitting distribution of fixation durations with a relatively simple theoretical justification…

  16. Basic research and data analysis for the earth and ocean physics applications program and for the National Geodetic Satellite Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Data analysis and supporting research in connection with the following objectives are discussed: (1) provide a precise and accurate geometric description of the earth's surface, (2) provide a precise and accurate mathematical description of the earth's gravitational field, and (3) determine time variations of the geometry of the ocean surface, the solid earth, the gravity field and other geophysical parameters.

  17. Access to Basic Education in Ghana: Politics, Policies and Progress. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 42

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Angela W.

    2010-01-01

    This monograph examines the history and politics of educational reform in Ghana. Using data from interviews conducted with senior policy-makers, implementers and researchers, as well as documentary sources, to explore the drivers and inhibitors of change at the political, bureaucratic and grass-roots levels. The monograph explores the nature of…

  18. Basic Communication Course Annual. Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugenberg, Lawrence W., Ed.

    This volume of an annual collection of essays relating to instruction in the basic communication course presents 1992 Speech Communication Association Basic Course Committee award winning papers, articles on teaching assistants in the basic course, approaches to teaching in the basic course, research on the basic course, and a commentary. Essays…

  19. Using Very Small-scale Experiments to Investigate Materials: The 21st Century Direction in Basic Pu Research?

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, E A

    2004-10-25

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have developed several techniques to probe the properties of Plutonium using tiny microgram-to-milligram samples. This commentary describes the advantages of this experimental approach, and contains examples of successful experimental setups. One motivation for such experiments is that they couple well to computational simulations of electronic and atomistic properties and processes, and examples of this coupling are discussed.

  20. 48 CFR 235.072 - Additional contract clauses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....072 Additional contract clauses. (a) Use the clause at 252.235-7002, Animal Welfare, or one... involving research on live vertebrate animals. (b) Use the basic or the alternate of the clause at 252.235..., testing, or operating a device requiring a frequency authorization. (1) Use the basic clause if...

  1. Computer Programming: BASIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Patience; And Others

    This guide was prepared to help teachers of the Lincoln Public School's introductory computer programming course in BASIC to make the necessary adjustments for changes made in the course since the purchase of microcomputers and such peripheral devices as television monitors and disk drives, and the addition of graphics. Intended to teach a…

  2. The history of hepatitis C virus (HCV): Basic research reveals unique features in phylogeny, evolution and the viral life cycle with new perspectives for epidemic control.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Jens

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 1989 permitted basic research to unravel critical components of a complex life cycle for this important human pathogen. HCV is a highly divergent group of viruses classified in 7 major genotypes and a great number of subtypes, and circulating in infected individuals as a continuously evolving quasispecies destined to escape host immune responses and applied antivirals. Despite the inability to culture patient viruses directly in the laboratory, efforts to define the infectious genome of HCV resulted in development of experimental recombinant in vivo and in vitro systems, including replicons and infectious cultures in human hepatoma cell lines. And HCV has become a model virus defining new paradigms in virology, immunology and biology. For example, HCV research discovered that a virus could be completely dependent on microRNA for its replication since microRNA-122 is critical for the HCV life cycle. A number of other host molecules critical for HCV entry and replication have been identified. Thus, basic HCV research revealed important molecules for development of host targeting agents (HTA). The identification and characterization of HCV encoded proteins and their functional units contributed to the development of highly effective direct acting antivirals (DAA) against the NS3 protease, NS5A and the NS5B polymerase. In combination, these inhibitors have since 2014 permitted interferon-free therapy with cure rates above 90% among patients with chronic HCV infection; however, viral resistance represents a challenge. Worldwide control of HCV will most likely require the development of a prophylactic vaccine, and numerous candidates have been pursued. Research characterizing features critical for antibody-based virus neutralization and T cell based virus elimination from infected cells is essential for this effort. If the world community promotes an ambitious approach by applying current DAA broadly, continues to develop

  3. The history of hepatitis C virus (HCV): Basic research reveals unique features in phylogeny, evolution and the viral life cycle with new perspectives for epidemic control.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Jens

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 1989 permitted basic research to unravel critical components of a complex life cycle for this important human pathogen. HCV is a highly divergent group of viruses classified in 7 major genotypes and a great number of subtypes, and circulating in infected individuals as a continuously evolving quasispecies destined to escape host immune responses and applied antivirals. Despite the inability to culture patient viruses directly in the laboratory, efforts to define the infectious genome of HCV resulted in development of experimental recombinant in vivo and in vitro systems, including replicons and infectious cultures in human hepatoma cell lines. And HCV has become a model virus defining new paradigms in virology, immunology and biology. For example, HCV research discovered that a virus could be completely dependent on microRNA for its replication since microRNA-122 is critical for the HCV life cycle. A number of other host molecules critical for HCV entry and replication have been identified. Thus, basic HCV research revealed important molecules for development of host targeting agents (HTA). The identification and characterization of HCV encoded proteins and their functional units contributed to the development of highly effective direct acting antivirals (DAA) against the NS3 protease, NS5A and the NS5B polymerase. In combination, these inhibitors have since 2014 permitted interferon-free therapy with cure rates above 90% among patients with chronic HCV infection; however, viral resistance represents a challenge. Worldwide control of HCV will most likely require the development of a prophylactic vaccine, and numerous candidates have been pursued. Research characterizing features critical for antibody-based virus neutralization and T cell based virus elimination from infected cells is essential for this effort. If the world community promotes an ambitious approach by applying current DAA broadly, continues to develop

  4. Early life stress and telomere length: investigating the connection and possible mechanisms: a critical survey of the evidence base, research methodology and basic biology.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Idan

    2012-11-01

    How can adverse experiences in early life, such as maltreatment, exert such powerful negative effects on health decades later? The answer may lie in changes to DNA. New research suggests that exposure to stress can accelerate the erosion of DNA segments called telomeres. Shorter telomere length correlates with chronological age and also disease morbidity and mortality. Thus, telomere erosion is a potential mechanism linking childhood stress to health problems later in life. However, an array of mechanistic, methodological, and basic biological questions must be addressed in order to translate telomere discoveries into clinical applications for monitoring health and predicting disease risk. This paper covers the current state of the science and lays out new research directions.

  5. Basic research on ceramic materials for energy storage and conversion systems. Progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, D.H.

    1980-12-01

    The present research program involves utilizing appropriate experimental probes for measuring the movement of ionic and electronic charge carriers in ceramic materials suitable for solid electrolyte and electrode applications in high-performance, secondary battery and fuel cell systems. Special emphasis is placed on developing: (1) a better understanding of the effects of structure, impurities and composition on charge carrier transport mechanisms in such materials; and (2) detailed knowledge of the kinetics and mechanism of reactions occurring (on a microscopic scale) at the electrode-electrolyte interfaces of energy storage and conversion systems.

  6. Sunspace basics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    Anyone who lives in a home with a sunspace will tell you that the sunspace is the most enjoyable room in the house. Many times the homeowner`s only regret is that the sunspace is not larger. Although aesthetics often drive the decision to add a sunspace or include one in a new home design, sunspaces can also provide supplemental space heating and a healthy environment for plants and people. In fact, a well-designed sunspace can provide up to 60% of a home`s winter heating requirements. This publication addresses basic elements of sunspace design; design considerations for supplemental space heating, growing plants, and use as a living space; design guidelines including siting, heat distribution, and glazing angles; and major sunspace components including glazing options, thermal mass, insulation, and climate controls. A list of sources for more information is also provided.

  7. Challenges and Practices in Building and Implementing Biosafety and Biosecurity Programs to Enable Basic and Translational Research with Select Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Colleen B.; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Roy, Chad J.; Perlin, David S.; Byrne, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Select agent research in the United States must meet federally-mandated biological surety guidelines and rules which are comprised of two main components: biosecurity and biosafety. Biosecurity is the process employed for ensuring biological agents are properly safeguarded against theft, loss, diversion, unauthorized access or use/release. Biosafety is those processes that ensure that operations with such agents are conducted in a safe, secure and reliable manner. As such, a biological surety program is generally concerned with biological agents that present high risk for adverse medical and/or agricultural consequences upon release outside of proper containment. The U.S. Regional and National Biocontainment Laboratories (RBL, NBL) represent expertise in this type of research, and are actively engaged in the development of programs to address these critical needs and federal requirements. While this comprises an ongoing activity for the RBLs, NBLs and other facilities that handle select agents as new guidelines and regulations are implemented, the present article is written with the goal of presenting a simplified yet comprehensive review of these requirements. Herein, we discuss the requirements and the various activities that the RBL/NBL programs have implemented to achieve these metrics set forth by various agencies within the U.S. Federal government. PMID:24900945

  8. PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in cancer stem cells: from basic research to clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Pu; Xu, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of tumor cells that possess unique self-renewal activity and mediate tumor initiation and propagation. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway can be considered as a master regulator for cancer. More and more recent studies have shown the links between PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and CSC biology. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of signaling components upstream and downstream of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in CSC. In addition, we also summarize various classes of small molecule inhibitors of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and their clinical potential in CSC. Overall, the current available data suggest that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway could be a promising target for development of CSC-target drugs. PMID:26175931

  9. Insulin Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes. Other Ways to Give Become a Member Vehicle Donation Planned Giving Options Do-it-Yourself Fundraising & ... Find your leading role for type 2 diabetes management. » « Connect With Us Register for diabetes news, research ...

  10. Internet Training: The Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Gail; Wichowski, Chester P.

    This paper outlines the basic information teachers need to know to use the World Wide Web for research and communication, using Netscape 3.04. Topics covered include the following: what is the World Wide Web?; what is a browser?; accessing the Web; moving around a web document; the Uniform Resource Locator (URL); Bookmarks; saving and printing a…

  11. Basic Skills Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Alexander C.; Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    After surveying 1,827 students in their final year at eighty randomly selected two-year and four-year public and private institutions, American Institutes for Research (2006) reported that approximately 30 percent of students in two-year institutions and nearly 20 percent of students in four-year institutions have only basic quantitative…

  12. Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal – Basic principles and recommendations in clinical and field Science Research: 2016 Update

    PubMed Central

    Padulo, Johnny; Oliva, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Summary The proper design and implementation of a study as well as a balanced and well-supported evaluation and interpretation of its main findings are of crucial importance when reporting and disseminating research. Also accountability, funding acknowledgement and adequately declaring any conflict of interest play a major role in science. Since the Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal (MLTJ) is committed to the highest scientific and ethical standards, we encourage all Authors to take into account and to comply, as much as possible, to the contents and issues discussed in this official editorial. This could be useful for improving the quality of the manuscripts, as well as to stimulate interest and debate and to promote constructive change, reflecting upon uses and misuses within our disciplines belonging to the field of “Clinical and Sport - Science Research”. PMID:27331026

  13. The role of histamine H1 and H4 receptors in atopic dermatitis: from basic research to clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Yusuke; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2014-12-01

    Histamine plays important roles in inflammation and nervous irritability in allergic disorders, including atopic dermatitis (AD). It has been shown to regulate the expression of pruritic factors, such as nerve growth factor and semaphorin 3A, in skin keratinocytes via histamine H1 receptor (H1R). Furthermore, H1R antagonist reduced the level of IL-31, a cytokine involving the skin barrier and pruritus, in chronic dermatitis lesions in NC/Nga mice and patients with AD. Histamine plays roles in the induction of allergic inflammation by activating eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and Th2 cells via histamine H4 receptor (H4R). H4R, in addition to H1R, is expressed on sensory neurons, and a decrease in scratching behaviors was observed in H4R-deficient mice and mice treated with a H4R antagonist. We found that the combined administration of H1R and H4R antagonists inhibited the itch response and chronic allergic inflammation, and had a pharmacological effect similar to that of prednisolone. Although the oral administration of H1R antagonists is widely used to treat AD, it is not very effective. In contrast, JNJ39758979, a novel H4R antagonist, had marked effects against pruritus in Japanese patients with AD in a phase II clinical trial. Next generation antihistaminic agents possessing H1R and H4R antagonistic actions may be a potent therapeutic drug for AD. PMID:25249063

  14. Environmental effects on skeletal versus dental development II: further testing of a basic assumption in human osteological research.

    PubMed

    Conceição, E L N; Cardoso, H F V

    2011-03-01

    This study further tests the general assumption that skeletal development is more sensitive to socioeconomic factors than dental development in a sample of modern immature Portuguese skeletons (N = 41) of known sex, age, and socioeconomic background. Skeletal development was assessed from skeletal maturation of the knee and dental development was assessed from schedules of tooth formation. Discrepancies between physiological age (skeletal and dental age) and chronological age were used as a measure of developmental status. A positive score indicates that physiological age is in advance of chronological age, whereas a negative score indicates the reverse. Two socioeconomic groups, one of low and the other of high socioeconomic status, were created based on the occupation of the father and on the place of residence, and developmental status was compared between the two socioeconomic groups. Results confirm previous studies by showing that dental development is less affected by environmental insults than skeletal maturation. While socioeconomic differences in skeletal maturation range from 1.20 to 1.22 years (15-18% of chronological age), socioeconomic differences in dental maturation range from 0.51 to 0.53 years (4-9% of chronological age). Compared to a previous study, results also suggest that skeletal maturation is more affected than skeletal growth. Additionally, an adaptation of the radiographic atlas of skeletal development of the knee is proposed for use with dry skeletal material.

  15. Mouse models for studies of HLA-G functions in basic science and pre-clinical research.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Lefebvre, Anh Thu; Ajith, Ashwin; Portik-Dobos, Vera; Horuzsko, Daniel D; Mulloy, Laura L; Horuzsko, Anatolij

    2016-09-01

    HLA-G was described originally as a tolerogenic molecule that allows the semiallogeneic fetus to escape from recognition by the maternal immune response. This review will discuss different steps in the study of HLA-G expression and functions in vivo, starting with analyses of expression of the HLA-G gene and its receptors in transgenic mice, and continuing with applications of HLA-G and its receptors in prevention of allograft rejection, transplantation tolerance, and controlling the development of infection. Humanized mouse models have been discussed for developing in vivo studies of HLA-G in physiological and pathological conditions. Collectively, animal models provide an opportunity to evaluate the importance of the interaction between HLA-G and its receptors in terms of its ability to regulate immune responses during maternal-fetal tolerance, survival of allografts, tumor-escape mechanisms, and development of infections when both HLA-G and its receptors are expressed. In addition, in vivo studies on HLA-G also offer novel approaches to achieve a reproducible transplantation tolerance and to develop personalized medicine to prevent allograft rejection.

  16. A plant resource and experiment management system based on the Golm Plant Database as a basic tool for omics research

    PubMed Central

    Köhl, Karin I; Basler, Georg; Lüdemann, Alexander; Selbig, Joachim; Walther, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    and barcode labels facilitate identification and management of the material. Web pages are provided as user interfaces to facilitate maintaining the system in an environment with many desktop computers and a rapidly changing user community. Web based search tools are the basis for joint use of the material by all researchers of the institute. Conclusion The Golm Plant Database system, which is based on a relational database, collects the genetic and environmental information on plant material during its production or experimental use at the Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology. It thus provides information according to the MIAME standard for the component 'Sample' in a highly standardised format. The Plant Database system thus facilitates collaborative work and allows efficient queries in data analysis for systems biology research. PMID:18495032

  17. Propensity scores as a basis for equating groups: basic principles and application in clinical treatment outcome research.

    PubMed

    West, Stephen G; Cham, Heining; Thoemmes, Felix; Renneberg, Babette; Schulze, Julian; Weiler, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    A propensity score is the probability that a participant is assigned to the treatment group based on a set of baseline covariates. Propensity scores provide an excellent basis for equating treatment groups on a large set of covariates when randomization is not possible. This article provides a nontechnical introduction to propensity scores for clinical researchers. If all important covariates are measured, then methods that equate on propensity scores can achieve balance on a large set of covariates that mimics that achieved by a randomized experiment. We present an illustration of the steps in the construction and checking of propensity scores in a study of the effectiveness of a health coach versus treatment as usual on the well-being of seriously ill individuals. We then consider alternative methods of equating groups on propensity scores and estimating treatment effects including matching, stratification, weighting, and analysis of covariance. We illustrate a sensitivity analysis that can probe for the potential effects of omitted covariates on the estimate of the causal effect. Finally, we briefly consider several practical and theoretical issues in the use of propensity scores in applied settings. Propensity score methods have advantages over alternative approaches to equating groups particularly when the treatment and control groups do not fully overlap, and there are nonlinear relationships between covariates and the outcome.

  18. Basic technologies of web services framework for research, discovery, and processing the disparate massive Earth observation data from heterogeneous sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savorskiy, V.; Lupyan, E.; Balashov, I.; Burtsev, M.; Proshin, A.; Tolpin, V.; Ermakov, D.; Chernushich, A.; Panova, O.; Kuznetsov, O.; Vasilyev, V.

    2014-04-01

    Both development and application of remote sensing involves a considerable expenditure of material and intellectual resources. Therefore, it is important to use high-tech means of distribution of remote sensing data and processing results in order to facilitate access for as much as possible number of researchers. It should be accompanied with creation of capabilities for potentially more thorough and comprehensive, i.e. ultimately deeper, acquisition and complex analysis of information about the state of Earth's natural resources. As well objective need in a higher degree of Earth observation (EO) data assimilation is set by conditions of satellite observations, in which the observed objects are uncontrolled state. Progress in addressing this problem is determined to a large extent by order of the distributed EO information system (IS) functioning. Namely, it is largely dependent on reducing the cost of communication processes (data transfer) between spatially distributed IS nodes and data users. One of the most effective ways to improve the efficiency of data exchange processes is the creation of integrated EO IS optimized for running procedures of distributed data processing. The effective EO IS implementation should be based on specific software architecture.

  19. From BCS to Vortices: A 40 Year Personal Journey through Superconductivity from Basic Research to Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Paul M.

    2011-03-01

    A century has passed since the discovery of superconductivity in Leiden followed 75 years later by the Great Leap Forward in Zuerich. This talk will chronicle the author's trajectory through the science and technology of superconductivity first taking off with his IBM career in fundamental research on organic and layered copper oxide perovskite superconductors to a final landing at EPRI to explore applications of the latter to the electric power industry. Although many fundamental mysteries remain with respect to the copper and iron compounds, especially regarding the BCS pairing mechanism, nonetheless a significant number of successful demonstrations of cables, rotating machinery, storage and power conditioning equipment employing both low-and high- T superconducting materials have been undertaken worldwide since the decade of the 1960s to the present. However, massive application to the power industry has yet to take place or be inserted into utility long-range planning. Although there will certainly be a relatively small number of opportunistic deployments in those situations where superconductivity has a compelling advantage over conventional technology, its time will more likely await a future revolution in energy and electricity infrastructure such as a symbiosis of nuclear and hydrogen with superconductivity. Perhaps the distant future will even deliver the dream of a room temperature superconductor. ``20th Anniversary of the Woodstock of Physics,'' APS March Meeting 2007, Denver, CO.

  20. Sleep scoring made easy-Semi-automated sleep analysis software and manual rescoring tools for basic sleep research in mice.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, M; Polta, S; Gapp, J; Schuler, C; Kochs, E F; Fenzl, T

    2015-01-01

    Studying sleep behavior in animal models demands clear separation of vigilance states. Pure manual scoring is time-consuming and commercial scoring software is costly. We present a LabVIEW-based, semi-automated scoring routine using recorded EEG and EMG signals. This scoring routine is •designed to reliably assign the vigilance/sleep states wakefulness (WAKE), non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) to defined EEG/EMG episodes.•straightforward to use even for beginners in the field of sleep research.•freely available upon request. Chronic recordings from mice were used to design and evaluate the scoring routine consisting of an artifact-removal, a scoring- and a rescoring routine. The scoring routine processes EMG and different EEG frequency bands. Amplitude-based thresholds for EEG and EMG parameters trigger a decision tree assigning each EEG episode to a defined vigilance/sleep state automatically. Using the rescoring routine individual episodes or particular state transitions can be re-evaluated manually. High agreements between auto-scored and manual sleep scoring could be shown for experienced scorers and for beginners quickly and reliably. With small modifications to the software, it can be easily adapted for sleep analysis in other animal models.

  1. A proboscis extension response protocol for investigating behavioral plasticity in insects: application to basic, biomedical, and agricultural research.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian H; Burden, Christina M

    2014-01-01

    Insects modify their responses to stimuli through experience of associating those stimuli with events important for survival (e.g., food, mates, threats). There are several behavioral mechanisms through which an insect learns salient associations and relates them to these events. It is important to understand this behavioral plasticity for programs aimed toward assisting insects that are beneficial for agriculture. This understanding can also be used for discovering solutions to biomedical and agricultural problems created by insects that act as disease vectors and pests. The Proboscis Extension Response (PER) conditioning protocol was developed for honey bees (Apis mellifera) over 50 years ago to study how they perceive and learn about floral odors, which signal the nectar and pollen resources a colony needs for survival. The PER procedure provides a robust and easy-to-employ framework for studying several different ecologically relevant mechanisms of behavioral plasticity. It is easily adaptable for use with several other insect species and other behavioral reflexes. These protocols can be readily employed in conjunction with various means for monitoring neural activity in the CNS via electrophysiology or bioimaging, or for manipulating targeted neuromodulatory pathways. It is a robust assay for rapidly detecting sub-lethal effects on behavior caused by environmental stressors, toxins or pesticides. We show how the PER protocol is straightforward to implement using two procedures. One is suitable as a laboratory exercise for students or for quick assays of the effect of an experimental treatment. The other provides more thorough control of variables, which is important for studies of behavioral conditioning. We show how several measures for the behavioral response ranging from binary yes/no to more continuous variable like latency and duration of proboscis extension can be used to test hypotheses. And, we discuss some pitfalls that researchers commonly encounter

  2. A proboscis extension response protocol for investigating behavioral plasticity in insects: application to basic, biomedical, and agricultural research.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian H; Burden, Christina M

    2014-09-08

    Insects modify their responses to stimuli through experience of associating those stimuli with events important for survival (e.g., food, mates, threats). There are several behavioral mechanisms through which an insect learns salient associations and relates them to these events. It is important to understand this behavioral plasticity for programs aimed toward assisting insects that are beneficial for agriculture. This understanding can also be used for discovering solutions to biomedical and agricultural problems created by insects that act as disease vectors and pests. The Proboscis Extension Response (PER) conditioning protocol was developed for honey bees (Apis mellifera) over 50 years ago to study how they perceive and learn about floral odors, which signal the nectar and pollen resources a colony needs for survival. The PER procedure provides a robust and easy-to-employ framework for studying several different ecologically relevant mechanisms of behavioral plasticity. It is easily adaptable for use with several other insect species and other behavioral reflexes. These protocols can be readily employed in conjunction with various means for monitoring neural activity in the CNS via electrophysiology or bioimaging, or for manipulating targeted neuromodulatory pathways. It is a robust assay for rapidly detecting sub-lethal effects on behavior caused by environmental stressors, toxins or pesticides. We show how the PER protocol is straightforward to implement using two procedures. One is suitable as a laboratory exercise for students or for quick assays of the effect of an experimental treatment. The other provides more thorough control of variables, which is important for studies of behavioral conditioning. We show how several measures for the behavioral response ranging from binary yes/no to more continuous variable like latency and duration of proboscis extension can be used to test hypotheses. And, we discuss some pitfalls that researchers commonly encounter

  3. A Proboscis Extension Response Protocol for Investigating Behavioral Plasticity in Insects: Application to Basic, Biomedical, and Agricultural Research

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brian H.; Burden, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    Insects modify their responses to stimuli through experience of associating those stimuli with events important for survival (e.g., food, mates, threats). There are several behavioral mechanisms through which an insect learns salient associations and relates them to these events. It is important to understand this behavioral plasticity for programs aimed toward assisting insects that are beneficial for agriculture. This understanding can also be used for discovering solutions to biomedical and agricultural problems created by insects that act as disease vectors and pests. The Proboscis Extension Response (PER) conditioning protocol was developed for honey bees (Apis mellifera) over 50 years ago to study how they perceive and learn about floral odors, which signal the nectar and pollen resources a colony needs for survival. The PER procedure provides a robust and easy-to-employ framework for studying several different ecologically relevant mechanisms of behavioral plasticity. It is easily adaptable for use with several other insect species and other behavioral reflexes. These protocols can be readily employed in conjunction with various means for monitoring neural activity in the CNS via electrophysiology or bioimaging, or for manipulating targeted neuromodulatory pathways. It is a robust assay for rapidly detecting sub-lethal effects on behavior caused by environmental stressors, toxins or pesticides. We show how the PER protocol is straightforward to implement using two procedures. One is suitable as a laboratory exercise for students or for quick assays of the effect of an experimental treatment. The other provides more thorough control of variables, which is important for studies of behavioral conditioning. We show how several measures for the behavioral response ranging from binary yes/no to more continuous variable like latency and duration of proboscis extension can be used to test hypotheses. And, we discuss some pitfalls that researchers commonly encounter

  4. The Elusive Multiplying Factor for Sustainable Development: The Case for Integrating Scientific Research and Basic Education in the MAP Region, SW Amazonia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, I.; de Los Rios, M.; Mendoza, E.; Reis, V. L.

    2005-05-01

    systems along the frontier develop new curricula that incorporates satellite imagery and landscape ecology, as well as discussions about two basic human rights linked to education and research: the right to information about sustainable development and the right to participate in collective decisions. Curriculum reform that includes insertion of research results and techniques into the basic education system has the potential of reaching tens of thousands of persons per decade in the MAP Region. As such, the collaboration of scientists and educators may provide a means to encounter the elusive multiplying factors necessary to promote a more sustainable future for the region.

  5. Design, Discovery and Growth of Novel Materials For Basic Research: An Urgent U.S. Need Report on the DOE/BES Workshop: “Future Directions of Design, Discovery and Growth of Single Crystals for Basic Research”

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, Paul

    2003-10-10

    - leading leading capabilities in neutron and x-ray science, even as powerful new facilities come on line. This situatio n is exacerbated by the several decade- long decline of traditionally strong industrial expertise in crystal synthesis, by the relatively small number of synthesis scientists being trained in U.S. universities and national laboratories, and by increasing support for single crystal materials synthesis in Europe and Japan. The principal recommendation of the workshop is that the Department of Energy should act to close the gap in U.S. based design, discovery and growth of novel materials for basic research by growing and coordinating the nation’s existing crystal growth efforts, by adding qualitatively new capabilities, and by significantly enhancing Ph.D. and postdoctoral training opportunities in universities, national laboratories and industry. Specifically, the workshop recommendations are: 1) to broadly increase the level of funding for individual research activities in new materials and single crystal growth, 2) to establish a novel, national materials design, discovery and growth network with unprecedented interconnectivity, and 3) to create multi- investigator materials preparation facilities that feature specialized capabilities, provide samples on - a priority basis, and offer training in advanced techniques. We believe these recommendations will strengthen the U.S. base in materials synthesis at all levels, optimize the use of national resources, and integrate the materials synthesis community more effectively into the larger U.S. condensed matter science enterprise for maximum impact.

  6. Basic electronics for clinical neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Misulis, K E

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the basic electronics that are important to clinical neurophysiology. It is divided into six sections: basic principles of electronics; filters; transistors and amplifiers; displays; electrodes and the electrode-amplifier interface; and electrical safety. In addition, at the end of the review is a brief electronics glossary (Appendix A) and an annotated bibliography (Appendix B) to guide further reading.

  7. The European Network for Research, Action and Training in Adult Literacy and Basic Education (Dublin, Ireland, May 25-30, 1991). A Seminar Organised by EUROALPHA. Adult Basic Education in Prisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1991

    This conference report on adult basic education in European prisons contains the following introductory materials: a list of participants, the program, and introductions to the seminar by Frank Dunne and Pierre Freynet. "Keynote Address" (Robert Suvaal) discusses five items a prison educator must deal with: philosophy, position of education in…

  8. 34 CFR 660.32 - What additional selection criteria does the Secretary use for an application for a research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... use for an application for a research project, a survey, or a study? 660.32 Section 660.32 Education... evaluates an application for a research project, study, or survey on the basis of the criteria in this..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AND STUDIES PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a...

  9. 34 CFR 660.32 - What additional selection criteria does the Secretary use for an application for a research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... use for an application for a research project, a survey, or a study? 660.32 Section 660.32 Education... evaluates an application for a research project, study, or survey on the basis of the criteria in this..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AND STUDIES PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a...

  10. 34 CFR 660.32 - What additional selection criteria does the Secretary use for an application for a research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... use for an application for a research project, a survey, or a study? 660.32 Section 660.32 Education... evaluates an application for a research project, study, or survey on the basis of the criteria in this..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AND STUDIES PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a...

  11. Basic Science for a Secure Energy Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Linda

    2010-03-01

    Anticipating a doubling in the world's energy use by the year 2050 coupled with an increasing focus on clean energy technologies, there is a national imperative for new energy technologies and improved energy efficiency. The Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) supports fundamental research that provides the foundations for new energy technologies and supports DOE missions in energy, environment, and national security. The research crosses the full spectrum of materials and chemical sciences, as well as aspects of biosciences and geosciences, with a focus on understanding, predicting, and ultimately controlling matter and energy at electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. In addition, BES is the home for national user facilities for x-ray, neutron, nanoscale sciences, and electron beam characterization that serve over 10,000 users annually. To provide a strategic focus for these programs, BES has held a series of ``Basic Research Needs'' workshops on a number of energy topics over the past 6 years. These workshops have defined a number of research priorities in areas related to renewable, fossil, and nuclear energy -- as well as cross-cutting scientific grand challenges. These directions have helped to define the research for the recently established Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) and are foundational for the newly announced Energy Innovation Hubs. This overview will review the current BES research portfolio, including the EFRCs and user facilities, will highlight past research that has had an impact on energy technologies, and will discuss future directions as defined through the BES workshops and research opportunities.

  12. Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces.

    Research findings on college instruction and basic skills deficiencies are discussed in 12 papers from the first Regional Conference on University Teaching. Titles and authors are as follows: "Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies" (Susanne D. Roueche, with responses by Gary B. Donart, Betty Harris, and James Nordyke); "Is Higher Education an…

  13. Circulating tumour cells: the evolving concept and the inadequacy of their enrichment by EpCAM-based methodology for basic and clinical cancer research.

    PubMed

    Grover, P K; Cummins, A G; Price, T J; Roberts-Thomson, I C; Hardingham, J E

    2014-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are responsible for metastatic relapse and this has fuelled interest in their detection and quantification. Although numerous methods have been developed for the enrichment and detection of CTCs, none has yet reached the 'gold' standard. Since epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-based enrichment of CTCs offers several advantages, it is one of the most commonly used and has been adapted for high-throughput technology. However, emerging evidence suggests that CTCs are highly heterogeneous: they consist of epithelial tumour cells, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) cells, hybrid (epithelial/EMT(+)) tumour cells, irreversible EMT(+) tumour cells, and circulating tumour stem cells (CTSCs). The EpCAM-based approach does not detect CTCs expressing low levels of EpCAM and non-epithelial phenotypes such as CTSCs and those that have undergone EMT and no longer express EpCAM. Thus, the approach may lead to underestimation of the significance of CTCs, in general, and CTSCs and EMT(+) tumour cells, in particular, in cancer dissemination. Here, we provide a critical review of research literature on the evolving concept of CTCs and the inadequacy of their enrichment by EpCAM-based technology for basic and clinical cancer research. The review also outlines future perspectives in the field.

  14. Concise review: Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells change phenotype following in vitro culture: implications for basic research and the clinic.

    PubMed

    Bara, Jennifer J; Richards, R Geoff; Alini, Mauro; Stoddart, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are increasingly being used in tissue engineering and cell-based therapies in all fields ranging from orthopedic to cardiovascular medicine. Despite years of research and numerous clinical trials, MSC therapies are still very much in development and not considered mainstream treatments. The majority of approaches rely on an in vitro cell expansion phase in monolayer to produce large cell numbers prior to implantation. It is clear from the literature that this in vitro expansion phase causes dramatic changes in MSC phenotype which has very significant implications for the development of effective therapies. Previous reviews have sought to better characterize these cells in their native and in vitro environments, described known stem cell interactions within the bone marrow, and discussed the use of innovative culture systems aiming to model the bone marrow stem cell niche. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on our knowledge of MSCs in their native environment, focusing on bone marrow-derived MSCs. We provide a detailed description of the differences between naive cells and those that have been cultured in vitro and examine the effect of isolation and culture parameters on these phenotypic changes. We explore the concept of "one step" MSC therapy and discuss the potential cellular and clinical benefits. Finally, we describe recent work attempting to model the MSC bone marrow niche, with focus on both basic research and clinical applications and consider the challenges associated with these new generation culture systems.

  15. Parameters and pitfalls to consider in the conduct of food additive research, Carrageenan as a case study.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Myra L

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides guidance on the conduct of new in vivo and in vitro studies on high molecular weight food additives, with carrageenan, the widely used food additive, as a case study. It is important to understand the physical/chemical properties and to verify the identity/purity, molecular weight and homogeneity/stability of the additive in the vehicle for oral delivery. The strong binding of CGN to protein in rodent chow or infant formula results in no gastrointestinal tract exposure to free CGN. It is recommended that doses of high Mw non-caloric, non-nutritive additives not exceed 5% by weight of total solid diet to avoid potential nutritional effects. Addition of some high Mw additives at high concentrations to liquid nutritional supplements increases viscosity and may affect palatability, caloric intake and body weight gain. In in vitro studies, the use of well-characterized, relevant cell types and the appropriate composition of the culture media are necessary for proper conduct and interpretation. CGN is bound to media protein and not freely accessible to cells in vitro. Interpretation of new studies on food additives should consider the interaction of food additives with the vehicle components and the appropriateness of the animal or cell model and dose-response.

  16. Parameters and pitfalls to consider in the conduct of food additive research, Carrageenan as a case study.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Myra L

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides guidance on the conduct of new in vivo and in vitro studies on high molecular weight food additives, with carrageenan, the widely used food additive, as a case study. It is important to understand the physical/chemical properties and to verify the identity/purity, molecular weight and homogeneity/stability of the additive in the vehicle for oral delivery. The strong binding of CGN to protein in rodent chow or infant formula results in no gastrointestinal tract exposure to free CGN. It is recommended that doses of high Mw non-caloric, non-nutritive additives not exceed 5% by weight of total solid diet to avoid potential nutritional effects. Addition of some high Mw additives at high concentrations to liquid nutritional supplements increases viscosity and may affect palatability, caloric intake and body weight gain. In in vitro studies, the use of well-characterized, relevant cell types and the appropriate composition of the culture media are necessary for proper conduct and interpretation. CGN is bound to media protein and not freely accessible to cells in vitro. Interpretation of new studies on food additives should consider the interaction of food additives with the vehicle components and the appropriateness of the animal or cell model and dose-response. PMID:26615870

  17. Piloting the Post-Entry Language Assessment: Outcomes from a New System for Supporting Research Candidates with English as an Additional Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynan, Liz; Johns, Kellie

    2015-01-01

    The Post-Entry Language Assessment (PELA) was introduced by the James Cook University Graduate Research School in February 2013 as a pilot programme to test a new mechanism for initiating post-enrolment support for research degree candidates who have English as an additional language. Language ability does not necessarily, on its own, predict…

  18. The Effectiveness of Learning Model of Basic Education with Character-Based at Universitas Muslim Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosmiati, Rosmiati; Mahmud, Alimuddin; Talib, Syamsul B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the basic education learning model with character-based through learning in the Universitas Muslim Indonesia. In addition, the research specifically examines the character of discipline, curiosity and responsibility. The specific target is to produce a basic education learning model…

  19. Comparative studies on drug binding to the purified and pharmaceutical-grade human serum albumins: Bridging between basic research and clinical applications of albumin.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Ebrahimi, Farangis; Ranjbar, Samira; Ghobadi, Sirous; Moradi, Nastaran; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2015-09-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in blood plasma, is a monomeric multidomain protein that possesses an extraordinary capacity for binding, so that serves as a circulating depot for endogenous and exogenous compounds. During the heat sterilization process, the structure of pharmaceutical-grade HSA may change and some of its activities may be lost. In this study, to provide deeper insight on this issue, we investigated drug-binding and some physicochemical properties of purified albumin (PA) and pharmaceutical-grade albumin (PGA) using two known drugs (indomethacin and ibuprofen). PGA displayed significantly lower drug binding capacity compared to PA. Analysis of the quenching and thermodynamic parameters indicated that intermolecular interactions between the drugs and the proteins are different from each other. Surface hydrophobicity as well as the stability of PGA decreased compared to PA, also surface hydrophobicity of PA and PGA increased upon drugs binding. Also, kinetic analysis of pseudo-esterase activities indicated that Km and Vmax parameters for PGA enzymatic activity are more and less than those of PA, respectively. This in vitro study demonstrates that the specific drug binding of PGA is significantly reduced. Such studies can act as connecting bridge between basic research discoveries and clinical applications.

  20. Basic Opportunity Grants for Higher Education: Will the Outcome Differ from the Intent? Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers No. 194-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, W. Lee; Lampman, Robert J.

    The Basic Opportunity Grants symbolize one approach to the financing of higher education. In this paper, the formula of the grant is tested against the theory and practice of negative income taxation. A key concept in both Basic Opportunity Grants and in other types of income taxation is that of the family unit whose income must be counted in…