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Sample records for additional binding site

  1. An additional substrate binding site in a bacterial phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Ronau, Judith A; Paul, Lake N; Fuchs, Julian E; Corn, Isaac R; Wagner, Kyle T; Liedl, Klaus R; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; Das, Chittaranjan

    2013-09-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is a non-heme iron enzyme that catalyzes oxidation of phenylalanine to tyrosine, a reaction that must be kept under tight regulatory control. Mammalian PAH has a regulatory domain in which binding of the substrate leads to allosteric activation of the enzyme. However, the existence of PAH regulation in evolutionarily distant organisms, for example some bacteria in which it occurs, has so far been underappreciated. In an attempt to crystallographically characterize substrate binding by PAH from Chromobacterium violaceum, a single-domain monomeric enzyme, electron density for phenylalanine was observed at a distal site 15.7 Å from the active site. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments revealed a dissociation constant of 24 ± 1.1 μM for phenylalanine. Under the same conditions, ITC revealed no detectable binding for alanine, tyrosine, or isoleucine, indicating the distal site may be selective for phenylalanine. Point mutations of amino acid residues in the distal site that contact phenylalanine (F258A, Y155A, T254A) led to impaired binding, consistent with the presence of distal site binding in solution. Although kinetic analysis revealed that the distal site mutants suffer discernible loss of their catalytic activity, X-ray crystallographic analysis of Y155A and F258A, the two mutants with the most noticeable decrease in activity, revealed no discernible change in the structure of their active sites, suggesting that the effect of distal binding may result from protein dynamics in solution.

  2. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiajian; Stormo, Gary D

    2005-01-01

    Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data. PMID:16014175

  3. Two additional carbohydrate-binding sites of beta-amylase from Bacillus cereus var. mycoides are involved in hydrolysis and raw starch-binding.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhengmao; Miyake, Hideo; Tatsumi, Maki; Nishimura, Shigenori; Nitta, Yasunori

    2004-03-01

    In the previous X-ray crystallographic study, it was found that beta-amylase from Bacillus cereus var. mycoides has three carbohydrate-binding sites aside from the active site: two (Site2 and Site3) in domain B and one (Site1) in domain C. To investigate the roles of these sites in the catalytic reaction and raw starch-binding, Site1 and Site2 were mutated. From analyses of the raw starch-binding of wild-type and mutant enzymes, it was found that Site1 contributes to the binding affinity to raw-starch more than Site2, and that the binding capacity is maintained when either Site1 or Site2 exists. The raw starch-digesting ability of this enzyme was poor. From inhibition studies by maltitol, GGX and alpha-CD for hydrolyses of maltopentaose (G5) and amylose ( (n) = 16) catalyzed by wild-type and mutant enzymes, it was found that alpha-CD is a competitive inhibitor, while, maltitol behaves as a mixed-type or competitive inhibitor depending on the chain length of the substrate and the mutant enzyme. From the analysis of the inhibition mechanism, we conclude that the bindings of maltitol and GGX to Site2 in domain B form an abortive ESI complex when amylose ( (n) = 16) is used as a substrate.

  4. Structural and functional analysis of the two haemoglobins of the antarctic seabird Catharacta maccormicki characterization of an additional phosphate binding site by molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Tamburrini, M; Riccio, A; Romano, M; Giardina, B; di Prisco, G

    2000-10-01

    The amino-acid sequence and the oxygen-binding properties of the two haemoglobins of the Antarctic seabird south polar skua have been investigated. The two haemoglobins showed peculiar functional features, which were probably acquired to meet special needs in relation to the extreme environmental conditions. Both haemoglobins showed a weak alkaline Bohr effect which, during prolonged flight, may protect against sudden and uncontrolled stripping of oxygen in response to acidosis. We suggest that a weak Bohr effect in birds may reflect adaptation to extreme life conditions. The values of heat of oxygenation suggest different functional roles of the two haemoglobins. The experimental evidence suggests that both haemoglobins may bind phosphate at two distinct binding sites. In fact, analysis of the molecular models revealed that an additional phosphate binding site, formed by residues NA1alpha, G6alpha and HC3alpha, is located between the two alpha chains. This additional site may act as an entry/leaving site, thus increasing the probability of capturing phosphate and transferring it to the main binding site located between the two beta chains by means of a site-site migratory mechanism, thereby favouring the release of oxygen. It is suggested that most haemoglobins possess an additional phosphate binding site, having such a role in oxygen transport.

  5. Characterization and regulation of an additional actin-filament-binding site in large isoforms of the stereocilia actin-bundling protein espin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lili; Beeler, Dina M; Bartles, James R

    2014-03-15

    The espin actin-bundling proteins, which are produced as isoforms of different sizes from a single gene, are required for the growth of hair cell stereocilia. We have characterized an additional actin-filament-binding site present in the extended amino-termini of large espin isoforms. Constitutively active in espin 2, the site increased the size of actin bundles formed in vitro and inhibited actin fluorescence recovery in microvilli. In espin 1, which has an N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain, the site was autoinhibited by binding between the ankyrin repeat domain and a peptide near the actin-binding site. Deletion of this peptide from espin 1 activated its actin-binding site. The peptide resembled tail homology domain I of myosin III, a ligand of the ankyrin repeat domain localized with espin 1 at the tip of stereocilia. A myosin III tail homology domain I peptide, but not scrambled control peptides, inhibited internal binding of the ankyrin repeat domain and released the espin 1 actin-binding site from autoinhibition. Thus, this regulation could result in local activation of the additional actin-binding site of espin 1 by myosin III in stereocilia.

  6. Identification of drug-binding sites on human serum albumin using affinity capillary electrophoresis and chemically modified proteins as buffer additives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Seung; Austin, John; Hage, David S

    2002-03-01

    A technique based on affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) and chemically modified proteins was used to screen the binding sites of various drugs on human serum albumin (HSA). This involved using HSA as a buffer additive, following the site-selective modification of this protein at two residues (tryptophan 214 or tyrosine 411) located in its major binding regions. The migration times of four compounds (warfarin, ibuprofen, suprofen and flurbiprofen) were measured in the presence of normal or modified HSA. These times were then compared and the mobility shifts observed with the modified proteins were used to identify the binding regions of each injected solute on HSA. Items considered in optimizing this assay included the concentration of protein placed into the running buffer, the reagents used to modify HSA, and the use of dextran as a secondary additive to adjust protein mobility. The results of this method showed good agreement with those of previous reports. The advantages and disadvantages of this approach are examined, as well as its possible extension to other solutes.

  7. Additive Promotion of Viral Internal Ribosome Entry Site-Mediated Translation by Far Upstream Element-Binding Protein 1 and an Enterovirus 71-Induced Cleavage Product

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chuan-Tien; Kung, Yu-An; Li, Mei-Ling; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Liu, Shih-Tung; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of the enterovirus 71 (EV71) RNA genome contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is indispensable for viral protein translation. Due to the limited coding capacity of their RNA genomes, EV71 and other picornaviruses typically recruit host factors, known as IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs), to mediate IRES-dependent translation. Here, we show that EV71 viral proteinase 2A is capable of cleaving far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FBP1), a positive ITAF that directly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region to promote viral IRES-driven translation. The cleavage occurs at the Gly-371 residue of FBP1 during the EV71 infection process, and this generates a functional cleavage product, FBP11-371. Interestingly, the cleavage product acts to promote viral IRES activity. Footprinting analysis and gel mobility shift assay results showed that FBP11-371 similarly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region, but at a different site from full-length FBP1; moreover, FBP1 and FBP11-371 were found to act additively to promote IRES-mediated translation and virus yield. Our findings expand the current understanding of virus-host interactions with regard to viral recruitment and modulation of ITAFs, and provide new insights into translational control during viral infection. PMID:27780225

  8. Binding of [3H]idazoxan and of its methoxy derivative [3H] RX821002 in human fat cells: [3H]idazoxan but not [3H] RX821002 labels additional non-alpha 2-adrenergic binding sites.

    PubMed

    Langin, D; Paris, H; Lafontan, M

    1990-06-01

    Binding studies were carried out in human fat cell membranes with two alpha 2-adrenergic antagonists, [3H]idazoxan and its methoxy derivative [3H]RX821002. Inhibition studies with epinephrine enantiomers indicate that [3H]RX821002 only binds to alpha 2-adrenoceptors, whereas [3H]idazoxan labels alpha 2-adrenoceptors and additional nonadrenergic sites (NAIBS). NAIBS and alpha 2-adrenoceptors display different affinities towards drugs from various chemical families. Imidazoline and some guanidine derivatives exhibit a high affinity for NAIBS. Pharmacological studies of human NAIBS indicate that they are slightly different from those previously reported in the rabbit, suggesting the existence of several subtypes of NAIBS. Furthermore, NAIBS are different from the previously described "imidazoline-preferring sites." [3H]idazoxan and [3H]RX821002 saturation analyses were performed in human adipocytes from different anatomical locations, in order to compare the number of NAIBS and alpha 2-adrenoceptors. Although there was an important variation in NAIBS and alpha 2-adrenoceptor numbers in the studied samples, a very poor correlation was obtained between the Bmax values of the two sites. Moreover, alkylation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors by phenoxybenzamine produces a 90% reduction in accessible [3H]RX821002 binding sites, without modification of [3H]idazoxan binding. These data show that NAIBS are not closely related to the alpha 2-adrenergic molecule. In addition, benextramine appears to be a reversible competitor at NAIBS. [3H]idazoxan binding, but not [3H]RX821002 binding, is sensitive to K+, suggesting that the domains involved in the ligand-NAIBS interaction are different from those involved in the ligand-alpha 2-adrenoceptor interaction.

  9. Structural-functional characterization of the cathodic haemoglobin of the conger eel Conger conger: molecular modelling study of an additional phosphate-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Giardina, Bruno; Verde, Cinzia; Carratore, Vito; Olianas, Alessandra; Sollai, Luigi; Sanna, Maria T; Castagnola, Massimo; di Prisco, Guido

    2003-01-01

    The protein sequence data for the alpha- and beta-chains have been deposited in the SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL protein knowledgebase under the accession numbers P83479 and P83478 respectively. The Conger conger (conger eel) haemoglobin (Hb) system is made of three components, one of which, the so-called cathodic Hb, representing approx. 20% of the total pigment, has been purified and characterized from both a structural and functional point of view. Stripped Hb showed a reverse Bohr effect, high oxygen affinity and slightly low cooperativity in the absence of any effector. Addition of saturating GTP strongly influences the pH dependence of the oxygen affinity, since the reverse Bohr effect, observed under stripped conditions, is converted into a small normal Bohr effect. A further investigation of the GTP effect on oxygen affinity, carried out by fitting its titration curve, demonstrated the presence of two independent binding sites. Therefore, on the basis of the amino acid sequence of the alpha- and beta-chains, which have been determined, a computer modelling study has been performed. The data suggest that C. conger cathodic Hb may bind organic phosphates at two distinct binding sites located along the central cavity of the tetramer by hydrogen bonds and/or electrostatic interactions with amino acid residues of both chains, which have been identified. Among these residues, the two Lys-alpha(G6) (where the letter refers to the haemoglobin helix and the number to the amino acid position in the helix) appear to have a key role in the GTP movement from the external binding region to the internal central cavity of the tetrameric molecule. PMID:12646043

  10. The +37 kb Cebpa Enhancer Is Critical for Cebpa Myeloid Gene Expression and Contains Functional Sites that Bind SCL, GATA2, C/EBPα, PU.1, and Additional Ets Factors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stacy; Guo, Hong; Friedman, Alan D

    2015-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains an evolutionarily conserved 453 bp enhancer located at +37 kb that, together with its promoter, directs expression to myeloid progenitors and to long-term hematopoietic stem cells in transgenic mice. In human acute myeloid leukemia cases, the enhancer lacks point mutations but binds the RUNX1-ETO oncoprotein. The enhancer contains the H3K4me1 and H3K27Ac histone modifications, denoting an active enhancer, at progressively increasing levels as long-term hematopoietic stem cells transition to granulocyte-monocyte progenitors. We previously identified four enhancer sites that bind RUNX1 and demonstrated that their integrity is required for maximal enhancer activity in 32Dcl3 myeloid cells. The +37 kb Cebpa enhancer also contains C/EBP, Ets factor, Myb, GATA, and E-box consensus sites conserved in the human +42 kb CEBPA enhancer. Mutation of the two C/EBP, seven Ets, one Myb, two GATA, or two E-box sites reduces activity of an enhancer-promoter reporter in 32Dcl3 cells. In 293T gel shift assays, exogenous C/EBPα binds both C/EBP sites, c-Myb binds the Myb site, PU.1 binds the second Ets site, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, and Ets1 bind the sixth Ets site, GATA2 binds both GATA sites, and SCL binds the second E-box. Endogenous hematopoietic RUNX1, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, C/EBPα, GATA2, and SCL were previously shown to bind the enhancer, and we find that endogenous PU.1 binds the second Ets site in 32Dcl3 cells. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we developed 32Dcl3 lines in which the wild-type enhancer alleles are replaced with a variant mutant in the seven Ets sites. These lines have 20-fold reduced Cebpa mRNA when cultured in IL-3 or G-CSF, demonstrating a critical requirement for enhancer integrity for optimal Cebpa expression. In addition, these results indicate that the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer is the focus of multiple regulatory transcriptional pathways that impact its expression during normal hematopoiesis and potentially during myeloid transformation.

  11. Allosteric binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wess, Jürgen

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Molecular Pharmacology, Tränkle et al. (p. 1597) present new findings regarding the existence of a second allosteric site on the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 mAChR). The M2 mAChR is a prototypic class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that has proven to be a very useful model system to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the binding of allosteric GPCR ligands. Previous studies have identified several allosteric muscarinic ligands, including the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor tacrine and the bis-pyridinium derivative 4,4'-bis-[(2,6-dichloro-benzyloxy-imino)-methyl]-1,1'-propane-1,3-diyl-bis-pyridinium dibromide (Duo3), which, in contrast to conventional allosteric muscarinic ligands, display concentration-effect curves with slope factors >1. By analyzing the interactions of tacrine and Duo3 with other allosteric muscarinic agents predicted to bind to the previously identified ;common' allosteric binding site, Tränkle et al. provide evidence suggesting that two allosteric agents and one orthosteric ligand may be able to bind to the M2 mAChR simultaneously. Moreover, studies with mutant mAChRs indicated that the M2 receptor epitopes involved in the binding of tacrine and Duo3 may not be identical. Molecular modeling and ligand docking studies suggested that the additional allosteric site probably represents a subdomain of the receptor's allosteric binding cleft. Because allosteric binding sites have been found on many other GPCRs and drugs interacting with these sites are thought to have great therapeutic potential, the study by Tränkle et al. should be of considerable general interest.

  12. Data of protein-RNA binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook; Park, Byungkyu; Choi, Daesik; Han, Kyungsook

    2017-02-01

    Despite the increasing number of protein-RNA complexes in structure databases, few data resources have been made available which can be readily used in developing or testing a method for predicting either protein-binding sites in RNA sequences or RNA-binding sites in protein sequences. The problem of predicting protein-binding sites in RNA has received much less attention than the problem of predicting RNA-binding sites in protein. The data presented in this paper are related to the article entitled "PRIdictor: Protein-RNA Interaction predictor" (Tuvshinjargal et al. 2016) [1]. PRIdictor can predict protein-binding sites in RNA as well as RNA-binding sites in protein at the nucleotide- and residue-levels. This paper presents four datasets that were used to test four prediction models of PRIdictor: (1) model RP for predicting protein-binding sites in RNA from protein and RNA sequences, (2) model RaP for predicting protein-binding sites in RNA from RNA sequence alone, (3) model PR for predicting RNA-binding sites in protein from protein and RNA sequences, and (4) model PaR for predicting RNA-binding sites in protein from protein sequence alone. The datasets supplied in this article can be used as a valuable resource to evaluate and compare different methods for predicting protein-RNA binding sites.

  13. Thioredoxin binding site of phosphoribulokinase overlaps the catalytic site. [R

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, M.A.; Hartman, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    The ATP-regulatory binding site of phosphoribulokinase was studied using bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate (BrAcNHEtOP). BrAcNHEtOP binds to the active-regulatory binding site of the protein. Following trypsin degradation of the labeled protein, fragments were separated by HPLC and sequenced. (DT)

  14. Addition of transcription activator-like effector binding sites to a pathogen strain-specific rice bacterial blight resistance gene makes it effective against additional strains and against bacterial leaf streak.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Aaron W; Doyle, Erin L; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2012-09-01

    Xanthomonas transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors promote disease in plants by binding to and activating host susceptibility genes. Plants counter with TAL effector-activated executor resistance genes, which cause host cell death and block disease progression. We asked whether the functional specificity of an executor gene could be broadened by adding different TAL effector binding elements (EBEs) to it. We added six EBEs to the rice Xa27 gene, which confers resistance to strains of the bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) that deliver the TAL effector AvrXa27. The EBEs correspond to three other effectors from Xoo strain PXO99(A) and three from strain BLS256 of the bacterial leaf streak pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc). Stable integration into rice produced healthy lines exhibiting gene activation by each TAL effector, and resistance to PXO99(A) , a PXO99(A) derivative lacking AvrXa27, and BLS256, as well as two other Xoo and 10 Xoc strains virulent toward wildtype Xa27 plants. Transcripts initiated primarily at a common site. Sequences in the EBEs were found to occur nonrandomly in rice promoters, suggesting an overlap with endogenous regulatory sequences. Thus, executor gene specificity can be broadened by adding EBEs, but caution is warranted because of the possible coincident introduction of endogenous regulatory elements.

  15. Predicting Ca2+-binding Sites Using Refined Carbon Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kun; Wang, Xue; Wong, Hing C.; Wohlhueter, Robert; Kirberger, Michael P.; Chen, Guantao; Yang, Jenny J.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying Ca2+-binding sites in proteins is the first step towards understanding the molecular basis of diseases related to Ca2+-binding proteins. Currently, these sites are identified in structures either through X-ray crystallography or NMR analysis. However, Ca2+-binding sites are not always visible in X-ray structures due to flexibility in the binding region or low occupancy in a Ca2+-binding site. Similarly, both Ca2+ and its ligand oxygens are not directly observed in NMR structures. To improve our ability to predict Ca2+-binding sites in both X-ray and NMR structures, we report a new graph theory algorithm (MUGC) to predict Ca2+-binding sites. Using carbon atoms covalently bonded to the chelating oxygen atoms, and without explicit reference to side-chain oxygen ligand coordinates, MUGC is able to achieve 94% sensitivity with 76% selectivity on a dataset of X-ray structures comprised of 43 Ca2+-binding proteins. Additionally, prediction of Ca2+-binding sites in NMR structures were obtained by MUGC using a different set of parameters determined by analysis of both Ca2+-constrained and unconstrained Ca2+-loaded structures derived from NMR data. MUGC identified 20 out of 21 Ca2+-binding sites in NMR structures inferred without the use of Ca2+ constraints. MUGC predictions are also highly-selective for Ca2+-binding sites as analyses of binding sites for Mg2+, Zn2+, and Pb2+ were not identified as Ca2+-binding sites. These results indicate that the geometric arrangement of the second-shell carbon cluster is sufficient for both accurate identification of Ca2+-binding sites in NMR and X-ray structures, and for selective differentiation between Ca2+ and other relevant divalent cations. PMID:22821762

  16. Predicting tissue specific transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of gene regulation often utilize genome-wide predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Most existing prediction methods are based on sequence information alone, ignoring biological contexts such as developmental stages and tissue types. Experimental methods to study in vivo binding, including ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq, can only study one transcription factor in a single cell type and under a specific condition in each experiment, and therefore cannot scale to determine the full set of regulatory interactions in mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks. Results We developed a new computational approach, PIPES, for predicting tissue-specific TF binding. PIPES integrates in vitro protein binding microarrays (PBMs), sequence conservation and tissue-specific epigenetic (DNase I hypersensitivity) information. We demonstrate that PIPES improves over existing methods on distinguishing between in vivo bound and unbound sequences using ChIP-seq data for 11 mouse TFs. In addition, our predictions are in good agreement with current knowledge of tissue-specific TF regulation. Conclusions We provide a systematic map of computationally predicted tissue-specific binding targets for 284 mouse TFs across 55 tissue/cell types. Such comprehensive resource is useful for researchers studying gene regulation. PMID:24238150

  17. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  18. (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, D.A.; Taylor, D.P.; Enna, S.J.

    1983-05-01

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone ((/sup 3/) THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of (/sup 3/)THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, (/sup 3/) THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that (/sup 3/)THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors.

  19. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, S.M. . Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. )

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  20. A citrate-binding site in calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, T; Eisenstein, M; Muszkat, K A; Fleminger, G

    1998-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a major Ca2+ messenger which, upon Ca2+ activation, binds and activates a number of target enzymes involved in crucial cellular processes. The dependence on Ca2+ ion concentration suggests that CaM activation may be modulated by low-affinity Ca2+ chelators. The effect on CaM structure and function of citrate ion, a Ca2+ chelator commonly found in the cytosol and the mitochondria, was therefore investigated. A series of structural and biochemical methods, including tryptic mapping, immunological recognition by specific monoclonal antibodies, CIDNP-NMR, binding to specific ligands and association with radiolabeled citrate, showed that citrate induces conformational modifications in CaM which affect the shape and activity of the protein. These changes were shown to be associated with the C-terminal lobe of the molecule and involve actual binding of citrate to CaM. Analyzing X-ray structures of several citrate-binding proteins by computerized molecular graphics enabled us to identify a putative citrate-binding site (CBS) on the CaM molecule around residues Arg106-His107. Owing to the tight proximity of this site to the third Ca(2+)-binding loop of CaM, binding of citrate is presumably translated into changes in Ca2+ binding to site III (and indirectly to site IV). These changes apparently affect the structural and biochemical properties of the conformation-sensitive protein.

  1. DNA binding studies of tartrazine food additive.

    PubMed

    Kashanian, Soheila; Zeidali, Sahar Heidary

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA with tartrazine in 10 mM Tris-HCl aqueous solution at neutral pH 7.4 was investigated. Tartrazine is a nitrous derivative and may cause allergic reactions, with a potential of toxicological risk. Also, tartrazine induces oxidative stress and DNA damage. Its DNA binding properties were studied by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectra, competitive binding with Hoechst 33258, and viscosity measurements. Tartrazine molecules bind to DNA via groove mode as illustrated by hyperchromism in the UV absorption band of tartrazine, decrease in Hoechst-DNA solution fluorescence, unchanged viscosity of DNA, and conformational changes such as conversion from B-like to C-like in the circular dichroism spectra of DNA. The binding constants (K(b)) of DNA with tartrazine were calculated at different temperatures. Enthalpy and entropy changes were calculated to be +37 and +213 kJ mol(-1), respectively, according to the Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that the reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Also, tartrazine does not cleave plasmid DNA. Tartrazine interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 3.75 × 10(4) M(-1).

  2. Predicted metal binding sites for phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashok; Roy, Sudeep; Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Roy, Pratibha; Mishra, Manoj; Khan, Feroz; Meena, Abha

    2009-09-05

    Metal ion binding domains are found in proteins that mediate transport, buffering or detoxification of metal ions. The objective of the study is to design and analyze metal binding motifs against the genes involved in phytoremediation. This is being done on the basis of certain pre-requisite amino-acid residues known to bind metal ions/metal complexes in medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP's). Earlier work on MAP's have shown that heavy metals accumulated by aromatic and medicinal plants do not appear in the essential oil and that some of these species are able to grow in metal contaminated sites. A pattern search against the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL databases yielded true positives in each case showing the high specificity of the motifs designed for the ions of nickel, lead, molybdenum, manganese, cadmium, zinc, iron, cobalt and xenobiotic compounds. Motifs were also studied against PDB structures. Results of the study suggested the presence of binding sites on the surface of protein molecules involved. PDB structures of proteins were finally predicted for the binding sites functionality in their respective phytoremediation usage. This was further validated through CASTp server to study its physico-chemical properties. Bioinformatics implications would help in designing strategy for developing transgenic plants with increased metal binding capacity. These metal binding factors can be used to restrict metal update by plants. This helps in reducing the possibility of metal movement into the food chain.

  3. Aminoglycoside antibiotics: A-site specific binding to 16S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2009-06-01

    The A-site of 16S rRNA, which is a part of the 30S ribosomal subunit involved in prokaryotic translation, is a well known aminoglycoside binding site. Full characterization of the conformational changes undergone at the A-site upon aminoglycoside binding is essential for development of future RNA/drug complexes; however, the massiveness of 16S makes this very difficult. Recently, studies have found that a 27 base RNA construct (16S27) that comprises the A-site subdomain of 16S behaves similarly to the whole A-site domain. ESI-MS, ion mobility and molecular dynamics methods were utilized in this study to analyze the A-site of 16S27 before and after the addition of ribostamycin (R), paromomycin (P) and lividomycin (L). The ESI mass spectrum for 16S27 alone illustrated both single-stranded 16S27 and double-stranded (16S27)2 complexes. Upon aminoglycoside addition, the mass spectra showed that only one aminoglycoside binds to 16S27, while either one or two bind to (16S27)2. Ion mobility measurements and molecular dynamics calculations were utilized in determining the solvent-free structures of the 16S27 and (16S27)2 complexes. These studies found 16S27 in a hairpin conformation while (16S27)2 existed as a cruciform. Only one aminoglycoside binds to the single A-site of the 16S27 hairpin and this attachment compresses the hairpin. Since two A-sites exist for the (16S27)2 cruciform, either one or two aminoglycosides may bind. The aminoglycosides compress the A-sites causing the cruciform with just one aminoglycoside bound to be larger than the cruciform with two bound. Non-specific binding was not observed in any of the aminoglycoside/16S27 complexes.

  4. Bridging lectin binding sites by multivalent carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Valentin; Pieters, Roland J

    2013-05-21

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions are involved in a multitude of biological recognition processes. Since individual protein-carbohydrate interactions are usually weak, multivalency is often required to achieve biologically relevant binding affinities and selectivities. Among the possible mechanisms responsible for binding enhancement by multivalency, the simultaneous attachment of a multivalent ligand to several binding sites of a multivalent receptor (i.e. chelation) has been proven to have a strong impact. This article summarizes recent examples of chelating lectin ligands of different size. Covered lectins include the Shiga-like toxin, where the shortest distance between binding sites is ca. 9 Å, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (shortest distance between binding sites 13-14 Å), LecA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (shortest distance 26 Å), cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin (shortest distance 31 Å), anti-HIV antibody 2G12 (shortest distance 31 Å), concanavalin A (ConA) (shortest distance 72 Å), RCA120 (shortest distance 100 Å), and Erythrina cristagalli (ECL) (shortest distance 100 Å). While chelating binding of the discussed ligands is likely, experimental proof, for example by X-ray crystallography, is limited to only a few cases.

  5. Drug Promiscuity in PDB: Protein Binding Site Similarity Is Key

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Drug repositioning applies established drugs to new disease indications with increasing success. A pre-requisite for drug repurposing is drug promiscuity (polypharmacology) – a drug’s ability to bind to several targets. There is a long standing debate on the reasons for drug promiscuity. Based on large compound screens, hydrophobicity and molecular weight have been suggested as key reasons. However, the results are sometimes contradictory and leave space for further analysis. Protein structures offer a structural dimension to explain promiscuity: Can a drug bind multiple targets because the drug is flexible or because the targets are structurally similar or even share similar binding sites? We present a systematic study of drug promiscuity based on structural data of PDB target proteins with a set of 164 promiscuous drugs. We show that there is no correlation between the degree of promiscuity and ligand properties such as hydrophobicity or molecular weight but a weak correlation to conformational flexibility. However, we do find a correlation between promiscuity and structural similarity as well as binding site similarity of protein targets. In particular, 71% of the drugs have at least two targets with similar binding sites. In order to overcome issues in detection of remotely similar binding sites, we employed a score for binding site similarity: LigandRMSD measures the similarity of the aligned ligands and uncovers remote local similarities in proteins. It can be applied to arbitrary structural binding site alignments. Three representative examples, namely the anti-cancer drug methotrexate, the natural product quercetin and the anti-diabetic drug acarbose are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that global structural and binding site similarity play a more important role to explain the observed drug promiscuity in the PDB than physicochemical drug properties like hydrophobicity or molecular weight. Additionally, we find ligand flexibility to have a

  6. Radiation inactivation reveals discrete cation binding sites that modulate dihydropyridine binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolger, G.T.; Skolnick, P.; Kempner, E.S. )

    1989-08-01

    In low ionic strength buffer (5 mM Tris.HCl), the binding of (3H) nitrendipine to dihydropyridine calcium antagonist binding sites of mouse forebrain membranes is increased by both Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. Radiation inactivation was used to determine the target size of ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding sites in 5 mM Tris.HCl buffer, in the presence and absence of these cations. After irradiation, ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine binding in buffer with or without Na+ was diminished, due to a loss of binding sites and also to an increase in Kd. After accounting for radiation effects on the dissociation constant, the target size for the nitrendipine binding site in buffer was 160-170 kDa and was 170-180 kDa in the presence of sodium. In the presence of calcium ions, ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding showed no radiation effects on Kd and yielded a target size of 150-170 kDa. These findings suggest, as in the case of opioid receptors, the presence of high molecular weight membrane components that modulate cation-induced alterations in radioligand binding to dihydropyridine binding sites.

  7. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions. PMID:26540053

  8. Opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney: Radioligand homogenate binding and autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Dissanayake, V.U.; Hughes, J.; Hunter, J.C. )

    1991-07-01

    The specific binding of the selective {mu}-, {delta}-, and {kappa}-opioid ligands (3H)(D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5)enkephalin ((3H) DAGOL), (3H)(D-Pen2,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((3H)DPDPE), and (3H)U69593, respectively, to crude membranes of the guinea pig and rat whole kidney, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla was investigated. In addition, the distribution of specific 3H-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney was visualized by autoradiography. Homogenate binding and autoradiography demonstrated the absence of {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig kidney. No opioid binding sites were demonstrable in the rat kidney. In the guinea pig whole kidney, cortex, and medulla, saturation studies demonstrated that (3H)DPDPE bound with high affinity (KD = 2.6-3.5 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding sites (Bmax = 8.4-30 fmol/mg of protein). Competition studies using several opioid compounds confirmed the nature of the {delta}-opioid binding site. Autoradiography experiments demonstrated that specific (3H)DPDPE binding sites were distributed radially in regions of the inner and outer medulla and at the corticomedullary junction of the guinea pig kidney. Computer-assisted image analysis of saturation data yielded KD values (4.5-5.0 nM) that were in good agreement with those obtained from the homogenate binding studies. Further investigation of the {delta}-opioid binding site in medulla homogenates, using agonist ((3H)DPDPE) and antagonist ((3H)diprenorphine) binding in the presence of Na+, Mg2+, and nucleotides, suggested that the {delta}-opioid site is linked to a second messenger system via a GTP-binding protein. Further studies are required to establish the precise localization of the {delta} binding site in the guinea pig kidney and to determine the nature of the second messenger linked to the GTP-binding protein in the medulla.

  9. Probing binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-01

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein–RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein–RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein–protein and protein–RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein–RNA recognition sites with desired affinity. PMID:26365245

  10. Probing binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-29

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein-RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein-RNA recognition sites with desired affinity.

  11. Molecular simulations of multimodal ligand-protein binding: elucidation of binding sites and correlation with experiments.

    PubMed

    Freed, Alexander S; Garde, Shekhar; Cramer, Steven M

    2011-11-17

    Multimodal chromatography, which employs more than one mode of interaction between ligands and proteins, has been shown to have unique selectivity and high efficacy for protein purification. To test the ability of free solution molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water to identify binding regions on the protein surface and to shed light on the "pseudo affinity" nature of multimodal interactions, we performed MD simulations of a model protein ubiquitin in aqueous solution of free ligands. Comparisons of MD with NMR spectroscopy of ubiquitin mutants in solutions of free ligands show a good agreement between the two with regard to the preferred binding region on the surface of the protein and several binding sites. MD simulations also identify additional binding sites that were not observed in the NMR experiments. "Bound" ligands were found to be sufficiently flexible and to access a number of favorable conformations, suggesting only a moderate loss of ligand entropy in the "pseudo affinity" binding of these multimodal ligands. Analysis of locations of chemical subunits of the ligand on the protein surface indicated that electrostatic interaction units were located on the periphery of the preferred binding region on the protein. The analysis of the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity maps, and the binding of both acetate and benzene probes were used to further study the localization of individual ligand moieties. These results suggest that water-mediated electrostatic interactions help the localization and orientation of the MM ligand to the binding region with additional stability provided by nonspecific hydrophobic interactions.

  12. Nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites exert interdependent effects on the binding affinities of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bulyk, Martha L.; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    We can determine the effects of many possible sequence variations in transcription factor binding sites using microarray binding experiments. Analysis of wild-type and mutant Zif268 (Egr1) zinc fingers bound to microarrays containing all possible central 3 bp triplet binding sites indicates that the nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites cannot be treated independently. This indicates that the current practice of characterizing transcription factor binding sites by mutating individual positions of binding sites one base pair at a time does not provide a true picture of the sequence specificity. Similarly, current bioinformatic practices using either just a consensus sequence, or even mononucleotide frequency weight matrices to provide more complete descriptions of transcription factor binding sites, are not accurate in depicting the true binding site specificities, since these methods rely upon the assumption that the nucleotides of binding sites exert independent effects on binding affinity. Our results stress the importance of complete reference tables of all possible binding sites for comparing protein binding preferences for various DNA sequences. We also show results suggesting that microarray binding data using particular subsets of all possible binding sites can be used to extrapolate the relative binding affinities of all possible full-length binding sites, given a known binding site for use as a starting sequence for site preference refinement. PMID:11861919

  13. Insulin binding sites in various segments of the rabbit nephron

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, R.; Emmanouel, D.S.; Katz, A.I.

    1983-07-01

    Insulin binds specifically to basolateral renal cortical membranes and modifies tubular electrolyte transport, but the target sites of this hormone in the nephron have not been identified. Using a microassay that permits measurement of hormone binding in discrete tubule segments we have determined the binding sites of /sup 125/I-insulin along the rabbit nephron. Assays were performed under conditions that minimize insulin degradation, and specific binding was measured as the difference between /sup 125/I-insulin bound in the presence or absence of excess (10(-5) M) unlabeled hormone. Insulin monoiodinated in position A14 was used in all assays. Specific insulin binding (attomol . cm-1 +/- SE) was highest in the distal convoluted tubule (180.5 +/- 15.0) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (132.9 +/- 14.6), followed by the proximal convoluted and straight tubule. When expressed per milligram protein, insulin binding capacity was highest along the entire thick ascending limb (medullary and cortical portions) and the distal convoluted tubule, i.e., the ''diluting segment'' (congruent to 10(-13) mol . mg protein-1), and was lower (congruent to 4 X 10(-14) mol . mg protein-1), and remarkably similar, in all other nephron segments. Binding specificity was verified in competition studies with unlabeled insulin, insulin analogues (proinsulin and desoctapeptide insulin), and unrelated hormones (glucagon, 1-34 parathyroid hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone). In addition, serum containing antiinsulin receptor antibody from two patients with type B insulin resistance syndrome markedly inhibited insulin binding to isolated tubules. Whether calculated per unit tubule length or protein content, insulin binding is highest in the thick ascending limb and the distal convoluted tubule, the same nephron sites where a regulatory role in sodium transport has been postulated for this hormone.

  14. A novel non-opioid binding site for endomorphin-1.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, I; Toth, F; Biyashev, D; Szatmari, I; Monory, K; Tomboly, C; Toth, G; Benyhe, S; Borsodi, A

    2016-08-01

    Endomorphins are natural amidated opioid tetrapeptides with the following structure: Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2 (endomorphin-1), and Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2 (endomorphin-2). Endomorphins interact selectively with the μ-opioid or MOP receptors and exhibit nanomolar or sub-nanomolar receptor binding affinities, therefore they suggested to be endogenous agonists for the μ-opioid receptors. Endomorphins mediate a number of characteristic opioid effects, such as antinociception, however there are several physiological functions in which endomorphins appear to act in a fashion that does not involve binding to and activation of the μ-opioid receptor. Our recent data indicate that a radiolabelled [(3)H]endomorphin-1 with a specific radioactivity of 2.35 TBq/mmol - prepared by catalytic dehalogenation of the diiodinated peptide precursor in the presence of tritium gas - is able to bind to a second, naloxone insensitive recognition site in rat brain membranes. Binding heterogeneity, i.e., the presence of higher (Kd = 0.4 nM / Bmax = 120 fmol/mg protein) and lower (Kd = 8.2 nM / Bmax = 432 fmol/mg protein) affinity binding components is observed both in saturation binding experiments followed by Schatchard analysis, and in equilibrium competition binding studies. The signs of receptor multiplicity, e.g., curvilinear Schatchard plots or biphasic displacement curves are seen only if the non-specific binding is measured in the presence of excess unlabeled endomorphin-1 and not in the presence of excess unlabeled naloxone. The second, lower affinity non-opioid binding site is not recognized by heterocyclic opioid alkaloid ligands, neither agonists such as morphine, nor antagonists such as naloxone. On the contrary, endomorphin-1 is displaced from its lower affinity, higher capacity binding site by several natural neuropeptides, including methionine-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, nociceptin-orphanin FQ, angiotensin and FMRF-amide. This naloxone-insensitive, consequently non-opioid binding site seems

  15. Being a binding site: characterizing residue composition of binding sites on proteins.

    PubMed

    Iván, Gábor; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince

    2007-12-30

    The Protein Data Bank contains the description of more than 45,000 three-dimensional protein and nucleic-acid structures today. Started to exist as the computer-readable depository of crystallographic data complementing printed articles, the proper interpretation of the content of the individual files in the PDB still frequently needs the detailed information found in the citing publication. This fact implies that the fully automatic processing of the whole PDB is a very hard task. We first cleaned and re-structured the PDB data, then analyzed the residue composition of the binding sites in the whole PDB for frequency and for hidden association rules. Main results of the paper: (i) the cleaning and repairing algorithm (ii) redundancy elimination from the data (iii) application of association rule mining to the cleaned non-redundant data set. We have found numerous significant relations of the residue-composition of the ligand binding sites on protein surfaces, summarized in two figures. One of the classical data-mining methods for exploring implication-rules, the association-rule mining, is capable to find previously unknown residue-set preferences of bind ligands on protein surfaces. Since protein-ligand binding is a key step in enzymatic mechanisms and in drug discovery, these uncovered preferences in the study of more than 19,500 binding sites may help in identifying new binding protein-ligand pairs.

  16. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    PubMed Central

    Kantcheva, Adriana K.; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Nissen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding. PMID:23641004

  17. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters.

    PubMed

    Kantcheva, Adriana K; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Nissen, Poul

    2013-05-21

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding.

  18. Resolving protein structure-function-binding site relationships from a binding site similarity network perspective.

    PubMed

    Mudgal, Richa; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2017-03-25

    Functional annotation is seldom straightforward with complexities arising due to functional divergence in protein families or functional convergence between non-homologous protein families, leading to mis-annotations. An enzyme may contain multiple domains and not all domains may be involved in a given function, adding to the complexity in function annotation. To address this, we use binding site information from bound cognate ligands and catalytic residues, since it can help in resolving fold-function relationships at a finer level and with higher confidence. A comprehensive database of 2,020 fold-function-binding site relationships has been systematically generated. A network-based approach is employed to capture the complexity in these relationships, from which different types of associations are deciphered, that identify versatile protein folds performing diverse functions, same function associated with multiple folds and one-to-one relationships. Binding site similarity networks integrated with fold, function and ligand similarity information are generated to understand the depth of these relationships. Apart from the observed continuity in the functional site space, network properties of these revealed versatile families with topologically different or dissimilar binding sites and structural families that perform very similar functions. As a case study, subtle changes in the active site of a set of evolutionarily related superfamilies are studied using these networks. Tracing of such similarities in evolutionarily related proteins provide clues into the transition and evolution of protein functions. Insights from this study will be helpful in accurate and reliable functional annotations of uncharacterized proteins, poly-pharmacology and designing enzymes with new functional capabilities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Organic additives stabilize RNA aptamer binding of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yubin; Chi, Hong; Wu, Yuanyuan; Marks, Robert S; Steele, Terry W J

    2016-11-01

    Aptamer-ligand binding has been utilized for biological applications due to its specific binding and synthetic nature. However, the applications will be limited if the binding or the ligand is unstable. Malachite green aptamer (MGA) and its labile ligand malachite green (MG) were found to have increasing apparent dissociation constants (Kd) as determined through the first order rate loss of emission intensity of the MGA-MG fluorescent complex. The fluorescent intensity loss was hypothesized to be from the hydrolysis of MG into malachite green carbinol base (MGOH). Random screening organic additives were found to reduce or retain the fluorescence emission and the calculated apparent Kd of MGA-MG binding. The protective effect became more apparent as the percentage of organic additives increased up to 10% v/v. The mechanism behind the organic additive protective effects was primarily from a ~5X increase in first order rate kinetics of MGOH→MG (kMGOH→MG), which significantly changed the equilibrium constant (Keq), favoring the generation of MG, versus MGOH without organic additives. A simple way has been developed to stabilize the apparent Kd of MGA-MG binding over 24h, which may be beneficial in stabilizing other triphenylmethane or carbocation ligand-aptamer interactions that are susceptible to SN1 hydrolysis.

  20. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Jacob; Adami, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through position weight matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain about 0.5 bits of information about the presence of Twist transcription factor binding sites in the flanking sequence. We also find that Dorsal binding site detectors conditioned on flanking sequence information make better predictions about what is a Dorsal site relative to background DNA than detection without information about flanking sequence features.

  1. Substrate and drug binding sites in LeuT.

    PubMed

    Nyola, Ajeeta; Karpowich, Nathan K; Zhen, Juan; Marden, Jennifer; Reith, Maarten E; Wang, Da-Neng

    2010-08-01

    LeuT is a member of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter family, which includes the neuronal transporters for serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. The original crystal structure of LeuT shows a primary leucine-binding site at the center of the protein. LeuT is inhibited by different classes of antidepressants that act as potent inhibitors of the serotonin transporter. The newly determined crystal structures of LeuT-antidepressant complexes provide opportunities to probe drug binding in the serotonin transporter, of which the exact position remains controversial. Structure of a LeuT-tryptophan complex shows an overlapping binding site with the primary substrate site. A secondary substrate binding site was recently identified, where the binding of a leucine triggers the cytoplasmic release of the primary substrate. This two binding site model presents opportunities for a better understanding of drug binding and the mechanism of inhibition for mammalian transporters.

  2. Type II oestrogen binding sites in human colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Piantelli, M; Ricci, R; Larocca, L M; Rinelli, A; Capelli, A; Rizzo, S; Scambia, G; Ranelletti, F O

    1990-01-01

    Seven cases of colorectal adenocarcinomas were investigated for the presence of oestrogen receptors and progesterone receptors. The tumours specifically bound oestradiol. This binding almost exclusively resulted from the presence of high numbers of type II oestrogen binding sites. Oestrogen receptors were absent or present at very low concentrations. Immunohistochemical investigation of nuclear oestrogen receptors gave negative results. This indicates that antioestrogen receptor antibodies recognise oestrogen receptors but not type II oestrogen binding sites. The presence of specific type II oestrogen binding sites and progesterone binding offers further evidence for a potential role for these steroids and their receptors in colorectal carcinoma. PMID:2266171

  3. Why Transcription Factor Binding Sites Are Ten Nucleotides Long

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alexander J.; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled primarily by transcription factors, whose DNA binding sites are typically 10 nt long. We develop a population-genetic model to understand how the length and information content of such binding sites evolve. Our analysis is based on an inherent trade-off between specificity, which is greater in long binding sites, and robustness to mutation, which is greater in short binding sites. The evolutionary stable distribution of binding site lengths predicted by the model agrees with the empirical distribution (5–31 nt, with mean 9.9 nt for eukaryotes), and it is remarkably robust to variation in the underlying parameters of population size, mutation rate, number of transcription factor targets, and strength of selection for proper binding and selection against improper binding. In a systematic data set of eukaryotic and prokaryotic transcription factors we also uncover strong relationships between the length of a binding site and its information content per nucleotide, as well as between the number of targets a transcription factor regulates and the information content in its binding sites. Our analysis explains these features as well as the remarkable conservation of binding site characteristics across diverse taxa. PMID:22887818

  4. Identification of a second substrate-binding site in solute-sodium symporters.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Lee, Ashley S E; Bracher, Susanne; Jung, Heinrich; Paz, Aviv; Kumar, Jay P; Abramson, Jeff; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-02

    The structure of the sodium/galactose transporter (vSGLT), a solute-sodium symporter (SSS) from Vibrio parahaemolyticus, shares a common structural fold with LeuT of the neurotransmitter-sodium symporter family. Structural alignments between LeuT and vSGLT reveal that the crystallographically identified galactose-binding site in vSGLT is located in a more extracellular location relative to the central substrate-binding site (S1) in LeuT. Our computational analyses suggest the existence of an additional galactose-binding site in vSGLT that aligns to the S1 site of LeuT. Radiolabeled galactose saturation binding experiments indicate that, like LeuT, vSGLT can simultaneously bind two substrate molecules under equilibrium conditions. Mutating key residues in the individual substrate-binding sites reduced the molar substrate-to-protein binding stoichiometry to ~1. In addition, the related and more experimentally tractable SSS member PutP (the Na(+)/proline transporter) also exhibits a binding stoichiometry of 2. Targeting residues in the proposed sites with mutations results in the reduction of the binding stoichiometry and is accompanied by severely impaired translocation of proline. Our data suggest that substrate transport by SSS members requires both substrate-binding sites, thereby implying that SSSs and neurotransmitter-sodium symporters share common mechanistic elements in substrate transport.

  5. Autoradiographic localization of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.D.; Springall, D.R.; Wharton, J.; Polak, J.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques and {sup 125}I-labeled endothelin-1 were used to study the distribution of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin. Specific endothelin-1 binding sites were localized to blood vessels (capillaries, deep cutaneous vascular plexus, arteries, and arterioles), the deep dermal and connective tissue sheath of hair follicles, sebaceous and sweat glands, and arrector pili muscle. Specific binding was inhibited by endothelin-2 and endothelin-3 as well as endothelin-1. Non-specific binding was found in the epidermis and the medulla of hair follicles. No binding was found in connective tissue or fat. These vascular binding sites may represent endothelin receptors, in keeping with the known cutaneous vasoconstrictor actions of the peptide. If all binding sites are receptors, the results suggest that endothelin could also regulate the function of sweat glands and may have trophic effects in the skin.

  6. Protein function annotation by local binding site surface similarity.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N

    2014-04-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against ∼60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that predated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of 12 currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins.

  7. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  8. Whole-genome cartography of estrogen receptor alpha binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Yo; Vega, Vinsensius B; Thomsen, Jane S; Zhang, Tao; Kong, Say Li; Xie, Min; Chiu, Kuo Ping; Lipovich, Leonard; Barnett, Daniel H; Stossi, Fabio; Yeo, Ailing; George, Joshy; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A; Lee, Yew Kok; Charn, Tze Howe; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Miller, Lance D; Cheung, Edwin; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Ruan, Yijun; Bourque, Guillaume; Wei, Chia-Lin; Liu, Edison T

    2007-06-01

    Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation-paired end diTag cloning and sequencing strategy, we mapped estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) binding sites in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We identified 1,234 high confidence binding clusters of which 94% are projected to be bona fide ERalpha binding regions. Only 5% of the mapped estrogen receptor binding sites are located within 5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start sites of adjacent genes, regions containing the proximal promoters, whereas vast majority of the sites are mapped to intronic or distal locations (>5 kb from 5' and 3' ends of adjacent transcript), suggesting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms over significant physical distances. Of all the identified sites, 71% harbored putative full estrogen response elements (EREs), 25% bore ERE half sites, and only 4% had no recognizable ERE sequences. Genes in the vicinity of ERalpha binding sites were enriched for regulation by estradiol in MCF-7 cells, and their expression profiles in patient samples segregate ERalpha-positive from ERalpha-negative breast tumors. The expression dynamics of the genes adjacent to ERalpha binding sites suggest a direct induction of gene expression through binding to ERE-like sequences, whereas transcriptional repression by ERalpha appears to be through indirect mechanisms. Our analysis also indicates a number of candidate transcription factor binding sites adjacent to occupied EREs at frequencies much greater than by chance, including the previously reported FOXA1 sites, and demonstrate the potential involvement of one such putative adjacent factor, Sp1, in the global regulation of ERalpha target genes. Unexpectedly, we found that only 22%-24% of the bona fide human ERalpha binding sites were overlapping conserved regions in whole genome vertebrate alignments, which suggest limited conservation of functional binding sites. Taken together, this genome-scale analysis suggests complex but definable rules governing ERalpha binding and gene

  9. Characterization of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland and median eminence of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Calvo, J.R.; Rubio, A.; Goberna, R.; Guerrero, J.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of specific melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland (HG) and median eminence (ME) of the rat was studied using ({sup 125}I)melatonin. Binding of melatonin to membrane crude preparations of both tissues was dependent on time and temperature. Thus, maximal binding was obtained at 37{degree}C after 30-60 min incubation. Binding was also dependent on protein concentration. The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)melatonin was saturable, exhibiting only the class of binding sites in both tissues. The dissociation constants (Kd) were 170 and 190 pM for ME and HG, respectively. The concentration of the binding sites in ME was 8 fmol/mg protein, and in the HG 4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, binding of ({sup 125}I)melatonin to ME or HG was inhibited by increasing concentration of native melatonin; 50% inhibition was observed at about 702 and 422 nM for ME and HG, respectively. Additionally, the ({sup 125}I)melatonin binding to the crude membranes was not affected by the addition of different drugs such as norepinephrine, isoproterenol, phenylephrine, propranolol, or prazosin. The results confirm the presence of melatonin binding sites in median eminence and show, for the first time, the existence of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland.

  10. Lipid binding to the carotenoid binding site in photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sasmit S; Tang, Kai; Kálmán, László

    2011-10-12

    Lipid binding to the carotenoid binding site near the inactive bacteriochlorophyll monomer was probed in the reaction centers of carotenoid-less mutant, R-26 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Recently, a marked light-induced change of the local dielectric constant in the vicinity of the inactive bacteriochlorophyll monomer was reported in wild type that was attributed to structural changes that ultimately lengthened the lifetime of the charge-separated state by 3 orders of magnitude (Deshmukh, S. S.; Williams, J. C.; Allen, J. P.; Kalman, L. Biochemistry 2011, 50, 340). Here in the R-26 reaction centers, the combination of light-induced structural changes and lipid binding resulted in a 5 orders of magnitude increase in the lifetime of the charge-separated state involving the oxidized dimer and the reduced primary quinone in proteoliposomes. Only saturated phospholipids with fatty acid chains of 12 and 14 carbon atoms long were bound successfully at 8 °C by cooling the reaction center protein slowly from room temperature. In addition to reporting a dramatic increase of the lifetime of the charge-separated state at physiologically relevant temperatures, this study reveals a novel lipid binding site in photosynthetic reaction center. These results shed light on a new potential application of the reaction center in energy storage as a light-driven biocapacitor since the charges separated by ∼30 Å in a low-dielectric medium can be prevented from recombination for hours.

  11. Sizes of Mn-binding sites in spinach thylakoids.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Asada, K

    1986-12-25

    The sizes of the Mn-binding sites in spinach thylakoids were estimated by target size analysis, assaying the membrane-bound Mn that was resistant to EDTA washing after radiation inactivation. The inactivation curve showed well the inactivation of two independent Mn-binding sites of different sizes: about two-thirds of the Mn coordinated to a binding site of 65 kDa, and the rest bound to a much smaller site of only about 3 kDa. In the large site, there was about 1 g atom of Mn/110 mol of chlorophyll in spinach thylakoids, which was constant in normally grown plants, although the Mn level in the small site depended on culture conditions. Thylakoids that had been incubated with hydroxylamine or in 0.8 M Tris lost Mn exclusively from the large binding site.

  12. Sizes of Mn-binding sites in spinach thylakoids

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, M.; Asada, K.

    1986-12-25

    The sizes of the Mn-binding sites in spinach thylakoids were estimated by target size analysis, assaying the membrane-bound Mn that was resistant to EDTA washing after radiation inactivation. The inactivation curve showed well the inactivation of two independent Mn-binding sites of different sizes: about two-thirds of the Mn coordinated to a binding site of 65 kDa, and the rest bound to a much smaller site of only about 3 kDa. In the large site, there was about 1 g atom of Mn/110 mol of chlorophyll in spinach thylakoids, which was constant in normally grown plants, although the Mn level in the small site depended on culture conditions. Thylakoids that had been incubated with hydroxylamine or in 0.8 M Tris lost Mn exclusively from the large binding site.

  13. Structure and localisation of drug binding sites on neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Ravna, Aina W; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Dahl, Svein G

    2009-10-01

    The dopamine (DAT), serotontin (SERT) and noradrenalin (NET) transporters are molecular targets for different classes of psychotropic drugs. The crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus LeuT(Aa) was used as a template for molecular modeling of DAT, SERT and NET, and two putative drug binding sites (pocket 1 and 2) in each transporter were identified. Cocaine was docked into binding pocket 1 of DAT, corresponding to the leucine binding site in LeuT(Aa), which involved transmembrane helices (TMHs) 1, 3, 6 and 8. Clomipramine was docked into binding pocket 2 of DAT, involving TMHs 1, 3, 6, 10 and 11, and extracellular loops 4 and 6, corresponding to the clomipramine binding site in a crystal structure of a LeuT(Aa)-clomipramine complex. The structures of the proposed cocaine- and tricyclic antidepressant-binding sites may be of particular interest for the design of novel DAT interacting ligands.

  14. Druggability of methyl-lysine binding sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, C.; Nguyen, K.; Schapira, M.

    2011-12-01

    Structural modules that specifically recognize—or read—methylated or acetylated lysine residues on histone peptides are important components of chromatin-mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms is associated with disease conditions, and antagonists of acetyl-lysine binding bromodomains are efficacious in animal models of cancer and inflammation, but little is known regarding the druggability of methyl-lysine binding modules. We conducted a systematic structural analysis of readers of methyl marks and derived a predictive druggability landscape of methyl-lysine binding modules. We show that these target classes are generally less druggable than bromodomains, but that some proteins stand as notable exceptions.

  15. Autoradiographic localization of endothelin-1 binding sites in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems

    SciTech Connect

    Power, R.F.; Wharton, J.; Zhao, Y.; Bloom, S.R.; Polak, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Specific high-affinity binding sites for endothelin-1 (ET-1) have been demonstrated in peripheral tissues using the technique of in vitro receptor autoradiography. Binding was time dependent and saturable and inhibited by coincubation with an excess of unlabeled ET-1 but resistant to dissociation. Binding sites were localized to blood vessels of all sizes including coronary arteries, intrapulmonary vessels, and intrarenal and intrasplenic arteries. In addition, high-affinity binding sites were identified on airway smooth muscle, over alveolar septa, and on nerve trunks. Scatchard analysis of the data revealed a Bmax of 250 amol/mm2 and a Kd of 0.1 nM for the binding of rat tracheal smooth muscle, with similar values for porcine coronary artery. The localization of binding sites is consistent with the known effects of ET-1 and suggests a direct action on specific receptors.

  16. Chondroitin sulfate addition to CD44H negatively regulates hyaluronan binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffell, Brian; Johnson, Pauline . E-mail: pauline@interchange.ubc.ca

    2005-08-26

    CD44 is a widely expressed cell adhesion molecule that binds hyaluronan, an extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, in a tightly regulated manner. This regulated interaction has been implicated in inflammation and tumor metastasis. CD44 exists in the standard form, CD44H, or as higher molecular mass isoforms due to alternative splicing. Here, we identify serine 180 in human CD44H as the site of chondroitin sulfate addition and show that lack of chondroitin sulfate addition at this site enhances hyaluronan binding by CD44. A CD44H-immunoglobulin fusion protein expressed in HEK293 cells, and CD44H expressed in murine L fibroblast cells were modified by chondroitin sulfate, as determined by reduced sulfate incorporation after chondroitinase ABC treatment. Mutation of serine 180 or glycine 181 in CD44H reduced chondroitin sulfate addition and increased hyaluronan binding, indicating that serine 180 is the site for chondroitin sulfate addition in CD44H and that this negatively regulates hyaluronan binding.

  17. Deformed protein binding sites and cofactor binding sites are required for the function of a small segment-specific regulatory element in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, C; Pinsonneault, J; Gellon, G; McGinnis, N; McGinnis, W

    1994-01-01

    How each of the homeotic selector proteins can regulate distinct sets of DNA target elements in embryos is not understood. Here we describe a detailed functional dissection of a small element that is specifically regulated by the Deformed homeotic protein. This 120 bp element (module E) is part of a larger 2.7 kb autoregulatory enhancer that maintains Deformed (Dfd) transcription in the epidermis of the maxillary and mandibular segments of Drosophila embryos. In vitro binding assays show that module E contains only one Dfd protein binding site. Mutations in the Dfd binding site that increase or decrease its in vitro affinity for Dfd protein generate parallel changes in the regulatory activity of module E in transgenic embryos, strong evidence that the in vitro-defined binding site is a direct target of Dfd protein in embryos. However, a monomer or multimer of the Dfd binding region alone is not sufficient to supply Dfd-dependent, segment-specific reporter gene expression. An analysis of a systematic series of clustered point mutations in module E revealed that an additional region containing an imperfect inverted repeat sequence is also required for the function of this homeotic protein response element. The Dfd binding site and the putative cofactor binding site(s) in the region of the inverted repeat are both necessary and in combination sufficient for the function of module E. Images PMID:7910795

  18. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  19. Crystal structure of equine serum albumin in complex with cetirizine reveals a novel drug binding site.

    PubMed

    Handing, Katarzyna B; Shabalin, Ivan G; Szlachta, Karol; Majorek, Karolina A; Minor, Wladek

    2016-03-01

    Serum albumin (SA) is the main transporter of drugs in mammalian blood plasma. Here, we report the first crystal structure of equine serum albumin (ESA) in complex with antihistamine drug cetirizine at a resolution of 2.1Å. Cetirizine is bound in two sites--a novel drug binding site (CBS1) and the fatty acid binding site 6 (CBS2). Both sites differ from those that have been proposed in multiple reports based on equilibrium dialysis and fluorescence studies for mammalian albumins as cetirizine binding sites. We show that the residues forming the binding pockets in ESA are highly conserved in human serum albumin (HSA), and suggest that binding of cetirizine to HSA will be similar. In support of that hypothesis, we show that the dissociation constants for cetirizine binding to CBS2 in ESA and HSA are identical using tryptophan fluorescence quenching. Presence of lysine and arginine residues that have been previously reported to undergo nonenzymatic glycosylation in CBS1 and CBS2 suggests that cetirizine transport in patients with diabetes could be altered. A review of all available SA structures from the PDB shows that in addition to the novel drug binding site we present here (CBS1), there are two pockets on SA capable of binding drugs that do not overlap with fatty acid binding sites and have not been discussed in published reviews.

  20. The number of nucleotide binding sites in cytochrome C oxidase.

    PubMed

    Rieger, T; Napiwotzki, J; Hüther, F J; Kadenbach, B

    1995-12-05

    The binding of 2'(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-adenosine-5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP), [35S]ATP alpha S and 8-azido-[gamma-32P]ATP to isolated cytochrome c oxidase of bovine heart and liver and to the two-subunit enzyme of Paracoccus dentrificans was studied by measuring the fluorescence change or bound radioactivity, respectively. With TNP-ATP three binding sites were determined at cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart and liver, both with two dissociation constants Kd of about 0.2 and 0.9 microM. Trypsin treatment of the enzyme from bovine heart, resulted in one binding site with a Kd of 0.3 microM. The two-subunit enzyme of Paracoccus dentrificans had only one binding site with a Kd of 3.6 microM. The binding of [35S]ATP alpha S to cytochrome c oxidase was studied by equilibrium dialysis. With the enzyme of bovine heart seven and the enzyme of liver six high-affinity binding sites with apparent Kd's of 7.5 and 12 microM, respectively, were obtained. The two-subunit enzyme of Paracoccus denitrificans had one binding site with a Kd of 20 microM. The large number of binding sites at cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart, mainly at nuclear coded subunits, was verified by photoaffinity labelling with 8-azido-[gamma-32P]ATP.

  1. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine.

  2. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  3. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  4. Structural signatures of antibiotic binding sites on the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    David-Eden, Hilda; Mankin, Alexander S.; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The ribosome represents a major target for antibacterial drugs. Being a complex molecular machine, it offers many potential sites for functional interference. The high-resolution structures of ribosome in complex with various antibiotics provide a unique data set for understanding the universal features of drug-binding pockets on the ribosome. In this work, we have analyzed the structural and evolutionary properties of 65 antibiotic binding sites (ABSs) in the ribosome. We compared these sites to similar-size computed pockets extracted from the small and large ribosomal subunits. Based on this analysis, we defined properties of the known drug-binding sites, which constitute the signature of a ‘druggable’ site. The most noticeable properties of the ABSs are prevalence of non-paired bases, a strong bias in favor of unusual syn conformation of the RNA bases and an unusual sugar pucker. We propose that despite the different geometric and chemical properties of diverse antibiotics, their binding sites tend to have common attributes that possibly reflect the potency of the pocket for binding small molecules. Finally, we utilized the ensemble of properties to derive a druggability index, which can be used in conjunction with site functionality information to identify new drug-binding sites on the ribosome. PMID:20494981

  5. Influence of sulfhydryl sites on metal binding by bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nell, Ryan M.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2017-02-01

    The role of sulfhydryl sites within bacterial cell envelopes is still unknown, but the sites may control the fate and bioavailability of metals. Organic sulfhydryl compounds are important complexing ligands in aqueous systems and they can influence metal speciation in natural waters. Though representing only approximately 5-10% of the total available binding sites on bacterial surfaces, sulfhydryl sites exhibit high binding affinities for some metals. Due to the potential importance of bacterial sulfhydryl sites in natural systems, metal-bacterial sulfhydryl site binding constants must be determined in order to construct accurate models of the fate and distribution of metals in these systems. To date, only Cd-sulfhydryl binding has been quantified. In this study, the thermodynamic stabilities of Mn-, Co-, Ni-, Zn-, Sr- and Pb-sulfhydryl bacterial cell envelope complexes were determined for the bacterial species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Metal adsorption experiments were conducted as a function of both pH, ranging from 5.0 to 7.0, and metal loading, from 0.5 to 40.0 μmol/g (wet weight) bacteria, in batch experiments in order to determine if metal-sulfhydryl binding occurs. Initially, the data were used to calculate the value of the stability constants for the important metal-sulfhydryl bacterial complexes for each metal-loading condition studied, assuming a single binding reaction for the dominant metal-binding site type under the pH conditions of the experiments. For most of the metals that we studied, these calculated stability constant values increased significantly with decreasing metal loading, strongly suggesting that our initial assumption was not valid and that more than one type of binding occurs at the assumed binding site. We then modeled each dataset with two distinct site types with identical acidity constants: one site with a high metal-site stability constant value, which we take to represent metal-sulfhydryl binding and which dominates under low

  6. Incorporating replacement free energy of binding-site waters in molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanzi; Zhao, Lifeng; Peng, Shiming; Huang, Niu

    2014-09-01

    Binding-site water molecules play a crucial role in protein-ligand recognition, either being displaced upon ligand binding or forming water bridges to stabilize the complex. However, rigorously treating explicit binding-site waters is challenging in molecular docking, which requires to fully sample ensembles of waters and to consider the free energy cost of replacing waters. Here, we describe a method to incorporate structural and energetic properties of binding-site waters into molecular docking. We first developed a solvent property analysis (SPA) program to compute the replacement free energies of binding-site water molecules by post-processing molecular dynamics trajectories obtained from ligand-free protein structure simulation in explicit water. Next, we implemented a distance-dependent scoring term into DOCK scoring function to take account of the water replacement free energy cost upon ligand binding. We assessed this approach in protein targets containing important binding-site waters, and we demonstrated that our approach is reliable in reproducing the crystal binding geometries of protein-ligand-water complexes, as well as moderately improving the ligand docking enrichment performance. In addition, SPA program (free available to academic users upon request) may be applied in identifying hot-spot binding-site residues and structure-based lead optimization.

  7. Conserved properties of individual Ca2+-binding sites in calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Halling, D. Brent; Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hall, Amelia W.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a Ca2+-sensing protein that is highly conserved and ubiquitous in eukaryotes. In humans it is a locus of life-threatening cardiomyopathies. The primary function of CaM is to transduce Ca2+ concentration into cellular signals by binding to a wide range of target proteins in a Ca2+-dependent manner. We do not fully understand how CaM performs its role as a high-fidelity signal transducer for more than 300 target proteins, but diversity among its four Ca2+-binding sites, called EF-hands, may contribute to CaM’s functional versatility. We therefore looked at the conservation of CaM sequences over deep evolutionary time, focusing primarily on the four EF-hand motifs. Expanding on previous work, we found that CaM evolves slowly but that its evolutionary rate is substantially faster in fungi. We also found that the four EF-hands have distinguishing biophysical and structural properties that span eukaryotes. These results suggest that all eukaryotes require CaM to decode Ca2+ signals using four specialized EF-hands, each with specific, conserved traits. In addition, we provide an extensive map of sites associated with target proteins and with human disease and correlate these with evolutionary sequence diversity. Our comprehensive evolutionary analysis provides a basis for understanding the sequence space associated with CaM function and should help guide future work on the relationship between structure, function, and disease. PMID:26884197

  8. Localization of gonadotropin binding sites in human ovarian neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, R.; Kitayama, S.; Yamoto, M.; Shima, K.; Ooshima, A. )

    1989-10-01

    The binding of human luteinizing hormone and human follicle-stimulating hormone to ovarian tumor biopsy specimens from 29 patients was analyzed. The binding sites for human luteinizing hormone were demonstrated in one tumor of epithelial origin (mucinous cystadenoma) and in one of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor). The binding sites for human follicle-stimulating hormone were found in three tumors of epithelial origin (serous cystadenoma and mucinous cystadenoma) and in two of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor and theca-granulosa cell tumor). The surface-binding autoradiographic study revealed that the binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the stromal tissue. The results suggest that gonadotropic hormones may play a role in the growth and differentiation of a certain type of human ovarian neoplasms.

  9. Autoradiographic localization of relaxin binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Osheroff, P.L.; Phillips, H.S. )

    1991-08-01

    Relaxin is a member of the insulin family of polypeptide hormones and exerts its best understood actions in the mammalian reproductive system. Using a biologically active 32P-labeled human relaxin, the authors have previously shown by in vitro autoradiography specific relaxin binding sites in rat uterus, cervix, and brain tissues. Using the same approach, they describe here a detailed localization of human relaxin binding sites in the rat brain. Displaceable relaxin binding sites are distributed in discrete regions of the olfactory system, neocortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, midbrain, and medulla of the male and female rat brain. Characterization of the relaxin binding sites in the subfornical organ and neocortex reveals a single class of high-affinity sites (Kd = 1.4 nM) in both regions. The binding of relaxin to two of the circumventricular organs (subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis) and the neurosecretory magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei) provides the anatomical and biochemical basis for emerging physiological evidence suggesting a central role for relaxin in the control of blood pressure and hormone release. They conclude that specific, high-affinity relaxin binding sites are present in discrete regions of the rat brain and that the distribution of some of these sites may be consistent with a role for relaxin in control of vascular volume and blood pressure.

  10. Immunomodulatory role of melatonin: specific binding sites in human and rodent lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Calvo, J R; Rafii-el-Idrissi, M; Pozo, D; Guerrero, J M

    1995-04-01

    This paper reviews the evidence that supports the hypothesis of the existence of specific binding sites for melatonin on immune cells. These binding sites have been described in human blood lymphocytes and granulocytes, and thymus, spleen, and bursa of Fabricius from different rodents and birds. The dissociation constant values of these binding sites are in the 0.1-1 nM range, suggesting that melatonin may play a physiological role in lymphocyte regulation. Moreover, melatonin binding sites appear to be modulated by guanine nucleotides. Therefore, in addition to other mechanisms described for the regulation of immune function by melatonin, a direct mechanism of regulation can be involved via binding of melatonin by immunocompetent cells.

  11. Identification, characterization, and developmental regulation of embryonic benzodiazepine binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, L.A.; Gibbs, T.T.; Farb, D.H.

    1987-06-01

    We report the identification and characterization of 2 classes of benzodiazepine binding sites in the embryonic chick CNS. Binding was examined by competition and saturation binding experiments, using as radioligands /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, a classical benzodiazepine anxiolytic, and /sup 3/H-Ro5-4864, a convulsant benzodiazepine. The results demonstrate that high-affinity (KD = 2.3 nM) /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding sites (site-A) are present by embryonic day 5 (Hamburger and Hamilton stage 27) and increase throughout development (Bmax = 0.3 and 1.3 pmol/mg protein in 7 and 20 d brain membranes, respectively). When 7 or 20 d brain membranes are photoaffinity-labeled with /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam and ultraviolet light, the radioactivity migrates as 2 bands on SDS-PAGE, consistent with Mrs of 48,000 and 51,000. GABA potentiates /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding at both 7 and 20 d of development, indicating that site-A is coupled to receptors for GABA early in development. Importantly, we have also identified a novel site (site-B) that binds classical benzodiazepine agonists with low affinity (micromolar) but displays high affinity for Ro5-4864 (KD = 41 nM). Site-B displays characteristics expected for a functional receptor, including stereospecificity and sensitivity to inactivation by heat and protease treatment. Saturation binding studies employing /sup 3/H-Ro5-4864 indicate that the levels of site-B are similar in 7 and 20 d brain (ca. 2.5 pmol/mg protein). The function of site-B is not known, but its preponderance in 7 d brain, relative to site-A, suggests that it might be important during early embryonic development.

  12. Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5;-Phosphosulfate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-08-31

    Adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3{prime}-phosphate 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis.

  13. Development of cholecystokinin binding sites in rat upper gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, P.H.; Moran, T.H.; Goldrich, M.; McHugh, P.R.

    1987-04-01

    Autoradiography using /sup 125/I-labeled Bolton Hunter-CCK-33 was used to study the distribution of cholecystokinin binding sites at different stages of development in the rat upper gastrointestinal tract. Cholecystokinin (CCK) binding was present in the distal stomach, esophagus, and gastroduodenal junction in the rat fetus of gestational age of 17 days. In the 20-day fetus, specific binding was found in the gastric mucosa, antral circular muscle, and pyloric sphincter. Mucosal binding declined during postnatal development and had disappeared by day 15. Antral binding declined sharply between day 10 and day 15 and disappeared by day 50. Pyloric muscle binding was present in fetal stomach and persisted in the adult. Pancreatic CCK binding was not observed before day 10. These results suggest that CCK may have a role in the control of gastric emptying and ingestive behavior in the neonatal rat.

  14. Multi-site substrate binding and interplay in barley alpha-amylase 1.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Munch; Seo, Eun-Seong; Bozonnet, Sophie; Aghajari, Nushin; Robert, Xavier; Haser, Richard; Svensson, Birte

    2008-07-23

    Certain starch hydrolases possess secondary carbohydrate binding sites outside of the active site, suggesting that multi-site substrate interactions are functionally significant. In barley alpha-amylase both Tyr380, situated on a remote non-catalytic domain, and Tyr105 in subsite -6 of the active site cleft are principal carbohydrate binding residues. The dual active site/secondary site mutants Y105A/Y380A and Y105A/Y380M show that each of Tyr380 and Tyr105 is important, albeit not essential for binding, degradation, and multiple attack on polysaccharides, while Tyr105 predominates in oligosaccharide hydrolysis. Additional delicate structure/function relationships of the secondary site are uncovered using Y380A/H395A, Y380A, and H395A AMY1 mutants.

  15. Transcription Factor Binding Site Positioning in Yeast: Proximal Promoter Motifs Characterize TATA-Less Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of ‘proximal promoter motifs’ (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters. PMID:21931670

  16. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    PubMed

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  17. Genome wide features, distribution and correlations of NF-Y binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zambelli, Federico; Pavesi, Giulio

    2016-10-18

    NF-Y is a trimeric transcription factor that binds on DNA the CCAAT-box motif. In this article we reviewed and complemented with additional bioinformatic analysis existing data on genome-wide NF-Y binding characterization in human, reaching the following main conclusions: (1) about half of NF-Y binding sites are located at promoters, about 60-80 base pairs from transcription start sites; NF-Y binding to distal genomic regions takes place at inactive chromatin loci and/or DNA repetitive elements more often than active enhancers; (2) on almost half of its binding sites, regardless of their genomic localization (promoters or distal regions), NF-Y finds on DNA more than one CCAAT-box, and most of those multiple CCAAT binding loci present precise spacing and organization of the elements composing them; (3) there exists a well defined class of transcription factors that show genome-wide co-localization with NF-Y. Some of them lack their canonical binding site in binding regions overlapping with NF-Y, hence hinting at NF-Y mediated recruitment, while others show a precise positioning on DNA of their binding sites with respect to the CCAAT box bound by NF-Y. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear Factor Y in Development and Disease, edited by Prof. Roberto Mantovani.

  18. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Javier; Ruiz-Herrero, Teresa; Scholes, Clarissa; Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/.

  19. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Clarissa; Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/. PMID:26987123

  20. Cation binding site of cytochrome c oxidase: progress report.

    PubMed

    Vygodina, Tatiana V; Kirichenko, Anna; Konstantinov, Alexander A

    2014-07-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart binds Ca(2+) reversibly at a specific Cation Binding Site located near the outer face of the mitochondrial membrane. Ca(2+) shifts the absorption spectrum of heme a, which allowed earlier the determination of the kinetic and equilibrium characteristics of the binding, and, as shown recently, the binding of calcium to the site inhibits cytochrome oxidase activity at low turnover rates of the enzyme [Vygodina, Т., Kirichenko, A., Konstantinov, A.A (2013). Direct Regulation of Cytochrome c Oxidase by Calcium Ions. PloS ONE 8, e74436]. This paper summarizes further progress in the studies of the Cation Binding Site in this group presenting the results to be reported at 18th EBEC Meeting in Lisbon, 2014. The paper revises specificity of the bovine oxidase Cation Binding Site for different cations, describes dependence of the Ca(2+)-induced inhibition on turnover rate of the enzyme and reports very high affinity binding of calcium with the "slow" form of cytochrome oxidase. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Guest Editors: Manuela Pereira and Miguel Teixeira.

  1. Mg NMR in DNA solutions: Dominance of site binding effects.

    PubMed

    Rose, D M; Bleam, M L; Record, M T; Bryant, R G

    1980-11-01

    (25)Mg NMR spectroscopy is applied to a study of magnesium ion interactions with DNA, which is considered as a model for a linear polyelectrolyte. It is demonstrated that the magnesium ion spectrum is complicated by a non-Lorent-zian line shape and is dominated by the effects of chemical exchange with macromolecule binding sites. A distinction is made between specific-site interactions in which the magnesium ion loses a water molecule from the first coordination sphere on binding and those interactions, referred to as territorial binding, in which the ion maintains its first coordination sphere complement of solvent. The first type of site-binding interactions are shown to dominate the magnesium ion NMR spectrum, based on a consideration of the magnitudes of the observed (25)Mg relaxation rates compared with (23)Na relaxation rates, the clear contributions of chemical exchange-limited relaxation, and an ion displacement experiment employing sodium.

  2. SiteLight: binding-site prediction using phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Inbal; Wolfson, Haim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2003-07-01

    Phage display enables the presentation of a large number of peptides on the surface of phage particles. Such libraries can be tested for binding to target molecules of interest by means of affinity selection. Here we present SiteLight, a novel computational tool for binding site prediction using phage display libraries. SiteLight is an algorithm that maps the 1D peptide library onto a three-dimensional (3D) protein surface. It is applicable to complexes made up of a protein Template and any type of molecule termed Target. Given the three-dimensional structure of a Template and a collection of sequences derived from biopanning against the Target, the Template interaction site with the Target is predicted. We have created a large diverse data set for assessing the ability of SiteLight to correctly predict binding sites. SiteLight predictive mapping enables discrimination between the binding and nonbinding parts of the surface. This prediction can be used to effectively reduce the surface by 75% without excluding the binding site. In 63% of the cases we have tested, there is at least one binding site prediction that overlaps the interface by at least 50%. These results suggest the applicability of phage display libraries for automated binding site prediction on three-dimensional structures. For most effective binding site prediction we propose using a random phage display library twice, to scan both binding partners of a given complex. The derived peptides are mapped to the other binding partner (now used as a Template). Here, the surface of each partner is reduced by 75%, focusing their relative positions with respect to each other significantly. Such information can be utilized to improve docking algorithms and scoring functions.

  3. Chloramphenicol binding to human serum albumin: Determination of binding constants and binding sites by steady-state fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fei; Zhao, Guangyu; Chen, Shoucong; Liu, Feng; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Li

    2009-07-01

    The interaction between chloramphenicol and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by fluorescence, UV/vis, circular dichroism (CD) and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of HSA by chloramphenicol was the result of the formation of drug-HSA complex, and the effective quenching constants ( Ka) were 2.852 × 10 4, 2.765 × 10 4, 2.638 × 10 4 and 2.542 × 10 4 M -1 at 287, 295, 303 and 311 K, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (Δ H) and entropy change (Δ S) for the reaction were calculated to be -3.634 kJ mol -1 and 72.66 J mol -1 K -1 according to van't Hoff equation. The results indicated that the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions played a major role in the binding of drug to HSA. The distance r between donor and acceptor was obtained to be 3.63 nm according to Förster's theory. Site marker competitive experiments indicated that the binding of drug to HSA primarily took place in subdomain IIA. The alterations of HSA secondary structure in the presence of chloramphenicol were confirmed by the evidences from synchronous fluorescence, CD and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra. In addition, the effect of common ions on the binding constants of drug-HSA complex was also discussed.

  4. Characterisation of imidazoline I2 binding sites in pig brain.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Neil J; Lupo, Patrick A; Nutt, David J; Hudson, Alan L; Robinson, Emma S J

    2005-09-05

    The imidazoline I2 binding sites in the central nervous system have previously been described in several different species including rat, mouse, rabbit and frog. The present study has investigated the imidazoline I2 binding site, and its relationship to the monoamine oxidase isoforms, in pig whole brain and compared the results obtained with data from other species. Results from saturation binding studies revealed that the imidazoline I2-selective ligand, [3H]2BFI (2-(2-benzofuranyl)-2-imidazoline) labelled a single saturable population of sites with a KD=6.6 nM and Bmax=771.7 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological characterisation of the sites was similar to that previously reported with a rank order of potency for the imidazoline I2 ligands of 2BFI>BU224>Idazoxan>BU226. Displacement by the imidazoline I1 ligands was low affinity and the monoamine oxidase inhibitors displaced with micromolar affinity. The majority of compounds displaced the binding in a monophasic manner, however, displacement by the putative endogenous ligand, harmane was biphasic. The relative populations of the two monoamine oxidase isoforms revealed a 10 fold greater expression of monoamine oxidase B relative to monoamine oxidase A. These data confirm the presence of imidazoline I2 binding sites in pig brain and show that their pharmacology is characteristic of that seen in other species. The proportion of monoamine oxidase A and B expressed in the pig brain is similar to that seen in the human brain therefore, given the association between imidazoline I2 binding sites and monoamine oxidase, the pig may provide a more useful model for human imidazoline I2 binding sites than other species such as the rat.

  5. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus SarA binding sites.

    PubMed

    Sterba, Kristen M; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Blevins, Jon S; Hurlburt, Barry K; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2003-08-01

    The staphylococcal accessory regulator locus (sarA) encodes a DNA-binding protein (SarA) that modulates expression of over 100 genes. Whether this occurs via a direct interaction between SarA and cis elements associated with its target genes is unclear, partly because the definitive characteristics of a SarA binding site have not been identified. In this work, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) were used to identify a SarA binding site(s) upstream of the SarA-regulated gene cna. The results suggest the existence of multiple high-affinity binding sites within the cna promoter region. Using a SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) procedure and purified, recombinant SarA, we also selected DNA targets that contain a high-affinity SarA binding site from a random pool of DNA fragments. These fragments were subsequently cloned and sequenced. Randomly chosen clones were also examined by EMSA. These DNA fragments bound SarA with affinities comparable to those of recognized SarA-regulated genes, including cna, fnbA, and sspA. The composition of SarA-selected DNAs was AT rich, which is consistent with the nucleotide composition of the Staphylococcus aureus genome. Alignment of selected DNAs revealed a 7-bp consensus (ATTTTAT) that was present with no more than one mismatch in 46 of 56 sequenced clones. By using the same criteria, consensus binding sites were also identified upstream of the S. aureus genes spa, fnbA, sspA, agr, hla, and cna. With the exception of cna, which has not been previously examined, this 7-bp motif was within the putative SarA binding site previously associated with each gene.

  6. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  7. Modeling lanthanide series binding sites on humic acid.

    PubMed

    Pourret, Olivier; Martinez, Raul E

    2009-02-01

    Lanthanide (Ln) binding to humic acid (HA) has been investigated by combining ultrafiltration and ICP-MS techniques. A Langmuir-sorption-isotherm metal-complexation model was used in conjunction with a linear programming method (LPM) to fit experimental data representing various experimental conditions both in HA/Ln ratio (varying between 5 and 20) and in pH range (from 2 to 10) with an ionic strength of 10(-3) mol L(-1). The LPM approach, not requiring prior knowledge of surface complexation parameters, was used to solve the existing discrepancies in LnHA binding constants and site densities. The application of the LPM to experimental data revealed the presence of two discrete metal binding sites at low humic acid concentrations (5 mg L(-1)), with log metal complexation constants (logK(S,j)) of 2.65+/-0.05 and 7.00 (depending on Ln). The corresponding site densities were 2.71+/-0.57x10(-8) and 0.58+/-0.32x10(-8) mol of Ln(3+)/mg of HA (depending on Ln). Total site densities of 3.28+/-0.28x10(-8), 4.99+/-0.02x10(-8), and 5.01+/-0.01x10(-8) mol mg(-1) were obtained by LPM for humic acid, for humic acid concentrations of 5, 10, and 20 mg L(-1), respectively. These results confirm that lanthanide binding occurs mainly at weak sites (i.e., ca. 80%) and second at strong sites (i.e., ca. 20%). The first group of discrete metal binding sites may be attributed to carboxylic groups (known to be the main binding sites of Ln in HA), and the second metal binding group to phenolic moieties. Moreover, this study evidences heterogeneity in the distribution of the binding sites among Ln. Eventually, the LPM approach produced feasible and reasonable results, but it was less sensitive to error and did not require an a priori assumption of the number and concentration of binding sites.

  8. Site Preference of Ternary Alloying Additions to AuTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of the site substitution behavior of several alloying additions, namely. Na, Mg, Al, Si. Sc, V, Cr, Mn. Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr. Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt in B2 TiAu is reported. The 30 elements can be grouped according to their absolute preference for a specific site, regardless of concentration, or preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice. Results of large scale simulations are also presented, distinguishing between additions that remain in solution from those that precipitate a second phase.

  9. Impact of germline and somatic missense variations on drug binding sites.

    PubMed

    Yan, C; Pattabiraman, N; Goecks, J; Lam, P; Nayak, A; Pan, Y; Torcivia-Rodriguez, J; Voskanian, A; Wan, Q; Mazumder, R

    2017-03-01

    Advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are generating a vast amount of data. This exacerbates the current challenge of translating NGS data into actionable clinical interpretations. We have comprehensively combined germline and somatic nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs) that affect drug binding sites in order to investigate their prevalence. The integrated data thus generated in conjunction with exome or whole-genome sequencing can be used to identify patients who may not respond to a specific drug because of alterations in drug binding efficacy due to nsSNVs in the target protein's gene. To identify the nsSNVs that may affect drug binding, protein-drug complex structures were retrieved from Protein Data Bank (PDB) followed by identification of amino acids in the protein-drug binding sites using an occluded surface method. Then, the germline and somatic mutations were mapped to these amino acids to identify which of these alter protein-drug binding sites. Using this method we identified 12 993 amino acid-drug binding sites across 253 unique proteins bound to 235 unique drugs. The integration of amino acid-drug binding sites data with both germline and somatic nsSNVs data sets revealed 3133 nsSNVs affecting amino acid-drug binding sites. In addition, a comprehensive drug target discovery was conducted based on protein structure similarity and conservation of amino acid-drug binding sites. Using this method, 81 paralogs were identified that could serve as alternative drug targets. In addition, non-human mammalian proteins bound to drugs were used to identify 142 homologs in humans that can potentially bind to drugs. In the current protein-drug pairs that contain somatic mutations within their binding site, we identified 85 proteins with significant differential gene expression changes associated with specific cancer types. Information on protein-drug binding predicted drug target proteins and prevalence of both somatic and

  10. 20. Photographic copy of an asconstructed site plan for additions ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photographic copy of an as-constructed site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. A(8-1), Military Construction, Materiel Command Flight Test Base, Muroc, California; Additional Construction, Location Plan, Sheet No. 2, October 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. Gaussian mapping of chemical fragments in ligand binding sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Murcia, Marta; Constans, Pere; Pérez, Carlos; Ortiz, Angel R.

    2004-02-01

    We present a new approach to automatically define a quasi-optimal minimal set of pharmacophoric points mapping the interaction properties of a user-defined ligand binding site. The method is based on a fitting algorithm where a grid of sampled interaction energies of the target protein with small chemical fragments in the binding site is approximated by a linear expansion of Gaussian functions. A heuristic approximation selects from this expansion the smallest possible set of Gaussians required to describe the interaction properties of the binding site within a prespecified accuracy. We have evaluated the performance of the approach by comparing the computed Gaussians with the positions of aromatic sites found in experimental protein-ligand complexes. For a set of 53 complexes, good correspondence is found in general. At a 95% significance level, ˜65% of the predicted interaction points have an aromatic binding site within 1.5 Å. We then studied the utility of these points in docking using the program DOCK. Short docking times, with an average of ˜0.18 s per conformer, are obtained, while retaining, both for rigid and flexible docking, the ability to sample native-like binding modes for the ligand. An average 4-5-fold speed-up in docking times and a similar success rate is estimated with respect to the standard DOCK protocol. Abbreviations: RMSD - root mean square deviation; ASA - Atomic Shell Approximation; LSF - Least-Squares Fitting; 3D - three-dimensional; VDW - Van der Waals.

  12. Identification of an imidazoline binding protein: Creatine kinase and an imidazoline-2 binding site

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Atsuko; Tyacke, Robin J.; Robinson, James J.; Husbands, Stephen M.; Minchin, Michael C.W.; Nutt, David J.; Hudson, Alan L.

    2009-01-01

    Drugs that bind to imidazoline binding proteins have major physiological actions. To date, three subtypes of such proteins, I1, I2 and I3, have been proposed, although characterisations of these binding proteins are lacking. I2 binding sites are found throughout the brain, particularly dense in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Selective I2 ligands demonstrate antidepressant-like activity and the identity of the proteins that respond to such ligands remained unknown until now. Here we report the isolation of a ∼ 45 kDa imidazoline binding protein from rabbit and rat brain using a high affinity ligand for the I2 subtype, 2-BFI, to generate an affinity column. Following protein sequencing of the isolated ∼ 45 kDa imidazoline binding protein, we identified it to be brain creatine kinase (B-CK). B-CK shows high binding capacity to selective I2 ligands; [3H]-2-BFI (5 nM) specifically bound to B-CK (2330 ± 815 fmol mg protein− 1). We predicted an I2 binding pocket near the active site of B-CK using molecular modelling. Furthermore, B-CK activity was inhibited by a selective I2 irreversible ligand, where 20 μM BU99006 reduced the enzyme activity by 16%, confirming the interaction between B-CK and the I2 ligand. In summary, we have identified B-CK to be the ∼ 45 kDa imidazoline binding protein and we have demonstrated the existence of an I2 binding site within this enzyme. The importance of B-CK in regulating neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release may well explain the various actions of I2 ligands in brain and the alterations in densities of I2 binding sites in psychiatric disorders. PMID:19410564

  13. Penicillin-binding site on the Escherichia coli cell envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, L.; Lee, Y.; Schwarz, U.; Lorian, V.

    1986-08-01

    The binding of /sup 35/S-labeled penicillin to distinct penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of the cell envelope obtained from the sonication of Escherichia coli was studied at different pHs ranging from 4 to 11. Experiments distinguishing the effect of pH on penicillin binding by PBP 5/6 from its effect on beta-lactamase activity indicated that although substantial binding occurred at the lowest pH, the amount of binding increased with pH, reaching a maximum at pH 10. Based on earlier studies, it is proposed that the binding at high pH involves the formation of a covalent bond between the C-7 of penicillin and free epsilon amino groups of the PBPs. At pHs ranging from 4 to 8, position 1 of penicillin, occupied by sulfur, is considered to be the site that establishes a covalent bond with the sulfhydryl groups of PBP 5. The use of specific blockers of free epsilon amino groups or sulfhydryl groups indicated that wherever the presence of each had little or no effect on the binding of penicillin by PBP 5, the presence of both completely prevented binding. The specific blocker of the hydroxyl group of serine did not affect the binding of penicillin.

  14. ConBind: motif-aware cross-species alignment for the identification of functional transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveld, Stefan H.; Schütte, Judith; Dijkstra, Maurits J.J.; Bawono, Punto; Kinston, Sarah J.; Göttgens, Berthold; Heringa, Jaap; Bonzanni, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is regulated by transcription factors (TFs) binding to promoter as well as distal enhancers. TFs recognize short, but specific binding sites (TFBSs) that are located within the promoter and enhancer regions. Functionally relevant TFBSs are often highly conserved during evolution leaving a strong phylogenetic signal. While multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a potent tool to detect the phylogenetic signal, the current MSA implementations are optimized to align the maximum number of identical nucleotides. This approach might result in the omission of conserved motifs that contain interchangeable nucleotides such as the ETS motif (IUPAC code: GGAW). Here, we introduce ConBind, a novel method to enhance alignment of short motifs, even if their mutual sequence similarity is only partial. ConBind improves the identification of conserved TFBSs by improving the alignment accuracy of TFBS families within orthologous DNA sequences. Functional validation of the Gfi1b + 13 enhancer reveals that ConBind identifies additional functionally important ETS binding sites that were missed by all other tested alignment tools. In addition to the analysis of known regulatory regions, our web tool is useful for the analysis of TFBSs on so far unknown DNA regions identified through ChIP-sequencing. PMID:26721389

  15. Threading polyintercalators with extremely slow dissociation rates and extended DNA binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amy Rhoden; Iverson, Brent L.

    2013-01-01

    The development of small molecules that bind DNA sequence specifically has the potential to modulate gene expression in a general way. One mode of DNA binding is intercalation, or the insertion of molecules between DNA base pairs. We have developed a modular polyintercalation system in which intercalating naphthalene diimide (NDI) units are connected by flexible linkers that alternate between the minor and major grooves of DNA when bound. We recently reported a threading tetraintercalator with a dissociation half-life of 16 days, the longest reported to date, from its preferred 14 bp binding site. Herein, three new tetraintercalator derivatives were synthesized with one, two, and three additional methylene units in the central major groove-binding linker. These molecules displayed dissociation half-lives of 57, 27, and 18 days, respectively, from the 14 bp site. The optimal major groove-binding linker was used in the design of an NDI hexaintercalator that was analyzed by gel-shift assays, DNase I footprinting, and UV-visible spectroscopy. The hexaintercalator bound its entire 22 bp binding site, the longest reported specific binding site for a synthetic, non-nucleic acid based DNA binding molecule, but with a significantly faster dissociation rate compared to the tetraintercalators. PMID:23919778

  16. Evidence for chemoreceptors with bimodular ligand-binding regions harboring two signal-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Molina, Estela; Reyes-Darias, José-Antonio; Lacal, Jesús; Ramos, Juan L.; García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Gavira, Jose A.; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemoreceptor-based signaling is a central mechanism in bacterial signal transduction. Receptors are classified according to the size of their ligand-binding region. The well-studied cluster I proteins have a 100- to 150-residue ligand-binding region that contains a single site for chemoattractant recognition. Cluster II receptors, which contain a 220- to 300-residue ligand-binding region and which are almost as abundant as cluster I receptors, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report high-resolution structures of the ligand-binding region of the cluster II McpS chemotaxis receptor (McpS-LBR) of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 in complex with different chemoattractants. The structure of McpS-LBR represents a small-molecule binding domain composed of two modules, each able to bind different signal molecules. Malate and succinate were found to bind to the membrane-proximal module, whereas acetate binds to the membrane-distal module. A structural alignment of the two modules revealed that the ligand-binding sites could be superimposed and that amino acids involved in ligand recognition are conserved in both binding sites. Ligand binding to both modules was shown to trigger chemotactic responses. Further analysis showed that McpS-like receptors were found in different classes of proteobacteria, indicating that this mode of response to different carbon sources may be universally distributed. The physiological relevance of the McpS architecture may lie in its capacity to respond with high sensitivity to the preferred carbon sources malate and succinate and, at the same time, mediate lower sensitivity responses to the less preferred but very abundant carbon source acetate. PMID:23112148

  17. Relations between high-affinity binding sites of markers for binding regions on human serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Kragh-Hansen, U

    1985-01-01

    Binding of warfarin, digitoxin, diazepam, salicylate and Phenol Red, individually or in different pair combinations, to defatted human serum albumin at ligand/protein molar ratios less than 1:1 was studied at pH 7.0. The binding was determined by ultrafiltration. Some of the experiments were repeated with the use of equilibrium dialysis in order to strengthen the results. Irrespective of the method used, all ligands bind to one high-affinity binding site with an association constant in the range 10(4)-10(6) M-1. High-affinity binding of the following pair of ligands took place independently: warfarin-Phenol Red, warfarin-diazepam, warfarin-digitoxin and digitoxin-diazepam. Simultaneous binding of warfarin and salicylate led to a mutual decrease in binding of one another, as did simultaneous binding of digitoxin and Phenol Red. Both effects could be accounted for by a coupling constant. The coupling constant is the factor by which the primary association constants are affected; in these examples of anti-co-operativity the factor has a value between 0 and 1. In the first example it was calculated to be 0.8 and in the latter 0.5. Finally, digitoxin and salicylate were found to compete for a common high-affinity binding site. The present findings support the proposal of four separate primary binding sites for warfarin, digitoxin (and salicylate), diazepam and Phenol Red. An attempt to correlate this partial binding model for serum albumin with other models in the literature is made. PMID:3977850

  18. Synthetic human serum albumin Sudlow I binding site mimics.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Björn C G; Rosengren, Annika M; Näslund, Inga; Andersson, Per Ola; Nicholls, Ian A

    2010-11-25

    Here, we report the design, synthesis, and characterization of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) derived mimics of the human serum albumin (HSA) Sudlow I site-the binding site for the anticoagulant warfarin. MIP design was based upon a combination of experimental ((1)H NMR) and computational (molecular dynamics) methods. Two MIPs and corresponding nonimprinted reference polymers were synthesized and characterized (scanning electron microscopy; nitrogen sorption; and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). MIP-ligand recognition was examined using radioligand binding studies, where the largest number of selective sites was found in a warfarin-imprinted methacrylic acid-ethylene dimethacrylate copolymer (MAA-MIP). The warfarin selectivity of this MIP was confirmed using radioligand displacement and zonal chromatographic studies. A direct comparison of MIP-warfarin binding characteristics with those of the HSA Sudlow I binding site was made, and similarities in site population (per gram polymer or protein) and affinities were observed. The warfarin selectivity of the MIP suggests its potential for use as a recognition element in a MIP-based warfarin sensor and even as a model to aid in understanding and steering blood-plasma protein-regulated transport processes or even for the development of warfarin sensors.

  19. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jay M; Cura, Anthony J; Lloyd, Kenneth P; Carruthers, Anthony

    2015-05-15

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites-the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis.

  20. MicroRNA binding sites in C. elegans 3' UTRs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaochun; Rennie, William A; Mallick, Bibekanand; Kanoria, Shaveta; Long, Dang; Wolenc, Adam; Carmack, C Steven; Ding, Ye

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Since the discovery of lin-4, the founding member of the miRNA family, over 360 miRNAs have been identified for Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Prediction and validation of targets are essential for elucidation of regulatory functions of these miRNAs. For C. elegans, crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP) has been successfully performed for the identification of target mRNA sequences bound by Argonaute protein ALG-1. In addition, reliable annotation of the 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs) as well as developmental stage-specific expression profiles for both miRNAs and 3' UTR isoforms are available. By utilizing these data, we developed statistical models and bioinformatics tools for both transcriptome-scale and developmental stage-specific predictions of miRNA binding sites in C. elegans 3' UTRs. In performance evaluation via cross validation on the ALG-1 CLIP data, the models were found to offer major improvements over established algorithms for predicting both seed sites and seedless sites. In particular, our top-ranked predictions have a substantially higher true positive rate, suggesting a much higher likelihood of positive experimental validation. A gene ontology analysis of stage-specific predictions suggests that miRNAs are involved in dynamic regulation of biological functions during C. elegans development. In particular, miRNAs preferentially target genes related to development, cell cycle, trafficking, and cell signaling processes. A database for both transcriptome-scale and stage-specific predictions and software for implementing the prediction models are available through the Sfold web server at http://sfold.wadsworth.org.

  1. Dynamic coupling of regulated binding sites and cycling myosin heads in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2014-03-01

    In an activated muscle, binding sites on the thin filament and myosin heads switch frequently between different states. Because the status of the binding sites influences the status of the heads, and vice versa, the binding sites and myosin heads are dynamically coupled. The functional consequences of this coupling were investigated using MyoSim, a new computer model of muscle. MyoSim extends existing models based on Huxley-type distribution techniques by incorporating Ca(2+) activation and cooperative effects. It can also simulate arbitrary cross-bridge schemes set by the researcher. Initial calculations investigated the effects of altering the relative speeds of binding-site and cross-bridge kinetics, and of manipulating cooperative processes. Subsequent tests fitted simulated force records to experimental data recorded using permeabilized myocardial preparations. These calculations suggest that the rate of force development at maximum activation is limited by myosin cycling kinetics, whereas the rate at lower levels of activation is limited by how quickly binding sites become available. Additional tests investigated the behavior of transiently activated cells by driving simulations with experimentally recorded Ca(2+) signals. The unloaded shortening profile of a twitching myocyte could be reproduced using a model with two myosin states, cooperative activation, and strain-dependent kinetics. Collectively, these results demonstrate that dynamic coupling of binding sites and myosin heads is important for contractile function.

  2. Effect of cysteamine on cytosolic somatostatin binding sites in rabbit duodenal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Guijarro, L.; Lopez-Ruiz, M.P.; Bodegas, G.; Prieto, J.C.; Arilla, E.

    1987-04-01

    Administration of cysteamine in rabbits elicited a rapid depletion of both duodenal mucosa and plasma somatostatin. A significant reduction was observed within 5 min, returning toward control values by 150 min. The depletion of somatostatin was associated with an increase in the binding capacity and a decrease in the affinity of both high- and low-affinity binding sites present in cytosol of duodenal mucosa. Incubation of cytosolic fraction from control rabbits with 1 mM cysteamine did not modify somatostatin binding. Furthermore, addition of cysteamine at the time of binding assay did not affect the integrity of /sup 125/I-Tyr11-somatostatin. It is concluded that in vivo administration of cysteamine to rabbits depletes both duodenal mucosa and plasma somatostatin and leads to up-regulation of duodenal somatostatin binding sites.

  3. 19. Photographic copy of an asconstructed site plan for additions ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photographic copy of an as-constructed site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. Muroc A(511), Military Construction, Third District Region, San Bernardino, California; Muroc Bombing Range, Muroc Lake, Calif; Additional Temporary Construction, Materiel Center Flight Test Base, Location Grading & Paving Plan, Sheet No. 1 of 21, March 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. 18. Photographic copy of site plan for additions to North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photographic copy of site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. Muroc A(511), Military Construction, Third District Region, San Bernardino, California; Muroc Bombing Range, Muroc Lake, Calif; Additional Temporary Construction, Materiel Center Flight Test Base, Location Plan, February 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. IMPORTANCE We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. PMID:26764003

  6. Curcumin recognizes a unique binding site of tubulin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Soumyananda; Das, Lalita; Kapoor, Neha; Das, Amlan; Dwivedi, Vishnu; Poddar, Asim; Chakraborti, Gopal; Janik, Mark; Basu, Gautam; Panda, Dulal; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Surolia, Avadhesha; Bhattacharyya, Bhabatarak

    2011-09-22

    Although curcumin is known for its anticarcinogenic properties, the exact mechanism of its action or the identity of the target receptor is not completely understood. Studies on a series of curcumin analogues, synthesized to investigate their tubulin binding affinities and tubulin self-assembly inhibition, showed that: (i) curcumin acts as a bifunctional ligand, (ii) analogues with substitution at the diketone and acetylation of the terminal phenolic groups of curcumin are less effective, (iii) a benzylidiene derivative, compound 7, is more effective than curcumin in inhibiting tubulin self-assembly. Cell-based studies also showed compound 7 to be more effective than curcumin. Using fluorescence spectroscopy we show that curcumin binds tubulin 32 Å away from the colchicine-binding site. Docking studies also suggests that the curcumin-binding site to be close to the vinblastine-binding site. Structure-activity studies suggest that the tridented nature of compound 7 is responsible for its higher affinity for tubulin compared to curcumin.

  7. Specific binding sites for muramyl peptides on murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.H.S.; Krueger, J.M.; Karnovsky, M.L.

    1986-03-15

    Two radiolabeled (/sup 125/I) muramyl peptide derivatives of high specific activity were prepared: a tripeptide with an iodinated C-terminal tyrosine methyl ester (Ligand I), and a muramyl tripeptide with a C-terminal lysine derivatized with Bolton-Hunter reagent (Ligand II). These were used to characterize binding of muramyl peptides to monolayers of murine macrophages. Saturable high-affinity binding to resident, caseinate-elicited, and Listeria-activated peritoneal cells was observed with both radioligands. Binding affinities varied with the state of activation of the macrophages, and K/sub D/ values ranged from 48 +/- 33 pM (for resident macrophages, Ligand I) to 1020 +/- 90 pM (for activated macrophages, Ligand II). Specific binding sites were also found on a macrophage-derived cell line. The ability of several unlabeled muramyl peptides to compete with Ligands I and II for their binding sites was tested. Competition was stereospecific and correlated with known biological activities of these compounds (i.e., immunoadjuvanticity, pyrogenicity, and somnogenicity). The sites identified here for Ligands I and II may mediate some of the effects that muramyl peptides have previously been demonstrated to have on macrophages.

  8. An opiate binding site in the rat brain is highly selective for 4,5-epoxymorphinans.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Sadée, W

    1983-09-16

    In vitro binding studies have demonstrated the existence of multiple opiate receptor types. An additional site in the rat brain (termed the lambda site) is distinct from the established types by its selectivity for 4,5-epoxymorphinans (such as naloxone and morphine). While the lambda site displays a high affinity for naloxone in vivo and in vitro in fresh brain membrane homogenates, these sites rapidly convert in vitro to a state of low affinity. The regional distribution of the lambda site in the brain is strikingly different from that of the classic opiate receptor types.

  9. Characterization of a labile naloxone binding site (lambda site) in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Yu, V; Sadée, W

    1985-05-01

    A high-affinity binding site selective for naloxone and other 4,5-epoxymorphinans (lambda site) has been previously described in rat brain. Following homogenization of freshly dissected brain, the lambda sites convert from a high-affinity to a low-affinity state. When measured with [3H]naloxone, the decay is very rapid at 20 degrees C (t 1/2 less than 2 min), whereas it is progressively slowed at lower temperatures. Proteinase inhibitors, antoxidants, and sulfhydryl group-protecting agents failed to prevent this conversion. Kinetic measurements of mu and lambda binding at varying temperatures demonstrated that the decrease in lambda binding does not coincide with the concurrent increase in mu binding and that the loss of high-affinity lambda binding at 20 degrees C can be partially restored when the temperature is lowered to 0 degrees C. The low-affinity state of the lambda site is rather stable in the Tris buffer homogenates and is susceptible to digestion by a protease. The (-)-isomer of WIN 44,441, a benzomorphan drug, binds to lambda sites with moderate affinity (dissociation constant, KD = 63 nM), whereas the (+)-isomer does not (KD greater than 10,000 nM), thus establishing stereoselectivity of the binding process. Neither the high-affinity nor the low-affinity state of lambda binding is significantly affected by the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride or 50 microM Gpp(NH)p, (a GTP analog), which is in contrast to the dramatic effect of these agents on the established opioid receptor system. Naltrexone, naloxone, nalorphine, and morphine (in this order of decreasing potency) bind to the lambda site in vivo in intact rat brain over dosage ranges that are commonly employed in pharmacological studies.

  10. Regional development of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites in the prenatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Schlumpf, M; Palacios, J M; Cortes, R; Lichtensteiger, W

    1991-01-01

    The ontogeny of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites was studied in rat fetal central nervous system by in vitro autoradiographic techniques using [3H]N-methyl scopolamine as ligand (1 nM). Nonspecific binding was determined after the addition of 1 microM atropine. The main findings of this study are the early appearance of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites in fetal rat central nervous system before gestational day 14, their subsequent spread in a caudofrontal direction and the rapid change of patterns within individual brain regions. Muscarinic cholinergic sites are present shortly after cell birth, though the time-lag between cell generation and expression of muscarinic sites differs between neuronal cell populations. High receptor densities are noted in certain brainstem nuclei that are important for early fetal and neonatal behaviors.

  11. Characterization of the Copper(II) Binding Sites in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    PubMed Central

    Nettles, Whitnee L.; Song, He; Farquhar, Erik R.; Fitzkee, Nicholas C.; Emerson, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a well-studied, robust, mononuclear Zn-containing metalloprotein that serves as an excellent biological ligand system to study the thermodynamics associated with metal ion coordination chemistry in aqueous solution. The apo-form of human carbonic anhydrase II (CA) binds two equivalents of copper(II) with high affinity. The Cu2+ ions bind independently forming two non-coupled type-II copper centers in CA (CuA and CuB). However, the location and coordination mode of the CuA site in solution is unclear, compared to the CuB site that has been well characterized. Using paramagnetic NMR techniques and X-ray absorption spectroscopy we have identified an N-terminal Cu2+ binding location and collected information on the coordination mode of the CuA site in CA, which is consistent with a four to five coordinate N-terminal Cu2+ binding site reminiscent to a number of N-terminal copper(II) binding sites including the copper(II)-ATCUN and copper(II)-beta-amyloid complexes. Additionally, we report a more detailed analysis of the thermodynamics associated with copper(II) binding to CA. Although we are still unable to fully deconvolute Cu2+ binding data to the high-affinity CuA site, we have derived pH- and buffer-independent values for the thermodynamics parameters K and ΔH associated with Cu2+ binding to the CuB site of CA to be 2 × 109 and −17.4 kcal/mol, respectively. PMID:26010488

  12. Probing Molecular Docking in a Charged Model Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Brenk, Ruth; Vetter, Stefan W.; Boyce, Sarah E.; Goodin, David B.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    A model binding site was used to investigate charge–charge interactions in molecular docking. This simple site, a small (180 Å3) engineered cavity in cyctochrome c peroxidase (CCP), is negatively charged and completely buried from solvent, allowing us to explore the balance between electrostatic energy and ligand desolvation energy in a system where many of the common approximations in docking do not apply. A database with about 5300 molecules was docked into this cavity. Retrospective testing with known ligands and decoys showed that overall the balance between electrostatic interaction and desolvation energy was captured. More interesting were prospective docking scre”ens that looked for novel ligands, especially those that might reveal problems with the docking and energy methods. Based on screens of the 5300 compound database, both high-scoring and low-scoring molecules were acquired and tested for binding. Out of 16 new, high-scoring compounds tested, 15 were observed to bind. All of these were small heterocyclic cations. Binding constants were measured for a few of these, they ranged between 20 μM and 60 μM. Crystal structures were determined for ten of these ligands in complex with the protein. The observed ligand geometry corresponded closely to that predicted by docking. Several low-scoring alkyl amino cations were also tested and found to bind. The low docking score of these molecules owed to the relatively high charge density of the charged amino group and the corresponding high desolvation penalty. When the complex structures of those ligands were determined, a bound water molecule was observed interacting with the amino group and a backbone carbonyl group of the cavity. This water molecule mitigates the desolvation penalty and improves the interaction energy relative to that of the “naked” site used in the docking screen. Finally, six low-scoring neutral molecules were also tested, with a view to looking for false negative predictions

  13. Energetic localization of saxitoxin in its channel binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Gaurav; Shang, Lisa; Li, Xiufeng; Dudley, Samuel C

    2002-01-01

    Saxitoxin (STX) selectively blocks the voltage-gated sodium channel at the outer vestibule lined by P-loops of the four domains. Neosaxitoxin has an additional -OH group at the N1 position of the 1,2,3 guanidinium (N1-OH) that interacts with domains I and IV of the Na(+) channel. Determination of a second toxin interaction with the channel would fix the location of STX. Gonyautoxin 2,3 and Gonyautoxin 1,4 are C-11 sulfated derivatives of saxitoxin and neosaxitoxin, respectively. We used these variants to constrain the STX docking orientation by energetically localizing the C-11 sulfate in the outer vestibule. Interactions between the C-11 sulfate and each of the four domains of the channel were determined by a systematic approach to mutant cycle analysis in which all known carboxyl groups important for site 1 toxin binding were neutralized, allowing energetic triangulation of the toxin sulfate and overcoming some limitations of mutant cycles. Toxin IC(50)s were measured by two-electrode voltage clamp from Xenopus oocytes injected with the channel mRNA. Three unique types of analysis based on the coupling results localized the C-11 sulfate between domains III and IV. Combined with our previous report, the data establish the orientation of STX in the outer vestibule and confirm the clockwise arrangement of the channel domains. PMID:12124273

  14. E2F in vivo binding specificity: Comparison of consensus versus nonconsensus binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Alina; Jin, Victor X.; Rabinovich, Roman; Xu, Xiaoqin; Farnham, Peggy J.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that most sites bound by E2F family members in vivo do not contain E2F consensus motifs. However, differences between in vivo target sites that contain or lack a consensus E2F motif have not been explored. To understand how E2F binding specificity is achieved in vivo, we have addressed how E2F family members are recruited to core promoter regions that lack a consensus motif and are excluded from other regions that contain a consensus motif. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) assays, we have shown that the predominant factors specifying whether E2F is recruited to an in vivo binding site are (1) the site must be in a core promoter and (2) the region must be utilized as a promoter in that cell type. We have tested three models for recruitment of E2F to core promoters lacking a consensus site, including (1) indirect recruitment, (2) looping to the core promoter mediated by an E2F bound to a distal motif, and (3) assisted binding of E2F to a site that weakly resembles an E2F motif. To test these models, we developed a new in vivo assay, termed eChIP, which allows analysis of transcription factor binding to isolated fragments. Our findings suggest that in vivo (1) a consensus motif is not sufficient to recruit E2Fs, (2) E2Fs can bind to isolated regions that lack a consensus motif, and (3) binding can require regions other than the best match to the E2F motif. PMID:18836037

  15. Peanut lectin-binding sites in large bowel carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H S

    1982-10-01

    Peanut lectin is known to bind to B-D-Gal-(1 leads to 3)-D-GalNac which provides antigenic determination for the T (TAg) blood group antigen. We examined 33 rectosigmoid carcinomas and 15 corresponding controls for their ability to express peanut lectin-binding sites. In controls one could localize TAg to the supranuclear portion of the cell, however, in cancers one noticed a cytostructural relocalization of TAg with the following two major patterns: localization to the region of the glycocalyx and localization intracytoplasmically in the apical portion of the cell. These two patterns were associated with glandular differentiation. Less frequently noted or in association with the above was a mucin glob-like pattern and/or a fine diffuse intracytoplasmic pattern associated with solid, nonglandular areas. The more poorly differentiated cancers less frequently expressed peanut lectin-binding sites. Benign (nontransitional zone) epithelium in those patients whose tumor expressed TAg was negative for peanut lectin-binding sites in 66 per cent of the cases. Reduced tumoral glycosyltransferases may explain this increased synthesis of TAg in cancers as compared with controls, if one considers TAg to be an incomplete glycoprotein of the MN blood group system.

  16. Secondary anionic phospholipid binding site and gating mechanism in Kir2.1 inward rectifier channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sun-Joo; Wang, Shizhen; Borschel, William; Heyman, Sarah; Gyore, Jacob; Nichols, Colin G.

    2013-11-01

    Inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels regulate multiple tissues. All Kir channels require interaction of phosphatidyl-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) at a crystallographically identified binding site, but an additional nonspecific secondary anionic phospholipid (PL(-)) is required to generate high PIP2 sensitivity of Kir2 channel gating. The PL(-)-binding site and mechanism are yet to be elucidated. Here we report docking simulations that identify a putative PL(-)-binding site, adjacent to the PIP2-binding site, generated by two lysine residues from neighbouring subunits. When either lysine is mutated to cysteine (K64C and K219C), channel activity is significantly decreased in cells and in reconstituted liposomes. Directly tethering K64C to the membrane by modification with decyl-MTS generates high PIP2 sensitivity in liposomes, even in the complete absence of PL(-)s. The results provide a coherent molecular mechanism whereby PL(-) interaction with a discrete binding site results in a conformational change that stabilizes the high-affinity PIP2 activatory site.

  17. Characterization of angiotensin-binding sites in the bovine adrenal and the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rogulja, I.

    1989-01-01

    The first study was designed to determine whether systemically administered MSG affects neurons in the CVOs that are potentially important in mediating angiotensin-dependent responses. Rats were pretreated with MSG and the receptors for angiotensin II were assayed by radioligand binding in brain homogenates from the septum anteroventral third ventricular region (AV3V) and the thalamus/hypothalamus region using {sup 125}I-angiotensin II as the radioligand. The results of this experiment indicate that systematically administered MSG in the rat significantly reduced the number (Bmax) of Ang II receptors in a tissue sample which contained both extra blood-brain barrier organs as well as tissue within the blood-brain barrier with no change in the affinity (Kd) of the binding sites. The second chapter reports the successful solubilization of bovine adrenal {sup 125}I Ang II and {sup 125}I Sar{sup 1},Ile{sup 8}-Ang II binding sites with the detergent CHAPS. The results of our studies indicate the presence of two angiotensin binding sites. The one site is specific for naturally occurring angiotensins as well as sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensin analogues. The other site which can be optimally stabilized be re-addition of 0.3% CHAPS into the incubation assay binds sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensins exclusively. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography experiments suggest that these sites, possibly, represent distinct proteins. The third chapter discusses the successful solubilization and partial characterization of the rat brain angiotensin receptor.

  18. Addition of a single E2 binding site to the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 long control region enhances killing of HPV positive cells via HPV E2 protein-regulated herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase-mediated suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rachna; Palefsky, Joel M

    2010-07-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is associated with the development of anogenital cancers and their precursor lesions, intraepithelial neoplasia. Treatment strategies against HPV-induced intraepithelial neoplasia are not HPV specific and mostly consist of physical removal or ablation of lesions. We had previously designed an HPV-specific approach to kill HPV-infected cells by the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (TK) gene driven by HPV E2 binding to E2-binding sites (E2BS) in the native HPV16 long control region. E2-induced TK expression renders the cells sensitive to the prodrug ganciclovir. To optimize this therapeutic approach, we modified the native long control region by adding variable numbers of E2BS adjacent to E2BS4, resulting in greatly increased cell death in HPV-positive cell lines with variable levels of E2 protein expression and no reduction in HPV specificity. Our results showed maximum increase in TK expression and cell killing when one additional E2BS was added adjacent to E2BS. As HPV-infected patients also exhibit variable E2 expression across lesions and within a lesion, this approach may potentiate the clinical utility of the herpes simplex virus type 1 TK/ganciclovir therapeutic approach.

  19. Photoaffinity labeling in target- and binding-site identification

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ewan; Collins, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling (PAL) using a chemical probe to covalently bind its target in response to activation by light has become a frequently used tool in drug discovery for identifying new drug targets and molecular interactions, and for probing the location and structure of binding sites. Methods to identify the specific target proteins of hit molecules from phenotypic screens are highly valuable in early drug discovery. In this review, we summarize the principles of PAL including probe design and experimental techniques for in vitro and live cell investigations. We emphasize the need to optimize and validate probes and highlight examples of the successful application of PAL across multiple disease areas. PMID:25686004

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of Zika virus NS3 helicase: Insights into RNA binding site activity.

    PubMed

    Mottin, Melina; Braga, Rodolpho C; da Silva, Roosevelt A; Silva, Joao H Martins da; Perryman, Alexander L; Ekins, Sean; Andrade, Carolina Horta

    2017-03-21

    America is still suffering with the outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. Congenital ZIKV syndrome has already caused a public health emergency of international concern. However, there are still no vaccines to prevent or drugs to treat the infection caused by ZIKV. The ZIKV NS3 helicase (NS3h) protein is a promising target for drug discovery due to its essential role in viral genome replication. NS3h unwinds the viral RNA to enable the replication of the viral genome by the NS5 protein. NS3h contains two important binding sites: the NTPase binding site and the RNA binding site. Here, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the molecular behavior of ZIKV NS3h in the presence and absence of ssRNA and the potential implications for NS3h activity and inhibition. Although there is conformational variability and poor electron densities of the RNA binding loop in various apo flaviviruses NS3h crystallographic structures, the MD trajectories of NS3h-ssRNA demonstrated that the RNA binding loop becomes more stable when NS3h is occupied by RNA. Our results suggest that the presence of RNA generates important interactions with the RNA binding loop, and these interactions stabilize the loop sufficiently that it remains in a closed conformation. This closed conformation likely keeps the ssRNA bound to the protein for a sufficient duration to enable the unwinding/replication activities of NS3h to occur. In addition, conformational changes of this RNA binding loop can change the nature and location of the optimal ligand binding site, according to ligand binding site prediction results. These are important findings to help guide the design and discovery of new inhibitors of NS3h as promising compounds to treat the ZIKV infection.

  1. Comparison of SARS and NL63 papain-like protease binding sites and binding site dynamics: inhibitor design implications.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rima; Tang, Sishi; Zhao, Guijun; Lu, Hui; Case, David A; Johnson, Michael E

    2011-11-25

    The human severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and the NL63 coronaviruses are human respiratory pathogens for which no effective antiviral treatment exists. The papain-like cysteine proteases encoded by the coronavirus (SARS-CoV: PLpro; NL63: PLP1 and PLP2) represent potential targets for antiviral drug development. Three recent inhibitor-bound PLpro structures highlight the role of an extremely flexible six-residue loop in inhibitor binding. The high binding site plasticity is a major challenge in computational drug discovery/design efforts. From conventional molecular dynamics and accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations, we find that with conventional molecular dynamics simulation, PLpro translationally samples the open and closed conformation of BL2 loop on a picosecond-nanosecond timescale but does not reproduce the peptide bond inversion between loop residues Tyr269 and Gln270 that is observed on inhibitor GRL0617 binding. Only aMD simulation, starting from the closed loop conformation, reproduced the 180° ϕ-ψ dihedral rotation back to the open loop state. The Tyr-Gln peptide bond inversion appears to involve a progressive conformational change of the full loop, starting at one side, and progressing to the other. We used the SARS-CoV apo X-ray structure to develop a model of the NL63-PLP2 catalytic site. Superimposition of the PLP2 model on the PLpro X-ray structure identifies binding site residues in PLP2 that contribute to the distinct substrate cleavage site specificities between the two proteases. The topological and electrostatic differences between the two protease binding sites also help explain the selectivity of non-covalent PLpro inhibitors.

  2. Kinetic studies show that Ca2+ and Tb3+ have different binding preferences toward the four Ca2+-binding sites of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L; Leavis, P C; Gergely, J

    1984-12-18

    The stepwise addition of Tb3+ to calmodulin yields a large tyrosine-sensitized Tb3+ luminescence enhancement as the third and fourth ions bind to the protein [Wang, C.-L. A., Aquaron, R. R., Leavis, P. C., & Gergely, J. (1982) Eur. J. Biochem. 124, 7-12]. Since the only tyrosine residues in calmodulin are located within binding sites III and IV, these results suggest that Tb3+ binds first to sites I and II. Recent NMR studies have provided evidence that Ca2+, on the other hand, binds preferentially to sites III and IV. Kinetic studies using a stopped-flow apparatus also show that the preferential binding of Ca2+ and lanthanide ions is different. Upon rapid mixing of 2Ca-calmodulin with two Tb3+ ions, there was a small and rapid tyrosine fluorescence change, but no Tb3+ luminescence was observed, indicating that Tb3+ binds to sites I and II but not sites III and IV. When two Tb3+ ions are mixed with 2Dy-calmodulin, Tb3+ luminescence rises rapidly as Tb3+ binds to the empty sites III and IV, followed by a more gradual decrease (k = 0.4 s-1 as the ions redistribute themselves over the four sites. These results indicate that (i) both Tb3+ and Dy3+ prefer binding to sites I and II of calmodulin and (ii) the binding of Tb3+ to calmodulin is not impeded by the presence of two Ca2+ ions initially bound to the protein. Thus, the Ca2+ and lanthanide ions must exhibit opposite preferences for the four sites of calmodulin: sites III and IV are the high-affinity sites for Ca2+, whereas Tb3+ and Dy3+ prefer sites I and II.

  3. Distinct OGT-Binding Sites Promote HCF-1 Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Tanja; Waridel, Patrice; Kapuria, Vaibhav; Zoete, Vincent; Herr, Winship

    2015-01-01

    Human HCF-1 (also referred to as HCFC-1) is a transcriptional co-regulator that undergoes a complex maturation process involving extensive O-GlcNAcylation and site-specific proteolysis. HCF-1 proteolysis results in two active, noncovalently associated HCF-1N and HCF-1C subunits that regulate distinct phases of the cell-division cycle. HCF-1 O-GlcNAcylation and site-specific proteolysis are both catalyzed by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), which thus displays an unusual dual enzymatic activity. OGT cleaves HCF-1 at six highly conserved 26 amino acid repeat sequences called HCF-1PRO repeats. Here we characterize the substrate requirements for OGT cleavage of HCF-1. We show that the HCF-1PRO-repeat cleavage signal possesses particular OGT-binding properties. The glutamate residue at the cleavage site that is intimately involved in the cleavage reaction specifically inhibits association with OGT and its bound cofactor UDP-GlcNAc. Further, we identify a novel OGT-binding sequence nearby the first HCF-1PRO-repeat cleavage signal that enhances cleavage. These results demonstrate that distinct OGT-binding sites in HCF-1 promote proteolysis, and provide novel insights into the mechanism of this unusual protease activity. PMID:26305326

  4. Opioid binding site in EL-4 thymoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorica, E.; Spector, S.

    1988-01-01

    Using EL-4 thymoma cell-line we found a binding site similar to the k opioid receptor of the nervous system. The Scatchard analysis of the binding of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine indicated a single site with a K/sub D/ = 60 +/- 17 nM and Bmax = 2.7 +/- 0.8 pmols/10/sup 6/ cells. To characterize this binding site, competition studies were performed using selective compounds for the various opioid receptors. The k agonist U-50,488H was the most potent displacer of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine with an IC/sub 50/ value = 0.57..mu..M. The two steroisomers levorphanol and dextrorphan showed the same affinity for this site. While morphine, (D-Pen/sup 2/, D-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin and ..beta..-endorphin failed to displace, except at very high concentrations, codeine demonstrated a IC/sub 50/ = 60..mu..M, that was similar to naloxone. 32 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Site Occupancy of Ternary Additions to B2 Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Amador, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    In this broad-based survey study, the substitutional site preference of ternary alloying additions to B2 compounds (stable at room temperature and 50/50 composition) is determined using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for alloys. The method is applied to Ni, Al, Ti, Cr, Cu, Co, Fe, Ta, Hf, Mo, Nb, W, V and Ru additions to NiAl, FeAl, CoAl, CoFe, CoHf, CoTi, FeTi, RuAl, RuSi, RuHf, RuTi, and RuZr. The results are compared, when available, to experimental data and other theoretical results.

  6. Positive cooperative regulation of double binding sites for human acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-10-25

    Acetylcholinesterase is a potent enzyme that regulates neurotransmission by rapidly hydrolyzing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in synapses of the nervous system. As drug target of anti-AD, it has catalytic and peripheral anionic sites. However, the regulation relation between these two sites is unclear. Therefore, we constructed dynamics fluctuation network based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the regulation mechanism. The results suggest that the correlation network in double-site system (hAChE/TZ5) is distinctly different from that in the free state and single-site systems (hAChE/huprine and hAChE/1YL). The community network analysis indicates that the information freely transfers from the peripheral anionic site to the catalytic active site in hAChE/TZ5. Furthermore, the binding free energy between the inhibitor and hAChE for hAChE/TZ5 is significantly lower than of either hAChE/huprine or hAChE/1YL. Thus, a hypothesis of 'positive cooperative regulation' is proposed for the regulation of double binding sites and further confirmed by the weakening and mutation community analyses. Finally, one possible cooperative regulation pathway of W86-TZ5-W286 was identified based on the shortest path algorithm and was confirmed by the network perturbation analysis. Interestingly, the regulation pathway for single-site systems is significantly different from that of dual-site system. The process targeting on the shortest pathway can better regulate the hydrolyzing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and significantly inhibit the aggregation of Aβ amyloid.

  7. Discovery of the ammonium substrate site on glutamine synthetase, a third cation binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, S. H.; Kuo, I.; Eisenberg, D.

    1995-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to yield glutamine, ADP, and inorganic phosphate in the presence of divalent cations. Bacterial GS is an enzyme of 12 identical subunits, arranged in two rings of 6, with the active site between each pair of subunits in a ring. In earlier work, we have reported the locations within the funnel-shaped active site of the substrates glutamate and ATP and of the two divalent cations, but the site for ammonia (or ammonium) has remained elusive. Here we report the discovery by X-ray crystallography of a binding site on GS for monovalent cations, Tl+ and Cs+, which is probably the binding site for the substrate ammonium ion. Fourier difference maps show the following. (1) Tl+ and Cs+ bind at essentially the same site, with ligands being Glu 212, Tyr 179, Asp 50', Ser 53' of the adjacent subunit, and the substrate glutamate. From its position adjacent to the substrate glutamate and the cofactor ADP, we propose that this monovalent cation site is the substrate ammonium ion binding site. This proposal is supported by enzyme kinetics. Our kinetic measurements show that Tl+, Cs+, and NH4+ are competitive inhibitors to NH2OH in the gamma-glutamyl transfer reaction. (2) GS is a trimetallic enzyme containing two divalent cation sites (n1, n2) and one monovalent cation site per subunit. These three closely spaced ions are all at the active site: the distance between n1 and n2 is 6 A, between n1 and Tl+ is 4 A, and between n2 and Tl+ is 7 A. Glu 212 and the substrate glutamate are bridging ligands for the n1 ion and Tl+. (3) The presence of a monovalent cation in this site may enhance the structural stability of GS, because of its effect of balancing the negative charges of the substrate glutamate and its ligands and because of strengthening the "side-to-side" intersubunit interaction through the cation-protein bonding. (4) The presence of the cofactor ADP increases the Tl+ binding to GS

  8. Discriminating between HuR and TTP binding sites using the k-spectrum kernel method

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Debra S.; Dowell, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Background The RNA binding proteins (RBPs) human antigen R (HuR) and Tristetraprolin (TTP) are known to exhibit competitive binding but have opposing effects on the bound messenger RNA (mRNA). How cells discriminate between the two proteins is an interesting problem. Machine learning approaches, such as support vector machines (SVMs), may be useful in the identification of discriminative features. However, this method has yet to be applied to studies of RNA binding protein motifs. Results Applying the k-spectrum kernel to a support vector machine (SVM), we first verified the published binding sites of both HuR and TTP. Additional feature engineering highlighted the U-rich binding preference of HuR and AU-rich binding preference for TTP. Domain adaptation along with multi-task learning was used to predict the common binding sites. Conclusion The distinction between HuR and TTP binding appears to be subtle content features. HuR prefers strongly U-rich sequences whereas TTP prefers AU-rich as with increasing A content, the sequences are more likely to be bound only by TTP. Our model is consistent with competitive binding of the two proteins, particularly at intermediate AU-balanced sequences. This suggests that fine changes in the A/U balance within a untranslated region (UTR) can alter the binding and subsequent stability of the message. Both feature engineering and domain adaptation emphasized the extent to which these proteins recognize similar general sequence features. This work suggests that the k-spectrum kernel method could be useful when studying RNA binding proteins and domain adaptation techniques such as feature augmentation could be employed particularly when examining RBPs with similar binding preferences. PMID:28333956

  9. Visualization of specific binding sites of benzodiazepine in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Shinotoh, H.; Yamasaki, T.; Inoue, O.; Itoh, T.; Suzuki, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Tateno, Y.; Ikehira, H.

    1986-10-01

    Using 11C-labeled Ro15-1788 and positron emission tomography, studies of benzodiazepine binding sites in the human brain were performed on four normal volunteers. Rapid and high accumulation of 11C activity was observed in the brain after i.v. injection of (11C)Ro15-1788, the maximum of which was within 12 min. Initial distribution of 11C activity in the brain was similar to the distribution of the normal cerebral blood flow. Ten minutes after injection, however, a high uptake of 11C activity was observed in the cerebral cortex and moderate uptake was seen in the cerebellar cortex, the basal ganglia, and the thalamus. The accumulation of 11C activity was low in the brain stem. This distribution of 11C activity was approximately parallel to the known distribution of benzodiazepine receptors. Saturation experiments were performed on four volunteers with oral administration of 0.3-1.8 mg/kg of cold Ro15-1788 prior to injection. Initial distribution of 11C activity following injection peaked within 2 min and then the accumulation of 11C activity decreased rapidly and remarkably throughout the brain. The results indicated that (11C) Ro15-1788 associates and dissociates to specific and nonspecific binding sites rapidly and has a high ratio of specific receptor binding to nonspecific binding in vivo. Carbon-11 Ro15-1788 is a suitable radioligand for the study of benzodiazepine receptors in vivo in humans.

  10. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  11. A Conserved Steroid Binding Site in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Ling; Mills, Denise A.; Buhrow, Leann; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2010-09-02

    Micromolar concentrations of the bile salt deoxycholate are shown to rescue the activity of an inactive mutant, E101A, in the K proton pathway of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase. A crystal structure of the wild-type enzyme reveals, as predicted, deoxycholate bound with its carboxyl group at the entrance of the K path. Since cholate is a known potent inhibitor of bovine oxidase and is seen in a similar position in the bovine structure, the crystallographically defined, conserved steroid binding site could reveal a regulatory site for steroids or structurally related molecules that act on the essential K proton path.

  12. Minimal Zn2+ Binding Site of Amyloid-β

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Kulikova, Alexandra A.; Golovin, Andrey V.; Tkachev, Yaroslav V.; Archakov, Alexander I.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc-induced aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is a hallmark molecular feature of Alzheimer's disease. Here we provide direct thermodynamic evidence that elucidates the role of the Aβ region 6–14 as the minimal Zn2+ binding site wherein the ion is coordinated by His6, Glu11, His13, and His14. With the help of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, the region 11–14 was determined as the primary zinc recognition site and considered an important drug-target candidate to prevent Zn2+-induced aggregation of Aβ. PMID:21081056

  13. Minimal Zn(2+) binding site of amyloid-β.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Kulikova, Alexandra A; Golovin, Andrey V; Tkachev, Yaroslav V; Archakov, Alexander I; Kozin, Sergey A; Makarov, Alexander A

    2010-11-17

    Zinc-induced aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is a hallmark molecular feature of Alzheimer's disease. Here we provide direct thermodynamic evidence that elucidates the role of the Aβ region 6-14 as the minimal Zn(2+) binding site wherein the ion is coordinated by His(6), Glu(11), His(13), and His(14). With the help of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, the region 11-14 was determined as the primary zinc recognition site and considered an important drug-target candidate to prevent Zn(2+)-induced aggregation of Aβ.

  14. Analysis of zinc binding sites in protein crystal structures.

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, I. L.; Nadassy, K.; Wodak, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    The geometrical properties of zinc binding sites in a dataset of high quality protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank have been examined to identify important differences between zinc sites that are directly involved in catalysis and those that play a structural role. Coordination angles in the zinc primary coordination sphere are compared with ideal values for each coordination geometry, and zinc coordination distances are compared with those in small zinc complexes from the Cambridge Structural Database as a guide of expected trends. We find that distances and angles in the primary coordination sphere are in general close to the expected (or ideal) values. Deviations occur primarily for oxygen coordinating atoms and are found to be mainly due to H-bonding of the oxygen coordinating ligand to protein residues, bidentate binding arrangements, and multi-zinc sites. We find that H-bonding of oxygen containing residues (or water) to zinc bound histidines is almost universal in our dataset and defines the elec-His-Zn motif. Analysis of the stereochemistry shows that carboxyl elec-His-Zn motifs are geometrically rigid, while water elec-His-Zn motifs show the most geometrical variation. As catalytic motifs have a higher proportion of carboxyl elec atoms than structural motifs, they provide a more rigid framework for zinc binding. This is understood biologically, as a small distortion in the zinc position in an enzyme can have serious consequences on the enzymatic reaction. We also analyze the sequence pattern of the zinc ligands and residues that provide elecs, and identify conserved hydrophobic residues in the endopeptidases that also appear to contribute to stabilizing the catalytic zinc site. A zinc binding template in protein crystal structures is derived from these observations. PMID:10082367

  15. Solubilization and characterization of haloperidol-sensitive (+)-( sup 3 H)SKF-10,047 binding sites (sigma sites) from rat liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, D.J.; Su, T.P. )

    1991-05-01

    The zwitterionic detergent 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylamino)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) produced optimal solubilization of (+)-({sup 3}H)SKF-10,047 binding sites from rat liver membranes at a concentration of 0.2%, well below the critical micellular concentration of the detergent. The pharmacological selectivity of the liver (+)-({sup 3}H)SKF-10,047 binding sites corresponds to that of sigma sites from rat and guinea pig brain. When the affinities of 18 different drugs at (+)-({sup 3}H)SKF-10,047 binding sites in membranes and solubilized preparations were compared, a correlation coefficient of 0.99 and a slope of 1.03 were obtained, indicating that the pharmacological selectivity of rat liver sigma sites is retained after solubilization. In addition, the binding of 20 nM ({sup 3}H)progesterone to solubilized rat liver preparations was found to exhibit a pharmacological selectivity appropriate for sigma sites. A stimulatory effect of phenytoin on (+)-({sup 3}H)SKF-10,047 binding to sigma sites persisted after solubilization. When the solubilized preparation was subjected to molecular sizing chromatography, a single peak exhibiting specific (+)-({sup 3}H)SKF-10,047 binding was obtained. The binding activity of this peak was stimulated symmetrically when assays were performed in the presence of 300 microM phenytoin. The molecular weight of the CHAPS-solubilized sigma site complex was estimated to be 450,000 daltons. After solubilization with CHAPS, rat liver sigma sites were enriched to 12 pmol/mg of protein. The present results demonstrate a successful solubilization of sigma sites from rat liver membranes and provide direct evidence that the gonadal steroid progesterone binds to sigma sites. The results also suggest that the anticonvulsant phenytoin binds to an associated allosteric site on the sigma site complex.

  16. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  17. Two mechanisms of ion selectivity in protein binding sites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haibo; Noskov, Sergei Yu; Roux, Benoît

    2010-11-23

    A theoretical framework is presented to clarify the molecular determinants of ion selectivity in protein binding sites. The relative free energy of a bound ion is expressed in terms of the main coordinating ligands coupled to an effective potential of mean force representing the influence of the rest of the protein. The latter is separated into two main contributions. The first includes all the forces keeping the ion and the coordinating ligands confined to a microscopic subvolume but does not prevent the ligands from adapting to a smaller or larger ion. The second regroups all the remaining forces that control the precise geometry of the coordinating ligands best adapted to a given ion. The theoretical framework makes it possible to delineate two important limiting cases. In the limit where the geometric forces are dominant (rigid binding site), ion selectivity is controlled by the ion-ligand interactions within the matching cavity size according to the familiar "snug-fit" mechanism of host-guest chemistry. In the limit where the geometric forces are negligible, the ion and ligands behave as a "confined microdroplet" that is free to fluctuate and adapt to ions of different sizes. In this case, ion selectivity is set by the interplay between ion-ligand and ligand-ligand interactions and is controlled by the number and the chemical type of ion-coordinating ligands. The framework is illustrated by considering the ion-selective binding sites in the KcsA channel and the LeuT transporter.

  18. Binding sites of retinol and retinoic acid with serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Belatik, A; Hotchandani, S; Bariyanga, J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-02-01

    Retinoids are effectively transported in the bloodstream via serum albumins. We report the complexation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with retinol and retinoic acid at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration and various retinoid contents. FTIR, CD and fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to analyze retinoid binding site, the binding constant and the effects of complexation on BSA stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that retinoids bind BSA via hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions with overall binding constants of K(Ret)(-BSA) = 5.3 (±0.8) × 10(6) M(-1) and K(Retac-BSA) = 2.3 (±0.4) × 10(6) M(-1). The number of bound retinoid molecules (n) was 1.20 (±0.2) for retinol and 1.8 (±0.3) for retinoic acid. Molecular modeling showed the participation of several amino acids in retinoid-BSA complexes stabilized by H-bonding network. The retinoid binding altered BSA conformation with a major reduction of α-helix from 61% (free BSA) to 36% (retinol-BSA) and 26% (retinoic acid-BSA) with an increase in turn and random coil structures indicating a partial protein unfolding. The results indicate that serum albumins are capable of transporting retinoids in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Direct GR Binding Sites Potentiate Clusters of TF Binding across the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    Vockley, Christopher M; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; McDowell, Ian C; Majoros, William H; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E

    2016-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds the human genome at >10,000 sites but only regulates the expression of hundreds of genes. To determine the functional effect of each site, we measured the glucocorticoid (GC) responsive activity of nearly all GR binding sites (GBSs) captured using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in A549 cells. 13% of GBSs assayed had GC-induced activity. The responsive sites were defined by direct GR binding via a GC response element (GRE) and exclusively increased reporter-gene expression. Meanwhile, most GBSs lacked GC-induced reporter activity. The non-responsive sites had epigenetic features of steady-state enhancers and clustered around direct GBSs. Together, our data support a model in which clusters of GBSs observed with ChIP-seq reflect interactions between direct and tethered GBSs over tens of kilobases. We further show that those interactions can synergistically modulate the activity of direct GBSs and may therefore play a major role in driving gene activation in response to GCs.

  20. Novel benzimidazole inhibitors bind to a unique site in the kinesin spindle protein motor domain.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Payal R; Shipps, Gerald W; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Smith, Catherine K; Chuang, Cheng-Chi; Sanden, David; Basso, Andrea D; Vilenchik, Lev; Gray, Kimberly; Annis, D Allen; Nickbarg, Elliott; Ma, Yao; Lahue, Brian; Herbst, Ronald; Le, Hung V

    2010-09-28

    Affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) screening of kinesin spindle protein (KSP) followed by enzyme inhibition studies and temperature-dependent circular dichroism (TdCD) characterization was utilized to identify a series of benzimidazole compounds. This series also binds in the presence of Ispinesib, a known anticancer KSP inhibitor in phase I/II clinical trials for breast cancer. TdCD and AS-MS analyses support simultaneous binding implying existence of a novel non-Ispinesib binding pocket within KSP. Additional TdCD analyses demonstrate direct binding of these compounds to Ispinesib-resistant mutants (D130V, A133D, and A133D + D130V double mutant), further strengthening the hypothesis that the compounds bind to a distinct binding pocket. Also importantly, binding to this pocket causes uncompetitive inhibition of KSP ATPase activity. The uncompetitive inhibition with respect to ATP is also confirmed by the requirement of nucleotide for binding of the compounds. After preliminary affinity optimization, the benzimidazole series exhibited distinctive antimitotic activity as evidenced by blockade of bipolar spindle formation and appearance of monoasters. Cancer cell growth inhibition was also demonstrated either as a single agent or in combination with Ispinesib. The combination was additive as predicted by the binding studies using TdCD and AS-MS analyses. The available data support the existence of a KSP inhibitory site hitherto unknown in the literature. The data also suggest that targeting this novel site could be a productive strategy for eluding Ispinesib-resistant tumors. Finally, AS-MS and TdCD techniques are general in scope and may enable screening other targets in the presence of known drugs, clinical candidates, or tool compounds that bind to the protein of interest in an effort to identify potency-enhancing small molecules that increase efficacy and impede resistance in combination therapy.

  1. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  2. Camptothecin-binding site in human serum albumin and protein transformations induced by drug binding.

    PubMed

    Fleury, F; Ianoul, A; Berjot, M; Feofanov, A; Alix, A J; Nabiev, I

    1997-07-14

    Circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectroscopy were employed in order to locate a camptothecin (CPT)-binding site within human serum albumin (HSA) and to identify protein structural transformations induced by CPT binding. A competitive binding of CPT and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (a ligand occupying IIIA structural sub-domain of the protein) to HSA does not show any competition and demonstrates that the ligands are located in the different binding sites, whereas a HSA-bound CPT may be replaced by warfarin, occupying IIA structural sub-domain of the protein. Raman and CD spectra of HSA and HSA/CPT complexes show that the CPT-binding does not induce changes of the global protein secondary structure. On the other hand, Raman spectra reveal pronounced CPT-induced local structural modifications of the HSA molecule, involving changes in configuration of the two disulfide bonds and transfer of a single Trp-residue to hydrophilic environment. These data suggest that CPT is bound in the region of interdomain connections within the IIA structural domain of HSA and it induces relative movement of the protein structural domains.

  3. Molecular modelling and competition binding study of Br-noscapine and colchicine provide insight into noscapinoid-tubulin binding site.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pradeep K; Santoshi, Seneha; Rai, Ankit; Joshi, Harish C

    2011-06-01

    We have previously discovered the tubulin-binding anti-cancer properties of noscapine and its derivatives (noscapinoids). Here, we present three lines of evidence that noscapinoids bind at or near the well studied colchicine binding site of tubulin: (1) in silico molecular docking studies of Br-noscapine and noscapine yield highest docking score with the well characterised colchicine-binding site from the co-crystal structure; (2) the molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA) scoring results ΔΔG(bind-cald) for both noscapine and Br-noscapine (3.915 and 3.025 kcal/mol) are in reasonably good agreement with our experimentally determined binding affinity (ΔΔG(bind-Expt) of 3.570 and 2.988 kcal/mol, derived from K(d) values); and (3) Br-noscapine competes with colchicine binding to tubulin. The simplest interpretation of these collective data is that Br-noscapine binds tubulin at a site overlapping with, or very close to colchicine-binding site of tubulin. Although we cannot rule out a formal possibility that Br-noscapine might bind to a site distinct and distant from the colchicine-binding site that might negatively influence the colchicine binding to tubulin.

  4. Protein-Binding RNA Aptamers Affect Molecular Interactions Distantly from Their Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Daniel M.; Thuesen, Cathrine K.; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A.; Behrens, Manja A.; Dam, Karen; Sørensen, Hans P.; Pedersen, Jan S.; Ploug, Michael; Jensen, Jan K.; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site. PMID:25793507

  5. Activation of brown adipose tissue mitochondrial GDP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The primary function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is heat production. This ability is attributed to the existence of a unique inner mitochondrial membrane protein termed the uncoupling protein or thermogenin. This protein is permeable to H+ and thus allows respiration (and therefore thermogenesis) to proceed at a rapid rate, independent of ADP phosphorylation. Proton conductance can be inhibited by the binding of purine nucleotides to the uncoupling protein. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-GDP to BAT mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of BAT thermogenic activity. Rats fed a diet that was low but adequate in protein exhibited a decrease in feed efficiency. In addition, BAT thermogenesis was activated as indicated by an elevation in the level of GDP binding to BAT mitochondria. This phenomena occurred in older rats and persisted over time.

  6. Defining the binding site of homotetrameric R67 dihydrofolate reductase and correlating binding enthalpy with catalysis.

    PubMed

    Strader, Michael Brad; Chopra, Shaileja; Jackson, Michael; Smiley, R Derike; Stinnett, Lori; Wu, Jun; Howell, Elizabeth E

    2004-06-15

    R67 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a novel protein that possesses 222 symmetry. A single active site pore traverses the length of the homotetramer. Although the 222 symmetry implies that four symmetry-related binding sites should exist for each substrate as well as each cofactor, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies indicate only two molecules bind. Three possible combinations include two dihydrofolate molecules, two NADPH molecules, or one substrate with one cofactor. The latter is the productive ternary complex. To evaluate the roles of A36, Y46, T51, G64, and V66 residues in binding and catalysis, a site-directed mutagenesis approach was employed. One mutation per gene produces four mutations per active site pore, which often result in large cumulative effects. Conservative mutations at these positions either eliminate the ability of the gene to confer trimethoprim resistance or have no effect on catalysis. This result, in conjunction with previous mutagenesis studies on K32, K33, S65, Q67, I68, and Y69 [Strader, M. B., et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 11344-11352; Hicks, S. N., et al. (2003) Biochemistry 42, 10569-10578; Park, H., et al. (1997) Protein Eng. 10, 1415-1424], allows mapping of the active site surface. Residues for which conservative mutations have large effects on binding and catalysis include K32, Q67, I68, and Y69. These residues form a stripe that establishes the ligand binding surface. Residues that accommodate conservative mutations that do not greatly affect catalysis include K33, Y46, T51, S65, and V66. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies were also conducted on many of the mutants described above to determine the enthalpy of folate binding to the R67 DHFR.NADPH complex. A linear correlation between this DeltaH value and log k(cat)/K(m) is observed. Since structural tightness appears to be correlated with the exothermicity of the binding interaction, this leads to the hypothesis that enthalpy-driven formation of the ternary

  7. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs.

  8. How the mongoose can fight the snake: the binding site of the mongoose acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Barchan, D; Kachalsky, S; Neumann, D; Vogel, Z; Ovadia, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1992-01-01

    The ligand binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) is within a short peptide from the alpha subunit that includes the tandem cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193. To elucidate the molecular basis of the binding properties of the AcChoR, we chose to study nonclassical muscle AcChoRs from animals that are resistant to alpha-neurotoxins. We have previously reported that the resistance of snake AcChoR to alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) may be accounted for by several major substitutions in the ligand binding site of the receptor. In the present study, we have analyzed the binding site of AcChoR from the mongoose, which is also resistant to alpha-neurotoxins. It was shown that mongoose AcChoR does not bind alpha-BTX in vivo or in vitro. cDNA fragments of the alpha subunit of mongoose AcChoR corresponding to codons 122-205 and including the presumed ligand binding site were cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein fragments of the mongoose, as well as of snake receptors, do not bind alpha-BTX. The mongoose fragment is highly homologous (greater than 90%) to the respective mouse fragment. Out of the seven amino acid differences between the mongoose and mouse in this region, five cluster in the presumed ligand binding site, close to cysteines 192 and 193. These changes are at positions 187 (Trp----Asn), 189 (Phe----Thr), 191 (Ser----Ala), 194 (Pro----Leu), and 197 (Pro----His). The mongoose like the snake AcChoR has a potential glycosylation site in the binding site domain. Sequence comparison between species suggests that substitutions at positions 187, 189, and 194 are important in determining the resistance of mongoose and snake AcChoR to alpha-BTX. In addition, it was shown that amino acid residues that had been reported to be necessary for acetylcholine binding are conserved in the toxin-resistant animals as well. Images PMID:1380164

  9. How the mongoose can fight the snake: the binding site of the mongoose acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Barchan, D; Kachalsky, S; Neumann, D; Vogel, Z; Ovadia, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1992-08-15

    The ligand binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) is within a short peptide from the alpha subunit that includes the tandem cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193. To elucidate the molecular basis of the binding properties of the AcChoR, we chose to study nonclassical muscle AcChoRs from animals that are resistant to alpha-neurotoxins. We have previously reported that the resistance of snake AcChoR to alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) may be accounted for by several major substitutions in the ligand binding site of the receptor. In the present study, we have analyzed the binding site of AcChoR from the mongoose, which is also resistant to alpha-neurotoxins. It was shown that mongoose AcChoR does not bind alpha-BTX in vivo or in vitro. cDNA fragments of the alpha subunit of mongoose AcChoR corresponding to codons 122-205 and including the presumed ligand binding site were cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein fragments of the mongoose, as well as of snake receptors, do not bind alpha-BTX. The mongoose fragment is highly homologous (greater than 90%) to the respective mouse fragment. Out of the seven amino acid differences between the mongoose and mouse in this region, five cluster in the presumed ligand binding site, close to cysteines 192 and 193. These changes are at positions 187 (Trp----Asn), 189 (Phe----Thr), 191 (Ser----Ala), 194 (Pro----Leu), and 197 (Pro----His). The mongoose like the snake AcChoR has a potential glycosylation site in the binding site domain. Sequence comparison between species suggests that substitutions at positions 187, 189, and 194 are important in determining the resistance of mongoose and snake AcChoR to alpha-BTX. In addition, it was shown that amino acid residues that had been reported to be necessary for acetylcholine binding are conserved in the toxin-resistant animals as well.

  10. A threonine turnstile defines a dynamic amphiphilic binding motif in the AAA ATPase p97 allosteric binding site.

    PubMed

    Burnett, James C; Lim, Chaemin; Peyser, Brian D; Samankumara, Lalith P; Kovaliov, Marina; Colombo, Raffaele; Bulfer, Stacie L; LaPorte, Matthew G; Hermone, Ann R; McGrath, Connor F; Arkin, Michelle R; Gussio, Rick; Huryn, Donna M; Wipf, Peter

    2017-03-29

    The turnstile motion of two neighboring threonines sets up a dynamic side chain interplay that can accommodate both polar and apolar ligands in a small molecule allosteric protein binding site. A computational model based on SAR data and both X-ray and cryo-EM structures of the AAA ATPase p97 was used to analyze the effects of paired threonines at the inhibitor site. Specifically, the Thr side chain hydroxyl groups form a hydrogen bonding network that readily accommodates small, highly polar ligand substituents. Conversely, diametric rotation of the χ1 torsion by 150-180° orients the side chain β-methyl groups into the binding cleft, creating a hydrophobic pocket that can accommodate small, apolar substituents. This motif was found to be critical for rationalizing the affinities of a structurally focused set of inhibitors of p97 covering a > 2000-fold variation in potencies, with a preference for either small-highly polar or small-apolar groups. The threonine turnstile motif was further validated by a PDB search that identified analogous binding modes in ligand interactions in PKB, as well as by an analysis of NMR structures demonstrating additional gear-like interactions between adjacent Thr pairs. Combined, these data suggest that the threonine turnstile motif may be a general feature of interest in protein binding pockets.

  11. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    PubMed

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides.

  12. Differences between high-affinity forskolin binding sites in dopamine-riche and other regions of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Poat, J.A.; Cripps, H.E.; Iversen, L.L.

    1988-05-01

    Forskolin labelled with (/sup 3/H) bound to high- and low-affinity sites in the rat brain. The high-affinity site was discretely located, with highest densities in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercule, substantia nigra, hippocampus, and the molecular layers of the cerebellum. This site did not correlate well with the distribution of adenylate cyclase. The high-affinity striatal binding site may be associated with a stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Thus, the number of sites was increased by the addition of Mg/sup 2 +/ and guanylyl imidodiphosphate. Cholera toxin stereotaxically injected into rat striatum increased the number of binding sites, and no further increase was noted following the subsequent addition of guanyl nucleotide. High-affinity forskolin binding sites in non-dopamine-rich brain areas (hippocampus and cerebullum) were modulated in a qualitatively different manner by guanyl nucleotides. In these areas the number of binding sites was significantly reduced by the addition of guanyl nucleotide. These results suggest that forskolin may have a potential role in identifying different functional/structural guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

  13. Photoaffinity labeling of uncoupler binding sites on mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Kurup, C K; Sanadi, D R

    1977-02-01

    3H 2-azido-4-nitrophenol, a photoactive uncoupler, has been synthesized, and its uncoupling action on oxidative phosphorylation and its binding to the mitochondrial membrane have been studied. The uncoupler bound covalently to the mitochondrial membrane on photoirradiation was 3-4 times that bound reversibly in the absence of light. When irradiation was carried out in the presence of serum albumin, covalent binding was significantly depressed. The pattern of loss of ATP-Pi exchange activity with increasing amounts of the uncoupler suggests that serum albumin prevents the binding of the uncoupler to the functional sites as well. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of photoaffinity labeled submitochondrial particles in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate revealed that a 9000 dalton peptide bound high levels of uncoupler. Other proteins in the molecular weight range of 20,000-40,000 and 55,000 were also labeled. Photolysis in the presence of serum albumin or ATP decreased the covalent binding of the uncoupler to all the proteins, but particularly to the 20,000 dalton component. Soluble ATPase and the mitochondrial proteolipid purified from labeled mitochondria showed the presence of label.

  14. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  15. A Unitary Anesthetic-Binding Site at High Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Vedula, L.; Brannigan, G; Economou, N; Xi, J; Hall, M; Liu, R; Rossi, M; Dailey, W; Grasty, K; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABAA receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  16. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Brannigan, Grace; Economou, Nicoleta J.; Xi, Jin; Hall, Michael A.; Liu, Renyu; Rossi, Matthew J.; Dailey, William P.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Loll, Patrick J.

    2009-10-21

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  17. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. ); Nicoletti, G. ); Holan, G. )

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  18. Coenzyme A Binding to the Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb Increases Conformational Sampling of Antibiotic Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaohu; Norris, Adrianne; Baudry, Jerome Y; Serpersu, Engin H

    2011-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to describe the dynamic properties of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb (AAC) in its apo and coenzyme A (CoASH) bound forms. The {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H HSQC spectra indicate a partial structural change and coupling of the CoASH binding site with another region in the protein upon the CoASH titration into the apo enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate a significant structural and dynamic variation of the long loop in the antibiotic binding domain in the form of a relatively slow (250 ns), concerted opening motion in the CoASH enzyme complex and that binding of the CoASH increases the structural flexibility of the loop, leading to an interchange between several similar equally populated conformations.

  19. Characterization of binding sites for /sup 3/H-spiroperidol in human retina

    SciTech Connect

    McGonigle, P.; Wax, M.B.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1988-05-01

    Binding sites for the D-2-selective antagonist (/sup 3/H)-spiroperidol were characterized in human retina. Nonspecific binding, measured in the presence of 2 microM (+)-butaclamol, made up 20% of total binding. Scatchard analysis of the binding of (/sup 3/H)-spiroperidol resulted in linear plots and yielded a Kd value of 87 pM and a Bmax value of 1500 fmol/mg protein. In studies of the inhibition of the binding of (/sup 3/H)-spiroperidol, (+)-butaclamol was approximately 1000-fold more potent than the (-)-stereoisomer. The inhibition curve for dopamine was shifted to the right and the Hill coefficient was increased by the addition of 300 microM GTP. This effect was agonist-specific and suggests that some of the receptors are coupled to stimulation or inhibition of the enzyme adenylate cyclase. The inhibition curves for most of the antagonists had Hill coefficients between 0.6 and 0.8. Hill coefficients were also consistently less than 1.0 for agonists even in the presence of GTP. Nonlinear regression analysis of untransformed data revealed that these shallow inhibition curves were best explained by the presence of two populations of binding sites, 40% of the sites having a high affinity for dopamine in the presence of GTP and domperidone and the remaining 60% having a lower affinity for these ligands. The larger population of sites had a higher affinity for sulpiride, fluphenazine, and N-propylnorapomorphine in the presence of GTP. The possibility that either of these classes of sites consisted of serotonin receptors was ruled out by the finding that the 5-HT2 antagonist ketanserin had a low affinity for both classes of sites.

  20. Characterization of binding sites for 3H-spiroperidol in human retina.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, P; Wax, M B; Molinoff, P B

    1988-05-01

    Binding sites for the D-2-selective antagonist (3H)-spiroperidol were characterized in human retina. Nonspecific binding, measured in the presence of 2 microM (+)-butaclamol, made up 20% of total binding. Scatchard analysis of the binding of (3H)-spiroperidol resulted in linear plots and yielded a Kd value of 87 pM and a Bmax value of 1500 fmol/mg protein. In studies of the inhibition of the binding of (3H)-spiroperidol, (+)-butaclamol was approximately 1000-fold more potent than the (-)-stereoisomer. The inhibition curve for dopamine was shifted to the right and the Hill coefficient was increased by the addition of 300 microM GTP. This effect was agonist-specific and suggests that some of the receptors are coupled to stimulation or inhibition of the enzyme adenylate cyclase. The inhibition curves for most of the antagonists had Hill coefficients between 0.6 and 0.8. Hill coefficients were also consistently less than 1.0 for agonists even in the presence of GTP. Nonlinear regression analysis of untransformed data revealed that these shallow inhibition curves were best explained by the presence of two populations of binding sites, 40% of the sites having a high affinity for dopamine in the presence of GTP and domperidone and the remaining 60% having a lower affinity for these ligands. The larger population of sites had a higher affinity for sulpiride, fluphenazine, and N-propylnorapomorphine in the presence of GTP. The possibility that either of these classes of sites consisted of serotonin receptors was ruled out by the finding that the 5-HT2 antagonist ketanserin had a low affinity for both classes of sites.

  1. Analysis of binding site hot spots on the surface of Ras GTPase.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Greg; O'Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L; Mattos, Carla

    2011-11-04

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the "off" and "on" allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  2. Analysis of Binding Site Hot Spots on the Surface of Ras GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Buhrman, Greg; O; #8242; Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M.; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A.; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Mattos, Carla

    2012-09-17

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the 'off' and 'on' allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  3. MX Siting Investigation. Mineral Resources Survey, Seven Additional Valleys, Nevada/Utah Siting Area. Volume IV.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-23

    8217 AD-AI13 146 ERTEC WESTERN INC. LONG BEACH CA F/6 B/7 MX SITING INVESTIGATION. MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY, SEVEN AGOITI--ETC(U) UNCLASSIFIED E-TR...50 MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY SEVEN ADDITIONAL VALLEYS NEVADA/UTAH SITING AREA VOLUME IV 4Prepared for: U. S. Department of the Air Force Ballistic...VALLEY MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEfV STUDY AREA OXJNOARY SEPT. 26, 1960 I MX SITING INVESTIGATION 27 FEDC t97 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE I ik 320’- 36 37 4

  4. Conformational changes in the metal-binding sites of cardiac troponin C induced by calcium binding

    SciTech Connect

    Krudy, G.A.; Brito, R.M.M.; Putkey, J.A.; Rosevear, P.R. )

    1992-02-18

    Isotope labeling of recombinant normal cardiac troponin C (cTnC3) with {sup 15}N-enriched amino acids and multidimensional NMR were used to assign the downfield-shifted amide protons of Gly residues at position 6 in Ca{sup 2+}-binding loops II, III, and IV, as well a tightly hydrogen-bonded amides within the short antiparallel {beta}-sheets between pairs of Ca{sup 2+}-binding loops. The amide protons of Gly70, Gly110, and Gly146 were found to be shifted significantly downfield from the remaining amide proton resonances in Ca{sup 2+}-saturated cTnC3. No downfield-shifted Gly resonance was observed from the naturally inactive site I. Comparison of downfield-shifted amide protons in the Ca{sup 2+}-saturated forms of cTnC3 and CBM-IIA, a mutant having Asp65 replaced by Ala, demonstrated the Gly70 is hydrogen bonded to the carboxylate side chain of Asp65. Thus, the hydrogen bond between Gly and Asp in positions 6 and 1, respectively, of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding loop appears crucial for maintaining the integrity of the helix-loop-helix Ca{sup 2+}-binding sites. The amide protons of Ile112 and Ile148 in the C-terminal domain and Ile36 in the N-terminal domain {beta}-sheets exhibit chemical shifts consistent with hydrogen-bond formation between the pair of Ca{sup 2+}-binding loops in each domain of Ca{sup 2+}-saturated cTnC3. In the absence of Ca{sup 2+}, no strong hydrogen bonds were detected between the {beta}-strands in the N-terminal domain of cTnC3. Thus, Ca{sup 2+} binding at site II results in a tightening of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding loop and formation of one strong hydrogen bond between {beta}-strands in the N-terminal domain. These changes may initiate movement of helices in the N-terminal domain responsible for the interaction of TnC with troponin I.

  5. Suramin and the suramin analogue NF307 discriminate among calmodulin-binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, M; Bofill-Cardona, E; Mayer, B; Nanoff, C; Freissmuth, M; Hohenegger, M

    2001-01-01

    Calmodulin-binding sites on target proteins show considerable variation in primary sequence; hence compounds that block the access of calmodulin to these binding sites may be more selective than compounds that inactivate calmodulin. Suramin and its analogue NF307 inhibit the interaction of calmodulin with the ryanodine receptor. We have investigated whether inhibition of calmodulin binding to target proteins is a general property of these compounds. Suramin inhibited binding of [(125)I]calmodulin to porcine brain membranes and to sarcoplasmic reticulum from skeletal muscle (IC(50)=4.9+/-1.2 microM and 19.9+/-1.8 microM, respectively) and blocked the cross-linking of [(125)I]calmodulin to some, but not all, target proteins in brain membranes by [(125)I]calmodulin. Four calmodulin-binding proteins were purified [ryanodine receptor-1 (RyR1) from rabbit skeletal muscle, neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) from Sf9 cells, G-protein betagamma dimers (Gbetagamma) from porcine brain and a glutathione S-transferase-fusion protein comprising the C-terminal calmodulin-binding domain of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 7A (GST-CmGluR7A) from bacterial lysates]. Three of the proteins employed (Gbetagamma, GST-CmGluR7A and RyR1) display a comparable affinity for calmodulin (in the range of 50-70 nM). Nevertheless, suramin and NF307 only blocked the binding of Gbetagamma and RyR1 to calmodulin-Sepharose. In contrast, the association of GST-CmGluR7A and nNOS was not impaired, whereas excess calmodulin uniformly displaced all proteins from the matrix. Thus suramin and NF307 are prototypes of a new class of calmodulin antagonists that do not interact directly with calmodulin but with calmodulin-recognition sites. In addition, these compounds discriminate among calmodulin-binding motifs. PMID:11311147

  6. A reexamination of information theory-based methods for DNA-binding site identification

    PubMed Central

    Erill, Ivan; O'Neill, Michael C

    2009-01-01

    Background Searching for transcription factor binding sites in genome sequences is still an open problem in bioinformatics. Despite substantial progress, search methods based on information theory remain a standard in the field, even though the full validity of their underlying assumptions has only been tested in artificial settings. Here we use newly available data on transcription factors from different bacterial genomes to make a more thorough assessment of information theory-based search methods. Results Our results reveal that conventional benchmarking against artificial sequence data leads frequently to overestimation of search efficiency. In addition, we find that sequence information by itself is often inadequate and therefore must be complemented by other cues, such as curvature, in real genomes. Furthermore, results on skewed genomes show that methods integrating skew information, such as Relative Entropy, are not effective because their assumptions may not hold in real genomes. The evidence suggests that binding sites tend to evolve towards genomic skew, rather than against it, and to maintain their information content through increased conservation. Based on these results, we identify several misconceptions on information theory as applied to binding sites, such as negative entropy, and we propose a revised paradigm to explain the observed results. Conclusion We conclude that, among information theory-based methods, the most unassuming search methods perform, on average, better than any other alternatives, since heuristic corrections to these methods are prone to fail when working on real data. A reexamination of information content in binding sites reveals that information content is a compound measure of search and binding affinity requirements, a fact that has important repercussions for our understanding of binding site evolution. PMID:19210776

  7. The water network in galectin-3 ligand binding site guides inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiyong; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Peiqi; Liu, Fengjian; Tai, Guihua; Zhou, Yifa

    2015-03-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3) which shows affinity of β-galactosides is a cancer-related protein. Thus, it is important to understand its ligand binding mechanism and then design its specific inhibitor. It was suggested that the positions of water molecules in Gal-3 ligand-binding site could be replaced by appropriate chemical groups of ideal inhibitors. However, the reported structures of Gal-3 carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) complexed with lactose showed that the number of water molecules are different and the water positions are inconsistent in the ligand-binding site. This study reported four high-resolution (1.24-1.19 Å) structures of Gal-3 CRD complexed with lactose, and accurately located 12 conserved water molecules in the water network of Gal-3 CRD ligand-binding site by merging these structures. These water molecules either directly stabilize the binding of Gal-3 CRD and lactose, or hold the former water molecules at the right place. In particular, water molecule 4 (W4) which only coordinates with water molecule 5 (W5) and water molecule 6 (W6) plays a key role in stabilizing galactose residue. In addition, by three-dimensional alignment of the positions of all residues, 14 flexible parts of Gal-3 CRD were found to dynamically fluctuate in the crystalline environment.

  8. Viral receptor-binding site antibodies with diverse germline origins

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Aaron G.; Therkelsen, Matthew D.; Stewart, Shaun; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Haynes, Barton F.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines for rapidly evolving pathogens will confer lasting immunity if they elicit antibodies recognizing conserved epitopes, such as a receptor-binding site (RBS). From characteristics of an influenza-virus RBS-directed antibody, we devised a signature motif to search for similar antibodies. We identified, from three vaccinees, over 100 candidates encoded by eleven different VH genes. Crystal structures show that antibodies in this class engage the hemagglutinin RBS and mimic binding of the receptor, sialic acid, by supplying a critical dipeptide on their projecting, heavy-chain third complementarity determining region. They share contacts with conserved, receptor-binding residues but contact different residues on the RBS periphery, limiting the likelihood of viral escape when several such antibodies are present. These data show that related modes of RBS recognition can arise from different germline origins and mature through diverse affinity maturation pathways. Immunogens focused on an RBS-directed response will thus have a broad range of B-cell targets. PMID:25959776

  9. Altering the GTP binding site of the DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/TB-RBP, decreases RNA binding and may create a dominant negative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chennathukuzhi, V M; Kurihara, Y; Bray, J D; Yang, J; Hecht, N B

    2001-11-01

    The DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/Testis Brain RNA-binding protein (Translin/TB-RBP), contains a putative GTP binding site in its C-terminus which is highly conserved. To determine if guanine nucleotide binding to this site functionally alters nucleic acid binding, electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed with RNA and DNA binding probes. GTP, but not GDP, reduces RNA binding by approximately 50% and the poorly hydrolyzed GTP analog, GTPgammaS, reduces binding by >90% in gel shift and immunoprecipitation assays. No similar reduction of DNA binding is seen. When the putative GTP binding site of TB-RBP, amino acid sequence VTAGD, is altered to VTNSD by site directed mutagenesis, GTP will no longer bind to TB-RBP(GTP) and TB-RBP(GTP) no longer binds to RNA, although DNA binding is not affected. Yeast two-hybrid assays reveal that like wild-type TB-RBP, TB-RBP(GTP) will interact with itself, with wild-type TB-RBP and with Translin associated factor X (Trax). Transfection of TB-RBP(GTP) into NIH 3T3 cells leads to a marked increase in cell death suggesting a dominant negative function for TB-RBP(GTP) in cells. These data suggest TB-RBP is an RNA-binding protein whose activity is allosterically controlled by nucleotide binding.

  10. Ontogeny of basic fibroblast growth factor binding sites in mouse ocular tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Fayein, N.A.; Courtois, Y.; Jeanny, J.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) binding to ocular tissues has been studied by autoradiographical and biochemical approaches directly performed on sections during mouse embryonic and postnatal development. Frozen sections of embryos (9 to 18 days), newborns, and adults (1 day to 6 months) were incubated with iodinated bFGF. One specific FGF binding site (KD = 2.5 nM) is colocalized with heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the basement membranes and is heparitinase sensitive. It first appears at Day 9 around the neural tube, the optic vesicles, and below the head ectoderm and by Day 14 of embryonic development is found in all basement membranes of the eye. At Day 16, very intensely labeled patches appear, corresponding to mast cells which have been characterized by metachromatic staining of their heparin-rich granulations with toluidine blue. In addition to the latter binding, we have also observed a general diffuse distribution of silver grains on all tissues and preferentially in the ecto- and neuroectodermic tissues. From Days 17-18, there is heterogeneous labeling inside the retina, localized in the pigmented epithelium and in three different layers colocalized with the inner and outer plexiform layers and with the inner segments of the photoreceptors. This binding is heparitinase resistant but N-glycanase sensitive and may represent a second specific binding site corresponding to cellular FGF receptors (KD = 280 pM). Both types of binding patterns observed suggest a significant role for bFGF in eye development and physiology.

  11. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  12. Examination of the thiamin diphosphate binding site in yeast transketolase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Meshalkina, L; Nilsson, U; Wikner, C; Kostikowa, T; Schneider, G

    1997-03-01

    The role of two conserved amino acid residues in the thiamin diphosphate binding site of yeast transketolase has been analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of E162, which is part of a cluster of glutamic acid residues at the subunit interface, by alanine or glutamine results in mutant enzymes with most catalytic properties similar to wild-type enzyme. The two mutant enzymes show, however, significant increases in the K0.5 values for thiamin diphosphate in the absence of substrate and in the lag of the reaction progress curves. This suggests that the interaction of E162 with residue E418, and possibly E167, from the second subunit is important for formation and stabilization of the transketolase dimer. Replacement of the conserved residue D382, which is buried upon binding of thiamin diphosphate, by asparagine and alanine, results in mutant enzymes severely impaired in thiamin diphosphate binding and catalytic efficiency. The 25-80-fold increase in K0.5 for thiamin diphosphate suggests that D382 is involved in cofactor binding, probably by electrostatic compensation of the positive charge of the thiazolium ring and stabilization of a flexible loop at the active site. The decrease in catalytic activities in the D382 mutants indicates that this residue might also be important in subsequent steps in catalysis.

  13. Imidazoline binding sites and receptors in cardiovascular tissue.

    PubMed

    Molderings, G J; Göthert, M

    1999-01-01

    1. Imidazoline binding sites and receptors and their endogenous ligands have been identified in cardiovascular tissue of various species including human beings. 2. I2- (but only exceptionally I1-)imidazoline binding sites have been shown to exist on cardiac myocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells; at present, their functional role is unknown. 3. The sympathetic nerves supplying the cardiovascular system are endowed with presynaptic inhibitory imidazoline receptors that may become of therapeutic relevance as targets of drugs. 4. ATP-sensitive K+ channels present in heart and blood vessels can be blocked by several imidazolines and guanidines; hence, those drugs can interfere with the cardioprotective effects resulting from K(ATP) channel activation by a decrease in the endogenous ligand ATP or by drugs. 5. Imidazoline derivatives exhibit antiarrhythmic properties that are due to a reduction of sympathetic tone by central and peripheral mechanisms and to blockade of postsynaptic alpha2-adrenoceptors in the heart and coronary arteries. 6. Agmatine and clonidine-displacing substance, which are endogenous ligands at imidazoline and alpha2-receptors, are present in the blood serum and appear to participate in vascular smooth muscle proliferation and blood pressure regulation.

  14. Atrial natriuretic factor binding sites in experimental congestive heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, C.; Thibault, G.; Wrobel-Konrad, E.; De Lean, A.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M. )

    1989-10-01

    A quantitative in vitro autoradiographic study was performed on the aorta, renal glomeruli, and adrenal cortex of cardiomyopathic hamsters in various stages of heart failure and correlated, in some instances, with in vivo autoradiography. The results indicate virtually no correlation between the degree of congestive heart failure and the density of 125I-labeled atrial natriuretic factor ((Ser99, Tyr126)ANF) binding sites (Bmax) in the tissues examined. Whereas the Bmax was increased in the thoracic aorta in moderate and severe heart failure, there were no significant changes in the zona glomerulosa. The renal glomeruli Bmax was lower in mild and moderate heart failure compared with control and severe heart failure. The proportion of ANF B- and C-receptors was also evaluated in sections of the aorta, adrenal, and kidney of control and cardiomyopathic hamsters with severe heart failure. (Arg102, Cys121)ANF (des-(Gln113, Ser114, Gly115, Leu116, Gly117) NH2) (C-ANF) at 10(-6) M displaced approximately 505 of (Ser99, Tyr126)125I-ANF bound in the aorta and renal glomeruli and approximately 20% in the adrenal zona glomerulosa in both series of animals. These results suggest that ANF may exert a buffering effect on the vasoconstriction of heart failure and to a certain extent may inhibit aldosterone secretion. The impairment of renal sodium excretion does not appear to be related to glomerular ANF binding sites at any stage of the disease.

  15. The first intron of the human growth hormone gene contains a binding site for glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Moore, D D; Marks, A R; Buckley, D I; Kapler, G; Payvar, F; Goodman, H M

    1985-02-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) protein stimulates transcription from a variety of cellular genes. We show here that GCR partially purified from rat liver binds specifically to a site within the first intron of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene, approximately 100 base pairs downstream from the start of hGH transcription. GCR binding is selectively inhibited by methylation of two short, symmetrically arranged clusters of guanine residues within this site. A cloned synthetic 24-base-pair deoxyoligonucleotide containing the predicted GCR binding sequence interacts specifically with GCR. The hGH binding site shares sequence homology with a GCR binding site upstream from the human metallothionein II gene and a subset of GCR binding sites from mouse mammary tumor virus. All of these binding sites for this eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory protein show remarkable similarity in overall geometry to the binding sites for several prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  16. The roles of histidine residues at the starch-binding site in streptococcal-binding activities of human salivary amylase.

    PubMed

    Tseng, C C; Miyamoto, M; Ramalingam, K; Hemavathy, K C; Levine, M J; Ramasubbu, N

    1999-02-01

    Human salivary alpha-amylase participates in the initial digestion of starch and may be involved in the colonization of viridans streptococci in the mouth. To elucidate the role of histidine residues located near the starch-binding site on the streptococcal-binding activity, the wild type and three histidine mutants, H52A, H299A and H305A were constructed and expressed in a baculovirus system. While His52 is located near the non-reducing end of the starch-binding pocket (subsite S3/S4), the residues His299 and His305 are located near the subsites S1/S1'. For the wild type, the cDNA encoding the leader and secreted sequences of human salivary amylase was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from a human submandibular salivary-gland cDNA library, and subcloned into the baculovirus shuttle vector pVL1392 downstream of the polyhedrin promoter. Oligonucleotide-based, site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate the mutants expressed in the baculovirus system. Replacing His52 or His299 or His305 to Ala residue did not alter the bacterial-binding activity significantly, but these mutants did show differences in their catalytic activities. The mutant H52A showed negligible reduction in enzymatic activity compared to that of wild type for the hydrolysis of starch and oligosaccharides. In contrast, the H299A and H305A mutants showed a 12 to 13-fold reduction (90-92%) in starch-hydrolysing activity. In addition, the k(cat) for the hydrolysis of oligosaccharides by H299A decreased by as much as 11-fold for maltoheptaoside. This reduction was even higher (40-fold) for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl maltoside, with a significant change in K(M). The mutant H305A, however, exhibited a reduction in k(cat) only, with no changes in the K(M) for the hydrolysis of oligosaccharides. The reduction in the k(cat) for the H305A mutant was almost 93% for maltoheptaoside hydrolysis. The pH activity profile for the H305A mutant was also significantly different from that of the wild type

  17. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation. PMID:26506102

  18. Development of a protein-ligand-binding site prediction method based on interaction energy and sequence conservation.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Hiroto; Sato, Kenta; Wei, Cao; Saad, Gul; Sumikoshi, Kazuya; Nakamura, Shugo; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-09-01

    We present a new method for predicting protein-ligand-binding sites based on protein three-dimensional structure and amino acid conservation. This method involves calculation of the van der Waals interaction energy between a protein and many probes placed on the protein surface and subsequent clustering of the probes with low interaction energies to identify the most energetically favorable locus. In addition, it uses amino acid conservation among homologous proteins. Ligand-binding sites were predicted by combining the interaction energy and the amino acid conservation score. The performance of our prediction method was evaluated using a non-redundant dataset of 348 ligand-bound and ligand-unbound protein structure pairs, constructed by filtering entries in a ligand-binding site structure database, LigASite. Ligand-bound structure prediction (bound prediction) indicated that 74.0 % of predicted ligand-binding sites overlapped with real ligand-binding sites by over 25 % of their volume. Ligand-unbound structure prediction (unbound prediction) indicated that 73.9 % of predicted ligand-binding residues overlapped with real ligand-binding residues. The amino acid conservation score improved the average prediction accuracy by 17.0 and 17.6 points for the bound and unbound predictions, respectively. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the combined use of the interaction energy and amino acid conservation in the ligand-binding site prediction.

  19. Structure-function studies on human retinol-binding protein using site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sivaprasadarao, A; Findlay, J B

    1994-01-01

    Retinol-binding protein (RBP) transports vitamin A in the plasma. It consists of eight anti-parallel beta-strands (A to H) that fold to form an orthogonal barrel. The loops connecting the strands A and B, C and D, and E and F form the entrance to the binding site in the barrel. The retinol molecule is found deep inside this barrel. Apart from its specific interaction with retinol, RBP is involved in two other molecular-recognition properties, that is it binds to transthyretin (TTR), another serum protein, and to a cell-surface receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis, specific changes were made to the loop regions of human RBP and the resultant mutant proteins were tested for their ability to bind to retinol, to TTR and to the RBP receptor. While all the variants retained their ability to bind retinol, that in which residues 92 to 98 of the loop E-F were deleted completely lost its ability to interact with TTR, but retained some binding activity for the receptor. In contrast, the double mutant in which leucine residues at positions 63 and 64 of the loop C-D were changed to arginine and serine respectively partially retained its TTR-binding ability, but completely lost its affinity for the RBP receptor. Mutation of Leu-35 of loop A-B to valine revealed no apparent effect on any of the binding activities of RBP. However, substitution of leucine for proline at position 35 markedly reduced the affinity of the protein for TTR, but showed no apparent change in its receptor-binding activity. These results demonstrate that RBP interacts with both TTR and the receptor via loops C-D and E-F. The binding sites, however, are overlapping rather than identical. RBP also appears to make an additional contact with TTR via its loop A-B. A further implication of these results is that RBP, when bound to TTR, cannot bind simultaneously to the receptor. This observation is consistent with our previously proposed mechanism for delivery of retinol to target tissues [Sivaprasadarao and

  20. DBD2BS: connecting a DNA-binding protein with its binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ting-Ying; Lin, Chih-Kang; Lin, Chih-Wei; Weng, Yi-Zhong; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chang, Darby Tien-Hao

    2012-01-01

    By binding to short and highly conserved DNA sequences in genomes, DNA-binding proteins initiate, enhance or repress biological processes. Accurately identifying such binding sites, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs), is an important step in understanding the control mechanisms of cells. When given coordinates of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) bound with DNA, a potential function can be used to estimate the change of binding affinity after base substitutions, where the changes can be summarized as a PWM. This technique provides an effective alternative when the chromatin immunoprecipitation data are unavailable for PWM inference. To facilitate the procedure of predicting PWMs based on protein–DNA complexes or even structures of the unbound state, the web server, DBD2BS, is presented in this study. The DBD2BS uses an atom-level knowledge-based potential function to predict PWMs characterizing the sequences to which the query DBD structure can bind. For unbound queries, a list of 1066 DBD–DNA complexes (including 1813 protein chains) is compiled for use as templates for synthesizing bound structures. The DBD2BS provides users with an easy-to-use interface for visualizing the PWMs predicted based on different templates and the spatial relationships of the query protein, the DBDs and the DNAs. The DBD2BS is the first attempt to predict PWMs of DBDs from unbound structures rather than from bound ones. This approach increases the number of existing protein structures that can be exploited when analyzing protein–DNA interactions. In a recent study, the authors showed that the kernel adopted by the DBD2BS can generate PWMs consistent with those obtained from the experimental data. The use of DBD2BS to predict PWMs can be incorporated with sequence-based methods to discover binding sites in genome-wide studies. Available at: http://dbd2bs.csie.ntu.edu.tw/, http://dbd2bs.csbb.ntu.edu.tw/, and http://dbd2bs.ee.ncku.edu.tw. PMID:22693214

  1. The noncompetitive inhibitor WW781 senses changes in erythrocyte anion exchanger (AE1) transport site conformation and substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Knauf, P A; Raha, N M; Spinelli, L J

    2000-02-01

    WW781 binds reversibly to red blood cell AE1 and inhibits anion exchange by a two-step mechanism, in which an initial complex (complex 1) is rapidly formed, and then there is a slower equilibration to form a second complex (complex 2) with a lower free energy. According to the ping-pong kinetic model, AE1 can exist in forms with the anion transport site facing either inward or outward, and the transition between these forms is greatly facilitated by binding of a transportable substrate such as Cl(-). Both the rapid initial binding of WW781 and the formation of complex 2 are strongly affected by the conformation of AE1, such that the forms with the transport site facing outward have higher affinity than those with the transport site facing inward. In addition, binding of Cl(-) seems to raise the free energy of complex 2 relative to complex 1, thereby reducing the equilibrium binding affinity, but Cl(-) does not compete directly with WW781. The WW781 binding site, therefore, reveals a part of the AE1 structure that is sensitive to Cl(-) binding and to transport site orientation, in addition to the disulfonic stilbene binding site. The relationship of the inhibitory potency of WW781 under different conditions to the affinities for the different forms of AE1 provides information on the possible asymmetric distributions of unloaded and Cl(-)-loaded transport sites that are consistent with the ping-pong model, and supports the conclusion from flux and nuclear magnetic resonance data that both the unloaded and Cl(-)-loaded sites are very asymmetrically distributed, with far more sites facing the cytoplasm than the outside medium. This asymmetry, together with the ability of WW781 to recruit toward the forms with outward-facing sites, implies that WW781 may be useful for changing the conformation of AE1 in studies of structure-function relationships.

  2. Antidepressant binding site in a bacterial homologue of neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satinder K; Yamashita, Atsuko; Gouaux, Eric

    2007-08-23

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 A above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational design of

  3. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational

  4. Oligosaccharyltransferase directly binds to ribosome at a location near the translocon-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Y.; Li, H.; Li, Hua; Lennarz, W. J.

    2009-04-28

    Oligosaccharyltransferase (OT) transfers high mannose-type glycans to the nascent polypeptides that are translated by the membrane-bound ribosome and translocated into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum through the Sec61 translocon complex. In this article, we show that purified ribosomes and OT can form a binary complex with a stoichiometry of {approx}1 to 1 in the presence of detergent. We present evidence that OT may bind to the large ribosomal subunit near the site where nascent polypeptides exit. We further show that OT and the Sec61 complex can simultaneously bind to ribosomes in vitro. Based on existing data and our findings, we propose that cotranslational translocation and N-glycosylation of nascent polypeptides are mediated by a ternary supramolecular complex consisting of OT, the Sec61 complex, and ribosomes.

  5. GE23077 binds to the RNA polymerase 'i' and 'i+1' sites and prevents the binding of initiating nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Degen, David; Ho, Mary X; Sineva, Elena; Ebright, Katherine Y; Ebright, Yon W; Mekler, Vladimir; Vahedian-Movahed, Hanif; Feng, Yu; Yin, Ruiheng; Tuske, Steve; Irschik, Herbert; Jansen, Rolf; Maffioli, Sonia; Donadio, Stefano; Arnold, Eddy; Ebright, Richard H

    2014-04-22

    Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and structural approaches, we show that the cyclic-peptide antibiotic GE23077 (GE) binds directly to the bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) active-center 'i' and 'i+1' nucleotide binding sites, preventing the binding of initiating nucleotides, and thereby preventing transcription initiation. The target-based resistance spectrum for GE is unusually small, reflecting the fact that the GE binding site on RNAP includes residues of the RNAP active center that cannot be substituted without loss of RNAP activity. The GE binding site on RNAP is different from the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, GE and rifamycins do not exhibit cross-resistance, and GE and a rifamycin can bind simultaneously to RNAP. The GE binding site on RNAP is immediately adjacent to the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, covalent linkage of GE to a rifamycin provides a bipartite inhibitor having very high potency and very low susceptibility to target-based resistance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02450.001.

  6. Binding of coumarins to site I of human serum albumin. Effect of the fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Zatón, A M; Ferrer, J M; Ruiz de Gordoa, J C; Marquínez, M A

    1995-07-14

    It is known that binding site I on human serum albumin (HSA) consists of a zone of two overlapping regions: the specific binding region represented by warfarin binding and the specific binding region represented by azapropazone and phenylbutazone binding. In this paper binding parameters to defatted HSA and to HSA with fatty acids (molar ratio of fatty acid/HSA = 4) were compared. High-affinity binding sites for warfarin, 4-chromanol, 4-hydroxycoumarin, coumarin, 3-acetylcoumarin and phenylbutazone (759,549 M-1 > Ka > 67,024 M-1) constitute binding site I on HSA. In this binding area defatted HSA can bind two molecules of warfarin, but the presence of fatty acids diminish the binding capacity of warfarin to HSA (2 > n > 1).

  7. Mapping of the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site within the alpha subunit of the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Safran, A; Gershoni, J M; Fuchs, S

    1986-01-01

    Synthetic peptides and their respective antibodies have been used in order to map the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site within the alpha subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. By using antibodies to a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 169-181 of the alpha subunit, we demonstrate that this sequence is included within the 18-kDa toxin binding fragment previously reported. Furthermore, the 18-kDa fragment was also found to bind a monoclonal antibody (5.5) directed against the cholinergic binding site. Sequential proteolysis of the acetylcholine receptor with trypsin, prior to Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion, resulted in a 15-kDa toxin binding fragment that is included within the 18-kDa fragment but is shorter than it only at its carboxyl terminus. This 15-kDa fragment therefore initiates beyond Asp-152 and terminates in the region of Arg-313/Lys-314. In addition, experiments are reported that indicate that in the intact acetylcholine receptor, Cys-128 and/or Cys-142 are not crosslinked by disulfide bridges with any of the cysteines (at positions 192, 193, and 222) that reside in the 15-kDa toxin binding fragment. Finally, the synthetic dodecapeptide Lys-His-Trp-Val-Tyr-Tyr-Thr-Cys-Cys-Pro-Asp-Thr, which is present in the 15-kDa fragment (corresponding to residues 185-196 of the alpha subunit) was shown to bind alpha-bungarotoxin directly. This binding was completely inhibited by competition with d-tubocurarine. Images PMID:3458258

  8. Mapping of the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site within the alpha subunit of the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Safran, A; Gershoni, J M; Fuchs, S

    1986-05-01

    Synthetic peptides and their respective antibodies have been used in order to map the alpha-bungarotoxin binding site within the alpha subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. By using antibodies to a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 169-181 of the alpha subunit, we demonstrate that this sequence is included within the 18-kDa toxin binding fragment previously reported. Furthermore, the 18-kDa fragment was also found to bind a monoclonal antibody (5.5) directed against the cholinergic binding site. Sequential proteolysis of the acetylcholine receptor with trypsin, prior to Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion, resulted in a 15-kDa toxin binding fragment that is included within the 18-kDa fragment but is shorter than it only at its carboxyl terminus. This 15-kDa fragment therefore initiates beyond Asp-152 and terminates in the region of Arg-313/Lys-314. In addition, experiments are reported that indicate that in the intact acetylcholine receptor, Cys-128 and/or Cys-142 are not crosslinked by disulfide bridges with any of the cysteines (at positions 192, 193, and 222) that reside in the 15-kDa toxin binding fragment. Finally, the synthetic dodecapeptide Lys-His-Trp-Val-Tyr-Tyr-Thr-Cys-Cys-Pro-Asp-Thr, which is present in the 15-kDa fragment (corresponding to residues 185-196 of the alpha subunit) was shown to bind alpha-bungarotoxin directly. This binding was completely inhibited by competition with d-tubocurarine.

  9. Equilibrium binding of single-stranded DNA to the secondary DNA binding site of the bacterial recombinase RecA.

    PubMed

    Gourves, A S; Defais, M; Johnson, N P

    2001-03-30

    The bacterial recombinase RecA forms a nucleoprotein filament in vitro with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) at its primary DNA binding site, site I. This filament has a second site, site II, which binds ssDNA and double-stranded DNA. We have investigated the binding of ssDNA to the RecA protein in the presence of adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) cofactor using fluorescence anisotropy. The RecA protein carried out DNA strand exchange with a 5'-fluorescein-labeled 32-mer oligonucleotide. The anisotropy signal was shown to measure oligonucleotide binding to RecA, and the relationship between signal and binding density was determined. Binding of ssDNA to site I of RecA was stable at high NaCl concentrations. Binding to site II could be described by a simple two-state equilibrium, K = 4.5 +/- 1.5 x 10(5) m(-1) (37 degrees C, 150 mm NaCl, pH 7.4). The reaction was enthalpy-driven and entropy-opposed. It depended on salt concentration and was sensitive to the type of monovalent anion, suggesting that anion-dependent protein conformations contribute to ssDNA binding at site II.

  10. Functional impact of HIV coreceptor-binding site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Biscone, Mark J.; Miamidian, John L.; Muchiri, John M.; Baik, Sarah S.W.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Reeves, Jacqueline D. . E-mail: jreeves@MonogramBio.com

    2006-07-20

    The bridging sheet region of the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 Env protein interacts with the major virus coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. We examined the impact of mutations in and adjacent to the bridging sheet region of an X4 tropic HIV-1 on membrane fusion and entry inhibitor susceptibility. When the V3-loop of this Env was changed so that CCR5 was used, the effects of these same mutations on CCR5 use were assayed as well. We found that coreceptor-binding site mutations had greater effects on CXCR4-mediated fusion and infection than when CCR5 was used as a coreceptor, perhaps related to differences in coreceptor affinity. The mutations also reduced use of the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and CCR8 to varying degrees, indicating that the bridging sheet region is important for the efficient utilization of both major and minor HIV coreceptors. As seen before with a primary R5 virus strain, bridging sheet mutations increased susceptibility to the CCR5 inhibitor TAK-779, which correlated with CCR5 binding efficiency. Bridging sheet mutations also conferred increased susceptibility to the CXCR4 ligand AMD-3100 in the context of the X4 tropic Env. However, these mutations had little effect on the rate of membrane fusion and little effect on susceptibility to enfuvirtide, a membrane fusion inhibitor whose activity is dependent in part on the rate of Env-mediated membrane fusion. Thus, mutations that reduce coreceptor binding and enhance susceptibility to coreceptor inhibitors can affect fusion and enfuvirtide susceptibility in an Env context-dependent manner.

  11. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: location of the ligand binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, E.; Wheatley, M.; Curtis, C.; Birdsall, N.

    1987-05-01

    The key to understanding the pharmacological specificity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR's) is the location within the receptor sequence of the amino acid residues responsible for ligand binding. To approach this problem, they have purified mAChR's from rat brain to homogeneity by sequential ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and molecular weight fractionation. Following labelling of the binding site with an alkylating affinity label, /sup 3/H-propylbenzilycholine mustard aziridinium ion (/sup 3/H-PrBCM), the mAChR was digested with a lysine-specific endoproteinase, and a ladder of peptides of increasing molecular weight, each containing the glycosylated N-terminus, isolated by chromatography on wheat-germ agglutinin sepharose. The pattern of labelling showed that a residue in the peptides containing transmembrane helices 2 and/or 3 of the mAChR was alkylated. The linkage was cleaved by 1 M hydroxylamine, showing that /sup 3/H-PrBCM was attached to an acidic residue, whose properties strongly suggested it to be embedded in a hydrophobic intramembrane region of the mAChR. Examination of the cloned sequence of the mAChR reveals several candidate residues, the most likely of which is homologous to an aspartic acid residue thought to protonate the retinal Schiff's base in the congeneric protein rhodopsin.

  12. A Sialic Acid Binding Site in a Human Picornavirus

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Martin; Hähnlein-Schick, Irmgard; Ekström, Jens-Ola; Arnberg, Niklas; Stehle, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    The picornaviruses coxsackievirus A24 variant (CVA24v) and enterovirus 70 (EV70) cause continued outbreaks and pandemics of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC), a highly contagious eye disease against which neither vaccines nor antiviral drugs are currently available. Moreover, these viruses can cause symptoms in the cornea, upper respiratory tract, and neurological impairments such as acute flaccid paralysis. EV70 and CVA24v are both known to use 5-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) for cell attachment, thus providing a putative link between the glycan receptor specificity and cell tropism and disease. We report the structures of an intact human picornavirus in complex with a range of glycans terminating in Neu5Ac. We determined the structure of the CVA24v to 1.40 Å resolution, screened different glycans bearing Neu5Ac for CVA24v binding, and structurally characterized interactions with candidate glycan receptors. Biochemical studies verified the relevance of the binding site and demonstrated a preference of CVA24v for α2,6-linked glycans. This preference can be rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations that show that α2,6-linked glycans can establish more contacts with the viral capsid. Our results form an excellent platform for the design of antiviral compounds to prevent AHC. PMID:25329320

  13. Structural relationship between the enzymatic and streptococcal binding sites of human salivary alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Scannapieco, F A; Bhandary, K; Ramasubbu, N; Levine, M J

    1990-12-31

    Previous studies have demonstrated that human salivary alpha-amylase specifically binds to the oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii. This interaction is inhibited by substrates such as starch and maltotriose suggesting that bacterial binding may involve the enzymatic site of amylase. Experiments were performed to determine if amylase bound to the bacterial surface possessed enzymatic activity. It was found that over one-half of the bound amylase was enzymatically active. In addition, bacterial-bound amylase hydrolyzed starch to glucose which was then metabolized to lactic acid by the bacteria. In further studies, the role of amylase's histidine residues in streptococcal binding and enzymatic function was assessed after their selective modification with diethyl pyrocarbonate. DEP-modified amylase showed a marked reduction in both enzymatic and streptococcal binding activities. These effects were diminished when DEP modification occurred in the presence of maltotriose. DEP-modified amylase had a significantly altered secondary structure when compared with native enzyme or amylase modified in the presence of maltotriose. Collectively, these results suggest that human salivary alpha-amylase may possess multiple sites for bacterial binding and enzymatic activity which share structural similarities.

  14. Validation of binding of SE-75 labeled sucralfate to sites of gastrointestinal ulceration

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, A.H.; Knight, L.C.; Kollman, M.; Krevsky, B.; Pleet, D.; D'Ercole, F.; Siegel, J.A.; Fisher, R.S.; Malmud, L.S.

    1985-05-01

    This study was performed to determine if and for how long sucralfate (SU) binds selectively to sites of gastro-intestinal (GI) ulceration. Se-Su was prepared by sulfating sucrose with tracer Se-75 and precipitating it as the basic Al salt. All patients (pts) had endoscopy to confirm the presence of either: esophagitis (n=5), gastritis (GA) (n=5), gastric ulcers (GU) (n=5), duodenal ulcers (DU) (n=5), or no ulceration (NU) (n=5). Following an overnight fast the pts swallowed 1 gm with 100 ..mu..Ci of Se-SU and were imaged continuously over 24 hours or until no activity remained in the upper GI tract. Pts with GU visually demonstrated focal SU binding at the ulcers for an average of 3.9 +- 1.1 hrs. with a mean GET of 68 +- 25 min. Mean GET for pts with DU was prolonged, 171 +- 63 min, however focal binding at duodenal ulcers was not seen. All pts with GA had diffuse retention of SU in the stomach with a mean GET of 118 +- 34 min. Focal binding of SU at all sites of esophagitis was seen with a T-1/2 of 65 +- 32 min at the ulcerations. In conclusion these data support the theory that the mechanism of ulcer healing with SU is related to its ability to adhere to the ulcer site forming a protective barrier. In addition Se-SU is a potential ulcer imaging agent which can be used to noninvasively assess healing.

  15. A zinc-binding site by negative selection induces metallodrug susceptibility in an essential chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Cun, Shujian; Sun, Hongzhe

    2010-01-01

    GroES is an indispensable chaperonin virtually found throughout all life forms. Consequently, mutations of this protein must be critically scrutinized by natural selection. Nevertheless, the homolog from a potentially virulent gastric pathogen, Helicobacter pylori, strikingly features a histidine/cysteine-rich C terminus that shares no significant homology with other family members. Additionally, three more (H45, C51, and C53) are uniquely present in its apical domain. The statistical analyses show that these residues may have originated from negative selection, presumably driven by either dependent or independent amino acid mutations. In the absence of the C-terminal metal-binding domain, the mutant protein still exhibits a substantial capacity for zinc binding in vivo. The biochemical properties of site-directed mutants indicate that H45, C51, and C53 make up an oxidation-sensitive zinc-binding site that may donate the bound metal to a zinc acceptor. Of interest, bismuth antiulcer drugs strongly bind at this site (Kd of approximately 7 × 10-26 M), replacing the bound zinc and consequently inducing the disruption of the quaternary structure. Because biological features by negative selection are usually inert to change during evolution, this study sheds light on a promising field whereby medicines can be designed or improved to specifically target the residues that uniquely evolved in pathogenic proteins so as to retard the emergence of drug resistance. PMID:20194796

  16. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  17. Probing the Functional Heterogeneity of Surface Binding Sites by Analysis of Experimental Binding Traces and the Effect of Mass Transport Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Svitel, Juraj; Boukari, Hacène; Van Ryk, Donald; Willson, Richard C.; Schuck, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Many techniques rely on the binding activity of surface-immobilized proteins, including antibody-based affinity biosensors for the detection of analytes, immunoassays, protein arrays, and surface plasmon resonance biosensors for the study of thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of protein interactions. To study the functional homogeneity of the surface sites and to characterize their binding properties, we have recently proposed a computational tool to determine the distribution of affinity and kinetic rate constants from surface binding progress curves. It is based on modeling the experimentally measured binding signal as a superposition of signals from binding to sites spanning a range of rate and equilibrium constants, with regularization providing the most parsimonious distribution consistent with the data. In the present work, we have expanded the scope of this approach to include a compartment-like transport step, which can describe competitive binding to different surface sites in a zone of depleted analyte close to the sensor surface. This approach addresses a major difficulty in the analysis of surface binding where both transport limitation as well as unknown surface site heterogeneity may be present. In addition to the kinetic binding parameters of the ensemble of surface sites, it can provide estimates for effective transport rate constants. Using antibody-antigen interactions as experimental model systems, we studied the effects of the immobilization matrix and of the analyte flow-rate on the effective transport rate constant. Both were experimentally observed to influence mass transport. The approximate description of mass transport by a compartment model becomes critical when applied to strongly transport-controlled data, and we examined the limitations of this model. In the presence of only moderate mass transport limitation the compartment model provides a good description, but this approximation breaks down for strongly transport-limited surface

  18. Characterisation of the Rab binding properties of Rab coupling protein (RCP) by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Andrew J; McCaffrey, Mary W

    2004-07-30

    Rab coupling protein (RCP) is a member of the Rab11-family of interacting proteins (Rab11-FIPs). Family members are characterised by their ability to interact with Rab11. This property is mediated by a conserved Rab binding domain (RBD) located at their carboxy-termini. Several Rab11-FIPs can also interact with other small GTPases. RCP interacts with Rab4 in addition to Rab11. To dissect out the individual properties of the Rab4 and Rab11 interactions with RCP, conserved amino acids within the RBD of RCP were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. The effect of these mutations on Rab4 and Rab11 binding, and the intracellular localisation of RCP, was examined. Our results indicate that Rab11, rather than Rab4, mediates the intracellular localisation of RCP, and that the class I Rab11-FIPs compete for binding to Rab11.

  19. Binding site for the adenosyl group of coenzyme B12 in diol dehydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Toraya, T.

    1985-11-01

    The binding of cob(II)alamin (CblII) and 5'-deoxyadenosine to diol dehydrase was studied spectroscopically and with (U-/sup 14/C)5'-deoxyadenosine. CblII was bound to this enzyme forming a tight 1:1 complex which was resistant to oxidation by O/sub 2/ even in the presence of CN-. An irreversible 1:1:1 ternary complex was formed between enzyme, CblII, and 5'-deoxyadenosine, when the enzyme was incubated first with the nucleoside and then with CblII. When this order of addition of the constituents was reversed, no 5'-deoxyadenosine was bound to the enzyme-CblII complex. Hydroxocobalamin could also bind to the enzyme together with the nucleoside, while other cob(III)alamins bearing a bulkier Co beta ligand displaced the nucleoside upon binding to the enzyme. The binding of (U-/sup 14/C)5'-deoxyadenosine was strongly inhibited by unlabeled 5'-deoxy-ara-adenosine, 4',5'-anhydroadenosine, adenosine, adenine, and 5',8-cyclic adenosine, in this order, but not by 5'-deoxyuridine. These results constitute direct evidence for the presence of the binding site for the adenosyl group of adenosylcobalamin, which is spatially limited to and highly specific for adenine nucleosides. The binding of 5'-deoxyadenosine to the apoenzyme was reversible.

  20. The elusive permeability barriers and binding sites for proflavine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gravelle, M J; Mehta, B M; Kushner, D J

    1972-06-01

    Cells of proflavine-sensitive and -resistant Escherichia coli strains were altered in different ways, and the proflavine binding of the changed material was studied. Spheroplasts prepared from sensitive and resistant cells bound similar amounts of proflavine at saturation, whether or not they were osmotically protected by 10% sucrose. Intact cells bound approximately the same amounts of proflavine as spheroplasts. On addition of glucose, osmotically protected resistant but not sensitive spheroplasts released proflavine; unprotected spheroplasts did not release bound proflavine. Thus, osmotically protected membranes are not required for proflavine binding (a passive process) but are required for proflavine release (an active process). The presence of sucrose reduced proflavine binding by resistant cells. Adding glucose to cells in 20% sucrose did not cause a release of residual proflavine, though glucose caused a release of proflavine from cells suspended in 0 or 10% sucrose. On treatment of heated cells or ruptured spheroplasts with nucleases and Pronase, practically all nucleic acids were removed. Proflavine-binding ability of such preparations fell by only 30 to 50%. Washing heated cells with ethanol did not reduce their proflavine-binding ability. There appear to be important binding sites in cells aside from nucleic acids.

  1. Reversibly Bound Chloride in the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Hormone Binding Domain: Possible Allosteric Regulation and a Conserved Structural Motif for the Chloride-binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.; Qiu, Y; Philo, J; Arakawa, T; Ogata, C; Misono, K

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(-)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(-) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(-) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis.

  2. Reconstruction of adenovirus replication origins with a human nuclear factor I binding site.

    PubMed

    Adhya, S; Shneidman, P S; Hurwitz, J

    1986-03-05

    Nuclear factor I is a host-coded DNA-binding protein that stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. To understand the mechanism of action of nuclear factor I, we have constructed, by recombinant DNA techniques, origins of replication in which the adenovirus type 5 nuclear factor I binding site (FIB site) has been replaced by a FIB site isolated from human genomic DNA (Gronostajski, R. M., Nagata, K., and Hurwitz, J. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 81, 4013-4017). Assays of such recombinants for initiation and elongation in vitro showed that nuclear factor I was active only when the FIB site was relatively close to the DNA terminus, i.e. the FIB site was centered at nucleotides 30-36 from the end of the DNA. Nuclear factor I was active in either orientation within this distance range. The presence of one or two additional FIB sites in the downstream region had no effect. The implications of these results for the mechanism of nuclear factor I action are discussed.

  3. Interpretation of Ocular Melanin Drug Binding Assays. Alternatives to the Model of Multiple Classes of Independent Sites.

    PubMed

    Manzanares, José A; Rimpelä, Anna-Kaisa; Urtti, Arto

    2016-04-04

    Melanin has a high binding affinity for a wide range of drugs. The determination of the melanin binding capacity and its binding affinity are important, e.g., in the determination of the ocular drug distribution, the prediction of drug effects in the eye, and the trans-scleral drug delivery. The binding parameters estimated from a given data set vary significantly when using different isotherms or different nonlinear fitting methods. In this work, the commonly used bi-Langmuir isotherm, which assumes two classes of independent sites, is confronted with the Sips isotherm. Direct, log-log, and Scatchard plots are used, and the interpretation of the binding curves in the latter is critically analyzed. In addition to the goodness of fit, the emphasis is placed on the physical meaning of the binding parameters. The bi-Langmuir model imposes a bimodal distribution of binding energies for the sites on the melanin granules, but the actual distribution is most likely continuous and unimodal, as assumed by the Sips isotherm. Hence, the latter describes more accurately the distribution of binding energies and also the experimental results of melanin binding to drugs and metal ions. Simulations are used to show that the existence of two classes of sites cannot be confirmed on the sole basis of the shape of the binding curve in the Scatchard plot, and that serious doubts may appear on the meaning of the binding parameters of the bi-Langmuir model. Experimental results of melanin binding to chloroquine and metoprolol are used to illustrate the importance of the choice of the binding isotherm and of the method used to evaluate the binding parameters.

  4. Structural characterization of single nucleotide variants at ligand binding sites and enzyme active sites of human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazunori D.; Nishi, Hafumi; Nakata, Junichi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Functional sites on proteins play an important role in various molecular interactions and reactions between proteins and other molecules. Thus, mutations in functional sites can severely affect the overall phenotype. Progress of genome sequencing projects has yielded a wealth of information on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), especially those with less than 1% minor allele frequency (rare variants). To understand the functional influence of genetic variants at a protein level, we investigated the relationship between SNVs and protein functional sites in terms of minor allele frequency and the structural position of variants. As a result, we observed that SNVs were less abundant at ligand binding sites, which is consistent with a previous study on SNVs and protein interaction sites. Additionally, we found that non-rare variants tended to be located slightly apart from enzyme active sites. Examination of non-rare variants revealed that most of the mutations resulted in moderate changes of the physico-chemical properties of amino acids, suggesting the existence of functional constraints. In conclusion, this study shows that the mapping of genetic variants on protein structures could be a powerful approach to evaluate the functional impact of rare genetic variations. PMID:27924270

  5. Binding of dexamethasone to rat liver nuclei in vivo and in vitro: evidence for two distinct binding sites.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, S H; Shaper, J H

    1984-03-01

    The binding of [3H]dexamethasone (DEX) to rat liver nuclei in vitro and in vivo have been compared. In vitro, purified nuclei displayed a single class of specific glucocorticoid binding sites with a dissociation constant (Kd) of approximately 10(-7) M for [3H]DEX at 4 degrees C. The glucocorticoid agonists prednisolone, cortisol, and corticosterone and the antagonists progesterone and cortexolone competed avidly for this site, but the potent glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide (TA) competed poorly in vitro. Nuclei isolated from the livers of intact rats contained 1-2 X 10(4) [3H]DEX binding sites/nucleus. Up to 85% of the binding sites were recovered in the nuclear envelope (NE) fraction when NE were prepared either before or after labeling with [3H]DEX in vitro. After adrenalectomy, the specific [3H]DEX binding capacity of both nuclei and NE decreased to 15-20% of control values, indicating sensitivity of the binding sites to hormonal status of the animals. Efforts to restore the binding capacity by administration of exogenous glucocorticoids, however, were unsuccessful. After labeling of rat liver nuclei in vivo by intraperitoneal injection of [3H]DEX or [3H]TA into living animals, the steroid specificity and subnuclear localization of radiolabel were different. Both [3H]TA (which did not bind in vitro) and [3H]DEX became localized to nuclei in a saturable fashion in vivo. With either of these ligands, approximately 20% of the total nuclear radiolabel was recovered in the NE fraction. These results suggest the presence of two separate and distinct binding sites in rat liver nuclei, one which is localized to the NE and binds [3H]DEX (but not [3H]TA) in vitro, and another which is not localized to the NE but binds [3H]DEX and [3H]TA in vivo.

  6. Full-contact domain labeling: identification of a novel phosphoinositide binding site on gelsolin that requires the complete protein.

    PubMed

    Feng, L; Mejillano, M; Yin, H L; Chen, J; Prestwich, G D

    2001-01-30

    Gelsolin, an actin and phosphoinositide binding protein, was photoaffinity labeled using a variety of benzophenone-containing phosphoinositide polyphosphate analogues. The N-terminal half and the C-terminal half of gelsolin showed synergy in the binding of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2]. Competitive displacement experiments with dibutyryl, dioctanoyl, or dipalmitoyl derivatives of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) suggested that, in addition to the inositol headgroup, a diacylglyceryl moiety was important for binding; these analogues also inhibited the gelsolin-severing activity of F-actin. In addition to the previously identified PtdIns(4,5)P2 binding site in the N-terminal half of gelsolin, a new binding site was identified in the C-terminal half by mapping the photocovalently modified peptide fragments. Moreover, increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) decreased the binding of the photolabile analogues to the C-terminal phosphoinositide binding site on gelsolin. A molecular model of the binding of PtdIns(4,5)P2 within two folded repeats of gelsolin has been calculated using these data.

  7. Characterization of ruthenium red-binding sites of the Ca(2+)-ATPase from sarcoplasmic reticulum and their interaction with Ca(2+)-binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Corbalan-Garcia, S; Teruel, J A; Gomez-Fernandez, J C

    1992-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase has previously been shown to bind and dissociate two Ca2+ ions in a sequential mode. This behaviour is confirmed here by inducing sequential Ca2+ dissociation with Ruthenium Red. Ruthenium Red binds to sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (6 nmol/mg) with a Kd = 2 microM, producing biphasic kinetics of Ca2+ dissociation from the Ca(2+)-ATPase, decreasing the affinity for Ca2+ binding. Studies on the effect of Ca2+ on Ruthenium Red binding indicate that Ruthenium Red does not bind to the high-affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites, as suggested by the following observations: (i) micromolar concentrations of Ca2+ do not significantly alter Ruthenium Red binding to the sarcoplasmic reticulum; (ii) quenching of the fluorescence of fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate (FITC) bound to Ca(2+)-ATPase by Ruthenium Red (resembling Ruthenium Red binding) is not prevented by micromolar concentrations of Ca2+; (iii) quenching of FITC fluorescence by Ca2+ binding to the high-affinity sites is achieved even though Ruthenium Red is bound to the Ca(2+)-ATPase; and (iv) micromolar Ca2+ concentrations prevent inhibition of the ATP-hydrolytic capability by dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide modification, but Ruthenium Red does not. However, micromolar concentrations of lanthanides (La3+ and Tb3+) and millimolar concentrations of bivalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) inhibit Ruthenium Red binding as well as quenching of FITC-labelled Ca(2+)-ATPase fluorescence by Ruthenium Red. Studies of Ruthenium Red binding to tryptic fragments of Ca(2+)-ATPase, as demonstrated by ligand blotting, indicate that Ruthenium Red does not bind to the A1 subfragment. Our observations suggest that Ruthenium Red might bind to a cation-binding site in Ca(2+)-ATPase inducing fast release of the last bound Ca2+ by interactions between the sites. PMID:1280106

  8. Fluorescence energy transfer between points in G-actin: the nucleotide-binding site, the metal-binding site and Cys-373 residue.

    PubMed

    Miki, M; Wahl, P

    1985-04-05

    Fluorescence energy transfers were studied in order to investigate the spatial relationships between the nucleotide-binding site, the metal-binding site and the Cys-373 residue in the G-actin molecule. When 1-N6-ethenoadenosine-5'-triphosphate (epsilon-ATP) in the nucleotide-binding site and Co2+ or Ni2+ in the metal-binding site were used as fluorescence donor and acceptor, respectively, the fluorescence intensity of epsilon-ATP was perfectly quenched by Ni2+ or Co2+. This indicated that the nucleotide-binding site is very close to the metal-binding site; the distance should be less than 10 A. When N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (IAEDANS) bound to Cys-373 residue and Co2+ in the metal-binding site were used as a fluorescence donor and an acceptor, respectively, the transfer efficiency was equal to 5 +/- 1%. The corresponding distance was calculated to be 23-32 A, assuming a random orientation factor K2 = 2/3.

  9. Dissecting a regulatory calcium-binding site of CLC-K kidney chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Gradogna, Antonella; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The kidney and inner ear CLC-K chloride channels, which are involved in salt absorption and endolymph production, are regulated by extracellular Ca2+ in the millimolar concentration range. Recently, Gradogna et al. (2010. J. Gen. Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201010455) identified a pair of acidic residues (E261 and D278) located in the loop between helices I and J as forming a putative intersubunit Ca2+-binding site in hClC-Ka. In this study, we sought to explore the properties of the binding site in more detail. First, we verified that the site is conserved in hClC-Kb and rClC-K1. In addition, we could confer Ca2+ sensitivity to the Torpedo marmorata ClC-0 channel by exchanging its I–J loop with that from ClC-Ka, demonstrating a direct role of the loop in Ca2+ binding. Based on a structure of a bacterial CLC and a new sequence alignment, we built homology models of ClC-Ka. The models suggested additional amino acids involved in Ca2+ binding. Testing mutants of these residues, we could restrict the range of plausible models and positively identify two more residues (E259 and E281) involved in Ca2+ coordination. To investigate cation specificity, we applied extracellular Zn2+, Mg2+, Ba2+, Sr2+, and Mn2+. Zn2+ blocks ClC-Ka as well as its Ca2+-insensitive mutant, suggesting that Zn2+ binds to a different site. Mg2+ does not activate CLC-Ks, but the channels are activated by Ba2+, Sr2+, and Mn2+ with a rank order of potency of Ca2+ > Ba2+ > Sr2+ = Mn2+ for the human CLC-Ks. Dose–response analysis indicates that the less potent Ba2+ has a lower affinity rather than a lower efficacy. Interestingly, rClC-K1 shows an altered rank order (Ca2+ > Sr2+ >> Ba2+), but homology models suggest that residues outside the I–J loop are responsible for this difference. Our detailed characterization of the regulatory Ca2+-binding site provides a solid basis for the understanding of the physiological modulation of CLC-K channel function in the kidney and inner ear. PMID

  10. Dissecting a regulatory calcium-binding site of CLC-K kidney chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Gradogna, Antonella; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Forrest, Lucy R; Pusch, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The kidney and inner ear CLC-K chloride channels, which are involved in salt absorption and endolymph production, are regulated by extracellular Ca(2+) in the millimolar concentration range. Recently, Gradogna et al. (2010. J. Gen. Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201010455) identified a pair of acidic residues (E261 and D278) located in the loop between helices I and J as forming a putative intersubunit Ca(2+)-binding site in hClC-Ka. In this study, we sought to explore the properties of the binding site in more detail. First, we verified that the site is conserved in hClC-Kb and rClC-K1. In addition, we could confer Ca(2+) sensitivity to the Torpedo marmorata ClC-0 channel by exchanging its I-J loop with that from ClC-Ka, demonstrating a direct role of the loop in Ca(2+) binding. Based on a structure of a bacterial CLC and a new sequence alignment, we built homology models of ClC-Ka. The models suggested additional amino acids involved in Ca(2+) binding. Testing mutants of these residues, we could restrict the range of plausible models and positively identify two more residues (E259 and E281) involved in Ca(2+) coordination. To investigate cation specificity, we applied extracellular Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), and Mn(2+). Zn(2+) blocks ClC-Ka as well as its Ca(2+)-insensitive mutant, suggesting that Zn(2+) binds to a different site. Mg(2+) does not activate CLC-Ks, but the channels are activated by Ba(2+), Sr(2+), and Mn(2+) with a rank order of potency of Ca(2+) > Ba(2+) > Sr(2+) = Mn(2+) for the human CLC-Ks. Dose-response analysis indicates that the less potent Ba(2+) has a lower affinity rather than a lower efficacy. Interestingly, rClC-K1 shows an altered rank order (Ca(2+) > Sr(2+) > Ba(2+)), but homology models suggest that residues outside the I-J loop are responsible for this difference. Our detailed characterization of the regulatory Ca(2+)-binding site provides a solid basis for the understanding of the physiological modulation of CLC

  11. Identification and characterization of a novel high affinity metal-binding site in the hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M R; Simorre, J P; Hanson, P; Mokler, V; Bellon, L; Beigelman, L; Pardi, A

    1999-01-01

    A novel metal-binding site has been identified in the hammerhead ribozyme by 31P NMR. The metal-binding site is associated with the A13 phosphate in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme and is distinct from any previously identified metal-binding sites. 31P NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the metal-binding affinity for this site and leads to an apparent dissociation constant of 250-570 microM at 25 degrees C for binding of a single Mg2+ ion. The NMR data also show evidence of a structural change at this site upon metal binding and these results are compared with previous data on metal-induced structural changes in the core of the hammerhead ribozyme. These NMR data were combined with the X-ray structure of the hammerhead ribozyme (Pley HW, Flaherty KM, McKay DB. 1994. Nature 372:68-74) to model RNA ligands involved in binding the metal at this A13 site. In this model, the A13 metal-binding site is structurally similar to the previously identified A(g) metal-binding site and illustrates the symmetrical nature of the tandem G x A base pairs in domain 2 of the hammerhead ribozyme. These results demonstrate that 31P NMR represents an important method for both identification and characterization of metal-binding sites in nucleic acids. PMID:10445883

  12. Shared binding sites in Lepidoptera for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins.

    PubMed

    Herrero, S; González-Cabrera, J; Tabashnik, B E; Ferré, J

    2001-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxins act by binding to specific target sites in the insect midgut epithelial membrane. The best-known mechanism of resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins is reduced binding to target sites. Because alteration of a binding site shared by several toxins may cause resistance to all of them, knowledge of which toxins share binding sites is useful for predicting cross-resistance. Conversely, cross-resistance among toxins suggests that the toxins share a binding site. At least two strains of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) with resistance to Cry1A toxins and reduced binding of Cry1A toxins have strong cross-resistance to Cry1Ja. Thus, we hypothesized that Cry1Ja shares binding sites with Cry1A toxins. We tested this hypothesis in six moth and butterfly species, each from a different family: Cacyreus marshalli (Lycaenidae), Lobesia botrana (Tortricidae), Manduca sexta (Sphingidae), Pectinophora gossypiella (Gelechiidae), P. xylostella (Plutellidae), and Spodoptera exigua (Noctuidae). Although the extent of competition varied among species, experiments with biotinylated Cry1Ja and radiolabeled Cry1Ac showed that Cry1Ja and Cry1Ac competed for binding sites in all six species. A recent report also indicates shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins in Heliothis virescens (Noctuidae). Thus, shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A occur in all lepidopteran species tested so far.

  13. Competitive binding between mercury and copper for reduced sulfur binding sites on dissolved organic matter from the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbig, C. A.; Aiken, G. R.; Ryan, J. N.

    2007-12-01

    The interaction of mercury and dissolved organic matter (DOM) strongly influences the biogeochemistry of mercury in the Florida Everglades. Previous laboratory-based studies of simple systems at environmentally relevant concentrations of mercury(II) (a soft Lewis acid) and DOM found strong conditional binding constants (log KHgL' = 28-31). These large constants result from the interaction of mercury(II) with reduced sulfur (a soft Lewis base) sites on DOM. Reported conditional binding constants for other metals with DOM (e.g. log KCuL' = 11-14), suggest that metals of borderline Lewis acidity would not compete with mercury(II) for the strongest binding sites at environmentally relevant concentrations. However, the small proportion of strong binding sites responsible for mercury(II) binding have proven to be susceptible to competitive effects from borderline metals. Equilibrium dialysis experiments using organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades were designed to determine the effects of competitive binding between copper(II) and mercury(II) on DOM binding sites. These experiments demonstrated that copper(II), a borderline Lewis acid, effectively competed for strong DOM sites at concentrations only 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than experimental mercury(II) concentrations (which ranged from 0.05 to 0.2nM). Our results indicate that the reduced sulfur sites responsible for Hg(II) binding on DOM also have high affinities for borderline metals. Interactions of copper(II) and DOM were also investigated in the absence of mercury(II). These results further substantiate the significance of a small concentration of strong binding sites on DOM. At low copper(II) to DOM ratios, preliminary results indicate that the binding interactions between copper(II) and DOM are significantly greater than previously reported and are close to those measured for DOM-mercury(II) binding. We conclude that currently available binding constants for metals of interest (borderline

  14. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R.; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A.; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-01-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5–inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented. PMID:27139631

  15. Rpn1 provides adjacent receptor sites for substrate binding and deubiquitination by the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuan; Chen, Xiang; Elsasser, Suzanne; Stocks, Bradley B.; Tian, Geng; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Naixia; de Poot, Stefanie A. H.; Tuebing, Fabian; Sun, Shuangwu; Vannoy, Jacob; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Engen, John R.; Finley, Daniel; Walters, Kylie J.

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract INTRODUCTION The ubiquitin-proteasome system comprises hundreds of distinct pathways of degradation, which converge at the step of ubiquitin recognition by the proteasome. Five proteasomal ubiquitin receptors have been identified, two that are intrinsic to the proteasome (Rpn10 and Rpn13) and three reversibly associated proteasomal ubiquitin receptors (Rad23, Dsk2, and Ddi1). RATIONALE We found that the five known proteasomal ubiquitin receptors of yeast are collectively nonessential for ubiquitin recognition by the proteasome. We therefore screened for additional ubiquitin receptors in the proteasome and identified subunit Rpn1 as a candidate. We used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize the structure of the binding site within Rpn1, which we term the T1 site. Mutational analysis of this site showed its functional importance within the context of intact proteasomes. T1 binds both ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like (UBL) proteins, in particular the substrate-delivering shuttle factor Rad23. A second site within the Rpn1 toroid, T2, recognizes the UBL domain of deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp6, as determined by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis and validated by amino acid substitution and functional assays. The Rpn1 toroid thus serves a critical scaffolding role within the proteasome, helping to assemble multiple proteasome cofactors as well as substrates. RESULTS Our results indicate that proteasome subunit Rpn1 can recognize both ubiquitin and UBL domains of substrate shuttling factors that themselves bind ubiquitin and function as reversibly-associated proteasomal ubiquitin receptors. Recognition is mediated by the T1 site within the Rpn1 toroid, which supports proteasome function in vivo. We found that the capacity of T1 to recognize both ubiquitin and UBL proteins was shared with Rpn10 and Rpn13. The surprising multiplicity of ubiquitin-recognition domains within the proteasome may promote enhanced

  16. Addition of lysophospholipids with large head groups to cells inhibits Shiga toxin binding

    PubMed Central

    Ailte, Ieva; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Bergan, Jonas; Kvalvaag, Audun Sverre; Myrann, Anne-Grethe; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), an AB5 toxin, binds specifically to the neutral glycosphingolipid Gb3 at the cell surface before being transported into cells. We here demonstrate that addition of conical lysophospholipids (LPLs) with large head groups inhibit Stx binding to cells whereas LPLs with small head groups do not. Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI 18:0), the most efficient LPL with the largest head group, was selected for in-depth investigations to study how the binding of Stx is regulated. We show that the inhibition of Stx binding by LPI is reversible and possibly regulated by cholesterol since addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD) reversed the ability of LPI to inhibit binding. LPI-induced inhibition of Stx binding is independent of signalling and membrane turnover as it occurs in fixed cells as well as after depletion of cellular ATP. Furthermore, data obtained with fluorescent membrane dyes suggest that LPI treatment has a direct effect on plasma membrane lipid packing with shift towards a liquid disordered phase in the outer leaflet, while lysophosphoethanolamine (LPE), which has a small head group, does not. In conclusion, our data show that cellular treatment with conical LPLs with large head groups changes intrinsic properties of the plasma membrane and modulates Stx binding to Gb3. PMID:27458147

  17. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  18. Specificity of Auxin-binding Sites on Maize Coleoptile Membranes as Possible Receptor Sites for Auxin Action 1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Peter M.; Dohrmann, Ulrike; Hertel, Rainer

    1977-01-01

    Dissociation coefficients of auxin-binding sites on maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptile membranes were measured, for 48 auxins and related ring compounds, by competitive displacement of 14C-naphthaleneacetic acid from the binding sites. The sites bind with high affinity several ring compounds with acidic side chains 2 to 4 carbons long, and much more weakly bind neutral ring compounds and phenols related to these active acids, most phenoxyalkylcarboxylic acids, and arylcarboxylic acids except benzoic acid, which scarcely binds, and triiodobenzoic acids, which bind strongly. Specificity of the binding is narrowed in the presence of a low molecular weight “supernatant factor” that occurs in maize and other tissues. Activity of many of the analogs as auxin agonists or antagonists in the cell elongation response was determined with maize coleoptiles. These activities on the whole roughly parallel the affinities of the binding sites for the same compounds, especially affinities measured in the presence of supernatant factor, but there are some quantitative discrepancies, especially among phenoxyalkylcarboxylic acids. In view of several factors that can cause receptor affinity and biological activity values to diverge quantitatively among analogs, the findings appear to support the presumption that the auxin-binding sites may be receptors for auxin action. PMID:16660143

  19. Gibbs Recursive Sampler: finding transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William; Rouchka, Eric C; Lawrence, Charles E

    2003-07-01

    The Gibbs Motif Sampler is a software package for locating common elements in collections of biopolymer sequences. In this paper we describe a new variation of the Gibbs Motif Sampler, the Gibbs Recursive Sampler, which has been developed specifically for locating multiple transcription factor binding sites for multiple transcription factors simultaneously in unaligned DNA sequences that may be heterogeneous in DNA composition. Here we describe the basic operation of the web-based version of this sampler. The sampler may be acces-sed at http://bayesweb.wadsworth.org/gibbs/gibbs.html and at http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/bayesian/gibbs/gibbs.html. An online user guide is available at http://bayesweb.wadsworth.org/gibbs/bernoulli.html and at http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/bayesian/gibbs/manual/bernoulli.html. Solaris, Solaris.x86 and Linux versions of the sampler are available as stand-alone programs for academic and not-for-profit users. Commercial licenses are also available. The Gibbs Recursive Sampler is distributed in accordance with the ISCB level 0 guidelines and a requirement for citation of use in scientific publications.

  20. Mutations and Binding Sites of Human Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Schaefer, Ulf; Jankovic, Boris R.; Archer, John A. C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, “insertions” are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. PMID:22670148

  1. Oriented Immobilization of Fab Fragments by Site-Specific Biotinylation at the Conserved Nucleotide Binding Site for Enhanced Antigen Detection.

    PubMed

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-09-08

    Oriented immobilization of antibodies and antibody fragments has become increasingly important as a result of the efforts to reduce the size of diagnostic and sensor devices to miniaturized dimensions for improved accessibility to the end-user. Reduced dimensions of sensor devices necessitate the immobilized antibodies to conserve their antigen binding activity for proper operation. Fab fragments are becoming more commonly used in small-scaled diagnostic devices due to their small size and ease of manufacture. In this study, we used the previously described UV-NBS(Biotin) method to functionalize Fab fragments with IBA-EG11-Biotin linker utilizing UV energy to initiate a photo-cross-linking reaction between the nucleotide binding site (NBS) on the Fab fragment and IBA-Biotin molecule. Our results demonstrate that immobilization of biotinylated Fab fragments via UV-NBS(Biotin) method generated the highest level of immobilized Fab on surfaces when compared to other typical immobilization methods while preserving antigen binding activity. UV-NBS(Biotin) method provided 432-fold, 114-fold, and 29-fold improved antigen detection sensitivity than physical adsorption, NHS-Biotin, and ε-NH3(+), methods, respectively. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA utilizing Fab fragments immobilized via UV-NBS(Biotin) method was significantly lower than that of the other immobilization methods, with an LOD of 0.4 pM PSA. In summary, site-specific biotinylation of Fab fragments without structural damage or loss in antigen binding activity provides a wide range of application potential for UV-NBS immobilization technique across numerous diagnostic devices and nanotechnologies.

  2. Copper(I)-α-synuclein interaction: structural description of two independent and competing metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Camponeschi, Francesca; Valensin, Daniela; Tessari, Isabella; Bubacco, Luigi; Dell'Acqua, Simone; Casella, Luigi; Monzani, Enrico; Gaggelli, Elena; Valensin, Gianni

    2013-02-04

    The aggregation of α-synuclein (αS) is a critical step in the etiology of Parkinson's disease. Metal ions such as copper and iron have been shown to bind αS, enhancing its fibrillation rate in vitro. αS is also susceptible to copper-catalyzed oxidation that involves the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) and the conversion of O(2) into reactive oxygen species. The mechanism of the reaction is highly selective and site-specific and involves interactions of the protein with both oxidation states of the copper ion. The reaction can induce oxidative modification of the protein, which generally leads to extensive protein oligomerization and precipitation. Cu(II) binding to αS has been extensively characterized, indicating the N terminus and His-50 as binding donor residues. In this study, we have investigated αS-Cu(I) interaction by means of NMR and circular dichroism analysis on the full-length protein (αS(1-140)) and on two, designed ad hoc, model peptides: αS(1-15) and αS(113-130). In order to identify and characterize the metal binding environment in full-length αS, in addition to Cu(I), we have also used Ag(I) as a probe for Cu(I) binding. Two distinct Cu(I)/Ag(I) binding domains with comparable affinities have been identified. The structural rearrangements induced by the metal ions and the metal coordination spheres of both sites have been extensively characterized.

  3. Computational Characterization and Prediction of Estrogen Receptor Coactivator Binding Site Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Gutendorf, andJ. Westendorf. 2000. Endocrine disruptors in fried meat: PhIP is an estrogen. Proceedings of the American Association for Cancer...binding site of the ERa LBD [3-5]. Because these studies have focused on the estradiol binding site, new potential ER disruptors that bind in the co...activator site have been missed. Our proposal focuses on developing a new computational approach to predict therapeutically useful ERa disruptors by

  4. NMR and Mutational Identification of the Collagen-Binding Site of the Chaperone Hsp47

    PubMed Central

    Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Yoshikawa, Sumi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Nishi, Yohei; Kurimoto, Eiji; Ishida, Yoshihito; Homma, Takayuki; Hoseki, Jun; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Koide, Takaki; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kato, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein 47 (Hsp47) acts as a client-specific chaperone for collagen and plays a vital role in collagen maturation and the consequent embryonic development. In addition, this protein can be a potential target for the treatment of fibrosis. Despite its physiological and pathological importance, little is currently known about the collagen-binding mode of Hsp47 from a structural aspect. Here, we describe an NMR study that was conducted to identify the collagen-binding site of Hsp47. We used chicken Hsp47, which has higher solubility than its human counterpart, and applied a selective 15N-labeling method targeting its tryptophan and histidine residues. Spectral assignments were made based on site-directed mutagenesis of the individual residues. By inspecting the spectral changes that were observed upon interaction with a trimeric collagen peptide and the mutational data, we successfully mapped the collagen-binding site in the B/C β-barrel domain and a nearby loop in a 3D-homology model based upon a serpin fold. This conclusion was confirmed by mutational analysis. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the design of compounds that target the interaction between Hsp47 and procollagen as therapeutics for fibrotic diseases. PMID:23049894

  5. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein-Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brackenridge, Danielle Allison; McGuffin, Liam James

    2015-12-15

    Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein-ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein-ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein-ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems.

  6. Antigen-binding site protection during radiolabeling leads to a higher immunoreactive fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Abbeele, A.D.; Aaronson, R.A.; Daher, S.; Taube, R.A.; Adelstein, S.J.; Kassis, A.I. )

    1991-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the immunointegrity of an antibody (Ab) depends on the preservation of its antigen-binding sites. Our goal was to radiolabel an antibody at several iodine:antibody molar ratios under conditions protecting its combining site and to compare its immunoreactive fraction (IRF) and electrophoretic mobility with those of the same antibody radiolabeled without protection. The data indicate that an antibody radiolabeled while its antigen-binding site is occupied by its antigen had the same IRF, regardless of the number of iodine atoms per antibody molecule. On the other hand, even at an I:Ab ratio of 1:1, the IRF of the same antibody radiolabeled without protection was lower than that of a protected one and decreased with increasing I:Ab ratios. In addition, the iodination of these Ab changes their electrophoretic mobility; however, when the Ab is labeled in the protected state, the degree of change is less. The binding of an antibody to its antigen prior to radiolabeling, therefore, enhances its immuno-integrity and prevents major conformational changes as reflected by electrophoresis.

  7. Determination of energies and sites of binding of PFOA and PFOS to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Muscionico, Isabella; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2010-11-25

    Structure and energies of the binding sites of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) to human serum albumin (HSA) were determined through molecular modeling. The calculations consisted of a compound approach based on docking, followed by molecular dynamics simulations and by the estimation of the free binding energies adopting WHAM-umbrella sampling and semiempirical methodologies. The binding sites so determined are common either to known HSA fatty acids sites or to other HSA sites known to bind to pharmaceutical compounds such as warfarin, thyroxine, indole, and benzodiazepin. Among the PFOA binding sites, five have interaction energies in excess of -6 kcal/mol, which become nine for PFOS. The calculated binding free energy of PFOA to the Trp 214 binding site is the highest among the PFOA complexes, -8.0 kcal/mol, in good agreement with literature experimental data. The PFOS binding site with the highest energy, -8.8 kcal/mol, is located near the Trp 214 binding site, thus partially affecting its activity. The maximum number of ligands that can be bound to HSA is 9 for PFOA and 11 for PFOS. The calculated data were adopted to predict the level of complexation of HSA as a function of the concentration of PFOA and PFOS found in human blood for different levels of exposition. The analysis of the factors contributing to the complex binding energy permitted to outline a set of guidelines for the rational design of alternative fluorinated surfactants with a lower bioaccumulation potential.

  8. Modeling Complex Equilibria in ITC Experiments: Thermodynamic Parameters Estimation for a Three Binding Site Model

    PubMed Central

    Le, Vu H.; Buscaglia, Robert; Chaires, Jonathan B.; Lewis, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    Isothermal Titration Calorimetry, ITC, is a powerful technique that can be used to estimate a complete set of thermodynamic parameters (e.g. Keq (or ΔG), ΔH, ΔS, and n) for a ligand binding interaction described by a thermodynamic model. Thermodynamic models are constructed by combination of equilibrium constant, mass balance, and charge balance equations for the system under study. Commercial ITC instruments are supplied with software that includes a number of simple interaction models, for example one binding site, two binding sites, sequential sites, and n-independent binding sites. More complex models for example, three or more binding sites, one site with multiple binding mechanisms, linked equilibria, or equilibria involving macromolecular conformational selection through ligand binding need to be developed on a case by case basis by the ITC user. In this paper we provide an algorithm (and a link to our MATLAB program) for the non-linear regression analysis of a multiple binding site model with up to four overlapping binding equilibria. Error analysis demonstrates that fitting ITC data for multiple parameters (e.g. up to nine parameters in the three binding site model) yields thermodynamic parameters with acceptable accuracy. PMID:23262283

  9. Ankyrin-independent membrane protein-binding sites for brain and erythrocyte spectrin.

    PubMed

    Steiner, J P; Bennett, V

    1988-10-05

    Brain spectrin reassociates in in vitro binding assays with protein(s) in highly extracted brain membranes quantitatively depleted of ankyrin and spectrin. These newly described membrane sites for spectrin are biologically significant and involve a protein since (a) binding occurs optimally at physiological pH (6.7-6.9) and salt concentrations (50 mM), (b) binding is abolished by digestion of membranes with alpha-chymotrypsin, (c) Scatchard analysis is consistent with a binding capacity of at least 50 pmol/mg total membrane protein, and highest affinity of 3 nM. The major ankyrin-independent binding activity of brain spectrin is localized to the beta subunit of spectrin. Brain membranes also contain high affinity binding sites for erythrocyte spectrin, but a 3-4 fold lower capacity than for brain spectrin. Some spectrin-binding sites associate preferentially with brain spectrin, some with erythrocyte spectrin, and some associate with both types of spectrin. Erythrocyte spectrin contains distinct binding domains for ankyrin and brain membrane protein sites, since the Mr = 72,000 spectrin-binding fragment of ankyrin does not compete for binding of spectrin to brain membranes. Spectrin binds to a small number of ankyrin-independent sites in erythrocyte membranes present in about 10,000-15,000 copies/cell or 10% of the number of sites for ankyrin. Brain spectrin binds to these sites better than erythrocyte spectrin suggesting that erythrocytes have residual binding sites for nonerythroid spectrin. Ankyrin-independent-binding proteins that selectively bind to certain isoforms of spectrin provide a potentially important flexibility in cellular localization and time of synthesis of proteins involved in spectrin-membrane interactions. This flexibility has implications for assembly of the membrane skeleton and targeting of spectrin isoforms to specialized regions of cells.

  10. Using sequence-specific chemical and structural properties of DNA to predict transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Amy L; Hlavacek, William S; Unkefer, Pat J; Mu, Fangping

    2010-11-18

    An important step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the DNA binding sites recognized by each transcription factor (TF). Conventional approaches to prediction of TF binding sites involve the definition of consensus sequences or position-specific weight matrices and rely on statistical analysis of DNA sequences of known binding sites. Here, we present a method called SiteSleuth in which DNA structure prediction, computational chemistry, and machine learning are applied to develop models for TF binding sites. In this approach, binary classifiers are trained to discriminate between true and false binding sites based on the sequence-specific chemical and structural features of DNA. These features are determined via molecular dynamics calculations in which we consider each base in different local neighborhoods. For each of 54 TFs in Escherichia coli, for which at least five DNA binding sites are documented in RegulonDB, the TF binding sites and portions of the non-coding genome sequence are mapped to feature vectors and used in training. According to cross-validation analysis and a comparison of computational predictions against ChIP-chip data available for the TF Fis, SiteSleuth outperforms three conventional approaches: Match, MATRIX SEARCH, and the method of Berg and von Hippel. SiteSleuth also outperforms QPMEME, a method similar to SiteSleuth in that it involves a learning algorithm. The main advantage of SiteSleuth is a lower false positive rate.

  11. Structural identification of DnaK binding sites within bovine and sheep bactenecin Bac7.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Michael; Kieslich, Bjorn; Berthold, Nicole; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Strater, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial resistance against common antibiotics is an increasing health problem. New pharmaceuticals for the treatment of infections caused by resistant pathogens are needed. Small proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) from insects are known to bind intracellularly to the conventional substrate binding cleft of the E. coli Hsp70 chaperone DnaK. Furthermore, bactenecins from mammals, members of the cathelicidin family, also contain potential DnaK binding sites. Crystal structures of bovine and sheep Bac7 in complex with the DnaK substrate binding domain show that the peptides bind in the forward binding mode with a leucine positioned in the central hydrophobic pocket. In most structures, proline and arginine residues preceding leucine occupy the hydrophobic DnaK binding sites -1 and -2. Within bovine Bac7, four potential DnaK binding sites were identified.

  12. Collagen binding specificity of the discoidin domain receptors: binding sites on collagens II and III and molecular determinants for collagen IV recognition by DDR1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huifang; Raynal, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Stavros; Myllyharju, Johanna; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2 are cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by triple-helical collagen. While normal DDR signalling regulates fundamental cellular processes, aberrant DDR signalling is associated with several human diseases. We previously identified GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as a major DDR2 binding site in collagens I-III, and located two additional DDR2 binding sites in collagen II. Here we extend these studies to the homologous DDR1 and the identification of DDR binding sites on collagen III. Using sets of overlapping triple-helical peptides, the Collagen II and Collagen III Toolkits, we located several DDR2 binding sites on both collagens. The interaction of DDR1 with Toolkit peptides was more restricted, with DDR1 mainly binding to peptides containing the GVMGFO motif. Triple-helical peptides containing the GVMGFO motif induced DDR1 transmembrane signalling, and DDR1 binding and receptor activation occurred with the same amino acid requirements as previously defined for DDR2. While both DDRs exhibit the same specificity for binding the GVMGFO motif, which is present only in fibrillar collagens, the two receptors display distinct preferences for certain non-fibrillar collagens, with the basement membrane collagen IV being exclusively recognised by DDR1. Based on our recent crystal structure of a DDR2-collagen complex, we designed mutations to identify the molecular determinants for DDR1 binding to collagen IV. By replacing five amino acids in DDR2 with the corresponding DDR1 residues we were able to create a DDR2 construct that could function as a collagen IV receptor.

  13. Developmental regulation of collagenase-3 mRNA in normal, differentiating osteoblasts through the activator protein-1 and the runt domain binding sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winchester, S. K.; Selvamurugan, N.; D'Alonzo, R. C.; Partridge, N. C.

    2000-01-01

    Collagenase-3 mRNA is initially detectable when osteoblasts cease proliferation, increasing during differentiation and mineralization. We showed that this developmental expression is due to an increase in collagenase-3 gene transcription. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site decreased collagenase-3 promoter activity, demonstrating that these sites are responsible for collagenase-3 gene transcription. The activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites bind members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor family of transcription factors, respectively. We identified core-binding factor a1 binding to the runt domain binding site and JunD in addition to a Fos-related antigen binding to the activator protein-1 site. Overexpression of both c-Fos and c-Jun in osteoblasts or core-binding factor a1 increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Furthermore, overexpression of c-Fos, c-Jun, and core-binding factor a1 synergistically increased collagenase-3 promoter activity. Mutation of either the activator protein-1 or the runt domain binding site resulted in the inability of c-Fos and c-Jun or core-binding factor a1 to increase collagenase-3 promoter activity, suggesting that there is cooperative interaction between the sites and the proteins. Overexpression of Fra-2 and JunD repressed core-binding factor a1-induced collagenase-3 promoter activity. Our results suggest that members of the activator protein-1 and core-binding factor families, binding to the activator protein-1 and runt domain binding sites are responsible for the developmental regulation of collagenase-3 gene expression in osteoblasts.

  14. Duplicate gene divergence by changes in microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L

    2015-02-02

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes.

  15. Duplicate Gene Divergence by Changes in MicroRNA Binding Sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes. PMID:25644246

  16. Alignment-free ultra-high-throughput comparison of druggable protein-ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Weill, Nathanaël; Rognan, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Inferring the biological function of a protein from its three-dimensional structure as well as explaining why a drug may bind to various targets is of crucial importance to modern drug discovery. Here we present a generic 4833-integer vector describing druggable protein-ligand binding sites that can be applied to any protein and any binding cavity. The fingerprint registers counts of pharmacophoric triplets from the Calpha atomic coordinates of binding-site-lining residues. Starting from a customized data set of diverse protein-ligand binding site pairs, the most appropriate metric and a similarity threshold could be defined for similar binding sites. The method (FuzCav) has been used in various scenarios: (i) screening a collection of 6000 binding sites for similarity to different queries; (ii) classifying protein families (serine endopeptidases, protein kinases) by binding site diversity; (iii) discriminating adenine-binding cavities from decoys. The fingerprint generation and comparison supports ultra-high throughput (ca. 1000 measures/s), does not require prior alignment of protein binding sites, and is able to detect local similarity among subpockets. It is thus particularly well suited to the functional annotation of novel genomic structures with low sequence identity to known X-ray templates.

  17. Slow-binding inhibitors of prolyl oligopeptidase with different functional groups at the P1 site.

    PubMed

    Venäläinen, Jarkko I; Juvonen, Risto O; Garcia-Horsman, J Arturo; Wallén, Erik A A; Christiaans, Johannes A M; Jarho, Elina M; Gynther, Jukka; Männistö, Pekka T

    2004-09-15

    POP (prolyl oligopeptidase) specifically hydrolyses a number of small proline-containing peptides at the carboxy end of the proline residue and POP inhibitors have been shown to have cognition-enhancing properties. It has been noted that certain functional groups at the P1 site of the inhibitor, which correspond to the substrate residue on the N-terminal side of the bond to be cleaved, increase the inhibitory potency. However, detailed mechanistic and kinetic analysis of the inhibition has not been studied. In the present study, we examined the effect of different functional groups at the P1 site of the parent inhibitor isophthalic acid bis-(L-prolylpyrrolidine) amide on the binding kinetics to POP. Addition of CHO, CN or COCH(2)OH groups to the P1 site increased the inhibitory potency by two orders of magnitude (K(i)=11.8-0.1 nM) and caused a clear slow-binding inhibition. The inhibitor containing a CHO group had the lowest association rate constant, k(on)=(2.43+/-0.12) x 10(5) M(-1) x s(-1), whereas the inhibitor with a CN group exhibited the fastest binding, k(on)=(12.0+/-0.08)x10(5) M(-1) x s(-1). In addition, the dissociation rate was found to be crucially dependent on the type of the functional group. Compounds with COCH(2)OH and CHO groups had much longer half-lives of dissociation (over 5 h) compared with the compound with the CN group (25 min), although the K(i) values of the compounds were relatively similar. A possibility to optimize the duration of inhibition by changing the functional group at the P1 site is important when planning therapeutically useful POP inhibitors.

  18. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Grazyna; Gowda, Veerabasappa T; Maroun, Rachid C

    2007-01-01

    Background The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2), present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL) at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i) presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii) natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii) coagulation factors present in human blood. Results Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa) via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-β-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS). The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. Conclusion We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors. PMID:18062812

  19. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    James, I.F.; Goldstein, A.

    1984-05-01

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, (/sup 3/H) dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for (/sup 3/H) (D-Ala2, D-Leu5)enkephalin and (3H)ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites.

  20. Characterization of the proton binding sites of extracellular polymeric substances in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Chang, Sheng; Defersha, Fantahun M

    2015-07-01

    This paper focuses on the characterization of the chemical compositions and acidic constants of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating synthetic brewery wastewater by using chemical analysis, linear programming analysis (LPA) of titration data, and FT-IR analysis. The linear programming analysis of titration data revealed that the EPSs have proton binding sites with pKa values from pKa ≤ 6, between 6 and 7, and approximately 9.8. The strong acidic sites (pKa ≤ 6) and some weak acidic sites (7.5 < pKa < 9.0) were found to be readily removed by 0.45-μm membrane filtration. In addition, the FT-IR analysis confirmed the presence of proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and lipids in the EPS samples. Based on the FT-IR analysis and the main chemical functional groups at the bacterial cell surfaces, the identified proton binding sites were related to carboxyl, phosphate, and hydroxyl/amine groups with pKa values of 4.6 ± 0.7, 6.6 ± 0.01, and 9.7 ± 0.1, respectively, with the corresponding respective intensities of 0.31 ± 0.05, 0.96 ± 0.3, and 1.53 ± 0.3 mmole/g-EPS. The pKa values and intensities of the proton binding sites are the fundamental molecular properties of EPSs that affect the EPS charge, molecular interactions, and metal complexation characteristics. Determination of such properties can advance Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO)-based concentration polarization modeling, facilitate the estimation of the osmotic pressure of the EPS concentration polarization layers, and lead to a deeper understanding of the role of metal complexation in membrane fouling.

  1. TEMPLE: analysing population genetic variation at transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Litovchenko, Maria; Laurent, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Genetic variation occurring at the level of regulatory sequences can affect phenotypes and fitness in natural populations. This variation can be analysed in a population genetic framework to study how genetic drift and selection affect the evolution of these functional elements. However, doing this requires a good understanding of the location and nature of regulatory regions and has long been a major hurdle. The current proliferation of genomewide profiling experiments of transcription factor occupancies greatly improves our ability to identify genomic regions involved in specific DNA-protein interactions. Although software exists for predicting transcription factor binding sites (TFBS), and the effects of genetic variants on TFBS specificity, there are no tools currently available for inferring this information jointly with the genetic variation at TFBS in natural populations. We developed the software Transcription Elements Mapping at the Population LEvel (TEMPLE), which predicts TFBS, evaluates the effects of genetic variants on TFBS specificity and summarizes the genetic variation occurring at TFBS in intraspecific sequence alignments. We demonstrate that TEMPLE's TFBS prediction algorithms gives identical results to PATSER, a software distribution commonly used in the field. We also illustrate the unique features of TEMPLE by analysing TFBS diversity for the TF Senseless (SENS) in one ancestral and one cosmopolitan population of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. TEMPLE can be used to localize TFBS that are characterized by strong genetic differentiation across natural populations. This will be particularly useful for studies aiming to identify adaptive mutations. TEMPLE is a java-based cross-platform software that easily maps the genetic diversity at predicted TFBSs using a graphical interface, or from the Unix command line.

  2. Characterization of 5-HT1D receptor binding sites in post-mortem human brain cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Martial, J; de Montigny, C; Cecyre, D; Quirion, R

    1991-01-01

    The present study provides further evidence for the presence of serotonin1D (5-HT1D) receptors in post-mortem human brain. Receptor binding parameters in temporal cortex homogenates were assessed using [3H]5-HT in the presence of 100 nM 8-OH-DPAT, 1 microM propranolol and 1 microM mesulergine to prevent labelling of the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1C sites, respectively. Under these conditions, [3H]5-HT apparently bound to a class of high affinity (Kd = 5.0 +/- 1.0 nM) low capacity (Bmax = 96 +/- 23 fmol/mg protein) sites. In competition experiments, 5-HT and 5-carboxyamidotryptamine (5-CT), as well as ergotamine, lysergic acid, sumatriptan and RU-24969 exhibited high affinity for these sites. This pharmacological profile is concordant with the ligand selectivity pattern reported for 5-HT1D receptors in other species and thus provides further evidence for its existence in human temporal cortex. In addition, the competition profile of some ligands, particularly of unlabelled 5-HT, 5-CT and ergotamine, revealed the existence of a lower affinity binding site. The latter suggests receptor heterogeneity or the presence of a lower affinity state of 5-HT1D receptors. PMID:1911737

  3. Late evolutionary appearance of 'peripheral-type' binding sites for benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Bolger, G T; Weissman, B A; Lueddens, H; Basile, A S; Mantione, C R; Barrett, J E; Witkin, J M; Paul, S M; Skolnick, P

    1985-07-15

    Four classes of non-mammalian vertebrates were examined for the presence of both 'brain-specific' and 'peripheral-type' binding sites for benzodiazepines in the central nervous system. 'Brain-specific' binding sites for benzodiazepines were found in the central nervous systems of all non-mammalian vertebrates studied. However, in contrast to mammals, either very low or undetectable levels of 'peripheral-type' binding sites for benzodiazepines were observed in the central nervous systems of these non-mammalian vertebrates. Furthermore, the density of 'peripheral-type' binding sites for benzodiazepines in non-mammalian vertebrate heart was less than or equal to 2% of that found in mammalian cardiac tissue. These findings suggest a very late evolutionary appearance of 'peripheral-type' binding sites for benzodiazepines, implying that these sites may have (a) highly specialized function(s) in both peripheral tissues and the central nervous system.

  4. Prediction of carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces with 3-dimensional probability density distributions of interacting atoms.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Keng-Chang; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Yang, Ei-Wen; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Peng, Hung-Pin; Chen, Ching-Tai; Chen, Jun-Bo; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Non-covalent protein-carbohydrate interactions mediate molecular targeting in many biological processes. Prediction of non-covalent carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces not only provides insights into the functions of the query proteins; information on key carbohydrate-binding residues could suggest site-directed mutagenesis experiments, design therapeutics targeting carbohydrate-binding proteins, and provide guidance in engineering protein-carbohydrate interactions. In this work, we show that non-covalent carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces can be predicted with relatively high accuracy when the query protein structures are known. The prediction capabilities were based on a novel encoding scheme of the three-dimensional probability density maps describing the distributions of 36 non-covalent interacting atom types around protein surfaces. One machine learning model was trained for each of the 30 protein atom types. The machine learning algorithms predicted tentative carbohydrate binding sites on query proteins by recognizing the characteristic interacting atom distribution patterns specific for carbohydrate binding sites from known protein structures. The prediction results for all protein atom types were integrated into surface patches as tentative carbohydrate binding sites based on normalized prediction confidence level. The prediction capabilities of the predictors were benchmarked by a 10-fold cross validation on 497 non-redundant proteins with known carbohydrate binding sites. The predictors were further tested on an independent test set with 108 proteins. The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) for the independent test was 0.45, with prediction precision and sensitivity (or recall) of 0.45 and 0.49 respectively. In addition, 111 unbound carbohydrate-binding protein structures for which the structures were determined in the absence of the carbohydrate ligands were predicted with the trained predictors. The overall

  5. Selectivity of ORC binding sites and the relation to replication timing, fragile sites, and deletions in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, Benoit; Ji, Zhe; Struhl, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds sites from which DNA replication is initiated. We address ORC binding selectivity in vivo by mapping ∼52,000 ORC2 binding sites throughout the human genome. The ORC binding profile is broader than those of sequence-specific transcription factors, suggesting that ORC is not bound or recruited to specific DNA sequences. Instead, ORC binds nonspecifically to open (DNase I-hypersensitive) regions containing active chromatin marks such as H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation. ORC sites in early and late replicating regions have similar properties, but there are far more ORC sites in early replicating regions. This suggests that replication timing is due primarily to ORC density and stochastic firing of origins. Computational simulation of stochastic firing from identified ORC sites is in accord with replication timing data. Large genomic regions with a paucity of ORC sites are strongly associated with common fragile sites and recurrent deletions in cancers. We suggest that replication origins, replication timing, and replication-dependent chromosome breaks are determined primarily by the genomic distribution of activator proteins at enhancers and promoters. These activators recruit nucleosome-modifying complexes to create the appropriate chromatin structure that allows ORC binding and subsequent origin firing. PMID:27436900

  6. Site-specific, covalent incorporation of Tus, a DNA-binding protein, on ionic-complementary self-assembling peptide hydrogels using transpeptidase Sortase A as a conjugation tool†Dedicated to the memory of Joachim H. G. Steinke.‡Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Further experimental data. See DOI: 10.1039/c3sm00131hClick here for additional data file.

    PubMed

    Piluso, Susanna; Cassell, Heather C; Gibbons, Jonathan L; Waller, Thomas E; Plant, Nick J; Miller, Aline F; Cavalli, Gabriel

    2013-08-07

    The site-specific conjugation of DNA-binding protein (Tus) to self-assembling peptide FEFEFKFKK was demonstrated. Rheology studies and TEM of the corresponding hydrogels (including PNIPAAm-containing systems) showed no significant variation in properties and hydrogel morphology compared to FEFEFKFKK. Critically, we demonstrate that Tus is accessible within the gel network displaying DNA-binding properties.

  7. Adaptive Evolution and the Birth of CTCF Binding Sites in the Drosophila Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaochun; Zhang, Yong E.; Nègre, Nicolas; Chen, Sidi; Long, Manyuan; White, Kevin P.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the physical interaction between cis-regulatory DNA sequences and proteins drive the evolution of gene expression. However, it has proven difficult to accurately quantify evolutionary rates of such binding change or to estimate the relative effects of selection and drift in shaping the binding evolution. Here we examine the genome-wide binding of CTCF in four species of Drosophila separated by between ∼2.5 and 25 million years. CTCF is a highly conserved protein known to be associated with insulator sequences in the genomes of human and Drosophila. Although the binding preference for CTCF is highly conserved, we find that CTCF binding itself is highly evolutionarily dynamic and has adaptively evolved. Between species, binding divergence increased linearly with evolutionary distance, and CTCF binding profiles are diverging rapidly at the rate of 2.22% per million years (Myr). At least 89 new CTCF binding sites have originated in the Drosophila melanogaster genome since the most recent common ancestor with Drosophila simulans. Comparing these data to genome sequence data from 37 different strains of Drosophila melanogaster, we detected signatures of selection in both newly gained and evolutionarily conserved binding sites. Newly evolved CTCF binding sites show a significantly stronger signature for positive selection than older sites. Comparative gene expression profiling revealed that expression divergence of genes adjacent to CTCF binding site is significantly associated with the gain and loss of CTCF binding. Further, the birth of new genes is associated with the birth of new CTCF binding sites. Our data indicate that binding of Drosophila CTCF protein has evolved under natural selection, and CTCF binding evolution has shaped both the evolution of gene expression and genome evolution during the birth of new genes. PMID:23139640

  8. A molecular model of the folate binding site of Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southerland, William M.

    1994-04-01

    The inhibition of Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) continues to be the major treatment strategy for P. carinii pneumonia (PCP). The design of new anti-pneumocystis agents would be significantly enhanced by the availability of a 3D model of the methotrexate (MTX) binding site of the P. carinii DHFR. However, an X-ray crystal structure of the P. carinii DHFR is not yet available. Alignment of the amino acid sequences of P. carinii and Lactobacillus casei DHFRs indicates that the two proteins show approximately 80% homology among MTX binding-site residues. This high level of homology suggests that the L. casei DHFR MTX binding-site structure could serve as a structural template in developing a model of the P. carinii DHFR MTX binding site. Therefore, the X-ray crystal structure of L. casei DHFR was used to develop a 3D model of the methotrexate binding site of P. carinii DHFR. The molecular modeling and dynamics software QUANTA/CHARMm was used. Amino acid residue mutations and deletions were performed using QUANTA and macromolecular minimizations were achieved with CHARMm. The MTX binding-site residues of L. casei DHFR were mutated to the corresponding residues of the P. carinii DHFR sequence. The resulting structure was extensively minimized. The resulting P. carinii MTX binding-site model showed significant differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns from the L. casei MTX binding site. Also, the P. carinii site is more hydrophobic than the corresponding L. casei site. Analysis of atom-to-atom close contacts between methotrexate and protein binding-site residues indicates that the P. carinii MTX binding-site complex is primarily stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, while the L. casei complex is mostly stabilized by electrostatic interactions. The model is consistent with the observed increased sensitivity of P. carinii DHFR to lipid-soluble inhibitors and provides a rational basis for the design of new anti-pneumocystis agents.

  9. Planar substrate-binding site dictates the specificity of ECF-type nickel/cobalt transporters

    PubMed Central

    Yu, You; Zhou, Mingze; Kirsch, Franziska; Xu, Congqiao; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Jiang, Zheng; Wang, Na; Li, Jun; Eitinger, Thomas; Yang, Maojun

    2014-01-01

    The energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters are multi-subunit protein complexes that mediate uptake of transition-metal ions and vitamins in about 50% of the prokaryotes, including bacteria and archaea. Biological and structural studies have been focused on ECF transporters for vitamins, but the molecular mechanism by which ECF systems transport metal ions from the environment remains unknown. Here we report the first crystal structure of a NikM, TtNikM2, the substrate-binding component (S component) of an ECF-type nickel transporter from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis. In contrast to the structures of the vitamin-specific S proteins with six transmembrane segments (TSs), TtNikM2 possesses an additional TS at its N-terminal region, resulting in an extracellular N-terminus. The highly conserved N-terminal loop inserts into the center of TtNikM2 and occludes a region corresponding to the substrate-binding sites of the vitamin-specific S components. Nickel binds to NikM via its coordination to four nitrogen atoms, which are derived from Met1, His2 and His67 residues. These nitrogen atoms form an approximately square-planar geometry, similar to that of the metal ion-binding sites in the amino-terminal Cu2+- and Ni2+-binding (ATCUN) motif. Replacements of residues in NikM contributing to nickel coordination compromised the Ni-transport activity. Furthermore, systematic quantum chemical investigation indicated that this geometry enables NikM to also selectively recognize Co2+. Indeed, the structure of TtNikM2 containing a bound Co2+ ion has almost no conformational change compared to the structure that contains a nickel ion. Together, our data reveal an evolutionarily conserved mechanism underlying the metal selectivity of EcfS proteins, and provide insights into the ion-translocation process mediated by ECF transporters. PMID:24366337

  10. Prediction of RNA binding sites in a protein using SVM and PSSM profile.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Gromiha, M Michael; Raghava, G P S

    2008-04-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression, which, along with transcriptional regulation, is a major way to regulate patterns of gene expression during development. Thus, the identification and prediction of RNA binding sites is an important step in comprehensive understanding of how RBPs control organism development. Combining evolutionary information and support vector machine (SVM), we have developed an improved method for predicting RNA binding sites or RNA interacting residues in a protein sequence. The prediction models developed in this study have been trained and tested on 86 RNA binding protein chains and evaluated using fivefold cross validation technique. First, a SVM model was developed that achieved a maximum Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.31. The performance of this SVM model further improved the MCC from 0.31 to 0.45, when multiple sequence alignment in the form of PSSM profiles was used as input to the SVM, which is far better than the maximum MCC achieved by previous methods (0.41) on the same dataset. In addition, SVM models were also developed on an alternative dataset that contained 107 RBP chains. Utilizing PSSM as input information to the SVM, the training/testing on this alternate dataset achieved a maximum MCC of 0.32. Conclusively, the prediction performance of SVM models developed in this study is better than the existing methods on the same datasets. A web server 'Pprint' was also developed for predicting RNA binding residues in a protein sequence which is freely available at http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/pprint/.

  11. Hydrolysis at One of the Two Nucleotide-binding Sites Drives the Dissociation of ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, M. E.; Altenberg, G. A.

    2013-10-15

    The functional unit of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters consists of two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). ATP binding elicits association of the two NBDs, forming a dimer in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides “sandwiched” at the dimer interface. Each of the two nucleotide-binding sites is formed by residues from the two NBDs. We recently found that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii dimerizes in response to ATP binding and dissociates completely following ATP hydrolysis. However, it is still unknown whether dissociation of NBD dimers follows ATP hydrolysis at one or both nucleotide-binding sites. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer to study heterodimers formed by one active (donor-labeled) and one catalytically defective (acceptor-labeled) NBD. Rapid mixing experiments in a stop-flow chamber showed that NBD heterodimers with one functional and one inactive site dissociated at a rate indistinguishable from that of dimers with two hydrolysis-competent sites. Comparison of the rates of NBD dimer dissociation and ATP hydrolysis indicated that dissociation followed hydrolysis of one ATP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dimer dissociation.

  12. The I1-imidazoline receptor: from binding site to therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ernsberger, Paul; Friedman, Jacob E.; Koletsky, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective To review previous work and present additional evidence characterizing the I1-imidazoline receptor and its role in cellular signaling, central cardiovascular control, and the treatment of metabolic syndromes. Second-generation centrally-acting antihypertensives inhibit sympathetic activity mainly via imidazoline receptors, whereas first-generation agents act viaα2-adrenergic receptors. The I1 subtype of imidazoline receptor resides in the plasma membrane and binds central antihypertensives with high affinity. Methods and results Radioligand binding assays have characterized I1-imidazoline sites in the brainstem site of action for these agents in the rostral ventrolateral medulla. Binding affinity at I1-imidazoline sites, but not at other classes of imidazoline binding sites, correlates closely with the potency of central antihypertensive agents in animals and in human clinical trials. The antihypertensive action of systemic moxonidine is eliminated by the I1/α2-antagonist efaroxan, but not by selective blockade of α2-adrenergic receptors. Until now, the cell signaling pathway coupled to I1-imidazoline receptors was unknown. Using a model system lacking α2-adrenergic receptors (PC12 pheochromocytoma cells) we have found that moxonidine acts as an agonist at the cell level and I1-imidazoline receptor activation leads to the production of the second messenger diacylglycerol, most likely through direct activation of phosphatidylcholine-selective phospholipase C. The obese spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR; SHROB strain) shows many of the abnormalities that cluster in human syndrome X, including elevations in blood pressure, serum lipids and insulin. SHROB and their lean SHR littermates were treated with moxonidine at 8 mg/kg per day. SHROB and SHR treated with moxonidine showed not only lowered blood pressure but also improved glucose tolerance and facilitated insulin secretion in response to a glucose load. Because α2-adrenergic agonists impair

  13. Biochemical study of prolactin binding sites in Xenopus laevis brain and choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Muccioli, G.; Guardabassi, A.; Pattono, P. )

    1990-03-01

    The occurrence of prolactin binding sites in some brain structures (telencephalon, ventral hypothalamus, myelencephalon, hypophysis, and choroid plexus) from Xenopus laevis (anuran amphibian) was studied by the in vitro biochemical technique. The higher binding values were obtained at the level of the choroid plexus and above all of the hypothalamus. On the bases of hormonal specificity and high affinity, these binding sites are very similar to those of prolactin receptors of classical target tissues as well as of those described by us in other structures from Xenopus. To our knowledge, the present results provide the first demonstration of the occurrence of prolactin specific binding sites in Xenopus laevis choroid plexus cells.

  14. 2-([sup 125]I) iodomelatonin binding sites in rat adrenals: Pharmacological characteristics and subcellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Persengiev, S.P. )

    1992-01-01

    Specific binding sites for 2-[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin, a selective radiolabeled melatonin receptor ligand, were detected and characterized in rat adrenal membranes. Saturation studies demonstrated that 2-[[sup 125]I]iodomelatonin binds to a single class of sites with an affinity constant (Kd) of 541 pM and a total binding capacity (Bmax) of 3.23 fmol/mg protein. Competition experiments revealed that the relative order of potency of compounds tested was as follows: 6-chloromelatonin > 2-iodomelatonin > melatonin > 5-methoxytryptamine > 5-methoxytryptophol. The highest density of binding sites was found in membranes from nuclear and mitochondrial subcellular fractions.

  15. Evidence for a non-opioid sigma binding site din the guinea-pig myenteric plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, F.; Pascaud, X.; Vauche, D.; Junien, J.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of a binding site to (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 was demonstrated in a guinea-pig myenteric plexus (MYP) membrane preparation. Specific binding to this receptor was saturable, reversible, linear with protein concentration and consisted of two components, a high affinity site and a low affinity site. Morphine and naloxone 10/sup -4/M were unable to displace (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding. Haloperidol, imipramine, ethylketocyclazocine and propranolol were among the most potent compounds to inhibit this specific binding. These results suggest the presence of a non-opioid haloperidol sensitive sigma receptor in the MYP of the guinea-pig.

  16. In vivo binding of PRDM9 reveals interactions with noncanonical genomic sites

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Corinne; Clément, Julie A.J.; Buard, Jérôme; Leblanc, Benjamin; Gut, Ivo; Gut, Marta; Duret, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed an extensive analysis of PRDM9 binding in mouse spermatocytes. Unexpectedly, we identified a noncanonical recruitment of PRDM9 to sites that lack recombination activity and the PRDM9 binding consensus motif. These sites include gene promoters, where PRDM9 is recruited in a DSB-dependent manner. Another subset reveals DSB-independent interactions between PRDM9 and genomic sites, such as the binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF. We propose that these DSB-independent sites result from interactions between hotspot-bound PRDM9 and genomic sequences located on the chromosome axis. PMID:28336543

  17. In vivo binding of PRDM9 reveals interactions with noncanonical genomic sites.

    PubMed

    Grey, Corinne; Clément, Julie A J; Buard, Jérôme; Leblanc, Benjamin; Gut, Ivo; Gut, Marta; Duret, Laurent; de Massy, Bernard

    2017-04-01

    In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed an extensive analysis of PRDM9 binding in mouse spermatocytes. Unexpectedly, we identified a noncanonical recruitment of PRDM9 to sites that lack recombination activity and the PRDM9 binding consensus motif. These sites include gene promoters, where PRDM9 is recruited in a DSB-dependent manner. Another subset reveals DSB-independent interactions between PRDM9 and genomic sites, such as the binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF. We propose that these DSB-independent sites result from interactions between hotspot-bound PRDM9 and genomic sequences located on the chromosome axis.

  18. Energetics of displacing water molecules from protein binding sites: consequences for ligand optimization.

    PubMed

    Michel, Julien; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2009-10-28

    A strategy in drug design is to consider enhancing the affinity of lead molecules with structural modifications that displace water molecules from a protein binding site. Because success of the approach is uncertain, clarification of the associated energetics was sought in cases where similar structural modifications yield qualitatively different outcomes. Specifically, free-energy perturbation calculations were carried out in the context of Monte Carlo statistical mechanics simulations to investigate ligand series that feature displacement of ordered water molecules in the binding sites of scytalone dehydratase, p38-alphaMAP kinase, and EGFR kinase. The change in affinity for a ligand modification is found to correlate with the ease of displacement of the ordered water molecule. However, as in the EGFR example, the binding affinity may diminish if the free-energy increase due to the removal of the bound water molecule is not more than compensated by the additional interactions of the water-displacing moiety. For accurate computation of the effects of ligand modifications, a complete thermodynamic analysis is shown to be needed. It requires identification of the location of water molecules in the protein-ligand interface and evaluation of the free-energy changes associated with their removal and with the introduction of the ligand modification. Direct modification of the ligand in free-energy calculations is likely to trap the ordered molecule and provide misleading guidance for lead optimization.

  19. Molecular basis for benzimidazole resistance from a novel β-tubulin binding site model.

    PubMed

    Aguayo-Ortiz, Rodrigo; Méndez-Lucio, Oscar; Romo-Mancillas, Antonio; Castillo, Rafael; Yépez-Mulia, Lilián; Medina-Franco, José L; Hernández-Campos, Alicia

    2013-09-01

    Benzimidazole-2-carbamate derivatives (BzCs) are the most commonly used antiparasitic drugs for the treatment of protozoan and helminthic infections. BzCs inhibit the microtubule polymerization mechanism through binding selectively to the β-tubulin subunit in which mutations have been identified that lead to drug resistance. Currently, the lack of crystallographic structures of β-tubulin in parasites has limited the study of the binding site and the analysis of the resistance to BzCs. Recently, our research group has proposed a model to explain the interaction between the BzCs and a binding site in the β-tubulin. Herein, we report the homology models of two susceptible (Haemonchus contortus and Giardia intestinalis) parasites and one unsusceptible (Entamoeba histolytica) generated using the structure of the mammal Ovis aries, considered as a low susceptible organism, as a template. Additionally, the mechanism by which the principal single point mutations Phe167Tyr, Glu198Ala and Phe200Tyr could lead to resistance to BzCs is analyzed. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies were carried out in order to evaluate the models and the ligand-protein complexes' behaviors. This study represents a first attempt towards understanding, at the molecular level, the structural composition of β-tubulin in all organisms, also suggesting possible resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, these results support the importance of benzimidazole derivative optimization in order to design more potent and selective (less toxic) molecules for the treatment of parasitic diseases.

  20. Cross-neutralizing human anti-poliovirus antibodies bind the recognition site for cellular receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaochun; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Hansen, Bryan T.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Bidzhieva, Bella; Makiya, Michelle; Agulto, Liane; Purcell, Robert H.; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    Most structural information about poliovirus interaction with neutralizing antibodies was obtained in the 1980s in studies of mouse monoclonal antibodies. Recently we have isolated a number of human/chimpanzee anti-poliovirus antibodies and demonstrated that one of them, MAb A12, could neutralize polioviruses of both serotypes 1 and 2. This communication presents data on isolation of an additional cross-neutralizing antibody (F12) and identification of a previously unknown epitope on the surface of poliovirus virions. Epitope mapping was performed by sequencing of antibody-resistant mutants and by cryo-EM of complexes of virions with Fab fragments. The results have demonstrated that both cross-neutralizing antibodies bind the site located at the bottom of the canyon surrounding the fivefold axis of symmetry that was previously shown to interact with cellular poliovirus receptor CD155. However, the same antibody binds to serotypes 1 and 2 through different specific interactions. It was also shown to interact with type 3 poliovirus, albeit with about 10-fold lower affinity, insufficient for effective neutralization. Antibody interaction with the binding site of the cellular receptor may explain its broad reactivity and suggest that further screening or antibody engineering could lead to a universal antibody capable of neutralizing all three serotypes of poliovirus. PMID:24277851

  1. IP3 receptor binds to and sensitizes TRPV4 channel to osmotic stimuli via a calmodulin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Elias, Anna; Lorenzo, Ivan M; Vicente, Rubén; Valverde, Miguel A

    2008-11-14

    Activation of the non-selective cation channel TRPV4 by mechanical and osmotic stimuli requires the involvement of phospholipase A2 and the subsequent production of the arachidonic acid metabolites, epoxieicosatrienoic acids (EET). Previous studies have shown that inositol trisphosphate (IP3) sensitizes TRPV4 to mechanical, osmotic, and direct EET stimulation. We now search for the IP3 receptor-binding site on TRPV4 and its relevance to IP3-mediated sensitization. Three putative sites involved in protein-protein interactions were evaluated: a proline-rich domain (PRD), a calmodulin (CaM)-binding site, and the last four amino acids (DAPL) that show a PDZ-binding motif-like. TRPV4-DeltaCaM-(Delta812-831) channels preserved activation by hypotonicity, 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and EET but lost their physical interaction with IP3 receptor 3 and IP3-mediated sensitization. Deletion of a PDZ-binding motif-like (TRPV4-DeltaDAPL) did not affect channel activity or IP3-mediated sensitization, whereas TRPV4-DeltaPRD-(Delta132-144) resulted in loss of channel function despite correct trafficking. We conclude that IP3-mediated sensitization requires IP3 receptor binding to a TRPV4 C-terminal domain that overlaps with a previously described calmodulin-binding site.

  2. Does transcription play a role in creating a condensin binding site?

    PubMed

    Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved condensin complex is essential for the condensation and integrity of chromosomes through cell division. Published data argue that high levels of transcription contribute to specify some condensin-binding sites on chromosomes but the exact role of transcription in this process remains elusive. Here we discuss our recent data addressing the role of transcription in establishing a condensin-binding site.

  3. Number and locations of agonist binding sites required to activate homomeric Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Diego; De Rosa, María José; Sine, Steven M; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-05-06

    Homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors contain five identical agonist binding sites, each formed at a subunit interface. To determine the number and locations of binding sites required to generate a stable active state, we constructed a receptor subunit with a mutation that disables the agonist binding site and a reporter mutation that alters unitary conductance and coexpressed mutant and nonmutant subunits. Although receptors with a range of different subunit compositions are produced, patch-clamp recordings reveal that the amplitude of each single-channel opening event reports the number and, for certain subunit combinations, the locations of subunits with intact binding sites. We find that receptors with three binding sites at nonconsecutive subunit interfaces exhibit maximal mean channel open time, receptors with binding sites at three consecutive or two nonconsecutive interfaces exhibit intermediate open time, and receptors with binding sites at two consecutive or one interface exhibit brief open time. Macroscopic recordings after rapid application of agonist reveal that channel activation slows and the extent of desensitization decreases as the number of binding sites per receptor decreases. The overall results provide a framework for defining mechanisms of activation and drug modulation for homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors.

  4. Design of accurate predictors for DNA-binding sites in proteins using hybrid SVM-PSSM method.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shinn-Ying; Yu, Fu-Chieh; Chang, Chia-Yun; Huang, Hui-Ling

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the design of accurate predictors for DNA-binding sites in proteins from amino acid sequences. As a result, we propose a hybrid method using support vector machine (SVM) in conjunction with evolutionary information of amino acid sequences in terms of their position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) for prediction of DNA-binding sites. Considering the numbers of binding and non-binding residues in proteins are significantly unequal, two additional weights as well as SVM parameters are analyzed and adopted to maximize net prediction (NP, an average of sensitivity and specificity) accuracy. To evaluate the generalization ability of the proposed method SVM-PSSM, a DNA-binding dataset PDC-59 consisting of 59 protein chains with low sequence identity on each other is additionally established. The SVM-based method using the same six-fold cross-validation procedure and PSSM features has NP=80.15% for the training dataset PDNA-62 and NP=69.54% for the test dataset PDC-59, which are much better than the existing neural network-based method by increasing the NP values for training and test accuracies up to 13.45% and 16.53%, respectively. Simulation results reveal that SVM-PSSM performs well in predicting DNA-binding sites of novel proteins from amino acid sequences.

  5. Characterization of EPPIN's Semenogelin I Binding Site: A Contraceptive Drug Target1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Erick J.R.; Hamil, Katherine G.; Richardson, Richard T.; O'Rand, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epididymal protease inhibitor (EPPIN) is found on the surface of spermatozoa and works as a central hub for a sperm surface protein complex (EPPIN protein complex [EPC]) that inhibits sperm motility on the binding of semenogelin I (SEMG1) during ejaculation. Here, we identify EPPIN's amino acids involved in the interactions within the EPC and demonstrate that EPPIN's sequence C102-P133 contains the major binding site for SEMG1. Within the same region, the sequence F117-P133 binds the EPC-associated protein lactotransferrin (LTF). We show that residues Cys102, Tyr107, and Phe117 in the EPPIN C-terminus are required for SEMG1 binding. Additionally, residues Tyr107 and Phe117 are critically involved in the interaction between EPPIN and LTF. Our findings demonstrate that EPPIN is a key player in the protein-protein interactions within the EPC. Target identification is an important step toward the development of a novel male contraceptive, and the functionality of EPPIN's residues Cys102, Tyr107, and Phe117 offers novel opportunities for contraceptive compounds that inhibit sperm motility by targeting this region of the molecule. PMID:22699487

  6. Ansamitocin P3 depolymerizes microtubules and induces apoptosis by binding to tubulin at the vinblastine site.

    PubMed

    Venghateri, Jubina B; Gupta, Tilak Kumar; Verma, Paul J; Kunwar, Ambarish; Panda, Dulal

    2013-01-01

    Maytansinoid conjugates are currently under different phases of clinical trials and have been showing promising activity for various types of cancers. In this study, we have elucidated the mechanism of action of ansamitocin P3, a structural analogue of maytansine for its anticancer activity. Ansamitocin P3 potently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7, HeLa, EMT-6/AR1 and MDA-MB-231 cells in culture with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 20±3, 50±0.5, 140±17, and 150±1.1 pM, respectively. Ansamitocin P3 strongly depolymerized both interphase and mitotic microtubules and perturbed chromosome segregation at its proliferation inhibitory concentration range. Treatment of ansamitocin P3 activated spindle checkpoint surveillance proteins, Mad2 and BubR1 and blocked the cells in mitotic phase of the cell cycle. Subsequently, cells underwent apoptosis via p53 mediated apoptotic pathway. Further, ansamitocin P3 was found to bind to purified tubulin in vitro with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.3±0.7 µM. The binding of ansamitocin P3 induced conformational changes in tubulin. A docking analysis suggested that ansamitocin P3 may bind partially to vinblastine binding site on tubulin in two different positions. The analysis indicated that the binding of ansamitocin P3 to tubulin is stabilized by hydrogen bonds. In addition, weak interactions such as halogen-oxygen interactions may also contribute to the binding of ansamitocin P3 to tubulin. The study provided a significant insight in understanding the antiproliferative mechanism of action of ansamitocin P3.

  7. Uncoupling of stem cell inhibition from monocyte chemoattraction in MIP-1alpha by mutagenesis of the proteoglycan binding site.

    PubMed

    Graham, G J; Wilkinson, P C; Nibbs, R J; Lowe, S; Kolset, S O; Parker, A; Freshney, M G; Tsang, M L; Pragnell, I B

    1996-12-02

    We have studied the role of proteoglycans in the function of Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1 alpha (MIP-1alpha), a member of the proteoglycan binding chemokine family. Sequence and peptide analysis has identified a basic region within MIP-1alpha which appears to be the major determinant of proteoglycan binding and we have now produced a mutant of MIP-1alpha lacking the basic charges on two of the amino acids within this proteoglycan binding site. This mutant (Hep Mut) appears to have lost the ability to bind to proteoglycans. Bioassay of Hep Mut indicates that it has retained stem cell inhibitory properties but has a compromised activity as a monocyte chemoattractant, thus suggesting uncoupling of these two properties of MIP-1alpha. Receptor studies have indicated that the inactivity of Hep Mut on human monocytes correlates with its inability to bind to CCR1, a cloned human MIP-1alpha receptor. In addition, studies using proteoglycan deficient cells transfected with CCR1 have indicated that the proteoglycan binding site in MIP-1alpha is a site that is also involved in the docking of MIP-1alpha to the monocyte receptor. The site for interaction with the stem cell receptor must therefore be distinct, suggesting that MIP-1alpha utilizes different receptors for these two different biological processes.

  8. Uncoupling of stem cell inhibition from monocyte chemoattraction in MIP-1alpha by mutagenesis of the proteoglycan binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, G J; Wilkinson, P C; Nibbs, R J; Lowe, S; Kolset, S O; Parker, A; Freshney, M G; Tsang, M L; Pragnell, I B

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the role of proteoglycans in the function of Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1 alpha (MIP-1alpha), a member of the proteoglycan binding chemokine family. Sequence and peptide analysis has identified a basic region within MIP-1alpha which appears to be the major determinant of proteoglycan binding and we have now produced a mutant of MIP-1alpha lacking the basic charges on two of the amino acids within this proteoglycan binding site. This mutant (Hep Mut) appears to have lost the ability to bind to proteoglycans. Bioassay of Hep Mut indicates that it has retained stem cell inhibitory properties but has a compromised activity as a monocyte chemoattractant, thus suggesting uncoupling of these two properties of MIP-1alpha. Receptor studies have indicated that the inactivity of Hep Mut on human monocytes correlates with its inability to bind to CCR1, a cloned human MIP-1alpha receptor. In addition, studies using proteoglycan deficient cells transfected with CCR1 have indicated that the proteoglycan binding site in MIP-1alpha is a site that is also involved in the docking of MIP-1alpha to the monocyte receptor. The site for interaction with the stem cell receptor must therefore be distinct, suggesting that MIP-1alpha utilizes different receptors for these two different biological processes. Images PMID:8978677

  9. Consensus topography in the ATP binding site of the simian virus 40 and polyomavirus large tumor antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.K.; Smith, T.F.; Lathrop, R.H.; Livingston, D.M.; Webster, T.A.

    1987-06-01

    The location and sequence composition of a consensus element of the nucleotide binding site in both simian virus 40 (SV40) and polyomavirus (PyV) large tumor antigens (T antigens) can be predicted with the assistance of a computer-based pattern-matching system, ARIADNE. The latter was used to optimally align elements of T antigen primary sequence and predicted secondary structure with a descriptor for a mononucleotide binding fold. Additional consensus elements of the nucleotide binding site in these two proteins were derived from comparisons of T antigen primary and predicted secondary structures with x-ray structures of the nucleotide binding sites in four otherwise unrelated proteins. Each of these elements was predicted to be encompassed within a 110-residue segment that is highly conserved between the two T antigens residues 418-528 in SV 40 T antigen and residues 565-675 in PyV. Results of biochemical and immunologic experiments on the nucleotide binding behavior of these proteins using (/sup 32/P)-Amp-labeled SV40 T antigen, were found to be consistent with these predictions. Taken together, the latter have resulted in a topological model of the ATP binding site in these two oncogene products.

  10. Prediction of flavin mono-nucleotide binding sites using modified PSSM profile and ensemble support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Mi, Gang; Wang, Cuicui; Zhang, Yongqing; Li, Juan; Guo, Yanzhi; Pu, Xuemei; Li, Menglong

    2012-11-01

    Flavin mono-nucleotide (FMN) closely evolves in many biological processes. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify FMN binding sites based on amino acid sequences of proteins only. A modified Position Specific Score Matrix was used to characterize the local environmental sequence information, and a visible improvement of performance was obtained. Also, the ensemble SVM was applied to solve the imbalanced data problem. Additionally, an independent dataset was built to evaluate the practical performance of the method, and a satisfactory accuracy of 87.87% was achieved. It demonstrates that the method is effective in predicting FMN-binding sites.

  11. Are high-affinity progesterone binding site(s) from porcine liver microsomes members of the sigma receptor family?

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Schmieding, K; Falkenstein, E; Wehling, M

    1998-04-24

    Membrane progesterone binding sites have been purified recently from pig liver. Since progesterone is considered as an endogenous sigma (sigma) receptor ligand, these sites were characterized pharmacologically by ligands selective for sigma receptor and dopamine receptor binding sites, and by other drugs from distinct pharmacological classes. Binding studies using the radioligand [3H]progesterone were done in crude membrane preparations and solubilized fractions to determine half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values, from which inhibitory constants (Ki values) were calculated. Radioligand binding was inhibited by the sigma receptor ligands haloperidol, carbetapentane citrate, 1,3-Di(2-tolyl)guanidine (DTG), R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2 aminopropane HCl (R(-)-PPAAP HCl), or sigma receptor antagonists like (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine HCl (R(+)-PPP HCl) and cis-9-[3-(3,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)propyl]-9H-carbazole dihydrochloride (rimcazole 2HCl). The hierarchy of inhibitory action was not fully compatible with either sigma receptor class I (moderate affinity of pentazocine, diphenylhydantoin (phenytoin) insensitivity) or II sites (high affinity of carbetapentane). The data thus suggest that progesterone binding sites in porcine liver membranes are related to the sigma receptor binding site superfamily, but may represent a particular species with progesterone specificity.

  12. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  13. Structural Insight into Guest Binding Sites in a Porous Homochiral Metal-Organic Material.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Yuan; Wojtas, Lukasz; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2015-09-23

    An enantiomeric pair of chiral metal-organic materials (CMOMs) based upon mandelate (man) and 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy) ligands, [Co2(S-man)2(bpy)3](NO3)2·guest (1S·guest) and [Co2(R-man)2(bpy)3](NO3)2·guest (1R·guest), have been prepared. The cationic frameworks exhibit one-dimensional chiral channels with dimensions of 8.0 Å × 8.0 Å. The pore chemistry is such that chiral surfaces lined with nitrate anions and phenyl groups create multiple binding sites for guest and/or solvent molecules. The performance of 1S and 1R with respect to resolution of racemic mixtures of 1-phenyl-1-propanol (PP) was studied by varying time, temperature, and the use of additives. Selectivity toward PP was determined by chiral HPLC with ee values of up to 60%. The binding sites and host-guest interactions were investigated through single-crystal X-ray structural analyses of guest-exchanged 1S and 1R. Crystallographically observed structural changes (e.g., the absolute configurations of the three PP binding sites switch from R, R, and S to R, R, and R/S) correlate with experimentally observed ee values of 33% and 60% for variants of 1S that contain PP and different solvent molecules, 1S·PPex and 1S·PPex', respectively. The fact that manipulation of guest solvent molecules, which in effect serve as cofactors, can modify chiral sites and increase enantioselectivity is likely to aid in the design of more effective CMOMs and processes for chiral separations.

  14. Analysis of transcription-factor binding-site evolution by using the Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancliff, Mark; Park, Jeong-Man

    2016-12-01

    We investigate a quasi-species mutation-selection model of transcription-factor binding-site evolution. By considering the mesa and the crater fitness landscapes designed to describe these binding sites and point mutations, we derive an evolution equation for the population distribution of binding sequences. In the long-length limit, the evolution equation is replaced by a Hamilton-Jacobi equation which we solve for the stationary state solution. From the stationary solution, we derive the population distributions and find that an error threshold, separating populations in which the binding site does or does not evolve, only exists for certain values of the fitness parameters. A phase diagram in this parameter space is derived and shows a critical line below which no error threshold exists. We also investigate the evolution of multiple binding sites for the same transcription factor. For two binding sites, we perform an analysis similar to that for a single site and determine a phase diagram showing different phases with both, one, or no binding sites selected. In the phase diagram, the phase boundary between the one-or-two selected site phases is qualitatively different for the mesa and the crater fitness landscapes. As fitness benefits for a second bound transcription factor tend to zero, the minimum mutation rate at which the two-site phase occurs diverges in the mesa landscape whereas the mutation rate at the phase boundary tends to a finite value for the crater landscape.

  15. The b' domain provides the principal peptide-binding site of protein disulfide isomerase but all domains contribute to binding of misfolded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Klappa, P; Ruddock, L W; Darby, N J; Freedman, R B

    1998-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a very efficient catalyst of folding of many disulfide-bonded proteins. A great deal is known about the catalytic functions of PDI, while little is known about its substrate binding. We recently demonstrated by cross-linking that PDI binds peptides and misfolded proteins, with high affinity but broad specificity. To characterize the substrate-binding site of PDI, we investigated the interactions of various recombinant fragments of human PDI, expressed in Escherichia coli, with different radiolabelled model peptides. We observed that the b' domain of human PDI is essential and sufficient for the binding of small peptides. In the case of larger peptides, specifically a 28 amino acid fragment derived from bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, or misfolded proteins, the b' domain is essential but not sufficient for efficient binding, indicating that contributions from additional domains are required. Hence we propose that the different domains of PDI all contribute to the binding site, with the b' domain forming the essential core. PMID:9463371

  16. Label-free microscale thermophoresis discriminates sites and affinity of protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Susanne A I; Wienken, Christoph J; Geissler, Sandra; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Duhr, Stefan; Reiter, Alwin; Trauner, Dirk; Braun, Dieter; Baaske, Philipp

    2012-10-15

    Look, no label! Microscale thermophoresis makes use of the intrinsic fluorescence of proteins to quantify the binding affinities of ligands and discriminate between binding sites. This method is suitable for studying binding interactions of very small amounts of protein in solution. The binding of ligands to iGluR membrane receptors, small-molecule inhibitorss to kinase p38, aptamers to thrombin, and Ca(2+) ions to synaptotagmin was quantified.

  17. Characterization of Naphthaleneacetic Acid Binding to Receptor Sites on Cellular Membranes of Maize Coleoptile Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Peter M.; Dohrmann, Ulrike; Hertel, Rainer

    1977-01-01

    Characteristics of and optimum conditions for saturable (“specific”) binding of [14C]naphthaleneacetic acid to sites located on membranous particles from maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptiles are described. Most, if not all, of the specific binding appears to be due to a single kinetic class of binding sites having a KD of 5 to 7 × 10−7m for naphthalene-1-acetic acid (NAA). Binding of NAA is insensitive to high monovalent salt concentrations, indicating that binding is not primarily ionic. However, specific binding is inhibited by Mg2+ or Ca2+ above 5 mm. Specific binding is improved by organic acids, especially citrate. Binding is heat-labile and is sensitive to agents that act either on proteins or on lipids. Specific binding is reversibly inactivated by reducing agents such as dithioerythritol; a reducible group, possibly a disulfide group, may be located at the binding site and required for its function. The affinity of the specific binding sites for auxins is modified by an unidentified dialyzable, heat-stable, apparently amphoteric, organic factor (“supernatant factor”) found in maize tissue. PMID:16659851

  18. In situ fluorescence labelling of jasmonic acid binding sites in plant tissues with cadmium-free quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qiumei; Yu, Ying; Cao, Yujuan; Lin, Bixia; Wei, Jingjing

    2015-02-01

    The fluorescence labelling of plant hormone binding sites is an important analytical technique in research on the molecular mechanisms of plant hormone activities. The authors synthesised a jasmonic acid (JA)-conjugated ZnS:Mn quantum dot (QD) probe, with a cubic structure and average hydrodynamic sizes of about 17.0 nm. The maximum fluorescence emission of the probe was recorded at about 585 nm. The probe was used for fluorescence labelling of JA binding sites in mung bean seedling tissues. Analysis revealed that the probe exhibited high selectivity to JA binding sites and good performance in eliminating interference from background fluorescence in plant tissues. In addition, the probe did not exhibit any apparent biotoxicity, and is much more suitable than probes constructed from CdTe QDs for the analysis of biological samples.

  19. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Binds to a Site in the Rat Growth Hormone Promoter Required for Induction by Thyroid Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Ronald J.; Brent, Gregory A.; Warne, Robert L.; Reed Larsen, P.; Moore, David D.

    1987-08-01

    Transcription of the rat growth hormone (rGH) gene in pituitary cells is increased by addition of thyroid hormone (T3). This induction is dependent on the presence of specific sequences just upstream of the rGH promoter. We have partially purified T3 receptor from rat liver and examined its interaction with these rGH sequences. We show here that T3 receptor binds specifically to a site just upstream of the basal rGH promoter. This binding site includes two copies of a 7-base-pair direct repeat, the centers of which are separated by 10 base pairs. Deletions that specifically remove the T3 receptor binding site drastically reduce response to T3 in transient transfection experiments. These results demonstrate that T3 receptor can recognize specific DNA sequences and suggest that it can act directly as a positive transcriptional regulatory factor.

  20. Transcriptionally active immediate-early protein of pseudorabies virus binds to specific sites on class II gene promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Cromlish, W A; Abmayr, S M; Workman, J L; Horikoshi, M; Roeder, R G

    1989-01-01

    In the presence of partially purified pseudorabies virus immediate-early protein, multiple sites of DNase I protection were observed on the adenovirus major late and human hsp 70 promoters. Southwestern (DNA-protein blot) analysis demonstrated that the immediate-early protein bound directly to the sequences contained in these sites. These sequences share only limited homology, differ in their affinities for the immediate-early protein, and are located at different positions on these two promoters. In addition, the site-specific binding of a temperature-sensitive immediate-early protein was eliminated by the same heat treatment which eliminates its transcriptional activating function, whereas the binding of the wild-type protein was unaffected by heat treatment. Thus, site-specific binding requires a functionally active immediate-early protein. Furthermore, immediate-early-protein-dependent in vitro transcription from the major late promoter was preferentially inhibited by oligonucleotides which are homologous to the high-affinity binding sites on the major late or hsp 70 promoters. These observations suggest that transcriptional stimulation by the immediate-early protein involves binding to cis-acting elements. Images PMID:2539489

  1. Crystal structure of plant ferritin reveals a novel metal binding site that functions as a transit site for metal transfer in ferritin.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taro; Goto, Fumiyuki; Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Mikami, Bunzo

    2010-02-05

    Ferritins are important iron storage and detoxification proteins that are widely distributed in living kingdoms. Because plant ferritin possesses both a ferroxidase site and a ferrihydrite nucleation site, it is a suitable model for studying the mechanism of iron storage in ferritin. This article presents for the first time the crystal structure of a plant ferritin from soybean at 1.8-A resolution. The soybean ferritin 4 (SFER4) had a high structural similarity to vertebrate ferritin, except for the N-terminal extension region, the C-terminal short helix E, and the end of the BC-loop. Similar to the crystal structures of other ferritins, metal binding sites were observed in the iron entry channel, ferroxidase center, and nucleation site of SFER4. In addition to these conventional sites, a novel metal binding site was discovered intermediate between the iron entry channel and the ferroxidase site. This site was coordinated by the acidic side chain of Glu(173) and carbonyl oxygen of Thr(168), which correspond, respectively, to Glu(140) and Thr(135) of human H chain ferritin according to their sequences. A comparison of the ferroxidase activities of the native and the E173A mutant of SFER4 clearly showed a delay in the iron oxidation rate of the mutant. This indicated that the glutamate residue functions as a transit site of iron from the 3-fold entry channel to the ferroxidase site, which may be universal among ferritins.

  2. Detecting O2 binding sites in protein cavities

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Ryo; Yoshimura, Yuichi; Xue, Mengjun; Kameda, Tomoshi; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Internal cavities are important elements in protein structure, dynamics, stability and function. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate the binding of molecular oxygen (O2) to cavities in a well-studied model for ligand binding, the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme. On increasing the O2 concentration to 8.9 mM, changes in 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shifts and signal broadening were observed specifically for backbone amide and side chain methyl groups located around the two hydrophobic cavities of the protein. O2-induced longitudinal relaxation enhancements for amide and methyl protons could be adequately accounted for by paramagnetic dipolar relaxation. These data provide the first experimental demonstration that O2 binds specifically to the hydrophobic, and not the hydrophilic cavities, in a protein. Molecular dynamics simulations visualized the rotational and translational motions of O2 in the cavities, as well as the binding and egress of O2, suggesting that the channel consisting of helices D, E, G, H, and J could be the potential gateway for ligand binding to the protein. Due to strong paramagnetic relaxation effects, O2 gas-pressure NMR measurements can detect hydrophobic cavities when populated to as little as 1%, and thereby provide a general and highly sensitive method for detecting oxygen binding in proteins. PMID:26830762

  3. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  4. Ceruloplasmin revisited: structural and functional roles of various metal cation-binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bento, Isabel; Peixoto, Cristina; Zaitsev, Vjacheslav N.; Lindley, Peter F.

    2007-02-01

    The three-dimensional molecular structure of human serum ceruloplasmin has been reinvestigated using X-ray synchrotron data collected at 100 K from a crystal frozen to liquid-nitrogen temperature. The three-dimensional molecular structure of human serum ceruloplasmin has been reinvestigated using X-ray synchrotron data collected at 100 K from a crystal frozen to liquid-nitrogen temperature. The resulting model, with an increase in resolution from 3.1 to 2.8 Å, gives an overall improvement of the molecular structure, in particular the side chains. In addition, it enables the clear definition of previously unidentified Ca{sup 2+}-binding and Na{sup +}-binding sites. The Ca{sup 2+} cation is located in domain 1 in a configuration very similar to that found in the activated bovine factor Va. The Na{sup +} sites appear to play a structural role in providing rigidity to the three protuberances on the top surface of the molecule. These features probably help to steer substrates towards the mononuclear copper sites prior to their oxidation and to restrict the size of the approaching substrate. The trinuclear copper centre appears to differ from the room-temperature structure in that a dioxygen moiety is bound in a similar way to that found in the endospore coat protein CotA from Bacillus subtilis.

  5. [Web server for prediction of miRNAs and their precursors and binding sites].

    PubMed

    Vorozheykin, P S; Titov, I I

    2015-01-01

    A microRNA (miRNA) is a small noncoding RNA molecule about 22 nucleotides in length. The paper describes a web server for predicting miRNAs and their precursors and binding sites. The predictions are based on either sequence similarity to known miRNAs of 223 organisms or context-structural hidden Markov models. It has been shown that the proposed methods of prediction of human miRNAs and pre-miRNAs outperform the existing ones in accuracy. The average deviation of predicted 5'-ends of human miRNAs from actual positions is 3.13 nt in the case of predicting one pair of complementary miRNAs (miRNA-miRNA* duplex). A useful option for our application is the prediction of an additional miRNA pair. In this mode, the pairs closest to actual miRNA deviate by 1.61 nt on average. The proposed method also shows good performance in predicting mouse miRNAs. Binding sites for miRNAs are predicted by two known approaches based on complementarity and thermodynamic stability of the miRNA-mRNA duplex and on a new approach, which takes into account miRNAs competition for the site. The role of the secondary structure in miRNA processing is considered. The web server is available at http://wwwmgs.bionet.nsc.ru/mgs/programs/rnaanalys/.

  6. A permanent ion binding site located between two gates of the Shaker K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Harris, R E; Larsson, H P; Isacoff, E Y

    1998-04-01

    K+ channels can be occupied by multiple permeant ions that appear to bind at discrete locations in the conduction pathway. Neither the molecular nature of the binding sites nor their relation to the activation or inactivation gates that control ion flow are well understood. We used the permeant ion Ba2+ as a K+ analog to probe for K+ ion binding sites and their relationship to the activation and inactivation gates. Our data are consistent with the existence of three single-file permeant-ion binding sites: one deep site, which binds Ba2+ with high affinity, and two more external sites whose occupancy influences Ba2+ movement to and from the deep site. All three sites are accessible to the external solution in channels with a closed activation gate, and the deep site lies between the activation gate and the C-type inactivation gate. We identify mutations in the P-region that disrupt two of the binding sites, as well as an energy barrier between the sites that may be part of the selectivity filter.

  7. Evaluation of the Significance of Starch Surface Binding Sites on Human Pancreatic α-Amylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Caner, Sami; Kwan, Emily; Li, Chunmin; Brayer, Gary D; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-11-01

    Starch provides the major source of caloric intake in many diets. Cleavage of starch into malto-oligosaccharides in the gut is catalyzed by pancreatic α-amylase. These oligosaccharides are then further cleaved by gut wall α-glucosidases to release glucose, which is absorbed into the bloodstream. Potential surface binding sites for starch on the pancreatic amylase, distinct from the active site of the amylase, have been identified through X-ray crystallographic analyses. The role of these sites in the degradation of both starch granules and soluble starch was probed by the generation of a series of surface variants modified at each site to disrupt binding. Kinetic analysis of the binding and/or cleavage of substrates ranging from simple maltotriosides to soluble starch and insoluble starch granules has allowed evaluation of the potential role of each such surface site. In this way, two key surface binding sites, on the same face as the active site, are identified. One site, containing a pair of aromatic residues, is responsible for attachment to starch granules, while a second site featuring a tryptophan residue around which a malto-oligosaccharide wraps is shown to heavily influence soluble starch binding and hydrolysis. These studies provide insights into the mechanisms by which enzymes tackle the degradation of largely insoluble polymers and also present some new approaches to the interrogation of the binding sites involved.

  8. A permanent ion binding site located between two gates of the Shaker K+ channel.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, R E; Larsson, H P; Isacoff, E Y

    1998-01-01

    K+ channels can be occupied by multiple permeant ions that appear to bind at discrete locations in the conduction pathway. Neither the molecular nature of the binding sites nor their relation to the activation or inactivation gates that control ion flow are well understood. We used the permeant ion Ba2+ as a K+ analog to probe for K+ ion binding sites and their relationship to the activation and inactivation gates. Our data are consistent with the existence of three single-file permeant-ion binding sites: one deep site, which binds Ba2+ with high affinity, and two more external sites whose occupancy influences Ba2+ movement to and from the deep site. All three sites are accessible to the external solution in channels with a closed activation gate, and the deep site lies between the activation gate and the C-type inactivation gate. We identify mutations in the P-region that disrupt two of the binding sites, as well as an energy barrier between the sites that may be part of the selectivity filter. PMID:9545043

  9. Characterization of the binding sites for dicarboxylic acids on bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Tonsgard, J H; Meredith, S C

    1991-01-01

    Dicarboxylic acids are prominent features of several diseases, including Reye's syndrome and inborn errors of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, dicarboxylic acids are potentially toxic to cellular processes. Previous studies [Tonsgard, Mendelson & Meredith (1988) J. Clin. Invest. 82, 1567-1573] demonstrated that long-chain dicarboxylic acids have a single high-affinity binding site and between one and three lower-affinity sites on albumin. Medium-chain-length dicarboxylic acids have a single low-affinity site. We further characterized dicarboxylic acid binding to albumin in order to understand the potential effects of drugs and other ligands on dicarboxylic acid binding and toxicity. Progesterone and oleate competitively inhibit octadecanedioic acid binding to the single high-affinity site. Octanoate inhibits binding to the low-affinity sites. Dansylated probes for subdomain 2AB inhibit dodecanedioic acid binding whereas probes for subdomain 3AB do not. In contrast, low concentrations of octadecanedioic acid inhibit the binding of dansylated probes to subdomain 3AB and 2AB. L-Tryptophan, which binds in subdomain 3AB, inhibits hexadecanedioic acid binding but has no effect on dodecanedioic acid. Bilirubin and acetylsalicylic acid, which bind in subdomain 2AB, inhibit the binding of medium-chain and long-chain dicarboxylic acids. Our results suggest that long-chain dicarboxylic acids bind in subdomains 2C, 3AB and 2AB. The single low-affinity binding site for medium-chain dicarboxylic acids is in subdomain 2AB. These studies suggest that dicarboxylic acids are likely to be unbound in disease states and may be potentially toxic. PMID:2064600

  10. Functional identification and characterization of sodium binding sites in Na symporters.

    PubMed

    Loo, Donald D F; Jiang, Xuan; Gorraitz, Edurne; Hirayama, Bruce A; Wright, Ernest M

    2013-11-19

    Sodium cotransporters from several different gene families belong to the leucine transporter (LeuT) structural family. Although the identification of Na(+) in binding sites is beyond the resolution of the structures, two Na(+) binding sites (Na1 and Na2) have been proposed in LeuT. Na2 is conserved in the LeuT family but Na1 is not. A biophysical method has been used to measure sodium dissociation constants (Kd) of wild-type and mutant human sodium glucose cotransport (hSGLT1) proteins to identify the Na(+) binding sites in hSGLT1. The Na1 site is formed by residues in the sugar binding pocket, and their mutation influences sodium binding to Na1 but not to Na2. For the canonical Na2 site formed by two -OH side chains, S392 and S393, and three backbone carbonyls, mutation of S392 to cysteine increased the sodium Kd by sixfold. This was accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the apparent sugar and phlorizin affinities. We suggest that mutation of S392 in the Na2 site produces a structural rearrangement of the sugar binding pocket to disrupt both the binding of the second Na(+) and the binding of sugar. In contrast, the S393 mutations produce no significant changes in sodium, sugar, and phlorizin affinities. We conclude that the Na2 site is conserved in hSGLT1, the side chain of S392 and the backbone carbonyl of S393 are important in the first Na(+) binding, and that Na(+) binding to Na2 promotes binding to Na1 and also sugar binding.

  11. Expanding GPCR homology model binding sites via a balloon potential: A molecular dynamics refinement approach.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S Roy; Tebben, Andrew J; Langley, David R

    2008-06-01

    Homology modeling of G protein-coupled receptors is becoming a widely used tool in drug discovery. However, unrefined models built using the bovine rhodopsin crystal structure as the template, often have binding sites that are too small to accommodate known ligands. Here, we present a novel systematic method to refine model active sites based on a pressure-guided molecular dynamics simulation. A distinct advantage of this approach is the ability to introduce systematic perturbations in model backbone atoms in addition to side chain adjustments. The method is validated on two test cases: (1) docking of retinal into an MD-relaxed structure of opsin and (2) docking of known ligands into a homology model of the CCR2 receptor. In both cases, we show that the MD expansion algorithm makes it possible to dock the ligands in poses that agree with the crystal structure or mutagenesis data.

  12. Kinetic and Equilibrium Analysis of Estradiol in Uterus: A Model of Binding-Site Distribution in Uterine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David; Gorski, Jack

    1972-01-01

    Kinetic and equilibrium binding studies indicate that the process by which the complex of estradiol-binding protein is transferred to the cell nuclei is very rapid and is readily reversible in intact cells; that is, the cytosol and nuclear binding sites are in a rapidly reversible equilibrium. Binding of the hormone appears to shift this equilibrium such that a large percent of the filled binding sites become associated with the nuclear fraction. A model is presented to show that the quantity of filled nuclear binding sites present at any estradiol concentration can be determined strictly by the initial binding between the hormone and the cytosol binding sites. PMID:4508334

  13. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  14. Screening Mixtures of Small Molecules for Binding to Multiple Sites on the Surface Tetanus Toxin C Fragment by Bioaffinity NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Cosman, M; Zeller, L; Lightstone, F C; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2002-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins include the closely related tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) toxins. Botulinum toxin is used to treat severe muscle disorders and as a cosmetic wrinkle reducer. Large quantities of botulinum toxin have also been produced by terrorists for use as a biological weapon. Because there are no known antidotes for these toxins, they thus pose a potential threat to human health whether by an accidental overdose or by a hostile deployment. Thus, the discovery of high specificity and affinity compounds that can inhibit their binding to neural cells can be used as antidotes or in the design of chemical detectors. Using the crystal structure of the C fragment of the tetanus toxin (TetC), which is the cell recognition and cell surface binding domain, and the computational program DOCK, sets of small molecules have been predicted to bind to two different sites located on the surface of this protein. While Site-1 is common to the TeNT and BoNTs, Site-2 is unique to TeNT. Pairs of these molecules from each site can then be linked together synthetically to thereby increase the specificity and affinity for this toxin. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy was used to experimentally screen each compound for binding. Mixtures containing binders were further screened for activity under biologically relevant conditions using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The screening of mixtures of compounds offers increased efficiency and throughput as compared to testing single compounds and can also evaluate how possible structural changes induced by the binding of one ligand can influence the binding of the second ligand. In addition, competitive binding experiments with mixtures containing ligands predicted to bind the same site could identify the best binder for that site. NMR transfer nuclear Overhauser effect (trNOE) confirm that TetC binds doxorubicin but that this molecule is displaced by N-acetylneuraminic acid (sialic acid) in a mixture that

  15. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Thomas T.

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  16. Catalytic residues in hydrolases: analysis of methods designed for ligand-binding site prediction

    PubMed Central

    Jadczyk, Tomasz; Roterman, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The comparison of eight tools applicable to ligand-binding site prediction is presented. The methods examined cover three types of approaches: the geometrical (CASTp, PASS, Pocket-Finder), the physicochemical (Q-SiteFinder, FOD) and the knowledge-based (ConSurf, SuMo, WebFEATURE). The accuracy of predictions was measured in reference to the catalytic residues documented in the Catalytic Site Atlas. The test was performed on a set comprising selected chains of hydrolases. The results were analysed with regard to size, polarity, secondary structure, accessible solvent area of predicted sites as well as parameters commonly used in machine learning (F-measure, MCC). The relative accuracies of predictions are presented in the ROC space, allowing determination of the optimal methods by means of the ROC convex hull. Additionally the minimum expected cost analysis was performed. Both advantages and disadvantages of the eight methods are presented. Characterization of protein chains in respect to the level of difficulty in the active site prediction is introduced. The main reasons for failures are discussed. Overall, the best performance offers SuMo followed by FOD, while Pocket-Finder is the best method among the geometrical approaches. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10822-010-9402-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21104192

  17. Catalytic residues in hydrolases: analysis of methods designed for ligand-binding site prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prymula, Katarzyna; Jadczyk, Tomasz; Roterman, Irena

    2011-02-01

    The comparison of eight tools applicable to ligand-binding site prediction is presented. The methods examined cover three types of approaches: the geometrical (CASTp, PASS, Pocket-Finder), the physicochemical (Q-SiteFinder, FOD) and the knowledge-based (ConSurf, SuMo, WebFEATURE). The accuracy of predictions was measured in reference to the catalytic residues documented in the Catalytic Site Atlas. The test was performed on a set comprising selected chains of hydrolases. The results were analysed with regard to size, polarity, secondary structure, accessible solvent area of predicted sites as well as parameters commonly used in machine learning (F-measure, MCC). The relative accuracies of predictions are presented in the ROC space, allowing determination of the optimal methods by means of the ROC convex hull. Additionally the minimum expected cost analysis was performed. Both advantages and disadvantages of the eight methods are presented. Characterization of protein chains in respect to the level of difficulty in the active site prediction is introduced. The main reasons for failures are discussed. Overall, the best performance offers SuMo followed by FOD, while Pocket-Finder is the best method among the geometrical approaches.

  18. Binding of [3H]SCH23390 to a non-dopaminergic site in bovine kidney.

    PubMed

    Hollis, C M; Turner, J D; Strange, P G

    1992-05-08

    Binding of the D1 dopamine receptor antagonist [3H]SCH23390 to bovine renal cortical membranes has been studied. Specific binding of [3H]SCH23390 was saturable and reversible and stereoisomers of SCH23390 competed stereoselectively. In contrast, competition with the isomers of butaclamol was not stereoselective and dopamine failed to compete for the [3H]SCH23390 binding site. The site is therefore not a D1 dopamine receptor. Competition studies with a very wide range of compounds failed to define the nature of the [3H]SCH23390 binding sites in renal cortex whereas in parallel studies the characteristics of [3H]SCH23390 binding in caudate nucleus were entirely consistent with those of D1 dopamine receptors. The nature of [3H]SCH23390 binding in preparations of tubular and glomerular membranes was found to be virtually identical to those of crude renal cortical membranes indicating lack of compartmentation of these sites. Autoradiographic studies of [3H]SCH23390 binding in bovine kidney showed significantly higher levels of binding sites in renal cortex compared with renal medulla and this was confirmed by direct ligand binding studies.

  19. Pharmacological specificity of some psychotomimetic and antipsychotic agents for the sigma and PCP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Itzhak, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacological specificity of representative psychotomimetic agents such a phencyclidine (PCP) analogs, opiate benzomorphans and several antipsychotic agents was assessed for the sigma and PCP binding sites. In a series of binding experiments, in rat brain membranes, sigma and PCP binding sites were labeled with (/sup 3/H)-1-(1-(3-hydroxyphenyl) cyclohexyl) piperidine ((/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH), (+)(/sup 3/H)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047) and (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-(3-hydroxy-phenyl)-N-(1-propyl) piperidine and ((+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP). PCP analogs inhibit potently high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding and (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 binding, moderately the low affinity binding component of (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and very weakly (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding. (+)SKF 10047 and cyclazocine are potent to moderate inhibitors of (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047, high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PCP-3-OH binding. The antipsychotic agents display high affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding sites, moderate affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 sites and have no effect on either the high or low affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding. 20 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Heparanase Activates Antithrombin through the Binding to Its Heparin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Águila, Sonia; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that participates in morphogenesis, tissue repair, heparan sulphates turnover and immune response processes. It is over-expressed in tumor cells favoring the metastasis as it penetrates the endothelial layer that lines blood vessels and facilitates the metastasis by degradation of heparan sulphate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix. Heparanase may also affect the hemostatic system in a non-enzymatic manner, up-regulating the expression of tissue factor, which is the initiator of blood coagulation, and dissociating tissue factor pathway inhibitor on the cell surface membrane of endothelial and tumor cells, thus resulting in a procoagulant state. Trying to check the effect of heparanase on heparin, a highly sulphated glycosaminoglycan, when it activates antithrombin, our results demonstrated that heparanase, but not proheparanase, interacted directly with antithrombin in a non-covalent manner. This interaction resulted in the activation of antithrombin, which is the most important endogenous anticoagulant. This activation mainly accelerated FXa inhibition, supporting an allosteric activation effect. Heparanase bound to the heparin binding site of antithrombin as the activation of Pro41Leu, Arg47Cys, Lys114Ala and Lys125Alaantithrombin mutants was impaired when it was compared to wild type antithrombin. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis showed that heparanase induced an activating conformational change in antithrombin similar to that induced by heparin and with a KD of 18.81 pM. In conclusion, under physiological pH and low levels of tissue factor, heparanase may exert a non-enzymatic function interacting and activating the inhibitory function of antithrombin. PMID:27322195

  1. Trinitrophenyl-ATP blocks colonic Cl- channels in planar phospholipid bilayers. Evidence for two nucleotide binding sites

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Outwardly rectifying 30-50-pS Cl- channels mediate cell volume regulation and transepithelial transport. Several recent reports indicate that rectifying Cl- channels are blocked after addition of ATP to the extracellular bath (Alton, E. W. F. W., S. D. Manning, P. J. Schlatter, D. M. Geddes, and A. J. Williams. 1991. Journal of Physiology. 443:137-159; Paulmichl, M., Y. Li, K. Wickman, M. Ackerman, E. Peralta, and D. Clapham. 1992. Nature. 356:238-241). Therefore, we decided to conduct a more detailed study of the ATP binding site using a higher affinity probe. We tested the ATP derivative, 2',3',O-(2,4,6- trinitrocyclohexadienylidene) adenosine 5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP), which has a high affinity for certain nucleotide binding sites. Here we report that TNP-ATP blocked colonic Cl- channels when added to either bath and that blockade was consistent with the closed-open-blocked kinetic model. The TNP-ATP concentration required for a 50% decrease in open probability was 0.27 microM from the extracellular (cis) side and 20 microM from the cytoplasmic (trans) side. Comparison of the off rate constants revealed that TNP-ATP remained bound 28 times longer when added to the extracellular side compared with the cytoplasmic side. We performed competition studies to determine if TNP-ATP binds to the same sites as ATP. Addition of ATP to the same bath containing TNP-ATP reduced channel amplitude and increased the time the channel spent in the open and fast-blocked states (i.e., burst duration). This is the result expected if TNP-ATP and ATP compete for block, presumably by binding to common sites. In contrast, addition of ATP to the bath opposite to the side containing TNP-ATP reduced amplitude but did not alter burst duration. This is the result expected if opposite-sided TNP- ATP and ATP bind to different sites. In summary, we have identified an ATP derivative that has a nearly 10-fold higher affinity for reconstituted rectifying colonic Cl- channels than any previously

  2. The selectivity of different external binding sites for quaternary ammonium ions in cloned potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Jarolimek, W; Soman, K V; Brown, A M; Alam, M

    1995-09-01

    Tetraethylammonium (TEA) is thought to be the most effective quaternary ammonium (QA) ion blocker at the external site of K+ channels, and small changes to the TEA ion reduce its potency. To examine the properties of the external QA receptor, we applied a variety of QA ions to excised patches from human embryonic kidney cells or Xenopus oocytes transfected with the delayed rectifying K+ channels Kv 2.1 and Kv 3.1. In outside-out patches of Kv 3.1, the relative potencies were TEA > tetrapropylammonium (TPA) > tetrabutylammonium (TBA). In contrast to Kv 3.1, the relative potencies in Kv 2.1 were TBA > TEA > TPA. In Kv 3.1 and Kv 2.1, external tetrapentylammonium (TPeA) blocked K+ currents in a fast, reversible and, in contrast to TEA, time-dependent manner. The external binding of TPeA appeared to be voltage independent, unlike the effects of TPeA applied to inside-out patches. External n-alkyl-triethylammonium compounds (C8, C10 chain length) had a lower affinity than TEA in Kv 3.1, but a higher affinity than TEA in Kv 2.1. In Kv 3.1, the decrease in QA affinity was large when one or two methyl groups were substituted for ethyl groups in TEA, but minor when propyl groups replaced ethyl groups. Changes in the free energy of binding could be correlated to changes in the free energy of hydration of TEA derivatives calculated by continuum methodology. These results reveal a substantial hydrophobic component of external QA ion binding to Kv 2.1, and to a lesser degree to Kv 3.1, in addition to the generally accepted electrostatic interactions. The chain length of hydrophobic TEA derivatives affects the affinity for the hydrophobic binding site, whereas the hydropathy of QA ions determines the electrostatic interaction energy.

  3. Selective inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 by targeting a substrate-specific secondary binding site.

    PubMed

    Kühn-Wache, Kerstin; Bär, Joachim W; Hoffmann, Torsten; Wolf, Raik; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4/CD26 (DP4) is a multifunctional serine protease liberating dipeptide from the N-terminus of (oligo)peptides which can modulate the activity of these peptides. The enzyme is involved in physiological processes such as blood glucose homeostasis and immune response. DP4 substrate specificity is characterized in detail using synthetic dipeptide derivatives. The specificity constant k(cat)/K(m) strongly depends on the amino acid in P₁-position for proline, alanine, glycine and serine with 5.0 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.8 x 10⁴ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 3.6 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.1 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. By contrast, kinetic investigation of larger peptide substrates yields a different pattern. The specific activity of DP4 for neuropeptide Y (NPY) cleavage comprising a proline in P₁-position is the same range as the k(cat)/K(m) values of NPY derivatives containing alanine or serine in P₁-position with 4 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 9.5 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹ and 2.1 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. The proposed existence of an additional binding region outside the catalytic center is supported by measurements of peptide substrates with extended chain length. This 'secondary' binding site interaction depends on the amino acid sequence in P₄'-P₈'-position. Interactions with this binding site could be specifically blocked for substrates of the GRF/glucagon peptide family. By contrast, substrates not belonging to this peptide family and dipeptide derivative substrates that only bind to the catalytic center of DP4 were not inhibited. This more selective inhibition approach allows, for the first time, to distinguish between substrate families by substrate-discriminating inhibitors.

  4. Multiple sup 3 H-oxytocin binding sites in rat myometrial plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Crankshaw, D.; Gaspar, V.; Pliska, V. )

    1990-01-01

    The affinity spectrum method has been used to analyse binding isotherms for {sup 3}H-oxytocin to rat myometrial plasma membranes. Three populations of binding sites with dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.6-1.5 x 10(-9), 0.4-1.0 x 10(-7) and 7 x 10(-6) mol/l were identified and their existence verified by cluster analysis based on similarities between Kd, binding capacity and Hill coefficient. When experimental values were compared to theoretical curves constructed using the estimated binding parameters, good fits were obtained. Binding parameters obtained by this method were not influenced by the presence of GTP gamma S (guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate) in the incubation medium. The binding parameters agree reasonably well with those found in uterine cells, they support the existence of a medium affinity site and may allow for an explanation of some of the discrepancies between binding and response in this system.

  5. Autoradiographic localization of peptide YY and neuropeptide Y binding sites in the medulla oblongata

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, R.A.; McDonald, T.J.; Robertson, H.A.

    1988-09-01

    Peptide YY is a highly potent emetic when given intravenously in dogs. We hypothesized that the area postrema, a small brain stem nucleus that acts as a chemoreceptive trigger zone for vomiting and lies outside the blood-brain barrier, might have receptors that PYY would bind to, in order to mediate the emetic response. We prepared (/sup 125/I)PYY and used autoradiography to show that high affinity binding sites for this ligand were highly localized in the area postrema and related nuclei of the dog medulla oblongata. Furthermore, the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites in the rat medulla oblongata was very similar to that in the dog; the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites throughout the rat brain was seen to be similar to the distribution of (/sup 125/I)NPY binding sites.

  6. Cluster Analysis of p53 Binding Site Sequences Reveals Subsets with Different Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji-Hyun; Latysheva, Natasha S.; Iggo, Richard D.; Barker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    p53 is an important regulator of cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis and metabolism, and is frequently mutated in tumors. It functions as a tetramer, where each component dimer binds to a decameric DNA region known as a response element. We identify p53 binding site subtypes and examine the functional and evolutionary properties of these subtypes. We start with over 1700 known binding sites and, with no prior labeling, identify two sets of response elements by unsupervised clustering. When combined, they give rise to three types of p53 binding sites. We find that probabilistic and alignment-based assessments of cross-species conservation show no strong evidence of differential conservation between types of binding sites. In contrast, functional analysis of the genes most proximal to the binding sites provides strong bioinformatic evidence of functional differentiation between the three types of binding sites. Our results are consistent with recent structural data identifying two conformations of the L1 loop in the DNA binding domain, suggesting that they reflect biologically meaningful groups imposed by the p53 protein structure. PMID:27812278

  7. Cooperative binding of an Ultrabithorax homeodomain protein to nearby and distant DNA sites.

    PubMed Central

    Beachy, P A; Varkey, J; Young, K E; von Kessler, D P; Sun, B I; Ekker, S C

    1993-01-01

    Cooperativity in binding of regulatory proteins to multiple DNA sites can heighten the sensitivity and specificity of the transcriptional response. We report here the cooperative DNA-binding properties of a developmentally active regulatory protein encoded by the Drosophila homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx). We show that naturally occurring binding sites for the Ubx-encoded protein contain clusters of multiple individual binding site sequences. Such sites can form complexes containing a dozen or more Ubx-encoded protein molecules, with simultaneous cooperative interactions between adjacent and distant DNA sites. The distant mode of interaction involves a DNA looping mechanism; both modes appear to enhance transcriptional activation in a simple yeast assay system. We found that cooperative binding is dependent on sequences outside the homeodomain, and we have identified regions predicted to form coiled coils carboxy terminal to the homeodomains of the Ubx-encoded protein and several other homeotic proteins. On the basis of our findings, we propose a multisite integrative model of homeotic protein action in which functional regulatory elements can be built from a few high-affinity sites, from many lower-affinity sites, or from sites of some intermediate number and affinity. An important corollary of this model is that even small differences in binding of homeotic proteins to individual sites could be summed to yield large overall differences in binding to multiple sites. This model is consistent with reports that homeodomain protein targets contain multiple individual binding site sequences distributed throughout sizable DNA regions. Also consistent is a recent report that sequences carboxy terminal to the Ubx homeodomain can contribute to segmental specificity. Images PMID:8105373

  8. Computational Analysis and Binding Site Identification of Type III Secretion System ATPase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Dash, Raju; Hosen, S M Zahid; Sultana, Tasniha; Junaid, Md; Majumder, Mohuya; Ishat, Ismat Ara; Uddin, Mir Muhammad Nasir

    2016-12-01

    In many gram-negative bacteria, the type III secretion system (T3SS), as a virulence factor, is an attractive target for developing novel antibacterial. Regarding this, in our study, we aimed to identify the putative drug target for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, considering ATPase enzyme involved in the type III secretion system. Selective protein sequence of P. aeruginosa involved in the T3SS was retrieved from NCBI databases, and its homologues were subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Its association in T3SS was analyzed via STRING, and the 3D structure was determined by means of homology modeling followed by intensive optimization and validation. The binding site was predicted by 3DLigandSite and examined through molecular docking simulation by Autodock Vina with salicylidene acylhydrazide class of virulence-blocking compounds. PROCHECK analysis showed that 96.7 % of the residues were in the most favored regions, 1.9 % were in the additional allowed region, and 1.4 % were in the generously allowed region of the Ramachandran plot. The refined model yielded ERRAT scores of 88.124 and Verify3D value of 0.2, which indicates that the environmental profile of the model is good. The best binding affinity was observed by ME0055 compound, and ALA160, ALA161, GlY162, GLY163, GLY164, GLY165, SER166, THR167, TYR338, and PRO339 residues were found to be having complementary in the ligand-binding site. However, these findings should be further confirmed by wet lab studies for design a targeted therapeutic agent.

  9. In situ detection of salicylic acid binding sites in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Wen; Deng, Da-Yi; Yu, Ying; Liu, Fang-Fei; Lin, Bi-Xia; Cao, Yu-Juan; Hu, Xiao-Gang; Wu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-02-01

    The determination of hormone-binding sites in plants is essential in understanding the mechanisms behind hormone function. Salicylic acid (SA) is an important plant hormone that regulates responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In order to label SA-binding sites in plant tissues, a quantum dots (QDs) probe functionalized with a SA moiety was successfully synthesized by coupling CdSe QDs capped with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) to 4-amino-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (PAS), using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyllaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) as the coupling agent. The probe was then characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, as well as UV/vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. The results confirmed the successful conjugation of PAS to CdSe QDs and revealed that the conjugates maintained the properties of the original QDs, with small core diameters and adequate dispersal in solution. The PAS-CdSe QDs were used to detect SA-binding sites in mung bean and Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in vitro and in vivo. The PAS-CdSe QDs were effectively transported into plant tissues and specifically bound to SA receptors in vivo. In addition, the effects of the PAS-CdSe QDs on cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in the tips of A. thaliana seedlings were investigated. Both SA and PAS-CdSe QDs had similar effects on the trend in cytosolic-free Ca(2+) concentrations, suggesting that the PAS-CdSe QDs maintained the bioactivity of SA. To summarize, PAS-CdSe QDs have high potential as a fluorescent probe for the in vitro/in vivo labeling and imaging of SA receptors in plants.

  10. Protein binding site analysis for drug discovery using a computational fragment-based method.

    PubMed

    Ludington, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    One of the most powerful tools for designing drug molecules is an understanding of the target protein's binding site. Identifying key amino acids and understanding the electronic, steric, and solvation properties of the site enables the design of potent ligands. Of equal importance for the success of a drug discovery program is the evaluation of binding site druggability. Determining, a priori, if a particular binding site has the appropriate character to bind drug-like ligands saves research time and money.While there are a variety of experimental and computational techniques to identify and characterize binding sites, the focus of this chapter is on Binding Site Analysis (BSA) using virtual fragment simulations. The methodology of the technique is described, along with examples of successful application to drug discovery programs. BSA both indicates if a protein is a viable target for drug discovery and provides a roadmap for designing ligands. Using a computational fragment-based method is a effective means of understanding of a binding site.

  11. Host-Guest Binding-Site-Tunable Self-Assembly of Stimuli-Responsive Supramolecular Polymers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hao; Qi, Miao; Liu, Yuyang; Tian, Wei

    2016-06-13

    Despite the remarkable progress made in controllable self-assembly of stimuli-responsive supramolecular polymers (SSPs), a basic issue that has not been consideration to date is the essential binding site. The noncovalent binding sites, which connect the building blocks and endow supramolecular polymers with their ability to respond to stimuli, are expected to strongly affect the self-assembly of SSPs. Herein, the design and synthesis of a dual-stimuli thermo- and photoresponsive Y-shaped supramolecular polymer (SSP2) with two adjacent β-cyclodextrin/azobenzene (β-CD/Azo) binding sites, and another SSP (SSP1) with similar building blocks, but only one β-CD/Azo binding site as a control, are described. Upon gradually increasing the polymer solution temperature or irradiating with UV light, SSP2 self-assemblies with a higher binding-site distribution density; exhibits a flower-like morphology, smaller size, and more stable dynamic aggregation process; and greater controllability for drug-release behavior than those observed with SSP1 self-assemblies. The host-guest binding-site-tunable self-assembly was attributed to the positive cooperativity generated among adjacent binding sites on the surfaces of SSP2 self-assemblies. This work is beneficial for precisely controlling the structural parameters and controlled release function of SSP self-assemblies.

  12. A functional study of concanavalin A-histamine binding site overlap in Tetrahymena phagocytosis test.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Darvas, Z; László, V

    1983-01-01

    Treatment with histamine stimulated the phagocytotic activity of the Tetrahymena to a measurable degree, which was still demonstrable after a week (about 40 generations). Concanavalin A, which binds to the same membrane binding site as histamine, inhibited the stimulatory action of subsequently added histamine, but did not in itself influence phagocytotic activity in any way. The inhibitory effect of Con A on the histamine binding site proved to be dose-dependent. These observations stress the importance of investigating the functional context--as sole realistic measure--of receptor--ligand bindings.

  13. Defining the Plasticity of Transcription Factor Binding Sites by Deconstructing DNA Consensus Sequences: The PhoP-Binding Sites among Gamma/Enterobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Harari, Oscar; Park, Sun-Yang; Huang, Henry; Groisman, Eduardo A.; Zwir, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptional regulators recognize specific DNA sequences. Because these sequences are embedded in the background of genomic DNA, it is hard to identify the key cis-regulatory elements that determine disparate patterns of gene expression. The detection of the intra- and inter-species differences among these sequences is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of both differential gene expression and evolution. Here, we address this problem by investigating the target promoters controlled by the DNA-binding PhoP protein, which governs virulence and Mg2+ homeostasis in several bacterial species. PhoP is particularly interesting; it is highly conserved in different gamma/enterobacteria, regulating not only ancestral genes but also governing the expression of dozens of horizontally acquired genes that differ from species to species. Our approach consists of decomposing the DNA binding site sequences for a given regulator into families of motifs (i.e., termed submotifs) using a machine learning method inspired by the “Divide & Conquer” strategy. By partitioning a motif into sub-patterns, computational advantages for classification were produced, resulting in the discovery of new members of a regulon, and alleviating the problem of distinguishing functional sites in chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray genome-wide analysis. Moreover, we found that certain partitions were useful in revealing biological properties of binding site sequences, including modular gains and losses of PhoP binding sites through evolutionary turnover events, as well as conservation in distant species. The high conservation of PhoP submotifs within gamma/enterobacteria, as well as the regulatory protein that recognizes them, suggests that the major cause of divergence between related species is not due to the binding sites, as was previously suggested for other regulators. Instead, the divergence may be attributed to the fast evolution of orthologous target genes and/or the

  14. A Predicted Binding Site for Cholesterol on the GABAA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hénin, Jérôme; Salari, Reza; Murlidaran, Sruthi; Brannigan, Grace

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of the GABA type A receptor (GABAAR) function by cholesterol and other steroids is documented at the functional level, yet its structural basis is largely unknown. Current data on structurally related modulators suggest that cholesterol binds to subunit interfaces between transmembrane domains of the GABAAR. We construct homology models of a human GABAAR based on the structure of the glutamate-gated chloride channel GluCl of Caenorhabditis elegans. The models show the possibility of previously unreported disulfide bridges linking the M1 and M3 transmembrane helices in the α and γ subunits. We discuss the biological relevance of such disulfide bridges. Using our models, we investigate cholesterol binding to intersubunit cavities of the GABAAR transmembrane domain. We find that very similar binding modes are predicted independently by three approaches: analogy with ivermectin in the GluCl crystal structure, automated docking by AutoDock, and spontaneous rebinding events in unbiased molecular dynamics simulations. Taken together, the models and atomistic simulations suggest a somewhat flexible binding mode, with several possible orientations. Finally, we explore the possibility that cholesterol promotes pore opening through a wedge mechanism. PMID:24806926

  15. Identification of 5-hydroxytryptamine1D binding sites in sheep caudate nucleus membranes.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, P J; Palmier, C; Briley, M

    1993-08-03

    Radioligand binding measurements were performed in membranes of sheep caudate nucleus using [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). [3H]5-HT labeled a population of high affinity binding sites with a Kd of 1.9 +/- 0.1 nM and a Bmax of 19.8 +/- 2.2 fmol/mg tissue. Combined 5-HTID/E binding sites were the predominant 5-HT1 subtype, accounting for 78% of the total population of 5-HT1 binding sites. 5-Carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) and sumatriptan yielded inhibition curves which best fitted a two-site model with high affinity values of 0.8 and 10.1 nM, and 1000 and 206 nM for their low affinity components. The proportion of the high affinity 5-CT and sumatriptan binding sites was 79 and 72%. The binding affinity profile of 5-HT1D binding sites [5-CT > 5-HT > d-LSD > 5-MeOT > sumatriptan > RU 24,969 > metergoline > tryptamine = rauwolscine = methylsergide > yohimbine = methiothepin > TFMPP = 8-OH-DPAT > 2-methyl-5-HT > mCPP = quipazine = CP 93,129 > ketanserin > (-)-propranolol = haloperidol = ipsapirone] compares well to that reported for 5-HT1D receptor sites in human caudate and cortex (correlation coefficient: 0.99 and 0.98). The present results indicate that sheep caudate nucleus is a valid tissue for studying interaction of compounds with 5-HT1D binding sites in the relative absence of 5-HT1E binding sites.

  16. Identification and grafting of a unique peptide-binding site in the Fab framework of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, Joshua M.; Zer, Cindy; Avery, Kendra N.; Bzymek, Krzysztof P.; Horne, David A.; Williams, John C.

    2013-10-07

    Capitalizing on their extraordinary specificity, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become one of the most reengineered classes of biological molecules. A major goal in many of these engineering efforts is to add new functionality to the parental mAb, including the addition of cytotoxins and imaging agents for medical applications. Herein, we present a unique peptide-binding site within the central cavity of the fragment antigen binding framework region of the chimeric, anti-epidermal growth factor receptor mAb cetuximab. We demonstrate through diffraction methods, biophysical studies, and sequence analysis that this peptide, a meditope, has moderate affinity for the Fab, is specific to cetuximab (i.e., does not bind to human IgGs), and has no significant effect on antigen binding. We further demonstrate by diffraction studies and biophysical methods that the meditope binding site can be grafted onto the anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 mAb trastuzumab, and that the antigen binding affinity of the grafted trastuzumab is indistinguishable from the parental mAb. Lastly, we demonstrate a bivalent meditope variant binds specifically and stably to antigen-bearing cells only in the presence of the meditope-enabled mAbs. Collectively, this finding and the subsequent characterization and engineering efforts indicate that this unique interface could serve as a noncovalent “linker” for any meditope-enabled mAb with applications in multiple mAb-based technologies including diagnostics, imaging, and therapeutic delivery.

  17. Interactions of divalent cations with calcium binding sites of BK channels reveal independent motions within the gating ring

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Pablo; Giraldez, Teresa; Holmgren, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels are key physiological players in muscle, nerve, and endocrine function by integrating intracellular Ca2+ and membrane voltage signals. The open probability of BK channels is regulated by the intracellular concentration of divalent cations sensed by a large structure in the BK channel called the “gating ring,” which is formed by four tandems of regulator of conductance for K+ (RCK1 and RCK2) domains. In contrast to Ca2+ that binds to both RCK domains, Mg2+, Cd2+, or Ba2+ interact preferentially with either one or the other. Interaction of cations with their binding sites causes molecular rearrangements of the gating ring, but how these motions occur remains elusive. We have assessed the separate contributions of each RCK domain to the cation-induced gating-ring structural rearrangements, using patch-clamp fluorometry. Here we show that Mg2+ and Ba2+ selectively induce structural movement of the RCK2 domain, whereas Cd2+ causes motions of RCK1, in all cases substantially smaller than those elicited by Ca2+. By combining divalent species interacting with unique sites, we demonstrate that RCK1 and RCK2 domains move independently when their specific binding sites are occupied. Moreover, binding of chemically distinct cations to both RCK domains is additive, emulating the effect of fully occupied Ca2+ binding sites. PMID:27872281

  18. Binding site number variation and high-affinity binding consensus of Myb-SANT-like transcription factor Adf-1 in Drosophilidae

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Michael; Juan, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the evolution of transcription factor binding sites and corresponding functional change of transcriptional regulation. In this context, we have examined the structural changes of the ADF-1 binding sites at the Adh promoters of Drosophila funebris and D. virilis. We detected an expanded footprinted region in D. funebris that contains various adjacent binding sites with different binding affinities. ADF-1 was described to direct sequence-specific DNA binding to sites consisting of the multiple trinucleotide repeat . The ADF-1 recognition sites with high binding affinity differ from this trinucleotide repeat consensus sequence and a new consensus sequence is proposed for the high-affinity ADF-1 binding sites. In vitro transcription experiments with the D. funebris and D. virilis ADF-1 binding regions revealed that stronger ADF-1 binding to the expanded D. funebris ADF-1 binding region only moderately lead to increased transcriptional activity of the Adh gene. The potential of this regional expansion is discussed in the context of different ADF-1 cellular concentrations and maintenance of the ADF-1 stimulus. Altogether, evolutionary change of ADF-1 binding regions involves both, rearrangements of complex binding site cluster and also nucleotide substitutions within sites that lead to different binding affinities. PMID:20542916

  19. Regulation of BCL-X splicing reveals a role for the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1/hnRNP I) in alternative 5′ splice site selection

    PubMed Central

    Bielli, Pamela; Bordi, Matteo; Biasio, Valentina Di; Sette, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) modulates many physiological and pathological processes. For instance, AS of the BCL-X gene balances cell survival and apoptosis in development and cancer. Herein, we identified the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) as a direct regulator of BCL-X AS. Overexpression of PTBP1 promotes selection of the distal 5′ splice site in BCL-X exon 2, generating the pro-apoptotic BCL-Xs splice variant. Conversely, depletion of PTBP1 enhanced splicing of the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant. In vivo cross-linking experiments and site-directed mutagenesis restricted the PTBP1 binding site to a polypyrimidine tract located between the two alternative 5′ splice sites. Binding of PTBP1 to this site was required for its effect on splicing. Notably, a similar function of PTBP1 in the selection of alternative 5′ splice sites was confirmed using the USP5 gene as additional model. Mechanistically, PTBP1 displaces SRSF1 binding from the proximal 5′ splice site, thus repressing its selection. Our study provides a novel mechanism of alternative 5′ splice site selection by PTBP1 and indicates that the presence of a PTBP1 binding site between two alternative 5′ splice sites promotes selection of the distal one, while repressing the proximal site by competing for binding of a positive regulator. PMID:25294838

  20. Purification of core-binding factor, a protein that binds the conserved core site in murine leukemia virus enhancers.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S W; Speck, N A

    1992-01-01

    The Moloney murine leukemia virus causes thymic leukemias when injected into newborn mice. A major genetic determinant of the thymic disease specificity of the Moloney virus genetically maps to two protein binding sites in the Moloney virus enhancer, the leukemia virus factor b site and the adjacent core site. Point mutations introduced into either of these sites significantly shifts the disease specificity of the Moloney virus from thymic leukemia to erythroleukemia (N. A. Speck, B. Renjifo, E. Golemis, T. Frederickson, J. Hartley, and N. Hopkins, Genes Dev. 4:233-242, 1990). We have purified several polypeptides that bind to the core site in the Moloney virus enhancer. These proteins were purified from calf thymus nuclear extracts by selective pH denaturation, followed by chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, nonspecific double-stranded DNA-cellulose, and core oligonucleotide-coupled affinity columns. We have achieved greater than 13,000-fold purification of the core-binding factors (CBFs), with an overall yield of approximately 19%. Analysis of purified protein fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis reveals more than 10 polypeptides. Each of the polypeptides was recovered from an SDS-polyacrylamide gel, and those in the molecular size range of 19 to 35 kDa were demonstrated to have core-binding activity. The purified CBFs were shown by DNase I footprint analyses to bind the core site in the Moloney virus enhancer specifically, and also to core motifs in the enhancers from a simian immunodeficiency virus, the immunoglobulin mu chain, and T-cell receptor gamma-chain genes. Images PMID:1309596

  1. Arabidopsis Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 binding sites contain putative GAGA factor binding motifs within coding regions of genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is an essential regulator of gene expression that maintains genes in a repressed state by marking chromatin with trimethylated Histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3). In Arabidopsis, loss of PRC2 function leads to pleiotropic effects on growth and development thought to be due to ectopic expression of seed and embryo-specific genes. While there is some understanding of the mechanisms by which specific genes are targeted by PRC2 in animal systems, it is still not clear how PRC2 is recruited to specific regions of plant genomes. Results We used ChIP-seq to determine the genome-wide distribution of hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged FERTLIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE-HA), the Extra Sex Combs homolog protein present in all Arabidopsis PRC2 complexes. We found that the FIE-HA binding sites co-locate with a subset of the H3K27me3 sites in the genome and that the associated genes were more likely to be de-repressed in mutants of PRC2 components. The FIE-HA binding sites are enriched for three sequence motifs including a putative GAGA factor binding site that is also found in Drosophila Polycomb Response Elements (PREs). Conclusions Our results suggest that PRC2 binding sites in plant genomes share some sequence features with Drosophila PREs. However, unlike Drosophila PREs which are located in promoters and devoid of H3K27me3, Arabidopsis FIE binding sites tend to be in gene coding regions and co-localize with H3K27me3. PMID:24001316

  2. Functional Analyses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Differ between Present-Day and Archaic Humans

    PubMed Central

    Weyer, Sven; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    We analyze 25 previously identified transcription factor binding sites that carry DNA sequence changes that are present in all or nearly all present-day humans, yet occur in the ancestral state in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of humans. When the ancestral and derived forms of the transcription factor binding sites are tested using reporter constructs in 3 neuronal cell lines, the activity of 12 of the derived versions of transcription factor binding sites differ from the respective ancestral variants. This suggests that the majority of this class of evolutionary differences between modern humans and Neandertals may affect gene expression in at least some tissue or cell type. PMID:26454764

  3. Carbonic anhydrase binding site parameterization in OPLS-AA force field.

    PubMed

    Bernadat, Guillaume; Supuran, Claudiu T; Iorga, Bogdan I

    2013-03-15

    The parameterization of carbonic anhydrase binding site in OPLS-AA force field was performed using quantum chemistry calculations. Both OH2 and OH(-) forms of the binding site were considered, showing important differences in terms of atomic partial charges. Three different parameterization protocols were used, and the results obtained highlighted the importance of including an extended binding site in the charge calculation. The force field parameters were subsequently validated using standard molecular dynamics simulations. The results presented in this work should greatly facilitate the use of molecular dynamics simulations for studying the carbonic anhydrase, and more generally, the metallo-enzymes.

  4. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of the bHLH domain of Deadpan to single and tandem sites.

    PubMed

    Winston, R L; Millar, D P; Gottesfeld, J M; Kent, S B

    1999-04-20

    The basic helix-loop-helix domain of the Drosophila transcription factor Deadpan (Dpn) was prepared by total chemical protein synthesis in order to characterize its DNA binding properties. Circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to correlate structural changes in Dpn with physiologically relevant monovalent (KCl) and divalent (MgCl2) cation concentrations. In addition, we have used electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and fluorescence anisotropy methods to determine equilibrium dissociation constants for the interaction of Dpn with two biologically relevant promoters involved in neural development and sex determination pathways. In this study, we have optimized DNA binding conditions for Dpn, and we have found a markedly higher DNA binding affinity for Dpn than reported for other bHLH domain transcription factors. Dpn binds as a homodimer (Kd = 2.6 nM) to double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the binding site CACGCG. In addition, we found that Dpn bound with the same affinity to a single or tandem binding site, indicating no cooperativity between adjacent DNA-bound Dpn dimers. DNA binding was also monitored as a function of physiologically relevant KCl and MgCl2 concentrations, and we found that this activity was significantly different in the presence and absence of the nonspecific competitor poly(dI-dC). Moreover, Dpn displayed moderate sequence selectivity, exhibiting a 100-fold higher binding affinity for specific DNA than for poly(dI-dC). This study constitutes the first detailed biophysical characterization of the DNA binding properties of a bHLH protein.

  5. Preferential binding of the methyl-CpG binding domain protein 2 at methylated transcriptional start site regions.

    PubMed

    Chatagnon, Amandine; Perriaud, Laury; Nazaret, Nicolas; Croze, Séverine; Benhattar, Jean; Lachuer, Joël; Dante, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Methyl-CpG Binding Domain (MBD) proteins are thought to be key molecules in the interpretation of DNA methylation signals leading to gene silencing through recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes. In cancer, the MBD-family member, MBD2, may be primarily involved in the repression of genes exhibiting methylated CpG at their 5' end. Here we ask whether MBD2 randomly associates methylated sequences, producing chance effects on transcription, or exhibits a more specific recognition of some methylated regions. Using chromatin and DNA immunoprecipitation, we analyzed MBD2 and RNA polymerase II deposition and DNA methylation in HeLa cells on arrays representing 25,500 promoter regions. This first whole-genome mapping revealed the preferential localization of MBD2 near transcription start sites (TSSs), within the region analyzed, 7.5 kb upstream through 2.45 kb downstream of 5' transcription start sites. Probe by probe analysis correlated MBD2 deposition and DNA methylation. Motif analysis did not reveal specific sequence motifs; however, CCG and CGC sequences seem to be overrepresented. Nonrandom association (multiple correspondence analysis, p < 0.0001) between silent genes, DNA methylation and MBD2 binding was observed. The association between MBD2 binding and transcriptional repression weakened as the distance between binding site and TSS increased, suggesting that MBD2 represses transcriptional initiation. This hypothesis may represent a functional explanation for the preferential binding of MBD2 at methyl-CpG in TSS regions.

  6. Aldose and aldehyde reductases : structure-function studies on the coenzyme and inhibitor-binding sites.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kabbani, O.; Old, S. E.; Ginell, S. L.; Carper, D. A.; Biosciences Division; Monash Univ.; NIH

    1999-09-03

    PURPOSE: To identify the structural features responsible for the differences in coenzyme and inhibitor specificities of aldose and aldehyde reductases. METHODS: The crystal structure of porcine aldehyde reductase in complex with NADPH and the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil was determined. The contribution of each amino acid lining the coenzyme-binding site to the binding of NADPH was calculated using the Discover package. In human aldose reductase, the role of the non-conserved Pro 216 (Ser in aldehyde reductase) in the binding of coenzyme was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. RESULTS: Sorbinil binds to the active site of aldehyde reductase and is hydrogen-bonded to Trp 22, Tyr 50, His 113, and the non-conserved Arg 312. Unlike tolrestat, the binding of sorbinil does not induce a change in the side chain conformation of Arg 312. Mutation of Pro 216 to Ser in aldose reductase makes the binding of coenzyme more similar to that of aldehyde reductase. CONCLUSIONS: The participation of non-conserved active site residues in the binding of inhibitors and the differences in the structural changes required for the binding to occur are responsible for the differences in the potency of inhibition of aldose and aldehyde reductases. We report that the non-conserved Pro 216 in aldose reductase contributes to the tight binding of NADPH.

  7. An Experimentally Based Computer Search Identifies Unstructured Membrane-binding Sites in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brzeska, Hanna; Guag, Jake; Remmert, Kirsten; Chacko, Susan; Korn, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Programs exist for searching protein sequences for potential membrane-penetrating segments (hydrophobic regions) and for lipid-binding sites with highly defined tertiary structures, such as PH, FERM, C2, ENTH, and other domains. However, a rapidly growing number of membrane-associated proteins (including cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, GTP-binding proteins, and their effectors) bind lipids through less structured regions. Here, we describe the development and testing of a simple computer search program that identifies unstructured potential membrane-binding sites. Initially, we found that both basic and hydrophobic amino acids, irrespective of sequence, contribute to the binding to acidic phospholipid vesicles of synthetic peptides that correspond to the putative membrane-binding domains of Acanthamoeba class I myosins. Based on these results, we modified a hydrophobicity scale giving Arg- and Lys-positive, rather than negative, values. Using this basic and hydrophobic scale with a standard search algorithm, we successfully identified previously determined unstructured membrane-binding sites in all 16 proteins tested. Importantly, basic and hydrophobic searches identified previously unknown potential membrane-binding sites in class I myosins, PAKs and CARMIL (capping protein, Arp2/3, myosin I linker; a membrane-associated cytoskeletal scaffold protein), and synthetic peptides and protein domains containing these newly identified sites bound to acidic phospholipids in vitro. PMID:20018884

  8. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M.; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  9. Distribution of cholecystokinin receptor binding sites in the human brain: an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Dietl, M.M.; Probst, A.; Palacios, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) binding sites were localized by in vitro autoradiography in human postmortem brain materials from 12 patients without reported neurological diseases using (125I)Bolton-Hunter CCK octapeptide (BHCCK-8) as a ligand. The pharmacological characteristics of BHCCK-8 binding to mounted tissue sections were comparable to those previously reported in the rat. CCK-8 being the most potent displacer, followed by caerulein, CCK-4, and gastrin I. The distribution of BHCCK-8 binding sites was heterogeneous. These sites were highly concentrated in a limited number of gray matter areas and nuclei. The highest binding densities were seen in the glomerular and external plexiform layers of the olfactory bulb. BHCCK-8 binding sites were also enriched in the neocortex, where they presented a laminar distribution with low levels in lamina I, moderate concentration in laminae II to IV, high density in lamina V, and low levels in lamina VI. A different laminar distribution was seen in the visual cortex, where a low receptor density was observed in lamina IV but higher density in laminae II and VI. In the basal ganglia the nucleus accumbens, caudatus, and the putamen presented moderate to high densities of binding sites, while the globus pallidus lacked sites of BHCCK-8 binding. In the limbic system the only area presenting moderate to high density was the amygdaloid complex, particularly in the granular nucleus, while most of the thalamic nuclei were extremely poor or lacked BHCCK-8 binding. The hippocampal formation showed low (CA1-3) to moderate (subiculum) densities. Midbrain areas generally disclosed very low levels of BHCCK-8 binding sites. The pontine gray and the nucleus reticularis tegmenti pontis showed a relatively high density of CCK-8 receptor specific binding.

  10. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation.

    PubMed

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-05-07

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy.

  11. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy. PMID:25950479

  12. Epoxide-mediated CifR repression of cif gene expression utilizes two binding sites in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ballok, Alicia E; Bahl, Christopher D; Dolben, Emily L; Lindsay, Allia K; St Laurent, Jessica D; Hogan, Deborah A; Madden, Dean R; O'Toole, George A

    2012-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an epoxide hydrolase virulence factor that reduces the apical membrane expression of ABC transporters such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This virulence factor, named CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif), is regulated by a TetR-family, epoxide-responsive repressor known as CifR via direct binding and repression. We identified two sites of CifR binding in the intergenic space between cifR and morB, the first gene in the operon containing the cif gene. We have mapped these binding sites and found they are 27 bp in length, and they overlap the -10 and +1 sites of both the cifR and morB regulatory region and the start of transcription, respectively. In addition, we found that CifR binds to each repression site with differing affinity. Mutagenesis of these binding sites resulted in a loss of DNA binding in vitro, and mutation of one of these sites in vivo resulted in an increase in transcription of both the cif and cifR genes. We characterized cif and cifR gene expression in sputum and found that, whereas cif gene expression varied relative to an in vitro coculture control, cifR gene expression was consistently higher. Analysis of a longitudinal sample of CF isolates from nine patients revealed that Cif protein was expressed over time, although variably, and these changes could not be linked to mutations in the cifR gene or the promoters of these genes. Finally, we tested CifR responsiveness to other epoxides and showed that CifR can respond to multiple epoxides to various degrees.

  13. Sites of strong Rec12/Spo11 binding in the fission yeast genome are associated with meiotic recombination and with centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Ludin, Katja; Mata, Juan; Watt, Stephen; Lehmann, Elisabeth; Bähler, Jürg; Kohli, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic recombination arises from Rec12/Spo11-dependent formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their subsequent repair. We identified Rec12-binding peaks across the S. pombe genome using chromatin immunoprecipitation after reversible formaldehyde cross-linking combined with whole-genome DNA microarrays. Strong Rec12-binding coincided with previously identified DSBs at the recombination hotspots ura4A, mbs1, and mbs2, and correlated with DSB formation at a new site. In addition, Rec12-binding corresponded to eight novel conversion hotspots and correlated with crossover density in segments of chromosome I. Notably, Rec12-binding inversely correlated with GC content, contrary to findings in S. cerevisiae. Although both replication origins and Rec12-binding sites preferred AT-rich gene-free regions, they seemed to exclude each other. We also uncovered a connection between binding sites of Rec12 and meiotic cohesin Rec8. Rec12-binding peaks lay often within 2.5 kb of a Rec8-binding peak. Rec12-binding showed preference for large intergenic regions and was found to bind preferentially near to genes expressed strongly in meiosis. Surprisingly, Rec12-binding was also detected in centromeric core regions, which raises the intriguing possibility that Rec12 plays additional roles in meiotic chromosome dynamics. PMID:18449558

  14. Sites of strong Rec12/Spo11 binding in the fission yeast genome are associated with meiotic recombination and with centromeres.

    PubMed

    Ludin, Katja; Mata, Juan; Watt, Stephen; Lehmann, Elisabeth; Bähler, Jürg; Kohli, Jürg

    2008-10-01

    Meiotic recombination arises from Rec12/Spo11-dependent formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their subsequent repair. We identified Rec12-binding peaks across the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome using chromatin immunoprecipitation after reversible formaldehyde cross-linking combined with whole-genome DNA microarrays. Strong Rec12 binding coincided with previously identified DSBs at the recombination hotspots ura4A, mbs1, and mbs2 and correlated with DSB formation at a new site. In addition, Rec12 binding corresponded to eight novel conversion hotspots and correlated with crossover density in segments of chromosome I. Notably, Rec12 binding inversely correlated with guanine-cytosine (GC) content, contrary to findings in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although both replication origins and Rec12-binding sites preferred AT-rich gene-free regions, they seemed to exclude each other. We also uncovered a connection between binding sites of Rec12 and meiotic cohesin Rec8. Rec12-binding peaks lay often within 2.5 kb of a Rec8-binding peak. Rec12 binding showed preference for large intergenic regions and was found to bind preferentially near to genes expressed strongly in meiosis. Surprisingly, Rec12 binding was also detected in centromeric core regions, which raises the intriguing possibility that Rec12 plays additional roles in meiotic chromosome dynamics.

  15. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  16. Separate [3H]-nitrendipine binding sites in mitochondria and plasma membranes of bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed Central

    Ballesta, J. J.; Garcia, A. G.; Gutierrez, L. M.; Hidalgo, M. J.; Palmero, M.; Reig, J. A.; Viniegra, S.

    1990-01-01

    1. Two binding sites for the 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) derivative [3H]-nitrendipine have been found in the bovine adrenal medulla. The high-affinity site (Kd = 0.48 nM and Bmax = 128 fmol mg-1 protein) was specifically located in purified plasma membranes. The low-affinity site (Kd = 252 nM and Bmax = 169 pmol mg-1 protein) was located only in mitochondria. Chromaffin granule membranes lacked specific binding sites for [3H]-nitrendipine. 2. Kinetic analysis of the rates of association and dissociation of [3H]-nitrendipine, saturation isotherms and displacement experiments with unlabelled nitrendipine and PN200-110 revealed single, homogeneous populations of high- and low-affinity sites in plasma and mitochondrial membranes, respectively. 3. The high affinity site was sensitive to Ca2+ deprivation and heating; it was practically unaffected by changes in ionic strength of the medium and its optimal pH was slightly alkaline. This site exhibited a strong DHP stereoselectivity; diltiazem increased and verapamil decreased the affinity of [3H]-nitrendipine. 4. In contrast, binding of [3H]-nitrendipine to the low affinity site was more heat resistant and less affected by Ca2+ removal. Its optimal pH was slightly acid and the increase in ionic strength enhanced the number of available sites. The site had no DHP stereoselectivity. Verapamil decreased the dissociation constant of [3H]-nitrendipine acting in a non-competitive manner; diltiazem did not affect equilibrium binding parameters of [3H]-nitrendipine. 5. These results suggest that both biding sites reflect different receptor entities. The high-affinity binding site corresponds to the dihydropyridine receptor associated with the L-type calcium channel. The function of the mitochondrial, low-affinity binding site is, at present, unknown. PMID:1704272

  17. Bayesian multiple-instance motif discovery with BAMBI: inference of recombinase and transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Jajamovich, Guido H.; Wang, Xiaodong; Arkin, Adam P.; Samoilov, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Finding conserved motifs in genomic sequences represents one of essential bioinformatic problems. However, achieving high discovery performance without imposing substantial auxiliary constraints on possible motif features remains a key algorithmic challenge. This work describes BAMBI—a sequential Monte Carlo motif-identification algorithm, which is based on a position weight matrix model that does not require additional constraints and is able to estimate such motif properties as length, logo, number of instances and their locations solely on the basis of primary nucleotide sequence data. Furthermore, should biologically meaningful information about motif attributes be available, BAMBI takes advantage of this knowledge to further refine the discovery results. In practical applications, we show that the proposed approach can be used to find sites of such diverse DNA-binding molecules as the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) and Din-family site-specific serine recombinases. Results obtained by BAMBI in these and other settings demonstrate better statistical performance than any of the four widely-used profile-based motif discovery methods: MEME, BioProspector with BioOptimizer, SeSiMCMC and Motif Sampler as measured by the nucleotide-level correlation coefficient. Additionally, in the case of Din-family recombinase target site discovery, the BAMBI-inferred motif is found to be the only one functionally accurate from the underlying biochemical mechanism standpoint. C++ and Matlab code is available at http://www.ee.columbia.edu/~guido/BAMBI or http://genomics.lbl.gov/BAMBI/. PMID:21948794

  18. Specific binding of a dichloroacetamide herbicide safener in maize at a site that also binds thiocarbamate and chloroacetanilide herbicides.

    PubMed

    Walton, J D; Casida, J E

    1995-09-01

    Dichloroacetamide safeners such as N,N-diallyl-2,2-dichloroacetamide and (R,S)-3-dichloroacetyl-2,2,5-trimethyl-1,3-oxazolidine protect maize (Zea mays) against injury from thiocarbamate and chloroacetanilide herbicides. Binding activity of tritium-labeled (R,S)-3-dichloroacetyl-2,2,5-trimethyl-1,3-oxazolidine (15 Ci/mmol; referred to as [3H]Saf) was characterized in extracts of etiolated maize seedlings. The binding is saturable, involves a single class of binding sites (Kd 0.12 microM; maximal binding in coleoptiles 0.53 nmol/g fresh weight, equivalent to 55 pmol/mg protein), and is sensitive to boiling and protease treatment. Binding in etiolated maize seedlings is highest in the coleoptile and lowest in the leaves. Binding of [3H]Saf also occurs in etiolated sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) shoots but not several other cereals. There is a good correlation between known safener effectiveness and the concentration that inhibits [3H]Saf binding half-maximally among 21 dichloroacetamides and related compounds. N,N-Diallyl-2,2-dichloroacetamide had the lowest inhibitor concentration that reduces specific binding by 50% (IC50), 0.01 microM. [3H]Saf binding is inhibited by 4 chloroacetanilide herbicides with IC50 values of 0.07 to 0.48 microM and by 12 thiocarbamate herbicides and analogs with IC50 values of 0.06 to 2.3 microM. The inhibition of [3H]Saf binding by alachlor and S-ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate is competitive.

  19. GTRD: a database of transcription factor binding sites identified by ChIP-seq experiments

    PubMed Central

    Yevshin, Ivan; Sharipov, Ruslan; Valeev, Tagir; Kel, Alexander; Kolpakov, Fedor

    2017-01-01

    GTRD—Gene Transcription Regulation Database (http://gtrd.biouml.org)—is a database of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) identified by ChIP-seq experiments for human and mouse. Raw ChIP-seq data were obtained from ENCODE and SRA and uniformly processed: (i) reads were aligned using Bowtie2; (ii) ChIP-seq peaks were called using peak callers MACS, SISSRs, GEM and PICS; (iii) peaks for the same factor and peak callers, but different experiment conditions (cell line, treatment, etc.), were merged into clusters; (iv) such clusters for different peak callers were merged into metaclusters that were considered as non-redundant sets of TFBSs. In addition to information on location in genome, the sets contain structured information about cell lines and experimental conditions extracted from descriptions of corresponding ChIP-seq experiments. A web interface to access GTRD was developed using the BioUML platform. It provides: (i) browsing and displaying information; (ii) advanced search possibilities, e.g. search of TFBSs near the specified gene or search of all genes potentially regulated by a specified transcription factor; (iii) integrated genome browser that provides visualization of the GTRD data: read alignments, peaks, clusters, metaclusters and information about gene structures from the Ensembl database and binding sites predicted using position weight matrices from the HOCOMOCO database. PMID:27924024

  20. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    PubMed Central

    Jaynes, William F.; Zartman, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (Kd = 24,100) retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 944). Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy) treated with choline (Kd = 13,800) and carnitine (Kd = 3960) adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (Kd = 944). A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 20,100) adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 1340) or the untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 293). Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity. PMID:22069725

  1. Theory and simulation of diffusion-influenced, stochastically gated ligand binding to buried sites

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, Jorge L.; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    We consider the diffusion-influenced rate coefficient of ligand binding to a site located in a deep pocket on a protein; the binding pocket is flexible and can reorganize in response to ligand entrance. We extend to this flexible protein-ligand system a formalism developed previously [A. M. Berezhkovskii, A, Szabo, and H.-X. Zhou, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 075103 (2011)10.1063/1.3609973] for breaking the ligand-binding problem into an exterior problem and an interior problem. Conformational fluctuations of a bottleneck or a lid and the binding site are modeled as stochastic gating. We present analytical and Brownian dynamics simulation results for the case of a cylindrical pocket containing a binding site at the bottom. Induced switch, whereby the conformation of the protein adapts to the incoming ligand, leads to considerable rate enhancement. PMID:22010732

  2. Internal binding sites for MSH: Analyses in wild-type and variant Cloudman melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Orlow, S.J.; Hotchkiss, S.; Pawelek, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma cells express both external (plasma membrane) and internal binding sites for MSH. Using 125I-beta melanotropin (beta-MSH) as a probe, we report here an extensive series of studies on the biological relevance of these internal sites. Cells were swollen in a hypotonic buffer and lysed, and a particulate fraction was prepared by high-speed centrifugation. This fraction was incubated with 125I-beta-MSH with or without excess nonradioactive beta-MSH in the cold for 2 hours. The material was then layered onto a step-wise sucrose gradient and centrifuged; fractions were collected and counted in a gamma counter or assayed for various enzymatic activities. The following points were established: (1) Specific binding sites for MSH were observed sedimenting at an average density of 50% sucrose in amelanotic cells and at higher densities in melanotic cells. (2) These sites were similar in density to those observed when intact cells were labeled externally with 125I-beta-MSH and then warmed to promote internalization of the hormone. (3) Most of the internal binding sites were not as dense as fully melanized melanosomes. (4) In control experiments, the MSH binding sites were not found in cultured hepatoma cells. (5) Variant melanoma cells, which differed from the wild-type in their responses to MSH, had reduced expression of internal binding sites even though their ability to bind MSH to the outer cell surface appeared normal. (MSH-induced responses included changes in tyrosinase, dopa oxidase, and dopachrome conversion factor activities, melanization, proliferation, and morphology.) (6) Isobutylmethylxanthine, which enhanced cellular responsiveness to MSH, also enhanced expression of internal binding sites. The results indicate that expression of internal binding sites for MSH is an important criterion for cellular responsiveness to the hormone.

  3. Multiple specific binding sites for purified glucocorticoid receptors on mammary tumor virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Payvar, F; Firestone, G L; Ross, S R; Chandler, V L; Wrange, O; Carlstedt-Duke, J; Gustafsson, J A; Yamamoto, K R

    1982-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones selectively stimulate the rate of transcription of integrated mammary tumor virus (MTV) sequences in infected rat hepatoma cells. Using two independent assays, we find that purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor protein binds specifically to at least four widely separated regions on pure MTV proviral DNA. One of these specific binding domains, which itself contains at least two distinct receptor binding sites, resides within a fragment of viral DNA that maps 110-449 bp upstream of the promoter for MTV RNA synthesis. Three other binding domains lie downstream of the promoter and within the MTV primary transcription unit. Restriction fragments bearing separate binding domains have been introduced into cultured cells; transformants have been recovered in which the introduced fragments are expressed under glucocorticoid control. Thus, it appears that this assay will be useful for assessing the biological significance of the receptor binding sites detected in vitro.

  4. Rat submaxillary gland contains predominantly P-type tachykinin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, S.H.; Burcher, E.

    1985-11-01

    The specific binding of the /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter labeled tachykinins substance K (BHSK), eledoisin (BHE), and substance P (BHSP) was examined in crude membrane suspensions and by autoradiography in rat submaxillary gland. All three ligands at 0.1 nM concentrations exhibited binding that was inhibited by tachykinins in a potency rank order of substance P greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than eledoisin greater than kassinin greater than neuromedin K with slope factors essentially equal to unity. All tachykinins were 5 to 10 times more potent in inhibiting BHSK and BHE binding compared to BHSP binding. Autoradiographic visualization of BHSK and BHSP binding sites in the gland revealed extensive labeling of mucous and serous acini. The intensity of labeling was much less for BHSK than for BHSP. The results indicate that the rat submaxillary gland contains predominantly P-type tachykinin binding sites.

  5. The structure of the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator Fur reveals three functional metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dian, Cyril; Vitale, Sylvia; Leonard, Gordon A; Bahlawane, Christelle; Fauquant, Caroline; Leduc, Damien; Muller, Cécile; de Reuse, Hilde; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle; Terradot, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    Fur, the ferric uptake regulator, is a transcription factor that controls iron metabolism in bacteria. Binding of ferrous iron to Fur triggers a conformational change that activates the protein for binding to specific DNA sequences named Fur boxes. In Helicobacter pylori, HpFur is involved in acid response and is important for gastric colonization in model animals. Here we present the crystal structure of a functionally active HpFur mutant (HpFur2M; C78S-C150S) bound to zinc. Although its fold is similar to that of other Fur and Fur-like proteins, the crystal structure of HpFur reveals a unique structured N-terminal extension and an unusual C-terminal helix. The structure also shows three metal binding sites: S1 the structural ZnS₄ site previously characterized biochemically in HpFur and the two zinc sites identified in other Fur proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis and spectroscopy analyses of purified wild-type HpFur and various mutants show that the two metal binding sites common to other Fur proteins can be also metallated by cobalt. DNA protection and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate that, while these two sites influence the affinity of HpFur for DNA, only one is absolutely required for DNA binding and could be responsible for the conformational changes of Fur upon metal binding while the other is a secondary site.

  6. A Conserved Surface Loop in Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases Positions an Active Site Arginine and Functions in Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Peterson, Scott N.; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-04-18

    Dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD) catalyzes the third step in the biosynthetic shikimate pathway. We present three crystal structures of the Salmonella enterica type I DHQD that address the functionality of a surface loop that is observed to close over the active site following substrate binding. Two wild-type structures with differing loop conformations and kinetic and structural studies of a mutant provide evidence of both direct and indirect mechanisms of involvement of the loop in substrate binding. In addition to allowing amino acid side chains to establish a direct interaction with the substrate, closure of the loop necessitates a conformational change of a key active site arginine, which in turn positions the substrate productively. The absence of DHQD in humans and its essentiality in many pathogenic bacteria make the enzyme a target for the development of nontoxic antimicrobials. The structures and ligand binding insights presented here may inform the design of novel type I DHQD inhibiting molecules.

  7. Trans-gamma-hydroxycrotonic acid binding sites in brain: evidence for a subpopulation of gamma-hydroxybutyrate sites.

    PubMed

    Hechler, V; Schmitt, M; Bourguignon, J J; Maitre, M

    1990-03-02

    Trans-gamma-hydroxycrotonate (THCA), a compound naturally present in rat brain, possesses high-affinity binding sites with a heterogeneous distribution which are superimposable with those for gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). Binding studies of THCA on rat brain membranes revealed two binding components, one of high affinity (Kd1, 7 nM, Bmax1 42 fmol/mg protein) and the other of low affinity (Kd2, 2 microM, Bmax2 13 pmol/mg protein). Displacement curves of [3H]THCA by THCA and GHB or of [3H]GHB by THCA are in favour of the existence of a specific high affinity site for THCA. Quantitative autoradiography with image analysis of [3H]THCA binding in rat brain slices indicated that [3H]THCA high affinity binding was displaced at a lower potency by GHB. THCA showed also some selectivity in displacing [3H]GHB from its high affinity binding site (Kd = 95 nM). This mutual overlap favours a subpopulation of GHB receptors, which have THCA as a natural ligand, showing partial agonistic properties compared to GHB. The functional significance of this result remains unknown.

  8. Current Understanding of the Binding Sites, Capacity, Affinity, and Biological Significance of Metals in Melanin

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lian; Simon, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Metal chelation is often invoked as one of the main biological functions of melanin. In order to understand the interaction between metals and melanin, extensive studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the metal binding sites, binding capacity and affinity. These data are central to efforts aimed at elucidating the role metal binding plays in determining the physical, structural, biological, and photochemical properties of melanin. This article examines the current state of understanding of this field. PMID:17580858

  9. Toward an atomistic model for predicting transcription-factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Endres, Robert G; Schulthess, Thomas C; Wingreen, Ned S

    2004-11-01

    Identifying the specific DNA-binding sites of transcription-factor proteins is essential to understanding the regulation of gene expression in the cell. Bioinformatics approaches are fast compared to experiments, but require prior knowledge of multiple binding sites for each protein. Here, we present an atomistic force-field method to predict binding sites based only on the X-ray structure of a related bound complex. Specific flexible contacts between the protein and DNA are modeled by a library of amino acid side-chain rotamers. Using the example of the mouse transcription factor, Zif268, a well-studied zinc-finger protein, we show that the protein sequence alone, without the detailed experimental structure, gives a strong bias toward the consensus binding site.

  10. An Overview of Tubulin Inhibitors That Interact with the Colchicine Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Chen, Jianjun; Xiao, Min; Li, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin dynamics is a promising target for new chemotherapeutic agents. The colchicine binding site is one of the most important pockets for potential tubulin polymerization destabilizers. Colchicine binding site inhibitors (CBSI) exert their biological effects by inhibiting tubulin assembly and suppressing microtubule formation. A large number of molecules interacting with the colchicine binding site have been designed and synthesized with significant structural diversity. CBSIs have been modified as to chemical structure as well as pharmacokinetic properties, and tested in order to find a highly potent, low toxicity agent for treatment of cancers. CBSIs are believed to act by a common mechanism via binding to the colchicine site on tubulin. The present review is a synopsis of compounds that have been reported in the past decade that have provided an increase in our understanding of the actions of CBSIs. PMID:22814904

  11. Autoradiographic localization of [3H]thiocolchicoside binding sites in the rat brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Balduini, W; De Angelis, V; Mazzoni, E; Depoortere, H; Cattabeni, F; Cimino, M

    2001-06-01

    Thiocolchicoside is used in humans as a myorelaxant drug with anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity. Recently we established the experimental conditions that allowed the identification of [3H]thiocolchicoside binding sites in synaptic membranes of rat spinal cord and cerebral cortex. The pharmacological characterization of these sites indicated that GABA and several of its agonists and antagonists, as well as strychnine, were able to interact with [3H]thiocolchicoside binding in a dose-dependent manner and with different affinities. In order to gain more insight into the nature and the anatomical distribution of the binding sites labeled by [3H]thiocolchicoside, in the present study we examined the localization of these sites on parasagittal and coronal sections of the rat brain and spinal cord, respectively, using receptor autoradiography. In the spinal cord an intense signal was observed in the gray matter, with the highest density occurring in the superficial layers of the dorsal horns. Strychnine completely displaced [3H]thiocolchicoside binding, whereas GABA only partially removed the radioligand from its binding sites. In the brain, specific binding occurred in several areas and was displaced by both GABA and strychnine. The distribution of [3H]thiocolchicoside binding sites in brain sections, however, did not match that found for [3H]muscimol. Furthermore, cold thiocolchicoside was not able to completely displace [3H]muscimol binding, and showed a different efficacy in the various areas labeled by the radioligand. We conclude that thiocolchicoside may interact with a subpopulation of GABA(A) receptors having low-affinity binding sites for GABA. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity to strychnine in the spinal cord indicates an interaction also with strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors, suggesting that the pharmacological effects of thiocolchicoside may be the result of its interaction with different receptor populations.

  12. MX Siting Investigation. Mineral Resources Survey, Seven Additional Valleys, Nevada/Utah Siting Area. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-23

    AO-AI13 14𔃾 ERTEC WESTERN INC LONG BEACH CA F/6 7/4 MX SITING INVESTIGATION. MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY, SEVEN ADDITI-ETC(U) JUN Al F04704-80-C-OGO6...DTIC-DDA-2 FORM DOCUMENT PROCESSING SHEET DTIC ocT :g 70A -- ~’ .9 ’I K ii I / "~1 - i~ / . . ..1’ ~ ~- .. ~ ~1 I E-TR-50 MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY...144 ERTEC WESTERN INC. LONG BEACH CA F/6 7/4 MX SITING INVESTIGATION. MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY. SEVEN AOOITI-ETCIU) JUN 81 FON7O-80-C-0006

  13. Mutations in the GM1 Binding Site of Simian Virus 40 VP1 Alter Receptor Usage and Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Buch, Michael H. C.; Murata, Haruhiko; Erickson, Kimberly D.; Neu, Ursula; Garcea, Robert L.; Peden, Keith; Stehle, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are nonenveloped viruses with capsids composed primarily of 72 pentamers of the viral VP1 protein, which forms the outer shell of the capsid and binds to cell surface oligosaccharide receptors. Highly conserved VP1 proteins from closely related polyomaviruses recognize different oligosaccharides. To determine whether amino acid changes restricted to the oligosaccharide binding site are sufficient to determine receptor specificity and how changes in receptor usage affect tropism, we studied the primate polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40), which uses the ganglioside GM1 as a receptor that mediates cell binding and entry. Here, we used two sequential genetic screens to isolate and characterize viable SV40 mutants with mutations in the VP1 GM1 binding site. Two of these mutants were completely resistant to GM1 neutralization, were no longer stimulated by incorporation of GM1 into cell membranes, and were unable to bind to GM1 on the cell surface. In addition, these mutant viruses displayed an infection defect in monkey cells with high levels of cell surface GM1. Interestingly, one mutant infected cells with low cell surface GM1 more efficiently than wild-type virus, apparently by utilizing a different ganglioside receptor. Our results indicate that a small number of mutations in the GM1 binding site are sufficient to alter ganglioside usage and change tropism, and they suggest that VP1 divergence is driven primarily by a requirement to accommodate specific receptors. In addition, our results suggest that GM1 binding is required for vacuole formation in permissive monkey CV-1 cells. Further study of these mutants will provide new insight into polyomavirus entry, pathogenesis, and evolution. PMID:22514351

  14. Status of the substrate binding sites of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase as determined with 2-C-carboxyarabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Genhai; Jensen, R.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The properties of the tight and specific binding of 2-C-carboxy-D-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate (CABP), which occurs only to reaction sites of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) that are activated by CO{sub 2} and Mg{sup 2+}, were studied. With fully active purified spinach (Spinacia oleracea) Rubisco the rate of tight binding of ({sup 14}C)CABP fit a multiple exponential rate equation with half of the sites binding with a rate constant of 40 per minute and the second half of the sites binding at 3.2 per minute. This suggests that after CABP binds to one site of a dimer of Rubisco large subunits, binding to the second site is considerably slower, indicating negative cooperativity as previously reported. The rate of CABP binding to partially activated Rubisco was complete within 2 to 5 minutes, with slower binding to inactive sites as they formed the carbamate and bound Mg{sup 2+}. Addition of ({sup 14}C)CABP and EDTA stopped binding of Mg{sup 2+} and allowed tight binding of the radiolabel only to sites which were CO{sub 2}/Mg{sup 2+}-activated at that moment. The rate of CO{sub 2} fixation was proportional to the CO{sub 2}/Mg{sup 2+}-activated sites. During light-dependent CO{sub 2} fixation with isolated spinach chloroplasts, the amount of carbamylation was proportional to Rubisco activity either initially upon lysis of the plastids or following total activation with Mg{sup 2+} and CO{sub 2}. Lysis of chloroplasts in media with ({sup 14}C)CABP plus EDTA estimated those carbamylated sites having Mg{sup 2+}. The loss of Rubisco activation during illumination was partially due to the lack of Mg{sup 2+} to stabilize the carbamylated sites.

  15. Synthetic peptides mimicking the binding site of human acetylcholinesterase for its inhibitor fasciculin 2.

    PubMed

    Kafurke, Uwe; Erijman, Ariel; Aizner, Yonatan; Shifman, Julia M; Eichler, Jutta

    2015-09-01

    Molecules capable of mimicking protein binding and/or functional sites present useful tools for a range of biomedical applications, including the inhibition of protein-ligand interactions. Such mimics of protein binding sites can currently be generated through structure-based design and chemical synthesis. Computational protein design could be further used to optimize protein binding site mimetics through rationally designed mutations that improve intermolecular interactions or peptide stability. Here, as a model for the study, we chose an interaction between human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) and its inhibitor fasciculin-2 (Fas) because the structure and function of this complex is well understood. Structure-based design of mimics of the hAChE binding site for Fas yielded a peptide that binds to Fas at micromolar concentrations. Replacement of hAChE residues known to be essential for its interaction with Fas with alanine, in this peptide, resulted in almost complete loss of binding to Fas. Computational optimization of the hAChE mimetic peptide yielded a variant with slightly improved affinity to Fas, indicating that more rounds of computational optimization will be required to obtain peptide variants with greatly improved affinity for Fas. CD spectra in the absence and presence of Fas point to conformational changes in the peptide upon binding to Fas. Furthermore, binding of the optimized hAChE mimetic peptide to Fas could be inhibited by hAChE, providing evidence for a hAChE-specific peptide-Fas interaction.

  16. Occlusion of the Ribosome Binding Site Connects the Translational Initiation Frequency, mRNA Stability and Premature Transcription Termination

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Mette; Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen; Mitarai, Namiko

    2017-01-01

    Protein production is controlled by ribosome binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA), quantified in part by the binding affinity between the ribosome and the ribosome binding sequence on the mRNA. Using the E. coli lac operon as model, Ringquist et al. (1992) found a more than 1,000-fold difference in protein yield when varying the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and its distance to the translation start site. Their proposed model accounted for this large variation by only a variation in the binding affinity and the subsequent initiation rate. Here we demonstrate that the decrease in protein yield with weaker ribosome binding sites in addition is caused by a decreased mRNA stability, and by an increased rate of premature transcription termination. Using different ribosome binding site sequences of the E. coli lacZ gene, we found that an approximately 100-fold span in protein expression could be subdivided into three mechanisms that each affected expression 3- to 6-fold. Our experiments is consistent with a two-step ribosome initiation model, in which occlusion of the initial part of the mRNA by a ribosome simultaneously protects the mRNA from both premature transcription termination and degradation: The premature termination we suggest is coupled to the absence of occlusion that allows binding of transcription termination factor, possibly Rho. The mRNA stability is explained by occlusion that prevents binding of the degrading enzymes. In our proposed scenario, a mRNA with lower translation initiation rate would at the same time be “hit” by an increased premature termination and a shorter life-time. Our model further suggests that the transcription from most if not all natural promoters is substantially influenced by premature termination. PMID:28382022

  17. Discovery and validation of information theory-based transcription factor and cofactor binding site motifs.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruipeng; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-11-28

    Data from ChIP-seq experiments can derive the genome-wide binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) and other regulatory proteins. We analyzed 765 ENCODE ChIP-seq peak datasets of 207 human TFs with a novel motif discovery pipeline based on recursive, thresholded entropy minimization. This approach, while obviating the need to compensate for skewed nucleotide composition, distinguishes true binding motifs from noise, quantifies the strengths of individual binding sites based on computed affinity and detects adjacent cofactor binding sites that coordinate with the targets of primary, immunoprecipitated TFs. We obtained contiguous and bipartite information theory-based position weight matrices (iPWMs) for 93 sequence-specific TFs, discovered 23 cofactor motifs for 127 TFs and revealed six high-confidence novel motifs. The reliability and accuracy of these iPWMs were determined via four independent validation methods, including the detection of experimentally proven binding sites, explanation of effects of characterized SNPs, comparison with previously published motifs and statistical analyses. We also predict previously unreported TF coregulatory interactions (e.g. TF complexes). These iPWMs constitute a powerful tool for predicting the effects of sequence variants in known binding sites, performing mutation analysis on regulatory SNPs and predicting previously unrecognized binding sites and target genes.

  18. Quantitative autoradiography of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Scatton, B.; Dubois, A.; Dubocovich, M.L.; Zahniser, N.R.; Fage, D.

    1985-03-04

    The distribution of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in the rat brain has been studied by quantitative autoradiography. The binding of /sup 3/H-nomifensine to caudate putamen sections was saturable, specific, of a highly affinity (Kd = 56 nM) and sodium-dependent. The dopamine uptake inhibitors benztropine, nomifensine, cocaine, bupropion and amfonelic acid were the most potent competitors of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding to striatal sections. The highest levels of (benztropine-displaceable) /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites were found in the caudate-putamen, the olfactory tubercle and the nucleus accumbens. 6-Hydroxy-dopamine-induced lesion of the ascending dopaminergic bundle resulted in a marked decrease in the /sup 3/H-ligand binding in these areas. Moderately high concentrations of the /sup 3/H-ligand were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the anteroventral thalamic nucleus, the cingulate cortex, the lateral septum, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the zona incerta and some hypothalamic nuclei. There were low levels of binding sites in the habenula, the dorsolateral geniculate body, the substantia nigra, the ventral tegmental area and the periaqueductal gray matter. These autoradiographic data are consistent with the hypothesis that /sup 3/H-nomifensine binds primarily to the presynaptic uptake site for dopamine but also labels the norepinephrine uptake site. 33 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  19. Estimating the relative position of risperidone primary binding site in Sera Albumins. Modeling from spectrofluorimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Celia Martins; Fragoso, Viviane Muniz S.; Silva, Dilson

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we used a mathematical model to study the interaction of risperidone with human and bovine serum albumins estimating the relative position of the primary binding site, based on the fluorescence quenching theory. Results have shown that the model was able to demonstrate that primary binding site for risperidone in HSA and BSA is very close to the position where is tryptophan 134 of BSA, possibly in domain 1B.

  20. Additional guidance on worst sites and NPL caliber sites to assist in sacm implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-26

    The document is intended to assist the Regions by giving clear guidance as to what constitutes NPL caliber sites and to assist in minimizing the potential for false positive NPL packages. It also sets forth the actions needed to support the efforts to implement SACM and encourage appropriate data gathering to support NPL listing and RI/FS decisions.

  1. Batrachotoxin, Pyrethroids, and BTG 502 Share Overlapping Binding Sites on Insect Sodium ChannelsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuzhe; Garden, Daniel; Khambay, Bhupinder; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2011-01-01

    Batrachotoxin (BTX), a steroidal alkaloid, and pyrethroid insecticides bind to distinct but allosterically coupled receptor sites on voltage-gated sodium channels and cause persistent channel activation. BTX presumably binds in the inner pore, whereas pyrethroids are predicted to bind at the lipid-exposed cavity formed by the short intracellular linker-helix IIS4-S5 and transmembrane helices IIS5 and IIIS6. The alkylamide insecticide (2E,4E)-N-(1,2-dimethylpropyl)-6-(5-bromo-2-naphthalenyl)-2,4-hexadienamide (BTG 502) reduces sodium currents and antagonizes the action of BTX on cockroach sodium channels, suggesting that it also binds inside the pore. However, a pyrethroid-sensing residue, Phe3i17 in IIIS6, which does not face the pore, is essential for the activity of BTG 502 but not for BTX. In this study, we found that three additional deltamethrin-sensing residues in IIIS6, Ile3i12, Gly3i14, and Phe3i16 (the latter two are also BTX-sensing), and three BTX-sensing residues, Ser3i15 and Leu3i19 in IIIS6 and Phe4i15 in IVS6, are all critical for BTG 502 action on cockroach sodium channels. Using these data as constraints, we constructed a BTG 502 binding model in which BTG 502 wraps around IIIS6, probably making direct contacts with all of the above residues on the opposite faces of the IIIS6 helix, except for the putative gating hinge Gly3i14. BTG 502 and its inactive analog DAP 1855 antagonize the action of deltamethrin. The antagonism was eliminated by mutations of Ser3i15, Phe3i17, Leu3i19, and Phe4i15 but not by mutations of Ile3i12, Gly3i14, and Phe3i16. Our analysis revealed a unique mode of action of BTG 502, its receptor site overlapping with those of both BTX and deltamethrin. PMID:21680776

  2. Mechanism for binding site diversity on ankyrin. Comparison of binding sites on ankyrin for neurofascin and the Cl-/HCO3- anion exchanger.

    PubMed

    Michaely, P; Bennett, V

    1995-12-29

    Ankyrins are a family of spectrin-binding proteins that associate with at least seven distinct membrane proteins, including ion transporters and cell adhesion molecules. The membrane-binding domain of ankyrin is comprised of a tandem array of 24 ANK repeats organized into four 6-repeat folding domains. Tandem arrays of ANK repeats have been proposed to mediate protein interactions in a variety of proteins including factors involved in the regulation of transcription and the cell cycle. This report provides several new insights into the versatility of ANK repeats of ankyrin in protein recognition, using neurofascin and the Cl-/HCO3- anion exchanger as model ligands and ankyrinR as the prototypic ankyrin. Different combinations of ANK repeat domains from this ankyrin form two distinct, high affinity binding sites for neurofascin. One site requires both repeat domains 3 and 4. The other site involves both repeat domains 2 and 3, although domain 2 has significant activity alone. The sites appear to be independent with Kd values of 3 and 14 nM, respectively. Both the Cl-/HCO3- anion exchanger and neurofascin can interact simultaneously with repeat domains 3 and 4, because neurofascin is unable to displace binding of the anion exchanger cytoplasmic domain to domains 3 and 4, despite having a 3-5-fold higher affinity. These results demonstrate two levels of diversity in the binding sites on ankyrin: one resulting from different combinations of ANK repeat domains and another from different determinants within the same combination of repeat domains. One consequence of this diversity is that ankyrin can accommodate two neurofascin molecules as well as the anion exchanger through interactions mediated by ANK repeats. The ability of ankyrin to simultaneously associate with multiple types of membrane proteins is an unanticipated finding with implications for the assembly of integral membrane proteins into specialized regions of the plasma membrane.

  3. MBSTAR: multiple instance learning for predicting specific functional binding sites in microRNA targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Dip; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression by binding to specific sites in the 3'untranslated regions of its target genes. Machine learning based miRNA target prediction algorithms first extract a set of features from potential binding sites (PBSs) in the mRNA and then train a classifier to distinguish targets from non-targets. However, they do not consider whether the PBSs are functional or not, and consequently result in high false positive rates. This substantially affects the follow up functional validation by experiments. We present a novel machine learning based approach, MBSTAR (Multiple instance learning of Binding Sites of miRNA TARgets), for accurate prediction of true or functional miRNA binding sites. Multiple instance learning framework is adopted to handle the lack of information about the actual binding sites in the target mRNAs. Biologically validated 9531 interacting and 973 non-interacting miRNA-mRNA pairs are identified from Tarbase 6.0 and confirmed with PAR-CLIP dataset. It is found that MBSTAR achieves the highest number of binding sites overlapping with PAR-CLIP with maximum F-Score of 0.337. Compared to the other methods, MBSTAR also predicts target mRNAs with highest accuracy. The tool and genome wide predictions are available at http://www.isical.ac.in/~bioinfo_miu/MBStar30.htm.

  4. Antimalarial 4(1H)-pyridones bind to the Qi site of cytochrome bc1

    PubMed Central

    Capper, Michael J.; O’Neill, Paul M.; Fisher, Nicholas; Strange, Richard W.; Moss, Darren; Ward, Stephen A.; Berry, Neil G.; Lawrenson, Alexandre S.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome bc1 is a proven drug target in the prevention and treatment of malaria. The rise in drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum, the organism responsible for malaria, has generated a global effort in designing new classes of drugs. Much of the design/redesign work on overcoming this resistance has been focused on compounds that are presumed to bind the Qo site (one of two potential binding sites within cytochrome bc1) using the known crystal structure of this large membrane-bound macromolecular complex via in silico modeling. Cocrystallization of the cytochrome bc1 complex with the 4(1H)-pyridone class of inhibitors, GSK932121 and GW844520, that have been shown to be potent antimalarial agents in vivo, revealed that these inhibitors do not bind at the Qo site but bind at the Qi site. The discovery that these compounds bind at the Qi site may provide a molecular explanation for the cardiotoxicity and eventual failure of GSK932121 in phase-1 clinical trial and highlight the need for direct experimental observation of a compound bound to a target site before chemical optimization and development for clinical trials. The binding of the 4(1H)-pyridone class of inhibitors to Qi also explains the ability of this class to overcome parasite Qo-based atovaquone resistance and provides critical structural information for future design of new selective compounds with improved safety profiles. PMID:25564664

  5. LTBP-2 Has a Single High-Affinity Binding Site for FGF-2 and Blocks FGF-2-Induced Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Menz, Clementine; Parsi, Mahroo K; Adams, Julian R J; Sideek, Mohamed A; Kopecki, Zlatko; Cowin, Allison J; Gibson, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Latent transforming growth factor-beta-1 binding protein-2 (LTBP-2) belongs to the fibrillin-LTBP superfamily of extracellular matrix proteins. LTBPs and fibrillins are involved in the sequestration and storage of latent growth factors, particularly transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), in tissues. Unlike other LTBPs, LTBP-2 does not covalently bind TGF-β, and its molecular functions remain unclear. We are screening LTBP-2 for binding to other growth factors and have found very strong saturable binding to fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) (Kd = 1.1 nM). Using a series of recombinant LTBP-2 fragments a single binding site for FGF-2 was identified in a central region of LTBP-2 consisting of six tandem epidermal growth factor-like (EGF-like) motifs (EGFs 9-14). This region was also shown to contain a heparin/heparan sulphate-binding site. FGF-2 stimulation of fibroblast proliferation was completely negated by the addition of 5-fold molar excess of LTBP-2 to the assay. Confocal microscopy showed strong co-localisation of LTBP-2 and FGF-2 in fibrotic keloid tissue suggesting that the two proteins may interact in vivo. Overall the study indicates that LTBP-2 is a potent inhibitor of FGF-2 that may influence FGF-2 bioactivity during wound repair particularly in fibrotic tissues.

  6. Photoaffinity site-specific covalent labeling of human corticosteroid-binding globulin.

    PubMed Central

    Marver, D; Chiu, W; Wolff, M E; Edelman, I S

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed for the synthesis of high-specific-activity 21-diazo-21-[6,7-(3)H]deoxycorticosterone, an analog of corticosterone. This analog was used as a photoaffinity label of a high affinity steroid-binding protein, human corticosteroid-binding globulin. Based on direct binding studies and crosscompetition experiments, this diazo derivative exhibited the requisite affinity (within a factor of 1.5 times that of corticosterone) and site specificity to qualify as an affinity labeling legand. Irradiation of corticosteroid-binding globulin with the 21-diazo derivative resulted in irreversible binding to corticosteroid-binding globulin, identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Specificity of covalent binding to corticosteroid-binding globulin was established by competition analysis with various steroids. Irreversibility of photodependent binding was shown by persistence of the complex on electrophoresis (in contrast to the noncovalently linked complex), and resistance to exchange with corticosterone or pregnanediol and to solvent extraction. Site specificity of covalent binding was inferred from the effects of a scavenger, Tris-HC1, and fluorescence quenching of a neighboring tryptophan. PMID:1069998

  7. Evidence for separate substrate binding sites for hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in the oxidation of ethanol by catalase

    SciTech Connect

    DeMaster, E.G.; Nagasawa,ss H.T.

    1986-03-01

    The oxidation of ethanol by purified bovine liver catalase (Sigma, C-40) can be supported by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or by CHP. The time course of the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported reaction (using glucose/glucose oxidase as the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ source) was linear for at least one hr, whereas the rate of acetaldehyde formation in the CHP (4.2 mM) supported reaction decreased with time. When catalase was exposed o CHP for 5 min before the addition of ethanol, the rate of CHP supported ethanol oxidation was reduced by more than 90% compared to incubations where the addition of ethanol preceded that of CHP. In the CHP inhibited state, the peroxidative activity of catalase was not restored by further addition of CHP or ethanol; however, addition of fresh catalase yielded its expected activity. Significantly, the CHP inhibited enzyme was equally effective as the untreated enzyme in catalyzing (a) the oxidation of ethanol in the presence H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported peroxidative activity as well as catalytic activity by CHP inhibited catalase points to separate binding sites for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and CHP in this reaction. Alternatively, CHP may bind adjacent to a common peroxide active site, thereby sterically impeding the binding of CHP - but not of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ - to this active site.

  8. Genome-Wide Identification of Transcription Start Sites, Promoters and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Vargas, Alfredo; Olvera, Leticia; Olvera, Maricela; Grande, Ricardo; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Taboada, Blanca; Jimenez-Jacinto, Verónica; Salgado, Heladia; Juárez, Katy; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Huerta, Araceli M.; Collado-Vides, Julio; Morett, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Despite almost 40 years of molecular genetics research in Escherichia coli a major fraction of its Transcription Start Sites (TSSs) are still unknown, limiting therefore our understanding of the regulatory circuits that control gene expression in this model organism. RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx/) is aimed at integrating the genetic regulatory network of E. coli K12 as an entirely bioinformatic project up till now. In this work, we extended its aims by generating experimental data at a genome scale on TSSs, promoters and regulatory regions. We implemented a modified 5′ RACE protocol and an unbiased High Throughput Pyrosequencing Strategy (HTPS) that allowed us to map more than 1700 TSSs with high precision. From this collection, about 230 corresponded to previously reported TSSs, which helped us to benchmark both our methodologies and the accuracy of the previous mapping experiments. The other ca 1500 TSSs mapped belong to about 1000 different genes, many of them with no assigned function. We identified promoter sequences and type of σ factors that control the expression of about 80% of these genes. As expected, the housekeeping σ70 was the most common type of promoter, followed by σ38. The majority of the putative TSSs were located between 20 to 40 nucleotides from the translational start site. Putative regulatory binding sites for transcription factors were detected upstream of many TSSs. For a few transcripts, riboswitches and small RNAs were found. Several genes also had additional TSSs within the coding region. Unexpectedly, the HTPS experiments revealed extensive antisense transcription, probably for regulatory functions. The new information in RegulonDB, now with more than 2400 experimentally determined TSSs, strengthens the accuracy of promoter prediction, operon structure, and regulatory networks and provides valuable new information that will facilitate the understanding from a global perspective the complex and intricate regulatory

  9. Heterogeneity of nuclear estrogen-binding sites in the rat uterus: a simple method for the quantitation of type I and type II sites by (3H)estradiol exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Markaverich, B.M.; Williams, M.; Upchurch, S.; Clark, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Estrogen administration to mature-ovariectomized rats causes the activation or stimulation of secondary nuclear estrogen-binding sites (type II) in the uterus which can interfere with estrogen receptor (type I) measurement. Earlier reports from our laboratory have shown that quantitation of type I sites in the presence of the type II site is very difficult and can only be achieved by graphic analysis of saturation curves which employ a wide range (0.4-40 NM) of (/sup 3/H)estradiol concentrations in nuclear exchange assay. The studies presented in this manuscript describe simple methods which can be used to separately quantitate both nuclear estrogen-binding sites using a single concentration of (/sup 3/H)estradiol. Since the nuclear type II site does not bind (/sup 3/H)estradiol in the presence of reducing agent, type I sites can be easily quantitated by incubating nuclei (37 C for 30 min) in Tris-EDTA buffer containing 0.1-1.00 mM dithiothreitol using a single saturating concentration of (/sup 3/H)estradiol. Conversely, a single concentration of (/sup 3/H)estradiol (40-80 nM) can be used to quantitate the nuclear type II site by incubating nuclei in Tris-EDTA buffer under conditions (4 C for 60 min) which do not measure occupied nuclear estrogen receptor. Therefore, by using the appropriate buffer system, type I and type II sites can be easily separated in mixed binding systems. In addition, we also demonstrate that Nafoxidine does not bind to the nuclear type II site. Therefore, it can be used as a competitive inhibitor of (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding to type I sites and permit the measurement of type II sites without interference from type I sites. These techniques should be applicable to autoradiographic or fluorescence studies which cannot discriminate between steroid binding to these two classes of nuclear estrogen-binding sites.

  10. Human retina contains polyamine sensitive [3H]-ifenprodil binding sites: implications for neuroprotection?

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, N; Xu, S

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—This study characterised the pharmacology of [3H]-ifenprodil binding to the polyamine binding sites (PBS) on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channel complex on human retinas. These data were correlated with the known neuroprotective effects of ifenprodil and eliprodil.
METHODS—Specific binding of [3H]-ifenprodil (under sigma site blockade) was investigated using human retinal homogenates and radioligand binding techniques. Scatchard and competition analyses were utilised to define the pharmacology of the [3H]-ifenprodil binding sites.
RESULTS—Specific binding of [3H]-ifenprodil comprised 73% (SEM 3%) of total and reflected interaction with two affinity sites (Kds = 0.39 and 4.3 µM) of different densities (Bmax = 14.4 and 105 pmol/ mg protein) (n = 5). The rank order of affinity of compounds competing for [3H]-ifenprodil binding to the high affinity PBS was: ifenprodil > eliprodil > arcaine > spermine > diaminodecane > spermidine > putrescine >> MK-801 (n = 3-7). However, [3H]-ifenprodil binding was minimally inhibited by glutamate, NMDA, and kainate.
CONCLUSION—These studies have shown, for the first time, the presence of specific [3H]-ifenprodil binding sites in the human retina with pharmacological characteristics of PBS associated with the NMDA receptor ionophore complex. The neuroprotective effects of eliprodil and ifenprodil may, in part, be mediated via these [3H]-ifenprodil labelled sites.

 Keywords: retina; neuroprotection; eliprodil; NMDA receptors PMID:10396205

  11. RPI-Bind: a structure-based method for accurate identification of RNA-protein binding sites.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiesi; Liu, Liang; Venkateswaran, Suresh; Song, Qianqian; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2017-04-04

    RNA and protein interactions play crucial roles in multiple biological processes, while these interactions are significantly influenced by the structures and sequences of protein and RNA molecules. In this study, we first performed an analysis of RNA-protein interacting complexes, and identified interface properties of sequences and structures, which reveal the diverse nature of the binding sites. With the observations, we built a three-step prediction model, namely RPI-Bind, for the identification of RNA-protein binding regions using the sequences and structures of both proteins and RNAs. The three steps include 1) the prediction of RNA binding regions on protein, 2) the prediction of protein binding regions on RNA, and 3) the prediction of interacting regions on both RNA and protein simultaneously, with the results from steps 1) and 2). Compared with existing methods, most of which employ only sequences, our model significantly improves the prediction accuracy at each of the three steps. Especially, our model outperforms the catRAPID by >20% at the 3(rd) step. All of these results indicate the importance of structures in RNA-protein interactions, and suggest that the RPI-Bind model is a powerful theoretical framework for studying RNA-protein interactions.

  12. Pharmacophore model of the quercetin binding site of the SIRT6 protein

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, S.; Singh, N.; Donnelly, D.; Migliore, M.; Johnson, P.; Fishwick, C.; Luke, Brian T.; Martin, B.; Maudsley, S.; Fugmann, S. D.; Moaddel, R.

    2014-01-01

    SIRT6 is a histone deacetylase that has been proposed as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders and the prevention of age-associated diseases. We have previously reported on the identification of quercetin and vitexin as SIRT6 inhibitors, and studied structurally related flavonoids including luteolin, kaempferol, apigenin and naringenin. It was determined that the SIRT6 protein remained active after immobilization and that a single frontal displacement could correctly predict the functional activity of the immobilized enzyme. The previous study generated a preliminary pharmacophore for the quercetin binding site on SIRT6, containing 3 hydrogen bond donors and one hydrogen bond acceptor. In this study, we have generated a refined pharmacophore with an additional twelve quercetin analogs. The resulting model had a positive linear behavior between the experimental elution time verses the fit values obtained from the model with a correlation coefficient of 0.8456. PMID:24491483

  13. The Bacterial Response Regulator ArcA Uses a Diverse Binding Site Architecture to Regulate Carbon Oxidation Globally

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dan M.; Akhtar, Md. Sohail; Ansari, Aseem Z.; Landick, Robert; Kiley, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis for cellular viability, how cells control redox balance globally is poorly understood. Here we provide new mechanistic insight into how the balance between reduced and oxidized electron carriers is regulated at the level of gene expression by mapping the regulon of the response regulator ArcA from Escherichia coli, which responds to the quinone/quinol redox couple via its membrane-bound sensor kinase, ArcB. Our genome-wide analysis reveals that ArcA reprograms metabolism under anaerobic conditions such that carbon oxidation pathways that recycle redox carriers via respiration are transcriptionally repressed by ArcA. We propose that this strategy favors use of catabolic pathways that recycle redox carriers via fermentation akin to lactate production in mammalian cells. Unexpectedly, bioinformatic analysis of the sequences bound by ArcA in ChIP-seq revealed that most ArcA binding sites contain additional direct repeat elements beyond the two required for binding an ArcA dimer. DNase I footprinting assays suggest that non-canonical arrangements of cis-regulatory modules dictate both the length and concentration-sensitive occupancy of DNA sites. We propose that this plasticity in ArcA binding site architecture provides both an efficient means of encoding binding sites for ArcA, σ70-RNAP and perhaps other transcription factors within the same narrow sequence space and an effective mechanism for global control of carbon metabolism to maintain redox homeostasis. PMID:24146625

  14. An Empirical Prior Improves Accuracy for Bayesian Estimation of Transcription Factor Binding Site Frequencies within Gene Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    A Bayesian method for sampling from the distribution of matches to a precompiled transcription factor binding site (TFBS) sequence pattern (conditioned on an observed nucleotide sequence and the sequence pattern) is described. The method takes a position frequency matrix as input for a set of representative binding sites for a transcription factor and two sets of noncoding, 5′ regulatory sequences for gene sets that are to be compared. An empirical prior on the frequency A (per base pair of gene-vicinal, noncoding DNA) of TFBSs is developed using data from the ENCODE project and incorporated into the method. In addition, a probabilistic model for binding site occurrences conditioned on λ is developed analytically, taking into account the finite-width effects of binding sites. The count of TFBS β (conditioned on the observed sequence) is sampled using Metropolis–Hastings with an information entropy-based move generator. The derivation of the method is presented in a step-by-step fashion, starting from specific conditional independence assumptions. Empirical results show that the newly proposed prior on β improves accuracy for estimating the number of TFBS within a set of promoter sequences. PMID:27812284

  15. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding sites differentiated by their affinity for pirenzepine do not interconvert

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, D.W.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1986-05-01

    Although it has been suggested by many investigators that subtypes of muscarinic cholinergic receptors exist, physical studies of solubilized receptors have indicated that only a single molecular species may exist. To test the hypothesis that the putative muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat forebrain are interconvertible states of the same receptor, the selective antagonist pirenzepine (PZ) was used to protect muscarinic receptors from blockade by the irreversible muscarinic receptor antagonist propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM). If interconversion of high (M1) and low (M2) affinity binding sites for PZ occurs, incubation of cerebral cortical membranes with PBCM in the presence of PZ should not alter the proportions of M1 and M2 binding sites that are unalkylated (i.e., protected). If, on the other hand, the binding sites are not interconvertible, PZ should be able to selectively protect M1 sites and alter the proportions of unalkylated M1 and M2 binding sites. In the absence of PZ, treatment of cerebral cortical membranes with 20 nM PBCM at 4 degrees C for 50 min resulted in a 69% reduction in the density of M1 binding sites and a 55% reduction in the density of M2 binding sites with no change in the equilibrium dissociation constants of the radioligands (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (/sup 3/H)PZ. The reasons for this somewhat selective effect of PBCM are not apparent. In radioligand binding experiments using cerebral cortical membranes, PZ inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in a biphasic manner.

  16. A General Pairwise Interaction Model Provides an Accurate Description of In Vivo Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Santolini, Marc; Mora, Thierry; Hakim, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs), in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF) binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM), a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting TFBSs beyond

  17. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of [3H]ANSTO-14 binding to the sigma 1 binding sites.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V H; Mardon, K; Kassiou, M; Christie, M D

    1999-02-01

    N-(4-phenylbutyl)-3-hydroxy-4-azahexacyclo[5.4.1.0(2,6).0(3, 10).0(5,9) .0(8,11)]dodecane (ANSTO-14) showed the highest activity for the sigma 1 site (Ki = 9.4 nM) and 19-fold sigma 1/sigma 2 selectivity. The present study showed that [3H]ANSTO-14 binds to a single high-affinity site in guinea pig brain membranes with an equilibrium Ki of 8.0 +/- 0.3 nM, in good agreement with the kinetic studies (Kd = 13.3 +/- 5.4 nM, n = 4), and a Bmax of 3.199 +/- 105 fmol/mg protein (n = 4). The in vivo biodistribution of [3H]ANSTO-14 showed a high uptake in the diencephalon. Pretreatment of rats with sigma ligands including (+)-pentazocine (sigma 1), ANSTO-14 (sigma 1), and DTG (sigma 1 and sigma 2) did not significantly reduce radiotracer uptake in the brain, but did in the spleen. A labelled metabolite was found in the liver and brain. Due to its insensitivity to sigma ligands, the accumulation of [3H]ANSTO-14 in the brain indicates high nonspecific binding. Therefore, [3H]ANSTO-14 is a suitable ligand for labelling sigma 1 sites in vitro but is not suitable for brain imaging of sigma binding sites in vivo.

  18. Transcriptional start and MetR binding sites on the Escherichia coli metH gene.

    PubMed

    Marconi, R; Wigboldus, J; Weissbach, H; Brot, N

    1991-03-29

    The 5' upstream region of the Escherichia coli metH gene has been sequenced. Primer extension analysis revealed a transcription start site at 324 bases upstream of the initiator codon. An 8 base sequence homologous to the MetR binding region on the E. coli metE gene is present 217 bp downstream of the transcription start site. Gel retardation experiments showed that purified MetR protein could bind to a 30 base oligonucleotide containing the putative MetR binding region. No "met box" was present which explains the relative lack of regulation of the expression of the metH gene by methionine.

  19. Unusually Situated Binding Sites for Bacterial Transcription Factors Can Have Hidden Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Haycocks, James R. J.; Grainger, David C.

    2016-01-01

    A commonly accepted paradigm of molecular biology is that transcription factors control gene expression by binding sites at the 5' end of a gene. However, there is growing evidence that transcription factor targets can occur within genes or between convergent genes. In this work, we have investigated one such target for the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. We show that CRP binds between two convergent genes. When bound, CRP regulates transcription of a small open reading frame, which we term aatS, embedded within one of the adjacent genes. Our work demonstrates that non-canonical sites of transcription factor binding can have hidden functionality. PMID:27258043

  20. 65-kilodalton protein phosphorylated by interleukin 2 stimulation bears two putative actin-binding sites and two calcium-binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zu, Youli; Shigesada, Katsuya; Hanaoka, Masao; Namba, Yuziro ); Nishida, Eisuke ); Kubota, Ichiro ); Kohno, Michiaki )

    1990-09-11

    The authors have previously characterized a 65-kilodalton protein (p65) as an interleukin 2 stimulated phosphoprotein in human T cells and showed that three endopeptide sequences of p65 are present in the sequence of l-plastin. In this paper, they present the complete primary structure of p65 based on the cDNA isolated from a human T lymphocyte (KUT-2) cDNA library. Analysis of p65 sequences and the amino acid composition of cleaved p65 N-terminal peptide indicated that the deduced p65 amino acid sequence exactly coincides with that of l-plastin over the C-terminal 580 residues and has a 57-residue extension at the N-terminus to l-plastin. Computer-assisted structural analysis revealed that p65 is a multidomain molecule involving at least three intriguing functional domains: two putative calcium-binding sites along the N-terminal 80 amino acid residues; a putative calmodulin-binding site following the calcium-binding region; and two tandem repeats of putative actin-binding domains in its middle and C-terminal parts, each containing approximately 240 amino acid residues. These results suggest that p65 belongs to actin-binding proteins.

  1. Mapping of anion binding sites on cytochrome c by differential chemical modification of lysine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Osheroff, N; Brautigan, D L; Margoliash, E

    1980-01-01

    The carbonate binding site on horse cytochrome c was mapped by comparing the yields of carboxydinitrophenyl-cytochromes c, each with a single carboxydinitrophenyl-substituted lysine residue per molecule, when the modification reaction was carried out in the presence and absence of carbonate. The site is located on the "left surface" of the protein and consists of lysine residues 72 and/or 73 as well as 86 and/or 87 (Carbonate Site). Although one of the binding sites for phosphate on cytochrome c (Phosphat Site I) is located near the carbonate site, the sites are distinctly different since carbonate does not displace bound phosphate, as monitored by 31P NMR. Furthermore, citrate interacts with Phosphate Site I with high affinity, whereas chloride, acetate, borate, and cacodylate have a much lower affinity for this site, if they bind to it at all. The affinity of phosphate for Phosphate Site I (KD = 2 X 10(-4) M) is at least 1 order of magnitude higher than it is for other sites of interaction. Images PMID:6254024

  2. A Disease-Causing Variant in PCNA Disrupts a Promiscuous Protein Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Caroline M; Hilbert, Brendan J; Kelch, Brian A

    2016-03-27

    The eukaryotic DNA polymerase sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen or PCNA, is a ring-shaped protein complex that surrounds DNA to act as a sliding platform for increasing processivity of cellular replicases and for coordinating various cellular pathways with DNA replication. A single point mutation, Ser228Ile, in the human PCNA gene was recently identified to cause a disease whose symptoms resemble those of DNA damage and repair disorders. The mutation lies near the binding site for most PCNA-interacting proteins. However, the structural consequences of the S228I mutation are unknown. Here, we describe the structure of the disease-causing variant, which reveals a large conformational change that dramatically transforms the binding pocket for PCNA client proteins. We show that the mutation markedly alters the binding energetics for some client proteins, while another, p21(CIP1), is only mildly affected. Structures of the disease variant bound to peptides derived from two PCNA partner proteins reveal that the binding pocket can adjust conformation to accommodate some ligands, indicating that the binding site is dynamic and pliable. Our work has implications for the plasticity of the binding site in PCNA and reveals how a disease mutation selectively alters interactions to a promiscuous binding site that is critical for DNA metabolism.

  3. Discovery of Fur binding site clusters in Escherichia coli by information theory models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zehua; Lewis, Karen A.; Shultzaberger, Ryan K.; Lyakhov, Ilya G.; Zheng, Ming; Doan, Bernard; Storz, Gisela; Schneider, Thomas D.

    2007-01-01

    Fur is a DNA binding protein that represses bacterial iron uptake systems. Eleven footprinted Escherichia coli Fur binding sites were used to create an initial information theory model of Fur binding, which was then refined by adding 13 experimentally confirmed sites. When the refined model was scanned across all available footprinted sequences, sequence walkers, which are visual depictions of predicted binding sites, frequently appeared in clusters that fit the footprints (∼83% coverage). This indicated that the model can accurately predict Fur binding. Within the clusters, individual walkers were separated from their neighbors by exactly 3 or 6 bases, consistent with models in which Fur dimers bind on different faces of the DNA helix. When the E. coli genome was scanned, we found 363 unique clusters, which includes all known Fur-repressed genes that are involved in iron metabolism. In contrast, only a few of the known Fur-activated genes have predicted Fur binding sites at their promoters. These observations suggest that Fur is either a direct repressor or an indirect activator. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis Fur models are highly similar to the E. coli Fur model, suggesting that the Fur–DNA recognition mechanism may be conserved for even distantly related bacteria. PMID:17921503

  4. 2( sup 125 I)Iodomelatonin binding sites in spleens of guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, A.M.S. ); Pang, S.F. )

    1992-01-01

    2-({sup 125}I)Iodomelatonin was found to bind specifically to the membrane preparations of the spleens of guinea pigs with high affinity. The binding was rapid, stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of the binding assays revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 49.8{plus minus}4.12 pmol/l and binding site density (Bmax) of 0.69{plus minus}0.082 fmol/mg protein at mid-light. There was no significant change in the Kd or the Bmax at mid-dark. Kinetic analysis showed a Kd of 23.13{plus minus}4.81 pmol/l, in agreement to that derived from the saturation studies. The 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin binding sites have the following order of potency: 2-iodomelatonin > melatonin > 6-chloromelatonin {much gt} N-acetylserotonin, 6-hydroxymelatonin > 5-methoxytryptamine, 5-methoxytryptophol > serotonin, 5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid > 5-hydroxytryptophol, 3-acetylindole, 1-acetylindole-3-carboxyaldehyde, L-tryptophan > tryptamine, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid. Differential centrifugation studies showed that the binding sites are localized mainly in the nuclear fraction, the rest are distributed in the microsomal fraction, mitochondrial fraction and cytosolic fraction. The demonstration of 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin binding sites in the spleen suggests the presence of melatonin receptors and a direct mechanism of action of melatonin on the immune system.

  5. Characterization and distribution of binding sites for a new neurotensin receptor antagonist ligand, [3H]SR 48692, in the guinea pig brain1

    PubMed Central

    Betancur, Catalina; Canton, Maryse; Gully, Danielle; Vela, Gema; Pélaprat, Didier; Rostène, William

    1995-01-01

    SR 48692, a selective non-peptide antagonist of neurotensin (NT) receptors was recently developed. In the present work we studied the binding properties of the corresponding radioligand, 3H-SR 48692, in the adult guinea-pig brain. The characterization of 3H-SR 48692 binding was carried out on brain membrane preparations and the distribution of 3H-SR 48692 binding sites was determined by receptor autoradiography, and compared to that of 125I-NT binding sites. In brain homogenates, 3H-SR 48692 bound to a single population of sites with a Kd of 2.19 nM and a Bmax of 1.15 pmol/mg protein. This Bmax value was 20 times higher than that observed for 125I-NT. NT agonists were able to competitively interact with the entire population of binding sites labeled by 3H-SR 48692, but their affinities were much lower than those observed for 125I-NT. By contrast, NT antagonists exhibited similar abilities to inhibit the binding of both radioligands. The addition of unlabeled NT in saturation assays revealed a competitive inhibition of 3H-SR 48692 binding, suggesting that agonist and antagonists ligands bind to overlapping domains of the NT receptor. The autoradiographic distribution of the low-affinity NT binding sites detected by 3H-SR 48692 (96% of the receptors) was very similar to the distribution of high-affinity receptors labeled with 125I-NT (4% of the receptors). In addition, the binding of 3H-SR 48692 was insensitive to guanyl nucleotides. Taken together, these findings suggest that the binding sites detected by 3H-SR 48692 in the guinea-pig brain mainly represent the uncoupled form of the NT receptor. PMID:7791120

  6. Receptor binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor are expressed by brown adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Bacay, A.C.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Mantyh, P.W. )

    1988-09-01

    To explore the possibility that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is involved in thermoregulation we used quantitative receptor autoradiography and homogenate receptor binding assays to identify ANF bindings sites in neonatal rat and sheep brown adipose tissue, respectively. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography were were able to localize high levels of specific binding sites for {sup 125}I-rat ANF in neonatal rat brown adipose tissue. Homogenate binding assays on sheep brown fat demonstrated that the radioligand was binding to the membrane fraction and that the specific binding was not due to a lipophilic interaction between {sup 125}I-rat ANF and brown fat. Specific binding of {sup 125}I-rat ANF to the membranes of brown fat cells was inhibited by unlabeled rat ANF with a Ki of 8.0 x 10(-9) M, but not by unrelated peptides. These studies demonstrate that brown fat cells express high levels of ANF receptor binding sites in neonatal rat and sheep and suggest that ANF may play a role in thermoregulation.

  7. Photoaffinity crosslinking of etorphine with opioid binding sites in the bovine adrenal medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Cantau, P.; Bourhim, N.; Giraud, P.; Oliver, C.; Castanas, E.

    1987-04-01

    The covalent crosslinking of (/sup 3/H)etorphine with opioid binding sites in the bovine adrenal medulla is reported. Of all the radiolabeled opiates tested (ethylketocyclazocine, etorphine, (D-Ala2, D-Leu5)enkephalin, (D-Ala2, Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol)enkephalin only etorphine could be crosslinked under uv irradiation. In our conditions (black uv lamp, 160 W, peak mean 360 nm, from a distance of 10 cm) maximum covalent binding was observed after a 10-min irradiation. Protein concentration was a crucial factor for the irreversible/total binding ratio. A good ratio (50%) was obtained at protein concentrations of about 1.0 mg/ml. Covalent binding of nonmodified opiates could be of interest for the biochemical characterization of their binding sites.

  8. Dual function of a nuclear factor I binding site in MMTV transcription regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Buetti, E; Kühnel, B; Diggelmann, H

    1989-01-01

    Using linker-scanning mutagenesis we had previously identified four elements within the MMTV LTR which are necessary for transcriptional stimulation by glucocorticoid hormones. Two of them overlapped with regions to which the glucocorticoid receptor binds in vitro. The third element contained a NF-I binding site, and the fourth the TATA box. Here we show that mutations that abolish in vitro binding of NF-I had a negative effect also on the basal activity of the MMTV promoter of LTR-containing plasmids stably integrated in Ltk- fibroblasts. The analysis of double mutants altered in the NF-I plus either one of the receptor binding elements further demonstrated that the NF-I site functionally cooperated with the proximal (-120) element, which alone was extremely inefficient in stimulation. The stronger distal (-181/-172) element was independent of NF-I and showed functional cooperativity with the proximal hormone-binding element. Images PMID:2542892

  9. High and low affinity binding sites for endothelin on cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Badr, K F; Munger, K A; Sugiura, M; Snajdar, R M; Schwartzberg, M; Inagami, T

    1989-06-15

    Endothelin contracts glomerular mesangial cells, thereby influencing glomerular size and filtration rate. Here, we demonstrate the presence of two ET-specific binding sites on cultured rat mesangial cells with Kds of 0.76 and 44.70 nM, and maximal binding capacity (Bmax) values of 6.78 x 10(2) and 27.60 x 10(2) binding sites/cell, respectively. Binding of [125I]-ET was maximal at 120 min at 4 degrees C, stable for the subsequent 60 min, and selective. No competition for binding was observed with greater than 1000-fold concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide, angiotensin II, arginine vasopressin, nicardipine, or nifedipine. The presence of specific receptors for ET on glomerular mesangial cells suggests a major role for this peptide in the regulation of glomerular filtration rate.

  10. An Improved Method for Identifying Specific DNA-Protein-Binding Sites In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liangyan; Lu, Huizhi; Wang, Yunguang; Yang, Su; Xu, Hong; Cheng, Kaiying; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2017-03-01

    Binding of proteins to specific DNA sequences is essential for a variety of cellular processes such as DNA replication, transcription and responses to external stimuli. Chromatin immunoprecipitation is widely used for determining intracellular DNA fragments bound by a specific protein. However, the subsequent specific or accurate DNA-protein-binding sequence is usually determined by DNA footprinting. Here, we report an alternative method for identifying specific sites of DNA-protein-binding (designated SSDP) in vitro. This technique is mainly dependent on antibody-antigen immunity, simple and convenient, while radioactive isotope labeling and optimization of partial degradation by deoxyribonuclease (DNase) are avoided. As an example, the specific binding sequence of a target promoter by DdrO (a DNA damage response protein from Deinococcus radiodurans) in vitro was determined by the developed method. The central sequence of the binding site could be easily located using this technique.

  11. On the Role of Additional [4Fe-4S] Clusters with a Free Coordination Site in Radical-SAM Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mulliez, Etienne; Duarte, Victor; Arragain, Simon; Fontecave, Marc; Atta, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The canonical CysXXXCysXXCys motif is the hallmark of the Radical-SAM superfamily. This motif is responsible for the ligation of a [4Fe-4S] cluster containing a free coordination site available for SAM binding. The five enzymes MoaA, TYW1, MiaB, RimO and LipA contain in addition a second [4Fe-4S] cluster itself bound to three other cysteines and thus also displaying a potentially free coordination site. This review article summarizes recent important achievements obtained on these five enzymes with the main focus to delineate the role of this additional [4Fe-4S] cluster in catalysis. PMID:28361051

  12. The effect of saturation of ACE binding sites on the pharmacokinetics of enalaprilat in man.

    PubMed Central

    Wade, J R; Meredith, P A; Hughes, D M; Elliott, H L

    1992-01-01

    1. Eight healthy male volunteers received oral enalapril, 10 mg, in the presence and absence of pretreatment with captopril, 50 mg, twice daily for 5 days. 2. Enalaprilat pharmacokinetics were characterised after both doses of enalapril to investigate the effect of saturating ACE binding sites by pretreatment with captopril. 3. The pharmacokinetics of enalaprilat were best described by a one compartment model with zero order input incorporating saturable binding to plasma and tissue ACE. 4. Values of AUC (0.72 h) for enalaprilat were 419 +/- 97 and 450 +/- 87 ng ml-1 h in the presence and absence of captopril, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant nor were there any other differences in model parameters. 5. Induction of ACE by captopril resulting in an increase in the number of ACE binding sites, may have obscured any effect of captopril on the occupancy of ACE binding sites by enalapril. PMID:1312853

  13. Endometrial oxytocin binding sites in normal women and in subfertile patients.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, P. N.; Peat, M. L.; Symonds, E. M.; Maynard, P. V.

    1990-01-01

    Specific binding of oxytocin to high affinity sites in endometrial membrane preparations has previously been shown in sheep. Endometrial tissue preparations from 27 'normal' women of proven fertility were incubated with tritiated oxytocin and the existence of significant binding sites in human endometrium was shown. Furthermore, the level of binding sites underwent a cyclical variation with the highest concentration of binding at midcycle. A cyclical pattern of binding site concentration not unlike that found in the normal women was shown in 19 subfertile patients taking clomiphene. However, in 20 subfertile patients not taking clomiphene, no cyclical pattern emerged with significantly lower levels of binding sites in the mid-portion of the cycle (P less than 0.02) and significantly higher levels in the mid-late luteal phase (P less than 0.01), as compared to the normal women. In the mid-portion of the cycle levels were significantly lower in the subfertile patients not taking clomiphene (P less than 0.03) as compared to those taking clomiphene. No significant differences were shown between the normal women and those patients taking clomiphene. PMID:2362885

  14. Oligomycin frames a common drug-binding site in the ATP synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Symersky, Jindrich; Osowski, Daniel; Walters, D. Eric; Mueller, David M.

    2015-12-01

    We report the high-resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) crystal structure of oligomycin bound to the subunit c10 ring of the yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase. Oligomycin binds to the surface of the c10 ring making contact with two neighboring molecules at a position that explains the inhibitory effect on ATP synthesis. The carboxyl side chain of Glu59, which is essential for proton translocation, forms an H-bond with oligomycin via a bridging water molecule but is otherwise shielded from the aqueous environment. The remaining contacts between oligomycin and subunit c are primarily hydrophobic. The amino acid residues that form the oligomycin-binding site are 100% conserved between human and yeast but are widely different from those in bacterial homologs, thus explaining the differential sensitivity to oligomycin. Prior genetics studies suggest that the oligomycin-binding site overlaps with the binding site of other antibiotics, including those effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and thereby frames a common 'drug-binding site.' We anticipate that this drug-binding site will serve as an effective target for new antibiotics developed by rational design.

  15. Agonist and antagonist protect sulfhydrals in the binding site of the D-1 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.; Kebabian, J.W.; Fishman, P.H.

    1986-05-01

    An iodinated compound (/sup 125/I)-SCH 23982 (8-iodo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine-7-ol) has been characterized as a specific, high affinity (Kd = 0.7 nM) ligand for the D-1 dopamine receptor. The ligand binding site of the D-1 receptor in rat striatum was inactivated by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) in a time and concentration dependent manner. The inactivation was rapid and irreversible with a 70% net loss of binding sites. Scatchard analysis of binding to NEM-treated tissue showed a decrease both in receptor number and in radioligand affinity. The remaining receptors retained their selectivity for stereoisomers of both agonist and antagonist. Receptor occupancy by either a D-1 specific agonist or antagonist protected in a dose dependent manner the binding sites from inactivation by NEM; the agonist was more effective than the antagonist. The agonist high affinity site, however, was abolished in the absence or presence of protective compound, presumably because of inactivation of the GTP-binding component of adenylate cyclase. In this regard, there was a total loss of agonist- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity after NEM treatment. The authors conclude that the D-1 dopamine receptor contains NEM-sensitive sulfhydral group(s) at or near the vicinity of the ligand binding site.

  16. Amyloid tracers detect multiple binding sites in Alzheimer's disease brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ruiqing; Gillberg, Per-Göran; Bergfors, Assar; Marutle, Amelia; Nordberg, Agneta

    2013-07-01

    Imaging fibrillar amyloid-β deposition in the human brain in vivo by positron emission tomography has improved our understanding of the time course of amyloid-β pathology in Alzheimer's disease. The most widely used amyloid-β imaging tracer so far is (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B, a thioflavin derivative but other (11)C- and (18)F-labelled amyloid-β tracers have been studied in patients with Alzheimer's disease and cognitively normal control subjects. However, it has not yet been established whether different amyloid tracers bind to identical sites on amyloid-β fibrils, offering the same ability to detect the regional amyloid-β burden in the brains. In this study, we characterized (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B binding in autopsied brain regions from 23 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 20 control subjects (aged 50 to 88 years). The binding properties of the amyloid tracers FDDNP, AV-45, AV-1 and BF-227 were also compared with those of (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B in the frontal cortices of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Saturation binding studies revealed the presence of high- and low-affinity (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B binding sites in the frontal cortex (K(d1): 3.5 ± 1.6 nM; K(d2): 133 ± 30 nM) and hippocampus (K(d1):5.6 ± 2.2 nM; K(d2): 181 ± 132 nM) of Alzheimer's disease brains. The relative proportion of high-affinity to low-affinity sites was 6:1 in the frontal cortex and 3:1 in the hippocampus. One control showed both high- and low-affinity (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B binding sites (K(d1): 1.6 nM; K(d2): 330 nM) in the cortex while the others only had a low-affinity site (K(d2): 191 ± 70 nM). (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B binding in Alzheimer's disease brains was higher in the frontal and parietal cortices than in the caudate nucleus and hippocampus, and negligible in the cerebellum. Competitive binding studies with (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B in the frontal cortices of Alzheimer's disease brains revealed high- and low-affinity binding sites for BTA

  17. Difference in redox behaviors between copper-binding octarepeat and nonoctarepeat sites in prion protein.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Norifumi; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2009-11-01

    We studied the redox behavior of copper-binding sites in prion protein (PrP) to clarify copper's role in the pathological mechanism underlying prion diseases. We investigated the coordination structures, binding affinities, and redox potentials of copper-binding peptide fragments derived from the N-terminal domain of PrP by density functional theory calculations. We used four models for copper-binding moieties in PrP(60-96): two were derived from the PHGGGWGQ octapeptide repeat region of PrP(60-91), and the others were tripeptide Gly-Thr-His fragments derived from the copper-binding nonoctarepeat site around His96. We found that such PrP-derived copper-binding complexes exhibit conformationally dependent redox behavior; for example, the copper-binding complex derived from the octarepeat region tends to possess high reduction potential for the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple, exceeding 0 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode, whereas the copper-binding nonoctarepeat model around His96 tends to possess high oxidation potential for the Cu(II)/Cu(III) couple and stabilize the higher-valent Cu(III) state. It is possible that such distinct redox activities of a copper-binding PrP are involved in the mechanism underlying prion diseases.

  18. Heterogeneity of Opioid Binding Sites in Guinea Pig Spinal Cord

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-30

    for the existence of k, and k j subtypes has been presented ( Attali et al., 1982; Pfeiffer et al., 1981). Attali and co-workers (1982) utilized...DADLE. The most potent ligand for the k j sites described by Attali and co-workers was 0-enctorphin while benzomorphan drugs hal a high affinity at...of temperatures from 40Cto37*C(Kellyetal, 1980;Czlonkowski e t a l , 1983; Ma:keta l , 1984; Attali e t a l , 1982; Qouarcteresetal, 1982). Opioid

  19. A Common Anesthetic Binding Site for Inhibition of Pentameric Ligand-gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kinde, Monica N.; Bu, Weiming; Chen, Qiang; Xu, Yan; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Tang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying functionally relevant anesthetic binding sites in pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) is an important step toward understanding molecular mechanisms underlying anesthetic action. The anesthetic propofol is known to inhibit cation-conducting pLGICs, including a prokaryotic pLGIC ELIC, but the sites responsible for functional inhibition remain undetermined. Methods We photolabeled ELIC with a light-activated derivative of propofol (AziPm) and performed 19F NMR to support propofol binding to a transmembrane domain (TMD) intra-subunit pocket. To differentiate sites responsible for propofol inhibition from those that are functionally irrelevant, we made an ELIC-GABAAR chimera that replaced the ELIC TMD with the α1β3GABAAR TMD and compared functional responses of ELIC-GABAAR and ELIC to propofol modulations. Results Photolabeling showed multiple AziPm-binding sites in the extracellular domain (ECD), but only one site in the TMD with labeled residues M265 and F308 in the resting state of ELIC. Notably, this TMD site is an intra-subunit pocket that overlaps with binding sites for anesthetics, including propofol, found previously in other pLGICs. 19F NMR supported propofol binding to this TMD intra-subunit pocket only in the absence of agonist. Functional measurements of ELIC-GABAAR showed propofol potentiation of the agonist-elicited current instead of inhibition observed on ELIC. Conclusions The distinctly different responses of ELIC and ELIC-GABAAR to propofol support the functional relevance of propofol binding to the TMD. Combining the newly identified TMD intra-subunit pocket in ELIC with equivalent TMD anesthetic sites found previously in other cationic pLGICs, we propose this TMD pocket as a common site for anesthetic inhibition of pLGICs. PMID:26756520

  20. Identification of candidate transcription factor binding sites in the cattle genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A resource that provides candidate transcription factor binding sites does not currently exist for cattle. Such data is necessary, as predicted sites may serve as excellent starting locations for future 'omics studies to develop transcriptional regulation hypotheses. In order to generate this resour...

  1. Mutational Analysis of the High-Affinity Zinc Binding Site Validates a Refined Human Dopamine Transporter Homology Model

    PubMed Central

    Stockner, Thomas; Montgomery, Therese R.; Kudlacek, Oliver; Weissensteiner, Rene; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H.

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT) is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i) when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii) LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22%) and (iii) the extracellular loop 2 (EL2) of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter‚s movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle. PMID:23436987

  2. Mutational analysis of the high-affinity zinc binding site validates a refined human dopamine transporter homology model.

    PubMed

    Stockner, Thomas; Montgomery, Therese R; Kudlacek, Oliver; Weissensteiner, Rene; Ecker, Gerhard F; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT) is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i) when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii) LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22%) and (iii) the extracellular loop 2 (EL2) of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter's movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle.

  3. FAD binding, cobinamide binding and active site communication in the corrin reductase (CobR)

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew D.; Taylor, Samantha L.; Scott, Alan; Rowe, Michelle L.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Howard, Mark J.; Warren, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosylcobalamin, the coenzyme form of vitamin B12, is one Nature's most complex coenzyme whose de novo biogenesis proceeds along either an anaerobic or aerobic metabolic pathway. The aerobic synthesis involves reduction of the centrally chelated cobalt metal ion of the corrin ring from Co(II) to Co(I) before adenosylation can take place. A corrin reductase (CobR) enzyme has been identified as the likely agent to catalyse this reduction of the metal ion. Herein, we reveal how Brucella melitensis CobR binds its coenzyme FAD (flavin dinucleotide) and we also show that the enzyme can bind a corrin substrate consistent with its role in reduction of the cobalt of the corrin ring. Stopped-flow kinetics and EPR reveal a mechanistic asymmetry in CobR dimer that provides a potential link between the two electron reduction by NADH to the single electron reduction of Co(II) to Co(I). PMID:24909839

  4. Guanyl nucleotide interactions with dopaminergic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol in human caudate and putamen: guanyl nucleotides enhance ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation and cause an apparent loss of high affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Andorn, A.C.; Bacon, B.R.; Nguyen-Hunh, A.T.; Parlato, S.J.; Stitts, J.A.

    1988-02-01

    The human caudate and putamen contain two high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Both of these affinity states exhibit dopaminergic selectivity. Ascorbic acid, at 0.1 mM, induces a slow loss of the low affinity component of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding in these tissues. The addition of guanyl nucleotides to the ascorbate produces a more rapid loss of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding which includes a loss of the highest affinity state for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Ascorbate induces lipid peroxidation in human caudate and putamen, an effect that is further enhanced by guanyl and inosine nucleotides. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides have no effect on (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding but do decrease the affinity of dopamine at each affinity state greater than 60-fold. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides apparently decrease agonist affinity at human brain dopamine2-binding sites without causing an interconversion of agonist affinity states.

  5. Autoradiographic localization of (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in the rat adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, D.P.; Maciejewski, A.R.; Printz, M.P.

    1985-03-01

    To gain greater insight into sites of action of circulating angiotensin II (Ang II) within the adrenal, we have localized the (/sup 125/I)-Ang II binding site using in vitro autoradiography. Autoradiograms were generated either by apposition of isotope-sensitive film or with emulsion-coated coverslips to slide-mounted adrenal sections labeled in vitro with 1.0 nM (/sup 125/I)-Ang II. Analysis of the autoradiograms showed that Ang II binding sites were concentrated in a thin band in the outer cortex (over the cells of the zona glomerulosa) and in the adrenal medulla, which at higher power was seen as dense patches. Few sites were evident in the inner cortex. The existence of Ang II binding sites in the adrenal medulla was confirmed by conventional homogenate binding techniques which revealed a single class of high affinity Ang II binding site (K/sub d/ . 0.7nM, B/sub max/ . 168.7 fmol/mg). These results suggest that the adrenal medulla may be a target for direct receptor-mediated actions of Ang II.

  6. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 2. 15N NMR studies of nucleophilic addition reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pettigrew, P.J.; Goldenberg, W.S.; Weber, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic amines are known to undergo covalent binding with humic substances in the environment. Although previous studies have examined reaction conditions and proposed mechanisms, there has been no direct spectroscopic evidence for the covalent binding of the amines to the functional groups in humic substances. In order to further elucidate the reaction mechanisms, the Suwannee River and IHSS soil fulvic and humic acids were reacted with 15N-labeled aniline at pH 6 and analyzed using 15N NMR spectrometry. Aniline underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with the quinone and other carbonyl groups in the samples and became incorporated in the form of anilinohydroquinone, anilinoquinone, anilide, imine, and heterocyclic nitrogen, the latter comprising 50% or more of the bound amine. The anilide and anilinohydroquinone nitrogens were determined to be susceptible to chemical exchange by ammonia. In the case of Suwannee River fulvic acid, reaction under anoxic conditions and pretreatment with sodium borohydride or hydroxylamine prior to reaction under oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in the proportion of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen incorporated. The relative decrease in the incorporation of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen with respect to anilinoquinone nitrogen under anoxic conditions suggested that inter- or intramolecular redox reactions accompanied the nucleophilic addition reactions.

  7. GATA1 Binding Kinetics on Conformation-Specific Binding Sites Elicit Differential Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Atsushi; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Daishi; Nakamura, Masahiro; Watanabe, Akira; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Trainor, Cecelia D; Shimizu, Ritsuko

    2016-08-15

    GATA1 organizes erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation by orchestrating the expression of multiple genes that show diversified expression profiles. Here, we demonstrate that GATA1 monovalently binds to a single GATA motif (Single-GATA) while a monomeric GATA1 and a homodimeric GATA1 bivalently bind to two GATA motifs in palindromic (Pal-GATA) and direct-repeat (Tandem-GATA) arrangements, respectively, and form higher stoichiometric complexes on respective elements. The amino-terminal zinc (N) finger of GATA1 critically contributes to high occupancy of GATA1 on Pal-GATA. GATA1 lacking the N finger-DNA association fails to trigger a rate of target gene expression comparable to that seen with the wild-type GATA1, especially when expressed at low level. This study revealed that Pal-GATA and Tandem-GATA generate transcriptional responses from GATA1 target genes distinct from the response of Single-GATA. Our results support the notion that the distinct alignments in binding motifs are part of a critical regulatory strategy that diversifies and modulates transcriptional regulation by GATA1.

  8. GATA1 Binding Kinetics on Conformation-Specific Binding Sites Elicit Differential Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Atsushi; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Daishi; Nakamura, Masahiro; Watanabe, Akira; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    GATA1 organizes erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation by orchestrating the expression of multiple genes that show diversified expression profiles. Here, we demonstrate that GATA1 monovalently binds to a single GATA motif (Single-GATA) while a monomeric GATA1 and a homodimeric GATA1 bivalently bind to two GATA motifs in palindromic (Pal-GATA) and direct-repeat (Tandem-GATA) arrangements, respectively, and form higher stoichiometric complexes on respective elements. The amino-terminal zinc (N) finger of GATA1 critically contributes to high occupancy of GATA1 on Pal-GATA. GATA1 lacking the N finger-DNA association fails to trigger a rate of target gene expression comparable to that seen with the wild-type GATA1, especially when expressed at low level. This study revealed that Pal-GATA and Tandem-GATA generate transcriptional responses from GATA1 target genes distinct from the response of Single-GATA. Our results support the notion that the distinct alignments in binding motifs are part of a critical regulatory strategy that diversifies and modulates transcriptional regulation by GATA1. PMID:27215385

  9. Localization of the binding site on IgG for solubilized placental Fc gamma receptor.

    PubMed

    Matre, R; Tönder, O

    1984-01-01

    Placental Fc gamma R (FcR) inhibited the rosette formation between monocytes and rabbit IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA), whereas the rosette formation with granulocytes was not impaired. Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) inhibited the rosette formation with both cell types. Results obtained in absorption and agglutination experiments showed that SpA blocked the binding of FcR to IgG, and Cl did not. Furthermore, FcR did not interfere with the binding of SpA to IgG, whereas C1 affected this binding. FcR apparently bind to the C gamma 3 region. Since FcR inhibited the binding of EA to monocytes, the monocyte FcR binding site is probably also located within the C gamma 3 region.

  10. Characterization of an intracellular hyaluronic acid binding site in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, S.J.; Raja, R.H.; Weigel, P.H. )

    1990-11-13

    125I-HA, prepared by chemical modification at the reducing sugar, specifically binds to rat hepatocytes in suspension or culture. Intact hepatocytes have relatively few surface 125I-HA binding sites and show low specific binding. However, permeabilization of hepatocytes with the nonionic detergent digitonin results in increased specific 125I-HA binding (45-65%) and a very large increase in the number of specific 125I-HA binding sites. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium 125I-HA binding to permeabilized hepatocytes in suspension at 4 degrees C indicates a Kd = 1.8 x 10(-7) M and 1.3 x 10(6) molecules of HA (Mr approximately 30,000) bound per cell at saturation. Hepatocytes in primary culture for 24 h show the same affinity but the total number of HA molecules bound per cell at saturation decreases to approximately 6.2 x 10(5). Increasing the ionic strength above physiologic concentrations decreases 125I-HA binding to permeable cells, whereas decreasing the ionic strength above causes an approximately 4-fold increase. The divalent cation chelator EGTA does not prevent binding nor does it release 125I-HA bound in the presence of 2 mM CaCl2, although higher divalent cation concentrations stimulate 125I-HA binding. Ten millimolar CaCl2 or MnCl2 increases HA binding 3-6-fold compared to EGTA-treated cells. Ten millimolar MgCl2, SrCl2, or BaCl2 increased HA binding by 2-fold. The specific binding of 125I-HA to digitonin-treated hepatocytes at 4{degrees}C increased greater than 10-fold at pH 5.0 as compared to pH 7.

  11. A mutational analysis of the acetylcholine receptor channel transmitter binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Akk, G; Zhou, M; Auerbach, A

    1999-01-01

    Mutagenesis and single-channel kinetic analysis were used to investigate the roles of four acetylcholine receptor channel (AChR) residues that are candidates for interacting directly with the agonist. The EC50 of the ACh dose-response curve was increased following alpha-subunit mutations Y93F and Y198F and epsilon-subunit mutations D175N and E184Q. Single-channel kinetic modeling indicates that the increase was caused mainly by a reduced gating equilibrium constant (Theta) in alphaY198F and epsilonD175N, by an increase in the equilibrium dissociation constant for ACh (KD) and a reduction in Theta in alphaY93F, and only by a reduction in KD in epsilonE184Q. This mutation altered the affinity of only one of the two binding sites and was the only mutation that reduced competition by extracellular K+. Additional mutations of epsilonE184 showed that K+ competition was unaltered in epsilonE184D and was virtually eliminated in epsilonE184K, but that neither of these mutations altered the intrinsic affinity for ACh. Thus there is an apparent electrostatic interaction between the epsilonE184 side chain and K+ ( approximately 1.7kBT), but not ACh+. The results are discussed in terms of multisite and induced-fit models of ligand binding to the AChR. PMID:9876135

  12. Reaction of some macrolide antibiotics with the ribosome. Labeling of the binding site components

    SciTech Connect

    Tejedor, F.; Ballesta, J.P.

    1986-11-18

    Radioactive carbomycin A, niddamycin, tylosin, and spiramycin, but not erythromycin, can be covalently bound to Escherichia coli ribosomes by incubation at 37 degrees C. The incorporation of radioactivity into the particles is inhibited by SH- and activated double bond containing compounds but not by amino groups, suggesting that the reactions may take place by addition to the double bond present in the reactive antibiotics. This thermic reaction must be different from the photoreaction described for some of these macrolides (Tejedor, F., and Ballesta, J. P. G. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 467-472) since tylosin, which is not photoincorporated, is thermically bound to ribosomes. Most of the radioactivity is incorporated into the ribosomal proteins. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins labeled by carbomycin A, niddamycin, and tylosin indicates that about 40% of the radioactivity is bound to protein L27; the rest is distributed among several other proteins such as L8, L2, and S12, to differing extents depending on the drug used. These results indicate, in accordance with previous data, that protein L27 plays an important role in the macrolide binding site, confirming that these drugs bind near the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome.

  13. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  14. Impact of disruption of secondary binding site S2 on dopamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Juan; Reith, Maarten E A

    2016-09-01

    The structures of the leucine transporter, drosophila dopamine transporter, and human serotonin transporter show a secondary binding site (designated S2 ) for drugs and substrate in the extracellular vestibule toward the membrane exterior in relation to the primary substrate recognition site (S1 ). The present experiments are aimed at disrupting S2 by mutating Asp476 and Ile159 to Ala. Both mutants displayed a profound decrease in [(3) H]DA uptake compared with wild-type associated with a reduced turnover rate kcat . This was not caused by a conformational bias as the mutants responded to Zn(2+) (10 μM) similarly as WT. The dopamine transporters with either the D476A or I159A mutation both displayed a higher Ki for dopamine for the inhibition of [3H](-)-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane binding than did the WT transporter, in accordance with an allosteric interaction between the S1 and S2 sites. The results provide evidence in favor of a general applicability of the two-site allosteric model of the Javitch/Weinstein group from LeuT to dopamine transporter and possibly other monoamine transporters. X-ray structures of transporters closely related to the dopamine (DA) transporter show a secondary binding site S2 in the extracellular vestibule proximal to the primary binding site S1 which is closely linked to one of the Na(+) binding sites. This work examines the relationship between S2 and S1 sites. We found that S2 site impairment severely reduced DA transport and allosterically reduced S1 site affinity for the cocaine analog [(3) H]CFT. Our results are the first to lend direct support for the application of the two-site allosteric model, advanced for bacterial LeuT, to the human DA transporter. The model states that, after binding of the first DA molecule (DA1 ) to the primary S1 site (along with Na(+) ), binding of a second DA (DA2 ) to the S2 site triggers, through an allosteric interaction, the release of DA1 and Na(+) into the cytoplasm.

  15. Saturable triiodothyronine-binding sites in the pituitary nuclei of salmonid teleost fish

    SciTech Connect

    Bres, O.; Eales, J.G. )

    1990-01-01

    High-affinity, limited-capacity, 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3)-binding sites were established by in vitro saturation analysis in cell nuclei of the pituitary gland of arctic charr. The sites were extracted from the purified nuclei using 0.4 M NaCl and incubated with ({sup 125}I)T3 in the presence of 0.2 M NaCl. T3 saturable binding attained equilibrium after 18-24 hr of incubation at 4 degrees. The association constant ranged from 6.7 to 20.1 liters.mol-1 x 10(9), indicating a T3 affinity greater than that for T3-binding sites in rainbow trout liver. The maximal binding capacity ranged from 0.93 to 2.05 10(-13) mol.mg DNA-1, representing a mean site abundance corresponding to 60% of that for nuclei from trout liver. Thyroxine (T4) completely displaced ({sup 125}I)T3 in the pituitary nuclei of arctic charr and T3 completely displaced ({sup 125}I)T4 in the pituitary nuclei of rainbow trout, suggesting that in salmonids both T4 and T3 bind to the same single class of sites. However, the site affinity for T4 was approximately 20-50x less than that for T3. The possible roles of these sites in pituitary function as well as their relationship to other nuclear T3-binding sites in salmonid fish are discussed.

  16. Membrane binding sites for plasma lipoproteins on endosomes from rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Jaeckle, S; Brady, S E; Havel, R J

    1989-01-01

    Highly purified endosomal membranes from rat liver, enriched in receptors for a number of macromolecules taken up into hepatocytes via the coated pit/endosome/lysosome pathway [including the receptor for low density lipoproteins (LDL)], were used to characterize binding sites for lipoproteins containing apolipoprotein E. In endosomal membranes from livers of estradiol-treated rats, in which LDL receptors are induced manyfold, two high-affinity binding sites were found for two apolipoprotein E-rich lipoproteins: very low density beta-lipoproteins (beta-VLDL) from cholesterol-fed rabbits and rat chylomicron remnants. One of these sites, binding to which is inhibited by 30 mM EDTA, appears identical to the LDL receptor by ligand and immunoblotting and other characteristics. The other site, highly resistant to EDTA, does not bind LDL. Binding to the EDTA-resistant site, however, is readily inhibited by heparin (as is the LDL receptor) and also by antisera prepared against rat or bovine LDL receptor. The distribution of the EDTA-resistant site among early endosomes, late endosomes, and endosome-derived receptor-recycling membranes is similar to that of the LDL receptor and other recycling receptors. The LDL receptor was present in endosomal membranes from livers of untreated rats at about 10% of the level found in membranes from estradiol-treated rats, but the EDTA-resistant site was barely detectable. No saturable binding of beta-VLDL that could not be inhibited by antisera to the LDL receptor could be detected in endosomal membranes from livers of either untreated or estradiol-treated rats. The EDTA-resistant site may be a modified form of the LDL receptor that recognizes apolipoprotein E but not the B apolipoprotein of LDL. Alternatively, it may be a distinct receptor sharing immunological determinants with the LDL receptor, specialized for the endocytosis of certain lipoproteins containing apolipoprotein E, including chylomicron remnants. Images PMID:2538819

  17. Crystal structure, exogenous ligand binding, and redox properties of an engineered diiron active site in a bacterial hemerythrin.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yasunori; Onoda, Akira; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Takano, Yu; Hirota, Shun; Kurtz, Donald M; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Takashi

    2013-11-18

    A nonheme diiron active site in a 13 kDa hemerythrin-like domain of the bacterial chemotaxis protein DcrH-Hr contains an oxo bridge, two bridging carboxylate groups from Glu and Asp residues, and five terminally ligated His residues. We created a unique diiron coordination sphere containing five His and three Glu/Asp residues by replacing an Ile residue with Glu in DcrH-Hr. Direct coordination of the carboxylate group of E119 to Fe2 of the diiron site in the I119E variant was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The substituted Glu is adjacent to an exogenous ligand-accessible tunnel. UV-vis absorption spectra indicate that the additional coordination of E119 inhibits the binding of the exogenous ligands azide and phenol to the diiron site. The extent of azide binding to the diiron site increases at pH ≤ 6, which is ascribed to protonation of the carboxylate ligand of E119. The diferrous state (deoxy form) of the engineered diiron site with the extra Glu residue is found to react more slowly than wild type with O2 to yield the diferric state (met form). The additional coordination of E119 to the diiron site also slows the rate of reduction from the met form. All these processes were found to be pH-dependent, which can be attributed to protonation state and coordination status of the E119 carboxylate. These results demonstrate that modifications of the endogenous coordination sphere can produce significant changes in the ligand binding and redox properties in a prototypical nonheme diiron-carboxylate protein active site.

  18. Binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 Toxins to the Midgut Brush Border Membrane Vesicles of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): Evidence of Shared Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Fiuza, L.; Nielsen-Leroux, C.; Goze, E.; Frutos, R.; Charles, J.

    1996-01-01

    Binding and competition among Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac, and Cry1Ba toxins were analyzed quantitatively in vitro by using (sup125)I-labeled activated toxins and brush border membrane vesicles isolated from Chilo suppressalis larval midguts. The three toxins bound specifically to the midgut brush border membrane vesicles. Direct binding experiments showed that Cry1Aa and Cry1Ba recognized a single class of binding sites with different affinities, whereas Cry1Aa recognized two classes of binding sites, one with a high affinity and a low concentration and the other with a lower affinity but higher concentration. Competition experiments showed that toxins Cry1Ac and Cry1Ba shared a binding site in the C. suppressalis midgut membranes and that this site was also the low-affinity binding site for Cry1Aa. PMID:16535306

  19. Thermodynamic binding and site occupancy in the light of the Schellman exchange concept.

    PubMed

    Timasheff, Serge N

    2002-12-10

    An analysis of Schellman's treatment of preferential interactions is presented, as viewed by a laboratory practitioner of the art. Starting with an intuitive description of what binding is in terms of the distribution of molecules of water and of a weakly interacting ligand (co-solvent), Schellman proceeded to a rigorous thermodynamic definition in which he showed that classical, dialysis equilibrium, binding is a purely thermodynamic quantity. Putting water and the co-solvent on an equivalent footing, he showed that the classical binding treatment is inadequate for weakly interacting systems, in which the replacement of water by ligand and exclusion of co-solvent are symmetrical concepts. Analyzing specifically the simple model of a single independent site, Schellman demonstrated how a positive binding constant can give rise to a measured negative binding stoichiometry. He showed that the origin of the complicated binding isotherms is the non-idealities of water and co-solvent, and went further to analyze critically the effect of site heterogeneity on the ligand concentration dependencies of site occupancy, preferential binding and the thermodynamic quantities, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy. This exposition of the Schellman treatment is accompanied by illustrations drawn from the experimental results obtained in this author's laboratory.

  20. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  1. Autoradiographic demonstration of oxytocin-binding sites in the macula densa

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckel, M.E.; Freund-Mercier, M.J. )

    1989-08-01

    Specific oxytocin (OT)-binding sites were localized in the rat kidney with use of a selective {sup 125}I-labeled OT antagonist ({sup 125}I-OTA). High concentrations of OT binding sites were detected on the juxtaglomerular apparatus with use of the conventional film autoradiographic technique. No labeling occurred on other renal structures. The cellular localization of the OT binding sites within the juxtaglomerular apparatus was studied in light microscope autoradiography, on semithin sections from paraformaldehyde-fixed kidney slices incubated in the presence of {sup 125}I-OTA. These preparations revealed selective labeling of the macula densa, mainly concentrated at the basal pole of the cells. Control experiments showed first that {sup 125}I-OTA binding characteristics were not noticeably altered by prior paraformaldehyde fixation of the kidneys and second that autoradiographic detection of the binding sites was not impaired by histological treatments following binding procedures. In view of the role of the macula densa in the tubuloglomerular feedback, the putative OT receptors of this structure might mediate the stimulatory effect of OT on glomerular filtration.

  2. Prediction of protein-glucose binding sites using support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Nassif, Houssam; Al-Ali, Hassan; Khuri, Sawsan; Keirouz, Walid

    2009-10-01

    Glucose is a simple sugar that plays an essential role in many basic metabolic and signaling pathways. Many proteins have binding sites that are highly specific to glucose. The exponential increase of genomic data has revealed the identity of many proteins that seem to be central to biological processes, but whose exact functions are unknown. Many of these proteins seem to be associated with disease processes. Being able to predict glucose-specific binding sites in these proteins will greatly enhance our ability to annotate protein function and may significantly contribute to drug design. We hereby present the first glucose-binding site classifier algorithm. We consider the sugar-binding pocket as a spherical spatio-chemical environment and represent it as a vector of geometric and chemical features. We then perform Random Forests feature selection to identify key features and analyze them using support vector machines classification. Our work shows that glucose binding sites can be modeled effectively using a limited number of basic chemical and residue features. Using a leave-one-out cross-validation method, our classifier achieves a 8.11% error, a 89.66% sensitivity and a 93.33% specificity over our dataset. From a biochemical perspective, our results support the relevance of ordered water molecules and ions in determining glucose specificity. They also reveal the importance of carboxylate residues in glucose binding and the high concentration of negatively charged atoms in direct contact with the bound glucose molecule.

  3. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  4. Structure and binding efficiency relations of QB site inhibitors of photosynthetic reaction centres.

    PubMed

    Husu, Ivan; Magyar, Melinda; Szabó, Tibor; Fiser, Béla; Gómez-Bengoa, Enrique; Nagy, László

    2015-04-01

    Many herbicides employed in agriculture and also some antibiotics bind to a specific site of the reaction centre protein (RC) blocking the photosynthetic electron transport. Crystal structures showed that all these compounds bind at the secondary ubiquinone (QB) site albeit to slightly different places. Different herbicide molecules have different binding affinities (evaluated as inhibition constants, KI, and binding enthalpy values, ΔHbind). The action of inhibitors depends on the following parameters: (i) herbicide molecular structure; (ii) interactions between herbicide and quinone binding site; (iii) protein environment. In our investigations KI and ΔHbind were determined for several inhibitors. Bound herbicide structures were optimized and their intramolecular charge distributions were calculated. Experimental and calculated data were compared to those available from databank crystal structures. We can state that the herbicide inhibition efficiency depends on steric and electronic, i.e. geometry of binding with the protein and molecular charge distribution, respectively. Apolar bulky groups on N-7 atom of the inhibitor molecule (like t-buthyl in terbutryn) are preferable for establishing stronger interactions with QB site, while such substituents are not recommended on N-8. The N-4,7,8 nitrogen atoms maintain a larger electron density so that more effective H-bonds are formed between the inhibitor and the surrounding amino acids of the protein.

  5. Characterization of the dopamine transporter gene expression and binding sites in cultured human amniotic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elwan, Mohamed A; Ishii, Takashi; Sakuragawa, Norio

    2003-05-15

    In this study we sought to investigate whether the dopamine transporter, DAT, and its binding sites are expressed in the human amniotic epithelial cells (HAEC) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and radioligand binding studies, respectively. The RT-PCR findings showed that HAEC expressed DAT mRNA with 100% homology to the human brain DAT. Saturation binding studies using [3H]mazindol showed a high affinity DAT binding site with K(D) and B(max) values of 12.32+/-1.67 nM and 82.7+/-9.74 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Competition experiments showed that selective DAT blockers are potent displacers of [3H]mazindol binding. The rank order of potency of the competing drugs is consistent with the pharmacology of the DAT. The present results provide compelling evidence that HAEC natively express the DAT mRNA and binding sites. More importantly, these results may suggest that HAEC is an appropriate human cell model for studying dopamine release and uptake processes and potential ligands at these sites.

  6. Characterization of a second ligand binding site of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Caili; Whittaker, Linda; Whittaker, Jonathan . E-mail: jonathan.whittaker@case.edu

    2006-08-18

    Insulin binding to its receptor is characterized by high affinity, curvilinear Scatchard plots, and negative cooperativity. These properties may be the consequence of binding of insulin to two receptor binding sites. The N-terminal L1 domain and the C-terminus of the {alpha} subunit contain one binding site. To locate a second site, we examined the binding properties of chimeric receptors in which the L1 and L2 domains and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor were replaced by corresponding regions of the insulin receptor. Substitutions of the L2 domain and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat together with the L1 domain produced 80- and 300-fold increases in affinity for insulin. Fusion of these domains to human immunoglobulin Fc fragment produced a protein which bound insulin with a K {sub d} of 2.9 nM. These data strongly suggest that these domains contain an insulin binding site.

  7. Cloning and characterisation of a nuclear, site specific ssDNA binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Smidt, M P; Russchen, B; Snippe, L; Wijnholds, J; Ab, G

    1995-01-01

    Estradiol inducible, liver-specific expression of the apoVLDL II gene is mediated through the estrogen receptor and a variety of other DNA-binding proteins. In the present study we report the cloning and characterisation of a single-strand DNA binding protein that interacts with the lower strand of a complex regulatory site, which includes the major estrogen responsive element and a site that resembles the rat albumin site D (apoVLDL II site D). Based on its binding specificity determined with electro-mobility shift assays, the protein is named single-strand D-box binding factor (ssDBF). Analysis of the deduced 302 amino acid sequence revealed that the protein belongs to the heteronuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B family (hnRNP A/B) and resembles other known eukaryotic single-strand DNA binding proteins. Transient transfection experiments in a chicken liver cell-line showed that the protein represses estrogen-induced transcription. A protein with similar binding characteristics is present in liver nuclear extract. The relevance of the occurrence of this protein to the expression of the apoVLDL II gene is discussed. Images PMID:7630716

  8. Identification of the NAD(P)H binding site of eukaryotic UDP-galactopyranose mutase.

    PubMed

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Solano, Luis M; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Robinson, Reeder M; Ellerbrock, Jacob F; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J

    2012-10-31

    UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) plays an essential role in galactofuranose biosynthesis in microorganisms by catalyzing the conversion of UDP-galactopyranose to UDP-galactofuranose. The enzyme has gained attention recently as a promising target for the design of new antifungal, antitrypanosomal, and antileishmanial agents. Here we report the first crystal structure of UGM complexed with its redox partner NAD(P)H. Kinetic protein crystallography was used to obtain structures of oxidized Aspergillus fumigatus UGM (AfUGM) complexed with NADPH and NADH, as well as reduced AfUGM after dissociation of NADP(+). NAD(P)H binds with the nicotinamide near the FAD isoalloxazine and the ADP moiety extending toward the mobile 200s active site flap. The nicotinamide riboside binding site overlaps that of the substrate galactopyranose moiety, and thus NADPH and substrate binding are mutually exclusive. On the other hand, the pockets for the adenine of NADPH and uracil of the substrate are distinct and separated by only 6 Å, which raises the possibility of designing novel inhibitors that bind both sites. All 12 residues that contact NADP(H) are conserved among eukaryotic UGMs. Residues that form the AMP pocket are absent in bacterial UGMs, which suggests that eukaryotic and bacterial UGMs have different NADP(H) binding sites. The structures address the longstanding question of how UGM binds NAD(P)H and provide new opportunities for drug discovery.

  9. Interaction of SR 33557 with skeletal muscle calcium channel blocker receptors in the baboon: characterization of its binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sol-Rolland, J.; Joseph, M.; Rinaldi-Carmona, M. )

    1991-05-01

    A procedure for the isolation of primate skeletal microsomal membranes was initiated. Membranes exhibited specific enzymatic markers such as 5'-nucleotidase, Ca{sup 2}{sup +},Mg({sup 2}{sup +})-adenosine triphosphatase and an ATP-dependent calcium uptake. Baboon skeletal microsomes bound specifically with high-affinity potent Ca{sup 2}{sup +} channel blockers such as dihydropyridine, phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine derivatives. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding assays with ({sup 3}H)(+)-PN 200-110, ({sup 3}H)(-)-desmethoxyverapamil (( {sup 3}H)(-)-D888) and ({sup 3}H)-d-cis-dilitiazem were consistent with a single class of binding sites for the three radioligands. The pharmacological profile of SR 33557, an original compound with calcium antagonist properties, was investigated using radioligand binding studies. SR 33557 totally inhibited the specific binding of the three main classes of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} channel effectors and interacted allosterically with them. In addition, SR 33557 bound with high affinity to a homogeneous population of binding sites in baboon skeletal muscle.

  10. Molecularly imprinted protein recognition cavities bearing exchangeable binding sites for postimprinting site-directed introduction of reporter molecules for readout of binding events.

    PubMed

    Sunayama, Hirobumi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-11-26

    Protein-imprinted cavities bearing exchangeable domains to be used for postimprinting fluorophore introduction to transform binding events into fluorescence changes were constructed in molecularly imprinted polymer (MIPs) matrixes prepared on glass substrates. Copolymerization was performed with acrylamide, N,N'-methylenebisaclylamide, and a newly designed functional group-exchangeable monomer, ({[2-(2-methacrylamido)ethyldithio]ethylcarbamoyl}methoxy)acetic acid (MDTA), in the presence of a model basic protein, lysozyme (Lyso); MDTA can interact with Lyso and assemble close to Lyso in the resulting polymer. After removal of Lyso, followed by a disulfide reduction to cleave the (ethylcarbamoylmethoxy)acetic acid moiety from the MDTA residues, the exposed thiol groups within the imprinted cavities were modified by aminoethylpyridyldisulfide to be transformed into aminoethyl groups that function as active sites for amine-reactive fluorophores. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was then coupled with the aminoethyl groups, yielding site specifically FITC-modified signaling imprinted cavities for Lyso binding. Because the in-cavity fluorescent labeling was achieved via a disulfide linkage, it was easy to remove, exchange, and/or replace amine-reactive fluorophores. This facilitated the screening of fluorophore