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  1. EFFECT OF NITROGEN AND METAL ADDITIONS ON NITROGEN FIXATION ACTIVITY IN BIOLOGICAL SOIL CRUSTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Lui, D.; Anbar, A. D.; Garcia-Pichel, F.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are diverse consortia of microorganisms that live in intimate association with soils in arid environments. Also called cryptogamic or microbiotic crusts, these communities can include cyanobacteria, algae, heterotrophic bacteria, fungi, lichens, and mosses. Together, these organisms provide many services to their surrounding ecosystems, including reduction of water runoff, promotion of water infiltration, and prevention of soil erosion. The cyanobacteria and algae also provide fixed carbon (C) to the soil through photosynthesis, and because atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) in arid environments is low, the major input of biologically available N comes from cyanobacteria capable of converting nitrogen gas (N2) to ammonium (NH4+). Biological soil crusts are easily destroyed by livestock grazing, motor vehicle travel, and many forms of recreational and agricultural land use. Loss of BSC cover can leave the soil vulnerable to intense erosion that can remove the nutrients necessary to sustain plant and animal life, thus accelerating the process of desertification. In order to preserve existing crusts and encourage the development of new crusts, it is crucial to understand the nutrient requirements of metabolism and growth in these microbial communities. This study investigated the affect of nitrogen and metal additions on N2-fixation activity in cyanobacterially-dominated crusts from the Colorado Plateau near Moab, Utah. Although N2-fixation has been studied in this system before, the affect of nutrient additions on N2-fixation activity has not been documented. The goal of this work was to understand how N and metal supplementation affects crust N metabolism. Three experiments were conducted to observe how N2-fixation activity changed with the addition of N, molybdenum (Mo), and vanadium (V). Molybdenum and vanadium were chosen because they are most commonly found at the active site of the enzyme nitrogenase, the molecule responsible

  2. Fates of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in aerobic biological treatment processes: the effects of aeration and sludge addition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Yang, Wen-Ben; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Yang, Jun-Chen; Zhao, Qing-Liang

    2014-05-01

    The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is becoming an environmental issue of increasing concern. As biological treatment has been considered as one important approach for VOC removal, lab-scale batch experiments were conducted in this study to investigate the fates of four chlorinated hydrocarbons, including chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC), in the biological treatment processes with respect to the effects of aeration and sludge addition. The VOC concentrations in the phases of air, water, and sludge under four simulated treatment stages (the first sedimentation, the forepart and rear part of aerobic biological treatment, and the second sedimentation) were analyzed. The results were used to understand the three-phase partitioning of these compounds and to estimate their potentials for volatilization and biological sorption and degradation in these technologies with the concept of fugacity. It was observed that the VOCs were mainly present in the water phase through the experiments. The effects of aeration or sludge addition on the fates of these VOCs occurred but appeared to be relatively limited. The concentration distributions of the VOCs were well below the reported partitioning coefficients. It was suggested that these compounds were unsaturated in the air and sludge phases, enhancing their potentials for volatilization and biological sorption/degradation through the processes. However, the properties of these chlorinated VOCs such as the volatility, polarity, or even biodegradability caused by their structural characteristics (e.g., the number of chlorine, saturated or unsaturated) may represent more significant factors for their fates in the aerobic biological treatment processes. These findings prove the complication behind the current knowledge of VOC pollutions in WWTPs and are of help to manage the adverse impacts on the environment and public

  3. Biological effect of food additive titanium dioxide nanoparticles on intestine: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Song, Zheng-Mei; Chen, Ni; Liu, Jia-Hui; Tang, Huan; Deng, Xiaoyong; Xi, Wen-Song; Han, Kai; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang; Wang, Haifang

    2015-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely found in food-related consumer products. Understanding the effect of TiO2 NPs on the intestinal barrier and absorption is essential and vital for the safety assessment of orally administrated TiO2 NPs. In this study, the cytotoxicity and translocation of two native TiO2 NPs, and these two TiO2 NPs pretreated with the digestion simulation fluid or bovine serum albumin were investigated in undifferentiated Caco-2 cells, differentiated Caco-2 cells and Caco-2 monolayer. TiO2 NPs with a concentration less than 200 µg ml(-1) did not induce any toxicity in differentiated cells and Caco-2 monolayer after 24 h exposure. However, TiO2 NPs pretreated with digestion simulation fluids at 200 µg ml(-1) inhibited the growth of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Undifferentiated Caco-2 cells swallowed native TiO2 NPs easily, but not pretreated NPs, implying the protein coating on NPs impeded the cellular uptake. Compared with undifferentiated cells, differentiated ones possessed much lower uptake ability of these TiO2 NPs. Similarly, the traverse of TiO2 NPs through the Caco-2 monolayer was also negligible. Therefore, we infer the possibility of TiO2 NPs traversing through the intestine of animal or human after oral intake is quite low. This study provides valuable information for the risk assessment of TiO2 NPs in food.

  4. Sonochemical degradation of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine: Effect of parameters, organic and inorganic additives and combination with a biological system.

    PubMed

    Serna-Galvis, Efraím A; Silva-Agredo, Javier; Giraldo-Aguirre, Ana L; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2015-08-15

    Fluoxetine (FLX), one of the most widely used antidepressants in the world, is an emergent pollutant found in natural waters that causes disrupting effects on the endocrine systems of some aquatic species. This work explores the total elimination of FLX by sonochemical treatment coupled to a biological system. The biological process acting alone was shown to be unable to remove the pollutant, even under favourable conditions of pH and temperature. However, sonochemical treatment (600 kHz) was shown to be able to remove the pharmaceutical. Several parameters were evaluated for the ultrasound application: the applied power (20-60 W), dissolved gas (air, Ar and He), pH (3-11) and initial concentration of fluoxetine (2.9-162.0 μmol L(-1)). Additionally, the presence of organic (1-hexanol and 2-propanol) and inorganic (Fe(2+)) compounds in the water matrix and the degradation of FLX in a natural mineral water were evaluated. The sonochemical treatment readily eliminates FLX following a kinetic Langmuir. After 360 min of ultrasonic irradiation, 15% mineralization was achieved. Analysis of the biodegradability provided evidence that the sonochemical process transforms the pollutant into biodegradable substances, which can then be mineralized in a subsequent biological treatment.

  5. The biological effects of subacute inhalation of diesel exhaust following addition of cerium oxide nanoparticles in atherosclerosis-prone mice☆

    PubMed Central

    Cassee, Flemming R.; Campbell, Arezoo; Boere, A. John F.; McLean, Steven G.; Duffin, Rodger; Krystek, Petra; Gosens, Ilse; Miller, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles improve the burning efficiency of fuel, however, little is known about health impacts of altered emissions from the vehicles. Methods Atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE−/−) mice were exposed by inhalation to diluted exhaust (1.7 mg/m3, 20, 60 or 180 min, 5 day/week, for 4 weeks), from an engine using standard diesel fuel (DE) or the same diesel fuel containing 9 ppm cerium oxide nanoparticles (DCeE). Changes in hematological indices, clinical chemistry, atherosclerotic burden, tissue levels of inflammatory cytokines and pathology of the major organs were assessed. Results Addition of CeO2 to fuel resulted in a reduction of the number (30%) and surface area (10%) of the particles in the exhaust, whereas the gaseous co-pollutants were increased (6–8%). There was, however, a trend towards an increased size and complexity of the atherosclerotic plaques following DE exposure, which was not evident in the DCeE group. There were no clear signs of altered hematological or pathological changes induced by either treatment. However, levels of proinflammatory cytokines were modulated in a brain region and liver following DCeE exposure. Conclusions These results imply that addition of CeO2 nanoparticles to fuel decreases the number of particles in exhaust and may reduce atherosclerotic burden associated with exposure to standard diesel fuel. From the extensive assessment of biological parameters performed, the only concerning effect of cerium addition was a slightly raised level of cytokines in a region of the central nervous system. Overall, the use of cerium as a fuel additive may be a potentially useful way to limit the health effects of vehicle exhaust. However, further testing is required to ensure that such an approach is not associated with a chronic inflammatory response which may eventually cause long-term health effects. PMID:22507957

  6. The biological effects of subacute inhalation of diesel exhaust following addition of cerium oxide nanoparticles in atherosclerosis-prone mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cassee, Flemming R.; Campbell, Arezoo; Boere, A. John F.; McLean, Steven G.; Krystek, Petra; Gosens, Ilse; Miller, Mark R.

    2012-05-15

    Background: Cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles improve the burning efficiency of fuel, however, little is known about health impacts of altered emissions from the vehicles. Methods: Atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE{sup -/-}) mice were exposed by inhalation to diluted exhaust (1.7 mg/m{sup 3}, 20, 60 or 180 min, 5 day/week, for 4 weeks), from an engine using standard diesel fuel (DE) or the same diesel fuel containing 9 ppm cerium oxide nanoparticles (DCeE). Changes in hematological indices, clinical chemistry, atherosclerotic burden, tissue levels of inflammatory cytokines and pathology of the major organs were assessed. Results: Addition of CeO{sub 2} to fuel resulted in a reduction of the number (30%) and surface area (10%) of the particles in the exhaust, whereas the gaseous co-pollutants were increased (6-8%). There was, however, a trend towards an increased size and complexity of the atherosclerotic plaques following DE exposure, which was not evident in the DCeE group. There were no clear signs of altered hematological or pathological changes induced by either treatment. However, levels of proinflammatory cytokines were modulated in a brain region and liver following DCeE exposure. Conclusions: These results imply that addition of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles to fuel decreases the number of particles in exhaust and may reduce atherosclerotic burden associated with exposure to standard diesel fuel. From the extensive assessment of biological parameters performed, the only concerning effect of cerium addition was a slightly raised level of cytokines in a region of the central nervous system. Overall, the use of cerium as a fuel additive may be a potentially useful way to limit the health effects of vehicle exhaust. However, further testing is required to ensure that such an approach is not associated with a chronic inflammatory response which may eventually cause long-term health effects.

  7. Global change and biological soil crusts: Effects of ultraviolet augmentation under altered precipitation regimes and nitrogen additions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Flint, S.; Money, J.; Caldwell, M.

    2008-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs), a consortium of cyanobacteria, lichens, and mosses, are essential in most dryland ecosystems. As these organisms are relatively immobile and occur on the soil surface, they are exposed to high levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition, rising temperatures, and alterations in precipitation patterns. In this study, we applied treatments to three types of BSCs (early, medium, and late successional) over three time periods (spring, summer, and spring-fall). In the first year, we augmented UV and altered precipitation patterns, and in the second year, we augmented UV and N. In the first year, with average air temperatures, we saw little response to our treatments except quantum yield, which was reduced in dark BSCs during one of three sample times and in Collema BSCs two of three sample times. There was more response to UV augmentation the second year when air temperatures were above average. Declines were seen in 21% of the measured variables, including quantum yield, chlorophyll a, UV-protective pigments, nitrogenase activity, and extracellular polysaccharides. N additions had some negative effects on light and dark BSCs, including the reduction of quantum yield, ??-carotene, nitrogenase activity, scytonemin, and xanthophylls. N addition had no effects on the Collema BSCs. When N was added to samples that had received augmented UV, there were only limited effects relative to samples that received UV without N. These results indicate that the negative effect of UV and altered precipitation on BSCs will be heightened as global temperatures increase, and that as their ability to produce UV-protective pigments is compromised, physiological functioning will be impaired. N deposition will only ameliorate UV impacts in a limited number of cases. Overall, increases in UV will likely lead to lowered productivity and increased mortality in BSCs through time, which, in turn, will reduce their ability to contribute

  8. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source.

  9. Synergistic and Additive Effect of Oregano Essential Oil and Biological Silver Nanoparticles against Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Scandorieiro, Sara; de Camargo, Larissa C.; Lancheros, Cesar A. C.; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F.; Nakamura, Celso V.; de Oliveira, Admilton G.; Andrade, Célia G. T. J.; Duran, Nelson; Nakazato, Gerson; Kobayashi, Renata K. T.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has become a clinical and public health problem, making therapeutic decisions more challenging. Plant compounds and nanodrugs have been proposed as potential antimicrobial alternatives. Studies have shown that oregano (Origanum vulgare) essential oil (OEO) and silver nanoparticles have potent antibacterial activity, also against multidrug-resistant strains; however, the strong organoleptic characteristics of OEO and the development of resistance to these metal nanoparticles can limit their use. This study evaluated the antibacterial effect of a two-drug combination of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (bio-AgNP), produced by Fusarium oxysporum, and OEO against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains. OEO and bio-AgNP showed bactericidal effects against all 17 strains tested, with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 0.298 to 1.193 mg/mL and 62.5 to 250 μM, respectively. Time-kill curves indicated that OEO acted rapidly (within 10 min), while the metallic nanoparticles took 4 h to kill Gram-negative bacteria and 24 h to kill Gram-positive bacteria. The combination of the two compounds resulted in a synergistic or additive effect, reducing their MIC values and reducing the time of action compared to bio-AgNP used alone, i.e., 20 min for Gram-negative bacteria and 7 h for Gram-positive bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed similar morphological alterations in Staphylococcus aureus (non-methicillin-resistant S. aureus, non-MRSA) cells exposed to three different treatments (OEO, bio-AgNP and combination of the two), which appeared cell surface blebbing. Individual and combined treatments showed reduction in cell density and decrease in exopolysaccharide matrix compared to untreated bacterial cells. It indicated that this composition have an antimicrobial activity against S. aureus by disrupting cells. Both compounds showed very low

  10. Additive manufacturing of biologically-inspired materials.

    PubMed

    Studart, André R

    2016-01-21

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies offer an attractive pathway towards the fabrication of functional materials featuring complex heterogeneous architectures inspired by biological systems. In this paper, recent research on the use of AM approaches to program the local chemical composition, structure and properties of biologically-inspired materials is reviewed. A variety of structural motifs found in biological composites have been successfully emulated in synthetic systems using inkjet-based, direct-writing, stereolithography and slip casting technologies. The replication in synthetic systems of design principles underlying such structural motifs has enabled the fabrication of lightweight cellular materials, strong and tough composites, soft robots and autonomously shaping structures with unprecedented properties and functionalities. Pushing the current limits of AM technologies in future research should bring us closer to the manufacturing capabilities of living organisms, opening the way for the digital fabrication of advanced materials with superior performance, lower environmental impact and new functionalities.

  11. Hofmeister effects in biology: effect of choline addition on the salt-induced super activity of horseradish peroxidase and its implication for salt resistance of plants.

    PubMed

    Pinna, M C; Bauduin, P; Touraud, D; Monduzzi, M; Ninham, B W; Kunz, W

    2005-09-01

    The effect of choline addition on the salt-induced super activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is investigated. HRP is presented in the literature as an efficient H(2)O(2) scavenger, and choline is the precursor of glycine betaine, a strong osmoprotectant molecule. Both the regulations of H(2)O(2) and of osmoprotectant concentrations are implicated in plants in order to counteract salt-induced cell damage. For the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), sulfate anions were found to play a crucial role in the increase of HRP activity. This induced super activity can be strongly reduced by adding choline chloride. The phenomena provide an example of physicochemical Hofmeister effects playing a central regulatory role in an important biological system.

  12. Microbial ecology and performance of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in biological processes treating petrochemical wastewater with high strength of ammonia: effect of Na(2)CO(3) addition.

    PubMed

    Whang, L M; Yang, K H; Yang, Y F; Han, Y L; Chen, Y J; Cheng, S S

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated nitrification performance and microbial ecology of AOB in a full-scale biological process, powder activated carbon treatment (PACT), and a pilot-scale biological process, moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR), treating wastewater collected from a petrochemical industry park. The petrochemical influent wastewater characteristics showed a relative low carbon to nitrogen ratio around 1 with average COD and ammonia concentrations of 310 mg/L and 325 mg-N/L, respectively. The average nitrification efficiency of the full-scale PACT process was around 11% during this study. For the pilot-scale MBBR, the average nitrification efficiency was 24% during the Run I operation mode, which provided a slightly better performance in nitrification than that of the PACT process. During the Run II operation, the pH control mode was switched from addition of NaOH to Na(2)CO(3), leading to a significant improvement in nitrification efficiency of 51%. In addition to a dramatic change in nitrification performance, the microbial ecology of AOB, monitored with the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) molecular methodology, was found to be different between Runs I and II. The amoA-based TRFLP results indicated that Nitrosomonas europaea lineage was the dominant AOB population during Run I operation, while Nitrosospira-like AOB was dominant during Run II operation. To confirm the effects of Na(2)CO(3) addition on the nitrification performance and AOB microbial ecology observed in the MBBR process, batch experiments were conducted. The results suggest that addition of Na(2)CO(3) as a pH control strategy can improve nitrification performance and also influence AOB microbial ecology as well. Although the exact mechanisms are not clear at this time, the results showing the effects of adding different buffering chemicals such as NaOH or Na(2)CO(3) on AOB populations have never been demonstrated until this study.

  13. Additive effects of predator cues and dimethoate on different levels of biological organisation in the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Van Praet, Nander; De Jonge, Maarten; Stoks, Robby; Bervoets, Lieven

    2014-10-01

    The combined effects of a pesticide and predation risk on sublethal endpoints in the midge Chironomus riparius were investigated using a combination of predator-release kairomones from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and alarm substances from conspecifics together with the pesticide dimethoate. Midge larvae were exposed for 30 days to three sublethal dimethoate concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 0.25 mg L(-1)) in the presence or absence of predator cues. Sublethal endpoints were analysed at different levels of biological organisation. Available energy reserves, enzyme biomarkers, feeding rate and life history endpoints were investigated. Three endpoints were significantly affected by the two highest dimethoate concentrations, i.e. AChE activity, age at emergence and emergence success, with a significant decrease in response after exposure to 0.25, 0.1 and 0.01 mg L(-1) dimethoate, respectively. Four sublethal endpoints were significantly affected by predator stress: Total protein content, GST activity and biomass decreased only in the presence of the predation risk, while AChE activity further decreased significantly in the presence of predation cues and effects on AChE of combined exposure were additive. From this study we can conclude that sublethal life history characteristics should be included in ecotoxicity testing as well as natural environmental stressors such as predator stress, which might act additively with pollutants on fitness related endpoints.

  14. Effects of spawn, supplement and phase II compost additions and time of re-casing second break compost on mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) yield and biological efficiency.

    PubMed

    Royse, Daniel J; Chalupa, William

    2009-11-01

    Three cropping experiments (0710, 0803 and 0805) were conducted to determine the effect of adding spawn, various levels of delayed release nutrient, and phase II compost to 2nd break mushroom compost (2BkC) on mushroom yield and biological efficiency (BE). We also investigated the effect of delaying time of re-casing non-supplemented and supplemented 2BkC on mushroom yields and BEs. The addition of 14.6% spawn to nutrient-supplemented 2BkC (w.w./d.w) increased yield by 11.1% over the control (no spawn) but did not affect BE. The addition of delayed release supplements to 2BkC increased maximum yields by 29-54%, depending on the treatment. Substitution of 15% phase II compost in 2BkC (15/85) did not significantly affect mushroom yields. However, use of 15% phase II compost in 2BkC increased the response of the mixture to delayed release supplement. Yield response to increasing levels of supplement was greater in the 15/85 mixture compared to 100% 2BkC. Yields also increased as time of re-casing was delayed up to 10 days. Mushroom yields increased approximately 2.1% for each day re-casing was delayed. Overall yields were generally higher from commercial 2BkC compared to 2BkC originating from the Penn State Mushroom Research Center (MRC) probably due to nitrogen (N) content of the 2BkC. Nitrogen content in commercial 2BkC (Crop 0805) was 3% while N content in 2BkC from Crops 0710 and 0803 was 2.2% and 2.1%, respectively. By optimizing supplement levels and adding 15% phase II compost to commercial 2BkC, or by delaying casing by 5-10 days, it was possible to obtain BEs that were equivalent to supplemented phase II compost.

  15. Effect of the addition of zero valent iron (Fe(0)) on the batch biological sulphate reduction using grass cellulose as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, Jean; Schaefer, L

    2013-12-01

    Mineral mining generates acidic, saline, metal-rich mine waters, often referred to as acid mine drainage (AMD). Treatment of AMD and recovering saleable products during the treatment process are a necessity since water is, especially in South Africa, a scarce commodity. The aim of the study presented here was to investigate the effect of zero valent iron (Fe(0)) on the biological removal of sulphate from AMD in batch reactors. The performance of the reactors was assessed by means of sulphate reduction, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acid (VFA) utilisation and volatile suspended solids (VSS) concentration. To this end, three batch reactors, A, B and C (volume 2.5 L), were operated similarly with the exception of the addition of grass cuttings and iron filings. Reactors A and B received twice as much grass (100 g) as C (50 g). Reactor A received no iron filings to act as a control, while reactors B and C received 50-g iron filings for the experimental duration. The results showed that Fe(0) appears to provide sustained sulphate removal when sufficient grass substrate is available. In reactors A and C, sulphate removal efficiency was higher when the COD concentration was lower due to utilisation. In reactor B, sulphate removal efficiency was accompanied by an accumulation of COD as hydrogen (H2) provided by the Fe(0) was utilised for sulphate reduction. Furthermore, these results showed the potential of Fe(0) to enhance the participation of microorganisms in sulphate reduction.

  16. Biological effects of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, G.D. Jr.

    1991-09-01

    In general, clay materials exhibit a range of biological activities, from apparently inactive or slightly active, such as hematite, to highly fibrogenic and carcinogenic, such as fibrous brucite (nemalite). The zeolites also exhibit such as range, with some mordenite being slightly active and erionite being highly active; however, erionite is the only zeolite that has been studied extensively. The diversity of mineral species holds great potential for probing these mechanisms, especially when mineralogical data are integrated with biological data. Unfortunately, many of the studies reporting data on the biological effects of clays and zeolites fail to report detailed mineralogical information; hence, it is difficult at present to interpret the biological activities of minerals in terms of their physical and chemical properties. Important mineralogical data that are only rarely considered in biological research include exact mineralogy of the specimen (i.e., identification and abundance of contaminants), physical and chemical properties of minerals, and surface properties of minerals. 141 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  17. [Effect of the addition of tropical fruits--pineapple (Ananas comosus) and papaya (Carica papaya)--on the production of biological silage from fish].

    PubMed

    Bello, R; Cardillo, E; Martínez, R

    1993-09-01

    Microbial Fish Silage was produced from under-utilized fish mixed with juice and waste fruits (pineapple and papaya) at 35 degrees C. Six different products were elaborated as following: A: fish muscle with pineapple juice; B: fish muscle with fruit wastes; C: gutted fish with pineapple juice; D: gutted fish with fruit wastes; E: whole fish with pineapple juice; F: whole fish with fruit wastes. Process development was evaluated by measuring: pH, acidity, non-protein nitrogen, consistency and exudate liquid. Results indicated a slow decrease in pH value and production of acidity during 20 storage days. The addition of fruits to silage did not have any effect on these values. Silage liquefaction or hydrolysis was related to the following parameters: consistency, non-protein nitrogen and exudate liquid. The addition of fruits was related to silage liquefaction or hydrolysis, and it was measured by the consistency. Exudate liquid and non-protein nitrogen increased during storage time. However silage made from whole fish showed highest values in those parameters than other processing conditions. This results suggested that hydrolysis involve first enzymes from guts and second enzymes from muscle and head. Pineapple juice did not contribute to hydrolysis process. Mainly sensory changes in the silage occurs during first 24 hours and they were related to chemical changes. Proximal analysis did not change during silage process and microbial counts indicated the freshness of raw material used i this study.

  18. The Mozart Effect: Additional Data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R.

    2002-04-01

    After the review of the Mozart effect was published in this journal (Hughes JR. Epilepsy Behav 2001;2:369-417), additional data from the music of Haydn and Liszt have been analyzed that may account for the decrease in seizure activity originally reported during Mozart music. Even with these added data Mozart music continued to score significantly higher than the selections from the other six composers in one of the important characteristics of this music, namely, the repetition of the melody. However Haydn's values were second highest among Mozart, J. S. Bach, Wagner, Beethoven, Chopin, and Liszt.

  19. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  20. Bustling argon: biological effect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas in group 18 of the periodic table. Certificated to exist in air atmosphere merely one century ago, discovery of argon shows interesting stories of researching and exploring. It was assumed to have no chemical activity. However, argon indeed present its biological effect on mammals. Narcotic effect of argon in diving operation and neur-protective function of argon in cerebral injury demonstrate that argon has crucial effect and be concentrated on is necessary. Furthermore, consider to be harmless to human, argon clinical application in therapy would be another option. PMID:24088583

  1. Quantum Effects in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser; Engel, Gregory S.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2014-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Quantum biology: introduction Graham R. Fleming and Gregory D. Scholes; 2. Open quantum system approaches to biological systems Alireza Shabani, Masoud Mohseni, Seogjoo Jang, Akihito Ishizaki, Martin Plenio, Patrick Rebentrost, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Jianshu Cao, Seth Lloyd and Robert Silbey; 3. Generalized Förster resonance energy transfer Seogjoo Jang, Hoda Hossein-Nejad and Gregory D. Scholes; 4. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy Tomáš Mančal; Part II. Quantum Effects in Bacterial Photosynthetic Energy Transfer: 5. Structure, function, and quantum dynamics of pigment protein complexes Ioan Kosztin and Klaus Schulten; 6. Direct observation of quantum coherence Gregory S. Engel; 7. Environment-assisted quantum transport Masoud Mohseni, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Patrick Rebentrost, Alireza Shabani, Seth Lloyd, Susana F. Huelga and Martin B. Plenio; Part III. Quantum Effects in Higher Organisms and Applications: 8. Excitation energy transfer in higher plants Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin and Rienk van Grondelle; 9. Electron transfer in proteins Spiros S. Skourtis; 10. A chemical compass for bird navigation Ilia A. Solov'yov, Thorsten Ritz, Klaus Schulten and Peter J. Hore; 11. Quantum biology of retinal Klaus Schulten and Shigehiko Hayashi; 12. Quantum vibrational effects on sense of smell A. M. Stoneham, L. Turin, J. C. Brookes and A. P. Horsfield; 13. A perspective on possible manifestations of entanglement in biological systems Hans J. Briegel and Sandu Popescu; 14. Design and applications of bio-inspired quantum materials Mohan Sarovar, Dörthe M. Eisele and K. Birgitta Whaley; 15. Coherent excitons in carbon nanotubes Leonas Valkunas and Darius Abramavicius; Glossary; References; Index.

  2. Effects of chemical, biological, and physical aging as well as soil addition on the sorption of pyrene to activated carbon and biochar.

    PubMed

    Hale, Sarah E; Hanley, Kelly; Lehmann, Johannes; Zimmerman, Andrewr; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2011-12-15

    In this study, the suitability of biochar and activated carbon (AC) for contaminated soil remediation is investigated by determining the sorption of pyrene to both materials in the presence and absence of soil and before as well as after aging. Biochar and AC were aged either alone or mixed with soil via exposure to (a) nutrients and microorganisms (biological), (b) 60 and 110 °C (chemical), and (c) freeze-thaw cycles (physical). Before and after aging, the pH, elemental composition, cation exchange capacity (CEC), microporous SA, and sorption isotherms of pyrene were quantified. Aging at 110 °C altered the physicochemical properties of all materials to the greatest extent (for example, pH increased by up to three units and CEC by up to 50% for biochar). Logarithmic K(Fr) values ranged from 7.80 to 8.21 (ng kg(-1))(ng L(-1))(-nF) for AC and 5.22 to 6.21 (ng kg(-1))(ng L(-1))(-nF) for biochar after the various aging regimes. Grinding biochar to a smaller particle size did not significantly affect the sorption of d(10) pyrene, implying that sorption processes operate on the subparticle scale. Chemical aging decreased the sorption of pyrene to the greatest extent (up to 1.8 log unit for the biochar+soil). The sorption to AC was affected more by the presence of soil than the sorption to biochar was. Our results suggest that AC and biochar have a high sorption capacity for pyrene that is maintained both in the presence of soil and during harsh aging. Both materials could therefore be considered in contaminated land remediation.

  3. Additive Effects on Asymmetric Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liang; Sun, Wangsheng; Yang, Dongxu; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Rui

    2016-03-23

    This review highlights a number of additives that can be used to make asymmetric reactions perfect. Without changing other reaction conditions, simply adding additives can lead to improved asymmetric catalysis, such as reduced reaction time, improved yield, or/and increased selectivity.

  4. Seismic Absorption and Modulus Measurements in Porous Rocks in Lab and Field: Physical, Chemical, and Biological Effects of Fluids (Detecting a Biosurfactant Additive in a Field Irrigation Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Spetzler, Hartmut

    2006-05-01

    We have been exploring a new technology that is based on using low-frequency seismic attenuation data to monitor changes in fluid saturation conditions in two-fluid phase porous materials. The seismic attenuation mechanism is related to the loss of energy due to the hysteresis of resistance to meniscus movement (changes in surface tension, wettability) when a pore containing two fluids is stressed at very low frequencies (< 10 Hz). This technology has potential applications to monitoring changes in (1) leakage at buried waste sites, (2) contaminant remediation, and (3) flooding during enhanced petroleum recovery. We have concluded a three year field study at the Maricopa Agricultural Center site of the University of Arizona. Three sets of instruments were installed along an East-West line perpendicular to the 50m by 50m inigation site. Each set of instruments consisted of one three component seismometer and one tiltmeter. Microseisms and solid Earth-tides served as strain sources. The former have a power peak at a period of about 6 seconds and the tides have about two cycles per day. Installation of instruments commenced in late summer of 2002. The instruments operated nearly continuously until April 2005. During the fall of 2003 the site was irrigated with water and one year later with water containing 150 ppm of a biosurfactant additive. This biodegradable additive served to mimic a class of contaminants that change the surface tension of the inigation fluid. Tilt data clearly show tidal tilts superimposed on local tilts due to agricultural irrigation and field work. When the observed signals were correlated with site specific theoretical tilt signals we saw no anomalies for the water irrigation in 2003, but large anomalies on two stations for the surfactant irrigation in 2004. Occasional failures of seismometers as well as data acquisition systems contributed to less than continuous coverage. These data are noisier than the tilt data, but do also show possible

  5. Biological Effects of Acoustic Cavitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    rectified diffusion. 56 III. STABLE CAVITATION A. Introduction There are manv areas associated with the biological effects of ultrasound in which the...used said as cavitation indicators. Further, if clinical ultrasound systems are found to be inducing cavitation , either stable or transient, it will...O BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ACOUSTIC CAVITATION by Lawrence A. Crum -- Physical Acoustics Research Laboratory Department of Physics and Astronomy ’ CTE

  6. Biological effects of tremolite.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J. C.; Chamberlain, M.; Brown, R. C.; Berry, G.; Pooley, F. D.; Davies, R.; Griffiths, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Tremolite is an amphibole which has been implicated in a variety of disease patterns in different parts of the world. It occurs in a number of phases, which are chemically identical but have specific physical characteristics. In an attempt to clarify the epidemiological findings, tremolite fibres of 3 specific forms--A, B and C--were characterized and studied for biological activity by: (i) in vivo intrapleural injection of rats (2 separate experiments--1 with poor survival). (ii) in vitro enzyme release from mouse peritoneal macrophages (iii) in vitro giant-cell formation in A549 cultures (iv) in vitro cytotoxicity for V79-4 cells. Sample C, which contained more long thin fibres than A and B, was alone in producing mesotheliomas. C, but not A or B, induced LDH and B-glucuronidase enzyme release, and induced giant cells. A was not cytotoxic, B moderately cytotoxic and C as highly cytotoxic as UICC crocidolite. The in vivo studies were marred by being split between 2 experiments, of which the second had poor survival. We are aware of the weakness of our in vivo data, but as Tremolite C was being considered for commercial use on the European market we felt it timely to submit our findings for publication. Images Fig. 4 PMID:6280741

  7. Biological Effects of Directed Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, Thomas; Beason, Charles; Hitt, M. K.; Rogers, Walter; Cook, Michael

    2002-11-01

    This Final Report summarizes the biological effects research conducted by Veridian Engineering personnel under contract F41624-96-C-9009 in support of the Air Force Research Laboratory's Radio Frequency Radiation Branch from April 1997 to April 2002. Biological effects research and consultation were provided in five major areas: Active Denial System (also known as Vehicle Mounted Active Denial System), radio frequency radiation (RFR) health and safety, non-lethal weapon biological effects research, the newly formed Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Human Effects Center of Excellence, and Biotechnology. The report is organized by research efforts within the major research areas, providing title, objective, a brief description, relevance to the AF or DoD, funding, and products.

  8. Effect of glutathione addition in sparkling wine.

    PubMed

    Webber, Vanessa; Dutra, Sandra Valduga; Spinelli, Fernanda Rodrigues; Marcon, Ângela Rossi; Carnieli, Gilberto João; Vanderlinde, Regina

    2014-09-15

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of the addition of glutathione (GSH) on secondary aromas and on the phenolic compounds of sparkling wine elaborated by traditional method. It was added 10 and 20 mg L(-1) of GSH to must and to base wine. The determination of aroma compounds was performed by gas chromatography. Phenolic compounds and glutathione content were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Sparkling wines with addition of GSH to must showed lower levels of total phenolic compounds and hydroxycinnamic acids. Furthermore, the sparkling wine with addition of GSH to must showed higher levels of 2-phenylethanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol and diethyl succinate, and lower concentrations of ethyl decanoate, octanoic and decanoic acids. The GSH addition to the must show a greater influence on sparkling wine than to base wine, however GSH addition to base wine seems retain higher SO2 free levels. The concentration of GSH added showed no significant difference.

  9. (Biological effects of atomic radiation)

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The traveler attended the thirty-ninth session of UNSCEAR, where he took part in the meetings of the Biological Subgroup and the Working Group of the full UNSCEAR Committee. He listened to the discussion of the many documents under preparation and provided advice on questions related to genetics. He was extensively involved in discussion of the document entitled Hereditary effects of radiation.'' During the discussion of that document, he served as the rapporteur of the Biological Subgroup. Important contacts were made with many internationally prominent scientists involved in radiation protection and risk evaluation. Since mouse data, many of them collected in the ORNL Biology Division, form a major component of genetic risk estimation, the traveler was able to provide first-hand information and to play an active role in the deliberations.

  10. The Additive Effects of Choice and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karbowski, Joseph; And Others

    In separate research studies, students who were given a choice of learning materials or who had control over aversive noise, demonstrated higher motivation and better task performance. To investigate the additive effects of choice and control on perception of control, 80 male and female college students participated in a 2 (choice vs. no-choice) X…

  11. Decavanadate effects in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Aureliano, Manuel; Gândara, Ricardo M C

    2005-05-01

    Vanadium biological studies often disregarded the formation of decameric vanadate species known to interact, in vitro, with high-affinity with many proteins such as myosin and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump and also to inhibit these biochemical systems involved in energy transduction. Moreover, very few in vivo animal studies involving vanadium consider the contribution of decavanadate to vanadium biological effects. Recently, it has been shown that an acute exposure to decavanadate but not to other vanadate oligomers induced oxidative stress and a different fate in vanadium intracellular accumulation. Several markers of oxidative stress analyzed on hepatic and cardiac tissue were monitored after in vivo effect of an acute exposure (12, 24 h and 7 days), to a sub-lethal concentration (5 mM; 1 mg/kg) of two vanadium solutions ("metavanadate" and "decavanadate"). It was observed that "decavanadate" promote different effects than other vanadate oligomers in catalase activity, glutathione content, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial superoxide anion production and vanadium accumulation, whereas both solutions seem to equally depress reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as well as total intracellular reducing power. Vanadium is accumulated in mitochondria in particular when "decavanadate" is administered. These recent findings, that are now summarized, point out the decameric vanadate species contributions to in vivo and in vitro effects induced by vanadium in biological systems.

  12. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sisir

    2014-07-01

    The debates about the trivial and non-trivial effects in biological systems have drawn much attention during the last decade or so. What might these non-trivial sorts of quantum effects be? There is no consensus so far among the physicists and biologists regarding the meaning of "non-trivial quantum effects". However, there is no doubt about the implications of the challenging research into quantum effects relevant to biology such as coherent excitations of biomolecules and photosynthesis, quantum tunneling of protons, van der Waals forces, ultrafast dynamics through conical intersections, and phonon-assisted electron tunneling as the basis for our sense of smell, environment assisted transport of ions and entanglement in ion channels, role of quantum vacuum in consciousness. Several authors have discussed the non-trivial quantum effects and classified them into four broad categories: (a) Quantum life principle; (b) Quantum computing in the brain; (c) Quantum computing in genetics; and (d) Quantum consciousness. First, I will review the above developments. I will then discuss in detail the ion transport in the ion channel and the relevance of quantum theory in brain function. The ion transport in the ion channel plays a key role in information processing by the brain.

  13. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  14. Biological effects summary report: pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Keimig, S.D.; Pattillo, R.W.

    1984-11-01

    A comprehensive review of pyrene was conducted to assess the potential health effects of this polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and to evaluate the need for recommending an interim occupational exposure limit to protect the health of exposed workers. Pyrene is formed as a trace pollutant during incomplete combustion of organic matter. Concentrations of pyrene in urban and industrial settings are generally higher than the levels recorded for benzo(a)pyrene. Concentrations of pyrene vary but are usually less than 50% of the total PAH, depending on the industry sampled. In humans, pyrene is a photosensitive material. Acute photo irritation effects may persist as chronic skin discoloration for as long as five months. No other documented clinical or epidemiological studies were found on effects of pure pyrene. There is evidence of co-carcinogenicity of pyrene and benzo(a)pyrene in mice. There is no clear evidence that pyrene is a tumor initiator. At this time, we do not recommend that a standard be set specific to pyrene in mixtures since available data on biological effects are limited, and since possible effects due to interactions of pyrene and the myriad of polynuclear aromatic compounds present during typical exposures have not been assessed. An exposure limit of 0.1 mg/m/sup 3/ would likely prevent photosensitization and irritation effects of pure pyrene. We recommend that the coal tar pitch volatile standard (CTPV) continue to be used for mixtures containing less than 50% pyrene. All exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable since in animals, pyrene appears to be a co-carcinogen with benzo(a)pyrene. 112 refs., 11 tabs.

  15. [Biological effect of wood dust].

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, A; Wojtczak, J; Bielichowska-Cybula, G; Domańska, A; Dutkiewicz, J; Mołocznik, A

    1993-01-01

    The biological effect of exposure to wood dust depends on its composition and the content of microorganisms which are an inherent element of the dust. The irritant and allergic effects of wood dust have been recognised for a long time. The allergic effect is caused by the wood dust of subtropical trees, e.g. western red cedar (Thuja plicata), redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), obeche (Triplochiton scleroxylon), cocabolla (Dalbergia retusa) and others. Trees growing in the European climate such as: larch (Larix), walnut (Juglans regia), oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus), pine (Pinus) cause a little less pronounced allergic effect. Occupational exposure to irritative or allergic wood dust may lead to bronchial asthma, rhinitis, alveolitis allergica, DDTS (Organic dust toxic syndrome), bronchitis, allergic dermatitis, conjunctivitis. An increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the sinonasal cavity is an important and serious problem associated with occupational exposure to wood dust. Adenocarcinoma constitutes about half of the total number of cancers induced by wood dust. An increased incidence of the squamous cell cancers can also be observed. The highest risk of cancer applies to workers of the furniture industry, particularly those dealing with machine wood processing, cabinet making and carpentry. The cancer of the upper respiratory tract develops after exposure to many kinds of wood dust. However, the wood dust of oak and beech seems to be most carcinogenic. It is assumed that exposure to wood dust can cause an increased incidence of other cancers, especially lung cancer and Hodgkin's disease. The adverse effects of microorganisms, mainly mould fungi and their metabolic products are manifested by alveolitis allergica and ODTS. These microorganisms can induce aspergillomycosis, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and allergic dermatitis.

  16. Additives-biological activities of tin-containing polymers bonded to noncarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Carraher, C.; Butler, C.; Foster, V.; Pandya, B.; Sterling, D.

    1993-12-31

    Organotin-containing polymers serve as effective additives to a silicon-based sealant, latex coating and talc exhibiting inhibition to tested bacteria and fungi. These polymers are candidates for uses a paint additives, sealant and caulk additives and within talc as an epidermal treatment.

  17. Quantification of biologically effective environmental UV irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, G.

    To determine the impact of environmental UV radiation on human health and ecosystems demands monitoring systems that weight the spectral irradiance according to the biological responses under consideration. In general, there are three different approaches to quantify a biologically effective solar irradiance: (i) weighted spectroradiometry where the biologically weighted radiometric quantities are derived from spectral data by multiplication with an action spectrum of a relevant photobiological reaction, e.g. erythema, DNA damage, skin cancer, reduced productivity of terrestrial plants and aquatic foodweb; (ii) wavelength integrating chemical-based or physical dosimetric systems with spectral sensitivities similar to a biological response curve; and (iii) biological dosimeters that directly weight the incident UV components of sunlight in relation to the effectiveness of the different wavelengths and to interactions between them. Most biological dosimeters, such as bacteria, bacteriophages, or biomolecules, are based on the UV sensitivity of DNA. If precisely characterized, biological dosimeters are applicable as field and personal dosimeters.

  18. Biological effects of anthropogenic contaminants in the San Francisco Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, B.; Adelsbach, T.; Brown, C.; Hunt, J.; Kuwabara, J.; Neale, J.; Ohlendorf, H.; Schwarzbach, S.; Spies, R.; Taberski, K.

    2007-01-01

    Concentrations of many anthropogenic contaminants in the San Francisco Estuary exist at levels that have been associated with biological effects elsewhere, so there is a potential for them to cause biological effects in the Estuary. The purpose of this paper is to summarize information about biological effects on the Estuary's plankton, benthos, fish, birds, and mammals, gathered since the early 1990s, focusing on key accomplishments. These studies have been conducted at all levels of biological organization (sub-cellular through communities), but have included only a small fraction of the organisms and contaminants of concern in the region. The studies summarized provide a body of evidence that some contaminants are causing biological impacts in some biological resources in the Estuary. However, no general patterns of effects were apparent in space and time, and no single contaminant was consistently related to effects among the biota considered. These conclusions reflect the difficulty in demonstrating biological effects due specifically to contamination because there is a wide range of sensitivity to contaminants among the Estuary's many organisms. Additionally, the spatial and temporal distribution of contamination in the Estuary is highly variable, and levels of contamination covary with other environmental factors, such as freshwater inflow or sediment-type. Federal and State regulatory agencies desire to develop biological criteria to protect the Estuary's biological resources. Future studies of biological effects in San Francisco Estuary should focus on the development of meaningful indicators of biological effects, and on key organism and contaminants of concern in long-term, multifaceted studies that include laboratory and field experiments to determine cause and effect to adequately inform management and regulatory decisions. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Titanium dioxide nanoparticles--biological effects].

    PubMed

    Świdwińska-Gajewska, Anna Maria; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Titanium dioxide occurs as particles of various sizes. Particles of up to 100 nm, corresponding to nanoparticles, and in the size range of 0.1-3 mm are the most frequently used. Titanium dioxide in a bulk form is not classified as dangerous substance, nevertheless nanoparticles may cause adverse health effects. Inhalation exposure to nano-TiO2, causes pulmonary inflammation that may lead to fibrotic and proliferative changes in the lungs. Many studies confirm the genotoxic effect of TiO2, especially in the form of nanoparticles, on mammal and human cells. In rats exposed to TiO2-nanoparticles by inhalation the development of tumors has been observed. However, there is no evidence of additional lung cancer risk or mortality in workers exposed to TiO2 dust. There are some studies demonstrating the adverse effect of TiO2-nanoparticles on fetal development, as well as on reproduction of animals. TiO2 nanoparticles find a still wider application and thus the risk of occupational exposure to this substance increases as well. Considering such alarming data on the biological activity of TiO2 nanoparticles, more attention should be paid to occupational exposure and its health effects. Properties of the nanoparticles, due to their larger surface area and reactivity, differ significantly from the inhalable dust of TiO2, for which the hygiene standards are mandatory in Poland.

  20. Rapid Recovery of Cyanobacterial Pigments in Desiccated Biological Soil Crusts following Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Raeid M. M.; Polerecky, Lubos; Al-Habsi, Amal; Oetjen, Janina; Strous, Marc; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    We examined soil surface colour change to green and hydrotaxis following addition of water to biological soil crusts using pigment extraction, hyperspectral imaging, microsensors and 13C labeling experiments coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALD-TOF MS). The topsoil colour turned green in less than 5 minutes following water addition. The concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl a), scytonemin and echinenon rapidly increased in the top <1 mm layer while in the deeper layer, their concentrations remained low. Hyperspectral imaging showed that, in both wet and dehydrated crusts, cyanobacteria formed a layer at a depth of 0.2–0.4 mm and this layer did not move upward after wetting. 13C labeling experiments and MALDI TOF analysis showed that Chl a was already present in the desiccated crusts and de novo synthesis of this molecule started only after 2 days of wetting due to growth of cyanobacteria. Microsensor measurements showed that photosynthetic activity increased concomitantly with the increase of Chl a, and reached a maximum net rate of 92 µmol m−2 h−1 approximately 2 hours after wetting. We conclude that the colour change of soil crusts to green upon water addition was not due to hydrotaxis but rather to the quick recovery and reassembly of pigments. Cyanobacteria in crusts can maintain their photosynthetic apparatus intact even under prolonged periods of desiccation with the ability to resume their photosynthetic activities within minutes after wetting. PMID:25375172

  1. Rapid recovery of cyanobacterial pigments in desiccated biological soil crusts following addition of water.

    PubMed

    Abed, Raeid M M; Polerecky, Lubos; Al-Habsi, Amal; Oetjen, Janina; Strous, Marc; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    We examined soil surface colour change to green and hydrotaxis following addition of water to biological soil crusts using pigment extraction, hyperspectral imaging, microsensors and 13C labeling experiments coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALD-TOF MS). The topsoil colour turned green in less than 5 minutes following water addition. The concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl a), scytonemin and echinenon rapidly increased in the top <1 mm layer while in the deeper layer, their concentrations remained low. Hyperspectral imaging showed that, in both wet and dehydrated crusts, cyanobacteria formed a layer at a depth of 0.2-0.4 mm and this layer did not move upward after wetting. 13C labeling experiments and MALDI TOF analysis showed that Chl a was already present in the desiccated crusts and de novo synthesis of this molecule started only after 2 days of wetting due to growth of cyanobacteria. Microsensor measurements showed that photosynthetic activity increased concomitantly with the increase of Chl a, and reached a maximum net rate of 92 µmol m-2 h-1 approximately 2 hours after wetting. We conclude that the colour change of soil crusts to green upon water addition was not due to hydrotaxis but rather to the quick recovery and reassembly of pigments. Cyanobacteria in crusts can maintain their photosynthetic apparatus intact even under prolonged periods of desiccation with the ability to resume their photosynthetic activities within minutes after wetting.

  2. Exploiting Allee effects for managing biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Patrick C; Berec, Luděk; Liebhold, Andrew M

    2011-06-01

    Biological invasions are a global and increasing threat to the function and diversity of ecosystems. Allee effects (positive density dependence) have been shown to play an important role in the establishment and spread of non-native species. Although Allee effects can be considered a bane in conservation efforts, they can be a benefit in attempts to manage non-native species. Many biological invaders are subject to some form of an Allee effect, whether due to a need to locate mates, cooperatively feed or reproduce or avoid becoming a meal, yet attempts to highlight the specific exploitation of Allee effects in biological invasions are surprisingly unprecedented. In this review, we highlight current strategies that effectively exploit an Allee effect, and propose novel means by which Allee effects can be manipulated to the detriment of biological invaders. We also illustrate how the concept of Allee effects can be integral in risk assessments and in the prioritization of resources allocated to manage non-native species, as some species beset by strong Allee effects could be less successful as invaders. We describe how tactics that strengthen an existing Allee effect or create new ones could be used to manage biological invasions more effectively.

  3. Biological effects of ozone reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The effects of increased UV radiation on the biosphere are described with ongoing research, and research areas that should be investigated. Some mention is also made of the potential climatic effects of ozone reduction on agriculture and the biosphere.

  4. Minireview: Biological effects of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, M.; Mustarelli, P. ); Caprotti, M. )

    1991-01-01

    The literature about the biological effects of magnetic fields is reviewed. The authors begin by discussing the weak and/or time variable fields, responsible for subtle changes in the circadian rhythms of superior animals, which are believed to be induced by same sort of resonant mechanism. The safety issues related with the strong magnetic fields and gradients generated by clinical NMR magnets are then considered. The last portion summarizes the debate about the biological effects of strong and uniform magnetic fields.

  5. The biological effects of UVA radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Urbach, F.; Gange, R.

    1986-01-01

    Interest in the biological effects of longwave radiation has increased dramatically in the last few years. The contributors to this state of the art volume discuss the most current knowledge of biological effects of UVA and provide guidelines regarding acceptable human exposure to this type of radiation. Contents include: historical aspects of UVA effects; mechanisms of UVA photosensitization; photorecovery by UVA; photoaugmentation of UVB effects by UVA; effects of UVA radiation on tissues of the eye; new UVA sunscreen; and recommendations for future research and possible actions.

  6. Conservation characteristics of wilted perennial ryegrass silage made using biological or chemical additives.

    PubMed

    Conaghan, P; O'Kiely, P; O'Mara, F P

    2010-02-01

    The effects of 7 additive treatments on the fermentation and aerobic stability characteristics of wilted grass silage were studied under laboratory conditions. Treatments included no additive applied (untreated control), ammonium tetraformate at 3 and 6 L/t, homofermentative lactic acid bacteria alone ((ho)LAB), a mixture of Lactobacillus buchneri plus homofermentative lactic acid bacteria ((he+ho)LAB), and an antimicrobial mixture of sodium benzoate, sodium propionate, sodium nitrite, and hexamethylenetetramine at 2.5 and 5 L/t. Additives were compared across 3 consecutive harvests of 2 perennial ryegrass cultivars (AberDart and Fennema) following a 24-h wilt. Silos were opened after at least 100 d of ensilage and aerobic stability was assessed. Season of harvest had a large effect on grass composition at ensiling, producing herbages of relatively low (approximately 145g/kg), medium (approximately 250g/kg), and high (approximately 365g/kg) dry matter (DM) concentrations. Within harvests there were lesser differences between cultivars. The untreated control and (ho)LAB additive produced badly fermented silage from the low-DM herbages and well-fermented silage from the medium- and high-DM herbages. The ammonium tetraformate treatments produced both well-fermented and badly fermented silage from the low-DM herbages depending on cultivar, and consistently well-fermented silage from the medium- and high-DM herbages. The (he+ho)LAB silages had similar or slightly lower standard of fermentation than the untreated and (ho)LAB silages. The antimicrobial mixture produced more silages of lower standard of fermentation than the untreated control and ammonium tetraformate and (ho)LAB additives. All additive treatments, including the untreated control, failed to consistently increase residual water-soluble carbohydrate concentrations at silo opening. Ammonium tetraformate at 6 L/t was the most successful and (he+ho)LAB the least successful additive at increasing residual WSC

  7. 78 FR 74218 - Imposition of Additional Sanctions on Syria Under the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Imposition of Additional Sanctions on Syria Under the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and Warfare... chemical weapons in violation of international law or lethal chemical weapons against its own nationals... the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and Warfare Elimination Act of 1991, 22 U.S.C. 5604(a)...

  8. Bayesian spatiotemporal analysis of zero-inflated biological population density data by a delta-normal spatiotemporal additive model.

    PubMed

    Arcuti, Simona; Pollice, Alessio; Ribecco, Nunziata; D'Onghia, Gianfranco

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate the spatiotemporal changes in the density of a particular species of crustacean known as deep-water rose shrimp, Parapenaeus longirostris, based on biological sample data collected during trawl surveys carried out from 1995 to 2006 as part of the international project MEDITS (MEDiterranean International Trawl Surveys). As is the case for many biological variables, density data are continuous and characterized by unusually large amounts of zeros, accompanied by a skewed distribution of the remaining values. Here we analyze the normalized density data by a Bayesian delta-normal semiparametric additive model including the effects of covariates, using penalized regression with low-rank thin-plate splines for nonlinear spatial and temporal effects. Modeling the zero and nonzero values by two joint processes, as we propose in this work, allows to obtain great flexibility and easily handling of complex likelihood functions, avoiding inaccurate statistical inferences due to misclassification of the high proportion of exact zeros in the model. Bayesian model estimation is obtained by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations, suitably specifying the complex likelihood function of the zero-inflated density data. The study highlights relevant nonlinear spatial and temporal effects and the influence of the annual Mediterranean oscillations index and of the sea surface temperature on the distribution of the deep-water rose shrimp density.

  9. Biological effects of sexual freedom.

    PubMed

    Catterall, R D

    1981-02-07

    It is difficult to determine the true incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STD). Underreporting of STD is widespread. In the United Kingdom the available figures exclude patients treated by general practitioners or patients in the armed forces. The incidence of STDs is rising. In 1979 the figure for the United Kingdom was about 500,000 new cases. The most common STD in England and Wales is non-specific urethritis or non-specific genital infection. The increase in gonorrhea has been less dramatic in England and Wales than it has been in other industrial and urbanized countries. Regardless, between 1960 and 1979 the incidence of the disease doubled to 60,000 new cases a year. Recent research has shown another group of sexually transmissible infectious agents which are now more common than the older venereal infections. Viruses are responsible for reversal of this 2nd generation of STDs. Their manifestations range from local discomfort to chronic disability, infertility, ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth, and neonatal death. There are many medical, social and economic factors which contribute to this increase in the incidence of STD and the recognition of the 2nd generation of sexual infections. Some of these are known, others unknown. The introduction of penicillin and other antibiotics has had a great effect on some STDs, notably syphilis. Pelvic inflammatory disease has been the most important cause of increases in female infertility and ectopic pregnancy. The new generation of STDs has serious and potentially dangerous effects on both expectant mothers and their infants.

  10. Improvement of dairy manufacture effluent anaerobic digestion with biological waste addition using a Chinese dome digester.

    PubMed

    Jihen, Toumi; Hassib, Bouallagui; Moktar, Hamdi; Said, Nouira

    2010-05-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manufacture effluent (DME) and biological waste (BW) was investigated at various DME/BW ratios using laboratory batch digesters. The biogas yield ranged 0.34-0.88l biogas g(-1) volatile solids (VS) removed. The highest VS reductions of 58% and 62% were obtained for DME/BW ratios of 60:40% and 80:20%, respectively. Results were used to operate a pilot-scale digester of 5m(3). The highest biogas yield of 0.48lg(-1) VS removed was obtained at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.64gVSl(-1)d(-1) corresponding to a DME/BW ratio of 80:20%. This could be mainly attributed to the higher biodegradability of DME and the correction of the C:N ratio by the addition of the BW. The N, P and K contents were increased significantly in the TS of the digestate to be around 6.8%, 0.64% and 1.26%, respectively.

  11. Biological responses of a simulated marine food chain to lead addition.

    PubMed

    Soto-Jiménez, Martín F; Arellano-Fiore, Claudia; Rocha-Velarde, Ruth; Jara-Marini, Martín E; Ruelas-Inzunza, Jorge; Voltolina, Domenico; Frías-Espericueta, Martín G; Quintero-Alvarez, Jesús M; Páez-Osuna, Federico

    2011-07-01

    This investigation sought to assess the biological responses to Pb along a simplified four-level food chain, from the primary producer, the microalgae Tetraselmis suecica, grown in a control medium with < 1 µg/L of Pb and exposed to a sublethal dose (20 µg/L of Pb) and used as the base of a simulated food chain, through the primary-, secondary-, and tertiary-level consumers, namely, the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana; the white-leg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei; and the grunt fish, Haemulon scudderi, respectively. Growth of Pb-exposed T. suecica was 40% lower than that of the control cultures, and survival of A. franciscana fed this diet was 25 to 30% lower than the control. No differences in the growth rates of Pb-exposed and control shrimp and fish and no gross morphological changes were evident in the exposed specimens. However, the exposed shrimp and fish had 20 and 15% higher mortalities than their controls, respectively. In addition, behavioral alterations were observed in exposed shrimp and fish, including reduction in food consumption or cessation of feeding, breathing air out of the water, reduction of motility, and erratic swimming. The negative correlation between Pb concentration in whole body of shrimp and fish and Fulton's condition factor suggested also that the exposed organisms were stressed because of Pb accumulation.

  12. The Picture Superiority Effect and Biological Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses learning behaviors where the "picture superiority effect" (PSE) seems to be most effective in biology education. Also considers research methodology and suggests a new research model which allows a more direct examination of the strategies learners use when matching up picture and text in efforts to "understand"…

  13. Effectiveness of Low Temperature Additives for Biodiesel Blends

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-30

    UNCLASSIFIED EFFECTIVENESS OF LOW TEMPERATURE ADDITIVES FOR BIODIESEL BLENDS INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 428 by Steven R...Do not return it to the originator. UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED EFFECTIVENESS OF LOW TEMPERATURE ADDITIVES FOR BIODIESEL BLENDS...17-2010 – 06-30-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effectiveness of Low Temperature Additives for Biodiesel Blends 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W56HZV-09-C-0100

  14. Lunar biological effects and the magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Bevington, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The debate about how far the Moon causes biological effects has continued for two millennia. Pliny the Elder argued for lunar power "penetrating all things", including plants, fish, animals and humans. He also linked the Moon with tides, confirmed mathematically by Newton. A review of modern studies of biological effects, especially from plants and animals, confirms the pervasive nature of this lunar force. However calculations from physics and other arguments refute the supposed mechanisms of gravity and light. Recent space exploration allows a new approach with evidence of electromagnetic fields associated with the Earth's magnetotail at full moon during the night, and similar, but more limited, effects from the Moon's wake on the magnetosphere at new moon during the day. The disturbance of the magnetotail is perhaps shown by measurements of electric fields of up to 16V/m compared with the usual <1V/m, suggesting the possibility of weak biological effects on some sensitive organisms. Similar intensities found in sferics, geomagnetic storms, aurora disturbance, sensations of a 'presence' and pre-seismic electromagnetic radiation are known to affect animals and 10-20% of the human population. There is now evidence for mechanisms such as calcium flux, melatonin disruption, magnetite and cryptochromes. Both environmental and receptor variations explain confounding factors and inconsistencies in the evidence. Electromagnetic effects might also account for some evolutionary changes. Further research on lunar biological effects, such as acute myocardial infarction, could help the development of strategies to reduce adverse effects for people sensitive to geomagnetic disturbance.

  15. Effectiveness of Biologic Factors in Shoulder Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giotis, Dimitrios; Aryaei, Ashkan; Vasilakakos, Theofanis; Paschos, Nikolaos K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Shoulder pathology can cause significant pain, discomfort, and loss of function that all interfere with activities of daily living and may lead to poor quality of life. Primary osteoarthritis and rotator cuff diseases with its sequalae are the main culprits. Management of shoulder disorders using biological factors gained an increasing interest over the last years. This interest reveals the need of effective treatments for shoulder degenerative disorders, and highlights the importance of a comprehensive and detailed understanding of the rapidly increasing knowledge in the field. Methods: This study will describe most of the available biology-based strategies that have been recently developed, focusing on their effectiveness in animal and clinical studies. Results: Data from in vitro work will also be briefly presented; in order to further elucidate newly acquired knowledge regarding mechanisms of tissue degeneration and repair that would probably drive translational work in the next decade. The role of platelet rich-plasma, growth factors, stem cells and other alternative treatments will be described in an evidence-based approach, in an attempt to provide guidelines for their clinical application. Finally, certain challenges that biologic treatments face today will be described as an initiative for future strategies. Conclusion: The application of different growth factors and mesenchymal stem cells appears as promising approaches for enhancing biologic repair. However, data from clinical studies are still limited, and future studies need to improve understanding of the repair process in cellular and molecular level and evaluate the effectiveness of biologic factors in the management of shoulder disorders.

  16. Mechanistic Effects of Calcitriol in Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Lorenza; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; García-Gaytán, Ana Cristina; Méndez, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Besides its classical biological effects on calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, calcitriol, the active vitamin D metabolite, has a broad variety of actions including anticancer effects that are mediated either transcriptionally and/or via non-genomic pathways. In the context of cancer, calcitriol regulates the cell cycle, induces apoptosis, promotes cell differentiation and acts as anti-inflammatory factor within the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we address the different mechanisms of action involved in the antineoplastic effects of calcitriol. PMID:26102214

  17. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  18. Biological effects of magnetic fluids: toxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacava, Z. G. M.; Azevedo, R. B.; Martins, E. V.; Lacava, L. M.; Freitas, M. L. L.; Garcia, V. A. P.; Rébula, C. A.; Lemos, A. P. C.; Sousa, M. H.; Tourinho, F. A.; Da Silva, M. F.; Morais, P. C.

    1999-07-01

    Toxicity of ionic and citrate-based magnetic fluids administrated intraperitoneally to mice was investigated through cytogenetic analysis, evaluation of mitotic index and morphological and cytometric alterations. Both magnetic fluid samples cause severe inflammatory reactions, being very toxic and thus not biocompatible. Peritoneal cells and tissues studies may provide a useful strategy to investigate the in vivo biological effects of magnetic nanoparticles.

  19. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of epidemiologic studies using multistage

  20. Implementation of Complexity Analyzing Based on Additional Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Na; Liang, Yanhong; Liu, Fang

    According to the Complexity Theory, there is complexity in the system when the functional requirement is not be satisfied. There are several study performances for Complexity Theory based on Axiomatic Design. However, they focus on reducing the complexity in their study and no one focus on method of analyzing the complexity in the system. Therefore, this paper put forth a method of analyzing the complexity which is sought to make up the deficiency of the researches. In order to discussing the method of analyzing the complexity based on additional effect, this paper put forth two concepts which are ideal effect and additional effect. The method of analyzing complexity based on additional effect combines Complexity Theory with Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ). It is helpful for designers to analyze the complexity by using additional effect. A case study shows the application of the process.

  1. Plasma effects in electromagnetic field interaction with biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R. P.; Batra, Karuna; Excell, Peter S.

    2011-02-01

    Theoretical analysis is presented of the nonlinear behavior of charge carriers in biological tissue under the influence of varying low-intensity electromagnetic (EM) field. The interaction occurs because of the nonlinear force arising due to the gradient of the EM field intensity acting on free electrons in the conduction band of proteins in metabolically active biological cell membrane receptors leading to a redistribution of charge carriers. Field dependence of the resulting dielectric constant is investigated by a suitable modification to include an additional electronic contribution term to the three-term Debye model. The exogenous EM field propagating in this nonlinear cellular medium satisfies the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and can be affected significantly. Resulting field effect can be substantially augmented and effective rectification/demodulation can occur. Possible implications of this modification on biological processes in white and grey matter are discussed.

  2. Effect of additives on the purification of urease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Wang, J.; Ulrich, J.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of additives on the purification of proteins was investigated. The target protein studied here is the enzyme urease. Studies on the purification of urease from jack bean meal were carried out. 32% (v/v) acetone was utilized to extract urease from the jack bean meal. Further purification by crystallization with the addition of 2-mercaptoethanol and EDTA disodium salt dehydrate was carried out. It was found out that the presence of additives can affect the selectivity of the crystallization. Increases in both purity and yield of the urease after crystallization were observed in the presence of additives, which were proven using both SDS-PAGE and activity. Urease crystals with a yield of 69.9% and a purity of 85.1% were obtained in one crystallization step in the presence of additives. Furthermore, the effect of additives on the thermodynamics and kinetics of urease crystallization was studied.

  3. The Biological Effects of Bilirubin Photoisomers.

    PubMed

    Jasprova, Jana; Dal Ben, Matteo; Vianello, Eleonora; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanova, Marie; Vyroubalova, Karolina; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Sticha, Martin; Cerna, Marcela; Vitek, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Although phototherapy was introduced as early as 1950's, the potential biological effects of bilirubin photoisomers (PI) generated during phototherapy remain unclear. The aim of our study was to isolate bilirubin PI in their pure forms and to assess their biological effects in vitro. The three major bilirubin PI (ZE- and EZ-bilirubin and Z-lumirubin) were prepared by photo-irradiation of unconjugated bilirubin. The individual photoproducts were chromatographically separated (TLC, HPLC), and their identities verified by mass spectrometry. The role of Z-lumirubin (the principle bilirubin PI) on the dissociation of bilirubin from albumin was tested by several methods: peroxidase, fluorescence quenching, and circular dichroism. The biological effects of major bilirubin PI (cell viability, expression of selected genes, cell cycle progression) were tested on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. Lumirubin was found to have a binding site on human serum albumin, in the subdomain IB (or at a close distance to it); and thus, different from that of bilirubin. Its binding constant to albumin was much lower when compared with bilirubin, and lumirubin did not affect the level of unbound bilirubin (Bf). Compared to unconjugated bilirubin, bilirubin PI did not have any effect on either SH-SY5Y cell viability, the expression of genes involved in bilirubin metabolism or cell cycle progression, nor in modulation of the cell cycle phase. The principle bilirubin PI do not interfere with bilirubin albumin binding, and do not exert any toxic effect on human neuroblastoma cells.

  4. Polymer Photooxidation: An Experiment to Demonstrate the Effect of Additives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Norman S.; McKellar, John F.

    1979-01-01

    This undergraduate experiment shows that the inclusion of an appropriate additive can have a very marked effect on the physical properties of a polymer. The polymer used is polypropylene and the additives are 2-hydroxy-4-octyloxy-benzophenone and benzophenone. (BB)

  5. Effect of Fortification and Additives on Breast Milk Osmolality.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vijay; Job, Victoria; Thomas, Niranjan

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of fortification and commonly used additives on the osmolality of human milk. Osmolality after fortification with milk powder and human milk fortifier increased from 303 mOsmol/kg to 397 and 373 mOsmol/kg, respectively. The maximal increase in osmolality was seen with the addition of calcium gluconate.

  6. Effects of various additives on sintering of aluminum nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komeya, K.; Inoue, H.; Tsuge, A.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of thirty additives on sintering A/N were investigated. The addition of alkali earth oxides and rare earth oxides gave fully densified aluminum nitride. This is due to the formation of nitrogen-containing aluminate liquid in the system aluminum nitride-alkali earth oxides or rare earth oxides. Microstructural studies of the sintered specimens with the above two types of additives suggested that the densification was due to the liquid phase sintering. Additions of silicon compounds resulted in poor densification by the formation of highly refractory compounds such as A/N polytypes.

  7. Interactive effects of nutrient additions and predation on infaunal communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Posey, M.H.; Alphin, T.D.; Cahoon, L.; Lindquist, D.; Becker, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nutrient additions represent an important anthropogenic stress on coastal ecosystems. At moderate levels, increased nutrients may lead to increased primary production and, possibly, to increased biomass of consumers although complex trophic interactions may modify or mask these effects. We examined the influence of nutrient additions and interactive effects of trophic interactions (predation) on benthic infaunal composition and abundances through small-scale field experiments in 2 estuaries that differed in ambient nutrient conditions. A blocked experimental design was used that allowed an assessment of direct nutrient effects in the presence and absence of predation by epibenthic predators as well as an assessment of the independent effects of predation. Benthic microalgal production increased with experimental nutrient additions and was greater when infaunal abundances were lower, but there were no significant interactions between these factors. Increased abundances of one infaunal taxa, Laeonereis culveri, as well as the grazer feeding guild were observed with nutrient additions and a number of taxa exhibited higher abundances with predator exclusion. In contrast to results from freshwater systems there were no significant interactive effects between nutrient additions and predator exclusion as was predicted. The infaunal responses observed here emphasize the importance of both bottom-up (nutrient addition and primary producer driven) and top-down (predation) controls in structuring benthic communities. These processes may work at different spatial and temporal scales, and affect different taxa, making observation of potential interactive effects difficult.

  8. [Kinetic analysis of additive effect on desulfurization activity].

    PubMed

    Han, Kui-hua; Zhao, Jian-li; Lu, Chun-mei; Wang, Yong-zheng; Zhao, Gai-ju; Cheng, Shi-qing

    2006-02-01

    The additive effects of A12O3, Fe2O3 and MnCO3 on CaO sulfation kinetics were investigated by thermogravimetic analysis method and modified grain model. The activation energy (Ea) and the pre-exponential factor (k0) of surface reaction, the activation energy (Ep) and the pre-exponential factor (D0) of product layer diffusion reaction were calculated according to the model. Additions of MnCO3 can enhance the initial reaction rate, product layer diffusion and the final CaO conversion of sorbents, the effect mechanism of which is similar to that of Fe2O3. The method based isokinetic temperature Ts and activation energy can not estimate the contribution of additive to the sulfation reactivity, the rate constant of the surface reaction (k), and the effective diffusivity of reactant in the product layer (Ds) under certain experimental conditions can reflect the effect of additives on the activation. Unstoichiometric metal oxide may catalyze the surface reaction and promote the diffusivity of reactant in the product layer by the crystal defect and distinct diffusion of cation and anion. According to the mechanism and effect of additive on the sulfation, the effective temperature and the stoichiometric relation of reaction, it is possible to improve the utilization of sorbent by compounding more additives to the calcium-based sorbent.

  9. Effects of some polymeric additives on the cocrystallization of caffeine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jihae; Kim, Il Won

    2011-11-01

    Effects of polymeric additives on the model cocrystallization were examined. The model cocrystal was made from caffeine and oxalic acid, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly( L-lactide) (PLLA), poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) were the additives. The cocrystals were formed as millimeter-sized crystals without additives, and they became microcrystals with PLLA and PCL, and nanocrystals with PAA. XRD and IR revealed that the cocrystal structure was unchanged despite the strong effects of the additives on the crystal morphology, although some decrease in crystallinity was observed with PAA as confirmed by DSC. The DSC study also showed that the cocrystal melted and recrystallized to form α-caffeine upon heating. The present study verified that the polymeric additives can be utilized to modulate the size and morphology of the cocrystals without interfering the intermolecular interactions essential to the integrity of the cocrystal structures.

  10. Development of Effects-Based Nutrient Criteria using Biological Endpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltner, R.

    2005-05-01

    Ohio employs biological endpoints to judge the status of aquatic life in rivers and streams. Specifically, numeric criteria derived from biological indices have been incorporated into Ohio's water quality standards for fish and macroinvertebrate communities. When appropriate, chemical-specific water quality standards derived from dose-response curves are used in concert with the biological indices to ascribe the causes and sources of impairment to polluted streams. However, water quality criteria have not been established for all polluting agents, especially those, like nutrients, that do not elicit a simple dose-response curve. In such cases, where biological impairment is observed, the linkage between the impairment and causal agent is made inferentially. Ohio EPA is currently studying the relationship between nutrient concentrations, periphytic chlorophyll a concentrations, and biological indices to ascertain whether a direct relationship exists between nutrient concentration and the biological health of fish and macroinvertebrate communities, with the eventual goal of adopting effects-based nutrient criteria in Ohio's water quality standards. Results from the first field season show a strong relationship between chlorophyll a concentrations, and physical and land use variables. Additionally, 48 h dissolved oxygen flux correlated with periphytic chlorophyll a concentrations and the degree of canopy cover.

  11. Ecotoxicological effects of activated carbon addition to sediments.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; Suijkerbuijk, Martin P W; Schmitt, Heike; Sinnige, Theo L

    2009-08-01

    Activated carbon (AC) addition is a recently developed technique for the remediation of sediments and soils contaminated with hydrophobic organic chemicals. Laboratory and field experiments have demonstrated that the addition of 3-4% of AC can reduce aqueous concentrations and the bioaccumulation potential of contaminants. However, one aspect of the technique that has hardly received any attention is the possible occurrence of secondary, eco(toxico)logical effects, i.e., effects of AC addition on the health, behavior, and habitat quality of local organisms. In the present study, several ecotoxicological effects were investigated in AC-water and AC-enriched (0-25%) sediment systems. It was demonstrated that (i) powdered activated carbons can be toxic to aquatic invertebrates (Lumbriculus variegatus, Daphnia magna, and Corophium volutator) based on different mechanisms and preferably should be washed prior to application; (ii) Asellus aquaticus and Corophium volutator may physically avoid AC-enriched sediments; (iii) exposure of Lumbriculus variegatus to AC-enriched sediments lead to a time and dose-dependent reduction in the worms' lipid content, which was most probably caused by the observation that (iv) worm egestion rates decreased drastically upon AC addition, indicating that the presence of AC disturbed feeding behavior; and (v) there were no obvious effects on the microbiological community structure. All in all, these results suggest potential ecotoxicological effects of powdered AC addition and stress the need for a detailed further investigation of secondary effects of the technique, prior to any large-scale field application.

  12. Assessing the influence of methanol-containing additive on biological characteristics of diesel exhaust emissions using microtox and mutatox assays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ta-Chang; Chao, Mu-Rong

    2002-02-04

    Here we investigate the effect of the methanol-containing additive (MCA) on the biological characteristics of diesel exhaust emissions. Microtox and Mutatox assays, respectively, were used to evaluate the acute toxicity and genotoxicity of crude extracts from diesel engine exhaust. The engine was tested on a series of diesel fuels blended with five additive levels (0, 5, 8, 10 and 15% of MCA by volume). Emission tests were performed over the hot start portion of the transient Heavy-Duty-Federal Test Procedure (HD-FTP) and two selected steady-state modes. Microtox results show that MCA additive moderately lowers the toxicity levels of particle-associated (SOF) samples, but generally increase the vapor-phase (XOC) associated toxicity. A strong correlation was found between XOC-associated toxicity and total hydrocarbon (THC) concentrations, while only a slight link was found between SOF-associated toxicity and particulate matter (PM) concentrations. For Mutatox test results, when either 5 or 8% MCA used, XOC and SOF-associated genotoxicity in both steady-state and hot-start transient cycle tests were relatively lower compared to those of the base diesel. The genotoxic potential of XOC samples was significantly increased after treatment with an exogenous metabolic activation system (S9). On the contrary, the genotoxic potential of SOF samples without S9 metabolic activation was generally higher than those with S9. It is noteworthy that the total particle-associated (SOF) PAHs emissions showed trends quite similar to that of the genotoxic potential. As expected, the total particle-associated (SOF) PAHs correlated moderately with direct mutagenicity, and fairly well with indirect mutagenicity. Finally, the genotoxicity data did not parallel the Microtox results in this study, indicating that potentially long-term genotoxic agents may not be revealed by short-term toxicity assays.

  13. Modeling external carbon addition in biological nutrient removal processes with an extension of the international water association activated sludge model.

    PubMed

    Swinarski, M; Makinia, J; Stensel, H D; Czerwionka, K; Drewnowski, J

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to account for a newly defined readily biodegradable substrate that can be consumed by polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) under anoxic and aerobic conditions, but not under anaerobic conditions. The model change was to add a new substrate component and process terms for its use by PAOs and other heterotrophic bacteria under anoxic and aerobic conditions. The Gdansk (Poland) wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), which has a modified University of Cape Town (MUCT) process for nutrient removal, provided field data and mixed liquor for batch tests for model evaluation. The original ASM2d was first calibrated under dynamic conditions with the results of batch tests with settled wastewater and mixed liquor, in which nitrate-uptake rates, phosphorus-release rates, and anoxic phosphorus uptake rates were followed. Model validation was conducted with data from a 96-hour measurement campaign in the full-scale WWTP. The results of similar batch tests with ethanol and fusel oil as the external carbon sources were used to adjust kinetic and stoichiometric coefficients in the expanded ASM2d. Both models were compared based on their predictions of the effect of adding supplemental carbon to the anoxic zone of an MUCT process. In comparison with the ASM2d, the new model better predicted the anoxic behaviors of carbonaceous oxygen demand, nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N), and phosphorous (PO4-P) in batch experiments with ethanol and fusel oil. However, when simulating ethanol addition to the anoxic zone of a full-scale biological nutrient removal facility, both models predicted similar effluent NO3-N concentrations (6.6 to 6.9 g N/m3). For the particular application, effective enhanced biological phosphorus removal was predicted by both models with external carbon addition but, for the new model, the effluent PO4-P concentration was approximately one-half of that found from

  14. Biologic effects of oil fly ash.

    PubMed Central

    Ghio, Andrew J; Silbajoris, Robert; Carson, Johnny L; Samet, James M

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated increased human morbidity and mortality with elevations in the concentration of ambient air particulate matter (PM). Fugitive fly ash from the combustion of oil and residual fuel oil significantly contributes to the ambient air particle burden. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) is remarkable in the capacity to provoke injury in experimental systems. The unique composition of this emission source particle makes it particularly useful as a surrogate for ambient air PM in studies of biologic effects testing the hypothesis that metals mediate the biologic effects of air pollution particles. A majority of the in vitro and animal model investigations support the postulate that transition metals present in ROFA (especially vanadium) participate in Fenton-like chemical reactions to produce reactive oxygen species. This is associated with tyrosine phosphorylation, nuclear factor kappa B and other transcription factor activation, induction of inflammatory mediator expression, and inflammatory lung injury. It is also evident that vanadium accounts for a significant portion of the biologic activity of ROFA. The extrapolation of this body of investigation on ROFA to the field of ambient air PM is difficult, as particles in numerous environments have such small amounts of vanadium. PMID:11834466

  15. Biologic effects of oil fly ash.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Silbajoris, Robert; Carson, Johnny L; Samet, James M

    2002-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated increased human morbidity and mortality with elevations in the concentration of ambient air particulate matter (PM). Fugitive fly ash from the combustion of oil and residual fuel oil significantly contributes to the ambient air particle burden. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) is remarkable in the capacity to provoke injury in experimental systems. The unique composition of this emission source particle makes it particularly useful as a surrogate for ambient air PM in studies of biologic effects testing the hypothesis that metals mediate the biologic effects of air pollution particles. A majority of the in vitro and animal model investigations support the postulate that transition metals present in ROFA (especially vanadium) participate in Fenton-like chemical reactions to produce reactive oxygen species. This is associated with tyrosine phosphorylation, nuclear factor kappa B and other transcription factor activation, induction of inflammatory mediator expression, and inflammatory lung injury. It is also evident that vanadium accounts for a significant portion of the biologic activity of ROFA. The extrapolation of this body of investigation on ROFA to the field of ambient air PM is difficult, as particles in numerous environments have such small amounts of vanadium.

  16. Time optimal control of an additional food provided predator-prey system with applications to pest management and biological conservation.

    PubMed

    Srinivasu, P D N; Prasad, B S R V

    2010-04-01

    Use of additional food has been widely recognized by experimental scientists as one of the important tools for biological control such as species conservation and pest management. The quality and quantity of additional food supplied to the predators is known to play a vital role in the controllability of the system. The present study is continuation of a previous work that highlights the importance of quality and quantity of the additional food in the dynamics of a predator-prey system in the context of biological control. In this article the controllability of the predator-prey system is analyzed by considering inverse of quality of the additional food as the control variable. Control strategies are offered to steer the system from a given initial state to a required terminal state in a minimum time by formulating Mayer problem of optimal control. It is observed that an optimal strategy is a combination of bang-bang controls and could involve multiple switches. Properties of optimal paths are derived using necessary conditions for Mayer problem. In the light of the results evolved in this work it is possible to eradicate the prey from the eco-system in the minimum time by providing the predator with high quality additional food, which is relevant in the pest management. In the perspective of biological conservation this study highlights the possibilities to drive the state to an admissible interior equilibrium (irrespective of its stability nature) of the system in a minimum time.

  17. The Biological Effects of Bilirubin Photoisomers

    PubMed Central

    Jasprova, Jana; Dal Ben, Matteo; Vianello, Eleonora; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanova, Marie; Vyroubalova, Karolina; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Sticha, Martin; Cerna, Marcela; Vitek, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Although phototherapy was introduced as early as 1950’s, the potential biological effects of bilirubin photoisomers (PI) generated during phototherapy remain unclear. The aim of our study was to isolate bilirubin PI in their pure forms and to assess their biological effects in vitro. The three major bilirubin PI (ZE- and EZ-bilirubin and Z-lumirubin) were prepared by photo-irradiation of unconjugated bilirubin. The individual photoproducts were chromatographically separated (TLC, HPLC), and their identities verified by mass spectrometry. The role of Z-lumirubin (the principle bilirubin PI) on the dissociation of bilirubin from albumin was tested by several methods: peroxidase, fluorescence quenching, and circular dichroism. The biological effects of major bilirubin PI (cell viability, expression of selected genes, cell cycle progression) were tested on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. Lumirubin was found to have a binding site on human serum albumin, in the subdomain IB (or at a close distance to it); and thus, different from that of bilirubin. Its binding constant to albumin was much lower when compared with bilirubin, and lumirubin did not affect the level of unbound bilirubin (Bf). Compared to unconjugated bilirubin, bilirubin PI did not have any effect on either SH-SY5Y cell viability, the expression of genes involved in bilirubin metabolism or cell cycle progression, nor in modulation of the cell cycle phase. The principle bilirubin PI do not interfere with bilirubin albumin binding, and do not exert any toxic effect on human neuroblastoma cells. PMID:26829016

  18. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1990-11-01

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of additives on the ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reaction probing, study state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow them to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas. 49 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1990-04-09

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reaction probing, study state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas.

  20. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1990-07-01

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reaction probing, study state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas.

  1. Chemical and biological consequences of using carbon dioxide versus acid additions in ocean acidification experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly K.; DuFore, Christopher M.; Robbins, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Use of different approaches for manipulating seawater chemistry during ocean acidification experiments has confounded comparison of results from various experimental studies. Some of these discrepancies have been attributed to whether addition of acid (such as hydrochloric acid, HCl) or carbon dioxide (CO2) gas has been used to adjust carbonate system parameters. Experimental simulations of carbonate system parameter scenarios for the years 1766, 2007, and 2100 were performed using the carbonate speciation program CO2SYS to demonstrate the variation in seawater chemistry that can result from use of these approaches. Results showed that carbonate system parameters were 3 percent and 8 percent lower than target values in closed-system acid additions, and 1 percent and 5 percent higher in closed-system CO2 additions for the 2007 and 2100 simulations, respectively. Open-system simulations showed that carbonate system parameters can deviate by up to 52 percent to 70 percent from target values in both acid addition and CO2 addition experiments. Results from simulations for the year 2100 were applied to empirically derived equations that relate biogenic calcification to carbonate system parameters for calcifying marine organisms including coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera. Calculated calcification rates for coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera differed from rates at target conditions by 0.5 percent to 2.5 percent in closed-system CO2 gas additions, from 0.8 percent to 15 percent in the closed-system acid additions, from 4.8 percent to 94 percent in open-system acid additions, and from 7 percent to 142 percent in open-system CO2 additions.

  2. Method for photo-altering a biological system to improve biological effect

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Richard A.; Doiron, Daniel R.; Crean, David H.

    2000-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a new adjunctive therapy for filtration surgery that does not use chemotherapy agents or radiation, but uses pharmacologically-active sensitizing compounds to produce a titratable, localized, transient, post operative avascular conjunctiva. A photosensitizing agent in a biological system is selectively activated by delivering the photosensitive agent to the biological system and laser activating only a spatially selected portion of the delivered photosensitive agent. The activated portion of the photosensitive agent reacts with the biological system to obtain a predetermined biological effect. As a result, an improved spatial disposition and effectuation of the biological effect by the photosensitive agent in the biological system is achieved.

  3. Study on thermal effects & sulfurized additives, in lubricating greases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Ami Atul

    Lithium Base grease constitutes about 50% of market. The greases are developed to be able to work in multiple working conditions and have longer working life. Greases with extreme pressure additives and anti-wear additives have been developed as a solution to many of the applications. These developed greases are tested under ASTM D2266 testing conditions to meet the requirements. The actual working conditions, although, differ than the real testing conditions. The loading, speed and temperature conditions can be more harsh, or fluctuating in nature. The cyclic nature of the parameters cannot be directly related to the test performance. For this purpose studies on the performance under spectrum loading, variable speed and fluctuating temperature must be performed. This study includes tests to understand the effect of thermal variation on some of the most commonly used grease additives that perform well under ASTM D2266 testing conditions. The studied additives include most widely used industrial extreme pressure additive MoS2. Performance of ZDDP which is trying to replace MoS2 in its industrial applications has also been studied. The tests cover study of extreme pressure, anti-wear and friction modifier additives to get a general idea on the effects of thermal variation in three areas. Sulphur is the most common extreme pressure additive. Sulphur based MoS 2 is extensively used grease additive. Study to understand the tribological performance of this additive through wear testing and SEM/EDX studies has been done. This performance is also studied for other metallic sulfides like WS2 and sulphur based organic compound. The aim is to study the importance of the type of bond that sulphur shares in its additive's structure on its performance. The MoS2 film formation is found to be on the basis of the FeS formation on the substrate and protection through sacrificial monolayer deposition of the MoS2 sheared structure. The free Mo then tends to oxidise. An attempt to

  4. Isoflavones: estrogenic activity, biological effect and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Daniela Cristina; Piazza, Cateno; Melilli, Barbara; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potent estrogenic activity; genistein, daidzein and glycitein are the most active isoflavones found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have similarity in structure with the human female hormone 17-β-estradiol, which can bind to both alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and mimic the action of estrogens on target organs, thereby exerting many health benefits when used in some hormone-dependent diseases. Numerous clinical studies claim benefits of genistein and daidzein in chemoprevention of breast and prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis as well as in relieving postmenopausal symptoms. The ability of isoflavones to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases largely depends on pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, in particular absorption and distribution to the target tissue. The chemical form in which isoflavones occur is important because it influences their bioavailability and, therefore, their biological activity. Glucose-conjugated isoflavones are highly polar, water-soluble compounds. They are hardly absorbed by the intestinal epithelium and have weaker biological activities than the corresponding aglycone. Different microbial families of colon can transform glycosylated isoflavones into aglycones. Clinical studies show important differences between the aglycone and conjugated forms of genistein and daidzein. The evaluation of isoflavone metabolism and bioavailability is crucial to understanding their biological effects. Lipid-based formulations such as drug incorporation into oils, emulsions and self-microemulsifying formulations have been introduced to increase bioavailability. Complexation with cyclodextrin also represent a valid method to improve the physicochemical characteristics of these substances in order to be absorbed and distributed to target tissues. We review and discuss pharmacokinetic issues that critically influence the biological activity of isoflavones.

  5. Thiopeptin, a New Feed-Additive Antibiotic: Biological Studies and Field Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mine, K.; Miyairi, N.; Takano, N.; Mori, S.; Watanabe, N.

    1972-01-01

    Thiopeptin is a new antibiotic, produced by Streptomyces tateyamensis and developed solely for animal use as a feed additive. The antibiotic content in animal tissue and feed was assayed in terms of the antimicrobial activity against Mycoplasma laidlawii A. This antibiotic was found to be relatively nontoxic in rats and mice. In chickens, this antibiotic is excreted into feces within 48 hr of administration and is not absorbed in tissue. It is well tolerated in both broilers and swine and is highly stable in animal feed. Thiopeptin-supplemented feed contributes to the improvement of weight gain, feed efficiency in chickens and swine, and the egg performance in layers. Thus, thiopeptin, when used as a feed additive, is quite suitable for supplementing animal nutrition. PMID:4680812

  6. The effect of one additional driver mutation on tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Johannes G; Bozic, Ivana; Allen, Benjamin; Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Nowak, Martin A

    2013-01-01

    Tumor growth is caused by the acquisition of driver mutations, which enhance the net reproductive rate of cells. Driver mutations may increase cell division, reduce cell death, or allow cells to overcome density-limiting effects. We study the dynamics of tumor growth as one additional driver mutation is acquired. Our models are based on two-type branching processes that terminate in either tumor disappearance or tumor detection. In our first model, both cell types grow exponentially, with a faster rate for cells carrying the additional driver. We find that the additional driver mutation does not affect the survival probability of the lesion, but can substantially reduce the time to reach the detectable size if the lesion is slow growing. In our second model, cells lacking the additional driver cannot exceed a fixed carrying capacity, due to density limitations. In this case, the time to detection depends strongly on this carrying capacity. Our model provides a quantitative framework for studying tumor dynamics during different stages of progression. We observe that early, small lesions need additional drivers, while late stage metastases are only marginally affected by them. These results help to explain why additional driver mutations are typically not detected in fast-growing metastases.

  7. Toxic effect of biosurfactant addition on the biodegradation of phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyung-Hee; Ahn, Yeonghee; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2005-11-01

    The effect of the biosurfactant rhamnolipid on phenanthrene biodegradation and cell growth of phenanthrene degraders was investigated. To compare the effect of rhamnolipid addition, two bacterial strains, 3Y and 4-3, which were isolated from a diesel-contaminated site in Korea, were selected. Without the biosurfactant, large amounts of phenanthrene were degraded with both strains at neutral pH, with higher rates of phenanthrene degradation when the cell growth was higher. Upon the addition of 240 mg/L rhamnolipid, the phenanthrene degradation and optical density were reduced, with this inhibitory effect similar for both 3Y and 4-3. To explain this inhibition, the cell growths of both strains were monitored with various concentrations of rhamnolipid, which showed significant toxic effects toward strain 3Y, but was nontoxic toward 4-3. Combining the inhibitory and toxicity results with regard to the biodegradation, different mechanisms can be suggested for each strain. In the biodegradation experiments, the toxicity of rhamnolipid itself mainly was responsible for the inhibitory effect in the case of 3Y, whereas the toxicity of solubilized phenanthrene or the increased toxicity of rhamnolipid in the presence of solubilized phenanthrene could have resulted in the inhibitory effect in the case of 4-3. This study demonstrated that the effectiveness of biosurfactant-enhanced biodegradation can be significantly different depending on the strain, and the toxicity of the biosurfactant should be considered as an important factor.

  8. Tin nanoparticles as an effective conductive additive in silicon anodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, L.; Beaudette, C.; Guo, J.; Bozhilov, K.; Mangolini, L.

    2016-01-01

    We have found that the addition of tin nanoparticles to a silicon-based anode provides dramatic improvements in performance in terms of both charge capacity and cycling stability. Using a simple procedure and off-the-shelf additives and precursors, we developed a structure in which the tin nanoparticles are segregated at the interface between the silicon-containing active layer and the solid electrolyte interface. Even a minor addition of tin, as small as ∼2% by weight, results in a significant decrease in the anode resistance, as confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This leads to a decrease in charge transfer resistance, which prevents the formation of electrically inactive “dead spots” in the anode structure and enables the effective participation of silicon in the lithiation reaction. PMID:27484849

  9. Effectiveness of various organometallics as antiwear additives in mineral oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with 1045 steel contacting 302 stainless steel and lubricated with various organometallics in mineral oil. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to determine the element present in the wear contact zone. The results indicate that there are organometallics which are as effective an antiwear additives as the commonly used zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate. These include dimethyl cadmium, triphenyl lead thiomethoxide, and triphenyl tin chloride. The additives were examined in concentrations to 1 weight percent. With dimethyl cadmium at concentrations of 0.5 weight percent and above, cadmium was detected in the contact zone. Coincident with the detection of cadmium, a marked decrease in the friction coefficient was observed. All additives examined reduced friction, but only the aforementioned reduced wear to a level comparable to that observed with zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate.

  10. Modulation of additive and interactive effects by trial history revisited.

    PubMed

    Masson, Michael E J; Rabe, Maximilian M; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2017-04-01

    Masson and Kliegl (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39, 898-914, 2013) reported evidence that the nature of the target stimulus on the previous trial of a lexical decision task modulates the effects of independent variables on the current trial, including additive versus interactive effects of word frequency and stimulus quality. In contrast, recent reanalyses of previously published data from experiments that, unlike the Masson and Kliegl experiments, did not include semantic priming as a factor, found no evidence for modulation of additive effects of frequency and stimulus quality by trial history (Balota, Aschenbrenner, & Yap, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39, 1563-1571, 2013; O'Malley & Besner, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 34, 1400-1411, 2013). We report two experiments that included semantic priming as a factor and that attempted to replicate the modulatory effects found by Masson and Kliegl. In neither experiment was additivity of frequency and stimulus quality modulated by trial history, converging with the findings reported by Balota et al. and O'Malley and Besner. Other modulatory influences of trial history, however, were replicated in the new experiments and reflect potential trial-by-trial alterations in decision processes.

  11. Ground-Level Ozone Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events: An Additional Biological Hazard?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Goracke, Byron D

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling, we examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and found that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supernovae and extreme solar proton events.

  12. Acidic precipitation, Vol. 2: Biological and ecological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Adriano, D.C.; Johnson, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    Acidic precipitation has its origin in emissions to the atmosphere of numerous compounds from both natural and man-made sources. The chapters in this volume cover a wide array of topics on the biological and ecological effects of acidic precipitation. A chapter on soil productivity emphasizes changes in biological and chemical characters of forest soils impacted by acidic deposition. Additional chapters discuss specific effects on soil microorganisms, trees, and crops. The importance of aluminum in this environmental issue is highlighted by a discussion on the mobility and phytotoxicity of this element in acidic soils. This chapter puts into perspective the biology of Al stressed plants. Two major chapters discuss the effect of acidic precipitation on forest ecosystems; one emphasizing North America, and the other Europe. Effects of soil acidification on key soil processes, including litter decomposition and depletion of essential plant nutrients in the soil profile are emphasized. Finally, three major chapters comprehensively cover limnological ecosystems and their response to acidic perturbation. These chapters discuss the response of stream and lake communities, both floral and faunal, to water acidification, including reduced biodiversity in these systems. Ten chapters have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  13. Effects of amino acid additives during hemodialysis of children.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, C L; Mrozinska, K; Mandel, S; McVicar, M; Wapnir, R A

    1984-01-01

    The intradialytic losses into the dialysate of free amino acids (AA) and alpha-amino nitrogen were determined during the dialysis of three children. Variations in plasma AA were determined pre- and postdialysis. The effect of these losses with the addition of an Abbott General Amino Acid Mixture to the dialysate in concentrations of 8.5, 17, and 34 mg/100 ml was studied. The major determinant of AA losses was the plasma concentration of the AA before beginning the dialysis treatment. Dialysance of individual AA varied inversely with their molecular weights. A zero flux of alpha-amino nitrogen occurred at a derived concentration of 22 mg/100 ml of the AA additive in the dialysate. Plasma concentrations of nonessential amino acids were little affected by the dialysate additive. In contrast, total essential amino acid nitrogen which fell during baseline dialyses showed significant improvement when the AA solution was added to the dialysate. This study suggests that the addition of AA to the dialysate bath may be effective in decreasing AA nitrogen losses during dialysis.

  14. Electron Correlation Effects in Biological Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. L.; Endres, R.; Kulkarni, R. V.; Labute, M.; Singh, R. R. P.

    2002-07-01

    Allosteric (conformation changing) proteins with transition metal atoms are at the heart of much important biological function (e.g., myoglobin hemoglobin used for storing and transporting oxygen in the bloodstream). In the case of myoglobin and hemoglobin, oxygen ligation to the iron center induces a spin crossover (high to low) coupled to a structural change; apart from the role of Hunds' exchange in the spin crossover, electron interaction effects have been ignored. We argue that the spin crossover/structure change observed in the similarly structured but far simpler cobalt valence tautomer molecules1 necessitates an inclusion of underscreened Kondo like correlations for a complete description of the energetics of the transition and dynamics, e.g., for x-ray absorption data. We carry this study out with Varma-Yafet-Gunnarsson-Schonhammer wave functions, which, in chemistry language, are basis set restricted configuration interaction in character. We briefly review the applicability of such wave functions to the description of the putative Kondo molecules cerocene (Ce[(CH)5]2) and ytterbocene bipyridine (Yb[(CH)5]2(bipy)) and to the problem of electron transfer in biological molecules and organic conductors, where anomalous long range tunneling may occur.

  15. Electron Correlation Effects in Biological Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. L.; Endres, R.; Kulkarni, R. V.; Labute, M.; Singh, R. R. P.

    Allosteric (conformation changing) proteins with transition metal atoms are at the heart of much important biological function (e.g., myoglobin hemoglobin used for storing and transporting oxygen in the bloodstream). In the case of myoglobin and hemoglobin, oxygen ligation to the iron center induces a spin crossover (high to low) coupled to a structural change; apart from the role of Hunds' exchange in the spin crossover, electron interaction effects have been ignored. We argue that the spin crossover/structure change observed in the similarly structured but far simpler cobalt valence tautomer molecules1 necessitates an inclusion of underscreened Kondo like correlations for a complete description of the energetics of the transition and dynamics, e.g., for x-ray absorption data. We carry this study out with Varma-Yafet-Gunnarsson-Schonhammer wave functions, which, in chemistry language, are basis set restricted configuration interaction in character. We briefly review the applicability of such wave functions to the description of the putative Kondo molecules cerocene (Ce[(CH)5]2) and ytterbocene bipyridine (Yb[(CH)5]2(bipy)) and to the problem of electron transfer in biological molecules and organic conductors, where anomalous long range tunneling may occur. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Research.

  16. Survival of free and microencapsulated Bifidobacterium: effect of honey addition.

    PubMed

    Favarin, Luciana; Laureano-Melo, Roberto; Luchese, Rosa Helena

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of honey addition on the viability of free and emulsion encapsulated cells of two strains of Bifidobacterium that underwent simulation of human upper gastrointestinal transit. In the control condition, without honey, free cells were drastically reduced after exposure to gastrointestinal conditions. The reduction was more pronounced with Bifidobacterium J7 of human origin. On the other hand, when cells were encapsulated, the viability reduction was higher for strain Bifidobacterium Bb12. The microencapsulation improved the viability maintenance of both Bifidobacterium strains, in recommended amounts for probiotic activity, after exposure to simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Moreover, suspending free cells of both Bifidobacterium strains in honey solutions resulted in a protective effect, equivalent to the plain microencapsulation with sodium alginate 3%. It is concluded that microencapsulation and the addition of honey improved the ability of Bifidobacterium to tolerate gastrointestinal conditions in vitro.

  17. Percolation phenomenon in mixed reverse micelles: the effect of additives.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bidyut K; Mitra, Rajib K

    2006-03-01

    The conductivity of AOT/IPM/water reverse micellar systems as a function of temperature, has been found to be non-percolating at three different concentrations (100, 175 and 250 mM), while the addition of nonionic surfactants [polyoxyethylene(10) cetyl ether (Brij-56) and polyoxyethylene(20) cetyl ether (Brij-58)] to these systems exhibits temperature-induced percolation in conductance in non-percolating AOT/isopropyl myristate (IPM)/water system at constant compositions (i.e., at fixed total surfactant concentration, omega and X(nonionic)). The influence of total surfactant concentration (micellar concentration) on the temperature-induced percolation behaviors of these systems has been investigated. The effect of Brij-58 is more pronounced than that of Brij-56 in inducing percolation. The threshold percolation temperature, Tp has been determined for these systems in presence of additives of different molecular structures, physical parameters and/or interfacial properties. The additives have shown both assisting and resisting effects on the percolation threshold. The additives, bile salt (sodium cholate), urea, formamide, cholesteryl acetate, cholesteryl benzoate, toluene, a triblock copolymer [(EO)13(PO)30(EO)13, Pluronic, PL64], polybutadiene, sucrose esters (sucrose dodecanoates, L-1695 and sucrose monostearate S-1670), formamide distinctively fall in the former category, whereas sodium chloride, cholesteryl palmitate, crown ether, ethylene glycol constitute the latter for both systems. Sucrose dodecanoates (L-595) had almost marginal effect on the process. The observed behavior of these additives on the percolation phenomenon has been explained in terms of critical packing parameter and/or other factors, which influence the texture of the interface and solution properties of the mixed reverse micellar systems. The activation energy, Ep for the percolation process has been evaluated. Ep values for the AOT/Brij-56 systems have been found to be lower than those of

  18. Effect of water on overbased sulfonate engine oil additives.

    PubMed

    Tavacoli, J W; Dowding, P J; Steytler, D C; Barnes, D J; Routh, A F

    2008-04-15

    The presence and effect of water on calcium carbonate nanoparticles used in engine additives, stabilized with a sulfonate surfactant, is investigated using small-angle neutron scattering, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and rheometry. These techniques provide complementary data that suggests the formation of a layer of water around the core of the particles ensuring continued colloidal stability yet increasing the dispersion viscosity. Through the use of small-angle neutron scattering, the dimensions of this layer have been quantified to effectively one or two water molecules in thickness. The lack of a significant electrostatic repulsion is evidence that the water layer is insufficient to cause major dissociation of surface ions.

  19. Biological Effects of Space Radiation and Development of Effective Countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronaut exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronaut health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronaut vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  20. Biological Effects of Space Radiation and Development of Effective Countermeasures

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronaut exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronaut health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronaut vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation. PMID:25258703

  1. Biological effects of space radiation and development of effective countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronauts' exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronauts' health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronauts' vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  2. Effect of Ceramic Scaffold Architectural Parameters on Biological Response

    PubMed Central

    Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Best, Serena M.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have focused on the optimization of ceramic architectures to fulfill a variety of scaffold functional requirements and improve biological response. Conventional fabrication techniques, however, do not allow for the production of geometrically controlled, reproducible structures and often fail to allow the independent variation of individual geometric parameters. Current developments in additive manufacturing technologies suggest that 3D printing will allow a more controlled and systematic exploration of scaffold architectures. This more direct translation of design into structure requires a pipeline for design-driven optimization. A theoretical framework for systematic design and evaluation of architectural parameters on biological response is presented. Four levels of architecture are considered, namely (1) surface topography, (2) pore size and geometry, (3) porous networks, and (4) macroscopic pore arrangement, including the potential for spatially varied architectures. Studies exploring the effect of various parameters within these levels are reviewed. This framework will hopefully allow uncovering of new relationships between architecture and biological response in a more systematic way as well as inform future refinement of fabrication techniques to fulfill architectural necessities with a consideration of biological implications. PMID:26501056

  3. Effect of Ceramic Scaffold Architectural Parameters on Biological Response.

    PubMed

    Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Best, Serena M

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have focused on the optimization of ceramic architectures to fulfill a variety of scaffold functional requirements and improve biological response. Conventional fabrication techniques, however, do not allow for the production of geometrically controlled, reproducible structures and often fail to allow the independent variation of individual geometric parameters. Current developments in additive manufacturing technologies suggest that 3D printing will allow a more controlled and systematic exploration of scaffold architectures. This more direct translation of design into structure requires a pipeline for design-driven optimization. A theoretical framework for systematic design and evaluation of architectural parameters on biological response is presented. Four levels of architecture are considered, namely (1) surface topography, (2) pore size and geometry, (3) porous networks, and (4) macroscopic pore arrangement, including the potential for spatially varied architectures. Studies exploring the effect of various parameters within these levels are reviewed. This framework will hopefully allow uncovering of new relationships between architecture and biological response in a more systematic way as well as inform future refinement of fabrication techniques to fulfill architectural necessities with a consideration of biological implications.

  4. Effect of additives on physicochemical properties in amorphous starch matrices.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jun; Wang, Simon; Ludescher, Richard D

    2015-03-15

    The effect of the addition of non-reducing sugars or methylcellulose on the matrix physical properties and rate of non-enzymatic browning (NBR) between exogenous glucose+lysine in a starch-based glassy matrix were studied, using the methods of luminescence and FTIR. Amorphous starch-based matrices were formulated by rapidly dehydrating potato starch gel mixed with additives at weight ratios of 7:93 (additive:starch). Data on the phosphorescence emission energy and lifetime from erythrosin B dispersed in the matrices indicated that sugars decreased starch matrix mobility in a Tg-dependent manner, except for trehalose that interacted with starch in a unique mode, while methylcellulose, the additive with the highest Tg, increased the molecular mobility. Using FTIR, we found that methylcellulose decreased the strength of hydrogen bond network and sugars enhanced the hydrogen bond strength in the order: trehalose>maltitol>sucrose. Comparing those changes with the rate of NBR between exogenous glucose+lysine, we suggest that NBR rates are primarily influenced by matrix mobility, which is modulated by the hydrogen bond network, and interactions among components.

  5. Cantaloupe melon peroxidase: characterization and effects of additives on activity.

    PubMed

    Lamikanra, O; Watson, M A

    2000-06-01

    Peroxidase in cantaloupe melon (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulatus Naud.), a fruit commonly fresh cut processed, was characterized to determine reaction pathway, optimal conditions for activity and effect of some additives on enzymatic action. Mn2+, CaCl2, NaNO2 and kinetin had partial inhibitory effects on enzyme activity. Activity was effectively inhibited by compounds capable of chelating peroxidase heme iron such as diethyldithiocarbamate and tiron, but unaffected by EDTA. Free radical scavenger, superoxide dismutase, also had no effect on reaction velocity. Enzymatic action was consistent with that of ascorbate peroxidase based on the relatively higher affinity for ascorbate over guaiacol. Optimum activity temperature was 50-55 degrees C. The enzyme was stable at temperatures below 40 degrees C and at 50 degrees C for up to 10 min. Over 90% of total activity was lost at 80 degrees C within 5 min. Broad pH optima, 5.5-7.5 at 50 degrees C and 6-7 at 30 degrees C, were obtained. Peroxidase activity in cantaloupe was higher than those in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), suggesting a relatively high oxidative stress in fresh cut cantaloupe. The potential use of ascorbate as an additive in fresh cut cantaloupe melon was demonstrated by its ability to preserve color in minimally processed fruits for 25 days at 4 degrees C, possibly as a result of an enhanced antioxidative action of the ascorbate-peroxidase complex and trace metal ion cofactors.

  6. Polarization Effects in Optical Coherence Tomography of Various Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Johannes F.; Srinivas, Shyam M.; Park, B. Hyle; Pham, Tuan H.; Chen, Zhongping; Milner, Thomas E.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) was used to obtain spatially resolved ex vivo images of polarization changes in skeletal muscle, bone, skin and brain. Through coherent detection of two orthogonal polarization states of the signal formed by interference of light reflected from the biological sample and a mirror in the reference arm of a Michelson interferometer, the depth resolved change in polarization was measured. Inasmuch as any fibrous structure will influence the polarization of light, PS-OCT is a potentially powerful technique investigating tissue structural properties. In addition, the effects of single polarization state detection on OCT image formation is demonstrated. PMID:25774083

  7. Effects of acetylacetone additions on PZT thin film processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.W.; Assink, R.A.; Dimos, D.; Sinclair, M.B.; Boyle, T.J.; Buchheit, C.D.

    1995-02-01

    Sol-gel processing methods are frequently used for the fabrication of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films for many electronic applications. Our standard approach for film fabrication utilizes lead acetate and acetic acid modified metal alkoxides of zirconium and titanium in the preparation of our precursor solutions. This report highlights some of our recent results on the effects of the addition of a second chelating ligand, acetylacetone, to this process. The authors discuss the changes in film drying behavior, densification and ceramic microstructure which accompany acetylacetone additions to the precursor solution and relate the observed variations in processing behavior to differences in chemical precursor structure induced by the acetylacetone ligand. Improvements in thin film microstructure, ferroelectric and optical properties are observed when acetylacetone is added to the precursor solution.

  8. Al addition effect of bulk MgB 2 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, K.; Ikeda, H.; Yoshizaki, R.

    2007-10-01

    The properties of transport and magnetization have been investigated for bulk MgB2Alx superconductor with Al addition (x = 0, 0.5, 1 wt%). MgB2 bulk samples sintered at different temperatures at 650-740 °C were prepared in the undoped state. The temperature and applied field dependencies of resistivity and magnetization were measured for the samples. The sample sintered at 690 °C exhibited the highest critical current density (Jc) and the lowest resistivity. This undoped sample was chosen as a criterion sample, and the effect of Al addition on the MgB2 bulk was studied from the transport and magnetization properties in a magnetic field. For MgB2Alx bulk samples sintered at 690 °C, the resistivity increased and Jc decreased as amount of Al was increased.

  9. Effect of mixed additives on lead-acid battery electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Arup; Basumallick, Indra Narayan

    This paper describes the corrosion behaviour of the positive and negative electrodes of a lead-acid battery in 5 M H 2SO 4 with binary additives such as mixtures of phosphoric acid and boric acid, phosphoric acid and tin sulphate, and phosphoric acid and picric acid. The effect of these additives is examined from the Tafel polarisation curves, double layer capacitance and percentage of inhibition efficiency. A lead salt battery has been fabricated replacing the binary mixture with an alternative electrolyte and the above electrochemical parameters have been evaluated for this lead salt battery. The results are explained in terms of H + ion transport and the morphological change of the PbSO 4 layer.

  10. Noise effects in two different biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, B.; Spezia, S.; Curcio, L.; Pizzolato, N.; Fiasconaro, A.; Valenti, D.; Lo Bue, P.; Peri, E.; Colazza, S.

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the role of the colored noise in two biological systems: (i) adults of Nezara viridula (L.) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), and (ii) polymer translocation. In the first system we analyze, by directionality tests, the response of N. viridula individuals to subthreshold signals plus noise in their mating behaviour. The percentage of insects that react to the subthreshold signal shows a nonmonotonic behaviour, characterized by the presence of a maximum, as a function of the noise intensity. This is the signature of the non-dynamical stochastic resonance phenomenon. By using a “soft” threshold model we find that the maximum of the input-output cross correlation occurs in the same range of noise intensity values for which the behavioural activation of the insects has a maximum. Moreover this maximum value is lowered and shifted towards higher noise intensities, compared to the case of white noise. In the second biological system the noise driven translocation of short polymers in crowded solutions is analyzed. An improved version of the Rouse model for a flexible polymer is adopted to mimic the molecular dynamics by taking into account both the interactions between adjacent monomers and the effects of a Lennard-Jones potential between all beads. The polymer dynamics is simulated in a two-dimensional domain by numerically solving the Langevin equations of motion in the presence of thermal fluctuations and a colored noise source. At low temperatures or for strong colored noise intensities the translocation process of the polymer chain is delayed. At low noise intensity, as the polymer length increases, we find a nonmonotonic behaviour for the mean first translocation time of the polymer centre of inertia. We show how colored noise influences the motion of short polymers, by inducing two different regimes of translocation in the dynamics of molecule transport.

  11. Assessment of additive/nonadditive effects in structure-activity relationships: implications for iterative drug design.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogendra; Gillet, Valerie J; Howe, Trevor; Pastor, Joaquin; Oyarzabal, Julen; Willett, Peter

    2008-12-11

    Free-Wilson (FW) analysis is common practice in medicinal chemistry and is based on the assumption that the contributions to activity made by substituents at different substitution positions are additive. We analyze eight near complete combinatorial libraries assayed on several different biological response(s) (GPCR, ion channel, kinase and P450 targets) and show that only half-exhibit clear additive behavior, which leads us to question the concept of additivity that is widely taken for granted in drug discovery. Next, we report a series of retrospective experiments in which subsets are extracted from the libraries for FW analysis to determine the minimum attributes (size, distribution of substituents, and activity range) necessary to reach the same conclusion about additive/nonadditive effects. These attributes can provide guidelines on when it is appropriate to apply FW analysis as well as for library design, and they also have important implications for further steps in iterative drug design.

  12. Biological properties of IRM with the addition of hydroxyapatite as a retrograde root filling material.

    PubMed

    Owadally, I D; Chong, B S; Pitt Ford, T R; Wilson, R F

    1994-10-01

    The effect of adding 10% & 20% hydroxyapatite (HAP) on the antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of IRM (Intermediate Restorative Material) when used as a retrograde root filling was compared with amalgam, a commonly used material. The antibacterial activity was assessed using the agar diffusion inhibitory test. Forty standardized pellets of each material were produced. Fresh materials, and materials aged for 1 week in sterile distilled water, were placed on blood agar plates inoculated with Streptococcus anginosus (milleri) or Enterococcus faecalis. The presence and diameter of zones of inhibition were recorded at intervals of 3, 7 and 10 days. There was no statistically significant overall difference in the response of the two bacteria tested. However, there were statistically significant overall differences in diameters of the zones of inhibition related to different materials, period of exposure and ageing of materials (P < 0.001). The diameter of the zones of inhibition increased with time for all materials, fresh and aged. IRM and both the HAP-modified forms produced large zones of inhibition. Amalgam produced no measureable zones of inhibition whether aged or fresh, regardless of period of exposure and was different from the other materials (P < 0.001). The cytotoxicity was assessed using the Millipore filter method. Ten standardized pellets of each material were produced and aged by storage in sterile distilled water for 72 h. Ten filters were included as controls. Amalgam produced a consistent cytotoxic score of 1, and the difference between amalgam and the other materials was statistically significant (P < 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Cell Biology of Thiazide Bone Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamba, Gerardo; Riccardi, Daniela

    2008-09-01

    The thiazide-sensitive Na+:Cl- cotransporter (NCC) is the major pathway for salt reabsorption in the mammalian kidney. The activity of NCC is not only related to salt metabolism, but also to calcium and magnesium homeostasis due to the inverse relationship between NCC activity and calcium reabsorption. Hence, the thiazide-type diuretics that specifically block NCC have been used for years, not only for treatment of hypertension and edematous disease, but also for the management of renal stone disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that chronic thiazide treatment is associated with higher bone mineral density and reduced risk of bone fractures, which can only partly be explained in terms of their effects on the kidney. In this regard, we have recently shown that NCC is expressed in bone cells and that inhibition of NCC in bone, either by thiazides or by reduction of NCC protein with specific siRNA, is associated with increased mineralization in vitro. These observations open a field of study to begin to understand the cell biology of the beneficial effects of thiazides in bone.

  14. A novel approach for phosphorus recovery and no wasted sludge in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process with external COD addition.

    PubMed

    Xia, Cheng-Wang; Ma, Yun-Jie; Zhang, Fang; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J

    2014-01-01

    In enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process, phosphorus (P) in wastewater is removed via wasted sludge without actual recovery. A novel approach to realize phosphorus recovery with special external chemical oxygen demand (COD) addition in EBPR process was proposed. During the new operating approach period, it was found that (1) no phosphorus was detected in the effluent; (2) with an external addition of 10 % of influent COD amount, 79 % phosphorus in the wastewater influent was recovered; (3) without wasted sludge, the MLVSS concentration in the system increased from 2,010 to 3,400 mg/L and kept stable after day 11 during 24-day operating period. This demonstrates that the novel approach is feasible to realize phosphorus recovery with no wasted sludge discharge in EBPR process. Furthermore, this approach decouples P removal and sludge age, which may enhance the application of membrane bioreactor for P removal.

  15. Eddy damping effect of additional conductors in superconducting levitation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhao-Fei; Gou, Xiao-Fan

    2015-12-01

    Passive superconducting levitation systems consisting of a high temperature superconductor (HTSC) and a permanent magnet (PM) have demonstrated several fascinating applications such as the maglev system, flywheel energy storage. Generally, for the HTSC-PM levitation system, the HTSC with higher critical current density Jc can obtain larger magnetic force to make the PM levitate over the HTSC (or suspended below the HTSC), however, the process of the vibration of the levitated PM, provides very limited inherent damping (essentially hysteresis). To improve the dynamic stability of the levitated PM, eddy damping of additional conductors can be considered as the most simple and effective approach. In this article, for the HTSC-PM levitation system with an additional copper damper attached to the HTSC, we numerically and comprehensively investigated the damping coefficient c, damping ratio, Joule heating of the copper damper, and the vibration frequency of the PM as well. Furthermore, we comparatively studied four different arrangements of the copper damper, on the comprehensive analyzed the damping effect, efficiency (defined by c/VCu, in which VCu is the volume of the damper) and Joule heating, and finally presented the most advisable arrangement.

  16. Effects of Particle Additives on Acoustically Coupled Fuel Droplet Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Hyung Sub; Plascencia Quiroz, Miguel; Vargas, Andres; Bennewitz, John; Smith, Owen; Karagozian, Ann

    2016-11-01

    Addition of nanoscale particulates to liquid hydrocarbon fuels is suggested to have numerous benefits for combustion systems, although aggregation of metal nanoparticles can produce deleterious effects. The present experiments explore the effect of nano Aluminum (nAl) additives on the combustion of single liquid fuel droplets, with and without exposure of the droplets to standing acoustic waves. Building on prior studies, the present experiments quantify variations in the burning rate constant K for ethanol droplets with increasing concentrations of nAl in a quiescent environment. Burning fuel droplets that are continuously fed via a capillary as well as suspended (non-fed) droplets are examined. Nano Al is observed to create ejections of both particles and vapor toward the end of the burning period for non-fed droplets; this phenomenon is delayed when the droplet is replenished via continuous fuel delivery. Yet for the majority of conditions explored, increasing concentrations of nAl tend to reduce K. When ethanol droplets with nAl are exposed to standing waves, acoustic perturbations appear to delay particulate agglomeration, sustaining combustion for a longer period of time and increasing K. Supported by AFOSR Grant FA9550-15-1-0339.

  17. What Makes Biology Learning Difficult and Effective: Students' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimer, Atilla

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to determine the biological topics that students have difficulties learning, the reasons why secondary school students have difficulties in learning biology, and ways to improve the effectiveness of students' biology learning. For these purposes, a self-administered questionnaire including three open-ended questions was…

  18. Probing the "additive effect" in the proline and proline hydroxamic acid catalyzed asymmetric addition of nitroalkanes to cyclic enones.

    PubMed

    Hanessian, Stephen; Govindan, Subramaniyan; Warrier, Jayakumar S

    2005-11-01

    The effect of chirality and steric bulk of 2,5-disubstituted piperazines as additives in the conjugate addition of 2-nitropropane to cyclohexenone, catalyzed by l-proline, was investigated. Neither chirality nor steric bulk affects the enantioselectivity of addition, which gives 86-93% ee in the presence of achiral and chiral nonracemic 2,5-disubstituted piperazines. Proline hydroxamic acid is shown for the first time to be an effective organocatalyst in the same Michael reaction.

  19. Thermal processing of EVA encapsulants and effects of formulation additives

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F.J.; Glick, S.H.

    1996-05-01

    The authors investigated the in-situ processing temperatures and effects of various formulation additives on the formation of ultraviolet (UV) excitable chromophores, in the thermal lamination and curing of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulants. A programmable, microprocessor-controlled, double-bag vacuum laminator was used to study two commercial as formulated EVA films, A9918P and 15295P, and solution-cast films of Elvaxrm (EVX) impregnated with various curing agents and antioxidants. The results show that the actual measured temperatures of EVA lagged significantly behind the programmed profiles for the heating elements and were affected by the total thermal mass loaded inside the laminator chamber. The antioxidant Naugard P{trademark}, used in the two commercial EVA formulations, greatly enhances the formation of UV-excitable, short chromophores upon curing, whereas other tested antioxidants show little effect. A new curing agent chosen specifically for the EVA formulation modification produces little or no effect on chromophore formation, no bubbling problems in the glass/EVX/glass laminates, and a gel content of {approximately}80% when cured at programmed 155{degrees}C for 4 min. Also demonstrated is the greater discoloring effect with higher concentrations of curing-generated chromophores.

  20. Effects of additional food in a delayed predator-prey model.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Banshidhar; Poria, Swarup

    2015-03-01

    We examine the effects of supplying additional food to predator in a gestation delay induced predator-prey system with habitat complexity. Additional food works in favor of predator growth in our model. Presence of additional food reduces the predatory attack rate to prey in the model. Supplying additional food we can control predator population. Taking time delay as bifurcation parameter the stability of the coexisting equilibrium point is analyzed. Hopf bifurcation analysis is done with respect to time delay in presence of additional food. The direction of Hopf bifurcations and the stability of bifurcated periodic solutions are determined by applying the normal form theory and the center manifold theorem. The qualitative dynamical behavior of the model is simulated using experimental parameter values. It is observed that fluctuations of the population size can be controlled either by supplying additional food suitably or by increasing the degree of habitat complexity. It is pointed out that Hopf bifurcation occurs in the system when the delay crosses some critical value. This critical value of delay strongly depends on quality and quantity of supplied additional food. Therefore, the variation of predator population significantly effects the dynamics of the model. Model results are compared with experimental results and biological implications of the analytical findings are discussed in the conclusion section.

  1. Adverse cognitive effects of antiepileptic pharmacotherapy: Each additional drug matters.

    PubMed

    Witt, Juri-Alexander; Elger, Christian E; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    The study was set up to evaluate the impact of the total drug load of antiepileptic pharmacotherapy on cognition. Retrospective analyses were based on 834 patients with epilepsy who underwent a brief routine assessment of executive function and verbal memory (EpiTrack Plus) at our department. The total drug load was quantified in two ways: (1) number of concurrent antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and (2) total drug load according to the defined daily dose (DDD) provided by the World Health Organization. The cognitive measures showed higher inverse correlations with the number of AEDs (executive function: r=-0.35, p<0.001; memory: r=-0.22, p<0.001) than with the total DDD (executive function: r=-0.27, p<0.001; memory: r=-0.17, p<0.001). Reanalysis with statistical control for disease severity hardly changed the aforementioned results. With each additional drug in polytherapy, we observed a significantly lower performance in executive function. In this regard an additional explorative approach revealed that regimens combining AEDs with favorable cognitive profiles were associated with higher cognitive performance. Correlations between indicators of disease severity and drug load indices were low: altogether explaining only up to 9% of the observed variance in drug load. The findings demonstrate a considerable adverse effect of a higher drug load on cognition, especially on executive functions. Simply counting the number of drugs may be sufficient as a rough estimate of the risk of side effects. However, the combination of AEDs with favorable cognitive profiles may attenuate the negative effect of the total drug load.

  2. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1989-04-30

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativeities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reactive probing, steady state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. CO insertion is known to be a key step to the formation of acetaldehyde and ethanol from CO hydrogenation. Reaction of ethylene with syngas is used as a probe to determine CO insertion capabilities of metal catalysts. During the sixth quarter of the project, the mechanism of CO insertion on Ni/SiO{sub 2} was investigated by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. Ni/SiO{sub 2}, a methanation catalyst, has been shown to exhibit CO insertion activity. In situ infrared studies of CO/H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/CO/H{sub 2} reactions show that the carbonylation of Ni/SiO{sub 2} to Ni(CO){sub 4} leads to an inhibition of methanation in CO hydrogenation but an enhancement of formation of propionaldehyde in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/CO/H{sub 2} reaction. The results suggest that the sites for propionaldehyde formation is different from those for methanation.

  3. Hierarchical additive effects on heterosis in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Zhiwu; Hu, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Yao, Guoxin; Zhu, Renshan; Huang, Wenchao; Zhu, Yingguo

    2015-01-01

    Exploitation of heterosis in crops has contributed greatly to improvement in global food and energy production. In spite of the pervasive importance of heterosis, a complete understanding of its mechanisms has remained elusive. In this study, a small test-crossed rice population was constructed to investigate the formation mechanism of heterosis for 13 traits. The results of the relative mid-parent heterosis and modes of inheritance of all investigated traits demonstrated that additive effects were the foundation of heterosis for complex traits in a hierarchical structure, and multiplicative interactions among the component traits were the framework of heterosis in complex traits. Furthermore, new balances between unit traits and related component traits provided hybrids with the opportunity to achieve an optimal degree of heterosis for complex traits. This study dissected heterosis of both reproductive and vegetative traits from the perspective of hierarchical structure for the first time. Additive multiplicative interactions of component traits were proven to be the origin of heterosis in complex traits. Meanwhile, more attention should be paid to component traits, rather than complex traits, in the process of revealing the mechanism of heterosis. PMID:26442051

  4. Biological effects of high DC magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1981-06-01

    The principal focus of the program is the analysis of magnetic field effects on physiological functions in experimental animals and selected organ and tissue systems. A major research effort has involved the use of electrical recording techniques to detect functional alterations in the cardiovascular, neural, and visual systems during the application of DC magnetic fields. These systems involve ionic conduction processes, and are therefore potentially sensitive to electrodynamic interactions with an applied magnetic field. In the specific case of the visual system, magnetic interactions could also arise through orientational effects on the magnetically anisotropic photopigment molecules within retinal photoreceptor cells. In addition to studies with potentially sensitive target tissues, an evaluation is being made of magnetic field effects on a broad range of other physiological functions in laboratory mammals, including the measurement of circadian rhythms using noninvasive recording techniques. Results of investigations of magnetic field effects on the conformation of DNA, and on the growth and development of plants and insects are also reported. Figures and tables provide a brief summary of some representative observations in each of the research areas described. No significant alterations were observed in any of the physiological parameters examined to date, with the exception of major changes that occur in the electrocardiogram during magnetic field exposure. Studies with several species of animals have provided evidence that this phenomenon is attributable to electrical potentials that are induced during pulsatile blood flow in the aorta and in other major vessels of the circulatory system.

  5. Evolutionary indirect effects of biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jennifer A

    2012-09-01

    Just as ecological indirect effects can have a wide range of consequences for community structure and ecosystem function, theory suggests that evolutionary indirect effects can also influence community dynamics and the outcome of species interactions. There is little empirical evidence documenting such effects, however. Here, I use a multi-generation selection experiment in the field to investigate: (1) how the exotic plant Medicago polymorpha and the exotic insect herbivore Hypera brunneipennis affect the evolution of anti-herbivore resistance traits in the native plant Lotus wrangelianus and (2) how observed Lotus evolutionary responses to Hypera alter interactions between Lotus and other members of the herbivore community. In one of two study populations, I document rapid evolutionary changes in Lotus resistance to Hypera in response to insecticide treatments that experimentally reduced Hypera abundance, and in response to Medicago-removal treatments that also reduced Hypera abundance. These evolutionary changes in response to Hypera result in reduced attack by aphids. Thus, an evolutionary change caused by one herbivore species alters interactions with other herbivore taxa, an example of an eco-evolutionary feedback. Given that many traits mediate interactions with multiple species, the effects of evolutionary changes in response to one key biotic selective agent may often cascade through interaction webs to influence additional community members.

  6. Spatial mapping of the biologic effectiveness of scanned particle beams: towards biologically optimized particle therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Fada; Bronk, Lawrence; Titt, Uwe; Lin, Steven H.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Kerr, Matthew D.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Dinh, Jeffrey; Sobieski, Mary; Stephan, Clifford; Peeler, Christopher R.; Taleei, Reza; Mohan, Radhe; Grosshans, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of particles used in radiation therapy, such as protons, have been well characterized, and their dose distributions are superior to photon-based treatments. However, proton therapy may also have inherent biologic advantages that have not been capitalized on. Unlike photon beams, the linear energy transfer (LET) and hence biologic effectiveness of particle beams varies along the beam path. Selective placement of areas of high effectiveness could enhance tumor cell kill and simultaneously spare normal tissues. However, previous methods for mapping spatial variations in biologic effectiveness are time-consuming and often yield inconsistent results with large uncertainties. Thus the data needed to accurately model relative biological effectiveness to guide novel treatment planning approaches are limited. We used Monte Carlo modeling and high-content automated clonogenic survival assays to spatially map the biologic effectiveness of scanned proton beams with high accuracy and throughput while minimizing biological uncertainties. We found that the relationship between cell kill, dose, and LET, is complex and non-unique. Measured biologic effects were substantially greater than in most previous reports, and non-linear surviving fraction response was observed even for the highest LET values. Extension of this approach could generate data needed to optimize proton therapy plans incorporating variable RBE. PMID:25984967

  7. Constant-Pressure Combustion Charts Including Effects of Diluent Addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, L Richard; Bogart, Donald

    1949-01-01

    Charts are presented for the calculation of (a) the final temperatures and the temperature changes involved in constant-pressure combustion processes of air and in products of combustion of air and hydrocarbon fuels, and (b) the quantity of hydrocarbon fuels required in order to attain a specified combustion temperature when water, alcohol, water-alcohol mixtures, liquid ammonia, liquid carbon dioxide, liquid nitrogen, liquid oxygen, or their mixtures are added to air as diluents or refrigerants. The ideal combustion process and combustion with incomplete heat release from the primary fuel and from combustible diluents are considered. The effect of preheating the mixture of air and diluents and the effect of an initial water-vapor content in the combustion air on the required fuel quantity are also included. The charts are applicable only to processes in which the final mixture is leaner than stoichiometric and at temperatures where dissociation is unimportant. A chart is also included to permit the calculation of the stoichiometric ratio of hydrocarbon fuel to air with diluent addition. The use of the charts is illustrated by numerical examples.

  8. Ivermectin plus diethylcarbamazine: an additive effect on early microfilarial clearance.

    PubMed

    Moulia-Pelat, J P; Nguyen, L N; Glaziou, P; Chanteau, S; Ottesen, E A; Cardines, R; Martin, P M; Cartel, J L

    1994-02-01

    The effects of ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine (DEC), and the combination of both drugs on levels of microfilaremia (mf) were studied in 30 male Polynesian Wuchereria bancrofti carriers. Microfilarial densities were measured 30 min (H1/2), 1 hr (H1), and 2, 4, 8, 24, and 96 hr (H2, H4, H8, H24, and H96) after supervised single doses of ivermectin plus DEC (400 micrograms/kg plus 1 mg/kg, respectively, 400 micrograms/kg plus 3 mg/kg, respectively, and 400 micrograms/kg plus 6 mg/kg, respectively), DEC (6 mg/kg) alone, and ivermectin (400 micrograms/kg and 100 micrograms/kg, respectively) alone given to six groups of five patients each. The results showed that 1) DEC alone or combined with ivermectin induced a rapid clearance of mf after drug intake; at H1/2, the number of circulating microfilariae was reduced to 16%, 8%, 28%, and 31%, respectively, of pretreatment values in the groups receiving ivermectin plus DEC (400 micrograms/kg plus 1 mg/kg, 400 micrograms/kg plus 3 mg/kg, and 400 micrograms/kg plus 6 mg/kg) and DEC (6 mg/kg) alone; 2) ivermectin alone induced a rapid increase of mf densities during the first 2 hr, followed by a sharp decrease from H4 to H96; and 3) between H8 and H96, mf clearance was almost complete with the combination of ivermectin and DEC. A comparison among groups did not show any synergistic interaction between ivermectin and DEC on the clearance of microfilaria, with the effect of each drug being additive to each another.

  9. Effect of surfactant addition on phenanthrene biodegradation in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Tsomides, H.J.; Hughes, J.B.; Thomas, J.M.; Ward, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine whether commercial surfactants enhance the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sediments. Phenanthrene was chosen as a representative PAH. An inoculum of PAH-degrading microorganisms, enriched from an aquatic sediment, was used in sediment-water slurry microcosm biodegradation experiments. Of seven nonionic surfactants tested, only one (Triton X-100) did not inhibit phenanthrene mineralization at concentrations above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Temporal studies on Triton X-100 revealed that while it initially inhibited mineralization in sediment-free microcosms, after 1 week Triton X-100 slightly improved phenanthrene biotransformation and mineralization in microcosms with and without sediment. For all treatments, phenanthrene disappearance was complete after 9 d. and mineralization reached 50 to 65% after 12 d. Sorption to the sediment appears to have reduced the free aqueous surfactant concentration, thereby reducing surfactant toxicity to the microorganisms. These results suggest that many surfactants are toxic to PAH-degrading microorganisms, and while surfactant addition may not always have adverse effects on biodegradation, the use of surfactants might not be necessary to achieve complete contaminant removal.

  10. Effect of surfactant addition on phenanthrene biodegradation in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Tsomides, H.J.; Hughes, J.B.; Thomas, J.M.; Ward, C.H.

    1995-06-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine whether commercial surfactants enhance the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sediments. Phenanthrene was chosen as a representative PAH; an inoculum of PAH-degrading microorganisms, enriched from an aquatic sediment, was used in sediment-water slurry microcosm biodegradation experiments. Of seven non-ionic surfactants tested, only one (Triton X-100) did not inhibit phenanthrene mineralization at concentrations above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Temporal studies on Triton X-100 revealed that while it initially inhibited mineralization in sediment-free microcosms, after 1 week Triton X-100 slightly improved phenanthrene biotransformation and mineralization in microcosms with and without sediment. For all treatments, phenanthrene disappearance was complete after 9 d, and mineralization reached 50 to 65% after 12 d. Sorption to the sediment appears to have reduced the free aqueous surfactant concentration, thereby reducing surfactant toxicity to the microorganisms. These results suggest that many surfactants are toxic to PAH-degrading microorganisms, and while surfactant addition may not always have adverse effects on biodegradation, the use of surfactants might not be desirable to achieve complete contamination removal.

  11. Congruence of additive and non-additive effects on gene expression estimated from pedigree and SNP data.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joseph E; Henders, Anjali K; McRae, Allan F; Kim, Jinhee; Hemani, Gibran; Martin, Nicholas G; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Gibson, Greg; Montgomery, Grant W; Visscher, Peter M

    2013-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that heritable variation in gene expression underlies genetic variation in susceptibility to disease. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the similarity between relatives for transcript variation is warranted--in particular, dissection of phenotypic variation into additive and non-additive genetic factors and shared environmental effects. We conducted a gene expression study in blood samples of 862 individuals from 312 nuclear families containing MZ or DZ twin pairs using both pedigree and genotype information. From a pedigree analysis we show that the vast majority of genetic variation across 17,994 probes is additive, although non-additive genetic variation is identified for 960 transcripts. For 180 of the 960 transcripts with non-additive genetic variation, we identify expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) with dominance effects in a sample of 339 unrelated individuals and replicate 31% of these associations in an independent sample of 139 unrelated individuals. Over-dominance was detected and replicated for a trans association between rs12313805 and ETV6, located 4MB apart on chromosome 12. Surprisingly, only 17 probes exhibit significant levels of common environmental effects, suggesting that environmental and lifestyle factors common to a family do not affect expression variation for most transcripts, at least those measured in blood. Consistent with the genetic architecture of common diseases, gene expression is predominantly additive, but a minority of transcripts display non-additive effects.

  12. Lubricant and additive effects on spur gear fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Scibbe, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Spur gear endurance tests were conducted with six lubricants using a single lot of consumable-electrode vacuum melted (CVM) AISI 9310 spur gears. The sixth lubricant was divided into four batches each of which had a different additive content. Lubricants tested with a phosphorus-type load carrying additive showed a statistically significant improvement in life over lubricants without this type of additive. The presence of sulfur type antiwear additives in the lubricant did not appear to affect the surface fatigue life of the gears. No statistical difference in life was produced with those lubricants of different base stocks but with similar viscosity, pressure-viscosity coefficients and antiwear additives. Gears tested with a 0.1 wt % sulfur and 0.1 wt % phosphorus EP additives in the lubricant had reactive films that were 200 to 400 (0.8 to 1.6 microns) thick.

  13. Technology Rich Biology Labs: Effects of Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuech, Robert; Zogg, Gregory; Zeeman, Stephan; Johnson, Mark

    This paper describes a study conducted on the lab sections of the general biology course for non-science majors at the University of New England, and reports findings of student misconceptions about photosynthesis and the mass/carbon uptake during plant growth. The current study placed high technology analytic tools in the hands of introductory…

  14. Relative effectiveness of additive pain interventions during vaccination in infants

    PubMed Central

    Taddio, Anna; Riddell, Rebecca Pillai; Ipp, Moshe; Moss, Steven; Baker, Stephen; Tolkin, Jonathan; Malini, Dave; Feerasta, Sharmeen; Govan, Preeya; Fletcher, Emma; Wong, Horace; McNair, Caitlin; Mithal, Priyanjali; Stephens, Derek

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vaccine injections can cause acute pain and distress in infants, which can contribute to dissatisfaction with the vaccination experience and vaccine hesitancy. We sought to compare the effectiveness of additive pain interventions administered consistently during vaccine injections in the first year of life. METHODS: We conducted a multicentre, longitudinal, double-blind, add-on, randomized controlled trial. Healthy infants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 levels of pain management for all vaccine injections at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months: (i) placebo control; (ii) parent-directed video education about infant soothing; (iii) the video plus sucrose administered orally or (iv) the video plus sucrose plus liposomal lidocaine applied topically. All infants benefit from injection techniques that minimize pain. We used a double-dummy design; hence all parents watched a video (active psychological intervention or placebo) and all infants received oral solution (sucrose or placebo) and topical cream (lidocaine or placebo). We assessed infant distress during 3 phases — preinjection (baseline), vaccine injection (needle), and 1 minute postinjection (recovery) — using the Modified Behavioural Pain Scale (range 0–10). We compared scores between groups and across infant ages using a mixed-model repeated-measures analysis. RESULTS: A total of 352 infants participated in the study, from Jan. 17, 2012, to Feb. 2, 2016. Demographics did not differ among intervention groups (p > 0.05). Baseline pain scores did not differ among intervention groups (p = 0.4), but did differ across ages (p < 0.001). Needle pain scores differed among groups (p = 0.003) and across ages (p < 0.001). The mean (± standard deviation) needle score was 6.3 (± 0.8) in the video–sucrose–lidocaine group compared with 6.7 (± 0.8) in each of the other groups. There were no other between-group differences. Recovery scores did not differ among groups (p = 0.98), but did differ across ages (p < 0

  15. Dose Addition Models Based on Biologically Relevant Reductions in Fetal Testosterone Accurately Predict Postnatal Reproductive Tract Alterations by a Phthalate Mixture in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Howdeshell, Kembra L.; Rider, Cynthia V.; Wilson, Vickie S.; Furr, Johnathan R.; Lambright, Christy R.; Gray, L. Earl

    2015-01-01

    Challenges in cumulative risk assessment of anti-androgenic phthalate mixtures include a lack of data on all the individual phthalates and difficulty determining the biological relevance of reduction in fetal testosterone (T) on postnatal development. The objectives of the current study were 2-fold: (1) to test whether a mixture model of dose addition based on the fetal T production data of individual phthalates would predict the effects of a 5 phthalate mixture on androgen-sensitive postnatal male reproductive tract development, and (2) to determine the biological relevance of the reductions in fetal T to induce abnormal postnatal reproductive tract development using data from the mixture study. We administered a dose range of the mixture (60, 40, 20, 10, and 5% of the top dose used in the previous fetal T production study consisting of 300 mg/kg per chemical of benzyl butyl (BBP), di(n)butyl (DBP), diethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP), di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP), and 100 mg dipentyl (DPP) phthalate/kg; the individual phthalates were present in equipotent doses based on their ability to reduce fetal T production) via gavage to Sprague Dawley rat dams on GD8-postnatal day 3. We compared observed mixture responses to predictions of dose addition based on the previously published potencies of the individual phthalates to reduce fetal T production relative to a reference chemical and published postnatal data for the reference chemical (called DAref). In addition, we predicted DA (called DAall) and response addition (RA) based on logistic regression analysis of all 5 individual phthalates when complete data were available. DA ref and DA all accurately predicted the observed mixture effect for 11 of 14 endpoints. Furthermore, reproductive tract malformations were seen in 17–100% of F1 males when fetal T production was reduced by about 25–72%, respectively. PMID:26350170

  16. Chemistry of Food Additives: Direct and Indirect Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauli, George H.

    1984-01-01

    The primary component(s), impurities, and degradation products of polysorbate 80, nitrate and nitrite salts, and diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) are discussed. Safety considerations related to these food additives are also noted. The chick-edema factor which results from an additive in poultry feed is also discussed. (JN)

  17. Biological Effects of Millimeter-Wave Irradiation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    CODES I8 SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Millimeter waves Bacillus megaterium 1...reported by earlier workers. Experiments were also performed to determine the Raman spectra of cultures of Bacillus megaterium to investigate if these are...L. and 0. P. Gandhi, "Absence of biologically related Raman lines in cultures of Bacillus megaterium ," Physics Letters, Vol. 102A, 1984, pp. 380-382

  18. Effects of Simulated Rare Earth Recycling Wastewaters on Biological Nitrification.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-18

    Increasing rare earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing will result in generation of new wastewaters. In some cases, disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored, but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50, and 100 ppm), and the extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions at 50 and 100 ppm inhibited N. europaea, even when virtually all of the REE was insoluble. Provision of TBP with Eu increased N. europaea inhibition, although TBP alone did not substantially alter activity. For N. winogradskyi cultures, Eu or Y additions at all tested levels induced significant inhibition, and nitrification shut down completely with TBP addition. REE solubility was calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but also likely affected by the formation of unknown phosphate phases, which determined aqueous concentrations experienced by the microorganisms.

  19. Impact of release rates on the effectiveness of augmentative biological control agents.

    PubMed

    Crowder, David W

    2007-01-01

    To access the effect of augmentative biological control agents, 31 articles were reviewed that investigated the impact of release rates of 35 augmentative biological control agents on the control of 42 arthropod pests. In 64% of the cases, the release rate of the biological control agent did not significantly affect the density or mortality of the pest insect. Results where similar when parasitoids or predators were utilized as the natural enemy. Within any order of natural enemy, there were more cases where release rates did not affect augmentative biological control than cases where release rates were significant. There were more cases in which release rates did not affect augmentative biological control when pests were from the orders Hemiptera, Acari, or Diptera, but not with pests from the order Lepidoptera. In most cases, there was an optimal release rate that produced effective control of a pest species. This was especially true when predators were used as a biological control agent. Increasing the release rate above the optimal rate did not improve control of the pest and thus would be economically detrimental. Lower release rates were of ten optimal when biological control was used in conjunction with insecticides. In many cases, the timing and method of biological control applications were more significant factors impacting the effectiveness of biological control than the release rate. Additional factors that may limit the relative impact of release rates include natural enemy fecundity, establishment rates, prey availability, dispersal, and cannibalism.

  20. Impact of Release Rates on the Effectiveness of Augmentative Biological Control Agents

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, David W.

    2007-01-01

    To access the effect of augmentative biological control agents, 31 articles were reviewed that investigated the impact of release rates of 35 augmentative biological control agents on the control of 42 arthropod pests. In 64% of the cases, the release rate of the biological control agent did not significantly affect the density or mortality of the pest insect. Results where similar when parasitoidsor predators were utilized as the natural enemy. Within any order of natural enemy, there were more cases where release rates did not affect augmentative biological control than cases where release rates were significant. There were more cases in which release rates did not affect augmentative biological control when pests were from the orders Hemiptera, Acari, or Diptera, but not with pests from the order Lepidoptera. In most cases, there was an optimal release rate that produced effective control of a pest species. This was especially true when predators were used as a biological control agent. Increasing the release rate above the optimal rate did not improve control of the pest and thus would be economically detrimental. Lower release rates were of ten optimal when biological control was used in conjunction with insecticides. In many cases, the timing and method of biological control applications were more significant factors impacting the effectiveness of biological control than the release rate. Additional factors that may limit the relative impact of release rates include natural enemy fecundity, establishment rates, prey availability, dispersal, and cannibalism. PMID:20307240

  1. Concentration Addition, Independent Action and Generalized Concentration Addition Models for Mixture Effect Prediction of Sex Hormone Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Humans are concomitantly exposed to numerous chemicals. An infinite number of combinations and doses thereof can be imagined. For toxicological risk assessment the mathematical prediction of mixture effects, using knowledge on single chemicals, is therefore desirable. We investigated pros and cons of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast, antagonism was observed for effects of Mixture 2 on this hormone. The mixtures contained chemicals exerting only limited maximal effects. This hampered prediction by the CA and IA models, whereas the GCA model could be used to predict a full dose response curve. Regarding effects on progesterone and estradiol, some chemicals were having stimulatory effects whereas others had inhibitory effects. The three models were not applicable in this situation and no predictions could be performed. Finally, the expected contributions of single chemicals to the mixture effects were calculated. Prochloraz was the predominant but not sole driver of the mixtures, suggesting that one chemical alone was not responsible for the mixture effects. In conclusion, the GCA model seemed to be superior to the CA and IA models for the prediction of testosterone effects. A situation with chemicals exerting opposing effects, for which the models could not be applied, was identified. In addition, the data indicate that in non-potency adjusted mixtures the effects cannot always be

  2. Facile preparation and biological imaging of luminescent polymeric nanoprobes with aggregation-induced emission characteristics through Michael addition reaction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiulan; Wang, Ke; Xu, Dazhuang; Liu, Meiying; Wan, Qing; Huang, Hongye; Liang, Shangdong; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-09-01

    Water dispersion aggregation-induced emission (AIE) dyes based nanomaterials have recently attracted increasing attention in the biomedical fields because of their unique optical properties, outstanding performance as imaging and therapeutic agents. The methods to conjugate hydrophilic polymers with AIE dyes to solve the hydrophobic nature of AIE dyes and makeS them widely used in biomedicine, which have been extensively explored and paid great effort previously. Although great advance has been made in the fabrication and biomedical applications of AIE-active polymeric nanoprobes, facile and efficient strategies for fabrication of biodegradable AIE-active nanoprobes are still high desirable. In this work, amphiphilic biodegradable fluorescent organic nanoparticles (PLL-TPE-O-E FONs) have been fabricated for the first time by conjugation of AIE dye tetraphenylethene acrylate (TPE-O-E) with Poly-l-Lysine (PLL) through a facile one-step Michael addition reaction, which was carried out under rather mild conditions, included air atmosphere, near room temperature and absent of metal catalysts or hazardous reagents. Due to the unique AIE properties, these amphiphilic copolymers tend to self-assemble into high luminescent water dispersible nanoparticles with size range from 400 to 600nm. Laser scanning microscope and cytotoxicity results revealed that PLL-TPE-O-E FONs can be internalized into cytoplasm with negative cytotoxicity, which implied that PLL-TPE-O-E FONs are promising for biological applications.

  3. Biological effects of inorganic phosphate: potential signal of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Park, Sung-Jin; Lee, Somin; Kim, Sanghwa; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) plays crucial roles in several biological processes and signaling pathways. Pi uptake is regulated by sodium-dependent phosphate (Na/Pi) transporters (NPTs). Moreover, Pi is used as a food additive in food items such as sausages, crackers, dairy products, and beverages. However, the high serum concentration of phosphate (> 5.5 mg/dL) can cause adverse renal effects, cardiovascular effects including vascular or valvular calcification, and stimulate bone resorption. In addition, Pi can also alter vital cellular signaling, related to cell growth and cap-dependent protein translation. Moreover, intake of dietary Pi, whether high (1.0%) or low (0.1%), affects organs in developing mice, and is related to tumorigenesis in mice. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of Pi is the daily dietary intake required to maintain levels above the lower limit of the range of normal serum Pi concentration (2.7 mg/dL) for most individuals (97-98%). Thus, adequate intake of Pi (RDA; 700 mg/day) and maintenance of normal Pi concentration (2.7-4.5 mg/dL) are important for health and prevention of diseases caused by inadequate Pi intake.

  4. Effects of Video Games as Reinforcers for Computerized Addition Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axelrod, Saul; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Four 2nd-grade students completed addition problems on a computer, using video games as reinforcers. Two variable ratio schedules of reinforcement failed to increase student accuracy or the rate of correct responses. In a no-games reinforcement condition, students had more opportunities to respond and had a greater number of correct answers.…

  5. Toxicogenomics concepts and applications to study hepatic effects of food additives and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Stierum, Rob . E-mail: stierum@voeding.tno.nl; Heijne, Wilbert; Kienhuis, Anne; Ommen, Ben van; Groten, John

    2005-09-01

    Transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics are genomics technologies with great potential in toxicological sciences. Toxicogenomics involves the integration of conventional toxicological examinations with gene, protein or metabolite expression profiles. An overview together with selected examples of the possibilities of genomics in toxicology is given. The expectations raised by toxicogenomics are earlier and more sensitive detection of toxicity. Furthermore, toxicogenomics will provide a better understanding of the mechanism of toxicity and may facilitate the prediction of toxicity of unknown compounds. Mechanism-based markers of toxicity can be discovered and improved interspecies and in vitro-in vivo extrapolations will drive model developments in toxicology. Toxicological assessment of chemical mixtures will benefit from the new molecular biological tools. In our laboratory, toxicogenomics is predominantly applied for elucidation of mechanisms of action and discovery of novel pathway-supported mechanism-based markers of liver toxicity. In addition, we aim to integrate transcriptome, proteome and metabolome data, supported by bioinformatics to develop a systems biology approach for toxicology. Transcriptomics and proteomics studies on bromobenzene-mediated hepatotoxicity in the rat are discussed. Finally, an example is shown in which gene expression profiling together with conventional biochemistry led to the discovery of novel markers for the hepatic effects of the food additives butylated hydroxytoluene, curcumin, propyl gallate and thiabendazole.

  6. Coexposure to phytoestrogens and bisphenol a mimics estrogenic effects in an additive manner.

    PubMed

    Katchy, Anne; Pinto, Caroline; Jonsson, Philip; Nguyen-Vu, Trang; Pandelova, Marchela; Riu, Anne; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Samarov, Daniel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Bondesson, Maria; Williams, Cecilia

    2014-03-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) are abundant in our environment. A number of EDCs, including bisphenol A (BPA) can bind to the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases such as breast cancer. Early exposure is of particular concern; many EDCs cross the placenta and infants have measurable levels of, eg, BPA. In addition, infants are frequently fed soy-based formula (SF) that contains phytoestrogens. Effects of combined exposure to xeno- and phytoestrogens are poorly studied. Here, we extensively compared to what extent BPA, genistein, and an extract of infant SF mimic estrogen-induced gene transcription and cell proliferation. We investigated ligand-specific effects on ER activation in HeLa-ERα and ERβ reporter cells; on proliferation, genome-wide gene regulation and non-ER-mediated effects in MCF7 breast cancer cells; and how coexposure influenced these effects. The biological relevance was explored using enrichment analyses of differentially regulated genes and clustering with clinical breast cancer profiles. We demonstrate that coexposure to BPA and genistein, or SF, results in increased functional and transcriptional estrogenic effects. Using statistical modeling, we determine that BPA and phytoestrogens act in an additive manner. The proliferative and transcriptional effects of the tested compounds mimic those of 17β-estradiol, and are abolished by cotreatment with an ER antagonist. Gene expression profiles induced by each compound clustered with poor prognosis breast cancer, indicating that exposure may adversely affect breast cancer prognosis. This study accentuates that coexposure to BPA and soy-based phytoestrogens results in additive estrogenic effects, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases, including breast cancer.

  7. Magnetic field effects in chemistry and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulten, Klaus

    Chemical and biological photoprocesses which involve bimolecular reactions between non-zero spin intermediates, e.g. doublet molecules 2A+2B, often produce the intermediate molecular pair in a pure overall spin state, e.g. a singlet state 1(2A+2B). and select for the reaction channels again such spin states, e.g. a triplet state 3(2A+2B). The necessery transition 1(2A+2B)→3(2A+2B) is affected by magnetic interactions (hyperfine, Zeeman, zero field splitting) and can be influenced by magnetic fields. Examples are photoinduced electron transfer processes, e.g. the primary reaction of photosynthesis.

  8. The effect of feedstock additives on FCC catalyst deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.; Koon, C.L.; McGhee, B.

    1995-12-31

    Fluid catalytic cracking is a major petroleum refining process and because of this the deactivation of FCC catalysts by coke deposition has been the subject of considerable investigation during the past 50 years. Nevertheless, a lack of understanding of the fundamental understanding of processes leading to coke formation still exists. Basic studies using Zeolites have usually involved excessively high levels of coke deposits compared to normal FCC operation. The present study addresses coke formation at realistic levels of 0.5 to 1.0% w/w using a standard MAT reactor in which concentrations of 1% and 10% of various additives were added to the n-hexadecane feedstock. These additives included, quinoline, phenanthrene, benzofuran, thianaphthene and indene. The coke formed was characterised by mass spectrometry and was significantly aliphatic in nature, the amount formed increasing in the order quinoline, phenanthrene, thianaphthene, benzofuran, indene. Quinoline acts primarily as a poison, whereas the other additives tend to promote coke formation in n-hexadecane cracking.

  9. Effect of shaddock albedo addition on the properties of frankfurters.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bing; Li, Xingmin; Pan, Teng; Zheng, Limin; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Huiyuan; Jiang, Lu; Zhen, Shaobo; Ren, Fazheng

    2015-07-01

    To explore the potential as a natural auxiliary emulsifier, shaddock albedo was added into frankfurters at six different levels: 0.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10 and 12.5 %. The emulsion capacity (EC) of meat batters and cooking properties of frankfurters were evaluated. EC of meat batters was improved with the addition of shaddock albedo and the maximum value was reached at the 5 % albedo concentration. The addition of shaddock albedo resulted in lower cooking losses of frankfurters, with the lowest value obtained at the 7.5 % level. The presence of shaddock albedo decreased the total expressible fluid (TEF) and the proportion of fat in total expressible fluid (PF) which indicated the emulsion stability of frankfurters and the lowest values both occurred at the concentration of 7.5 %. Shaddock albedo inclusion increased the lightness and yellowness of frankfurters and decreased redness. Texture profile analysis showed increased hardness and decreased chewiness of frankfurters with the addition of shaddock albedo. Consequently, shaddock albedo could be a potential source of auxiliary emulsifier filler for emulsion-type meat products.

  10. The Effect of Tungsten Additions on Disk Alloy CH98

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Gabb, Timothy P.

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for future subsonic transports will probably have higher pressure ratios which will require nickelbase superalloy disks with 1300 to 1400 F temperature capability. Several advanced disk alloys are being developed to fill this need. One of these, CH98, is a promising candidate for gas turbine engines and is being studied in NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program. For large disks, residual stresses generated during quenching from solution heat treatments are often reduced by a stabilization heat treatment, in which the disk is heated in the range of 1500 to 1600 F for several hours followed by a static air cool and age. The reduction in residual stress levels lessens distortion during machining of disks. Previous work on CH98 has indicated that stabilization treatments will decrease creep capability, however, tungsten additions appear to improve the creep capability of stabilized and aged CH98. In this study, a systematic variation of tungsten additions to CH98 was investigated. Specifically, the 1300 F tensile, creep, and fatigue crack growth properties of stabilized CH 98 were assessed with varying levels of tungsten additions.

  11. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  12. Iron diminishes the in vitro biological effect of vanadium.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanistic pathways underlying inflammatory injury following exposures to vanadium-containing compounds are not defined. We tested the postulate that the in vitro biological effect of vanadium results from its impact on iron homeostasis. Human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells ex...

  13. The Effect of Fluorocarbon Surfactant Additives on the Effective Viscosity of Acetone Solutions of Cellulose Diacetate,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    34 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION i00 Lfl .. THE EFFECT OF FLUOROCARBON SURFACTANT ADDITIVES ON THE EFFECTIVE VISCOSITY OF ACETONE SOLUTIONS OF CELLULOSE...ADDITIVES ON TH~ .. t- ’_ ition EFFECTIVE VISCOSITY OF ACETONE SOLUTIONS OF CELLULOSE DIACETATE D~rbt~l By: L.A. Shits, N. Yu. Kal’nova Codesuton English...VISCOSITY OF ACETONE SOLUTIONS OF CELLULOSE DIACETATE L. A. Shits, N. Yu. Kal’nova (Institute of Physical Chemistry of the AS USSR, Moscow) ! - The

  14. [Computational radiofrequency electromagnetic field dosimetry in evaluation of biological effects].

    PubMed

    Perov, S Iu; Kudryashov, Iu B; Rubtsova, N B

    2012-01-01

    Given growing computational resources, radiofrequency electromagnetic field dosimetry is becoming more vital in the study of biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation. The study analyzes numerical methods which are used in theoretical dosimetry to assess the exposure level and specific absorption rate distribution. The advances of theoretical dosimetry are shown. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods are analyzed in respect to electromagnetic field biological effects. The finite-difference time-domain method was implemented in detail; also evaluated were possible uncertainties of complex biological structure simulation for bioelectromagnetic investigations.

  15. Role of quantity of additional food to predators as a control in predator-prey systems with relevance to pest management and biological conservation.

    PubMed

    Srinivasu, P D N; Prasad, B S R V

    2011-10-01

    Necessity to understand the role of additional food as a tool in biological control programs is being increasingly felt, particularly due to its eco-friendly nature. A thorough mathematical analysis in this direction revealed the vital role of quality and quantity of the additional food in the controllability of the predator-prey systems. In this article controllability of the additional food--provided predator-prey system is studied from perspectives of pest eradication and biological conservation. Time optimal paths have been constructed to drive the state of the system to a desired terminal state by choosing quantity of the additional food as control variable. The theory developed in this article has been illustrated by solving problems related to pest eradication and biological conservation.

  16. Effects of an additional dimension in the Young experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, Allan Kardec

    2015-09-15

    The results of the Young experiment can be analyzed either by classical or Quantum Physics. The later one though leads to a more complete interpretation, based on two different patterns that appear when one works either with single or double slits. Here we show that the two patterns can be derived from a single principle, in the context of General Relativity, if one assumes an additional spatial dimension to the four known today. The found equations yield the same results as those in Quantum Mechanics.

  17. Biological Effects of the Great Oxidation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schopf, J.

    2012-12-01

    Fossil evidence of photoautotrophy, documented in Precambrian sediments by stromatolites, stromatolitic microfossils, and carbon isotopic data consistent with autotrophic CO2-fixation, extends to ~3,500 Ma. Such data, however, are insufficient to establish the time of origin of O2-producing (cyanobacterial) photosynthesis from its anoxygenic, photosynthetic bacterial, evolutionary precursor. The oldest (Paleoarchean) stromatolites may have been formed by anoxygenic photoautotrophs, rather than the cyanobacteria that dominate Proterozoic and modern stromatolites. Unlike the cyanobacteria of Proterozoic microbial assemblages, the filamentous and coccoidal microfossils of Archean deposits may represent remnants of non-O2-producing prokaryotes. And although the chemistry of Archean organic matter shows it to be biogenic, its carbon isotopic composition is insufficient to differentiate between oxygenic and anoxygenic sources. Though it is well established that Earth's ecosystem has been based on autotrophy since its early stages and that O2-producing photosynthesis evolved earlier, perhaps much earlier, than the increase of atmospheric oxygen in the ~2,450 and ~2,320 Ma Great Oxidation Event (GOE), the time of origin of oxygenic photoautotrophy has yet to be established. Recent findings suggest that Earth's ecosystem responded more or less immediately to the GOE. The increase of atmospheric oxygen markedly affected ocean water chemistry, most notably by increasing the availability of biologically usable oxygen (which enabled the development of obligate aerobes, such as eukaryotes), and of nitrate, sulfate and hydrogen sulfide (the increase of H2S being a result of microbial reduction of sulfate), the three reactants that power the anaerobic basis of sulfur-cycling microbial sulfuretums. Fossil evidence of the earliest eukaryotes (widely accepted to date from ~1800 Ma and, arguably, ~2200 Ma) fit this scenario, but the most telling example of life's response to the GOE

  18. Effects of Fuel Specification and Additives on Soot Formation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    develop models destined for gas turbine design. Present knowledge of these effects is limited to systems which are either too simple to adequately...information essential. To answer these technical questions, a multifaceted study was undertaken to 0) test candidate model laboratory combustors in the...effectiveness of the ASTM smoke point in predict- ing sooting behavior in complex flows. Two candidate model laboratory combustors were used -- a swirl

  19. Improvement of mechanical and biological properties of TiNi alloys by addition of Cu and Co to orthodontic archwires.

    PubMed

    Phukaoluan, Aphinan; Khantachawana, Anak; Kaewtatip, Pongpan; Dechkunakorn, Surachai; Kajornchaiyakul, Julathep

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate improved performances of TiNi in order to promote tooth movement. Special attention was paid to the effect on the clinical properties of TiNi of adding Cu and Co to this alloy. Ti49.4Ni50.6, Ti49Ni46Cu5 and Ti50Ni47Co3 (at %) alloys were prepared. Specimens were cold-rolled at 30% reduction and heat-treated at 400°C for 60min. Then, the test results were compared with two types of commercial archwires. The findings showed that superelasticity properties were confirmed in the manufactured commercial alloys at mouth temperature. The difference of stress plateau in TiNi, TiNiCo and commercial wires B at 25°C changed significantly at various testing temperatures due to the combination of martensite and austenite phases. At certain temperatures the alloys exhibited zero recovery stress at 2% strain and consequently produced zero activation force for moving teeth. The corrosion test showed that the addition of Cu and Co to TiNi alloys generates an increase in corrosion potential (Ecorr) and corrosion current densities (Icorr). Finally, we observed that addition of Cu and Co improved cell viability. We conclude that addition of an appropriate amount of a third alloying element can help enhance the performances of TiNi orthodontic archwires.

  20. Dose effect in the wood plastic composite formation in the presence of additives and co-additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mubarak A.; Ali, K. M. Idriss

    1994-10-01

    Wood plastic composite (WPC) formation was studied with simul wood and butylmethacrylate (BMA) at different compositions with swelling solvent methanol in the presence of a set of multifunctional acrylate monomer additives like N-vinyl Pyrrolidone (NVP), tripropylene glycol diacrylate (TPGDA) and trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) at a different doses between 1 and 3 Mrad using Co 60 gamma source. This was further investigated using another set of additives chosen from oligomers such as epoxy acrylate (EA), urethane acrylate (UA) and polyester acrylate (PEA). TMPTA yielded the highest polymer loading at relatively low dose (2 Mrad). Effect of co-additives like sulfuric acid (H + ions), copper sulphate (Cu 2+ ions) and urea was investigated in these series. Tensile strength (TS) of the composites were determined and the highest TS values were obtained with the composite produced in presence of urea.

  1. Additive thermochemical effects in turbulent erosive boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Levatin, J.L.

    1983-01-18

    Previously obtained interior ballistics and wall boundary layer modeling results indicate that significant reduction in erosive heating can be expected when finely divided particles are dispersed through the propellant combustion flow field. Attention was first placed on the particle size influences, together with particle dispersal dynamics in both turbulent combustion core flow and the erosive wall boundary layer region. Submicron thermochemically inert particles were predicted to disperse readily to the near wall region where they were then entrained in the boundary layer. This was estimated to substantially reduce the predicted erosive heat and mass transfer and experimentally confirmed. Examination of the time-averaged turbulent boundary layer macrostructure changes indicated that inertial influences were primarily responsible for this reduction in erosive heating to gun barrel walls. The boundary layers were thickened by the additives and erosive diffusion gradients were correspondingly reduced. The isolated inertial mechanisms are now understood but are difficult to apply in general dimensional analysis scaling or in analytical heat transfer correlation predictions. Three major factors which contribute to these difficulties are: time dependence of both developing mean flow and particle field; turbulence-particle interactions; and thermochemical heat release and exchange between reactive gas components and particles, particles and wall surface, and reactive gas and wall surface. To help illustrate the influence of thes mechanisms and provide a basis for prediction, the influence of submicron additives in unsteady turbulent boundary layer growth and interaction regions adjacent to a model of a chemically active metallic (steel) surface are examined. Equilibrium chemistry is assumed for all phases.

  2. Investigation of Fuel Additive Effects on Sooting Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-28

    Ndubizu, C. C., and B. T. Zinn : Effects of Metallic Aditive Upon Soot Formation in Polymer Diffusion Flames. Combust, Flame 46, 301-314 (1982). 3.4...Plenum Press, New York, p. 143 (1981). 3.28 Wersborg, B. L., .1. B. Howard , and G. C. Williams: Physical Mechanisms in Carbon 3 Formation in Flames

  3. Nutrient additions in pristine Patagonian Sphagnum bog vegetation: can phosphorus addition alleviate (the effects of) increased nitrogen loads.

    PubMed

    Fritz, C; van Dijk, G; Smolders, A J P; Pancotto, V A; Elzenga, T J T M; Roelofs, J G M; Grootjans, A P

    2012-05-01

    Sphagnum-bog ecosystems have a limited capability to retain carbon and nutrients when subjected to increased nitrogen (N) deposition. Although it has been proposed that phosphorus (P) can dilute negative effects of nitrogen by increasing biomass production of Sphagnum mosses, it is still unclear whether P-addition can alleviate physiological N-stress in Sphagnum plants. A 3-year fertilisation experiment was conducted in lawns of a pristine Sphagnum magellanicum bog in Patagonia, where competing vascular plants were practically absent. Background wet deposition of nitrogen was low (≈ 0.1-0.2 g · N · m(-2) · year(-1)). Nitrogen (4 g · N · m(-2) · year(-1)) and phosphorus (1 g · P · m(-2) · year(-1)) were applied, separately and in combination, six times during the growing season. P-addition substantially increased biomass production of Sphagnum. Nitrogen and phosphorus changed the morphology of Sphagnum mosses by enhancing height increment, but lowering moss stem density. In contrast to expectations, phosphorus failed to alleviate physiological stress imposed by excess nitrogen (e.g. amino acid accumulation, N-saturation and decline in photosynthetic rates). We conclude that despite improving growth conditions by P-addition, Sphagnum-bog ecosystems remain highly susceptible to nitrogen additions. Increased susceptibility to desiccation by nutrients may even worsen the negative effects of excess nitrogen especially in windy climates like in Patagonia.

  4. Review of Literature on High Power Microwave Pulse Biological Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    AFRL-RH-BR-TR-2009-0068 Review of Literature on High Power Microwave Pulse Biological Effects Ronald L. Seaman General...2009 Air Force Research Laboratory 711 Human Performance Wing Human Effectiveness Directorate Directed Energy Bioeffects...Performance Wing Human Effectiveness Directorate This report is published in the interest of scientific and technical information exchange

  5. Additive effects of vertebrate predators on insects in a Puerto Rican coffee plantation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borkhataria, R.R.; Collazo, J.A.; Groom, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of studies have established the value of shaded coffee plantations as habitat for birds. While the value of birds as biological controls in coffee has received some attention, the interactions between birds and other predators of insects have not been tested. We used exclosures to examine the effects of vertebrate predators on the arthropods associated with coffee, in particular the coffee leafminer (Leucoptera coffeella) and the flatid planthopper Petrusa epilepsis, in a shaded coffee plantation in Puerto Rico. We used a 2 x 2 factorial design with four treatments: exclusion of birds, lizards, birds and lizards, and control (no exclusion). Abundance of insects >5 mm increased when birds or both birds and lizards were removed. Birds and lizards had an additive effect for insects <5 mm and for all insects combined. Coffee leafminers showed a weak response to removal of predators while planthopper abundance increased significantly in the absence of avian predators. Arthropod predators and parasitoids did not differ significantly between treatments. Our findings suggest that vertebrate insectivores have an additive effect on insects in coffee and may help control abundances of some coffee pests. Equally important, we present evidence suggesting that they do not interfere with other known natural enemies of coffee pests. ?? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

  6. Basics of particle therapy II: relative biological effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinhyun

    2012-01-01

    In the previous review, the physical aspect of heavy particles, with a focus on the carbon beam was introduced. Particle beam therapy has many potential advantages for cancer treatment without increasing severe side effects in normal tissue, these kinds of radiation have different biologic characteristics and have advantages over using conventional photon beam radiation during treatment. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used for many biological, clinical endpoints among different radiation types and is the only convenient way to transfer the clinical experience in radiotherapy with photons to another type of radiation therapy. However, the RBE varies dependent on the energy of the beam, the fractionation, cell types, oxygenation status, and the biological endpoint studied. Thus this review describes the concerns about RBE related to particle beam to increase interests of the Korean radiation oncologists' society. PMID:23120738

  7. Gamma radiation effects on siloxane-based additive manufactured structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzer, Andrew M.; Cady, Carl M.; Geller, Drew; Ortiz-Acosta, Denisse; Zocco, Adam T.; Stull, Jamie; Labouriau, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Siloxane-basedadditive manufactured structures prepared by the direct ink write (DIW) technology were exposed to ionizing irradiation in order to gauge radiolysis effects on structure-property relationships. These well-defined 3-D structures were subjected to moderate doses of gamma irradiation in an inert atmosphere and characterized by a suite of experimental methods. Changes in thermal, chemical, microstructure, and mechanical properties were evaluated by DSC, TGA, FT-IR, mass spectroscopy, EPR, solvent swelling, SEM, and uniaxial compressive load techniques. Our results demonstrated that 3-D structures made from aromatic-free siloxane resins exhibited hardening after being exposed to gamma radiation. This effect was accompanied by gas evolution, decreasing in crystallization levels, decreasing in solvent swelling and damage to the microstructure. Furthermore, long-lived radiation-induced radicals were not detected by EPR methods. Our results are consistent with cross-link formation being the dominant degradation mechanism over chain scission reactions. On the other hand, 3-D structures made from high phenyl content siloxane resins showed little radiation damage as evidenced by low off gassing.

  8. Modelling and predicting the biological effects of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Winkler, D A; Burden, F R; Yan, B; Weissleder, R; Tassa, C; Shaw, S; Epa, V C

    2014-01-01

    The commercial applications of nanoparticles are growing rapidly, but we know relatively little about how nanoparticles interact with biological systems. Their value--but also their risk--is related to their nanophase properties being markedly different to those of the same material in bulk. Experiments to determine how nanoparticles are taken up, distributed, modified, and elicit any adverse effects are essential. However, cost and time considerations mean that predictive models would also be extremely valuable, particularly assisting regulators to minimize health and environmental risks. We used novel sparse machine learning methods that employ Bayesian neural networks to model three nanoparticle data sets using both linear and nonlinear machine learning methods. The first data comprised iron oxide nanoparticles decorated with 108 different molecules tested against five cell lines, HUVEC, pancreatic cancer, and three macrophage or macrophage-like lines. The second data set comprised 52 nanoparticles with various core compositions, coatings, and surface attachments. The nanoparticles were characterized using four descriptors (size, relaxivities, and zeta potential), and their biological effects on four cells lines assessed using four biological assays per cell line and four concentrations per assay. The third data set involved the biological responses to gold nanoparticles functionalized by 80 different small molecules. Nonspecific binding and binding to AChE were the biological endpoints modelled. The biological effects of nanoparticles were modelled using molecular descriptors for the molecules that decorated the nanoparticle surface. Models with good statistical quality were constructed for most biological endpoints. These proof-of-concept models show that modelling biological effects of nanomaterials is possible using modern modelling methods.

  9. Effects on Diagnostic Parameters After Removing Additional Synchronous Gear Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Harry J.

    2003-01-01

    Gear cracks are typically difficult to diagnose with sufficient time before catastrophic damage occurs. Significant damage must be present before algorithms appear to be able to detect the damage. Frequently there are multiple gear meshes on a single shaft. Since they are all synchronous with the shaft frequency, the commonly used synchronous averaging technique is ineffective in removing other gear mesh effects. Carefully applying a filter to these extraneous gear mesh frequencies can reduce the overall vibration signal and increase the accuracy of commonly used vibration metrics. The vibration signals from three seeded fault tests were analyzed using this filtering procedure. Both the filtered and unfiltered vibration signals were then analyzed using commonly used fault detection metrics and compared. The tests were conducted on aerospace quality spur gears in a test rig. The tests were conducted at speeds ranging from 2500 to 5000 revolutions per minute and torques from 184 to 228 percent of design load. The inability to detect these cracks with high confidence results from the high loading which is causing fast fracture as opposed to stable crack growth. The results indicate that these techniques do not currently produce an indication of damage that significantly exceeds experimental scatter.

  10. Biological effects of stellar collapse neutrinos

    PubMed

    Collar, J I

    1996-02-05

    Massive stars in their final stages of collapse radiate most of their binding energy in the form of MeV neutrinos. The recoil atoms that they produce in elastic scattering off nuclei in organic tissue create radiation damage which is highly effective in the production of irreparable DNA harm, leading to cellular mutation, neoplasia, and oncogenesis. Using a conventional model of the galaxy and of the collapse mechanism, the periodicity of nearby stellar collapses and the radiation dose are calculated. The possible contribution of this process to the paleontological record of mass extinctions is examined.

  11. [Nanosilver - harmful effects of biological activity].

    PubMed

    Świdwińska-Gajewska, Anna Maria; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Nanosilver, also identified as colloidal silver, has been known and used for ages to combat diseases or prolong food freshness. It usually occurs in the form of a suspension consisting of particles of size < 100 nm. Due to its specific properties, silver nanoparticles are used in many technologies to produce medical devices, textiles, conductive materials or photovoltaic cells. The growing popularity of nanosilver applications increases the number of people occupationally exposed to this substance. Potential exposure routes for silver nanoparticles are through dermal, oral and inhalation pathways. Silver nanoparticles may be absorbed through the lungs, intestine, and through the skin into circulation and thus may reach such organs as the liver, kidney, spleen, brain, heart and testes. Nanosilver may cause mild eyes and skin irritations. It can also act as a mild skin allergen. Inhalation of silver nanoparticles mainly affects the lungs and liver. It has been demonstrated that silver nanoparticles may be genotoxic to mammalian cells. There are some alarming reports on the adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on reproduction of experimental animals. Exposure to silver nanoparticles may exert a neurotoxic effect and affect cognitive functions, causing the impairment of short-term and working memory. Maximum admissible concentration (MAC) for the inhalable fraction of silver of 0.05 mg/m3 is currently binding in Poland. In light of toxicological studies of silver nanoparticles it seems reasonable to update the hygiene standards for silver with nanoparticles as a separate fraction.

  12. Enhancements in biologically effective ultraviolet radiation following volcanic eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogelmann, A. M.; Ackerman, T. P.; Turco, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to estimate the changes in biologically effective radiation (UV-BE) at the earth's surface produced by the El Chichon (1982) and Mount Pinatubo (1991) eruptions. It is found that in both cases surface intensity can increase because the effect of ozone depletion outweighs the increased scattering.

  13. Electromagnetic field induced biological effects in humans.

    PubMed

    Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Gremba, Jerzy; Gałdzińska-Calik, Barbara; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to artificial radio frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) has increased significantly in recent decades. Therefore, there is a growing scientific and social interest in its influence on health, even upon exposure significantly below the applicable standards. The intensity of electromagnetic radiation in human environment is increasing and currently reaches astronomical levels that had never before experienced on our planet. The most influential process of EMF impact on living organisms, is its direct tissue penetration. The current established standards of exposure to EMFs in Poland and in the rest of the world are based on the thermal effect. It is well known that weak EMF could cause all sorts of dramatic non-thermal effects in body cells, tissues and organs. The observed symptoms are hardly to assign to other environmental factors occurring simultaneously in the human environment. Although, there are still ongoing discussions on non-thermal effects of EMF influence, on May 31, 2011--International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)--Agenda of World Health Organization (WHO) has classified radio electromagnetic fields, to a category 2B as potentially carcinogenic. Electromagnetic fields can be dangerous not only because of the risk of cancer, but also other health problems, including electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). Electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) is a phenomenon characterized by the appearance of symptoms after exposure of people to electromagnetic fields, generated by EHS is characterized as a syndrome with a broad spectrum of non-specific multiple organ symptoms including both acute and chronic inflammatory processes located mainly in the skin and nervous systems, as well as in respiratory, cardiovascular systems, and musculoskeletal system. WHO does not consider the EHS as a disease-- defined on the basis of medical diagnosis and symptoms associated with any known syndrome. The symptoms may be associated with a single source of EMF

  14. Biological aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. Gannet; Huffman, J. Alex; Fridlind, Ann

    2012-12-01

    Bioaerosol Effects on Clouds Workshop;Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 5-6August 2012 Bioaerosols such as bacteria have been proposed as significant contributors to cloud ice nucleation, but too little is known about the properties and impacts of bioaerosol and other ice nuclei to make reliable conclusions about their wide-scale impact on clouds and precipitation. During late summer an international group of 40 participants met at a Steamboat Springs ski resort to share perspectives on bioaerosol sources, activity, and influence on clouds. Participants who were invited collectively spanned a broad range of expertise, including atmospheric chemistry, microbiology, micrometeorology, and cloud physics, as well as a broad range of research approaches, including laboratory measurement, field measurement, and modeling. Tours of Storm Peak Laboratory (http://www.stormpeak.dri.edu) were offered before and after the workshop.

  15. Additive effects prevail: The response of biota to multiple stressors in an intensively monitored watershed.

    PubMed

    Gieswein, Alexander; Hering, Daniel; Feld, Christian K

    2017-03-21

    Freshwater ecosystems are impacted by a range of stressors arising from diverse human-caused land and water uses. Identifying the relative importance of single stressors and understanding how multiple stressors interact and jointly affect biology is crucial for River Basin Management. This study addressed multiple human-induced stressors and their effects on the aquatic flora and fauna based on data from standard WFD monitoring schemes. For altogether 1095 sites within a mountainous catchment, we used 12 stressor variables covering three different stressor groups: riparian land use, physical habitat quality and nutrient enrichment. Twenty-one biological metrics calculated from taxa lists of three organism groups (fish, benthic invertebrates and aquatic macrophytes) served as response variables. Stressor and response variables were subjected to Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) analysis to identify stressor hierarchy and stressor interactions and subsequently to Generalised Linear Regression Modelling (GLM) to quantify the stressors standardised effect size. Our results show that riverine habitat degradation was the dominant stressor group for the river fauna, notably the bed physical habitat structure. Overall, the explained variation in benthic invertebrate metrics was higher than it was in fish and macrophyte metrics. In particular, general integrative (aggregate) metrics such as % Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT) taxa performed better than ecological traits (e.g. % feeding types). Overall, additive stressor effects dominated, while significant and meaningful stressor interactions were generally rare and weak. We concluded that given the type of stressor and ecological response variables addressed in this study, river basin managers do not need to bother much about complex stressor interactions, but can focus on the prevailing stressors according to the hierarchy identified.

  16. Effects of feed additives on rumen and blood profiles during a starch and fructose challenge.

    PubMed

    Golder, H M; Celi, P; Rabiee, A R; Lean, I J

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of feed additives on the risk of ruminal acidosis in Holstein heifers (n = 40) fed starch and fructose in a challenge study. Heifers were randomly allocated to feed additive groups (n = 8 heifers/group): (1) control (no additives); (2) virginiamycin (VM); (3) monensin + tylosin (MT); (4) monensin + live yeast (MLY); and (5) sodium bicarbonate + magnesium oxide (BUF). Heifers were fed 2.5% of body weight (BW) dry matter intake (DMI) per day of a total mixed ration (62:38 forage:concentrate) and feed additives for a 20-d adaptation period. Fructose (0.1% of BW/d) was included for the last 10d of the adaptation period. On d 21, heifers were fed to target a DMI of 1.0% of BW of wheat, fructose at 0.2% of BW, and their feed additives. Rumen fluid samples obtained by stomach tube and blood samples were collected weekly as well as during a 3.6-h period on challenge day (d 21). Virginiamycin and BUF groups maintained a consistently high DMI across the 20-d adaptation period. The MLY heifers had low DMI of the challenge ration. Average daily gain and feed conversion ratio were not affected by feed additives. All rumen and plasma measures changed weekly over adaptation and over the challenge sampling period with the exception of rumen total lactate and histamine concentrations, plasma oxidative stress index, and ceruloplasmin. Substantial within- and between-group variation was observed in rumen and plasma profiles at challenge sampling. No significant group changes were observed in rumen total volatile fatty acids, propionate, acetate-to-propionate ratio, isobutyrate, caproate, isovalerate, total lactate, d- and l-lactate, and pH measures on challenge day. Acetate concentration was increased in the BUF and control groups on challenge day. Butyrate concentration was lower in the MLY and MT groups compared with other groups at challenge. Valerate concentrations were lowest in the control, VM, and BUF groups and lactate concentrations were numerically

  17. Application of ToxCast to evaluate potential biological effects ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    With the development of “high throughput” in-vitro biological assays, screening-level information on potential adverse biological effects is available for a rapidly increasing number of chemicals. The U.S. EPA ToxCast program has now evaluated several thousand chemicals with more than 800 assays. The original intent of this data was to evaluate potential for human health effects, but it is now being extended to environmental health evaluations. The R package ToxEval was developed as a screening tool to use ToxCast results for evaluation of potential adverse biological effects from trace organic chemicals in water samples. Using ToxEval, trace organic chemical data from water samples and passive samplers collected at 57 Great Lakes tributaries from 2010-2013 were examined to determine the tributaries with the greatest potential for adverse biological effects with prioritization of the most influential contaminants. Results are being used as part of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to focus current and future investigations that will help understand likely adverse outcome pathways in biological organisms, and to formulate possible remediation strategies. not applicable

  18. Biological applications and effects of optical masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, William T., Jr.; Mueller, Harold A.; Guerry, R. K.; Guerry, Dupont, III; Cleary, Stephan F.

    1988-09-01

    Threshold radiant exposures for retinal damage in 3 macaque monkeys are given for exposures of 0.5, 0.125 and 0.016 seconds duration to laser wavelengths 514.5 and 488 nm. Intravitreal injections of 5 x .00005 gm of Cu-Zn SOD were toxic to cornea, lens and retina of the rhesus monkey after a radiant exposure of 33 j/sq cm of 440 nm light. No further experiments with SOD are contemplated. Similar experiments with catalase will be tried during the first quarter of the second contract year. The effect of oxygen on retinal toxicity during exposure to wave-lengths 540, 640 and 840 nm were delayed by the untimely death of Dr. Millen, our consultant on anesthesiology and oxygen administration. Arrangements have been made to activate this program during the second contract year. Threshold data on 40 microsecond pulse trains cannot be obtained until the acoustic modulator can be incorporated into the Ar-Kr laser which was used during the contract year to produce exposures less than 1 second to 514.5 and 488 nm laser lines. Data on PRF's of 10 and 100 KHz and 1, 10 and 20 MHz will be obtained during the second contract year. The long-term experiment on cataractogenesis on 2 rhesus monkeys exposed to a near UV spectrum (330 to 420 nm) has been completed.

  19. LASTING BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF EARLY ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Jen; Dubos, René

    1968-01-01

    A lasting depression of body weight was consistently produced in SPF mice by infecting them orally 2 days after birth with a nonlethal, bacteria-free filtrate, prepared from the intestine of young SPF mice previously infected with an unidentified agent. Neonatal infection caused a decrease of muscle DNA and of muscle and brain protein in the adults. No other effect was detected in the chemical composition of various organs. Incorporation of 14C-amino acid into the acid precipitable fractions of liver, kidney, muscle, and brain was lower in infected than in control animals. No difference in incorporation was recognized in the thymus and spleen. The free amino acid pool of adults, measured as blood levels of free amino nitrogen, was decreased by neonatal infection. Surprisingly, the food intake of young animals infected neonatally was higher than that of the controls, measured on the basis of body weight. Their fecal excretion of nitrogen was also higher. The comparative responses of infected and control adults to a stressful situation was measured by giving them intravenously the antituberculous vaccine BCG. Under these conditions, the mice infected neonatally excreted some 20% more nitrogen in their urine and 40% more in their feces than did the controls. The mechanisms through which neonatal infection caused a lasting weight depression are discussed in the light of these metabolic findings. PMID:5691984

  20. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    DOE PAGES

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; ...

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N.more » europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.« less

  1. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N. europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.

  2. Effects of waste activated sludge and surfactant addition on primary sludge hydrolysis and short-chain fatty acids accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhouying; Chen, Guanlan; Chen, Yinguang

    2010-05-01

    This paper focused on the effects of waste activated sludge (WAS) and surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) addition on primary sludge (PS) hydrolysis and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) accumulation in fermentation. The results showed that sludge hydrolysis, SCFA accumulation, NH(4)(+)-N and PO(4)(3-)-P release, and volatile suspended solids (VSS) reduction were increased by WAS addition to PS, which were further increased by the addition of SDBS to the mixture of PS and WAS. Acetic, propionic and valeric acids were the top three SCFA in all experiments. Also, the fermentation liquids of PS, PS+WAS, and PS+WAS+SDBS were added, respectively, to municipal wastewater to examine their effects on biological municipal wastewater treatment, and the enhancement of both wastewater nitrogen and phosphorus removals was observed compared with no fermentation liquid addition.

  3. Evident Biological Effects of Space Radiation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2004-01-01

    Though cancer risks are the primary concern for astronauts exposed to space radiation and a number of astronauts have developed cancer, identifying a direct association or cause of disease has been somewhat problematic due to a lack of statistics and a lack of an appropriate control group. However, several bio,logical effects observed in astronauts are believed to be primarily due to exposure to space radiation. Among those are, light flashes experienced by astronauts from early missions, cataract development in the crewmembers and excess chromosome aberrations detected in astronauts' lymphocytes postmission. The space radiation environment and evident biological effects will be discussed.

  4. The relative biological effectiveness of out-of-field dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderson, Michael; Koger, Brandon; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: using simulations and models derived from existing literature, this work investigates relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for out-of-field radiation and attempts to quantify the relative magnitudes of different contributing phenomena (spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects). Specific attention is paid to external beam radiotherapy treatments for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: using different biological models that account for spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects, the RBE was calculated for different points moving radially out from isocentre for a typical single arc VMAT prostate case. The RBE was found by taking the ratio of the equivalent dose with the physical dose. Equivalent doses were calculated by determining what physical dose would be necessary to produce the same overall biological effect as that predicted using the different biological models. Results: spectral effects changed the RBE out-of-field less than 2%, whereas response models incorporating low dose hypersensitivity and bystander effects resulted in a much more profound change of the RBE for out-of-field doses. The bystander effect had the largest RBE for points located just outside the edge of the primary radiation beam in the cranial caudal (z-direction) compared to low dose hypersensitivity and spectral effects. In the coplanar direction, bystander effect played the largest role in enhancing the RBE for points up to 8.75 cm from isocentre. Conclusions: spectral, bystander, and low dose hypersensitivity effects can all increase the RBE for out-of-field radiation doses. In most cases, bystander effects seem to play the largest role followed by low dose hypersensitivity. Spectral effects were unlikely to be of any clinical significance. Bystander, low dose hypersensitivity, and spectral effect increased the RBE much more in the cranial caudal direction (z-direction) compared with the coplanar directions.

  5. Biological Effects of Nuclear Explosions (BENE) Domain Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    irradiated soil), and the effectiveness of radiation on biological warfare agents. Operation SANDSTONE (Table 1.2) assessed the effects of ionizing...radiation on a variety of seeds, insects , and bacteria. Operation GREENHOUSE (Table 1.3) assessed the effects of nuclear radiation on mice, pigs... irradiated animals as well as dosimeters. Operation IVY (Table 1.4) did surveys of plant and animal specimens before and after Test Mike to determine

  6. Tea polyphenols, their biological effects and potential molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Milacic, V; Chen, M S; Wan, S B; Lam, W H; Huo, C; Landis-Piwowar, K R; Cui, Q C; Wali, A; Chan, T H; Dou, Q P

    2008-04-01

    Tea is the most popular beverage in the world, second only to water. Tea contains an infusion of the leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant rich in polyphenolic compounds known as catechins, the most abundant of which is (-)-EGCG. Although tea has been consumed for centuries, it has only recently been studied extensively as a health-promoting beverage that may act to prevent a number of chronic diseases and cancers. The results of several investigations indicate that green tea consumption may be of modest benefit in reducing the plasma concentration of cholesterol and preventing atherosclerosis. Additionally, the cancer-preventive effects of green tea are widely supported by results from epidemiological, cell culture, animal and clinical studies. In vitro cell culture studies show that tea polyphenols potently induce apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest in tumor cells but not in their normal cell counterparts. Green tea polyphenols were shown to affect several biological pathways, including growth factor-mediated pathway, the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase-dependent pathway, and ubiquitin/proteasome degradation pathways. Various animal studies have revealed that treatment with green tea inhibits tumor incidence and multiplicity in different organ sites such as skin, lung, liver, stomach, mammary gland and colon. Recently, phase I and II clinical trials have been conducted to explore the anticancer effects of green tea in humans. A major challenge of cancer prevention is to integrate new molecular findings into clinical practice. Therefore, identification of more molecular targets and biomarkers for tea polyphenols is essential for improving the design of green tea trials and will greatly assist in a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying its anti-cancer activity.

  7. Biological potential of extraterrestrial materials - 1. Nutrients in carbonaceous meteorites, and effects on biological growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.

    1997-06-01

    Soil nutrient analysis of the Murchison C2 carbonaceous chondrite shows biologically available S, P, Ca, Mg, Na, K and Fe and cation exchange capacity (CEC) at levels comparable with terrestrial agricultural soils. Weathering, and aqueous, hydrothermal (121°C, 15 min) and high-temperature (550°C, 3 h) processing increase the extractable nutrients. Extractable phosphorus (by 0.3 M NH 4F + 0.1 M HCl) content, which may be growth-limiting, is 6.3 μg g -1 in the unprocessed meteorite, but increases to 81 μg g -1 by hydrothermal processing and weathering, and to 130 μg g -1 by high temperature processing. The cation exchange capacity (CEC), attributed mainly to the organic fraction, corresponds responds to 345 meq per 100 g of the polymer, suggesting one ionizable COOH or OH group per 3-4 aromatic rings. The Allende C3(V) meteorite has low extractable Ca, Mg and K, in parallel to its low organic content and CEC, but high extractable P levels (160 μg g -1). Biological effects are observed on growth of the soil microorganisms Flavobacterium oryzihabitans and Nocardia asteroides in meteorite extracts, and the population levels suggest that P is the limiting nutrient. Effects on plant growth are examined on Solanum tuberosum (potato), where extracts of the Murchison meteorite lead to enhanced growth and pigmentation. The biologically available organic and inorganic nutrients in carbonaceous chondrites can provide concentrated solutions for prebiotic and early life processes, and serve as soils and fertilizers for future space-based biological expansion.

  8. Adaptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kudritsky, Yu.K.; Georgievsky, A.B.; Karpov, V.I.

    1993-12-31

    The adoptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiations is based on the recognition of the invariability of general biological laws for radiobiology and on the comprehension of life evolution regularities and axiomatic principles of environment and biota unity. The ionizing radiation factor is essential for life which could not exist beyond the radiation field. The possibility of future development of the adaptation hypothesis serves as a basis for it`s transformation into the theoretical foundation of radiobiology. This report discusses the aspects of the adaptation theory.

  9. Interactive effects of nitrogen addition, warming and invasion across organizational levels in an old-field plant community.

    PubMed

    Gornish, Elise S

    2014-10-08

    Response to global change is dependent on the level of biological organization (e.g. the ecologically relevant spatial scale) in which species are embedded. For example, individual responses can affect population-level responses, which, in turn, can affect community-level responses. Although relationships are known to exist among responses to global change across levels of biological organization, formal investigations of these relationships are still uncommon. I conducted an exploratory analysis to identify how nitrogen addition and warming by open top chambers might affect plants across spatial scales by estimating treatment effect size at the leaf level, the plant level and the community level. Moreover, I investigated if the presence of Pityopsis aspera, an experimentally introduced plant species, modified the relationship between spatial scale and effect size across treatments. I found that, overall, the spatial scale significantly contributes to differences in effect size, supporting previous work which suggests that mechanisms driving biotic response to global change are scale dependent. Interestingly, the relationship between spatial scale and effect size in both the absence and presence of experimental invasion is very similar for nitrogen addition and warming treatments. The presence of invasion, however, did not affect the relationship between spatial scale and effect size, suggesting that in this system, invasion may not exacerbate or attenuate climate change effects. This exercise highlights the value of moving beyond integration and scaling to the practice of directly testing for scale effects within single experiments.

  10. Effectiveness and versatility of biological prosthesis in transplanted patients

    PubMed Central

    Vennarecci, Giovanni; Mascianà, Gianluca; De Werra, Edoardo; Sandri, Giovanni Battista Levi; Ferraro, Daniele; Burocchi, Mirco; Tortorelli, Giovanni; Guglielmo, Nicola; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria

    2017-01-01

    AIM To emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of prosthesis, and good tolerance by patients with incisional hernia (IH). METHODS From December 2001 to February 2016, 270 liver transplantations were performed at San Camillo Hospital. IH occurred in 78 patients (28.8%). IH usually appeared early within the first year post-orthotopic liver transplantation. In the first era, fascial defect was repaired by primary closure for defects smaller than 2.5 cm or with synthetic mesh for greater defects. Recently, we started using biological mesh (Permacol™, Covidien). We present a series of five transplanted patients submitted to surgery for abdominal wall defect correction repaired with biological mesh (Permacol™, Covidien). RESULTS In our cases, the use of biological prosthesis (Permacol™, Covidien) have proven to be effective and versatile in repairing hernia defects of different kinds; patients did not suffer infections of the prosthesis and no recurrence was observed. Furthermore, the prosthesis remains intact even in the years after surgery. CONCLUSION The cases that we presented show that the use of biological mesh (Permacol™, Covidien) in transplanted patients may be safe and effective, being careful in the management of perioperative immunosuppression and renal and graft function, although the cost of the product itself has been the main limiting factor and there is need for prospective studies for further evaluations. PMID:28280694

  11. Utilization of Bacillus sp. strain TAT105 as a biological additive to reduce ammonia emissions during composting of swine feces.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kazutaka; Waki, Miyoko; Yasuda, Tomoko; Fukumoto, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Akihiro; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain TAT105 is a thermophilic, ammonium-tolerant bacterium that grows assimilating ammonium nitrogen and reduces ammonia emission during composting of swine feces. To develop a practical use of TAT105, a dried solid culture of TAT105 (5.3 × 10(9) CFU/g of dry matter) was prepared as an additive. It could be stored for one year without significant reduction of TAT105. Laboratory-scale composting of swine feces was conducted by mixing the additive. When the additive, mixed with an equal weight of water one day before use, was added to obtain a TAT105 concentration of above 10(7) CFU/g of dry matter in the initial material, the ammonia concentration emitted was lower and nitrogen loss was approximately 22% lower in the treatment with the additive than in the control treatment without the additive. The colony formation on an agar medium containing high ammonium could be used for enumeration of TAT105 in the composted materials.

  12. Aromatase inhibiting and combined estrogenic effects of parabens and estrogenic effects of other additives in cosmetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwen, J.A. van Son, O. van; Piersma, A.H.; Jong, P.C. de; Berg, M. van den

    2008-08-01

    There is concern widely on the increase in human exposure to exogenous (anti)estrogenic compounds. Typical are certain ingredients in cosmetic consumer products such as musks, phthalates and parabens. Monitoring a variety of human samples revealed that these ingredients, including the ones that generally are considered to undergo rapid metabolism, are present at low levels. In this in vitro research individual compounds and combinations of parabens and endogenous estradiol (E{sub 2}) were investigated in the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. The experimental design applied a concentration addition model (CA). Data were analyzed with the estrogen equivalency (EEQ) and method of isoboles approach. In addition, the catalytic inhibitory properties of parabens on an enzyme involved in a rate limiting step in steroid genesis (aromatase) were studied in human placental microsomes. Our results point to an additive estrogenic effect in a CA model for parabens. In addition, it was found that parabens inhibit aromatase. Noticeably, the effective levels in both our in vitro systems were far higher than the levels detected in human samples. However, estrogenic compounds may contribute in a cumulative way to the circulating estrogen burden. Our calculation for the extra estrogen burden due to exposure to parabens, phthalates and polycyclic musks indicates an insignificant estrogenic load relative to the endogenous or therapeutic estrogen burden.

  13. Herpetofauna of the Beni Biological Station Biosphere Reserve, Amazonian Bolivia: Additional information, and current knowledge in context

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middendorf, G.; Reynolds, R.; Herrera-MacBryde, Olga; Dallmeier, Francisco; MacBryde, Bruce; Cominskey, James A.; Miranda, Carmen

    2000-01-01

    Previous collections in the Departamento del Beni in tropical Bolivia only hinted at high levels of herpetological biodiversity (Fugler 1986, 1988; de la Riva 1990a; Fugler and de la Riva 1990). Fieldwork (totaling 48 days) in July-August 1988 and September 1987 (dry seasons) and November-December 1990 (wet season) has resulted in collection and identification of 401 amphibian and reptilian specimens from the general area of the Beni Biological Station's (EBB) headquarters at El Porvenir. These collections represent 33 amphibian and 17 reptilian species in 29 genera (14 amphibian, 15 reptilian). The inventory of herpetofauna scientifically documented to occur in the Departamento del Beni is considered to have been increased by 6 amphibian and 10 reptilian species. Specimens that could not be definitively identified (reflecting taxonomic uncertainty and/or probably species new to science) include 3 amphibian species (anurans) and 2 reptilian species (snakes). The EBB harbors the richest savanna for anuran species known in South America.

  14. Biological effects of high molecular weight lignin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Pessala, Piia; Schultz, Eija; Kukkola, Jukka; Nakari, Tarja; Knuutinen, Juha; Herve, Sirpa; Paasivirta, Jaakko

    2010-10-01

    A number of high molecular weight (HMW) lignin derivatives possessing varied chemical properties were screened for their biological effects in order to obtain more information on the possible structural features of HMW lignin-related effects. The studied compounds were both commercial and in-house extracted lignin derivatives. Bioassays used include reverse electron transport (RET), Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, and juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. The studied lignin derivatives inhibited the in vitro systems and luminescence of V. fischeri bacteria to some extent-daphnids were not affected. It seems that, at least in the RET assay, certain pH-dependent functional groups in lignin may be of importance regarding the biological effects.

  15. Electrophoretically pure mouse interferon exerts multiple biologic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Gresser, I; De Maeyer-Guignard, J; Tovey, M G; De Maeyer, E

    1979-01-01

    Electrophoretically pure mouse interferon was examined for a number of biologic effects previously ascribed to crude or partially purified interferon preparations. These effects include: inhibition of the growth of a transplantable tumor in mice; inhibition of cell multiplication of mouse tumor cells in vitro; enhancement of the expression of histocompatibility antigens on mouse tumor cells in vitro; inhibition of antibody formation in vitro; inhibition of sensitization to sheep erythrocytes and the expression of delayed type hypersensitivity in mice; enhancement of natural killer cell activity in vivo and in vitro; enhancement of cell sensitivity to the toxicity of poly(I)-poly(C); and enhanced production ("priming") of interferon production in vitro. Our results establish that the molecules responsible for the antiviral action of interferon are also responsible for these varied biologic effects. PMID:291948

  16. Consistent effects of canopy vs. understory nitrogen addition on the soil exchangeable cations and microbial community in two contrasting forests.

    PubMed

    Shi, Leilei; Zhang, Hongzhi; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Weixin; Shao, Yuanhu; Ha, Denglong; Li, Yuanqiu; Zhang, Chuangmao; Cai, Xi-an; Rao, Xingquan; Lin, Yongbiao; Zhou, Lixia; Zhao, Ping; Ye, Qing; Zou, Xiaoming; Fu, Shenglei

    2016-05-15

    Anthropogenic N deposition has been well documented to cause substantial impacts on the chemical and biological properties of forest soils. In most studies, however, atmospheric N deposition has been simulated by directly adding N to the forest floor. Such studies thus ignored the potentially significant effect of some key processes occurring in forest canopy (i.e., nitrogen retention) and may therefore have incorrectly assessed the effects of N deposition on soils. Here, we conducted an experiment that included both understory addition of N (UAN) and canopy addition of N (CAN) in two contrasting forests (temperate deciduous forest vs. subtropical evergreen forest). The goal was to determine whether the effects on soil exchangeable cations and microbial biomass differed between CAN and UAN. We found that N addition reduced pH, BS (base saturation) and exchangeable Ca and increased exchangeable Al significantly only at the temperate JGS site, and reduced the biomass of most soil microbial groups only at the subtropical SMT site. Except for soil exchangeable Mn, however, effects on soil chemical properties and soil microbial community did not significantly differ between CAN and UAN. Although biotic and abiotic soil characteristics differ significantly and the responses of both soil exchangeable cations and microbial biomass were different between the two study sites, we found no significant interactive effects between study site and N treatment approach on almost all soil properties involved in this study. In addition, N addition rate (25 vs. 50 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) did not show different effects on soil properties under both N addition approaches. These findings did not support previous prediction which expected that, by bypassing canopy effects (i.e., canopy retention and foliage fertilization), understory addition of N would overestimate the effects of N deposition on forest soil properties, at least for short time scale.

  17. Non-additive and additive genetic effects on extraversion in 3314 Dutch adolescent twins and their parents.

    PubMed

    Rettew, David C; Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Hudziak, James J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2008-05-01

    The influence of non-additive genetic influences on personality traits has been increasingly reported in adult populations. Less is known, however, with respect to younger samples. In this study, we examine additive and non-additive genetic contributions to the personality trait of extraversion in 1,689 Dutch twin pairs, 1,505 mothers and 1,637 fathers of the twins. The twins were on average 15.5 years (range 12-18 years). To increase statistical power to detect non-additive genetic influences, data on extraversion were also collected in parents and simultaneously analyzed. Genetic modeling procedures incorporating age as a potential modifier of heritability showed significant influences of additive (20-23%) and non-additive genetic factors (31-33%) in addition to unshared environment (46-48%) for adolescents and for their parents. The additive genetic component was slightly and positively related to age. No significant sex differences were found for either extraversion means or for the magnitude of the genetic and environmental influences. There was no evidence of non-random mating for extraversion in the parental generation. Results show that in addition to additive genetic influences, extraversion in adolescents is influenced by non-additive genetic factors.

  18. Comparative Effects of Various High School Biology Course-Content Backgrounds on Achievement in College Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Gordon Ronald

    The purposes of this study are (1) to determine whether college students who have taken Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) High School Biology attain significantly different grades in college biology courses at the University of Missouri than do college students who have taken a non-BSCS high school biology course, and (2) to determine if…

  19. Biological Effects of Laser Radiation. Volume I. Review of the Literature on Biological Effects of Laser Radiation-to 1965.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-17

    by block number) Biological Effects of Laser Radiation; Electron Spin Resonance; Spectroscopy; Microscopy: Tissue and Cell Culture Interaction...laser radiation to 1965 is reviewed. Laser production of free radicals, use in microscopy and holography, and tissue and cell culture effects are...Microscopy and Holography 16 4. Tissues and Cell Cultures 20 5. Studies on Interaction with Macromolecular Biochemical Preparations 26 6. The Laser

  20. Response to selection in finite locus models with non-additive effects.

    PubMed

    Esfandyari, Hadi; Henryon, Mark; Berg, Peer; Thomasen, Jorn Rind; Bijma, Piter; Sørensen, Anders Christian

    2017-01-12

    Under the finite-locus model in the absence of mutation, the additive genetic variation is expected to decrease when directional selection is acting on a population, according to quantitative-genetic theory. However, some theoretical studies of selection suggest that the level of additive variance can be sustained or even increased when non-additive genetic effects are present. We tested the hypothesis that finite-locus models with both additive and non-additive genetic effects maintain more additive genetic variance (V_A) and realize larger medium-to-long term genetic gains than models with only additive effects when the trait under selection is subject to truncation selection. Four genetic models that included additive, dominance, and additive-by-additive epistatic effects were simulated. The simulated genome for individuals consisted of 25 chromosomes, each with a length of 1M. One hundred bi-allelic QTL, four on each chromosome, were considered. In each generation, 100 sires and 100 dams were mated, producing five progeny per mating. The population was selected for a single trait (h(2)=0.1) for 100 discrete generations with selection on phenotype or BLUP-EBV. V_A decreased with directional truncation selection even in presence of non-additive genetic effects. Non-additive effects influenced long-term response to selection and among genetic models additive gene action had highest response to selection. In addition, in all genetic models, BLUP-EBV resulted in a greater fixation of favourable and unfavourable alleles and higher response than phenotypic selection. In conclusion, for the schemes we simulated, the presence of non-additive genetic effects had little effect in changes of additive variance and V_A decreased by directional selection.

  1. Effect of alloying additions on secondary hardening behavior of Mo-containing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, K. B.; Kim, C. M.; Yang, H. R.

    1997-03-01

    The effect of alloying additions on secondary hardening behavior in Fe-Mo-C steels has been investigated by means of the successive alloying additions of Cr, Co, and Ni. The Cr additions promote M3C cementite formation. The Ni additions destabilize the cementite formation, while the Co additions retard dislocation recovery and present the necessary sites for M2C formation which provides the secondary hardening.

  2. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Formica, Domenico; Silvestri, Sergio

    2004-01-01

    The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to allow the integration of the specific literature on the bio-effects produced by magnetic resonance systems with the vast literature concerning the bio-effects produced by electromagnetic fields. This work gives an overview of the findings about the safety concerns of exposure to static magnetic fields, radio-frequency fields, and time varying magnetic field gradients, focusing primarily on the physics of the interactions between these electromagnetic fields and biological matter. The scientific literature is summarized, integrated, and critically analyzed with the help of authoritative reviews by recognized experts, international safety guidelines are also cited. PMID:15104797

  3. Biological activities of thermo-tolerant microbes from fermented rice bran as an alternative microbial feed additive.

    PubMed

    Koh, J H; Suh, H J

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the commercial potential of new microbial feed additive, Issatchenkia orientalis Y266 and Bacillus subtilis B266 from commercial fermented rice bran were tested for their tolerance or resistance to pH, bile, oxgall, and temperature. It was found that the strains grew very well up to pH 3.0 and resistant to relatively high concentrations of bile salt and oxgall. I. orientalis and B. subtilis are extremely tolerant in range of 70-90 degrees C in solid medium. B. subtilis B266 also has excellent tolerant property up to 90 degrees C in liquid medium. The health indexes (the microflora in the small intestines and the antibody titer to Newcastle disease virus) of chicks were significantly improved in the fermented rice bran with these strains (0.25% addition to diet) in comparison with the Avilamycin (20 mg/kg diet)-fed group (p < 0.05). The fermented rice bran-fed group showed a better microbial flora in the small intestines. Accordingly, it would appear that the fermented rice bran with these strains may be a potential candidate for an alternative microbial feed additive.

  4. Testing systems for biologic markers of genotoxic exposure and effect

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1986-11-19

    Societal interest in genotoxicity stems from two concerns: the fear of carcinogenesis secondary to somatic mutation; and the fear of birth defects and decreasing genetic fitness secondary to heritable mutation. There is a pressing need to identify agents that can cause these effects, to understand the underlying dose-response relationships, to identify exposed populations, and to estimate both the magnitude of exposure and the risk of adverse health effects in such populations. Biologic markers refer either to evidence in surrogate organisms, or to the expressions of exposure and effect in human populations. 21 refs.

  5. Biological effects on canine bladder by Nd:YAP laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui-Guo; Zhang, Mei-Jue; Zhu, Jing

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To observe the difference of biological effects on canine bladder by Nd:YAP laser with different power and different irradiation time. Methods: The canine bladder was irradiated with different power and different irradiation time. The effects of ablation and thermal coagulation in different laser settings were observed. The damage scale was evaluated macroscopically, with microscope and with electroscope. Results: The thermal coagulation effects is mostly and ablation effects is subordinate on the canine bladder by irradiation of Nd:YAP laser on. Pathology vision shows the thermal coagulation dose on perforation is 10W、6s;20W、4s;30W、3s;40W、2s;50-60W、1s;the dose of whole audience wear through is 10W、6s 20W、4s 30W、3s;40W、2s;50-60W、1s. Conclusions: The thermal coagulation effects is mostly and ablation effects is subordinate on biological effect of Nd:YAP laser on canine bladder. The better safety dose is power 10W、duration time less than 6s; power 20W、duration time less than 4s. power 30W、time less than 3s. power 40W、time less than 2s. The ablation and thermal coagulation effects of Nd:YAP laser on canine bladder is homocercal of power and time.

  6. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Hao, Yan-Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  7. Some aspects of the biological effects of space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breus, T. K.; Ozheredov, V. A.; Syutkina, E. V.; Rogoza, A. N.

    2008-02-01

    Space weather hazards have been well-studied during the past few decades, mainly in connection with effects on technical systems. The biological effects of solar and geomagnetic activity have been largely ignored because the amplitudes of the electromagnetic fields (EMF) are small, typically one to several hundreds of nanoteslas. This is much weaker than electromagnetic noise of anthropogenic origin and about 10 orders of magnitude less than the characteristic energies of biochemical reactions. During the past 20 years, however, more careful consideration has been given to possible nonthermal mechanisms of interaction of biological systems with weak (<1 mT) low-frequency EMF, which are unavoidably present in the environment, and some progress has been made towards understanding how an interaction can occur.

  8. Assessing biological effects from highway-runoff constituents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckler, Denny R.; Granato, Gregory E.

    1999-01-01

    Increased emphasis on evaluation of nonpoint-source pollution has intensified the need for techniques that can be used to discern the toxicological effects of complex chemical mixtures. In response, the use of biological assessment techniques is receiving increased regulatory emphasis. When applied with documented habitat assessment and chemical analysis, these techniques can increase our understanding of the influence of environmental contaminants on the biological integrity and ecological function of aquatic communities.The contaminants of greatest potential concern in highway runoff are those that arise from highway construction, maintenance, and use. The major contaminants of interest are deicers; nutrients; metals; petroleum-related organic compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX), and methyl tert -butyl ether (MTBE); sediment washed off the road surface; and agricultural chemicals used in highway maintenance. Hundreds, if not thousands, of biological endpoints (measurable responses of living organisms) may be either directly or associatively affected by contaminant exposure. Measurable effects can occur throughout ecosystem processes across the wide range of biological complexity, ranging from responses at the biochemical level to the community level. The challenge to the environmental scientist is to develop an understanding of the relationship of effects at various levels of biological organization in order to determine whether a causal relationship exists between chemical exposure and substantial ecological impairment. This report provides a brief history of the evolution of biological assessment techniques, a description of the major classes of contaminants that are of particular interest in highway runoff, an overview of representative biological assessment techniques, and a discussion of data-quality considerations. Published reports with a focus on the effects of highway runoff on the

  9. Effect of Atmospheric Background Aerosols on Biological Agent Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Advanced Research Projects Agency, DARPA Chemical and Biological Sensor Standards Study. 32 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory, JBPDS...the Research Program on BW Detection, Space General, AD480357, 1966. (U) The goal of this project was to examine the effects of background...that relied on detection of chemiluminescence resulting from a chemical reaction UNCLASSIFIED 8 UNCLASSIFIED with luminal and porphyrin4. During

  10. Effect of pH on biological phosphorus uptake.

    PubMed

    Serralta, J; Ferrer, J; Borrás, L; Seco, A

    2006-12-05

    An anaerobic aerobic laboratory scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated to study the effect of pH on enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Seven steady states were achieved under different operating conditions. In all of them, a slight variation in the pH value was observed during anaerobic phase. However, pH rose significantly during aerobic phase. The increase observed was due to phosphorus uptake and carbon dioxide stripping. When pH was higher than 8.2-8.25 the phosphorus uptake rate clearly decreased. The capability of Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) and Biological Nutrient Removal Model No. 1 (BNRM1) to simulate experimental results was evaluated. Both models successfully characterized the enhanced biological phosphorus removal performance of the SBR. Furthermore, BNRM1 also reproduced the pH variations observed and the decrease in the phosphorus uptake rate. This model includes a switch function in the kinetic expressions to represent the pH inhibition in biological processes. The pH inhibition constants related to polyphosphate storage process were obtained by adjusting model predictions to measured phosphorus concentrations. On the other hand, pH inhibition should be included in ASM2d to accurately simulate experimental phosphorus evolution observed in an A/O SBR.

  11. A Study Assessing the Potential of Negative Effects in Interdisciplinary Math–Biology Instruction

    PubMed Central

    Madlung, Andreas; Bremer, Martina; Himelblau, Edward; Tullis, Alexa

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing enthusiasm for teaching approaches that combine mathematics and biology. The call for integrating more quantitative work in biology education has led to new teaching tools that improve quantitative skills. Little is known, however, about whether increasing interdisciplinary work can lead to adverse effects, such as the development of broader but shallower skills or the possibility that math anxiety causes some students to disengage in the classroom, or, paradoxically, to focus so much on the mathematics that they lose sight of its application for the biological concepts in the center of the unit at hand. We have developed and assessed an integrative learning module and found disciplinary learning gains to be equally strong in first-year students who actively engaged in embedded quantitative calculations as in those students who were merely presented with quantitative data in the context of interpreting biological and biostatistical results. When presented to advanced biology students, our quantitative learning tool increased test performance significantly. We conclude from our study that the addition of mathematical calculations to the first year and advanced biology curricula did not hinder overall student learning, and may increase disciplinary learning and data interpretation skills in advanced students. PMID:21364099

  12. A study assessing the potential of negative effects in interdisciplinary math-biology instruction.

    PubMed

    Madlung, Andreas; Bremer, Martina; Himelblau, Edward; Tullis, Alexa

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing enthusiasm for teaching approaches that combine mathematics and biology. The call for integrating more quantitative work in biology education has led to new teaching tools that improve quantitative skills. Little is known, however, about whether increasing interdisciplinary work can lead to adverse effects, such as the development of broader but shallower skills or the possibility that math anxiety causes some students to disengage in the classroom, or, paradoxically, to focus so much on the mathematics that they lose sight of its application for the biological concepts in the center of the unit at hand. We have developed and assessed an integrative learning module and found disciplinary learning gains to be equally strong in first-year students who actively engaged in embedded quantitative calculations as in those students who were merely presented with quantitative data in the context of interpreting biological and biostatistical results. When presented to advanced biology students, our quantitative learning tool increased test performance significantly. We conclude from our study that the addition of mathematical calculations to the first year and advanced biology curricula did not hinder overall student learning, and may increase disciplinary learning and data interpretation skills in advanced students.

  13. Evolutionary Tradeoffs between Economy and Effectiveness in Biological Homeostasis Systems

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, Pablo; Sheftel, Hila; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2013-01-01

    Biological regulatory systems face a fundamental tradeoff: they must be effective but at the same time also economical. For example, regulatory systems that are designed to repair damage must be effective in reducing damage, but economical in not making too many repair proteins because making excessive proteins carries a fitness cost to the cell, called protein burden. In order to see how biological systems compromise between the two tasks of effectiveness and economy, we applied an approach from economics and engineering called Pareto optimality. This approach allows calculating the best-compromise systems that optimally combine the two tasks. We used a simple and general model for regulation, known as integral feedback, and showed that best-compromise systems have particular combinations of biochemical parameters that control the response rate and basal level. We find that the optimal systems fall on a curve in parameter space. Due to this feature, even if one is able to measure only a small fraction of the system's parameters, one can infer the rest. We applied this approach to estimate parameters in three biological systems: response to heat shock and response to DNA damage in bacteria, and calcium homeostasis in mammals. PMID:23950698

  14. The effect of biological cohesion on current ripple development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malarkey, Jonathan; Baas, Jaco H.; Hope, Julie

    2014-05-01

    Results are presented from laboratory experiments examining the role of biological cohesion, associated with Extra Polymeric Substances, on the development of current ripples. The results demonstrate the importance of biological cohesion compared to the effect of physical cohesion associated with clays in an otherwise sandy bed. FURTHER INFORMATION In fluvial and marine environments sediment transport is mainly dependent on the nature of the bed surface (rippled or flat) and the nature of cohesion in the bed. Cohesion can be either physical, as a result of the presence of clays, or biological as a result of the presence of organisms. In the case of the latter, biological cohesion occurs as a result of the presence of Extra Polymeric Substances (EPS) secreted by microorganisms. While it is known that EPS can dramatically increase the threshold of motion (Grant and Gust, 1987), comparatively little is known about the effect of EPS on ripple formation and development. The experiments described here seek to fill this gap. They also allow the effect of biological cohesion to be compared with that of physical cohesion from previous experiments (Baas et al., 2013). The experiments, which were conducted in a 10m flume at Bangor University, involved a current over a bed made of fine sand, with a median diameter of 0.148mm, and various amounts of xanthan gum, a proxy for naturally occurring EPS (Vardy et al., 2007). The hydrodynamic experimental conditions were matched very closely to those of Baas et al. (2013). The ripple dimensions were recorded through the glass side wall of the tank using time lapse photography. In the physical cohesion experiments of Baas et al. (2013) for clay contents up to 12%, the clay was very quickly winnowed out of the bed, leaving essentially clay-free ripples that developed at more or less the same rate as clean sand ripples. The resulting equilibrium ripples were essentially the same length as the clean sand ripples but reduced in height. By

  15. Intuitive biological thought: Developmental changes and effects of biology education in late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Coley, John D; Arenson, Melanie; Xu, Yian; Tanner, Kimberly D

    2017-02-01

    A large body of cognitive research has shown that people intuitively and effortlessly reason about the biological world in complex and systematic ways. We addressed two questions about the nature of intuitive biological reasoning: How does intuitive biological thinking change during adolescence and early adulthood? How does increasing biology education influence intuitive biological thinking? To do so, we developed a battery of measures to systematically test three components of intuitive biological thought: anthropocentric thinking, teleological thinking and essentialist thinking, and tested 8th graders and university students (both biology majors, and non-biology majors). Results reveal clear evidence of persistent intuitive reasoning among all populations studied, consistent but surprisingly small differences between 8th graders and college students on measures of intuitive biological thought, and consistent but again surprisingly small influence of increasing biology education on intuitive biological reasoning. Results speak to the persistence of intuitive reasoning, the importance of taking intuitive knowledge into account in science classrooms, and the necessity of interdisciplinary research to advance biology education. Further studies are necessary to investigate how cultural context and continued acquisition of expertise impact intuitive biology thinking.

  16. Challenges in Analyzing the Biological Effects of Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, Cihan Suleyman; Vang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The suggested health effects (e.g., disease prevention) of dietary bioactive compounds such as resveratrol are challenging to prove in comparison to man-made drugs developed for therapeutic purposes. Dietary bioactive compounds have multiple cellular targets and therefore have a variety of biological effects. Extrapolating the biological effects of dietary compounds from in vitro and in vivo animal experiments to humans may lead to over- or under-estimation of the effect and role of these compounds. The present paper will discuss a few of these challenges and suggest directions for future research. Questions we address include: (1) Is the combinatorial effect of resveratrol and other compounds real? (2) What are the real and relevant doses of resveratrol after administration? and (3) Is it possible to estimate the preventive effect of resveratrol by clinical trials using standard experimental designs? The examples concerning resveratrol taken from the scientific literature are mainly from 2010 and later. The challenges pointed out in this review are similar to most naturally occurring bioactive compounds. PMID:27294953

  17. The biological effects and possible modes of action of nanosilver.

    PubMed

    Völker, Carolin; Oetken, Matthias; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Novel physicochemical and biological properties have led to a versatile spectrum of applications for nanosized silver particles. Silver nanoparticles are applied primarily for their antimicrobial effects, and may variety of commercially available products have emerged. To better predict and prevent possible environmental impacts from silver nanoparticles that are derived from increasing production volumes and environmental release, more data on the biological effects are needed on appropriate model organisms. We examined the literature that addressed the adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on different levels of biological integration, including in vitro and in vivo test systems. Results of in vitro studies indicate a dose-dependent programmed cell death included by oxidative stress as main possible pathway of toxicity. Furthermore, silver nanoparticles may affect cellular enzymes by interference with free thiol groups and mimicry of endogenous ions. Similar mechanisms may apply for antibacterial effects produced by nonasilver. These effects are primary from the interference nanosilver has with bacterial cell membranes. Few in vivo studies have been performed to evaluated the toxic mode of action of nanosilver or to provide evidence for oxidative stress as an important mechanism of nanosilver toxicity. Organisms that are most acutely sensitive to nanosilver toxicity are the freshwater filter-freeding organisms. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated tha silver ions released from nanoparticle surface contribute to the toxicity, and, indeed, some findings indicated a unique nanoparticles effect. For an adequate evaluation of the environmental impact of nanosilver, greater emphasis should be placed on combining mechanistic investigations that are performed in vitro, with results obtained in in vivo test systems. Future in vivo test system studies should emphasize long-term exposure scenarios. Moreover, the dietary uptake of silver nanoparticles and

  18. Biological effects from electromagnetic field exposure and public exposure standards.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Sage, Cindy

    2008-02-01

    During recent years there has been increasing public concern on potential health risks from power-frequency fields (extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields; ELF) and from radiofrequency/microwave radiation emissions (RF) from wireless communications. Non-thermal (low-intensity) biological effects have not been considered for regulation of microwave exposure, although numerous scientific reports indicate such effects. The BioInitiative Report is based on an international research and public policy initiative to give an overview of what is known of biological effects that occur at low-intensity electromagnetic fields (EMFs) exposure. Health endpoints reported to be associated with ELF and/or RF include childhood leukaemia, brain tumours, genotoxic effects, neurological effects and neurodegenerative diseases, immune system deregulation, allergic and inflammatory responses, breast cancer, miscarriage and some cardiovascular effects. The BioInitiative Report concluded that a reasonable suspicion of risk exists based on clear evidence of bioeffects at environmentally relevant levels, which, with prolonged exposures may reasonably be presumed to result in health impacts. Regarding ELF a new lower public safety limit for habitable space adjacent to all new or upgraded power lines and for all other new constructions should be applied. A new lower limit should also be used for existing habitable space for children and/or women who are pregnant. A precautionary limit should be adopted for outdoor, cumulative RF exposure and for cumulative indoor RF fields with considerably lower limits than existing guidelines, see the BioInitiative Report. The current guidelines for the US and European microwave exposure from mobile phones, for the brain are 1.6 W/Kg and 2 W/Kg, respectively. Since use of mobile phones is associated with an increased risk for brain tumour after 10 years, a new biologically based guideline is warranted. Other health impacts associated with exposure to

  19. Subcellular Biological Effects of Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Juergen F.; Stacey, Michael

    Membranes of biological cells can be charged by exposure to pulsed electric fields. After the potential difference across the barrier reaches critical values on the order of 1 V, pores will form. For moderate pulse parameters of duration and amplitude, the effect is limited to the outer cell membrane. With the exposure to nanosecond pulses of several tens of kilovolts per centimeter, a similar effect is also expected for subcellular membranes and structures. Cells will respond to the disruption by different biochemical processes. This offers possibilities for the development of novel medical therapies, the manipulation of cells and microbiological decontamination.

  20. Effective biological dose from occupational exposure during nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demou, Evangelia; Tran, Lang; Housiadas, Christos

    2009-02-01

    Nanomaterial and nanotechnology safety require the characterization of occupational exposure levels for completing a risk assessment. However, equally important is the estimation of the effective internal dose via lung deposition, transport and clearance mechanisms. An integrated source-to-biological dose assessment study is presented using real monitoring data collected during nanoparticle synthesis. Experimental monitoring data of airborne exposure levels during nanoparticle synthesis of CaSO4 and BiPO4 nanoparticles in a research laboratory is coupled with a human lung transport and deposition model, which solves in an Eulerian framework the general dynamic equation for polydisperse aerosols using particle specific physical-chemical properties. Subsequently, the lung deposition model is coupled with a mathematical particle clearance model providing the effective biological dose as well as the time course of the biological dose build-up after exposure. The results for the example of BiPO4 demonstrate that even short exposures throughout the day can lead to particle doses of 1.10·E+08#/(kg-bw·8h-shift), with the majority accumulating in the pulmonary region. Clearance of particles is slow and is not completed within a working shift following a 1 hour exposure. It mostly occurs via macrophage activity in the alveolar region, with small amounts transported to the interstitium and less to the lymph nodes.

  1. Efficiently and Effectively Evaluating Public Service Announcements: Additional Evidence for the Utility of Perceived Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Bigsby, Elisabeth; Cappella, Joseph N; Seitz, Holli H

    2013-03-01

    Recent research has made significant progress identifying measures of the perceived effectiveness (PE) of persuasive messages and providing evidence of a causal link from PE to actual effectiveness (AE). This article provides additional evidence of the utility of PE through unique analysis and consideration of another dimension of PE important to understanding the PE-AE association. Current smokers (N =1,139) watched four randomly selected anti-smoking Public Service Announcements (PSAs). PE scores aggregated by message were used instead of individual PE scores to create a summed total, minimizing the likelihood that PE perceptions are consequences of an individual's intention to quit, supporting instead the PE→AE order. Linear regression analyses provide evidence of PE's positive and significant influence on smoking cessation-related behavioral intentions.

  2. Efficiently and Effectively Evaluating Public Service Announcements: Additional Evidence for the Utility of Perceived Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bigsby, Elisabeth; Cappella, Joseph N.; Seitz, Holli H.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has made significant progress identifying measures of the perceived effectiveness (PE) of persuasive messages and providing evidence of a causal link from PE to actual effectiveness (AE). This article provides additional evidence of the utility of PE through unique analysis and consideration of another dimension of PE important to understanding the PE-AE association. Current smokers (N =1,139) watched four randomly selected anti-smoking Public Service Announcements (PSAs). PE scores aggregated by message were used instead of individual PE scores to create a summed total, minimizing the likelihood that PE perceptions are consequences of an individual’s intention to quit, supporting instead the PE→AE order. Linear regression analyses provide evidence of PE’s positive and significant influence on smoking cessation-related behavioral intentions. PMID:25568588

  3. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    , oral supplementation with antioxidants appears to be an effective approach for the radioprotection of hematopoietic cells against the cell killing effects of radiation, and for improving survival in irradiated animals. Preliminary data suggest similar antioxidant protective effects for animals exposed to potentially lethal doses of proton radiation. Studies were also performed to determine whether dietary antioxidants could affect the incidence rates of malignancies in CBA mice exposed to 300 cGy proton (1 GeV/n) radiation or 50 cGy iron ion (1 GeV/n) radiation [9]. Two antioxidant formulations were utilized in these studies; an AOX formulation containing the mixture of antioxidant agents developed from our previous studies and an antioxidant dietary formulation containing the soybean-derived protease inhibitor known as the Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI). BBI was evaluated in the form of BBI Concentrate (BBIC), which is the form of BBI utilized in human trials. BBIC has been utilized in human trials since 1992, as described [10]. The major finding in the long-term animal studies was that there was a reduced risk of malignant lymphoma in mice exposed to space radiations and maintained on diets containing the antioxidant formulations. In addition, the two different dietary countermeasures also reduced the yields of a variety of different rare tumor types, arising from both epithelial and connective tissue cells, observed in the animals exposed to space radiation. REFERENCES [1] Guan J. et al (2004) Radiation Research 162, 572-579. [2] Wan X.S. et al (2005) Radiation Research 163, 364-368. [3] Wan X.S. et al (2005) Radiation Research 163, 232-240. [4] Guan J. et al (2006) Radiation Research 165, 373-378. [5] Wan X.S. et al (2006) International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics 64, 1475-1481. [6] Kennedy A.R. et al (2006) Radiation Research 166, 327-332. [7] Kennedy A.R. et al (2007) Radiation & Environmental Biophysics 46(2), 201-3. [8]Wambi, C., Sanzari, J

  4. Diverse biological effects of electromagnetic-treated water.

    PubMed

    Yamabhai, Montarop; Chumseng, Suchintana; Yoohat, Kirana; Srila, Witsanu

    2014-07-01

    The effects of water treated with an electromagnetic field (EMF) were investigated on two biological systems, humans and plants. Purified de-ionised water was treated by (1) boiling, (2) exposure to microwave radiation, and (3) low frequency electromagnetic oscillation molecular resonance effect technology (MRET), before being used to prepare media for culturing human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from three healthy females. Our results indicated that PBMC culture in MRET-activated medium showed significantly less oxidative metabolism when compared to media prepared from other types of water. As for the effects on soybean, our results indicated that both MRET- and microwave-treated water greatly enhanced the length of the root. These results suggested that electromagnetic-treated water can have diverse biological effects on both animal and plant cells. Since these effects are related to the 'Memory of Water', hypothesis which has been suggested as an explanation of the action of high homeopathic dilutions, our finding warrant a further investigation on the mechanisms of various types of physically conditioned water on specific cellular activities.

  5. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  6. Modulation of Additive and Interactive Effects in Lexical Decision by Trial History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masson, Michael E. J.; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    Additive and interactive effects of word frequency, stimulus quality, and semantic priming have been used to test theoretical claims about the cognitive architecture of word-reading processes. Additive effects among these factors have been taken as evidence for discrete-stage models of word reading. We present evidence from linear mixed-model…

  7. Sedimentary selenium as a causal factor for adverse biological effects: Toxicity thresholds and stream modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Va Derveer, W.; Canton, S.

    1995-12-31

    Selenium (Se) in the aquatic environment exhibits a strong association with particulate organic matter and as a result, measurements of waterborne concentration can be an unreliable predictor of bioaccumulation and adverse effects. Particulate-bound Se, typically measured as sedimentary Se, has been repeatedly implicated as a causal factor for Se bioaccumulation and subsequent potential for reproductive failures in fish and/or birds at sites receiving coal-fired power plant and refinery effluents as well as irrigation drainage. In fact, the premise that adverse biological effects are largely induced by sedimentary Se satisfies all of Hill`s criteria for a causal association. Despite these findings, most efforts to control Se continue to focus on waterborne concentrations because sedimentary toxicity thresholds are largely unknown. Sedimentary Se and associated biological effects data from studies of Se-bearing industrial effluent and irrigation drainage were compiled to initiate development of biological effects thresholds, The probability of adverse effects on fish or birds appears to be low up to a sedimentary Se concentration of about 2.8 {micro}g/g dry weight and high at 6.4 {micro}g/g dry weight (10th and 50th percentile of effects data, respectively). In addition, a preliminary regression model was derived for predicting dissolved to sedimentary Se transfer in streams as an interactive function of site-specific sedimentary organic carbon content (R{sup 2} = 0,870, p < 0.001) based on irrigation drainage studies in Colorado. This dissolved Se interaction with sedimentary organic carbon provides a possible explanation for the variable biological response to waterborne Se-organic-rich sites are predisposed to greater Se bioaccumulation and subsequent biological effects than organic-poor sites.

  8. Far infrared radiation (FIR): its biological effects and medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Far infrared (FIR) radiation (λ = 3–100 μm) is a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum that has been investigated for biological effects. The goal of this review is to cover the use of a further sub-division (3– 12 μm) of this waveband, that has been observed in both in vitro and in vivo studies, to stimulate cells and tissue, and is considered a promising treatment modality for certain medical conditions. Technological advances have provided new techniques for delivering FIR radiation to the human body. Specialty lamps and saunas, delivering pure FIR radiation (eliminating completely the near and mid infrared bands), have became safe, effective, and widely used sources to generate therapeutic effects. Fibers impregnated with FIR emitting ceramic nanoparticles and woven into fabrics, are being used as garments and wraps to generate FIR radiation, and attain health benefits from its effects. PMID:23833705

  9. Far infrared radiation (FIR): its biological effects and medical applications.

    PubMed

    Vatansever, Fatma; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    Far infrared (FIR) radiation (λ = 3-100 μm) is a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum that has been investigated for biological effects. The goal of this review is to cover the use of a further sub-division (3- 12 μm) of this waveband, that has been observed in both in vitro and in vivo studies, to stimulate cells and tissue, and is considered a promising treatment modality for certain medical conditions. Technological advances have provided new techniques for delivering FIR radiation to the human body. Specialty lamps and saunas, delivering pure FIR radiation (eliminating completely the near and mid infrared bands), have became safe, effective, and widely used sources to generate therapeutic effects. Fibers impregnated with FIR emitting ceramic nanoparticles and woven into fabrics, are being used as garments and wraps to generate FIR radiation, and attain health benefits from its effects.

  10. Ionol (BHT). Distribution in the organism, metabolism, and biological effect. II. Biological effects of ionol (survey)

    SciTech Connect

    Degterev, I.A.; Zaikov, G.E.

    1986-08-01

    In these experiments, a 25 mg/kg dose of ionol, administered to mice immediately after transplantation of melanoma B-16 or injection of tumor cells, inhibited the growth of pigmented B-16 cells and somewhat decreased the number of metastases. Ionol inhibited the mutagenic effect of benz(a)pyrene in vitro and in a culture of Salmonella typhimurium. In a mix with butylhydroxyanisole and propyl gallate, it decreased the number of mutations induced by gamma irradiation in the same culture. It protected mice from dominant lethal mutations and hereditary translocations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). When ionol was present in the feed in a dose of 0.75% it reduced the lethal effect in mice of dimethylnitrosamine, EMS, ethylene dibromide and cyclophosphamide.

  11. A review of the effects of seamounts on biological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehlert, George W.; Genin, Amatzia

    Seamounts interacting with oceanic currents create flow complexities which depend upon current speed, stratification, latitude, and seamount morphology. Seamount effects, which include internal wave generation, eddy formation, local upwelling, and closed circulation patterns called Taylor columns, have important effects upon pelagic and benthic ecosystems over seamounts. The biological effects of these current-topography interactions are poorly understood. Flow acceleration on upper flanks of seamounts may lead to low sedimentation but areas of high standing stocks of benthic fauna, particularly filter feeders. Other effects extend into the water column; nutrient enrichment and enhanced primary productivity occur over some seamounts. Longer observational periods will be necessary to understand the time-varying nature of such enhanced productivity and the extent to which it remains at the seamount or is advected away. At higher trophic levels, unusual patterns of distribution and abundance occur at some seamounts. Maintenance of high standing stocks of seamount-associated micronekton and demersal fishes suggests that seamounts are locations for high rates of energy transfer. The energy driving this biological productivity may either be generated from in situ processes or be advected from elsewhere and concentrated at the seamount; interdisciplinary studies will be necessary to better understand these ecosystems.

  12. Effect of additives on jet fuel thermal stability determined using the gravimetric JFTOT

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, S.G.; Hardy, D.R.

    1996-10-01

    In an effort to address the need for improving the thermal stabilities of jet fuels, various additives are being examined. These include the antioxidant, BHT; a metal deactivator, MDA (N,N{prime}-Disalicylidene-1,2-propane diamine); a combination of BHT and MDA; and two dispersant/detergent additives, viz., a Betz and Mobil additive. In general, the additives were screened in three test fuels, viz., a refinery sampling blend (RSB), a JP-8, and a Jet A. Additive effectiveness on aging a fuel in the presence of 400 ppb copper was examined in the RSB fuel. Based on the studies conducted, the most effective additives were the MDA/BHT combination, the Betz, and the Mobil additive (when tested). For example, these additives significantly lowered the total thermal deposits formed for the copper-doped aged fuel. For the remaining two test fuels, differentiation in effectiveness among the additives screened was considerably less. These results, which are likely due to the test fuels being relatively thermally stable, focus on the necessity of using less stable fuels to better differentiate additive effectiveness.

  13. Modular elastic patches – mechanical and biological effects

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Monica A.; Kluge, Jonathan A.; Laha, Michael M.; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    A modular approach to engineering crosslinked elastic biomaterials is presented for fine tuning of material mechanical and biological properties. The three components, soluble elastin, hyaluronic acid and silk fibroin, contribute with different features to the overall properties of the final material system. The elastic biomaterial is chemically crosslinked via interaction between primary amine groups naturally present on the two proteins, silk and elastin, or chemically introduced on hyaluronan and N-succinimide functionalities of the crosslinker. The materials obtained by crosslinking the three components in different ratios have Young’s moduli ranging from ~700 kPa to 100 kPa, strain to failure between ~ 65-15 % and ultimate tensile strengths of ~ 50 to 20 kPa. The biological effects and enzymatic degradation rates of the different composites are also different based on material composition. These findings further underline the strength of modular, multi-component systems in creating a range of biomaterials, targeted tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications, with application-tailored mechanical and biological properties. PMID:20712340

  14. Biological and Health Effects of Exposure to Kerosene-Based Jet Fuels and Performance Additives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    naphthalene, and ethylbenzene (Spormann & Widdel, 2000). The capacity for anaerobic utilization of alkylbenzenes was observed in members of the alpha, beta ...degradation have been isolated that are members of the beta and delta subclass, respectively. For example, toluene is activated in anaerobic...bacteria and mycotoxins and β(1→ 3)- glucans from fungi. Airborne endotoxin or LPS is a documented inhalation hazard in workplaces, at least where bacteria

  15. Mangiferin Has an Additive Effect on the Apoptotic Properties of Hesperidin in Cyclopia sp. Tea Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Bartoszewski, Rafal; Hering, Anna; Marszałł, Marcin; Stefanowicz Hajduk, Justyna; Bartoszewska, Sylwia; Kapoor, Niren; Kochan, Kinga; Ochocka, Renata

    2014-01-01

    A variety of biological pro-health activities have been reported for mangiferin and hesperidin, two major phenolic compounds of Honeybush (Cyclopia sp.) tea extracts. Given their increasing popularity, there is a need for understanding the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of these compounds. In this study, we used real-time cytotoxicity cellular analysis of the Cyclopia sp. extracts on HeLa cells and found that the higher hesperidin content in non-fermented "green" extracts correlated with their higher cytotoxicity compared to the fermented extracts. We also found that mangiferin had a modulatory effect on the apoptotic effects of hesperidin. Quantitative PCR analysis of hesperidin-induced changes in apoptotic gene expression profile indicated that two death receptor pathway members, TRADD and TRAMP, were up regulated. The results of this study suggest that hesperidin mediates apoptosis in HeLa cells through extrinsic pathway for programmed cell death. PMID:24633329

  16. Lung function, biological monitoring, and biological effect monitoring of gemstone cutters exposed to beryls

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, R.; Heinrich-Ramm, R.; Nowak, D.; Olma, K.; Poschadel, B.; Szadkowski, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Gemstone cutters are potentially exposed to various carcinogenic and fibrogenic metals such as chromium, nickel, aluminium, and beryllium, as well as to lead. Increased beryllium concentrations had been reported in the air of workplaces of beryl cutters in Idar-Oberstein, Germany. The aim of the survey was to study the excretion of beryllium in cutters and grinders with occupational exposure to beryls—for example, aquamarines and emeralds—to examine the prevalence of beryllium sensitisation with the beryllium lymphocyte transformation test (BeLT), to examine the prevalence of lung disease induced by beryllium, to describe the internal load of the respective metals relative to work process, and to screen for genotoxic effects in this particular profession.
METHODS—In a cross sectional investigation, 57 out of 100 gemstone cutters working in 12 factories in Idar-Oberstein with occupational exposure to beryls underwent medical examinations, a chest radiograph, lung function testing (spirometry, airway resistance with the interrupter technique), and biological monitoring, including measurements of aluminium, chromium, and nickel in urine as well as lead in blood. Beryllium in urine was measured with a newly developed direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy technique with a measurement limit of 0.06 µg/l. Also, cytogenetic tests (rates of micronuclei and sister chromatid exchange), and a BeLT were performed. Airborne concentrations of beryllium were measured in three factories. As no adequate local control group was available, the cutters were categorised into those with an exposure to beryls of >4 hours/week (group A) and ⩽4 hours/week (group B).
RESULTS—Clinical, radiological, or spirometric abnormalities indicating pneumoconiosis were detected in none of the gemstone cutters. Metal concentrations in biological material were far below the respective biological limit values, and beryllium in urine was only measurable in

  17. Effect of Oxygen-affinity Additives on the Superconducting Properties of Magnesium Diboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, J.-J.; Ahn, J.-H.

    We examined the effect of oxygen-affinity additives on the superconducting properties of magnesium diborides. The additives were elemental Y, Sm, Ca, Li compounds (LiH, LiBH4), polyethylene and polyethylene glycol, which have a higher oxygen-affinity than magnesium. The formation of magnesium oxide during in-situ sintering of magnesium diboride was inhibited by the addition of such materials. The critical current density was not improved by the additives of Y, Sm, Ca and lithium compounds in spite of reduced oxide phases. Only the addition of polyethylene and polyethylene glycol resulted in the enhanced superconducting property.

  18. [New mechanisms of biological effects of electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, A L; Kuznetsov, D A; Berdinskiĭ, V L

    2006-01-01

    The production of ATP in mitochondria depends on the magnesium nuclear spin and magnetic moment of a Mg2+ ion in creatine kinase and ATPase. This suggests that enzymatic synthesis of ATP is an ion-radical process and thus depends on the external magnetic field (magnetobiology originates from this fact) and microwave fields, which control the spin states of ion-radical pairs and affect the ATP synthesis. The chemical mechanism of ATP synthesis and the origin of biological effects of electromagnetic (microwave) fields are discussed.

  19. Ion-Sensitive Field-Effect Transistor for Biological Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Soo; Kim, Sang Kyu; Kim, Moonil

    2009-01-01

    In recent years there has been great progress in applying FET-type biosensors for highly sensitive biological detection. Among them, the ISFET (ion-sensitive field-effect transistor) is one of the most intriguing approaches in electrical biosensing technology. Here, we review some of the main advances in this field over the past few years, explore its application prospects, and discuss the main issues, approaches, and challenges, with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing ISFET-based biosensors and extending their applications for reliable and sensitive analysis of various biomolecules such as DNA, proteins, enzymes, and cells. PMID:22423205

  20. A Review: Some biological effects of high LET radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    There are qualitative and quantitative differences in the biological damage observed after exposure to high LET radiation as compared to that caused by low LET radiations. This review is concerned with these differences, which are ultimately reflected at the biochemical, cellular and even whole animal levels. In general, high LET radiations seem to produce biochemical damage which is more severe and possibly less repairable. Experimental data for those effects are presented in terms of biochemical RBE's with consideration of both early and late manifestations. An LET independent process by which significant biochemical damage may result from protons, neutrons and negative pion mesons is discussed.

  1. BIOLOGICAL WARFARE

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, John

    1953-01-01

    The use of biological agents as controlled weapons of war is practical although uncertain. Three types of agents are feasible, including pathogenic organisms and biological pests, toxins, and synthetic hormones regulating plant growth. These agents may be chosen for selective effects varying from prolonged incipient illness to death of plants, man and domestic animals. For specific preventive and control measures required to combat these situations, there must be careful and detailed planning. The nucleus of such a program is available within the existing framework of public health activities. Additional research and expansion of established activities in time of attack are necessary parts of biological warfare defense. PMID:13059641

  2. Linking chemical contamination to biological effects in coastal pollution monitoring.

    PubMed

    Beiras, Ricardo; Durán, Iria; Parra, Santiago; Urrutia, Miren B; Besada, Victoria; Bellas, Juan; Viñas, Lucía; Sánchez-Marín, Paula; González-Quijano, Amelia; Franco, María A; Nieto, Óscar; González, Juan J

    2012-01-01

    To establish the connection between pollutant levels and their harmful effects on living resources, coastal monitoring programmes have incorporated biological tools, such as the scope for growth (SFG) in marine mussels and benthic macrofauna community indices. Although the relation between oxygen-depleting anthropogenic inputs and the alteration of benthic communities is well described, the effects of chemical pollutants are unknown because they are not expected to favour any particular taxa. In this study, the combined efforts of five research teams involved in the investigative monitoring of marine pollution allowed the generation of a multiyear data set for Ría de Vigo (NW Iberian Peninsula). Multivariate analysis of these data allowed the identification of the chemical-matrix combinations responsible for most of the variability among sites and the construction of a chemical pollution index (CPI) that significantly (P < 0.01) correlated with biological effects at both the individual and the community levels. We report a consistent reduction in the physiological fitness of local populations of mussels as chemical pollution increases. The energy balance was more sensitive to pollution than individual physiological rates, but the reduction in the SFG was primarily due to significantly decreased clearance rates. We also found a decrease in benthic macrofauna diversity as chemical pollution increases. This diversity reduction resulted not from altered evenness, as the classic paradigm might suggest, but from a loss of species richness.

  3. ALTERED IRON HOMEOSTATIS AND THE MECHANISM OF BIOLOGIC EFFECT BY PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several features of the clinical presentation and changes in physiology and pathology following exposure to many diverse ambient air pollution particles are comparable, suggesting a common mechanism for their biological effect. We propose that a mechanism of biological effect com...

  4. Static fields: biological effects and mechanisms relevant to exposure limits.

    PubMed

    van Rongen, Eric; Saunders, Richard D; van Deventer, Emilie T; Repacholi, Michael H

    2007-06-01

    Recently, the International EMF Project of the World Health Organization (WHO) published an Environmental Health Criteria monograph on static electric and magnetic fields. In the present paper a short overview is given of the biological and health effects discussed in this document. The main conclusions are that no acute effects other than transient phenomena such as vertigo and nausea have been observed with exposure to static magnetic flux densities up to 8 T. There are no reports of long term or chronic adverse effects following prolonged static magnetic field exposure, but few data are available on which to base any judgment. The guidelines on static field exposure recommended by ICNIRP in 1994 are discussed in the light of current scientific knowledge.

  5. The effect of activated carbon addition on membrane bioreactor processes for wastewater treatment and reclamation - A critical review.

    PubMed

    Skouteris, George; Saroj, Devendra; Melidis, Paraschos; Hai, Faisal I; Ouki, Sabèha

    2015-06-01

    This review concentrates on the effect of activated carbon (AC) addition to membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating wastewaters. Use of AC-assisted MBRs combines adsorption, biodegradation and membrane filtration. This can lead to advanced removal of recalcitrant pollutants and mitigation of membrane fouling. The relative contribution of adsorption and biodegradation to overall removal achieved by an AC-assisted MBR process can vary, and "biological AC" may not fully develop due to competition of target pollutants with bulk organics in wastewater. Thus periodic replenishment of spent AC is necessary. Sludge retention time (SRT) governs the frequency of spent AC withdrawal and addition of fresh AC, and is an important parameter that significantly influences the performance of AC-assisted MBRs. Of utmost importance is AC dosage because AC overdose may aggravate membrane fouling, increase sludge viscosity, impair mass transfer and reduce sludge dewaterability.

  6. Investigation of the effectiveness of smoke suppressant fuel additives for turbojet applications. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bramer, J.R.

    1982-10-01

    Seven fuel additives were tested to investigate their effectiveness at reducing exhaust stack gas opacity in a turbojet test cell. Exhaust particle sizes and mass concentrations were determined at the engine and stack exhausts using measurements of light transmittance at three frequencies. Particle samples were also collected at the engine exhaust and measured with a scanning electron microscope to verify the optical technique. Nitrous oxide emissions were measured at the test cell stack exhaust. Four of the additives tested were found effective at reducing stack exhaust opacity and particulate mass concentration. None of the additives had any measurable effect on particle diameters. No meaningful changes in particle size or mass occurred between the engine and stack exhausts. The optical technique for determining particle size was verified effective using the scanning electron microscope. No additive had any significant effect on nitrous oxide production.

  7. Effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and subsequent methane production by anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Ge, Xumeng; Liew, Lo Niee; Liu, Zhe; Li, Yebo

    2015-09-01

    The effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and sequential anaerobic digestion (AD) of the ensiled giant reed was evaluated. The dry matter loss during ensilage (up to 90 days) with or without urea addition was about 1%. Addition of 2% urea enhanced production of lactic acid by about 4 times, and reduced production of propionic acid by 2-8 times. Besides, urea addition reduced degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, and increased degradation of lignin in giant reed during ensilage. Ensilage with or without urea addition had no significant effects on the enzymatic digestibility of giant reed, but ensilage with urea addition achieved a cumulative methane yield of 173 L/kg VS, which was 18% higher than that of fresh giant reed. The improved methane yield of giant reed could be attributed to the production of organic acids and ethanol during ensilage.

  8. Additivity of Feature-Based and Symmetry-Based Grouping Effects in Multiple Object Tracking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chundi; Zhang, Xuemin; Li, Yongna; Lyu, Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple object tracking (MOT) is an attentional process wherein people track several moving targets among several distractors. Symmetry, an important indicator of regularity, is a general spatial pattern observed in natural and artificial scenes. According to the "laws of perceptual organization" proposed by Gestalt psychologists, regularity is a principle of perceptual grouping, such as similarity and closure. A great deal of research reported that feature-based similarity grouping (e.g., grouping based on color, size, or shape) among targets in MOT tasks can improve tracking performance. However, no additive feature-based grouping effects have been reported where the tracking objects had two or more features. "Additive effect" refers to a greater grouping effect produced by grouping based on multiple cues instead of one cue. Can spatial symmetry produce a similar grouping effect similar to that of feature similarity in MOT tasks? Are the grouping effects based on symmetry and feature similarity additive? This study includes four experiments to address these questions. The results of Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated the automatic symmetry-based grouping effects. More importantly, an additive grouping effect of symmetry and feature similarity was observed in Experiments 3 and 4. Our findings indicate that symmetry can produce an enhanced grouping effect in MOT and facilitate the grouping effect based on color or shape similarity. The "where" and "what" pathways might have played an important role in the additive grouping effect.

  9. Non-additive effects of intra- and interspecific competition between two larval salamanders.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Thomas L; Whiteman, Howard H

    2015-05-01

    Assessment of the relative strengths of intra- and interspecific competition has increased in recent years and is critical to understanding the importance of competition. Yet, whether intra- and interspecific competition can have non-additive effects has rarely been tested. The resulting fitness consequences of such non-additive interactions are important to provide the context necessary to advance our understanding of competition theory. We compared the strength of additive and non-additive intra- and interspecific competition by manipulating densities of a pair of larval salamanders (Ambystoma talpoideum and A. maculatum) in experimental mesocosms within a response surface design. Intraspecific density had the strongest effect on the strength of competition for both species, and few observed comparisons indicated interspecific competition was an important factor in predicting body size, growth or larval period length of either species. Non-additive effects of intra- and interspecific competition influenced some response variables, including size and mass at metamorphosis in A. maculatum, but at a reduced strength compared to intraspecific effects alone. Intraspecific competition was thus the dominant biotic interaction, but non-additive effects also impact the outcome of competition in these species, validating the importance of testing for and incorporating non-additive density effects into competition models.

  10. Synergistic effect of additives including multifunctional acrylates in wood plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mubarak A.; Idriss Ali, K. M.; Garnett, John L.

    1993-07-01

    Wood Plastic Composite (WPC) was prepared with simul (soft wood, density = 0.4g/cc) and butylmethacrylate (BMA) monomer using 10% methanol as the swelling agent. Effect of additives including (i) multifunctional acrylates such as tripropylene glycol diacrylate (TPGDA), trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) (ii) oligomer acrylates like the urethane (UA), epoxy (EA) and polyester (PEA) acrylates and (iii) N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP) was investigated using 1 to 3 Mrad dose at 0.8 Mrad/h. Synergistic increases in polymer loading yields was achieved in presence of the additives, particularly with the trifunctional acrylate (TMPTA). In addition, acid as well as urea were also used as co-additives and synergistic enhancement in yields of polymer loading were obtained. The synergistic polymer loading by acid addition causes substantial decrease in tensile strength of the composite; but other additives and co-additives increase both the polymer loading and the tensile strength in these systems.

  11. Conjugated linoleic acid isomers: differences in metabolism and biological effects.

    PubMed

    Churruca, Itziar; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Portillo, Maria Puy

    2009-01-01

    The term conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) refers to a mixture of linoleic acid positional and geometric isomers, characterized by having conjugated double bonds, not separated by a methylene group as in linoleic acid. CLA isomers appear as a minor component of the lipid fraction, found mainly in meat and dairy products from cows and sheep. The most abundant isomer is cis-9,trans-11, which represents up to 80% of total CLA in food. These isomers are metabolized in the body through different metabolic pathways, but important differences, that can have physiological consequences, are observed between the two main isomers. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer is more efficiently oxidized than the cis-9,trans-11 isomer, due to the position of its double bounds. Interest in CLA arose in its anticarcinogenic action but there is an increasing amount of specific scientific literature concerning the biological effects and properties of CLA. Numerous biological effects of CLA are due to the separate action of the most studied isomers, cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12. It is also likely that some effects are induced and/or enhanced by these isomers acting synergistically. Although the cis-9,trans-11 isomer is mainly responsible for the anticarcinogenic effect, the trans-10,cis-12 isomer reduces body fat and it is referred as the most effective isomer affecting blood lipids. As far as insulin function is concerned, both isomers seem to be responsible for insulin resistance in humans. Finally, with regard to the immune system it is not clear whether individual isomers of CLA could act similarly or differently.

  12. The biological effects of radium-224 injected into dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Boecker, B.B.

    1996-08-01

    A life-span study was conducted in 128 beagle dogs to determine the biological effects of intravenously injected {sup 224}Ra chloride. The {sup 224}Ra chloride was prepared by the same method used for intravenous injections in humans who were treated for ankylosing spondylitis and tuberculosis. Thus the results obtained from dogs can be compared directly to the population of treated humans, both for the elucidation of the effect of exposure rate and for comparison with other radionuclides for which data for humans are unavailable. Using equal numbers of males and females, the dogs were injected with one of four levels of {sup 224}Ra resulting in initial body burdens of approximately 13, 40, 120 or 350 kBq of {sup 224}Ra kg{sup -1} body mass. A control group of dogs was injected with diluent only. All dogs were divided further into three groups for which the amount of injected {sup 224}Ra (half-life of 3.62 days) or diluent was given in a single injection or divided equally into 10 or 50 weekly injections. As a result of these three injection schedules, the accumulation of dose from the injected {sup 224}Ra was distributed over approximately 1, 3 or 12 months. Each injection schedule included four different injection levels resulting in average absorbed {alpha}-particle doses to bone of 0.1, 0.3, 1 and 3 Gy, respectively. The primary early effect observed was a hematological dyscrasia in the dogs receiving either of the two highest injection levels. The effect was most severe in the dogs receiving a single injection of {sup 224}Ra and resulted in the death of three dogs injected at the highest level. The late-occurring biological effects were tumors. Bone tumors were the most common followed by tumors in the nasal mucosa. 52 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. [Galactic heavy charged particles damaging effect on biological structures].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, A I; Krasavin, E A; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2013-03-01

    A concept of the radiation risk of the manned interplanetary flights is proposed and substantiated. Heavy charged particles that are a component of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have a high damaging effect on the biological structures as great amount of energy is deposited in heavy particle tracks. The high biological effectiveness of heavy ions is observed in their action on cell genetic structures and the whole organism, including the brain structures. The hippocampus is the part of the central nervous system that is the most sensitive to radiation--first of all, to heavy charged particles. Irradiation of animals with accelerated iron ions at doses corresponding to the real fluxes of GCR heavy nuclei, to which Mars mission crews can be exposed, leads to marked behavioral function disorders in the post-irradiation period. To evaluate the radiation risk for the interplanetary flight crews, the concept of successful mission accomplishment is introduced. In these conditions, the central nervous system structures can be the critical target of GCR heavy nuclei. Their damage can modify the higher integrative functions of the brain and cause disorders in the crew members' operator performances.

  14. Distinct biological effects of different nanoparticles commonly used in cosmetics and medicine coatings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Metal oxides in nanoparticle form such as zinc oxide and titanium dioxide now appear on the ingredient lists of household products as common and diverse as cosmetics, sunscreens, toothpaste, and medicine. Previous studies of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide in non-nanoparticle format using animals have found few adverse effects. This has led the FDA to classify zinc oxide as GRAS (generally recognized as safe) for use as a food additive. However, there is no regulation specific for the use of these chemicals in nanoparticle format. Recent studies, however, have begun to raise concerns over the pervasive use of these compounds in nanoparticle forms. Unfortunately, there is a lack of easily-adaptable screening methods that would allow for the detection of their biological effects. Results We adapted two image-based assays, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based caspase activation assay and a green fluorescent protein coupled-LC3 assay, to test for the biological effects of different nanoparticles in a high-throughput format. We show that zinc oxide nanoparticles are cytotoxic. We also show that titanium dioxide nanoparticles are highly effective in inducing autophagy, a cellular disposal mechanism that is often activated when the cell is under stress. Conclusion We suggest that these image-based assays provide a method of screening for the biological effects of similar compounds that is both efficient and sensitive as well as do not involve the use of animals. PMID:21711940

  15. Effectiveness of the Touch Math Technique in Teaching Basic Addition to Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yikmis, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to reveal whether the touch math technique is effective in teaching basic addition to children with autism. The dependent variable of this study is the children's skills to solve addition problems correctly, whereas teaching with the touch math technique is the independent variable. Among the single-subject research models, a…

  16. Metabolic effects of ß-glucans addition to corn maize flour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The addition of ß-glucans to degermed precooked corn maize flour produced favorably low metabolic responses in healthy young subjects. The increase in viscosity in the small intestine during the digestion period is the proposed mechanism for this effect. The addition of ß-glucans to corn maize pro...

  17. Parental Anxiety and Child Symptomatology: An Examination of Additive and Interactive Effects of Parent Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Marcy; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined relations between parent anxiety and child anxiety, depression, and externalizing symptoms. In addition, the study tested the additive and interactive effects of parent anxiety with parent depression and externalizing symptoms in relation to child symptoms. Forty-eight parents with anxiety disorders and 49 parents…

  18. Additivity of Feature-Based and Symmetry-Based Grouping Effects in Multiple Object Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chundi; Zhang, Xuemin; Li, Yongna; Lyu, Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple object tracking (MOT) is an attentional process wherein people track several moving targets among several distractors. Symmetry, an important indicator of regularity, is a general spatial pattern observed in natural and artificial scenes. According to the “laws of perceptual organization” proposed by Gestalt psychologists, regularity is a principle of perceptual grouping, such as similarity and closure. A great deal of research reported that feature-based similarity grouping (e.g., grouping based on color, size, or shape) among targets in MOT tasks can improve tracking performance. However, no additive feature-based grouping effects have been reported where the tracking objects had two or more features. “Additive effect” refers to a greater grouping effect produced by grouping based on multiple cues instead of one cue. Can spatial symmetry produce a similar grouping effect similar to that of feature similarity in MOT tasks? Are the grouping effects based on symmetry and feature similarity additive? This study includes four experiments to address these questions. The results of Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated the automatic symmetry-based grouping effects. More importantly, an additive grouping effect of symmetry and feature similarity was observed in Experiments 3 and 4. Our findings indicate that symmetry can produce an enhanced grouping effect in MOT and facilitate the grouping effect based on color or shape similarity. The “where” and “what” pathways might have played an important role in the additive grouping effect. PMID:27199875

  19. The effect of alkaline additives on the performance of surfactant systems designed to recover light oils

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.; Evans, D.B.

    1991-02-01

    Surfactant flooding is flexible because of the ability to optimize formulations for a wide range of reservoir conditions and crude oil types. The objective for this work was to determine if the addition of alkaline additives will allow the design of surfactant formulations that are effective for the recovery of crude oil, while, at the same time, maintaining the surfactant concentration at a much lower level than has previously been used for micellar flooding. Specifically, the focus of the work was on light, midcontinent crudes that typically have very low acid contents. These oils are typical of much of the midcontinent resource. The positive effect of alkaline additives on the phase behavior of the surfactant formulations and acidic crude oils is well known. The extension to nonacidic and slightly acidic oils is not obvious. Three crude oils, a variety of commercial surfactants, and several alkaline additives were tested. The oils had acid numbers that ranged from 0.13, which is quite low, to less than 0.01 mg KOH/g of oil. Alkaline additives were found to be very effective in recovering Delaware-Childers (OK) oil at elevated temperatures, but much less effective at reservoir temperatures. Alkaline additives were very effective with Teapot Dome (WY) oil. With Teapot Dome oil, surfactant/alkali systems produced ultralow IFT values and recovered 60% of the residual oil that remained after waterflooding. The effect of alkaline additives on recovering Hepler (KS) oil was minimal. The results of this work indicate that alkaline additives do have merit for use in surfactant flooding of low acid crude oils; however, no universal statement about applicability can be made. Each oil behaves differently, with this treatment, and the effect of alkaline additives must be determined (at reservoir conditions) for each oil. 23 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Biological effects of the respirable dusts from ore mines

    SciTech Connect

    Adamis, Z.; Timar, M.; Koefler, L.; Tatrai, E.; Ungvary, G.

    1986-10-01

    The biological effects of ore dusts were examined on peritoneal macrophages in vitro and on rat lung in vivo. The methylene blue adsorption of the dust samples, cytotoxicity, and phospholipid and hydroxyproline content of the lung were determined. It was realized that the examined ore samples had cytotoxic effects and from the in vitro results one can get information about the type of damage to be expected in the lung tissue. It is supposed that the examined ore dusts are less dangerous and slower acting than quartz, but they cause progressive fibrosis. The in vivo biochemical experiments do not give information about the type of damage to be expected in lung tissue; and the data on ore, bentonite, and coal do not differ from each other. To determine the typical biochemical changes caused by quartz, the authors obtain the most valuable information by determination of lung weight and phospholipid, phosphatidylcholine, and hydroxyproline content.

  1. Biological effects of radiation, metabolic and replication kinetics alterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, J.

    1972-01-01

    The biological effects of radiation upon normal and cancerous tissues were studied. A macromolecular precursor of DNA, 3ETdR, was incorporated into the cell nucleus during synthesis and provided intranuclear beta radiation. Tritium labeled cells were studied with autoradiographic methods; cell cycle kinetics were determined and cell functions modified by radiation dosage or by drugs were also evaluated. The long term program has included; (1) effects of radiation on cell replication and the correlation with incorporated dose levels, (2) radiation induced changes in cell function, viz., the response of beta irradiated spleen lymphocytes to antigenic stimulation by sheep red blood cells (SRBC), (3) kinetics of tumor and normal cell replication; and (4) megakaryocyte formation and modification by radiomimetic drugs.

  2. Effects of maternally exposed colouring food additives on cognitive performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Doguc, Duygu Kumbul; Ceyhan, Betul Mermi; Ozturk, Mustafa; Gultekin, Fatih

    2013-08-01

    Artificial food colourings and additives (AFCAs) have long been suggested to adversely affect the learning and behaviour in children. In this study, we aimed to provide additional data to clarify the possible side effects of colouring additives on behaviour and memory. We administered acceptable daily intake values of AFCAs as a mixture (Eritrosin, Ponceau 4R, Allura Red AC, Sunset Yellow FCF, Tartrazin, Amaranth, Brilliant Blue, Azorubin and Indigotin) to female rats before and during gestation and then tested their effects on behaviour and on spatial working memory in their offspring. Effects on spatial learning and memory were evaluated by Morris water maze, behavioural effects were evaluated by open-field test and forced swim test. Our results showed that commonly used artificial food colourings have no adverse effects on spatial working memory and did not create a depressive behaviour in offspring. But they showed a few significant effects on locomotor activity as AFCAs increased some parameters of locomotor activity.

  3. Effectiveness of Additives in Improving Fuel Lubricity and Preventing Pump Failure at High Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    the specified 1,700 rpm, the housing pressure on pump No. 1 dropped significantly. Fuel began spewing out of test stand gear box and the pump seized...UNCLASSIFIED EFFECTIVENESS OF ADDITIVES IN IMPROVING FUEL LUBRICITY AND PREVENTING PUMP FAILURE AT HIGH TEMPERATURE INTERIM REPORT TFLRF...UNCLASSIFIED EFFECTIVENESS OF ADDITIVES IN IMPROVING FUEL LUBRICITY AND PREVENTING PUMP FAILURE AT HIGH TEMPERATURE INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 437

  4. The Effect of Alloy Additions on Superplasticity in Thermomechanically Processed High Magnesium Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    AD-Ri55 142 THE EFFECT OF ALLOY ADDITIONS ON SUPERPLASTICITY IN I/2 THERMOMECHANICALLY PR-.(U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL UNCLSSIIED MONTEREY CA R J...Ln Monterey, California DTr J U N 1985 * THESIS THE EFFECT OF ALLOY ADDITIONS ON SUPERPLASTICITY IN THERMOMECHANICALLY PROCESSED HIGH MAGNESIUM *0...ALUMINUM-MAGNESIUM ALLOYS >by 0 (Richard J. Self December 1984 C-31 Thesis Advisor: Terry McNelley Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  5. Late biological effects from internal and external exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Information on late biological effects of radiation was obtained from the long-term medical followup of a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout from a thermonuclear test in 1954. Endocrine data are compatible with a sequence of nonstochastic radiation effects. The ingestion of radioisotopes of iodine produced clinical thyroid hypofunction in children, biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction in some adults, thyroid adenomatous module formation, and, as a possible indirect effect of thyroid damage, at least two cases of pituitary adenoma. In contrast, the only evidence of a stochastic effect has been a real increase in thyroid cancers among the more highly exposed people of Rongelap, none of whom have evidence of residual disease. While three nonthyroidal cancers which are known to be inducible in humans by external irradiation have been documented in the exposed population, three similar cancers have occurred in an unexposed comparison population of Marshallese. Nonstochastic effects of radiation exposure may be common but subtle. In the Marshallese experience the morbidity of delayed nonstochastic effects far exceeds that of the stochastic. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. An electrical conductivity method for measuring the effects of additives on effective diffusivities in Portland cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kyi, A.A. ); Batchelor, B. . Civil Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Effective diffusivities are important in describing corrosion and leaching of contaminants in cementitious systems. An electrical conductivity procedure has been used to measure the effective diffusivities of compounds in cementitious systems containing the additives fly ash, silica fume, sodium silicate and bentonite. Silica fume was the most effective additive in reducing the effective diffusivity, but fly ash was the most cost effective. Diffusivities that have been measured with techniques that rely on flux of a compound through the solid were generally lower than those measured with the electrical conductivity procedure. Porosity and bulk density are not well correlated with effective diffusivity in systems containing additives.

  7. Effect of fluorapatite additive on the mechanical properties of tricalcium phosphate-zirconia composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallemi, I.; Ben Ayed, F.; Bouaziz, J.

    2012-02-01

    The effect of fluorapatite addition on the mechanical properties of tricalcium phosphate - 50 wt% zirconia composites was investigated during the sintering process. The Brazilian test was used to measure the mechanical resistance of bioceramics. The mechanical properties of composites increase with the sintering temperature and with fluorapatite additive. At 1400°C, the fluorapatite additive ameliorates the densification and the mechanical resistance of tricalcium phosphate - 50 wt% zirconia composites. The 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of tricalcium phosphate - zirconia composites sintered with fluorapatite additives reveals the presence of tetrahedral P sites.

  8. An atomic view of additive mutational effects in a protein structure

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, M.M.; Terwilliger, T.C.

    1996-04-01

    Substitution of a single amino acid in a protein will often lead to substantial changes in properties. If these properties could be altered in a rational way then proteins could be readily generated with functions tailored to specific uses. When amino acid substitutions are made at well-separated locations in a single protein, their effects are generally additive. Additivity of effects of amino acid substitutions is very useful because the properties of proteins with any combination of substitutions can be inferred directly from those of the proteins with single changes. It would therefore be of considerable interest to have a means of knowing whether substitutions at a particular pair of sites in a protein are likely to lead to additive effects. The structural basis for additivity of effects of mutations on protein function was examined by determining crystal structures of single and double mutants in the hydrophobic core of gene V protein. Structural effects of mutations were found to be cumulative when two mutations were made in a single protein. Additivity occurs in this case because the regions structurally affected by mutations at the two sites do not overlap even though the sites are separated by only 9 {angstrom}. Structural distortions induced by mutations in gene V protein decrease rapidly, but not isotropically, with distance from the site of mutation. It is anticipated that cases where structural and functional effects of mutations will be additive could be identified simply by examining whether the regions structurally affected by each component mutation overlap.

  9. Effect of a chromium-containing fuel additive on hot corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Four superalloys were tested at 900 C in high velocity combustion gases containing synthetic sea salt and, in some cases, a chromium containing fuel additive. While the additive reduced hot corrosion of the alloys over the 100 hour test period, the attack was not eliminated nor was the mode of attack changed. Reduction of the number of thermal cycles had as large a beneficial effect as the Cr additive. Intermittent washing during testing had either small beneficial or adverse effects depending on the alloy.

  10. Effect of Surface-active Additives on Physical Properties of Slurries of Vapor-process Magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinns, Murray L

    1955-01-01

    The presence of 3 to 5 percent surface-active additive gave the lowest Brookfield apparent viscosity, plastic viscosity, and yield value that were obtained for slurry fuels containing approximately 50 percent vapor-process magnesium in JP-1 fuel. The slurries settled little and were easily remixed. A polyoxyethylene dodecyl alcohol was the most effective of 13 additives tested in reducing the Brookfield apparent viscosity and the yield value of the slurry. The seven most effective additives all had a hydroxyl group plus an ester or polyoxethylene group in the molecule. The densities of some of the slurries were measured.

  11. Biological effects summary report: 4,4'-methylenedianiline

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholc, N.M.; Morris, S.C. III; Brower, J.E.

    1985-05-01

    The Center for Assessment of Chemical and Physical Hazards was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a Biological Effects Summary Report for 4,4'-methylenedianiline (MDA). The literature regarding MDA toxicity was reviewed and a risk assessment analysis was performed based on animal tumor data, structurally similar compounds, and human effects data. In man, acute exposures to MDA have caused epigastric pain, fever, jaundice, and oher symptoms consistent with hepatitis. These effects appear to be reversible. No liver damage has yet been observed from chronic exposure. Chronic skin effects disappear when MDA exposure stops. Skin sensitivity also occurs in some individuals. Recent findings suggest a link between exposure to MDA and the occurrence of bladder cancer in man. Studies indicate that the skin is a major route of exposure in the development of these health effects. In animals, chronic administration of MDA produces hepatic cirrhosis, liver lesions, and enlargement of the spleen, liver, and kidneys. MDA has also proved to be carcinogenic in rats and mice, causing liver, thyroid and several other tumors. Compounds structurally similar to MDA are also known to be carcinogenic in man and animals. Based on these findings, an interim exposure limit of 0.08 mg/m/sup 3/ (0.01 ppM) was recommended for an average concentration exposure to employees during an 8-h work shift. 52 refs., 5 figs., 16 tabs.

  12. Biological effects due to weak magnetic field on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    2004-01-01

    magnetic field may cause different biological effects at the cellular, tissue and organ levels. They may be functionally related to systems that regulate plant metabolism including the intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis. However, our understanding of very complex fundamental mechanisms and sites of interactions between weak magnetic fields and biological systems is still incomplete and still deserve strong research efforts.

  13. The biological effect of asbestos exposure is dependent on ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Abstract Functional groups on the surface of fibrous silicates can complex iron. We tested the postulate that 1) asbestos complexes and sequesters host cell iron resulting in a disruption of metal homeostasis and 2) this loss of essential metal results in an oxidative stress and biological effect in respiratory epithelial cells. Exposure of BEAS-2B cells to 50 μg/mL chrysotile resulted in diminished concentrations of mitochondrial iron. Pre-incubation of these cells with 200 μM ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) prevented significant mitochondrial iron loss following the same exposure. The host response to chrysotile included increased expression of the importer divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) supporting a functional iron deficiency. Incubation of BEAS-2B cells with both 200 μM FAC and 50 μg/mL chrysotile was associated with a greater cell accumulation of iron relative to either iron or chrysotile alone reflecting increased import to correct metal deficiency immediately following fiber exposure. Cellular oxidant generation was elevated after chrysotile exposure and this signal was diminished by co-incubation with 200 μM FAC. Similarly, exposure of BEAS-2B cells to 50 µg/mL chrysotile was associated with release of the pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 and these changes were diminished by co-incubation with 200 μM FAC. We conclude that 1) the biological response following exposure to chrysotile is associated with complexation an

  14. The non-haematopoietic biological effects of erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Arcasoy, Murat O

    2008-04-01

    In the haematopoietic system, the principal function of erythropoietin (Epo) is the regulation of red blood cell production, mediated by its specific cell surface receptor (EpoR). Following the cloning of the Epo gene (EPO) and characterization of the selective haematopoietic action of Epo in erythroid lineage cells, recombinant Epo forms (epoetin-alfa, epoetin-beta and the long-acting analogue darbepoetin-alfa) have been widely used for treatment of anaemia in chronic kidney disease and chemotherapy-induced anaemia in cancer patients. Ubiquitous EpoR expression in non-erythroid cells has been associated with the discovery of diverse biological functions for Epo in non-haematopoietic tissues. During development, Epo-EpoR signalling is required not only for fetal liver erythropoiesis, but also for embryonic angiogenesis and brain development. A series of recent studies suggest that endogenous Epo-EpoR signalling contributes to wound healing responses, physiological and pathological angiogenesis, and the body's innate response to injury in the brain and heart. Epo and its novel derivatives have emerged as major tissue-protective cytokines that are being investigated in the first human studies involving neurological and cardiovascular diseases. This review focuses on the scientific evidence documenting the biological effects of Epo in non-haematopoietic tissues and discusses potential future applications of Epo and its derivatives in the clinic.

  15. Biological vs. Physical Mixing Effects on Benthic Food Web Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Braeckman, Ulrike; Provoost, Pieter; Moens, Tom; Soetaert, Karline; Middelburg, Jack J.; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Biological particle mixing (bioturbation) and solute transfer (bio-irrigation) contribute extensively to ecosystem functioning in sediments where physical mixing is low. Macrobenthos transports oxygen and organic matter deeper into the sediment, thereby likely providing favourable niches to lower trophic levels (i.e., smaller benthic animals such as meiofauna and bacteria) and thus stimulating mineralisation. Whether this biological transport facilitates fresh organic matter assimilation by the metazoan lower part of the food web through niche establishment (i.e., ecosystem engineering) or rather deprives them from food sources, is so far unclear. We investigated the effects of the ecosystem engineers Lanice conchilega (bio-irrigator) and Abra alba (bioturbator) compared to abiotic physical mixing events on survival and food uptake of nematodes after a simulated phytoplankton bloom. The 13C labelled diatom Skeletonema costatum was added to 4 treatments: (1) microcosms containing the bioturbator, (2) microcosms containing the bio-irrigator, (3) control microcosms and (4) microcosms with abiotic manual surface mixing. Nematode survival and subsurface peaks in nematode density profiles were most pronounced in the bio-irrigator treatment. However, nematode specific uptake (Δδ13C) of the added diatoms was highest in the physical mixing treatment, where macrobenthos was absent and the diatom 13C was homogenised. Overall, nematodes fed preferentially on bulk sedimentary organic material rather than the added diatoms. The total C budget (µg C m−2), which included TO13C remaining in the sediment, respiration, nematode and macrobenthic uptake, highlighted the limited assimilation by the metazoan benthos and the major role of bacterial respiration. In summary, bioturbation and especially bio-irrigation facilitated the lower trophic levels mainly over the long-term through niche establishment. Since the freshly added diatoms represented only a limited food source for

  16. Iron diminishes the in vitro biological effect of vanadium.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Stonehuerner, Jacqueline; Soukup, Joleen M; Dailey, Lisa A; Kesic, Matthew J; Cohen, Mitchell D

    2015-06-01

    Mechanistic pathways underlying inflammatory injury following exposures to vanadium-containing compounds are not defined. We tested the postulate that the in vitro biological effect of vanadium results from its impact on iron homeostasis. Human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells exposed to vanadyl sulfate (VOSO4) showed a time- and dose-dependent increase in vanadium relative to PBS. HBE cells exposed to VOSO4 and then exposed to ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) significantly increased intracellular iron import supporting an interaction between the two metals. Following exposure to VOSO4, there was an increase (336±73%) in RNA for divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), a major iron importer. With inclusion of VOSO4 in the incubation, vanadium could be measured in the nuclear and mitochondrial fractions and the supernatant. Non-heme iron in the nuclear and mitochondrial fractions were decreased immediately following VOSO4 exposure while there was an increased concentration of non-heme iron in the supernatant. Provision of excess iron inhibited changes in the concentration of this metal provoked by VOSO4 exposures. Using Amplex Red, VOSO4 was shown to significantly increase oxidant generation by HBE cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. HBE cells pre-treated with FAC and then exposed to VOSO4 demonstrated a decreased generation of oxidants. Similarly, activation of the transcription factor NF-ĸB promoter and release of interleukin-6 and -8 were increased following VOSO4 exposure and these effects were diminished by pre-treatment with FAC. We conclude that an initiating event in biological effect after exposure to vanadyl sulfate is a loss of requisite cell iron.

  17. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or... Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded... for the reclassification of all biological products that have been classified into Category IIIA....

  18. Nitrogen Addition Altered the Effect of Belowground C Allocation on Soil Respiration in a Subtropical Forest

    PubMed Central

    He, Tongxin; Wang, Qingkui; Wang, Silong; Zhang, Fangyue

    2016-01-01

    The availabilities of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil play an important role in soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. However, the variation in the soil respiration (Rs) and response of microbial community to the combined changes in belowground C and N inputs in forest ecosystems are not yet fully understood. Stem girdling and N addition were performed in this study to evaluate the effects of C supply and N availability on Rs and soil microbial community in a subtropical forest. The trees were girdled on 1 July 2012. Rs was monitored from July 2012 to November 2013, and soil microbial community composition was also examined by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) 1 year after girdling. Results showed that Rs decreased by 40.5% with girdling alone, but N addition only did not change Rs. Interestingly, Rs decreased by 62.7% under the girdling with N addition treatment. The reducing effect of girdling and N addition on Rs differed between dormant and growing seasons. Girdling alone reduced Rs by 33.9% in the dormant season and 54.8% in the growing season compared with the control. By contrast, girdling with N addition decreased Rs by 59.5% in the dormant season and 65.4% in the growing season. Girdling and N addition significantly decreased the total and bacterial PLFAs. Moreover, the effect of N addition was greater than girdling. Both girdling and N addition treatments separated the microbial groups on the basis of the first principal component through principal component analysis compared with control. This indicated that girdling and N addition changed the soil microbial community composition. However, the effect of girdling with N addition treatment separated the microbial groups on the basis of the second principal component compared to N addition treatment, which suggested N addition altered the effect of girdling on soil microbial community composition. These results suggest that the increase in soil N availability by N deposition alters the effect of

  19. Effects of soil warming and nitrogen addition on soil respiration in a New Zealand tussock grassland.

    PubMed

    Graham, Scott L; Hunt, John E; Millard, Peter; McSeveny, Tony; Tylianakis, Jason M; Whitehead, David

    2014-01-01

    Soil respiration (RS) represents a large terrestrial source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Global change drivers such as climate warming and nitrogen deposition are expected to alter the terrestrial carbon cycle with likely consequences for RS and its components, autotrophic (RA) and heterotrophic respiration (RH). Here we investigate the impacts of a 3°C soil warming treatment and a 50 kg ha(-1) y(-1) nitrogen addition treatment on RS, RH and their respective seasonal temperature responses in an experimental tussock grassland. Average respiration in untreated soils was 0.96±0.09 μmol m(-2) s(-1) over the course of the experiment. Soil warming and nitrogen addition increased RS by 41% and 12% respectively. These treatment effects were additive under combined warming and nitrogen addition. Warming increased RH by 37% while nitrogen addition had no effect. Warming and nitrogen addition affected the seasonal temperature response of RS by increasing the basal rate of respiration (R10) by 14% and 20% respectively. There was no significant interaction between treatments for R10. The treatments had no impact on activation energy (E0). The seasonal temperature response of RH was not affected by either warming or nitrogen addition. These results suggest that the additional CO2 emissions from New Zealand tussock grassland soils as a result of warming-enhanced RS constitute a potential positive feedback to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  20. Medical-biological aspects of radiation effects in Daphnia magna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapultseva, E.; Uskalova, D.; Savina, N.; Ustenko, K.

    2017-01-01

    We have shown that γ-irradiation at doses of 100 and 1000 mGy significantly compromised fecundity and reproductive success of the directly exposed D. magna. These effects were also observed among the non-exposed first-generation progeny of irradiated parents, thus implying the manifestation of transgenerational effects in Daphnia. We have also shown that compromised viability of irradiated D. magna can be attributed cytotoxic effects of irradiation. It would therefore appear that the compromised viability may be attributed to the cytotoxic effects resulted from epigenetic changes affecting some metabolic pathways involved in detoxification of free-radicals. Additionally we have analyzed more distant progeny of irradiated at doses of 10, 100 and 1000 mGy Daphnia. Our data demonstrated that multicellular crustacean D. magna represent a very useful experimental model for analyse of long-term effects of ionising radiation at the organismal level.

  1. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  2. “The Biological Effects of Childhood Trauma”

    PubMed Central

    De Bellis, Michael D.; A.B., Abigail Zisk

    2014-01-01

    I. Synopsis Trauma in childhood is a grave psychosocial, medical, and public policy problem that has serious consequences for its victims and for society. Chronic interpersonal violence in children is common worldwide. Developmental traumatology, the systemic investigation of the psychiatric and psychobiological effects of chronic overwhelming stress on the developing child, provides a framework and principles when empirically examining the neurobiological effects of pediatric trauma. Despite the widespread prevalence of childhood trauma, less is known about trauma's biological effects in children as compared to adults with child trauma histories; and even less is known about how these pediatric mechanisms underlie trauma's short-term and long-term medical and mental health consequences. This article focuses primarily on the peer-reviewed literature on the neurobiological sequelae of childhood trauma in children and adults with histories of childhood trauma. We also review relevant studies of animal models of stress to help us better understand the psychobiological effects of trauma during development. Next, we review the neurobiology of trauma, its clinical applications and the biomarkers that may provide important tools for clinicians and researchers, both as predictors of posttraumatic stress symptoms and as useful tools to monitor treatment response. Finally, we offer suggestions for future researchers. PMID:24656576

  3. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyano, Yuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-08-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous two-dimensional fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it was shown [A. S. Mikhailov and R. Kapral, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015), 10.1073/pnas.1506825112] that such active proteins should induce nonthermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxislike drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them.

  4. Ginkgo biloba leave extract: biological, medicinal, and toxicological effects.

    PubMed

    Chan, Po-Chuen; Xia, Qingsu; Fu, Peter P

    2007-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leave extract is among the most widely sold herbal dietary supplements in the United States. Its purported biological effects include: scavenging free radical; lowering oxidative stress; reducing neural damages, reducing platelets aggregation; anti-inflammation; anti-tumor activities; and anti-aging. Clinically, it has been prescribed to treat CNS disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and cognitive deficits. It exerts allergy and changes in bleeding time. While its mutagenicity or carcinogenic activity has not been reported, its components, quercetin, kaempferol and rutin have been shown to be genotoxic. There are no standards or guidelines regulating the constituent components of Ginkgo biloba leave extract nor are exposure limits imposed. Safety evaluation of Ginkgo biloba leave extract is being conducted by the U.S. National Toxicology Program.

  5. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  6. Biological effects and equivalent doses in radiotherapy: A software solution

    PubMed Central

    Voyant, Cyril; Julian, Daniel; Roustit, Rudy; Biffi, Katia; Lantieri, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Background The limits of TDF (time, dose, and fractionation) and linear quadratic models have been known for a long time. Medical physicists and physicians are required to provide fast and reliable interpretations regarding delivered doses or any future prescriptions relating to treatment changes. Aim We, therefore, propose a calculation interface under the GNU license to be used for equivalent doses, biological doses, and normal tumor complication probability (Lyman model). Materials and methods The methodology used draws from several sources: the linear-quadratic-linear model of Astrahan, the repopulation effects of Dale, and the prediction of multi-fractionated treatments of Thames. Results and conclusions The results are obtained from an algorithm that minimizes an ad-hoc cost function, and then compared to an equivalent dose computed using standard calculators in seven French radiotherapy centers. PMID:24936319

  7. Effect of choline carboxylate ionic liquids on biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Doris; Kraus, Birgit; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D; Kunz, Werner

    2014-11-01

    Choline carboxylates, ChCm, with m=2-10 and choline oleate are known as biocompatible substances, yet their influence on biological membranes is not well-known, and the effect on human skin has not previously been investigated. The short chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m=2, 4, 6 act as hydrotropes, solubilizing hydrophobic compounds in aqueous solution, while the longer chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m=8, 10 and oleate are able to form micelles. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of choline carboxylates was tested using HeLa and SK-MEL-28 cells. The influence of these substances on liposomes prepared from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was also evaluated to provide insights on membrane interactions. It was observed that the choline carboxylates with a chain length of m>8 distinctly influence the bilayer, while the shorter ones had minimal interaction with the liposomes.

  8. [The biological effect of fireproof ceramic fibers--literature review].

    PubMed

    Krajnow, A

    1996-01-01

    The work presents reports, selected from the world literature, on the studies of biological effect of refractory ceramic fibres, carried out on experimental animals. The discrepancy between the results of studies performed may originate from differences in the distribution of fibre sizes or the durability of fibres in the organism and their surface properties which, in turn, depend on the chemical composition of fibres. In all studies discussed, ceramic fibres generally activated macrophages and they were characterised by a moderate fibrotic activity. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of tumor (mesothelioma) observed in several very important experimental studies may suggest that some types of refractory ceramic fibres show a similar carcinogenic potential to that of natural asbestos: crocidolite or chrysotile.

  9. Biological effects of inhaled magnesium sulphate whiskers in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hori, H; Kasai, T; Haratake, J; Ishimatsu, S; Oyabu, T; Yamato, H; Higashi, T; Tanaka, I

    1994-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to two types of magnesium sulphate whiskers by inhalation for six hours a day, five days a week, for four weeks (sub-chronic study), or for one year (chronic study) to clarify the biological effects of the whiskers. There were few whiskers detected in the rat lungs even at one day after the exposure, suggesting that they are dissolved and eliminated rapidly from the lungs. To measure the clearance rate of the whiskers from the lungs, an intratracheal instillation was performed in golden hamsters. The half life of the whiskers in the lung was determined as 17.6 minutes by temporally measuring the magnesium concentration up to 80 minutes after the instillation. A histopathological examination indicated a frequent occurrence of adenoma and carcinoma in the year after chronic exposure, but it was not significantly different between exposed and control rats. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8044250

  10. Kinetic effect of Pd additions on the hydrogen uptake of chemically activated, ultramicroporous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2010-01-01

    The effect of mixing chemically-activated ultramicroporous carbon (UMC) with Pd nanopowder is investigated. Results show that Pd addition doubles the rate of hydrogen uptake, but does not enhance the hydrogen capacity or improve desorption kinetics. The effect of Pd on the rate of hydrogen adsorption supports the occurrence of the hydrogen spillover mechanism in the Pd - UMC system.

  11. Influence of powdered activated carbon addition on water quality, sludge properties, and microbial characteristics in the biological treatment of commingled industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qing-Yuan; Li, Meng; Wang, Can; Ji, Min

    2015-09-15

    A powdered activated carbon-activated sludge (PAC-AS) system, a traditional activated sludge (AS) system, and a powdered activated carbon (PAC) system were operated to examine the insights into the influence of PAC addition on biological treatment. The average COD removal efficiencies of the PAC-AS system (39%) were nearly double that of the AS system (20%). Compared with the average efficiencies of the PAC system (7%), COD removal by biodegradation in the PAC-AS system was remarkably higher than that in the AS system. The analysis of the influence of PAC on water quality and sludge properties showed that PAC facilitated the removal of hydrophobic matter and metabolic acidic products, and also enhanced the biomass accumulation, sludge settleability, and specific oxygen uptake rate inside the biological system. The microbial community structures in the PAC-AS and AS systems were monitored. The results showed that the average well color development in the PAC-AS system was higher than that in the AS system. The utilization of various substrates by microorganisms in the two systems did not differ. The dissimilarity index was far less than one; thus, showing that the microbial community structures of the two systems were the same.

  12. Differences in the effects of solution additives on heat- and refolding-induced aggregation.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ryouta; Noguchi, Takumi; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2008-01-01

    Although a number of low-molecular-weight additives have been developed to suppress protein aggregation, it is unclear whether these aggregation suppressors affect various aggregation processes in the same manner. In this study, we evaluated the differences in the effect of solution additives on heat- and refolding-induced aggregation in the presence of guanidine (Gdn), arginine (Arg), and spermidine (Spd), and the comparable analysis showed the following differences: (i) Gdn did not suppress thermal aggregation but increased the yield of oxidative refolding. (ii) Spd showed the highest effect for heat-induced aggregation suppression among tested compounds, although it promoted aggregation in oxidative refolding. (iii) Arg was effective for both aggregation processes. Lysozyme solubility assay and thermal unfolding experiment showed that Spd was preferentially excluded from native lysozyme and Arg and Gdn solubilized the model state of intermediates during oxidative refolding. This preference of additives to protein surfaces is the cause of the different effect on aggregation suppression.

  13. Biological effects due to weak magnetic fields on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N.

    In the evolution process, living organisms have experienced the action of the Earth's magnetic field (MF) that is a natural component of our environment. It is known that a galactic MF induction does not exceed 0.1 nT, since investigations of weak magnetic field (WMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planning long-term space flights to other planets where the magnetizing force is near 10-5 Oe. However, the role of WMF and its influence on organisms' functioning are still insufficiently investigated. A large number of experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in WMF has found that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during the early terms of germination in comparison with control. The proliferation activity and cell reproduction are reduced in meristem of plant roots under WMF application. The prolongation of total cell reproductive cycle is registered due to the expansion of G phase in1 different plant species as well as of G phase in flax and lentil roots along with2 relative stability of time parameters of other phases of cell cycle. In plant cells exposed to WMF, the decrease in functional activity of genome at early prereplicate period is shown. WMF causes the intensification in the processes of proteins' synthesis and break-up in plant roots. Qualitative and quantitative changes in protein spectrum in growing and differentiated cells of plant roots exposed to WMF are revealed. At ultrastructural level, there are observed such ultrastructural peculiarities as changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to WMF. Mitochondria are the most sensitive organelle to WMF application: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix is electron

  14. Formation and Biological Targets of Quinones: Cytotoxic versus Cytoprotective Effects

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Quinones represent a class of toxicological intermediates, which can create a variety of hazardous effects in vivo including, acute cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenesis. In contrast, quinones can induce cytoprotection through the induction of detoxification enzymes, anti-inflammatory activities, and modification of redox status. The mechanisms by which quinones cause these effects can be quite complex. The various biological targets of quinones depend on their rate and site of formation and their reactivity. Quinones are formed through a variety of mechanisms from simple oxidation of catechols/hydroquinones catalyzed by a variety of oxidative enzymes and metal ions to more complex mechanisms involving initial P450-catalyzed hydroxylation reactions followed by two-electron oxidation. Quinones are Michael acceptors, and modification of cellular processes could occur through alkylation of crucial cellular proteins and/or DNA. Alternatively, quinones are highly redox active molecules which can redox cycle with their semiquinone radical anions leading to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and ultimately the hydroxyl radical. Production of ROS can alter redox balance within cells through the formation of oxidized cellular macromolecules including lipids, proteins, and DNA. This perspective explores the varied biological targets of quinones including GSH, NADPH, protein sulfhydryls [heat shock proteins, P450s, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), glutathione S-transferase (GST), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, (NQO1), kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), IκB kinase (IKK), and arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR)], and DNA. The evidence strongly suggests that the numerous mechanisms of quinone modulations (i.e., alkylation versus oxidative stress) can be correlated with the known pathology/cytoprotection of the parent compound(s) that is best described by an inverse U-shaped dose–response curve. PMID:27617882

  15. Interactive effects between N addition and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Annika; Strengbom, Joachim; From, Fredrik

    2014-05-01

    In management of boreal forests, nitrogen (N) enrichment from atmospheric deposition or from forest fertilization can appear in combination with land-use related disturbances, i.e. tree harvesting by clear-felling. Long-term interactive effects between N enrichment and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function are, however, poorly known. We investigated effects of N enrichment by forest fertilization done > 25 years ago on forest understory species composition in old-growth (undisturbed) forests, and in forests clear-felled 10 years ago (disturbed). In clear-felled forests we also investigated effects of the previous N addition on growth of tree saplings. The results show that the N enrichment effect on the understory species composition was strongly dependent on the disturbance caused by clear-felling. In undisturbed forests, there were small or no effects on understory species composition from N addition. In contrast, effects were large in forests first exposed to N addition and subsequently disturbed by clear-felling. Effects of N addition differed among functional groups of plants. Abundance of graminoids increased (+232%) and abundance of dwarf shrubs decreased (-44%) following disturbance in N fertilized forests. For vascular plants, the two perturbations had contrasting effects on α-(within forests) and β-diversity (among forests): in disturbed forests, N addition reduced, or had no effect on α-diversity, while β-diversity increased. For bryophytes, negative effects of disturbance on α-diversity were smaller in N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized, while neither N addition nor disturbance had any effects on β-diversity. Moreover, sapling growth in forests clear-felled 10 years ago was significantly higher in previously N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized. Our study show that effects of N addition on plant communities may appear small, short-lived, or even absent until exposed to a disturbance. This

  16. The effects of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system additives on solid by-products. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Huyck, K.A.; Tatum, G.S.; DeKraker, D.P.

    1995-12-01

    This study was designed to examine characteristics of by-products from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems that use performance-enhancing additives. The by-products were evaluated for handling, disposal, properties, and utilization potential. This study was designed to identify potential operation-limiting consequences (fatal flaws) caused by using FGD system additives. It was not intended to be an all-encompassing study of the possible process, environmental, and utilization circumstances at each plant. Seven utilities conducting additive testing agreed to provide samples for this study both before and during their testing. Solid samples were collected from FGD systems using the following additives: di-basic acid (DBA), which is a mixture of succinic, glutaric, and adipic acids; formate; sulfur; ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA); and chloride. Changes in handling properties that may alter process operations were observed at sites where DBS was used. Changes in leaching behavior, permeability and unconfined compressive strength (properties that affect by-product disposal properties) showed no clear trend for additive or system type. The intent of this study is to provide an overall assessment of potential system-limiting effects of FGD additive use. There were no overriding problems relating to disposal with the use of additives. However, properties of solids produced with and without additives should be tested at each site prior to use of an FGD system additive. This is necessary because of the variability in state disposal and permitting requirements and the influence of specific operating conditions on by-product properties.

  17. Relative biological effectiveness for photons: implication of complex DNA double-strand breaks as critical lesions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Xudong; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen; Luo, Chunxiong; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Yugang

    2017-03-21

    Current knowledge in radiobiology ascribes the adverse biological effects of ionizing radiation primarily to the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which is supposed to be potentially lethal and may be converted to lethal damage due to misrepair. Soft and ultrasoft x-rays have been found to bear elevated biological effectiveness for cell killing compared with conventional x-rays or (60)Co γ-rays. This phenomenon is qualitatively interpreted as the increased level of DSB induction for low energy photons, however, a thorough quantitative reasoning is lacking. Here, we systematically compared the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with relative DSB induction for photons from several hundreds of eV up to MeV. Although there is an approximate two-fold increase in the yields of DSB for low energy photons found in our calculation and a large number of experimental measurements, it is far from enough to account for the three- to four-fold increase in RBE. Further theoretical investigations show that DSB complexity (additional single-strand breaks and base damage within 10 base pairs) increases notably for low energy photons, which largely reconciles the discrepancy between RBE and DSB induction. Our theoretical results are in line with accumulating experimental evidence that complex DSBs are refractory to repair machinery and may contribute predominantly to the formation of lethal damage.

  18. Relative biological effectiveness for photons: implication of complex DNA double-strand breaks as critical lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Qibin; Wang, Xudong; Liu, Feng; Yang, Gen; Luo, Chunxiong; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Yugang

    2017-03-01

    Current knowledge in radiobiology ascribes the adverse biological effects of ionizing radiation primarily to the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which is supposed to be potentially lethal and may be converted to lethal damage due to misrepair. Soft and ultrasoft x-rays have been found to bear elevated biological effectiveness for cell killing compared with conventional x-rays or 60Co γ-rays. This phenomenon is qualitatively interpreted as the increased level of DSB induction for low energy photons, however, a thorough quantitative reasoning is lacking. Here, we systematically compared the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with relative DSB induction for photons from several hundreds of eV up to MeV. Although there is an approximate two-fold increase in the yields of DSB for low energy photons found in our calculation and a large number of experimental measurements, it is far from enough to account for the three- to four-fold increase in RBE. Further theoretical investigations show that DSB complexity (additional single-strand breaks and base damage within 10 base pairs) increases notably for low energy photons, which largely reconciles the discrepancy between RBE and DSB induction. Our theoretical results are in line with accumulating experimental evidence that complex DSBs are refractory to repair machinery and may contribute predominantly to the formation of lethal damage.

  19. Adaptive evolution of a generalist parasitoid: implications for the effectiveness of biological control agents

    PubMed Central

    Zepeda-Paulo, Francisca A; Ortiz-Martínez, Sebastián A; Figueroa, Christian C; Lavandero, Blas

    2013-01-01

    The use of alternative hosts imposes divergent selection pressures on parasitoid populations. In response to selective pressures, these populations may follow different evolutionary trajectories. Divergent natural selection could promote local host adaptation in populations, translating into direct benefits for biological control, thereby increasing their effectiveness on the target host. Alternatively, adaptive phenotypic plasticity could be favored over local adaptation in temporal and spatially heterogeneous environments. We investigated the existence of local host adaptation in Aphidius ervi, an important biological control agent, by examining different traits related to infectivity (preference) and virulence (a proxy of parasitoid fitness) on different aphid-host species. The results showed significant differences in parasitoid infectivity on their natal host compared with the non-natal hosts. However, parasitoids showed a similar high fitness on both natal and non-natal hosts, thus supporting a lack of host adaptation in these introduced parasitoid populations. Our results highlight the role of phenotypic plasticity in fitness-related traits of parasitoids, enabling them to maximize fitness on alternative hosts. This could be used to increase the effectiveness of biological control. In addition, A. ervi females showed significant differences in infectivity and virulence across the tested host range, thus suggesting a possible host phylogeny effect for those traits. PMID:24062806

  20. Adaptive evolution of a generalist parasitoid: implications for the effectiveness of biological control agents.

    PubMed

    Zepeda-Paulo, Francisca A; Ortiz-Martínez, Sebastián A; Figueroa, Christian C; Lavandero, Blas

    2013-09-01

    The use of alternative hosts imposes divergent selection pressures on parasitoid populations. In response to selective pressures, these populations may follow different evolutionary trajectories. Divergent natural selection could promote local host adaptation in populations, translating into direct benefits for biological control, thereby increasing their effectiveness on the target host. Alternatively, adaptive phenotypic plasticity could be favored over local adaptation in temporal and spatially heterogeneous environments. We investigated the existence of local host adaptation in Aphidius ervi, an important biological control agent, by examining different traits related to infectivity (preference) and virulence (a proxy of parasitoid fitness) on different aphid-host species. The results showed significant differences in parasitoid infectivity on their natal host compared with the non-natal hosts. However, parasitoids showed a similar high fitness on both natal and non-natal hosts, thus supporting a lack of host adaptation in these introduced parasitoid populations. Our results highlight the role of phenotypic plasticity in fitness-related traits of parasitoids, enabling them to maximize fitness on alternative hosts. This could be used to increase the effectiveness of biological control. In addition, A. ervi females showed significant differences in infectivity and virulence across the tested host range, thus suggesting a possible host phylogeny effect for those traits.

  1. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Biological Molecules—Mechanisms of Damage and Emerging Methods of Detection

    PubMed Central

    Reisz, Julie A.; Bansal, Nidhi; Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Weiling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR) involve a highly orchestrated series of events that are amplified by endogenous signaling and culminating in oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, proteins, and many metabolites. Despite the global impact of IR, the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue damage reveal that many biomolecules are chemoselectively modified by IR. Recent Advances: The development of high-throughput “omics” technologies for mapping DNA and protein modifications have revolutionized the study of IR effects on biological systems. Studies in cells, tissues, and biological fluids are used to identify molecular features or biomarkers of IR exposure and response and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their expression or synthesis. Critical Issues: In this review, chemical mechanisms are described for IR-induced modifications of biomolecules along with methods for their detection. Included with the detection methods are crucial experimental considerations and caveats for their use. Additional factors critical to the cellular response to radiation, including alterations in protein expression, metabolomics, and epigenetic factors, are also discussed. Future Directions: Throughout the review, the synergy of combined “omics” technologies such as genomics and epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics is highlighted. These are anticipated to lead to new hypotheses to understand IR effects on biological systems and improve IR-based therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 260–292. PMID:24382094

  2. Effects of magnetic ion-exchange resin addition during coagulation on floc properties and membrane filtration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yang Hun; Kweon, Ji Hyang; Jeong, Young Mi; Kwon, Soonbuhm; Kim, Hyung-Soo

    2010-03-01

    The application of magnetic ion-exchange resin (MIEX) during chemical coagulation was investigated for the removal of organic matters responsible for fouling in membrane processes. Two different coagulants were used-polyaluminium chloride (PAC1) and polyaluminum chloride silicate (PACS). The MIEX addition during coagulation with both PAC1 and PACS considerably enhanced removal of dissolved organic carbon. Coagulation with MIEX treatment substantially removed all portions of natural organic matter (NOM), while the MIEX treatment alone effectively removed the hydrophobic and transphilic portions of NOM. The enhanced NOM removal by PAC1 coagulation with the addition of MIEX had positive effects on membrane flux at moderate transmembrane pressure conditions. However, the almost identical flux patterns were reported in the experiments of coagulation with PACS and PACS with MIEX addition. The results of the specific cake resistances indicated that the MIEX addition substantially decreased the resistances. The larger size distributions of PAC1 with MIEX corresponded well with the flux improvement.

  3. Effects of additives on volume change on melting, surface tension, and viscosity of liquid aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. L.; Rasmussen, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of various oxide additives on the volume change on melting, the surface tension, and the viscosity of liquid Al2O3 were studied. Additives of Sm2O3, MgO, and Y2O3 which form solid solutions, compounds, and multiphase solids with Al2O3 were studied. A review of the property data for Al2O3 and Al2O3 containing oxide additives is presented. Oxide additives to Al2O3 reduce the volume change on melting and with the exception of SiO2 lower the viscosity; surface tensions change with oxide additives, but changes vary with different container material. Viscosity and volume change on melting appeared to be significantly more important for studying the properties of liquid oxides than surface tension. Supercooling of 270 K of yttrium aluminum garnet was observed.

  4. Effect of the additional anode layers on the absorption enhancement characteristic of plasmonic organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Sanghyuk; Kim, Jungho

    2014-12-01

    We numerically investigate the effect of additional anode layers on the absorption enhancement characteristic of pyramidal-grating plasmonic organic solar cells (OSCs) using the finite element method. The behaviors of the plasmonic absorption enhancement are compared between a “simple” structure consisting of only the active and metal cathode layers and a “practical” structure with the additional anode layers. The plasmonic absorption enhancement is identified by comparing the polarization-dependent absorbance spectra between the planar and plasmonic OSCs. When the active-layer thickness is small, the plasmonic resonance condition changes owing to the addition of the anode layers. When the active-layer thickness is large, the plasmonic resonance condition and corresponding absorption behavior show a slight difference irrespective of the inclusion of the additional anode layers. Therefore, the additional anode layers should be included in the optical analysis and design of plasmonic OSCs when the active-layer thickness is small.

  5. Biological Effects of Extracorporeal Shock Waves on Fibroblasts. A Review

    PubMed Central

    Frairia, Roberto; Berta, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Summary Tissue homeostasis is influenced by mechanical forces which regulate the normal function of connective tissues. Mechanotransduction, the process that transforms mechanical stimuli in chemical signals, involves mechanosensory units integrated in cell membrane. The mechanosensory units are able to activate gene expression for growth factors or cytochines as well as to induce a biological event which results in cell proliferation and/or differentiation. In connective tissue the fibroblasts are the cells more represented and are considered as a model of mechanosensitive cells. They are ubiquitous but specific for each type of tissue. Their heterogeneity consists in different morphological features and activity; the common function is the mechanosensitivity, the capacity to adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) and to each other, the secretion of growth factors and ECM components. Extracorporeal shock waves (ESW) have been recently used to treat damaged osteotendineous tissues. Studies in vitro and in vivo confirmed that ESW treatment enhances fibroblast proliferation and differentiation by activation of gene expression for transforming growth factor β1 (TGF- β1) and Collagen Types I and III. In addition, an increase of nitric oxide (NO) release is even reported in early stage of the treatment and the subsequent activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are related to TGF- β1 rise. The data have been related to the increase of angiogenesis observed in ESW treated tendons, an additional factor in accelerating the repairing process. A suitable treatment condition, characterized by a proper energy/shot number ratio, is the basis of treatment efficacy. Further ESWT applications are suggested in regenerative medicine, in all cases where fibroblast activity and the interaction with connective tissue can be positively influenced. PMID:23738262

  6. Solvent additive effects on small molecule crystallization in bulk heterojunction solar cells probed during spin casting.

    PubMed

    Perez, Louis A; Chou, Kang Wei; Love, John A; van der Poll, Thomas S; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Kramer, Edward J; Amassian, Aram; Bazan, Guillermo C

    2013-11-26

    Solvent additive processing can lead to drastic improvements in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) in solution processable small molecule (SPSM) bulk heterojunction solar cells. In situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the kinetics of crystallite formation during and shortly after spin casting. The additive is shown to have a complex effect on structural evolution invoking polymorphism and enhanced crystalline quality of the donor SPSM.

  7. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide addition on ultrasonic degradation of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimakage, Kaho; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Naya, Masakazu; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Shimada, Yuichiro; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    The ultrasonic degradation of methylene blue was carried out in the absence and presence of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a radical scavenger for various frequencies, and the effects of DMSO addition on the degradation rate constant estimated by assuming first-order kinetics were investigated. The degradation reaction rate decreased with DMSO addition, and hydroxyl radicals were observed to play important roles in the degradation of methylene blue. However, the degradation reaction did not stop with DMSO addition, and the degradation rate constant in the presence of DMSO was not affected by ultrasonic frequency.

  8. Effects of Metal Powder Addition in Ni-Sheathed PIT MgB2 Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, K.; Yamada, Y.; Katagiri, K.; Kumakura, H.; Iwamoto, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2004-06-01

    The effect of different metal powder additions on the transport current and stress/strain performance of ex-situ processed MgB2 tapes with Ni sheath has been studied. The metal powder added to the core exhibits elongated morphology after the fabrication. The addition of low melting point metal powder, e.g. In and Sn, produces an appreciable increase in the Jc of MgB2 core. An addition of 10 vol% In enhances Jc by a factor of 6 to 7 after the combination of rolling and annealing at 200 °C, up to the order of 105 A/cm2 at 0.5 T and 4.2 K. An addition of 10 vol% Sn enhances Jc by a factor of ˜ 3. The In and Sn additions also appreciably increase the n-value of the current-voltage transition. Both In and Sn metals infiltrate into gaps between MgB2 grains, improving the linkage of the grains. Current may transfer through the impregnated metal by the proximity effect. Furthermore, the metal powder addition appreciably improves the strain tolerance in MgB2 tapes. The low melting point metal powder addition is a relatively simple and easy approach to yield better transport current and stress/strain performance in ex-situ MgB2 tapes.

  9. Effect of exogenous phosphorus addition on soil respiration in Calamagrostis angustifolia freshwater marshes of Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Changchun; Liu, Deyan; Song, Yanyu; Yang, Guisheng; Wan, Zhongmei; Li, Yingchen; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2011-03-01

    Anthropogenic activities have increased phosphorus (P) inputs to wetland ecosystems. However, little is known about the effect of P enrichment on soil respiration in these ecosystems. To understand the effect of P enrichment on soil respiration, we conducted a field experiment in Calamagrostis angustifolia-dominated freshwater marshes, the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China. We investigated soil respiration in the first growing season after P addition at four rates (0, 1.2, 4.8 and 9.6 g P m-2 year-1). In addition, we also examined aboveground biomass, soil labile C fractions (dissolved organic C, DOC; microbial biomass C, MBC; easily oxidizable C, EOC) and enzyme activities (invertase, urease and acid phosphatase activities) following one year of P addition. P addition decreased soil respiration during the growing season. Dissolved organic C in soil pore water increased after P addition at both 5 and 15 cm depths. Moreover, increased P input generally inhibited soil MBC and enzyme activities, and had no effects on aboveground biomass and soil EOC. Our results suggest that, in the short-term, soil respiration declines under P enrichment in C. angustifolia-dominated freshwater marshes of Northeast China, and its extent varies with P addition levels.

  10. Effect of additives on isothermal crystallization kinetics and physical characteristics of coconut oil.

    PubMed

    Chaleepa, Kesarin; Szepes, Anikó; Ulrich, Joachim

    2010-05-01

    The effect of lauric acid and low-HLB sucrose esters (L-195, S170) on the isothermal crystallization of coconut oil was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The fundamental crystallization parameters, such as induction time of nucleation and crystallization rate, were obtained by using the Gompertz equation. The Gibb's free energy of nucleation was calculated via the Fisher-Turnbull equation based on the equilibrium melting temperature. All additives, investigated in this work, proved to have an inhibition effect on nucleation and crystallization kinetics of coconut oil. Our results revealed that the inhibition effect is related to the dissimilarity of the molecular characteristics between coconut oil and the additives. The equilibrium melting temperature (T(m) degrees ) of the coconut oil-additive mixtures estimated by the Hoffman-Weeks method was decreased with the addition of lauric acid and increased by using sucrose esters as additives. Micrographs showing simultaneous crystallization of coconut oil and lauric acid indicated that strong molecular interaction led to the increase in lamellar thickness resulting in the T(m) degrees depression of coconut oil. The addition of L-195 modified the crystal morphology of coconut oil into large, dense, non-porous crystals without altering the polymorphic occurrence of coconut oil. The enhancement in lamellar thickness and crystal perfection supported the T(m) degrees elevation of coconut oil.

  11. [Effects of superphosphate addition on NH3 and greenhouse gas emissions during vegetable waste composting].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Sun, Qin-ping; Li, Ni; Liu, Chun-sheng; Li, Ji-jin; Liu, Ben-sheng; Zou, Guo-yuan

    2015-01-01

    To study the effects of superphosphate (SP) on the NH, and greenhouse gas emissions, vegetable waste composting was performed for 27 days using 6 different treatments. In addition to the controls, five vegetable waste mixtures (0.77 m3 each) were treated with different amounts of the SP additive, namely, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25%. The ammonia volatilization loss and greenhouse gas emissions were measured during composting. Results indicated that the SP additive significantly decreased the ammonia volatilization and greenhouse gas emissions during vegetable waste composting. The additive reduced the total NH3 emission by 4.0% to 16.7%. The total greenhouse gas emissions (CO2-eq) of all treatments with SP additives were decreased by 10.2% to 20.8%, as compared with the controls. The NH3 emission during vegetable waste composting had the highest contribution to the greenhouse effect caused by the four different gases. The amount of NH3 (CO2-eq) from each treatment ranged from 59.90 kg . t-1 to 81.58 kg . t-1; NH3(CO2-eq) accounted for 69% to 77% of the total emissions from the four gases. Therefore, SP is a cost-effective phosphorus-based fertilizer that can be used as an additive during vegetable waste composting to reduce the NH3 and greenhouse gas emissions as well as to improve the value of compost as a fertilizer.

  12. Different responses of alpine plants to nitrogen addition: effects on plant-plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Peng; Yang, Hao; Mou, Chengxiang; Mo, Li

    2016-01-01

    The different responses of plant species to resource stress are keys to understand the dynamics of plant community in a changing environment. To test the hypothesis that nitrogen (N) increase would benefit N competitive species, rather than N stress-tolerant species, to compete with neighbours, we conducted an experiment with neighbour removal, N addition and soil moisture as treatments in an alpine grassland on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. Both growths and competitive-response abilities (CRA, the ability to tolerate the inhibitory effects of neighbors) of Kobresia macrantha, Polygonum viviparum and Potentilla anserine in wet site were facilitated by N addition, conversely, both growths and CRA of Taraxacum mongolicum and Ligularia virgaurea were suppressed by N addition, indicating that the responses of CRA of target species under N addition were consistent with the N utilization strategies of them. Moreover, the facilitative effects of N addition on competitive-response abilities of Kobresia macrantha and Polygonum viviparum were not found at the dry site, illustrating that soil moisture can alter the changes of neighbour effects caused by N addition. Life strategy of dominant species in plant community on the undisturbed southeastern Tibetan Plateau may shift from N stress-tolerant to N competitive, if the N increases continuously. PMID:27922131

  13. Effect of a phytogenic feed additive on the susceptibility of Onchorhynchus mykiss to Aeromonas salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Menanteau-Ledouble, S; Krauss, I; Santos, G; Fibi, S; Weber, B; El-Matbouli, M

    2015-06-29

    In recent years, feed additives have increasingly been adopted by the aquaculture industry. These supplements not only offer an alternative to antibiotics but have also been linked to enhanced growth performance. However, the literature is still limited and provides contradictory information on their effectiveness. This is mainly due to the wide variety of available products and their complex mechanisms of action. Phytogenic feed additives have been shown to have antimicrobial effects and can improve growth performance. In the present study, we investigated the susceptibility of several fish pathogenic bacteria to a phytogenic essential oil product in vitro. In addition, we determined the protective effect of a commercial phytogenic feed additive containing oregano, anis and citrus oils on the resistance of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to infection by Aeromonas salmonicida. The bacterium was administered through 3 different routes: intra-peritoneal injection, immersion in a bacterial solution and cohabitation with infected fish. Mortality rates were significantly lower in infected rainbow trout that had received the feed additive: the overall mortality rate across all routes of infection was 18% in fish fed a diet containing the additive compared to 37% in fish that received unsupplemented feed. The route of infection also significantly impacted mortality, with average mortality rates of 60, 17.5 and 5% for intra-peritoneal injection, immersion and cohabitation, respectively. In general, fish were better protected against infection by immersion than infection by injection.

  14. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Deutsch, Aaron J.; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E.; Tsoi, Lam C.; Van Heel, David A.; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M.; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer strong risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen binding repertoires between a heterozygote’s two expressed HLA variants may result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Ncases=5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D, Ncases=5,567), psoriasis vulgaris (Ncases=3,089), idiopathic achalasia (Ncases=727), and celiac disease (Ncases=11,115). In four out of five diseases, we observed highly significant non-additive dominance effects (RA: P=2.5×1012; T1D: P=2.4×10−10; psoriasis: P=5.9×10−6; celiac disease: P=1.2×10−87). In three of these diseases, the dominance effects were explained by interactions between specific classical HLA alleles (RA: P=1.8×10−3; T1D: P=8.6×1027; celiac disease: P=6.0×10−100). These interactions generally increased disease risk and explained moderate but significant fractions of phenotypic variance (RA: 1.4%, T1D: 4.0%, and celiac disease: 4.1%, beyond a simple additive model). PMID:26258845

  15. Determining environmental causes of biological effects: the need for a mechanistic physiological dimension in conservation biology.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Frank; Franklin, Craig E

    2012-06-19

    The emerging field of Conservation Physiology links environmental change and ecological success by the application of physiological theory, approaches and tools to elucidate and address conservation problems. Human activity has changed the natural environment to a point where the viability of many ecosystems is now under threat. There are already many descriptions of how changes in biological patterns are correlated with environmental changes. The next important step is to determine the causative relationship between environmental variability and biological systems. Physiology provides the mechanistic link between environmental change and ecological patterns. Physiological research, therefore, should be integrated into conservation to predict the biological consequences of human activity, and to identify those species or populations that are most vulnerable.

  16. Determining environmental causes of biological effects: the need for a mechanistic physiological dimension in conservation biology

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, Frank; Franklin, Craig E.

    2012-01-01

    The emerging field of Conservation Physiology links environmental change and ecological success by the application of physiological theory, approaches and tools to elucidate and address conservation problems. Human activity has changed the natural environment to a point where the viability of many ecosystems is now under threat. There are already many descriptions of how changes in biological patterns are correlated with environmental changes. The next important step is to determine the causative relationship between environmental variability and biological systems. Physiology provides the mechanistic link between environmental change and ecological patterns. Physiological research, therefore, should be integrated into conservation to predict the biological consequences of human activity, and to identify those species or populations that are most vulnerable. PMID:22566670

  17. Formamidopyrimidines in DNA: mechanisms of formation, repair, and biological effects.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral; Kirkali, Güldal; Jaruga, Pawel

    2008-12-15

    Oxidatively induced damage to DNA results in a plethora of lesions comprising modified bases and sugars, DNA-protein cross-links, tandem lesions, strand breaks, and clustered lesions. Formamidopyrimidines, 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyAde) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua), are among the major lesions generated in DNA by hydroxyl radical attack, UV radiation, or photosensitization under numerous in vitro and in vivo conditions. They are formed by one-electron reduction of C8-OH-adduct radicals of purines and thus have a common precursor with 8-hydroxypurines generated upon one-electron oxidation. Methodologies using mass spectrometry exist to accurately measure FapyAde and FapyGua in vitro and in vivo. Formamidopyrimidines are repaired by base excision repair. Numerous prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA glycosylases are highly specific for removal of these lesions from DNA in the first step of this repair pathway, indicating their biological importance. FapyAde and FapyGua are bypassed by DNA polymerases with the insertion of the wrong intact base opposite them, leading to mutagenesis. In mammalian cells, the mutagenicity of FapyGua exceeds that of 8-hydroxyguanine, which is thought to be the most mutagenic of the oxidatively induced lesions in DNA. The background and formation levels of the former in vitro and in vivo equal or exceed those of the latter under various conditions. FapyAde and FapyGua exist in living cells at significant background levels and are abundantly generated upon exposure to oxidative stress. Mice lacking the genes that encode specific DNA glycosylases accumulate these lesions in different organs and, in some cases, exhibit a series of pathological conditions including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Animals exposed to environmental toxins accumulate formamidopyrimidines in their organs. Here, we extensively review the mechanisms of formation, measurement, repair, and biological effects of formamidopyrimidines

  18. Effect of the addition of bentonite on the anaerobic biodegradability of solid fatty wastes.

    PubMed

    Mouneimne, A H; Carrère, H; Bernet, N; Delgenès, J P

    2004-04-01

    The biological degradation of solid fatty residues is limited by their low bioavailability. In this work, the effect of the day mineral bentonite on the degradation of hexane extractable matter and its conversion to volatile fatty acids was investigated. Our results showed that the best performance in the elimination of hexane extractable matter (73% +/- 2.5) and the production of volatile fatty acids (39% +/- 1.5) were observed in continuous experimental assays with a bentonite/greases ratio of 0.9. Isotherm studies showed that the sorption equilibria of oleate on bentonite and sludge could be described by the LANGMUIR model.

  19. Additive Effect on Soybean Peroxidase-Catalyzed Removal of Anilines from Water

    PubMed Central

    Mazloum, Samar; Al-Ansari, Mohammed Mousa; Taylor, Keith; Bewtra, Jatinder K.; Biswas, Niharendu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Soybean peroxidase has been shown to be effective in removal of aromatic compounds from wastewater, while the use of additives effectively reduces enzyme concentration requirement, hence overall treatment cost. Enzymatic treatment, an oxidative polymerization, was successful in removal of over 95% of both aniline and o-anisidine. The originality of this study lies in the findings that the additives, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS), Triton X-100, and sodium dodecanoate (SDOD), reduced enzyme concentration requirement, while polyethylene glycol (PEG, average molar mass of 3350 g/mol) had no effect on the required enzyme concentration. In addition, the presence of SDS also enhanced treatment by improving precipitation and color removal. These results are enabling advancement of soybean peroxidase-catalyzed treatment of anilines found in wastewaters as a new sustainable method. PMID:26989345

  20. [Effects of menthol as an additive in tobacco products and the need for regulation].

    PubMed

    Kahnert, S; Nair, U; Mons, U; Pötschke-Langer, M

    2012-03-01

    Menthol is the most widely used and the most prominent tobacco additive in tobacco products advertised and marketed by the tobacco industry. Besides its characteristic flavor, it possesses a variety of pharmacological properties facilitating tobacco smoke inhalation and potentiating dependence. These properties of menthol not only favor tobacco initiation and consumption but can also prevent smoking cessation. This article summarizes the effect of menthol as an additive in tobacco products and its effect on tobacco consumption that causes a number of chronic diseases and premature death and, therefore, counteracts tobacco control measures. Currently, there is no legislative regulation in Germany that considers the health hazard, addiction-enhancing and attractiveness-increasing properties of additives permitted in tobacco products. Effective regulation or even a ban could contribute to a reduction of tobacco consumption and, hence, save many people from a long-lasting tobacco dependence.

  1. Mechanisms and modeling of the effects of additives on the nitrogen oxides emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Krishna P.; Nguyen, Hung Lee; Kang, M. Paul

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical study on the emission of the oxides of nitrogen in the combustion of hydrocarbons is presented. The current understanding of the mechanisms and the rate parameters for gas phase reactions were used to calculate the NO(x) emission. The possible effects of different chemical species on thermal NO(x), on a long time scale were discussed. The mixing of these additives at various stages of combustion were considered and NO(x) concentrations were calculated; effects of temperatures were also considered. The chemicals such as hydrocarbons, H2, CH3OH, NH3, and other nitrogen species were chosen as additives in this discussion. Results of these calculations can be used to evaluate the effects of these additives on the NO(x) emission in the industrial combustion system.

  2. Effect of vermiculite addition on compost produced from Korean food wastes.

    PubMed

    Seo, J Y; Heo, J S; Kim, T H; Joo, W H; Crohn, D M

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of vermiculite addition on composting food wastes from Korean households, food wastes were composted in three small bins to which different additives were added. The following three bins were employed: in Case I, only recycled compost was composted; in Case II, food wastes with recycled compost; and in Case III, food wastes with recycled compost and vermiculite. In the experiment performed for 30 days, it was confirmed that the supplementary addition of vermiculite to the composting mixture did not significantly improve the weight loss rate and the decomposition rate of food wastes. Due to dilution through the use of inorganic vermiculite, the vermiculite addition reduced the organic matter concentration of the composting mixtures. Vermiculite addition did not raise the pH value. Weight losses of roughly 70% were observed based on calculating moisture loss as well as dry food waste loss and not considering additives, while dry food waste loss was 29.4% and 35.8% with and without the addition of vermiculite, respectively. For these experiments, the major portion of the weight loss was the loss of water. The results indicate a need to differentiate between weight loss percentages and decomposition percentages, and a need to indicate if either of these percentages includes or excludes the mass of additives.

  3. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde; Smith, Jim T; Ford, Alex T

    2015-10-01

    Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive. Current phyla-specific dose levels and limits proposed by major regulatory bodies were found to be inadequate to protect species across a range of endpoints including morbidity, mutation and reproduction and examples are discussed within. These findings serve to prioritise areas for future research that will significantly

  4. Mutagenic Effects of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Biological Cells.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Niluka M; Current, Kelley M; Obare, Sherine O

    2015-09-30

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the design and use of iron oxide materials with nanoscale dimensions for magnetic, catalytic, biomedical, and electronic applications. The increased manufacture and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in consumer products as well as industrial processes is expected to lead to the unintentional release of IONPs into the environment. The impact of IONPs on the environment and on biological species is not well understood but remains a concern due to the increased chemical reactivity of nanoparticles relative to their bulk counterparts. This review article describes the impact of IONPs on cellular genetic components. The mutagenic impact of IONPs may damage an organism's ability to develop or reproduce. To date, there has been experimental evidence of IONPs having mutagenic interactions on human cell lines including lymphoblastoids, fibroblasts, microvascular endothelial cells, bone marrow cells, lung epithelial cells, alveolar type II like epithelial cells, bronchial fibroblasts, skin epithelial cells, hepatocytes, cerebral endothelial cells, fibrosarcoma cells, breast carcinoma cells, lung carcinoma cells, and cervix carcinoma cells. Other cell lines including the Chinese hamster ovary cells, mouse fibroblast cells, murine fibroblast cells, Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm cells, mice lung cells, murine alveolar macrophages, mice hepatic and renal tissue cells, and vero cells have also shown mutagenic effects upon exposure to IONPs. We further show the influence of IONPs on microorganisms in the presence and absence of dissolved organic carbon. The results shed light on the OPEN ACCESS Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16 23483 transformations IONPs undergo in the environment and the nature of the potential mutagenic impact on biological cells.

  5. Mutagenic Effects of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Biological Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, Niluka M.; Current, Kelley M.; Obare, Sherine O.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the design and use of iron oxide materials with nanoscale dimensions for magnetic, catalytic, biomedical, and electronic applications. The increased manufacture and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in consumer products as well as industrial processes is expected to lead to the unintentional release of IONPs into the environment. The impact of IONPs on the environment and on biological species is not well understood but remains a concern due to the increased chemical reactivity of nanoparticles relative to their bulk counterparts. This review article describes the impact of IONPs on cellular genetic components. The mutagenic impact of IONPs may damage an organism’s ability to develop or reproduce. To date, there has been experimental evidence of IONPs having mutagenic interactions on human cell lines including lymphoblastoids, fibroblasts, microvascular endothelial cells, bone marrow cells, lung epithelial cells, alveolar type II like epithelial cells, bronchial fibroblasts, skin epithelial cells, hepatocytes, cerebral endothelial cells, fibrosarcoma cells, breast carcinoma cells, lung carcinoma cells, and cervix carcinoma cells. Other cell lines including the Chinese hamster ovary cells, mouse fibroblast cells, murine fibroblast cells, Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm cells, mice lung cells, murine alveolar macrophages, mice hepatic and renal tissue cells, and vero cells have also shown mutagenic effects upon exposure to IONPs. We further show the influence of IONPs on microorganisms in the presence and absence of dissolved organic carbon. The results shed light on the transformations IONPs undergo in the environment and the nature of the potential mutagenic impact on biological cells. PMID:26437397

  6. Effects of biological weathering on mine soil genesis and fertility

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    Strip mine spoils derived from overburden rocks of the Pennsylvanian Wise Formation in Buchanan County, Virginia, commonly contain 40% less than 2 mm sized soil material. The physical and chemical properties of these soil materials are related to their rock origin. The soil materials are alkaline due to the presence of carbonates. The principal source of P in the soil materials is apatite, and the principal source of K is mica. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine the short-term plant availability of P and K in these soil materials. Growth of sericea lespedeza over a 60-day period was found to be limited by P availability and not to be limited by K availability. Uptake of P by servicea lespedeza from P fertilized and unfertilized soil materials was found to be correlated with NaHCO3 extractable P from pots which received the same fertilizer treatments but did not contain plants. The correlations obtained were soil material specific. A separate greenhouse experiment was conducted in order to identify the effects of biological weathering on soil material properties. Sericea lespedeza and black locust were grown on unfertilized brown sandstone soil material for one year. Soil material pH was uniformly reduced by plant action regardless of proximity to roots. The P present in the soil material, however, was not uniformly depleted. Over half of the P removed from the soil material by sericea lespedeza and black locust was P which cannot be extracted using dilute HCl-H2SO4, but can be extracted using concentrated HCl. The results of the two experiments indicate that the plant availability of P and K in the soil materials is influenced by biological weathering. Acidification of the soil material increases the availability of P present in apatite particles. Uptake of K insures that the soil solution is constantly replenished with K from mica and that mica is transformed into vermiculite.

  7. Does the model of additive effect in placebo research still hold true? A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Bettina; Weger, Ulrich; Heusser, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Personalised and contextualised care has been turned into a major demand by people involved in healthcare suggesting to move toward person-centred medicine. The assessment of person-centred medicine can be most effectively achieved if treatments are investigated using ‘with versus without’ person-centredness or integrative study designs. However, this assumes that the components of an integrative or person-centred intervention have an additive relationship to produce the total effect. Beecher’s model of additivity assumes an additive relation between placebo and drug effects and is thus presenting an arithmetic summation. So far, no review has been carried out assessing the validity of the additive model, which is to be questioned and more closely investigated in this review. Initial searches for primary studies were undertaken in July 2016 using Pubmed and Google Scholar. In order to find matching publications of similar magnitude for the comparison part of this review, corresponding matches for all included reviews were sought. A total of 22 reviews and 3 clinical and experimental studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The results pointed to the following factors actively questioning the additive model: interactions of various effects, trial design, conditioning, context effects and factors, neurobiological factors, mechanism of action, statistical factors, intervention-specific factors (alcohol, caffeine), side-effects and type of intervention. All but one of the closely assessed publications was questioning the additive model. A closer examination of study design is necessary. An attempt in a more systematic approach geared towards solutions could be a suggestion for future research in this field. PMID:28321318

  8. Analysis of error-prone survival data under additive hazards models: measurement error effects and adjustments.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Yi, Grace Y

    2016-07-01

    Covariate measurement error occurs commonly in survival analysis. Under the proportional hazards model, measurement error effects have been well studied, and various inference methods have been developed to correct for error effects under such a model. In contrast, error-contaminated survival data under the additive hazards model have received relatively less attention. In this paper, we investigate this problem by exploring measurement error effects on parameter estimation and the change of the hazard function. New insights of measurement error effects are revealed, as opposed to well-documented results for the Cox proportional hazards model. We propose a class of bias correction estimators that embraces certain existing estimators as special cases. In addition, we exploit the regression calibration method to reduce measurement error effects. Theoretical results for the developed methods are established, and numerical assessments are conducted to illustrate the finite sample performance of our methods.

  9. Carryover effect of postpartum inflammatory diseases on developmental biology and fertility in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, E S; Gomes, G; Greco, L F; Cerri, R L A; Vieira-Neto, A; Monteiro, P L J; Lima, F S; Bisinotto, R S; Thatcher, W W; Santos, J E P

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this series of studies was to investigate the effects of inflammatory diseases occurring before breeding on the developmental biology and reproductive responses in dairy cows. Data from 5 studies were used to investigate different questions associating health status before breeding and reproductive responses. Health information for all studies was composed of the incidence of retained fetal membranes, metritis, mastitis, lameness, and respiratory and digestive problems from parturition until the day of breeding. Retained placenta and metritis were grouped as uterine disease (UTD). Mastitis, lameness, digestive and respiratory problems were grouped as nonuterine diseases (NUTD). Study 1 evaluated the effect of disease before artificial insemination (AI), anovulation before synchronization of the estrous cycle, and low body condition score at AI on pregnancy per AI, as well as their potential interactions or additive effects. Study 2 investigated the effect of site of inflammation (UTD vs. NUTD) and time of occurrence relative to preantral or antral stages of ovulatory follicle development, and the effect of UTD and NUTD on fertility responses of cows bred by AI or by embryo transfer. Study 3 evaluated the effect of disease on fertilization and embryonic development to the morula stage. Study 4 evaluated the effect of disease on preimplantation conceptus development as well as secretion of IFN-τ and transcriptome. Study 5 investigated the effect of diseases before AI on the transcript expression of interferon-stimulated genes in peripheral blood leukocytes during peri-implantation stages of conceptus development after first AI postpartum. Altogether, these studies demonstrated that inflammatory disease before breeding reduced fertilization of oocytes and development to morula, and impaired early conceptus development to elongation stages and secretion of IFN-τ in the uterine lumen. Diseases caused inflammation-like changes in transcriptome of

  10. [Effect of the incorporation of additives on the aging of corn starch gels and "arepas"].

    PubMed

    Rivero de Padua, M; Verde, O; Lucena de Orellana, M; Arias, J

    1988-12-01

    This research was carried out to investigate the effect of the incorporation of various additives on the ageing of corn starch and arepas. Starches were extracted from the endosperm of degerminated corn by a wet milling process, and its retrogradation, with or without the incorporation of additives was evaluated using the Brabender amilograph and by measuring the viscosity changes of the starch gels through time, using a Brookfield viscometer model RVT. The most effective additives in retarding the rate of ageing of starch gels, were used in the arepas. Likewise, trained panelists were utilized to find the levels of the additives incorporated in the arepas, by running taste threshold tests for each one of the additives. Textural changes of the arepas--maintained at two different storage temperatures, 9 degrees and 23 degrees C--were evaluated using an Instron texturometer. Preliminary tests with the corn starch allowed to choose the following additives: distilled monoglicerides, guar gum and hydrogenated vegetable oil. The effect of 15 different combinations of these additives on the texture of arepas was then studied, and findings revealed that only three of them were able to totally revert the retrogradation process, and maintain the hardness and elasticity within the expected range of a fresh-made arepa, when this is reheated until reaching a maximum temperature of 49 degrees C. A 66% of the hardening of the arepas prepared without additives can be reverted with the reheating process, but only if the product has not suffered dehydration. When stored for 24 hours at room temperature, unpacked arepas have a surface moisture loss of 47%, and even if reheated, hardening becomes irreversible in 84.6% of them.

  11. Effect of Ag, Ni and Bi Additions on Solderability of Lead-Free Solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobari, Amir Hossein; Maalekian, Mehran; Seelig, Karl; Pekguleryuz, Mihriban

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effects of Ag, Ni and Bi additions on the melting, solidification, fluidity and wetting behavior of Sn-0.7Cu base solder alloy are studied. The addition of a small amount of Ni reduces the undercooling and improves the feeding distance (fluidity length); however, Ni does not improve the wetting and the spreading performance. The effect of Ni on the fluidity length of Ag-containing Sn-0.7Cu (SAC alloy) is marginal. Bi and Ag both improve wetting performance and also lower the melting temperature; however, they do not improve the fluidity; instead, they reduce the maximum length of fluidity.

  12. Effective numbers in the partitioning of biological diversity.

    PubMed

    Gregorius, Hans-Rolf

    2016-11-21

    Admissible measures of diversity allow specification of the number of types (species, alleles, etc.) that are "effectively" involved in producing the diversity (the "diversity effective number", also referred to as "true diversity") of a community or population. In metacommunities, effective numbers additionally serve in partitioning the total diversity (symbolized by γ) into one component summarizing the diversity within communities (symbolized by α) and an independent component summarizing the differences between communities (symbolized by β). There is growing consensus that the β-component should be treated in terms of an effective number of "distinct" communities in the metacommunity. Yet, the notion of distinctness is shown in the present paper to remain conceptually ambiguous at least with respect to the diversity within the "distinct" communities. To overcome this ambiguity and to provide the means for designing further desirable effective numbers, a new approach is taken that involves a generalized concept of effective number. The approach relies on first specifying the distributional characteristics of partitioning diversity among communities (among which are differentiation, where the same types tend to occur in the same communities, and apportionment, where different types tend to occur in different communities), then developing the indices which measure these characteristics, and finally inferring the effective numbers from these indices.

  13. Across the Great Divide: The Effects of Technology in Secondary Biology Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Johnny Howard, II

    This study investigates the relationship between technology use and student achievement in public high school across North Carolina. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a digital divide (differences in technology utilization based on student demographics of race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, and municipality) exists among schools and whether those differences relate to student achievement in high school biology classrooms. The study uses North Carolina end-of-course (EOC) data for biology to analyze student demographic data and assessment results from the 2010-2011 school year from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. The data analyses use descriptive and factorial univariate statistics to determine the existence of digital divides and their effects on biology achievement. Analysis of these data described patterns of technology use to determine whether potential variances resulted in a digital divide. Specific technology uses were identified in the data and then their impact on biology achievement scores within various demographic groups was examined. Research findings revealed statistically significant variations of use within different population groups. Despite being statistically significant, the relevance of the association in the variations was minimal at best -- based on the effect scale established by Cohen (1988). Additional factorial univariate analyses were employed to determine potential relationships between technology use and student achievement. The data revealed that technology use did not influence the variation of student achievement scale scores as much as race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. White students outperformed Hispanic students by an average of three scale score points and Black students by an average of six scale score points. Technology use alone averaged less than a one point difference in mean scale scores, and only when interacting with race, gender, and/or SES did the mean difference

  14. New optoelectronic sensor for measuring biologically effective irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosyachenko, Leonid A.; Sklyarchuk, Valery M.

    1997-12-01

    A new optoelectronic sensor whose spectral responsivity to UV radiation is almost identical with that of the human skin or of the eyes is presented. The sensor comprises two closely-spaced UV-sensitive Au-SiC diode, one of which is fitted with a glass filter. The photodiodes are connected to electronics that amplifies, combines and subtracts electrical signals generated by radiation in the photodiodes. The responsivity of the Au-SiC diode structure with a semitransparent gold electrode covers the whole UV spectrum, with the long-wavelength end bounded by the semiconductor bandgap. The photodiode with a filter absorbing wavelengths shorter than 315-320 nm is responsive in the UV-A region, while the difference between the electrical signals generated in the filter-containing and filter-free diodes is determined by the UV-B + IV-C radiation. The measuring of biologically effective radiation over the entire UV spectral range is achieved through combining the signal generated by UV-A radiation and the previously amplified difference signal generated by UV-B + UV-C radiation. The sensor spectral responsivity thus obtained is very close to the tabular curve of the relative spectral effectiveness of UV radiation on the normal human skin or eyes.

  15. Biological effects of a nano red elemental selenium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J S; Gao, X Y; Zhang, L D; Bao, Y P

    2001-01-01

    A novel selenium form, nano red elemental selenium (Nano-Se) was prepared by adding bovine serum albumin to the redox system of selenite and glutathione. Nano-Se has a 7-fold lower acute toxicity than sodium selenite in mice (LD(50) 113 and 15 mg Se/kg body weight respectively). In Se-deficient rat, both Nano-Se and selenite can increase tissue selenium and GPx activity. The biological activities of Nano-Se and selenite were compared in terms of cell proliferation, enzyme induction and protection against free racial-mediated damage in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Nano-Se and selenite are similarly cell growth inhibited and stimulated synthesis of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) and thioredoxin reductase (TR). When HepG2 cells were co-treated with selenium and glutathione, Nano-Se showed less pro-oxidative effects than selenite, as measured by cell growth. These results demonstrate that Nano-Se has a similar bioavailability in the rat and antioxidant effects on cells.

  16. In vivo biological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery: A primate model

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, L.D.; Altschuler, E.M.; Flickinger, J.C.; Wu, A.; Martinez, A.J. )

    1990-09-01

    Single-fraction, closed skull, small-volume irradiation (radiosurgery) of intact intracranial structures requires accurate knowledge of radiation tolerance. We have developed a baboon model to assess the in vivo destructive radiobiological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery. Three baboons received a single-fraction, 150-Gy lesion of the caudate nucleus, the thalamus, or the pons using the 8-mm diameter collimator of the gamma unit. Serial standard neurodiagnostic tests (neurological examination, computed tomographic scan, magnetic resonance imaging, stable xenon-enhanced computed tomographic scan of cerebral blood flow, somatosensory and brain stem evoked potentials, and myelin basic protein levels of cerebrospinal fluid) were compared with preoperative studies. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the development of a lesion at the target site between 45 and 60 days after irradiation. Deterioration of the brain stem evoked potentials preceded imaging changes when the lesion encroached on auditory pathways. Myelin basic protein levels increased subsequent to imaging changes. Postmortem neuropathological examination confirmed a well-demarcated radionecrosis of the target volume. The baboon model appears to be an excellent method to study the in vivo biological effects of radiosurgery.

  17. Triclosan: A Widespread Environmental Toxicant with Many Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yueh, Mei-Fei; Tukey, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent that has been added to personal care products, including hand soaps and cosmetics, and impregnated in numerous different materials ranging from athletic clothing to food packaging. The constant disposal of TCS into the sewage system is creating a major environmental and public health hazard. Owing to its chemical properties of bioaccumulation and resistance to degradation, TCS is widely detected in various environmental compartments in concentrations ranging from nanograms to micrograms per liter. Epidemiology studies indicate that significant levels of TCS are detected in body fluids in all human age groups. We document here the emerging evidence—from in vitro and in vivo animal studies and environmental toxicology studies—demonstrating that TCS exerts adverse effects on different biological systems through various modes of action. Considering the fact that humans are simultaneously exposed to TCS and many TCS-like chemicals, we speculate that TCS-induced adverse effects may be relevant to human health. PMID:26738475

  18. Prescribed fire effects on biological control of leafy spurge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fellows, D.P.; Newton, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    The flea beetle, Aphthona nigriscutis Foudras, is a potentially useful agent for biological control of leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) in grasslands devoted to wildlife conservation. However, effects of other grassland management practices on the persistence and dynamics of flea beetle populations are not well understood. We conducted small plot tests to evaluate 1) the effect of prerelease burning on establishment of A. nigriscutis colonies, and 2) the ability of established A. nigriscutis colonies to survive prescribed fire. More colonies established on plots that were burned prior to beetle release (83% establishment) than on unburned plots (37% establishment), possibly due to litter reduction and baring of the soil surface. However, most colonies established with the aid of fire did not survive past the first generation unless the habitat was otherwise suitable for the species, and we conclude that the primary benefit of prerelease burning is increased recruitment of A. nigriscutis during the first few generations. Established colonies were not harmed by burns in October and May. Both spring and fall burns resulted in an increase in leafy spurge stem density during the first growing season, but stem density declined to the preburn level by the second growing season.

  19. Captopril: pharmacokinetics, antihypertensive and biological effects in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Richer, C; Giroux, B; Plouin, P F; Maarek, B; Giudicelli, J F

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of captopril plasma levels and of the drug-induced plasma converting enzyme activity (PCEA), plasma renin activity (PRA) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) modifications were studied over 24 h after oral administration of captopril, 1 mg/kg, to ten hypertensive patients. Free unchanged captopril pharmacokinetic parameters were: t1/2, alpha: 0.45 +/- 0.06 h; tmax: 0.98 +/- 0.13 h; Cmax: 1.31 +/- 0.20 mg l-1; t1/2,z: 0.66 +/- 0.13 h; V: 0.614 +/- 0.104 1 kg-1 and CLtot: 0.690 +/- 0.082 l h-1 kg-1. At 6 h captopril was no longer detectable in plasma. The onset of PCEA inhibition and of DBP decrease closely followed the rise of captopril's plasma levels, while that of PRA increase was delayed. In contrast, while captopril rapidly disappeared from plasma, its biological and antihypertensive effects were long-lasting. The lack of correlation between the relative bioavailability of captopril and the induced reduction in DBP (evaluated by the corresponding AUCs) suggests that free unchanged captopril plasma monitoring is not an adequate indicator of hypertensive patients' potential responsiveness to captopril's blood pressure lowering effects. PMID:6324834

  20. Effect of fluoride addition on the properties of dental alginate impression materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Kim, Cheol-We

    2004-03-01

    Fluoride-containing dental alginate impression materials can exert a considerable reduction in enamel solubility. The objective was to evaluate the effects of fluoride addition in the alginate impression materials on the properties and subsequent release of fluoride. Four experimental alginate impression materials were studied. Materials were mixed with distilled water (control) or 100-ppm fluoride solution. One or two percent NaF, or 1% SnF2 was added to the materials, which were mixed with distilled water. Fluoride release, flexibility, recovery from deformation, setting time, compressive strength and elastic modulus were determined in accordance with the ISO 1563 and ANSI/ADA Spec. 18. Fluoride release increased after addition of fluoride, and the released amount was 0.762-14.761 ppm. Addition of NaF or SnF2 resulted in higher fluoride release than the control group (p < 0.05). After fluoride addition, flexibility was 15.45-20.27%, and the recovery from deformation did not change except one material. Compressive strength after fluoride addition was 0.36-1.12 MPa. Addition of NaF or SnF2 in an alginate impression material may result in effective release of fluoride without deteriorating the properties of material itself.

  1. Effects of silicon additions on the mechanical properties and microstructure of high speed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, F.; Ding, P.; Zhou, S.; Kang, M.; Edmonds, D.V.

    1997-11-01

    The effects of silicon additions up to 3.5 wt% on the mechanical properties and microstructure of high speed steels 6W3Mo2Cr4V, W3Mo2Cr4V and W9Mo3Cr4V have been investigated. In order to understand these effects further, a Fe-16Mo-0.9C alloy is also used. The results show silicon additions can increase the temper hardness of steels Fe-16Mo-0.9C, 6W3Mo2Cr4V and W3Mo2Cr4V, bu yield an opposite influence on the temper hardness in W9Mo3Cr4V steels. A critical tempering temperature exists for the bending strength of high speed steels containing silicon. If tempering is carried out at temperatures lower than the critical temperature, the bending strength of the high speed steels can be improved by the addition of silicon, otherwise their bending strength is decreased. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that silicon additions can obviously refine secondary hardening carbides and inhibit the formation of M{sub 3}C cementite at peak temperature. However, they are also found to accelerate both the depletion of martensite and the formation of coarse M{sub 6}C precipitates during tempering. The mechanism whereby silicon additions affect the secondary hardness of high speed steels is discussed in detail, and the types of high speed steel in which silicon additions can be used are suggested.

  2. The effect of tailor-made additives on crystal growth of methyl paraben: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhihui; Liu, Yong; Song, Yang; Guan, Guoqiang; Jiang, Yanbin

    2017-03-01

    In this study, methyl paraben (MP) was selected as the model component, and acetaminophen (APAP), p-methyl acetanilide (PMAA) and acetanilide (ACET), which share the similar molecular structure as MP, were selected as the three tailor-made additives to study the effect of tailor-made additives on the crystal growth of MP. HPLC results indicated that the MP crystals induced by the three additives contained MP only. Photographs of the single crystals prepared indicated that the morphology of the MP crystals was greatly changed by the additives, but PXRD and single crystal diffraction results illustrated that the MP crystals were the same polymorph only with different crystal habits, and no new crystal form was found compared with other references. To investigate the effect of the additives on the crystal growth, the interaction between additives and facets was discussed in detail using the DFT methods and MD simulations. The results showed that APAP, PMAA and ACET would be selectively adsorbed on the growth surfaces of the crystal facets, which induced the change in MP crystal habits.

  3. Dissociating compatibility effects and distractor costs in the additional singleton paradigm.

    PubMed

    Folk, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    The interpretation of identity compatibility effects associated with irrelevant items outside the nominal focus of attention has fueled much of the debate over early versus late selection and perceptual load theory. However, compatibility effects have also played a role in the debate over the extent to which the involuntary allocation of spatial attention (i.e., attentional capture) is completely stimulus-driven or whether it is contingent on top-down control settings. For example, in the context of the additional singleton paradigm, irrelevant color singletons have been found to produce not only an overall cost in search performance but also significant compatibility effects. This combination of search costs and compatibility effects has been taken as evidence that spatial attention is indeed allocated in a bottom-up fashion to the salient but irrelevant singletons. However, it is possible that compatibility effects in the additional singleton paradigm reflect parallel processing of identity associated with low perceptual load rather than an involuntary shift of spatial attention. In the present experiments, manipulations of load were incorporated into the traditional additional singleton paradigm. Under low-load conditions, both search costs and compatibility effects were obtained, replicating previous studies. Under high-load conditions, search costs were still present, but compatibility effects were eliminated. This dissociation suggests that the costs associated with irrelevant singletons may reflect filtering processes rather than the allocation of spatial attention.

  4. The effect of lactic acid bacterial starter culture and chemical additives on wilted rice straw silage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Su; Shi, Wei; Huang, Lin-Ting; Ding, Cheng-Long; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2016-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are suitable for rice straw silage fermentation, but have been studied rarely, and rice straw as raw material for ensiling is difficult because of its disadvantages, such as low nutrition for microbial activities and low abundances of natural populations of LAB. So we investigated the effect of application of LAB and chemical additives on the fermentation quality and microbial community of wilted rice straw silage. Treatment with chemical additives increased the concentrations of crude protein (CP), water soluble carbohydrate (WSC), acetic acid and lactic acid, reduced the concentrations of acid detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF), but did not effectively inhibit the growth of spoilage organisms. Inoculation with LABs did not improve the nutritional value of the silage because of poor growth of LABs in wilted rice straw. Inoculation with LAB and addition of chemical materials improved the quality of silage similar to the effects of addition of chemical materials alone. Growth of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria was inhibited by this mixed treatment and the LAB gradually dominated the microbial community. In summary, the fermentation quality of wilted rice straw silage had improved by addition of LAB and chemical materials.

  5. Effect of Fuel Additives on Spray Performance of Alternative Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza

    2015-11-01

    Role of alternative fuels on reducing the combustion pollutants is gaining momentum in both land and air transport. Recent studies have shown that addition of nanoscale metal particles as fuel additives to liquid fuels have a positive effect not only on their combustion performance but also in reducing the pollutant formation. However, most of those studies are still in the early stages of investigation with the addition of nanoparticles at low weight percentages. Such an addition can affect the hydrodynamic and thermo-physical properties of the fuel. In this study, the near nozzle spray performance of gas-to-liquid jet fuel with and without the addition of alumina nanoparticles are investigated at macro- and microscopic levels using optical diagnostic techniques. At macroscopic level, the addition of nanoparticles is seen to enhance the sheet breakup process when compared to that of the base fuel. Furthermore, the microscopic spray characteristics such as droplet size and velocity are also found to be affected. Although the addition of nanoscale metal particles at low weight percentages does not affect the bulk fluid properties, the atomization process is found to be affected in the near nozzle region. Funded by Qatar National Research Fund.

  6. Effect of fructo-oligosaccharide and isomalto-oligosaccharide addition on baking quality of frozen dough.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Young; Jang, Sung-Bum; Lim, Seung-Taik

    2016-12-15

    The baking quality of frozen doughs containing different levels of fructo-oligosaccharides (FO) or isomalto-oligosaccharides (IMO) (3-9%, w/w flour), and stored for 0-8weeks at -18°C, was examined. The addition of FO or IMO increased the proof volume of the dough and the loaf volume of bread prepared from frozen dough. A 6% addition of FO or IMO was optimum, giving the highest proof volume and bread loaf volume, but a higher concentration than 6% induced low baking quality including lower proof volume and bread loaf volume. The bread crumb was moister and softer after the addition of FO or IMO before, and even after, frozen storage. Darker crumb colour was observed in the bread after the addition of FO or IMO. The oligosaccharides added to the frozen dough were effective in improving the quality of bread made from frozen dough, except for resulting in a darker bread crumb.

  7. Effects of mineral additions on durability and physico-mechanical properties of mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logbi, A.; Kriker, A.; Snisna, Z.

    2017-02-01

    This paper consists of an experimental study of the effect of some mineral admixtures on the properties of mortar. Blast furnace Slag of El-Hadjar, natural pozzolan of Beni saf and limestone of Ghardaia, all from Algeria, are crushed in high fineness and incorporated in the cement with different contents (15 % 20 % and 10%) respectively, in order to perform the physico-mechanical characteristics and durability of the mortar. The replacement of cement by 15% of natural pozzolan, or 20% of the Blast furnace Slag improves the mechanical performances of mortar in early and long ages than the mortar without additions, but 10% of limestone fillers have a positive effect only at early age. For durability the three additions have developed a beneficial effect on mechanical resistance under the free aquifers water, while their effects are different on capillary absorption.

  8. Testcross additive and dominance effects in best linear unbiased prediction of maize single-cross performance.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, R

    1996-11-01

    Best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) has been found to be useful in maize (Zea mays L.) breeding. The advantage of including both testcross additive and dominance effects (Intralocus Model) in BLUP, rather than only testcross additive effects (Additive Model), has not been clearly demonstrated. The objective of this study was to compare the usefulness of Intralocus and Additive Models for BLUP of maize single-cross performance. Multilocation data from 1990 to 1995 were obtained from the hybrid testing program of Limagrain Genetics. Grain yield, moisture, stalk lodging, and root lodging of untested single crosses were predicted from (1) the performance of tested single crosses and (2) known genetic relationships among the parental inbreds. Correlations between predicted and observed performance were obtained with a delete-one cross-validation procedure. For the Intralocus Model, the correlations ranged from 0.50 to 0.66 for yield, 0.88 to 0.94 for moisture, 0.47 to 0.69 for stalk lodging, and 0.31 to 0.45 for root lodging. The BLUP procedure was consistently more effective with the Intralocus Model than with the Additive Model. When the Additive Model was used instead of the Intralocus Model, the reductions in the correlation were largest for root lodging (0.06-0.35), smallest for moisture (0.00-0.02), and intermediate for yield (0.02-0.06) and stalk lodging (0.02-0.08). The ratio of dominance variance (v D) to total genetic variance (v G) was highest for root lodging (0.47) and lowest for moisture (0.10). The Additive Model may be used if prior information indicates that VD for a given trait has little contribution to VG. Otherwise, the continued use of the Intralocus Model for BLUP of single-cross performance is recommended.

  9. Effects of Ga Addition on Interfacial Reactions Between Sn-Based Solders and Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao-Hong; Li, Kuan-Ting

    2016-12-01

    The use of Ga as a micro-alloying element in Sn-based solders can change the microstructure of solder joints to improve the mechanical properties, and even suppress the interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) growth. This research investigated the effects of Ga addition (0.2-1 wt.%Ga) on the IMC formation and morphological evolution in the Sn-based solder joints with Ni substrate. In the soldering reaction at 250°C and with less than 0.2 wt.%Ga addition, the formed phase was Ni3Sn4. When the Ga addition increased to 0.5 wt.%, it changed to a thin Ni2Ga3 layer of ˜1 μm thick, which stably existed at the interface in the initial 1-h reaction. Subsequently, the whole Ni2Ga3 layer detached from the Ni substrate and drifted into the molten solder. The Ni3Sn4 phase became dominant in the later stage. Notably, the Ga addition significantly reduced the grain size of Ni3Sn4, resulting in the massive spalling of Ni3Sn4 grains. With 1 wt.%Ga addition, the Ni2Ga3 layer remained very thin with no significant growth, and it stably existed at the interface for more than 10 h. In addition, the solid-state reactions were examined at temperatures of 160°C to 200°C. With addition of 0.5 wt.%Ga, the Ni3Sn4 phase dominated the whole reaction. By contrast, with increasing to 1 wt.%Ga, only a thin Ni2Ga3 layer was found even after aging at 160°C for more than 1200 h. The 1 wt.%Ga addition in solder can effectively inhibit the Ni3Sn4 formation in soldering and the long-term aging process.

  10. The effect of additive compounds on glycerol-induced damage to human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Joshua; Laouar, Leila; Elliott, Janet A W; Korbutt, Gregory S; Jomha, Nadr M

    2017-04-01

    High concentrations of cryoprotective agents are required for cryopreservation techniques such as vitrification. Glycerol is a common cryoprotective agent used in cryopreservation protocols but this agent is toxic at high concentrations. This work is an attempt to mitigate the toxic effects of high concentrations of glycerol on intact chondrocytes in human knee articular cartilage from total knee arthroplasty patients by simultaneous exposure to glycerol and a variety of additive compounds. The resulting cell viability in the cartilage samples as measured by membrane integrity staining showed that, in at least one concentration or in combination, all of the tested additive compounds (tetramethylpyrazine, ascorbic acid, chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine sulphate) were able to reduce the deleterious effects of glycerol exposure when examination of membrane integrity took place on a delayed time frame. The use of additive compounds to reduce cryoprotectant toxicity in articular cartilage may help improve cell recovery after cryopreservation.

  11. Effects of magnesium chloride and organic additives on the synthesis of aragonite precipitated calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Woon Kyoung; Ko, Sang-Jin; Lee, Seung Woo; Cho, Kye-Hong; Ahn, Ji-Whan; Han, Choon

    2008-05-01

    The synthesis of aragonite precipitated calcium carbonate by treating a suspension of Ca(OH) 2 with CO 2 gas was investigated with regard to the effects of Mg 2+ ions and organic additives on polymorphism and alternative orientations. In the presence of a small amount of Mg 2+, Mg-calcite formed, but as the Mg 2+ ion concentration increased, the amount of Mg-calcite decreased and the amount of aragonite increased. Thus, the formation of Mg-calcite is suppressed and only aragonite is formed in the presence of 60 mol% MgCl 2. As the Mg 2+ ion concentration increased, the aragonite that formed was found to have decreased in terms of its longitude and aspect ratio. Furthermore, the effect of Mg 2+ ions in conjunction with organic additives was also investigated with regard to polymorphs and morphology and the structure-forming properties of the organic additives.

  12. 76 FR 30093 - Effectiveness Indications Statements in Veterinary Biologics Labeling; Notice of Public Meeting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Effectiveness Indications Statements in Veterinary Biologics... veterinary biological products, as well as other interested individuals, that we will be holding a public... veterinary biologics labeling. We are also making the concept paper available for review and comment....

  13. Track Structure and the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to195 keV/micron. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons.

  14. [The real-world effectiveness of personal protective equipment and additional risks for workers' health].

    PubMed

    Denisov, É I; Morozova, T V; Adeninskaia, E E; Kur'erov, N N

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of personal protective equipment (PPE) of hearing, respiratory organs and hands is considered. It is shown that real effect of PPE is twice lower than declared by supplier; this presumes some derating system. The aspects of discomfort and additional risks are analyzed. The hygienic and physiologic evaluation of PPE is required along with elaboration of an official document (OSH standard or sanitary regulation) on selection, personal fit, organization of use and individual training of workers and their motivation.

  15. The Effectiveness of an Additional Stretching Exercise Program in Improving Flexibility Level among Preschool Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Wee Akina Sia Seng; Rengasamy, Shabeshan A/L; Raju, Subramaniam A/L

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of a two minutes' additional stretching exercise program in a 30 minutes games teaching lesson in improving the flexibility level of 6 year old preschool boys (M = 5.92, SD = 0.27) in a preschool in Malaysia. Fifty (50) preschool boys were selected for the study based on the intact sampling…

  16. Ontogeny of additive and maternal genetic effects: lessons from domestic mammals.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Alastair J; Reale, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Evolution of size and growth depends on heritable variation arising from additive and maternal genetic effects. Levels of heritable (and nonheritable) variation might change over ontogeny, increasing through "variance compounding" or decreasing through "compensatory growth." We test for these processes using a meta-analysis of age-specific weight traits in domestic ungulates. Generally, mean standardized variance components decrease with age, consistent with compensatory growth. Phenotypic convergence among adult sheep occurs through decreasing environmental and maternal genetic variation. Maternal variation similarly declines in cattle. Maternal genetic effects are thus reduced with age (both in absolute and relative terms). Significant trends in heritability (decreasing in cattle, increasing in sheep) result from declining maternal and environmental components rather than from changing additive variation. There was no evidence for increasing standardized variance components. Any compounding must therefore be masked by more important compensatory processes. While extrapolation of these patterns to processes in natural population is difficult, our results highlight the inadequacy of assuming constancy in genetic parameters over ontogeny. Negative covariance between direct and maternal genetic effects was common. Negative correlations with additive and maternal genetic variances indicate that antagonistic pleiotropy (between additive and maternal genetic effects) may maintain genetic variance and limit responses to selection.

  17. Thermodynamic method of calculating the effect of alloying additives on interphase interaction in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuchinsky, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of alloying additives to the matrix of a composite on the high temperature solubility rate of a single component fiber was analyzed thermodynamically. With an example of binary Ni alloys, with Group IV-VI transition metals reinforced with W fibers, agreement between the calculated and experimental data was demonstrated.

  18. 20 CFR 725.309 - Additional claims; effect of a prior denial of benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional claims; effect of a prior denial of benefits. 725.309 Section 725.309 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED CLAIMS FOR BENEFITS...

  19. Biodegradability testing of synthetic ester lubricants--effects of additives and usage.

    PubMed

    Eisentraeger, Adolf; Schmidt, Martin; Murrenhoff, Hubertus; Dott, Wolfgang; Hahn, Stefan

    2002-07-01

    The optimised biodegradability test system "O2/CO2 Headspace Test with GC-TCD" is used for the assessment of synthetic ester lubricants. The effects of both additives and usage on biodegradability are examined and discussed. Ester based cutting fluids and hydraulic fluids with and without additives are used under defined conditions at machine tools and hydraulic and plain bearing test benches. The lubricants are characterised additionally with respect to kinematic viscosity, acidity and elemental composition. Furthermore, a formulated mineral oil is characterised before and after usage at an hydraulic test bench. The results clearly show that the mineral oil is far less biodegradable than the ester oils and that their biodegradability is not affected by usage. Biodegradability of the ester oils is mainly depending on the characteristics of the base fluids and not affected by the additives. Antioxidants are influencing stability respectively biodegradability indirectly, since they prevent oxopolymerisation effects. Other effects of usage on biodegradation are not detected. In this context, the antioxidants ensure ready biodegradability and have a positive effect on the environmental fate of synthetic ester lubricants.

  20. EFFECT OF A WHOLE-CATCHMENT N ADDITION ON STREAM DETRITUS PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM) is a paired catchment study investigating ecosystem effects of N and S deposition. Because of the decade long (NH4)2SO4 addition, the treatment catchment has higher stream NO3 and enriched foliar N concentrations compared to the reference ...

  1. Additive Effects of Stimulus Quality and Word Frequency on Eye Movements during Chinese Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Pingping; Li, Xingshan; Han, Buxin

    2015-01-01

    Eye movements of Chinese readers were recorded for sentences in which high- and low-frequency target words were presented normally or with reduced stimulus quality in two experiments. We found stimulus quality and word frequency produced strong additive effects on fixation durations for target words. The results demonstrate that stimulus quality…

  2. The Effect of Enzyme Addition on Anaerobic Digestion of Jose Tall Wheat Grass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of the addition of enzyme products containing cellulase, hemicellulase, and Beta-glucosidase to anaerobic digestion systems were studied. Anaerobic digestion tests were performed using batch reactors operated at 35°C. The application of enzyme products in three digestion configurations w...

  3. 20 CFR 410.535 - Reductions; effect of an additional claim for benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reductions; effect of an additional claim for benefits. 410.535 Section 410.535 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits §...

  4. 20 CFR 410.535 - Reductions; effect of an additional claim for benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reductions; effect of an additional claim for benefits. 410.535 Section 410.535 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits §...

  5. The biological effects of five feline IFN-alpha subtypes.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Susan L; Powell, Tim D; Sellins, Karen S; Radecki, Steven V; Cohen, J John; Milhausen, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    IFN-alpha has been shown to induce both antiviral and antiproliferative activities in animals. This report describes the biological activity of five recently identified feline IFN-alpha subtypes expressed in the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line (rfeIFN-alpha1[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha2[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha3[CHO], rfeIFN-alpha5[CHO] and rfeIFN-alpha6[CHO]) and the feIFN-alpha6 subtype expressed in and purified from Pichia pastoris (rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]). The rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes were tested for antiviral activity against either Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) or feline calicivirus (FCV) infected feline embryonic fibroblast cell line (AH927) or Crandell feline kidney cell line (CRFK). Antiviral activity was induced against both VSV and FCV infected AH927 cells and VSV infected CRFK cells by all five of the rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes and rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]. In addition, the IFN-alpha inducible Mx gene (associated with antiviral activity) was upregulated in vivo 24 h following treatment with rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris], compared to baseline levels seen prior to treatment. All of the rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes and rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris] exhibited antiproliferative activity in the FeT-J cell line (an IL-2 independent feline T-cell line). Both necrosis and apoptosis were observed in rfeIFN-alpha6[P. pastoris]-treated FeT-J cells. The rfeIFN-alpha3[CHO] subtype consistently exhibited lower antiviral and antiproliferative activity compared to that observed with the other four rfeIFN-alpha[CHO] subtypes. In summary, this paper demonstrates that five previously described feIFN-alpha subtypes induce both antiviral and antiproliferative activities in vitro and are capable of upregulating the feMx gene in vivo.

  6. Occurrence and Potential Biological Effects of Amphetamine on Stream Communities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sylvia S; Paspalof, Alexis M; Snow, Daniel D; Richmond, Erinn K; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J; Kelly, John J

    2016-09-06

    The presence of pharmaceuticals, including illicit drugs in aquatic systems, is a topic of environmental significance because of their global occurrence and potential effects on aquatic ecosystems and human health, but few studies have examined the ecological effects of illicit drugs. We conducted a survey of several drug residues, including the potentially illicit drug amphetamine, at 6 stream sites along an urban to rural gradient in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A. We detected numerous drugs, including amphetamine (3 to 630 ng L(-1)), in all stream sites. We examined the fate and ecological effects of amphetamine on biofilm, seston, and aquatic insect communities in artificial streams exposed to an environmentally relevant concentration (1 μg L(-1)) of amphetamine. The amphetamine parent compound decreased in the artificial streams from less than 1 μg L(-1) on day 1 to 0.11 μg L(-1) on day 22. In artificial streams treated with amphetamine, there was up to 45% lower biofilm chlorophyll a per ash-free dry mass, 85% lower biofilm gross primary production, 24% greater seston ash-free dry mass, and 30% lower seston community respiration compared to control streams. Exposing streams to amphetamine also changed the composition of bacterial and diatom communities in biofilms at day 21 and increased cumulative dipteran emergence by 65% and 89% during the first and third weeks of the experiment, respectively. This study demonstrates that amphetamine and other biologically active drugs are present in urban streams and have the potential to affect both structure and function of stream communities.

  7. Examining the Effect of Multiple Writing Tasks on Year 10 Biology Students' Understandings of Cell and Molecular Biology Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Brian; Hohenshell, Liesl; Prain, Vaughan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that examined the cumulative effects on students' learning of science, and perceptions of the role of writing in learning, when the students engaged in multiple writing tasks with planning strategy support. The study was conducted with Year 10 biology students who completed two consecutive units on Cells and Molecular…

  8. Additive protective effects of the addition of lactic acid and adrenaline on excitability and force in isolated rat skeletal muscle depressed by elevated extracellular K+

    PubMed Central

    de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Overgaard, Kristian; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2007-01-01

    During strenuous exercise, extracellular K+ ([K+]o) is increased, which potentially can reduce muscle excitability and force production. In addition, exercise leads to accumulation of lactate and H+ and increased levels of circulating catecholamines. Individually, reduced pH and increased catecholamines have been shown to counteract the depressing effect of elevated K+. This study examines (i) whether the effects of addition of lactic acid and adrenaline on the excitability of isolated muscles are caused by separate mechanisms and are additive and (ii) whether the effect of adding lactic acid or increasing CO2 is related to a reduction of intra- or extracellular pH. Rat soleus muscles were incubated at a [K+]o of 15 mm, which reduced tetanic force by 85%. Subsequent addition of 20 mm lactic acid or 10−5m adrenaline led to a small recovery of force, but when added together induced an almost complete force recovery. Compound action potentials showed that the force recovery was associated with recovery of muscle excitability. The improved excitability after addition of adrenaline was associated with increased Na+–K+ pump activity resulting in hyperpolarization and an increase in the chemical Na+ gradient. In contrast, addition of lactic acid had no effect on the membrane potential or the Na+–K+ pump activity, but most likely increased excitability via a reduction in intracellular pH. It is concluded that the protective effects of acidosis and adrenaline on muscle excitability and force took place via different mechanisms and were additive. The results suggest that circulating catecholamines and development of acidosis during exercise may improve the tolerance of muscles to elevated [K+]o. PMID:17347268

  9. Additive protective effects of the addition of lactic acid and adrenaline on excitability and force in isolated rat skeletal muscle depressed by elevated extracellular K+.

    PubMed

    de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Overgaard, Kristian; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Nielsen, Ole Baekgaard

    2007-06-01

    During strenuous exercise, extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](o)) is increased, which potentially can reduce muscle excitability and force production. In addition, exercise leads to accumulation of lactate and H(+) and increased levels of circulating catecholamines. Individually, reduced pH and increased catecholamines have been shown to counteract the depressing effect of elevated K(+). This study examines (i) whether the effects of addition of lactic acid and adrenaline on the excitability of isolated muscles are caused by separate mechanisms and are additive and (ii) whether the effect of adding lactic acid or increasing CO(2) is related to a reduction of intra- or extracellular pH. Rat soleus muscles were incubated at a [K(+)](o) of 15 mM, which reduced tetanic force by 85%. Subsequent addition of 20 mM lactic acid or 10(-5) M adrenaline led to a small recovery of force, but when added together induced an almost complete force recovery. Compound action potentials showed that the force recovery was associated with recovery of muscle excitability. The improved excitability after addition of adrenaline was associated with increased Na(+)-K(+) pump activity resulting in hyperpolarization and an increase in the chemical Na(+) gradient. In contrast, addition of lactic acid had no effect on the membrane potential or the Na(+)-K(+) pump activity, but most likely increased excitability via a reduction in intracellular pH. It is concluded that the protective effects of acidosis and adrenaline on muscle excitability and force took place via different mechanisms and were additive. The results suggest that circulating catecholamines and development of acidosis during exercise may improve the tolerance of muscles to elevated [K(+)](o).

  10. Effect of additive particles on mechanical, thermal, and cell functioning properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) cement

    PubMed Central

    Khandaker, Morshed; Vaughan, Melville B; Morris, Tracy L; White, Jeremiah J; Meng, Zhaotong

    2014-01-01

    The most common bone cement material used clinically today for orthopedic surgery is poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Conventional PMMA bone cement has several mechanical, thermal, and biological disadvantages. To overcome these problems, researchers have investigated combinations of PMMA bone cement and several bioactive particles (micrometers to nanometers in size), such as magnesium oxide, hydroxyapatite, chitosan, barium sulfate, and silica. A study comparing the effect of these individual additives on the mechanical, thermal, and cell functional properties of PMMA would be important to enable selection of suitable additives and design improved PMMA cement for orthopedic applications. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the effect of inclusion of magnesium oxide, hydroxyapatite, chitosan, barium sulfate, and silica additives in PMMA on the mechanical, thermal, and cell functional performance of PMMA. American Society for Testing and Materials standard three-point bend flexural and fracture tests were conducted to determine the flexural strength, flexural modulus, and fracture toughness of the different PMMA samples. A custom-made temperature measurement system was used to determine maximum curing temperature and the time needed for each PMMA sample to reach its maximum curing temperature. Osteoblast adhesion and proliferation experiments were performed to determine cell viability using the different PMMA cements. We found that flexural strength and fracture toughness were significantly greater for PMMA specimens that incorporated silica than for the other specimens. All additives prolonged the time taken to reach maximum curing temperature and significantly improved cell adhesion of the PMMA samples. The results of this study could be useful for improving the union of implant-PMMA or bone-PMMA interfaces by incorporating nanoparticles into PMMA cement for orthopedic and orthodontic applications. PMID:24920906

  11. Biological explanations and stigmatizing attitudes: using essentialism and perceived dangerousness to predict antistigma intervention effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Guy A

    2011-01-01

    The theory of essentialism suggests that biological explanations of stigmatized behavior may not be effective at decreasing stigmatizing attitudes. The effects of biological explanations on stigmatizing attitudes were the topic of two experiments. In the first experiment, participants (N = 243) perceived a biological explanation as a less effective in relation to dangerousness and social distancing attitudes about mental illness than about homosexuality. The second experiment (N = 113) compared the effect of biological and free choice explanations on stigmatizing attitudes about abnormal sexual and eating behaviors. The results indicated that a biological explanation increased belief in essentialism and was most effective for attitudes related to anger and blame. These results suggest that the effectiveness of biological explanations as an antistigma tool varies according to the attitude and stigmatized group.

  12. Effects of Litter and Nutrient Additions on Soil Carbon Cycling in a Tropical Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, D. F.; Halterman, S.; Turner, B. L.; Tanner, E.; Wright, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Soil carbon (C) dynamics present one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global C cycle models, with tropical forest soils containing some of the largest terrestrial C stocks. Drastic changes in soil C storage and loss are likely to occur if global change alters plant net primary production (NPP) and/or nutrient availability in these ecosystems. We assessed the effects of litter removal and addition, as well as fertilization with nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and/or potassium (K), on soil C stocks in a tropical seasonal forest in Panama after ten and sixteen years, respectively. We used a density fractionation scheme to assess manipulation effects on rapidly and slowly cycling pools of C. Soil samples were collected in the wet and dry seasons from 0-5 cm and 5-10 cm depths in 15- 45x45 m plots with litter removal, 2x litter addition, and control (n=5), and from 32- 40x40 m fertilization plots with factorial additions of N, P, and K. We hypothesized that litter addition would increase all soil C fractions, but that the magnitude of the effect on rapidly-cycling C would be dampened by a fertilization effect. Results for the dry season show that the "free light" C fraction, or rapidly cycling soil C pool, was significantly different among the three litter treatments, comprising 5.1 ± 0.9 % of total soil mass in the litter addition plots, 2.7 ± 0.3 % in control plots, and 1.0 ± 0.1 % in litter removal plots at the 0-5cm depth (means ± one standard error, p < 0.05). Bulk soil C results are similar to observed changes in the rapidly cycling C pool for the litter addition and removal. Fertilization treatments on average diminished this C pool size relative to control plots, although there was substantial variability among fertilization treatments. In particular, addition of N and P together did not significantly alter rapidly cycling C pool sizes (4.1 ± 1.2 % of total soil mass) relative to controls (3.5 ± 0.4 %), whereas addition of P alone resulted in

  13. Biological effects of cesium-137 injected in beagle dogs of different ages

    SciTech Connect

    Nikula, K.J.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Griffith, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    The toxicity of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) in the Beagle dog was investigated at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as part of a program to evaluate the biological effects of internally deposited radionuclides. The toxicity and health effects of {sup 137}Cs are important to understand because {sup 137}Cs is produced in large amounts in light-water nuclear reactors. Large quantities of cesium radioisotopes have entered the human food chain as a result of atmospheric nuclear weapons test, and additional cesium radioisotopes were released during the Chernobyl accident. Although the final analyses are not complete, three findings are significant: older dogs dies significantly earlier than juvenile and young adult dogs; greater occurrence of sarcomas in the cesium-137 injected dogs; the major nonneoplastic effect in dogs surviving beyond 52 d appears to be testicular atrophy.

  14. Biological effectiveness of neutron irradiation on animals and man

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron experiments on a highly radiosensitive in vivo system - oocytes in mice - provide new insight into the nature of the radiosensitive targets of these important cells. With the radiobiological literature as background, neutron data from animals and humans are integrated, and the controversial question of radiation protection standards for neutrons is addressed. Oocyte killing in juvenile mice by 0.43-MeV, /sup 252/Cf-fission, and 15 MeV neutrons, compared with that by /sup 60/Co gamma rays, yields unusually low neutron RBEs (relative biological effectiveness). At 0.1 rad of 0.43-MeV neutrons the RBE is only 1.8, contrasting greatly with values of 100 or more reported at low-doses for other endpoints. In mice just prior to birth, however, when oocytes are less radiosensitive, the neutron RBE is much higher, similar to values for most other mammalian endpoints. This dramatic change in neutron RBE with mouse age (occurring within 2 to 3 days) can be explained as the result of a shift from a less radiosensitive target (presumably nuclear DNA) to a much more radiosensitive one (probably the oocyte plasma membrane). Using various approaches, a value for the neutron Quality Factor (Q, a radiation protection standard) is estimated as 17 (+-100%), much lower than 100 which has been suggested. With the large uncertainty, 17 is not markedly different from the value of 10 presently in general use.

  15. Stochastic Effects in Computational Biology of Space Radiation Cancer Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janis; Harper, Jane; O'Neill, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Estimating risk from space radiation poses important questions on the radiobiology of protons and heavy ions. We are considering systems biology models to study radiation induced repair foci (RIRF) at low doses, in which less than one-track on average transverses the cell, and the subsequent DNA damage processing and signal transduction events. Computational approaches for describing protein regulatory networks coupled to DNA and oxidative damage sites include systems of differential equations, stochastic equations, and Monte-Carlo simulations. We review recent developments in the mathematical description of protein regulatory networks and possible approaches to radiation effects simulation. These include robustness, which states that regulatory networks maintain their functions against external and internal perturbations due to compensating properties of redundancy and molecular feedback controls, and modularity, which leads to general theorems for considering molecules that interact through a regulatory mechanism without exchange of matter leading to a block diagonal reduction of the connecting pathways. Identifying rate-limiting steps, robustness, and modularity in pathways perturbed by radiation damage are shown to be valid techniques for reducing large molecular systems to realistic computer simulations. Other techniques studied are the use of steady-state analysis, and the introduction of composite molecules or rate-constants to represent small collections of reactants. Applications of these techniques to describe spatial and temporal distributions of RIRF and cell populations following low dose irradiation are described.

  16. Biological effect of hydrolyzed collagen on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Daneault, Audrey; Prawitt, Janne; Fabien Soulé, Véronique; Coxam, Véronique; Wittrant, Yohann

    2017-06-13

    Osteoporosis is a chronic and asymptomatic disease characterized by low bone mass and skeletal microarchitectural deterioration, increased risk of fracture, and associated comorbidities most prevalent in the elderly. Due to an increasingly aging population, osteoporosis has become a major health issue requiring innovative disease management. Proteins are important for bone by providing building blocks and by exerting specific regulatory function. This is why adequate protein intake plays a considerable role in both bone development and bone maintenance. More specifically, since an increase in the overall metabolism of collagen can lead to severe dysfunctions and a more fragile bone matrix and because orally administered collagen can be digested in the gut, cross the intestinal barrier, enter the circulation, and become available for metabolic processes in the target tissues, one may speculate that a collagen-enriched diet provides benefits for the skeleton. Collagen-derived products such as gelatin or hydrolyzed collagen (HC) are well acknowledged for their safety from a nutritional point of view; however, what is their impact on bone biology? In this manuscript, we critically review the evidence from literature for an effect of HC on bone tissues in order to determine whether HC may represent a relevant alternative in the design of future nutritional approaches to manage osteoporosis prevention.

  17. Effects of water addition on soil arthropods and soil characteristics in a precipitation-limited environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikoski, Jennifer M.; Ferguson, Steven H.; Meyer, Lense

    2006-09-01

    We investigated the effect of water addition and season on soil arthropod abundance and soil characteristics (%C, %N, C:N, moisture, pH). The experimental design consisted of 24 groups of five boxes distributed within a small aspen stand in Saskatchewan, Canada. The boxes depressed the soil to create a habitat with suitable microclimate for soil arthropods, and by overturning boxes we counted soil arthropods during weekly surveys from April to September 1999. Soil samples were collected at two-month intervals and water was added once per week to half of the plots. Of the eleven recognizable taxonomic units identified, only mites (Acari) and springtails (Collembola) responded to water addition by increasing abundance, whereas ants decreased in abundance with water addition. During summer, springtail numbers increased with water addition, whereas pH was a stronger determinant of mite abundance. In autumn, springtails were positively correlated with water and negatively correlated with mites, whereas mite abundance was negatively correlated with increasing C:N ratio, positively correlated to water addition, and negatively correlated with springtail abundance. Although both mite and springtail numbers decreased in autumn with a decrease in soil moisture, mites became more abundant than springtails suggesting a predator-prey (mite-springtail) relationship. Water had a significant effect on both springtails and mites in summer and autumn supporting the assertion that prairie soil communities are water limited.

  18. Biochar mitigates negative effects of salt additions on two herbaceous plant species.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sean C; Frye, Susan; Gale, Nigel; Garmon, Matthew; Launchbury, Rebecca; Machado, Natasha; Melamed, Sarah; Murray, Jessica; Petroff, Alexandre; Winsborough, Carolyn

    2013-11-15

    Addition of pyrolyzed biomass ("biochar") to soils has commonly been shown to increase crop yields and alleviate plant stresses associated with drought and exposure to toxic materials. Here we investigate the ability of biochar (at two dosages: 5 and 50 t ha(-1)) to mitigate salt-induced stress, simulating road salt additions in a factorial glasshouse experiment involving the broadleaved herbaceous plants Abutilon theophrasti and Prunella vulgaris. Salt additions of 30 g m(-2) NaCl to unamended soils resulted in high mortality rates for both species. Biochar (Fagus grandifolia sawdust pyrolyzed at 378 °C), when applied at 50 t ha(-1) as a top dressing, completely alleviated salt-induced mortality in A. theophrasti and prolonged survival of P. vulgaris. Surviving A. theophrasti plants that received both 50 t ha(-1) biochar and salt addition treatments showed growth rates and physiological performance similar to plants without salt addition. Biochar treatments alone also substantially increased biomass of P. vulgaris, with a ∼50% increase relative to untreated controls at both biochar dosages. Biochar did not significantly affect photosynthetic carbon gain (Amax), water use efficiency, or chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) in either species. Our results indicate that biochar can ameliorate salt stress effects on plants through salt sorption, suggesting novel applications of biochar to mitigate effects of salinization in agricultural, urban, and contaminated soils.

  19. Towards understanding the effects of additives on the vermicomposting of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Xing, Meiyan; Lv, Baoyi; Zhao, Chunhui; Yang, Jian

    2015-03-01

    This work evaluated the effects of additives on the chemical properties of the final products (vermicompost) from vermicomposting of sewage sludge and the adaptable characteristics of Eisenia fetida during the process. An experimental design with different ratios of sewage sludge and the additives (cattle dung or pig manure) was conducted. The results showed that the vermicomposting reduced total organic carbon and the quotient of total organic carbon to total nitrogen (C/N ratio) of the initial mixtures and enhanced the stability and agronomical value of the final products. Notably, principal component analysis indicated that the additives had significant effects on the characteristics of the vermicomposts. Moreover, the vermibeds containing cattle dung displayed a better earthworm growth and reproduction than those with pig manure. Additionally, redundancy analysis demonstrated that electrical conductivity (EC), pH, and C/N ratio played crucial roles on earthworm growth and reproduction. In all, the additives with high C/N ratio, pH buffering capacity, and low EC are recommended to be used for vermicomposting of sewage sludge.

  20. Effect of the Addition of Schisandra chinensis Powder on the Physico-chemical Characteristics of Sausage

    PubMed Central

    Jin, S. K.; Park, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    The individual and interactive effects of Schisandra chinensis powder (SCP) and sodium nitrite additions on color, pH, water holding capacity, residual nitrite, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), volatile basic nitrogen, texture properties, fatty acids, amino acids and sensory evaluation of cooked pork sausages were investigated after 20 d of storage at 4°C. The powders (0, 0.5 and 1.0%) were added to sausages either alone or in combination with nitrite (0 and 100 ppm). SCP added-sausages showed lower L* (lightness) and W (whiteness) values, and higher b* (yellowness) values than sausage containing no nitrite, and exhibited the highest a* values at a 0.5% addition (p<0.05). Residual nitrite and TBARS values were found to be significantly reduced as the addition levels of SCP increased (p<0.05). As the addition of SCP increased, the sausage showed gradually decreased brittleness, cohesiveness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness, while adhesiveness increased. Polyunsaturated fatty acid, n-6 and n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio concentrations were significantly higher in sausages containing SCP (p<0.05). The addition of SCP to sausage significantly (p<0.05) increased the ammonia content (by 0.5% SCP) and aromatic amino acid concentrations (by 1.0% SCP) (p<0.05). Inclusion of SCP in sausage meat resulted in a significant deterioration in quality characteristics of flavor, springiness, juiciness and overall acceptability (p<0.05). As expected, the observed changes in a*, W, pH, shear force, texture property, TBARS, fatty acid, amino acid and sensory score of sausages, depended on the rate of addition of nitrite (p<0.05). These results suggest that SCP addition is not an effective way of improving the sensory evaluation of sausages, but may beneficially affect TBARS, nitrite scavenging activity, fatty acid and amino acid content in pork sausages. PMID:25049766

  1. Effect of ensiling and silage additives on fatty acid composition of ryegrass and corn experimental silages.

    PubMed

    Alves, S P; Cabrita, A R J; Jerónimo, E; Bessa, R J B; Fonseca, A J M

    2011-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted using laboratory mini-silos to study the effect of ensiling and silage additives on fatty acid (FA) composition, including minor or unusual FA, of ryegrass and corn silages. Ryegrass was ensiled for 12 wk with no additives, with the addition of a bacterial inoculant or formic acid. Corn was ensiled for 9 wk without additives, with the addition of a bacterial inoculant or calcium formate. Ensiling affected both total FA content and FA composition of ryegrass silages. Total FA concentration increased (P < 0.001) during ryegrass ensiling. The proportions (g/100 g of total FA) of the major unsaturated FA, 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6, were not affected (P > 0.05) by ensiling. However, their concentration (mg/g of DM) in silages was greater (P=0.017 and P=0.001, respectively) than in fresh ryegrass. Two 18:2 FA (trans-11,cis-15 and cis-9,cis-15) that were not originally present in the fresh ryegrass were detected in silages. Silage additives affected the FA composition of ryegrass silages, mostly by increasing the proportions of SFA, but not on total FA concentration. Ensiling did not affect (P=0.83) total FA content of corn silages; however, FA composition was affected, mostly by decreasing the proportions of 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3. Silage additives had no effect on corn silage FA composition. Exposing corn silages to air resulted in no oxidation of FA or reduction in total FA content or composition.

  2. The Effect of Silicon and Aluminum Additions on the Oxidation Resistance of Lean Chromium Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, J.S.; Alman, D.E.; Rawers, J.C.

    2001-09-01

    The effect of Si and Al additions on the oxidation of lean chromium austenitic stainless steels has been studied. A baseline composition of Fe-16Cr-16Ni-2Mn-1Mo was selected to allow combined Si and Al additions of up to 5 wt. pct. in a fully austenitic alloy. The baseline composition was selected using a net Cr equivalent equation to predict the onset of G-ferrite formation in austenite. Cyclic oxidation tests in air for 1000 hours were carried out on alloys with Si only or combined Si and Al additions in the temperature range 700 C to 800 C. Oxidation resistance of alloys with Si only additions were outstanding, particularly at 800 C. It was evident that different rate controlling mechanisms for oxidation were operative at 700 C and 800 C in the Si alloys. In addition, Si alloys pre-oxidized at 800 C, showed a zero weight gain in subsequent testing for 1000 hours at 700 C. The rate controlling mechanism in alloys with combined Si and Al addition for oxidation at 800 C was also different than alloys with Si only. SEM and ESCA analysis of the oxide films and base material at the oxide/base metal interface were conducted to study potential rate controlling mechanisms.

  3. Effect of lubricant extreme pressure additives on rolling element fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of surface active additives on rolling-element fatigue life were investigated with the five-ball fatigue tester at conditions where classical subsurface initiated rolling-element fatigue is the sole mode of failure. Test balls of AISI 52100, AISI M-50, and AISI 1018 were run with an acid-treated white oil containing either 2.5 percent sulfurized terpene, 1 percent didodecyl phosphite, or 5 percent chlorinated wax. In general, it was found that the influence of surface active additives was detrimental to rolling-element fatigue life. The chlorinated-wax additive significantly reduced fatigue life by a factor of 7. The base oil with the 2.5 percent sulfurized-terpene additive can reduce fatigue life by as much as 50 percent. No statistical change in fatigue life occurred with the base oil having the 1 percent didodecyl-phosphite additive. The additives used with the base oil did not change the ranking of the bearing steels where rolling-element fatigue life was of subsurface origin.

  4. Range uncertainty in proton therapy due to variable biological effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabe, Alejandro; Moteabbed, Maryam; Depauw, Nicolas; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald

    2012-03-01

    Traditionally, dose in proton radiotherapy is prescribed as Gy(RBE) by scaling up the physical dose by 10%. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons is considered to vary with dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd), dose (d) and (α/β)x. The increase of RBE with depth causes a shift of the falloff of the beam, i.e. a change of the beam range. The magnitude of this shift will depend on dose and (α/β)x. The aim of this project was to quantify the dependence of the range shift on these parameters. Three double-scattered beams of different ranges incident on a computational phantom consisting of different regions of interest (ROIs) were used. Each ROI was assigned with (α/β)x values between 0.5 and 20 Gy. The distribution of LETd within each ROI was obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation. The LETd distribution depends on the beam energy and thus its nominal range. The RBE values within the ROIs were calculated for doses between 1 and 15 Gy using an in-house developed biophysical model. Dose-volume histograms of the RBE-weighted doses were extracted for each ROI for a ‘fixed RBE’ (RBE = 1.1) and a ‘variable RBE’ (RBE = f (d, α/β, LETd)), and the percentage difference in range was obtained from the difference of the percentage volumes at the distal 80% of the dose. Range differences in normal tissue ((α/β)x = 3 Gy) of the order of 3-2 mm were obtained, respectively, for a shallow (physical range 4.8 cm) and a deep (physical range 12.8 cm) beam, when a dose of 1 Gy normalized to the mid-SOBP was delivered. As the dose increased to 15 Gy, the variable RBE decreases below 1.1 which induces ranges of about 1 mm shorter than those obtained with an RBE of 1.1. The shift in the range of an SOBP when comparing biological dose distributions obtained with a fixed or a variable RBE was quantified as a function of dose, (α/β)x and physical range (as a surrogate of the initial beam energy). The shift increases with the physical range but

  5. Additive effects of neurofeedback on the treatment of ADHD: A randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Jung, Chul-Ho

    2017-02-01

    Neurofeedback (NF) has been identified as a "possibly efficacious" treatment in current evidence-based reviews; therefore, more research is needed to determine its effects. The current study examined the potential additive effect of NF for children diagnosed with ADHD beginning a medication trial first. Thirty-six children (6-12 years) with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of ADHD were randomly assigned to an NF with medication (NF condition) or a medication only condition. Children in the NF group attended 20 twice-weekly sessions. Outcome measures included individual cognitive performance scores (ADS, K-WISC-III), ADHD rating scores completed by their parents (ARS, CRS) and brainwave indices of left and right hemispheres before and after NF treatment. Significant additive treatment effect in any of the symptom variables was found and a reduction of theta waves in both the right and left hemispheres was recorded in NF condition participants. However our randomized controlled study could not demonstrate superior effects of combined NF on intelligent functioning compared to the medication treatment only. This study suggested any possible evidence of positive and additive treatment effects of NF on brainwaves and ADHD symptomatology.

  6. Effects of water and nitrogen addition on species turnover in temperate grasslands in northern China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhuwen; Wan, Shiqiang; Ren, Haiyan; Han, Xingguo; Li, Mai-He; Cheng, Weixin; Jiang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Global nitrogen (N) deposition and climate change have been identified as two of the most important causes of current plant diversity loss. However, temporal patterns of species turnover underlying diversity changes in response to changing precipitation regimes and atmospheric N deposition have received inadequate attention. We carried out a manipulation experiment in a steppe and an old-field in North China from 2005 to 2009, to test the hypothesis that water addition enhances plant species richness through increase in the rate of species gain and decrease in the rate of species loss, while N addition has opposite effects on species changes. Our results showed that water addition increased the rate of species gain in both the steppe and the old field but decreased the rates of species loss and turnover in the old field. In contrast, N addition increased the rates of species loss and turnover in the steppe but decreased the rate of species gain in the old field. The rate of species change was greater in the old field than in the steppe. Water interacted with N to affect species richness and species turnover, indicating that the impacts of N on semi-arid grasslands were largely mediated by water availability. The temporal stability of communities was negatively correlated with rates of species loss and turnover, suggesting that water addition might enhance, but N addition would reduce the compositional stability of grasslands. Experimental results support our initial hypothesis and demonstrate that water and N availabilities differed in the effects on rate of species change in the temperate grasslands, and these effects also depend on grassland types and/or land-use history. Species gain and loss together contribute to the dynamic change of species richness in semi-arid grasslands under future climate change.

  7. Effective Mechanical Properties of Lattice Material Fabricated by Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang-In; Choi, Seung-kyum; Rosen, David W; Duty, Chad E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a two-step homogenization method is proposed and implemented for evaluating effective mechanical properties of lattice structured material fabricated by the material extrusion additive manufacturing process. In order to consider the characteristics of the additive manufacturing process in estimation procedures, the levels of scale for homogenization are divided into three stages the levels of layer deposition, structural element, and lattice structure. The method consists of two transformations among stages. In the first step, the transformation between layer deposition and structural element levels is proposed to find the geometrical and material effective properties of structural elements in the lattice structure. In the second step, the method to estimate effective mechanical properties of lattice material is presented, which uses a unit cell and is based on the discretized homogenization method for periodic structure. The method is implemented for cubic lattice structure and compared to experimental results for validation purposes.

  8. Additive Effects of Alcohols, Their Acidic By-Products, and Temperature on the Yeast Pachysolen tannophilus.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, M de F; Lee, H; Collins-Thompson, D L

    1990-02-01

    The effects of alcohols on the growth and fermentation of the yeast Pachysolen tannophilus were investigated at both 30 and 35 degrees C. Addition of alcohols to the culture medium decreased both the growth rate and the final cell yield in a dose-dependent manner, and this decrease was more severe at 35 degrees C. The concentration for 50% growth rate inhibition decreased as the chain length of the alcohol increased. In fermentations using a high initial cell density, production of acids was always observed when the medium was supplemented with alcohols. Supplementation of the culture medium with a short-chain alcohol plus the corresponding acid was shown to exert an additive deleterious effect on fermentation, and this effect increased with temperature. Production of acids was associated with the presence of alcohol dehydrogenase activity in cell extracts.

  9. The effect of diamic acid additives on the dielectric constant of polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of six selected diamic acids additives (including 2,2-prime bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride-aniline (An); 4,4-prime-oxydiphthalic anhydride-An, 3,3-prime diaminodiphenyl sulfone-phthalic anhydride (PA); 4,4-prime-oxydianiline-PA; 2,2-bis 4(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl hexafluoropropane-PA; and 2,2-bis 4(3-aminophenoxy)phenyl hexafluoropropane-PA) on the dielectric constants of low-dielectric-constant polyimide resins was evaluated. It was found that the effect of the incorporation of the diamic acids on reducing the dielectric constant of polyimides may be limited as the dielectric constant of the base resin itself becomes very low. The additives were found to lower the resin's values of glass transition temperature, with no effect on thermooxidative stability.

  10. Effect of indium addition in U-Zr metallic fuel on lanthanide migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Wiencek, T.; O'Hare, E.; Fortner, J.; Wright, A.; Cheon, J. S.; Lee, B. O.

    2017-02-01

    Advanced fast reactor concepts to achieve ultra-high burnup (∼50%) require prevention of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). Fission product lanthanide accumulation at high burnup is substantial and significantly contributes to FCCI upon migration to the cladding interface. Diffusion barriers are typically used to prevent interaction of the lanthanides with the cladding. A more active method has been proposed which immobilizes the lanthanides through formation of stable compounds with an additive. Theoretical analysis showed that indium, thallium, and antimony are good candidates. Indium was the strongest candidate because of its low reactivity with iron-based cladding alloys. Characterization of the as-fabricated alloys was performed to determine the effectiveness of the indium addition in forming compounds with lanthanides, represented by cerium. Tests to examine how effectively the dopant prevents lanthanide migration under a thermal gradient were also performed. The results showed that indium effectively prevented cerium migration.

  11. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) induce direct electric field effects and biological effects on human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, Emily H; Schoenbach, Karl H; Beebe, Stephen J

    2005-05-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) are ultrashort pulses with high electric field intensity (kV/cm) and high power (megawatts), but low energy density (mJ/cc). To determine roles for p53 in response to nsPEFs, HCT116 cells (p53+/+ and p53-/-) were exposed to nsPEF and analyzed for membrane integrity, phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase activation, and cell survival. Decreasing plasma membrane effects were observed in both HCT116p53+/+ and p53-/- cells with decreasing pulse durations and/or decreasing electric fields. However, addition of ethidium homodimer-1 and Annexin-V-FITC post-pulse demonstrated greater fluorescence in p53-/- versus p53+/+ cells, suggesting a postpulse p53-dependent biological effect at the plasma membrane. Caspase activity was significantly higher than nonpulsed cells only in the p53-/- cells. HCT116 cells exhibited greater survival in response to nsPEFs than HL-60 and Jurkat cells, but survival was more evident for HCT116p53+/+ cells than for HCT116p53-/- cells. These results indicate that nsPEF effects on HCT116 cells include (1) apparent direct electric field effects, (2) biological effects that are p53-dependent and p53-independent, (3) actions on mechanisms that originate at the plasma membranes and at intracellular structures, and (4) an apparent p53 protective effect. NsPEF applications provide a means to explore intracellular structures and functions that can reveal mechanisms in health and disease.

  12. Predicting the effects of nanoscale cerium additives in diesel fuel on regional-scale air quality.

    PubMed

    Erdakos, Garnet B; Bhave, Prakash V; Pouliot, George A; Simon, Heather; Mathur, Rohit

    2014-11-04

    Diesel vehicles are a major source of air pollutant emissions. Fuel additives containing nanoparticulate cerium (nCe) are currently being used in some diesel vehicles to improve fuel efficiency. These fuel additives also reduce fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions and alter the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and hydrocarbon (HC) species, including several hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). To predict their net effect on regional air quality, we review the emissions literature and develop a multipollutant inventory for a hypothetical scenario in which nCe additives are used in all on-road and nonroad diesel vehicles. We apply the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to a domain covering the eastern U.S. for a summer and a winter period. Model calculations suggest modest decreases of average PM2.5 concentrations and relatively larger decreases in particulate elemental carbon. The nCe additives also have an effect on 8 h maximum ozone in summer. Variable effects on HAPs are predicted. The total U.S. emissions of fine-particulate cerium are estimated to increase 25-fold and result in elevated levels of airborne cerium (up to 22 ng/m3), which might adversely impact human health and the environment.

  13. Investigation of the effects of short chain processing additives on polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Stclair, T. L.; Pratt, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of low level concentrations of several short chain processing additives on the properties of the 4,4'-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenoxy) diphenylsulfide dianhydride (BDSDA)/4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether (ODA)/1,3'-diaminobenzene (m-phenylene diamine) (MPA) (422) copolyimide were investigated. It was noted that 5 percent MPD/phthalic anhydride (PA) is more effective than 5 percent ODA/PA and BDSDA/aniline (AN) in strengthening the host material. However, the introduction of 10 percent BDSDA/AN produces disproportionately high effects on free volume and free electron density in the host copolyimide.

  14. The Effect of Gaseous Additives on Dynamic Pressure Output and Ignition Sensitivity of Nanothermites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puszynski, Jan; Doorenbos, Zac; Walters, Ian; Redner, Paul; Kapoor, Deepak; Swiatkiewicz, Jacek

    2011-06-01

    This contribution addresses important combustion characteristics of nanothermite systems. In this research the following nanothermites were investigated: a) Al-Bi2O3, b)Al-Fe2O3 and c)Al-Bi2O3-Fe2O3. The effect of various gasifying additives (such as nitrocellulose (NC) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)) as well as reactant stoichiometry, reactant particle size and shape on processability, ignition delay time and dynamic pressure outputs at different locations in a combustion chamber will be presented. In addition, this contribution will report electrostatic and friction sensitivities of standard and modified nanothermites.

  15. Effects of Ce additions on the age hardening response of Mg–Zn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Langelier, Brian Esmaeili, Shahrzad

    2015-03-15

    The effects of Ce additions on the precipitation hardening behaviour of Mg–Zn are examined for a series of alloys, with Ce additions at both alloying and microalloying levels. The alloys are artificially aged, and studied using hardness measurement and X-ray diffraction, as well as optical and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that the age-hardening effect is driven by the formation of fine precipitates, the number density of which is related to the Zn content of the alloy. Conversely, the Ce content is found to slightly reduce hardening. When the alloy content of Ce is high, large secondary phase particles containing both Ce and Zn are present, and remain stable during solutionizing. These particles effectively reduce the amount of Zn available as solute for precipitation, and thereby reduce hardening. Combining hardness results with thermodynamic analysis of alloy solute levels also suggests that Ce can have a negative effect on hardening when present as solutes at the onset of ageing. This effect is confirmed by designing a pre-ageing heat treatment to preferentially remove Ce solutes, which is found to restore the hardening capability of an Mg–Zn–Ce alloy to the level of the Ce-free alloy. - Highlights: • The effects of Ce additions on precipitation in Mg–Zn alloys are examined. • Additions of Ce to Mg–Zn slightly reduce the age-hardening response. • Ce-rich secondary phase particles deplete the matrix of Zn solute. • Hardening is also decreased when Ce is present in solution. • Pre-ageing to preferentially precipitate out Ce restores hardening capabilities.

  16. Addition of alarm pheromone components improves the effectiveness of desiccant dusts against Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Joshua B; Phillips, Seth A; Croxall, Travis J; Christensen, Brady S; Yoder, Jay A; Denlinger, David L

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate that the addition of bed bug, Cimex lectularius, alarm pheromone to desiccant formulations greatly enhances their effectiveness during short-term exposure. Two desiccant formulations, diatomaceous earth (DE) and Dri-die (silica gel), were applied at the label rate with and without bed bug alarm pheromone components, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-octenal, and a (E)-2-hexenal:(E)-2-octenal blend. First-instar nymphs and adult females were subjected to 10-min exposures, and water loss rates were used to evaluate the response. Optimal effectiveness was achieved with a pheromone concentration of 0.01 M. With Dri-die alone, the water loss was 21% higher than in untreated controls, and water loss increased nearly two times with (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-octenal and three times with the (E)-2-hexenal: (E)-2-octenal blend. This shortened survival of first-instar nymphs from 4 to 1 d, with a similar reduction noted in adult females. DE was effective only if supplemented with pheromone, resulting in a 50% increase in water loss over controls with the (E)-2-hexenal:(E)-2-octenal blend, and a survival decrease from 4 to 2 d in first-instar nymphs. Consistently, the addition of the pheromone blend to desiccant dust was more effective than adding either component by itself or by using Dri-die or DE alone. Based on observations in a small microhabitat, the addition of alarm pheromone components prompted bed bugs to leave their protective harborages and to move through the desiccant, improving the use of desiccants for control. We concluded that short exposure to Dri-die is a more effective treatment against bed bugs than DE and that the effectiveness of the desiccants can be further enhanced by incorporation of alarm pheromone. Presumably, the addition of alarm pheromone elevates excited crawling activity, thereby promoting cuticular changes that increase water loss.

  17. Effect of silver additive on physicochemical properties of hydroxyapatite applied to reconstructive surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuk, I. V. Rasskazova, L. A. Korotchenko, N. M.

    2015-11-17

    The effect of silver adding to hydroxyapatite (HA) in its solubility in physiological solution and biological activity was investigated. Samples of HA containing silver (AgHA) obtained by liquid-phase method in the conditions of microwave exposure. Solubility (C{sub Ca}{sup 2+}·10{sup 3}, mol/l) of the powders AgHA was determined by chemical methods according trilonometric titration of the calcium ions in physiological solution at 25 and 37 °C. To investigate the biological activity of the samples, a series of experiments on the formation of the calcium-phosphate layer on the surface of the SBF-solution at 37 °C for 28 days. Electronic micrographs of samples taken at the end of each 7 days of the experiment, indicate the formation of calcium-phosphate layer (CPL) in the samples, the kinetics of which is shown as a function of cumulative concentrations of calcium and magnesium ions from time.

  18. Effect of GdL Addition on Physico-chemical Properties of Fermented Sausages during Ripening.

    PubMed

    Yim, Dong-Gyun; Jang, Kyoung-Hwan; Chung, Ku-Young

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of glucono-δ-lactone (GdL) addition on physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of fermented sausages during ripening and drying. Five batches of sausages were produced under ripening conditions: without GdL and with 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75% of GdL addition. Samples from each treatment were taken for physicochemical and microbiological analyses on the 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20 and 25th day of ripening. Chemical analysis showed a significant decrease in moisture content of sausages with increasing amounts of GdL added (p<0.05). The moisture contents decreased, whereas the fat, protein and ash contents increased throughout ripening (p<0.05). Increasing levels of GdL caused a decrease in the pH values (p<0.05), which can have an inhibitory effect against microflora. Water holding capacity content of samples decreased with increasing GdL concentration (p<0.05). The shear force values of fermented sausages showed the highest in T4 (p<0.05). During ripening, the shear force values of sausages were increased on the 25th day compared to day 0 (p<0.05). The higher GdL level produced lighter and more yellow sausages. The addition of 0.75% GdL was effective in controlling bacteria counts. Addition of GdL in sausages resulted in the physicochemical and microbiological attributes equal to or better than no addition of GdL without any harmful effect.

  19. Explanation of non-additive effects in mixtures of similar mode of action chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Masashi; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Many models have been developed to predict the combined effect of drugs and chemicals. Most models are classified into two additive models: independent action (IA) and concentration addition (CA). It is generally considered if the modes of action of chemicals are similar then the combined effect obeys CA; however, many empirical studies report nonlinear effects deviating from the predictions by CA. Such deviations are termed synergism and antagonism. Synergism, which leads to a stronger toxicity, requires more careful management, and hence it is important to understand how and which combinations of chemicals lead to synergism. In this paper, three types of chemical reactions are mathematically modeled and the cause of the nonlinear effects among chemicals with similar modes of action was investigated. Our results show that combined effects obey CA only when the modes of action are exactly the same. Contrary to existing knowledge, combined effects are generally nonlinear even if the modes of action of the chemicals are similar. Our results further show that the nonlinear effects vanish out when the chemical concentrations are low, suggesting that the current management procedure of assuming CA is rarely inappropriate because environmental concentrations of chemicals are generally low.

  20. Molecular Signaling Pathways Behind the Biological Effects of Salvia Species Diterpenes in Neuropharmacology and Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Akaberi, M; Iranshahi, M; Mehri, S

    2016-06-01

    The genus Salvia, from the Lamiaceae family, has diverse biological properties that are primarily attributable to their diterpene contents. There is no comprehensive review on the molecular signaling pathways of these active components. In this review, we investigated the molecular targets of bioactive Salvia diterpenes responsible for the treatment of nervous and cardiovascular diseases. The effects on different pathways, including apoptosis signaling, oxidative stress phenomena, the accumulation of amyloid beta plaques, and tau phosphorylation, have all been considered to be mechanisms of the anti-Alzheimer properties of Salvia diterpenes. Additionally, effects on the benzodiazepine and kappa opioid receptors and neuroprotective effects are noted as neuropharmacological properties of Salvia diterpenes, including tanshinone IIA, salvinorin A, cryptotanshinone, and miltirone. Tanshinone IIA, as the primary diterpene of Salvia miltiorrhiza, has beneficial activities in heart diseases because of its ability to scavenge free radicals and its effects on transcription factors, such as nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Additionally, tanshinone IIA has also been proposed to have cardioprotective properties including antiarrhythmic activities and effects on myocardial infarction. With respect to the potential therapeutic effects of Salvia diterpenes, comprehensive clinical trials are warranted to evaluate these valuable molecules as lead compounds. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Effects of gentle remediation technologies on soil biological and biochemical activities - a review.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, B.; Haag, R.; Renella, G.

    2009-04-01

    Remediation technologies for contaminated sites are generally designed to reduce risks for human health, groundwater or plant quality. While some drastic remediation measures such as soil excavation, thermal treatment or soil washing eliminate or strongly reduce soil life, in-situ treatments involving plants or immobilizing additives may also restore soil functionality by establishing or promoting a well structured and active community of soil organisms. Biological parameters that are sensitive to contaminants and other pedo-environmental conditions and which contribute to biogeochemical nutrient cycles, can be used as synthetic indicators of the progress and also the efficiency of given remediation approaches. Data from long-term studies on re-vegetated mine spoils show that biological and biochemical activity is enhanced with increasing plant density and diversity. Among the soil amendments, most measures that introduce organic matter or alkalinity to the contaminated soils also improve microbial or faunal parameters. Only few amendments, such as phosphates and chelators have deleterious effects on soil biota. In this review, soil microbial biomass and the activity of the enzymes phosphatase and arylsulphatase are identified as suitable and sensitive biological indicators for soil health. The results and future research needs are are summarized.

  2. Biological Effects in Coral Biomineralization: The Ion-Microprobe Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, A.

    2004-12-01

    Scleractinian corals are among the most prolific biomineralizing organisms on Earth and massive, reef-building corals are used extensively as proxies for past variations in the global climate. It is therefore of wide interest to understand the degree to which biological versus inorganic processes control the chemistry of the coral skeleton. Early workers considered aragonitic coral skeleton formation to be a purely physiochemical process. More recent studies have increasingly emphasized the role of a skeletal organic matrix, or intercalated organic macro-molecules that control the macroscopic shape and size of the growing crystals. It is now well established that organic compounds play a key role in controlling the morphology of crystals in a wide variety of calcium carbonate biomineralization processes by binding to specific sites, thereby causing direction-specific binding energies on the crystal surfaces. Macro-molecules, such as aspartic acid-rich or glutamic proteins and sulfated polysaccharides, are known to be embedded within the aragonitic skeletal components of coral. In addition, endosymbiotic algae and the layer of cells adjacent to the mineralizing surface, the calicoblastic ectoderm, are believed to play important roles in driving and controlling hermatypic coral skeletogenesis. However, until recently, further progress has been somewhat limited because it was not possible to obtain chemical analyses of the coral skeleton with sufficiently high spatial resolution and sensitivity to correlate chemical variations with the micrometer scale organization of its different structural components. The recent emergence of new ion microprobe technology is changing this situation radically. Conventional ion microprobe and laser ablation techniques have already contributed substantially to our knowledge about the micro-distribution of key trace elements such as B, Mg, Sr, Ba and U. However, with the development of the NanoSIMS, a newly designed ion microprobe

  3. Effect of Reproductive History on Mammary Epithelial Biology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    Reproductive History on Mammary Epithelial Biology PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lewis A. Chodosh, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION : University of Pennsylvania...9348 Organization : University of Pennsylvania Those portions of the technical data contained in this report marked as limited rights data shall not...History on Mammary Epithelial DAMD17-99-1-9348 Biology 6. AUTHOR(S) Lewis A. Chodosh, M.D., Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8

  4. Effect on the operation properties of DMBR with the addition of GAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jizhi; Zhang, Qian; Hong, Junming

    2017-01-01

    The membrane bioreactor and dynamic membrane bioreactor were used to examine the effect of granular activated carbon (GAC) on the treatment of synthetic wastewater. After the addition of different volume fractions GAC in the DMBR, the operation parameters, effluent COD, NH4 +-N, NO3 --N, TN concentrations and sludge viscosity of the bioreactor was investigated. The results showed that the addition of GAC could relieve the membrane fouling and improve the removal efficiencies of pollutants in the DMBR. The effluent concentrations of pollutants were linear correlation with the addition of volume fractions of GAC in the bioreactor. The value of R2 of each modulation was almost more than 0.9. The sludge viscosity was almost not affected by the volume fractions of GAC in the bioreactor. The best volume fractions of GAC were 20% in the DMBR.

  5. The effects of beryllium additions on the oxidation of nickel aluminide and titanium aluminide based intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Chen, K.C.; Brady, M.P.

    1998-12-31

    The effects of Be additions on the oxidation behavior of {beta}-NiAl in moist air at 1,000 C and borderline alumina-forming {gamma} (TiAl) + Laves Ti-Al-Cr based alloys at 800 C and 1,000 C in dry and moist air were investigated. The addition of Be to {beta}-NiAl suppressed the formation of transient alumina, and resulted in the formation of a protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. In dry air, the addition of Be to the Ti-Al-Cr alloys also resulted in the formation of a protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. In moist air, only Ti-Al-Cr-Be alloys with a high Cr content (10 to 15 a/o) formed the protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} scale.

  6. The effects of beryllium additions on the oxidation of nickel aluminide and titanium aluminide based intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Chen, K.C.; Brady, M.P.

    1998-11-01

    The effects of Be additions on the oxidation behavior of {beta}-NiAl in moist air at 1,000 C as well as on the borderline alumina-forming {gamma} + Laves Ti-Al-Cr based alloys at 800 C and 1,000 C in dry and moist air were investigated. The addition of Be to {beta}-NiAl suppressed the formation of transient alumina and resulted in the formation of a protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. In dry air, the addition of Be to the Ti-Al-Cr alloys also resulted in the formation of a protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. In moist air, only Ti-Al-Cr-Be alloys with a high Cr content (10 to 15 a/o) formed the protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} scale.

  7. Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl Phosphate: Phosphorus – Nitrogen Synergism

    SciTech Connect

    Gaan, Sabyasachi; Sun, Gang; Hutches, Katherine; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen additives like urea, guanidine carbonate and melamine formaldehyde on the flame retardant efficacy of tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been investigated. From the LOI tests on treated cotton it is clear that the nitrogen additives have synergistic action. Estimation of activation energy of decomposition of treated cotton indicated that nitrogen additives enhance the thermal stability during the burning process. SEM pictures of chars formed after LOI test showed the formation of protective polymeric coating on the surface. The surface of chars formed were evaluated using FTIR-ATR and XPS analysis which showed that the coating was composed of Phosphorus-Nitrogen-Oxygen containing species. Formation of this coating during the burning process could lead to the synergistic interaction of phosphorus and nitrogen. Based on the experimental data we have further proposed several reaction mechanisms which could contribute to synergistic action and formation of protective coating on the surface of char.

  8. Effect of hot pressing additives on the leachability of hot pressed sodium hydrous titanium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.M.; Sambell, R.A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Sodium hydrous titanium oxide is an ion exchange resin which can be used for immobilizing medium level waste (MLW) liquors. When hot pressed, it undergoes conversion to a ceramic. Three low melting point materials (borax, bismuth trioxide, and a mixture of PbO/CuO) were added to the (Na)HTiO and the effect that each of these had on aiding densification was assessed. Hot pressing temperature, applied pressure, and percentage addition of hot pressing aid were varied. Percentage open porosity, flexural strength, and leachability were measured. There was a linear relationship between the percentage open porosity and the logarithm of the leach rate for a constant percentage addition of each additive.

  9. Effect of additives on mechanical properties of macroporous silicon carbide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Jung-Hye; Kim, Young-Wook

    2010-06-01

    Macroporous SiC ceramics were fabricated by carbothermal reduction of polysiloxane-derived SiOC containing hollow microspheres, followed by sintering and subsequent annealing. The effects of the additive composition and the annealing temperature on the porosity, microstructure, and mechanical strength of the resulting porous ceramics were investigated. Varying the additive composition was found to result in different porosities, microstructures, and mechanical properties. When the samples were sintered at 1750 °C and then annealed at 1900 °C for 4 h, the SiC prepared with 3% Al2O3 and 2% Y2O3 showed the highest strength (a flexural strength of 55 MPa and a compressive strength of 289 MPa, at a porosity of 45 %). The present results suggest that judicious selection of the sintering additive composition is very important for improving the mechanical properties of macroporous SiC ceramics.

  10. Vector Addition: Effect of the Context and Position of the Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2010-10-01

    In this article we investigate the effect of: 1) the context, and 2) the position of the vectors, on 2D vector addition tasks. We administered a test to 512 students completing introductory physics courses at a private Mexican university. In the first part, we analyze students' responses in three isomorphic problems: displacements, forces, and no physical context. Students were asked to draw two vectors and the vector sum. We analyzed students' procedures detecting the difficulties when drawing the vector addition and proved that the context matters, not only compared to the context-free case but also between the contexts. In the second part, we analyze students' responses with three different arrangements of the sum of two vectors: tail-to-tail, head-to-tail and separated vectors. We compared the frequencies of the errors in the three different positions to deduce students' conceptions in the addition of vectors.

  11. Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kakati, B. Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-28

    Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

  12. Effects of chemical additives on hydrocarbon disappearance and biodegradation in freshwater marsh microcosms.

    PubMed

    Nyman, J A; Klerks, P L; Bhattacharyya, S

    2007-09-01

    We determined how a cleaner and a dispersant affected hydrocarbon biodegradation in wetland soils dominated by the plant Panicum hemitomon, which occurs throughout North and South America. Microcosms received no hydrocarbons, South Louisiana crude, or diesel; and no additive, a dispersant, or a cleaner. We determined the concentration of four total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measures and 43 target hydrocarbons in water and sediment fractions 1, 7, 31, and 186 days later. Disappearance was distinguished from biodegradation via hopane-normalization. After 186 days, TPH disappearance ranged from 24% to 97%. There was poor correlation among the four TPH measures, which indicated that each quantified a different suite of hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbon disappearance and biodegradation were unaltered by these additives under worse-case scenarios. Any use of these additives must generate benefits that outweigh the lack of effect on biodegradation demonstrated in this report, and the increase in toxicity that we reported earlier.

  13. Effects of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions on Carbon Cycling of Tropical Mountain Rainforests in Hainan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, J.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) and Phosphorus (P) deposition is projected to increase significantly in tropical regions in the coming decades, which has changed and will change the structure and function of ecosystems, and affects on ecosystem Carbon (C) cycle. As an important part in global C cycle, how the C cycle of tropical rainforests will be influenced by the N and P deposition should be focused on. This study simulated N and P deposition in a primary and secondary forest of tropical mountain rainforest in Jianfengling, Hainan, China, during five-year field experiment to evaluate the effects of N and P deposition on C cycling processes and relate characteristics. Six levels of N and P treatments were treated: Control, Low-N, Medium-N, High-N, P and N+P. The relative growth rates (RGR) of tree layer in treatment plots were different from that in control plots after years of N and P addition. Simulated N and P deposition also increased ANPP in primary forest. N and P addition changed the growth of trees by altering soil nutrient and microbial activities. N and P addition increased soil organic carbon (SOC) and total N (TN) content, and significantly increased soil total P (TP) content, not changing soil pH. During the whole process of N and P addition, as net nitrification rate and net N mineralization rate were promoted by N and P addition, and effective N content (nitrate) of soil increased in the plot treated with N treatments compared to the control treatment. The microbial P content was increased by N and P addition, and microbial N was not changed. The increasing N deposition may enhance soil nutrient and stimulate growth of trees, which will lead to an increase of the C sequestration.

  14. Hydrothermal treatment of incineration fly ash for PCDD/Fs decomposition: the effect of iron addition.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Zhen; Hu, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Peng-Fei

    2012-12-01

    The catalytic effect of Fe addition on the decomposition of polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) contained in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash during the hydrothermal process was investigated. Influencing factors, such as Fe addition mode, reaction time and cooling procedure after reaction, were tested to evaluate their effects. Experimental results indicated that Fe addition in the form of a mixture of ferrous sulphate and ferric sulphate enhanced decomposition of PCDD/Fs contained in the MSWI fly ash, particularly for the decomposition of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-dioxin and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-furan under the reaction temperature of 563 K. The decomposition rate of PCDD/Fs reached 90.33% by international toxicity equivalent (I-TEQ) when Fe was added as a mixture of ferrous and ferric sulphates by 5% (wt/wt) with the Fe (III)/Fe (II) ratio being 2; without Fe addition, the decomposition rate of PCDD/Fs was only 46.17% by I-TEQ in the same process. Fe addition in the form of ferrous sulphate alone also showed an enhancing effect on PCDD/Fs decomposition, but the associated decomposition rates were relatively lower, suggesting iron oxides formed from the mixture of ferric and ferrous sulphates are more favourable catalysts. At the same time, the cooling procedure after the hydrothermal reaction became more flexible if Fe was added in the form of a mixture of ferric and ferrous sulphates. Although a longer reaction time was helpful to increase decomposition rates of PCDD/Fs, 1 h was proved to be a reasonable time under this condition.

  15. Effect of Cephalaria syriaca addition on rheological properties of composite flour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoðlu, M. M.

    2012-10-01

    The study was carried out to investigate the effect of whole and defatted Cephalaria syriaca flour on the rheological properties of composite flours that used in bran bread production. Cephalaria syriaca products were used to replace 0.25, 0.75, 1.25, 1.75, and 2.25% of wheat-wheat bran composite flour, and its rheological and fermentative properties were measured by farinograph, extensograph and rheofermentometre. The data showed that the rheological parameters of flours were greatly modified by addition of Cephalaria syriaca. The rheological properties of wheatwheat bran composite flour added with whole and defatted Cephalaria syriaca flour were considerably improved with regard to especially extensograph characteristics such as dough resistance, area (energy), ratio number and rheofermentometer parameters such as Hm, T1, Tx, volume loss and gas retention, as compared to control. However addition of Cephalaria syriaca products adversely affected the farinograph characteristics. Generally, these effects of both whole and defatted Cephalaria syriaca flour increased, as the addition level increased. Maximum Tx, gas retention and area (energy) of dough were obtained from wheat-wheat bran composite flour added with 1.75% whole Cephalaria syriaca flour, while the highest dough stability was at addition level of 0.25% whole Cephalaria syriaca flour.

  16. Effect of boron addition on the structure and magnetic properties of CoPt nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Khemjeen, Yutthaya; Pinitsoontorn, Supree Chompoosor, Apiwat

    2015-05-07

    The effect of B addition on CoPt nanoparticles was investigated. The CoPt-B nanoparticles were synthesized by means of the polyol process. Transmission electron microscopy has shown that the as-synthesized particles have a spherical morphology with average size about 2–3 nm. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy and the X-ray diffraction technique showed the effect of B concentration on phase transformation. The addition of B at up to 60% promoted the formation of the L1{sub 0} phase when the nanoparticles were subjected to annealing at 600 °C. If the B content is higher than 60%, the phase transition is suppressed. The evidence of B addition on the structure of CoPt nanoparticles was further supported by the magnetic measurements. The results show that the coercivity of the annealed CoPt-B nanoparticles was enhanced by the B additions from 20% to 60%, with the maximum coercivity of 12 000 Oe for the CoPt-40%B sample.

  17. The effect of various additives on Bayer digestion of diasporic bauxite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lunhe; Xu Qili; Wang Xiangli

    1996-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of about ten kinds of additives on Bayer digestion of diasporic bauxite has been investigated. The experiment results has showed that mineral additives such as dolomite, chlorite, medicinal stone, magnesite have a great influence upon the alumina extraction efficiency of diasporite and the scaling property of slurry. Nevertheless, a great quantity of additives must be used, the digestive result of bauxite is not satisfactory (except dolime). So it is difficult to put into practice. In addition, the authors treated lime and red mud or slurry with sodium aluminate liquor to achieve synthesis catalyzators on the definite conditions. Compared to the results when lime was being added, the alumina extraction efficiency of diasporite increased 2--4% when this kind of synthesis catalyzator was being added under otherwise equal conditions, and their molar ratio of digestion liquor (Na{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) decreased 0.03--0.11. The effect is obvious and the technology is simple. The experiment results proved that the synthesis catalyzator have industrial applying value.

  18. Effects of chitosan fiber addition on the properties of polyurethane with thermo-responsive shape memory.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kyotaro; Iijima, Masahiro; Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Ohta, Mitsuru; Muguruma, Takeshi; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nakazawa, Futoshi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2016-03-30

    We investigated the effects of the addition of chitosan fiber (biomass nanofiber made by Sugino (BiNFi-s)) to polyether-based thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) on material properties. BiNFi-s (2 and 5 wt %)/TPU composite materials were prepared via compression molding, and glass fiber (2 and 5 wt %)/TPU composite materials and plain TPU were also prepared for comparison. The glass transition temperature was analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry, and the crystal structure was investigated using X-ray diffraction. 20-mm-long test specimens with cross-sectional dimensions of 1 mm × 1 mm were cut from sheets of the composite materials, and three-point bending tests were carried out using a universal testing machine to investigate their mechanical properties and shape memory. The addition of BiNFi-s or glass fiber to TPU did not influence the glass transition temperature, although the crystal structure changed from semi-crystalline to amorphous. The elastic modulus increased 40% by the addition of 5 wt % BiNFi-s (2.31 MPa) compared with plain TPU (1.65 MPa), and these composites exhibited shape recovery with clinically relevant changes in temperature. The addition of 5 wt % BiNFi-s into TPU resulted in an improvement in the elastic modulus without any decrease in the shape memory effect. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  19. Co-digestion of manure and industrial waste--The effects of trace element addition.

    PubMed

    Nordell, Erik; Nilsson, Britt; Nilsson Påledal, Sören; Karisalmi, Kaisa; Moestedt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Manure is one of the most common substrates for biogas production. Manure from dairy- and swine animals are often considered to stabilize the biogas process by contributing nutrients and trace elements needed for the biogas process. In this study two lab-scale reactors were used to evaluate the effects of trace element addition during co-digestion of manure from swine- and dairy animals with industrial waste. The substrate used contained high background concentrations of both cobalt and nickel, which are considered to be the most important trace elements. In the reactor receiving additional trace elements, the volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration was 89% lower than in the control reactor. The lower VFA concentration contributed to a more digested digestate, and thus lower methane emissions in the subsequent storage. Also, the biogas production rate increased with 24% and the biogas production yield with 10%, both as a result of the additional trace elements at high organic loading rates. All in all, even though 50% of the feedstock consisted of manure, trace element addition resulted in multiple positive effects and a more reliable process with stable and high yield.

  20. Effects of water and nitrogen addition on ecosystem carbon exchange in a meadow steppe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunbo; Jiang, Qi; Yang, Zhiming; Sun, Wei; Wang, Deli

    2015-01-01

    A changing precipitation regime and increasing nitrogen deposition are likely to have profound impacts on arid and semiarid ecosystem C cycling, which is often constrained by the timing and availability of water and nitrogen. However, little is known about the effects of altered precipitation and nitrogen addition on grassland ecosystem C exchange. We conducted a 3-year field experiment to assess the responses of vegetation composition, ecosystem productivity, and ecosystem C exchange to manipulative water and nitrogen addition in a meadow steppe. Nitrogen addition significantly stimulated aboveground biomass and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), which suggests that nitrogen availability is a primary limiting factor for ecosystem C cycling in the meadow steppe. Water addition had no significant impacts on either ecosystem C exchange or plant biomass, but ecosystem C fluxes showed a strong correlation with early growing season precipitation, rather than whole growing season precipitation, across the 3 experimental years. After we incorporated water addition into the calculation of precipitation regimes, we found that monthly average ecosystem C fluxes correlated more strongly with precipitation frequency than with precipitation amount. These results highlight the importance of precipitation distribution in regulating ecosystem C cycling. Overall, ecosystem C fluxes in the studied ecosystem are highly sensitive to nitrogen deposition, but less sensitive to increased precipitation.

  1. Effects of the addition of dimer acid alkyl esters on the properties of ethyl cellulose.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangjun; Ko, Kwang-Hwan; Shin, Jihoon; Kim, Nam-Kyun; Kim, Young-Wun; Kim, Joon-Seop

    2015-05-05

    In this study, we synthesized dimer acid (DA) esters, having short to long alkyl chains, (DA-Cn) by the Diels-Alder reaction and subsequent esterification reaction of fatty acids that were prepared by the hydrolysis of waste vegetable oil. It was found that the DA-Cn were thermally more stable than common petroleum-based plasticizer DOP. When the DOP, DA, or DA-Cn with short alkyl chains were added to ethyl cellulose (EC), the optical clarity and SEM images of the samples showed their good miscibility with those additives in a micro-scale. It was also found that the rubbery modulus of the EC decreased with increasing amount of additives; the type of the additives did not affect the rates of the decrease in the rubbery modulus. The main transition temperatures of the EC containing either DA or DA-C1 or DA-C4 decreased with increasing amounts of those additives and were comparable to that of the DOP-containing EC. The above findings suggested that the DA and its esters with short alkyl chains could act as effective plasticizer and, thus, could be used instead of the DOP. In addition, the results obtained from tensile testing and leaching experiments implied that the DA might be better plasticizer than the DA-C1 and DA-C4, at least in some cases, because of hydrogen-bonding with the EC.

  2. Effect of additives on size and shape of lithium carbonate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborga, P.; Brito, I.; Graber, T. A.

    2017-02-01

    Generally, properties such internal structure, shape, and size distribution influence the reactivity, fluidity and wettability of the crystals, and may be modified by the use of additives such as polyelectrolytes or surfactants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different additives on the size and morphology of lithium carbonate crystals obtained by reactive crystallization from solutions of LiCl and Na2CO3. The additives used were: polyethylenimine (PEI), polyethylene glycol (PEG), poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid), (P4SA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS). Obtained crystals were observed using scanning electron microscopy, the crystal size distribution was determined by a size image analyzer, and the crystal structure were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the presence of PEI, PEG and P4SA, increased the length of the lithium carbonate particles. The presence of SDS decreases the crystals size. Using SDBS as additive, the crystals had a needle-like shape, Finally PAA allowed the production of Li2CO3 spherulites. Crystal structure of lithium carbonate did not change in the presence of the tested additives.

  3. Effects of two warm-mix additives on aging, rheological and failure properties of asphalt cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omari, Isaac Obeng

    Sustainable road construction and maintenance could be supported when excellent warm-mix additives are employed in the modification of asphalt. These warm-mix additives provide remedies for today's requirements such as fatigue cracking resistance, durability, thermal cracking resistance, rutting resistance and resistance to moisture damage. Warm-mix additives are based on waxes and surfactants which reduce energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions significantly during the construction phase of the pavement. In this study, the effects of two warm mix additives, siloxane and oxidised polyethylene wax, on roofing asphalt flux (RAF) and asphalt modified with waste engine oil (655-7) were investigated to evaluate the rheological, aging and failure properties of the asphalt binders. In terms of the properties of these two different asphalts, RAF has proved to be superior quality asphalt whereas 655-7 is poor quality asphalt. The properties of the modified asphalt samples were measured by Superpave(TM) tests such as Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) test and Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR) test as well as modified protocols such as the extended BBR (eBBR) test (LS-308) and the Double- Edge-Notched Tension (DENT) test (LS-299) after laboratory aging. In addition, the Avrami theory was used to gain an insight on the crystallization of asphalt or the waxes within the asphalt binder. This study has however shown that the eBBR and DENT tests are better tools for providing accurate specification tests to curb thermal and fatigue cracking in contemporary asphalt pavements.

  4. Effect of the BSCCO superconducting properties by tiny Y2O3 addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yan; Sun, Aimin; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhang, Meng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the effect of tiny Y2O3 addition in (Bi,Pb)-2223 superconductor prepared by solid state reaction technique was studied. The properties of samples have been investigated via X-ray diffraction (XRD), resistance-temperature (R-T) curve, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). XRD data indicated that all samples are multiphase and the major phases are high-temperature phases and low-temperature phases. The volume fraction of (Bi,Pb)-2223 is not great change with tiny Y2O3 addition. All samples exhibit superconducting phase with the critical transition temperature and one-step transition, however, the transition width was decreased with the Y2O3 addition up to 0.04 wt.% and sharp increased with the excessive oxide addition. SEM pictures show that the Y2O3 appeared on the flake-type grains surface obviously, but the number and size of the hole between grains are decreased in the 0.04 wt.% addition.

  5. CAN Canopy Addition of Nitrogen Better Illustrate the Effect of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition on Forest Ecosystem?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Weijun; Zhu, Shidan; Wan, Shiqiang; Luo, Yiqi; Yan, Junhua; Wang, Keya; Liu, Lei; Dai, Huitang; Li, Peixue; Dai, Keyuan; Zhang, Weixin; Liu, Zhanfeng; Wang, Faming; Kuang, Yuanwen; Li, Zhian; Lin, Yongbiao; Rao, Xingquan; Li, Jiong; Zou, Bi; Cai, Xian; Mo, Jiangming; Zhao, Ping; Ye, Qing; Huang, Jianguo; Fu, Shenglei

    2015-06-10

    Increasing atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition could profoundly impact community structure and ecosystem functions in forests. However, conventional experiments with understory addition of N (UAN) largely neglect canopy-associated biota and processes and therefore may not realistically simulate atmospheric N deposition to generate reliable impacts on forest ecosystems. Here we, for the first time, designed a novel experiment with canopy addition of N (CAN) vs. UAN and reviewed the merits and pitfalls of the two approaches. The following hypotheses will be tested: i) UAN overestimates the N addition effects on understory and soil processes but underestimates those on canopy-associated biota and processes, ii) with low-level N addition, CAN favors canopy tree species and canopy-dwelling biota and promotes the detritus food web, and iii) with high-level N addition, CAN suppresses canopy tree species and other biota and favors rhizosphere food web. As a long-term comprehensive program, this experiment will provide opportunities for multidisciplinary collaborations, including biogeochemistry, microbiology, zoology, and plant science to examine forest ecosystem responses to atmospheric N deposition.

  6. CAN Canopy Addition of Nitrogen Better Illustrate the Effect of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition on Forest Ecosystem?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Weijun; Zhu, Shidan; Wan, Shiqiang; Luo, Yiqi; Yan, Junhua; Wang, Keya; Liu, Lei; Dai, Huitang; Li, Peixue; Dai, Keyuan; Zhang, Weixin; Liu, Zhanfeng; Wang, Faming; Kuang, Yuanwen; Li, Zhian; Lin, Yongbiao; Rao, Xingquan; Li, Jiong; Zou, Bi; Cai, Xian; Mo, Jiangming; Zhao, Ping; Ye, Qing; Huang, Jianguo; Fu, Shenglei

    2015-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition could profoundly impact community structure and ecosystem functions in forests. However, conventional experiments with understory addition of N (UAN) largely neglect canopy-associated biota and processes and therefore may not realistically simulate atmospheric N deposition to generate reliable impacts on forest ecosystems. Here we, for the first time, designed a novel experiment with canopy addition of N (CAN) vs. UAN and reviewed the merits and pitfalls of the two approaches. The following hypotheses will be tested: i) UAN overestimates the N addition effects on understory and soil processes but underestimates those on canopy-associated biota and processes, ii) with low-level N addition, CAN favors canopy tree species and canopy-dwelling biota and promotes the detritus food web, and iii) with high-level N addition, CAN suppresses canopy tree species and other biota and favors rhizosphere food web. As a long-term comprehensive program, this experiment will provide opportunities for multidisciplinary collaborations, including biogeochemistry, microbiology, zoology, and plant science to examine forest ecosystem responses to atmospheric N deposition. PMID:26059183

  7. Effects of Water and Nitrogen Addition on Ecosystem Carbon Exchange in a Meadow Steppe

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbo; Jiang, Qi; Yang, Zhiming; Sun, Wei; Wang, Deli

    2015-01-01

    A changing precipitation regime and increasing nitrogen deposition are likely to have profound impacts on arid and semiarid ecosystem C cycling, which is often constrained by the timing and availability of water and nitrogen. However, little is known about the effects of altered precipitation and nitrogen addition on grassland ecosystem C exchange. We conducted a 3-year field experiment to assess the responses of vegetation composition, ecosystem productivity, and ecosystem C exchange to manipulative water and nitrogen addition in a meadow steppe. Nitrogen addition significantly stimulated aboveground biomass and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), which suggests that nitrogen availability is a primary limiting factor for ecosystem C cycling in the meadow steppe. Water addition had no significant impacts on either ecosystem C exchange or plant biomass, but ecosystem C fluxes showed a strong correlation with early growing season precipitation, rather than whole growing season precipitation, across the 3 experimental years. After we incorporated water addition into the calculation of precipitation regimes, we found that monthly average ecosystem C fluxes correlated more strongly with precipitation frequency than with precipitation amount. These results highlight the importance of precipitation distribution in regulating ecosystem C cycling. Overall, ecosystem C fluxes in the studied ecosystem are highly sensitive to nitrogen deposition, but less sensitive to increased precipitation. PMID:26010888

  8. CAN Canopy Addition of Nitrogen Better Illustrate the Effect of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition on Forest Ecosystem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Weijun; Zhu, Shidan; Wan, Shiqiang; Luo, Yiqi; Yan, Junhua; Wang, Keya; Liu, Lei; Dai, Huitang; Li, Peixue; Dai, Keyuan; Zhang, Weixin; Liu, Zhanfeng; Wang, Faming; Kuang, Yuanwen; Li, Zhian; Lin, Yongbiao; Rao, Xingquan; Li, Jiong; Zou, Bi; Cai, Xian; Mo, Jiangming; Zhao, Ping; Ye, Qing; Huang, Jianguo; Fu, Shenglei

    2015-06-01

    Increasing atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition could profoundly impact community structure and ecosystem functions in forests. However, conventional experiments with understory addition of N (UAN) largely neglect canopy-associated biota and processes and therefore may not realistically simulate atmospheric N deposition to generate reliable impacts on forest ecosystems. Here we, for the first time, designed a novel experiment with canopy addition of N (CAN) vs. UAN and reviewed the merits and pitfalls of the two approaches. The following hypotheses will be tested: i) UAN overestimates the N addition effects on understory and soil processes but underestimates those on canopy-associated biota and processes, ii) with low-level N addition, CAN favors canopy tree species and canopy-dwelling biota and promotes the detritus food web, and iii) with high-level N addition, CAN suppresses canopy tree species and other biota and favors rhizosphere food web. As a long-term comprehensive program, this experiment will provide opportunities for multidisciplinary collaborations, including biogeochemistry, microbiology, zoology, and plant science to examine forest ecosystem responses to atmospheric N deposition.

  9. Effects of Sn addition on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Ti–Nb–Sn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, Paulo E.L.; Contieri, Rodrigo J.; Lopes, Eder S.N.; Robin, Alain; Caram, Rubens

    2014-10-15

    Ti and Ti alloys are widely used in restorative surgery because of their good biocompatibility, enhanced mechanical behavior and high corrosion resistance in physiological media. The corrosion resistance of Ti-based materials is due to the spontaneous formation of the TiO{sub 2} oxide film on their surface, which exhibits elevated stability in biological fluids. Ti–Nb alloys, depending on the composition and the processing routes to which the alloys are subjected, have high mechanical strength combined with low elastic modulus. The addition of Sn to Ti–Nb alloys allows the phase transformations to be controlled, particularly the precipitation of ω phase. The aim of this study is to discuss the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of cast Ti–Nb alloys to which Sn has been added. Samples were centrifugally cast in a copper mold, and the microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. Mechanical behavior evaluation was performed using Berkovich nanoindentation, Vickers hardness and compression tests. The corrosion behavior was evaluated in Ringer's solution at room temperature using electrochemical techniques. The results obtained suggested that the physical, mechanical and chemical behaviors of the Ti–Nb–Sn alloys are directly dependent on the Sn content. - Graphical abstract: Effects of Sn addition to the Ti–30Nb alloy on the elastic modulus. - Highlights: • Sn addition causes reduction of the ω phase precipitation. • Minimum Vickers hardness and elastic modulus occurred for 6 wt.% Sn content. • Addition of 6 wt.% Sn resulted in maximum ductility and minimum compression strength. • All Ti–30Nb–XSn (X = 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10%) alloys are passive in Ringer's solution. • Highest corrosion resistance was observed for 6 wt.% Sn content.

  10. The Effects of Ultrasound on Biological Systems: Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Karmi, Anan M.

    vs. 18 minutes). This demonstrates that the biological effects of ultrasound are influenced by Ca^ {2+}. The larger increases in G _{rm t} and the time constants confirm other studies addressing the role of Ca ^{2+} in potentiating lipid peroxidation by free radicals, and the role of calcium ions in the formation of tight junctions.

  11. Penetration and propagation into biological matter and biological effects of high-power ultra-wideband pulses: a review.

    PubMed

    Schunck, Thérèse; Bieth, François; Pinguet, Sylvain; Delmote, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Systems emitting ultra-wideband high power microwave (HP/UWB) pulses are developed for military and civilian applications. HP/UWB pulses typically have durations on the order of nanoseconds, rise times of picoseconds and amplitudes around 100 kV m(-1). This article reviews current research on biological effects from HP/UWB exposure. The different references were classified according to endpoints (cardiovascular system, central nervous system, behavior, genotoxicity, teratology …). The article also reviews the aspects of mechanisms of interactions and tissue damage as well as the numerical work that has been done for studying HP/UWB pulse propagation and pulse energy deposition inside biological tissues. The mechanisms proposed are the molecular conformation change, the modification of chemical reaction rates, membrane excitation and breakdown and direct electrical forces on cells or cell constituents, and the energy deposition. As regards the penetration of biological matter and the deposited energy, mainly computations were published. They have shown that the EM field inside the biological matter is strongly modified compared to the incident EM field and that the energy absorption for HP/UWB pulses occurs in the same way as for continuous waves. However, the energy carried by a HP/UWB pulse is very low and the deposited energy is low. The number of published studies dealing with the biological effects is small and only a few pointed out slight effects. It should be further noted that the animal populations used in the studies were not always large, the statistical analyses not always relevant and the teams involved in this research rather limited in number.

  12. Effect of Dysprosia Additive on the Consolidation of CeO2 by Spark Plasma Sintering

    SciTech Connect

    K. Choi; R. E. Reavis; D. D. Osterberg; B. J. Jacques; D. P. Butt; R. D. Mariani; D. E. Burkes; Z. A. Munir

    2012-05-01

    The influence of dysprosia addition on the sintering and resulting microstructure of nano-grained CeO2 ceramics was investigated as functions of the spark plasma sintering (SPS) parameters. The addition of Dy2O3 (forming a solid solution) resulted in an increase in relative density and a decrease in grain size. The relative density of samples with Dy2O3 content of 6 and 10 mol% was over 95% when sintered at 1050 C under 500 MPa for holding times as short as 5 minutes. The application of high pressure facilitated the consolidation to relatively high densities with minimal grain growth. Heating rate and holding time, however, had insignificant effect on density but a measurable effect on grain size.

  13. Age and work environment characteristics in relation to sleep: Additive, interactive and curvilinear effects.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Katharine R

    2016-05-01

    Although additive combinations of age and work environment characteristics have been found to predict sleep impairment, possible age x work environment interactions have been largely disregarded. The present study examined linear and curvilinear interactions of age with work environment measures in relation to sleep quality and duration. Survey data were collected from offshore day-shift personnel (N = 901). Main effects and interactions of the age terms with work environment measures (job demand, control, and social support, physical environment and strenuous work) were evaluated. Sleep duration was predicted by a curvilinear interaction, age(2) x job demand (p < .005), and by the age x social support interaction (p < .002); sleep quality was predicted by age x job demand (p < .002). Job control and physical environment showed significant additive effects. At a time when older employees are encouraged to remain in the workforce, the findings serve to increase understanding of how ageing and work demands jointly contribute to sleep impairment.

  14. Effect of Ca and Zn additions on the mechanical properties of Mg produced by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guleryuz, L. F.; Ipek, R.; Arıtman, I.; Karaoglu, S.

    2017-02-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are among important research topics in view of their excellent biocompatibility.In this study mechanical and microstructure properties of hot sintered Mg-Zn-Ca alloys were studied.The effects of the addition of different amounts Ca and Zn were added to the base material has been processed by powder metallurgy method.resulting microstructures densities and compression test behaviors of the Mg-based alloys were studied.Visual inspection using SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) analyses indicates that the microstructure of the composite is also greatly effected by these parameters. In addition, EDS (Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy) analyses were performed for reliable determination of the chemical composition.

  15. Reducing the matrix effects in chemical analysis: fusion of isotope dilution and standard addition methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliano, Enea; Meija, Juris

    2016-04-01

    The combination of isotope dilution and mass spectrometry has become an ubiquitous tool of chemical analysis. Often perceived as one of the most accurate methods of chemical analysis, it is not without shortcomings. Current isotope dilution equations are not capable of fully addressing one of the key problems encountered in chemical analysis: the possible effect of sample matrix on measured isotope ratios. The method of standard addition does compensate for the effect of sample matrix by making sure that all measured solutions have identical composition. While it is impossible to attain such condition in traditional isotope dilution, we present equations which allow for matrix-matching between all measured solutions by fusion of isotope dilution and standard addition methods.

  16. Ring Substituent Effects on the Thiol Addition and Hydrolysis Reactions of N-Arylmaleimides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingche; Tsao, Kelvin; De Francesco, Élise; Keillor, Jeffrey W

    2015-12-18

    Maleimide groups are used extensively in bioconjugation reactions, but limited kinetic information is available regarding their thiol addition and hydrolysis reactions. We prepared a series of fluorogenic coumarin maleimide derivatives that differ by the substituent on their maleimide C═C bond. Fluorescence-based kinetic studies of the reaction with β-mercaptoethanol (BME) yielded the second-order rate constants (k2), while pH-rate studies from pH 7 to 9 gave base-catalyzed hydrolysis rate constants (kOH). Linear free-energy relationships were studied through the correlation of log k2 and log kOH to both electronic (σ(+)) and steric (Es(norm)) parameters of the C═C substituent. These correlations revealed the thiol addition reaction is primarily sensitive to the electronic effects, while steric effects dominate the hydrolysis reaction. These mechanistic studies provide the basis for the design of novel bioconjugation reactants or fluorogenic labeling agents.

  17. The additive effects of minoxidil and retinol on human hair growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyeon Gyeong; Chang, In-Young; Pyo, Hyun Keol; Kang, Yong Jung; Lee, Seung Ho; Kwon, Oh Sang; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Eun, Hee Chul; Kim, Kyu Han

    2007-01-01

    Minoxidil enhances hair growth by prolonging the anagen phase and induces new hair growth in androgenetic alopecia (AGA), whereas retinol significantly improves scalp skin condition and promotes hair growth. We investigated the combined effects of minoxidil and retinol on human hair growth in vitro and on cultured human dermal papilla cells (DPCs) and epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). The combination of minoxidil and retinol additively promoted hair growth in hair follicle organ cultures. In addition, minoxidil plus retinol more effectively elevated phosphorylated Erk, phosphorylated Akt levels, and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio than minoxidil alone in DPCs and HaCaT. We found that the significant hair shaft elongation demonstrated after minoxidil plus retinol treatment would depend on the dual kinetics associated with the activations of Erk- and Akt-dependent pathways and the prevention of apoptosis by increasing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio.

  18. Dextransucrase production using cashew apple juice as substrate: effect of phosphate and yeast extract addition.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Clarice M A; Honorato, Talita L; Pinto, Gustavo A S; Maia, Geraldo A; Rodrigues, Sueli

    2007-05-01

    Cashew apples are considered agriculture excess in the Brazilian Northeast because cashew trees are cultivated primarily with the aim of cashew nut production. In this work, the use of cashew apple juice as a substrate for Leuconostoc mesenteroides cultivation was investigated. The effect of yeast extract and phosphate addition was evaluated using factorial planning tools. Both phosphate and yeast extract addition were significant factors for biomass growth, but had no significant effect on maximum enzyme activity. The enzyme activities found in cashew apple juice assays were at least 3.5 times higher than the activity found in the synthetic medium. Assays with pH control (pH = 6.5) were also carried out. The pH-controlled fermentation enhanced biomass growth, but decreased the enzyme activity. Crude enzyme free of cells produced using cashew apple juice was stable for 16 h at 30 degrees C at a pH of 5.0.

  19. Is the additional greenhouse effect already evident in the current climate?

    PubMed

    Raschke, E

    2001-11-01

    Several greenhouse gases, which are in part or entirely produced by human activities, have accumulated in the atmosphere since approximately the middle of the 19th century. They are assumed to have an additional greenhouse effect causing a further increase of atmospheric temperatures near the ground and a decrease in the layers above approximately 15 km altitude. The currently observed near-surface warming over nearly the entire globe is already considered by a large fraction of our society to be result of this additional greenhouse effect. Complete justification of this assumption is, however, not yet possible, because there are still too many unknowns in our knowledge of participating processes and in our modeling capabilities.

  20. SIX2 Effects on Wilms Tumor Biology1

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Janene; Murphy, Andrew J.; Panzer, Alexis; de Caestecker, Christian; Ayers, Gregory D.; Neblett, David; Saito-Diaz, Kenyi; de Caestecker, Mark; Lovvorn, Harold N.

    2014-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) blastema retains gene expression profiles characteristic of the multipotent nephron progenitor pool, or cap mesenchyme (CM), in the developing kidney. As a result, WT blastema and the CM are believed to represent contextual analogues of one another. Sine oculis homeobox 2 (SIX2) is a transcription factor expressed specifically in the CM, provides a critical mechanism for CM self-renewal, and remains persistently active in WT blastema, although its purpose in this childhood malignancy remains unclear. We hypothesized that SIX2, analogous to its function in development, confers a survival pathway to blastema, the putative WT stem cell. To test its functional significance in WT biology, wild-type SIX2 was overexpressed in the human WT cell line, WiT49. After validating this model, SIX2 effects on anchorage-independent growth, proliferation, invasiveness, canonical WNT pathway signaling, and gene expression of specific WNT pathway participants were evaluated. Relative to controls, WiT49 cells overexpressing SIX2 showed significantly enhanced anchorage-independent growth and early-passage proliferation representing surrogates of cell survival. Interestingly, overexpression of SIX2 generally repressed TCF/LEF-dependent canonical WNT signaling, which activates and coordinates both differentiation and stem pathways, but significantly heightened canonical WNT signaling through the survivin promoter, a mechanism that exclusively maintains the stem state. In summary, when overexpressed in a human WT cell line, SIX2 enhances cell survival and appears to shift the balance in WNT/β-catenin signaling away from a differentiation path and toward a stem cell survival path. PMID:25500091

  1. Health Effects Associated with Inhalation Exposure to Diesel Emission Generated with and without CeO2 Nano Fuel Additive

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Addition of nano cerium (Ce) oxide additive to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency resulting in altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. We hypothesized that inh...

  2. Effect of Chromium Addition to the Low Temperature Hot Corrosion Resistance of Platinum Modified Aluminide Coatings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Diffusion aluminide coatings were the first coatings developed for hot corrosion resistance. Aluminum is applied to the surface of the superalloy by a...D.H., "Mechanisms of Formation of Diffusion Aluminide Coatings on Nickel-oase Superalloys , Oxidation of Metals, v. 3, pp. 475-477, 1971. 17. Lehnert...Classification) E.FFECT OF CHROMIUJM ADDITION TO THE LOW TEMPERATURE HOT CORROSION RESISTANCE OF PLATINUM MODIFIED ALUMINIDE COATINGS 2 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Dust

  3. Synergistic Effects Between Phosphonium-Alkylphosphate Ionic Liquids and Zinc Dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) as Lubricant Additives

    DOE PAGES

    Qu, Jun; Barnhill, William C.; Luo, Huimin; ...

    2015-07-14

    Unique synergistic effects between phosphonium-alkylphosphate ionic liquids and zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) are discovered when used together as lubricant additives, resulting in significant friction and wear reduction along with distinct tribofilm composition and mechanical properties. The synergism is attributed to the 30-70× higher-than-nominal concentrations of hypothetical new compounds (via anion exchange between IL and ZDDP) on the fluid surface/interface.

  4. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANT ADDITION ON RHEOLOGY USING LASER SCANNING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    White, T

    2007-05-08

    The effectiveness of three dispersants to modify rheology was examined using rheology measurements and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) in simulated waste solutions. All of the dispersants lowered the yield stress of the slurries below the baseline samples. The rheology curves were fitted reasonably to a Bingham Plastic model. The three-dimensional LSCM images of simulants showed distinct aggregates were greatly reduced after the addition of dispersants leading to a lowering of the yield stress of the simulated waste slurry solutions.

  5. Tannins: current knowledge of food sources, intake, bioavailability and biological effects.

    PubMed

    Serrano, José; Puupponen-Pimiä, Riitta; Dauer, Andreas; Aura, Anna-Marja; Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio

    2009-09-01

    Tannins are a unique group of phenolic metabolites with molecular weights between 500 and 30 000 Da, which are widely distributed in almost all plant foods and beverages. Proanthocyanidins and hydrolysable tannins are the two major groups of these bioactive compounds, but complex tannins containing structural elements of both groups and specific tannins in marine brown algae have also been described. Most literature data on food tannins refer only to oligomeric compounds that are extracted with aqueous-organic solvents, but a significant number of non-extractable tannins are usually not mentioned in the literature. The biological effects of tannins usually depend on their grade of polymerisation and solubility. Highly polymerised tannins exhibit low bioaccessibility in the small intestine and low fermentability by colonic microflora. This review summarises a new approach to analysis of extractable and non-extractable tannins, major food sources, and effects of storage and processing on tannin content and bioavailability. Biological properties such as antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiviral effects are also described. In addition, the role of tannins in diabetes mellitus has been discussed.

  6. Comparative investigations on the biological effects of As (III) and As (V) in clam Ruditapes philippinarum using multiple biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenglong; Xu, Hai'e; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng

    2015-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a known pollutant with two chemical forms, arsenite (As (III)) and arsenate (As (V)), in marine environment. Clam Ruditapes philippinarum is an important fishery species along the Bohai coast. In this study, the biological effects induced by the two arsenic chemical forms (arsenite and arsenate) were compared using multiple biochemical indices in the digestive glands of clam R. philippinarum. The production of reactive oxygen species, antioxidant enzyme activities and metabolic responses exhibited that both As (III) and As (V) induced immune, oxidative and osmotic stresses in clam digestive glands. The differential metabolic biomarkers, histidine and taurine, indicated the differential responsive mechanisms in osmotic regulation in clam digestive glands. In addition, both arsenic treatments enhanced the anaerobiosis metabolism in clam digestive glands. Overall, this work illustrated that arsenite and arsenate induced similar biological effects in clams, which might be accounted for the biological transformation of arsenate to arsenite in clams.

  7. Essential Oils from Thyme (Thymus vulgaris): Chemical Composition and Biological Effects in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vetvickova, Jana

    2016-12-01

    Thymus species are popular spices and contain volatile oils as main chemical constituents. Recently, plant-derived essential oils are gaining significant attention due to their significant biological activities. Seven different thymus-derived essential oils were compared in our study. First, we focused on their chemical composition, which was followed up by testing their effects on phagocytosis, cytokine production, chemotaxis, edema inhibition, and liver protection. We found limited biological activities among tested oils, with no correlation between composition and biological effects. Similarly, no oils were effective in every reaction. Based on our data, the tested biological use of these essential oils is questionable.

  8. Effects of alumina (Al2O3) addition on mechanical property of fabricated melt-derived bioactive glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Hasmaliza; Yan, Phooi; Ibrahim, Nurul Farhana; Noor, Siti Noor Fazliah Mohd

    2016-12-01

    Bioactive glass (BG) is advance materials that have the ability to form hydroxyapatite layer (HA) that accelerate bonding between bone tissues indicating a good biological response. However, BG fabricated with basic composition from SiO2-CaO-Na2O-P2O5 system exhibit lower mechanical strength. The present work aims to study the effects on alumina (Al2O3) addition in SiO2-CaO-Na2O-P2O5 system towards its mechanical performance. Bioactive glass (BG) was fabricated through melt-derived route. Various amount of alumina at (1 wt%, 2 wt%, 3 wt% and 4 wt%) was added in the system. BG with 2 wt% of alumina addition show highest compressive strength and significant improvement observed after sintered at 750°C and 950°C. XRD revealed the existence of crystalline peaks after the glass was sintered that might assist on the mechanical improvement. SEM shows reduction on porosity and enhancement on grain size for sintered bioactive glass.

  9. The effect of selected alloying element additions on properties of Mg-based alloy as bioimplants: A literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Nan; Hou, Zeng-Tao; Ye, Xin; Xu, Zhao-Bin; Bai, Xue-Ling; Shang, Peng

    2013-09-01

    This review investigates the current application limitations of Mg and Mg alloys. The key issues hindering the application of biodegradable Mg alloys as implants are their fast degradation rate and biological consideration. We have discussed the effect of some selected alloying element additions on the properties of the Mg-based alloy, especially the nutrient elements in human (Zn, Mn, Ca, Sr). Different grain sizes, phase constituents and distributions consequently influence the mechanical properties of the Mg alloys. Solution strengthening and precipitation strengthening are enhanced by the addition of alloying elements, generally improving the mechanical properties. Besides, the hot working process can also improve the mechanical properties. Combination of different processing steps is suggested to be adopted in the fabrication of Mg-based alloys. Corrosion properties of these Mg-based alloys have been measured in vitro and in vivo. The degradation mechanism is also discussed in terms of corrosion types, rates, byproducts and response of the surrounding tissues. Moreover, the clinical response and requirements of degradable implants are presented, especially for the nutrient elements (Ca, Mn, Zn, Sr). This review provides information related to different Mg alloying elements and presents the promising candidates for an ideal implant.

  10. Effect of Grape Pomace Powder Addition on TBARS and Color of Cooked Pork Sausages during Storage.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kyeong Seon; Shim, Kwan Seob; Shin, Daekeun

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effects of grape skin and seed pomace (GSP) additions on the lipid oxidation susceptibility and the color change of cooked pork sausages, the chemical characteristics of GSP itself and the addition for two different levels of GSP (0.5 and 1.0% GSP, respectively) to sausages were examined. Both the redness and blueness of the GSP were significantly reduced as the pH level was increased from 5 to 7, but a reverse result was determined in the color tint and yellowness (p<0.05). The GSP polyphenol and flavonoid contents were influenced by the percentages of methanol solvents, and more flavonoids were established when 100% of methanol was applied as a solvent to the GSP. But, similar results were not observed in the polyphenol of GSP. In cooked pork sausages, significant decreases in the lightness and redness were found in both the 0.5% and 1.0% of GSP sausages during the storage period (p<0.05). However, an incompatible effect was observed in terms of yellowness, which increased as compared to the control sausage after 6 days of storage. The 0.5% addition of GSP decreased the levels of TBARS (p<0.05), but the ability of GSP to minimize lipid oxidation was not dose dependent. Therefore, the results indicated that the GSP is an efficient suppressor of lipid oxidation and has latent effects as a natural antioxidant when 0.5% of GSP is added to the cooked pork sausages.

  11. Effect of additives on gas-phase catalysis with immobilised Thermoanaerobacter species alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH T).

    PubMed

    Trivedi, A H; Spiess, A C; Daussmann, T; Büchs, J

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a strategy for preparing an efficient immobilised alcohol dehydrogenase preparation for a gas-phase reaction. The effects of additives such as buffers and sucrose on the immobilisation efficiency (residual activity and protein loading) and on the gas-phase reaction efficiency (initial reaction rate and half-life) of Thermoanaerobacter sp. alcohol dehydrogenase were studied. The reduction of acetophenone to 1-phenylethanol under in situ cofactor regeneration using isopropanol as co-substrate was used as a model reaction at fixed reaction conditions (temperature and thermodynamic activities). A strongly enhanced thermostability of the enzyme in the gas-phase reaction was achieved when the enzyme was immobilised with 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7) containing sucrose five times the protein amount (on weight/weight basis). This resulted in a remarkable productivity of 200 g L(-1) day(-1) even at non-optimised reaction conditions. The interaction of additives with the enzyme and water affects the immobilisation and gas-phase efficiencies of the enzyme. However, it was not possible to predict the effect of additives on the gas-phase reaction efficiency even after knowing their effect on the immobilisation efficiency.

  12. Effect of Mo Addition on the Transformation Stasis Phenomenon During the Isothermal Formation of Bainitic Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Congyu; Chen, Hao; Zhu, Kangying; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-12-01

    The effect of Mo addition on the transformation stasis (TS) phenomenon during bainitic transformation has been investigated in Fe-0.2C-1.5Mn-1.5Si-(0.2, 1.5, 3)Mo (wt pct) alloys. Both diffusionless and diffusional models failed in predicting the TS that is strongly affected by Mo concentration in experiment. The Gibbs energy balance approach could capture TS in alloys with 0.2 and 1.5 wt pct Mo, but significantly underestimate bainite fraction at stasis for alloy with 3 wt pct Mo, which is deduced to arise from the so-called anti-coupled solute drag effect.

  13. Effects of V addition on recrystallization resistance of 7150 aluminum alloy after simulative hot deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Jing; Shi, Cangji; Chen, X.-Grant

    2014-10-15

    The effects of different V contents (0.01 to 0.19 wt.%) on the recrystallization resistance of 7150 aluminum alloys during post-deformation heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural evolutions at as-cast, as-homogenized conditions and after post-deformation annealing were studied using optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes and using the electron backscattered diffraction technique. The precipitation of Al{sub 21}V{sub 2} dispersoids was observed in alloys containing 0.11 to 0.19 wt.% V after homogenization. The dispersoids were mainly distributed in the dendrite cells, and the precipitate-free zones occurred in the interdendritic regions and near grain boundaries. V addition could significantly enhance the recrystallization resistance during post-deformation annealing, particularly in the presence of a great number of Al{sub 21}V{sub 2} dispersoids. Recrystallized grain growth was effectively restricted because of the dispersoid pinning effect. The alloy containing 0.15 wt.% V exhibited the highest recrystallization resistance amongst all V-containing alloys studied. - Highlights: • Investigated the effect of V level on microstructure and flow stress of 7150 alloys • Characterized microstructures using optical microscopy, SEM, TEM and EBSD • Described the precipitation behavior of V-dispersoids in the dendritic structure • Studied the V effect on recrystallization resistance during post heat treatment • V addition greatly enhanced the recrystallization resistance during annealing.

  14. Non-additive effects of herbivores and pollinators on Erysimum mediohispanicum (Cruciferae) fitness.

    PubMed

    Gómez, José M

    2005-04-01

    In this study, the non-additivity of effects of herbivores and pollinator on fitness of the plant Erysimum mediohispanicum (Cruciferae) has been experimentally tested. The abundance and diversity of the pollinator assemblage of plants excluded from and exposed to mammalian herbivores, and the combined effect of pollinators and herbivores on plant reproduction were determined over a period of 2 years. Pollinator abundance was higher and diversity was lower on plants excluded from herbivores. Furthermore, the experimental exclusions demonstrated that both pollinators and herbivores affected plant fitness, but their effects were not independent. Herbivores only had a detrimental effect on plant fitness when pollinators were present. Similarly, pollinators enhanced fitness only when herbivores were excluded. This outcome demonstrates that the importance of pollinators for plant fitness depends on the occurrence of herbivores, and suggests that herbivores may hamper pollinator-mediated adaptation in plants.

  15. Biological monitoring of non-thermal effects of mobile phone radiation: recent approaches and challenges.

    PubMed

    Gaestel, Matthias

    2010-08-01

    This review describes recent developments in analysing the influence of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs ) on biological systems by monitoring the cellular stress response as well as overall gene expression. Recent data on the initiation and modulation of the classical cellular stress response by RF-EMFs, comprising expression of heat shock proteins and stimulation of stress-activated protein kinases, are summarised and evaluated. Since isothermic RF-EMF exposure is assumed rather than proven there are clear limitations in using the stress response to describe non-thermal effects of RF-EMFs. In particular, further experiments are needed to characterise better the threshold of the thermal heat shock response and the homogeneity of the cellular response in the whole sample for each biological system used. Before then, it is proposed that the absence of the classical stress response can define isothermal experimental conditions and qualifies other biological effects of RF-EMFs detected under these conditions to be of non-thermal origin. To minimise the probability that by making this assumption valuable insights into the nature of biological effects of RF-EMFs could be lost, proteotoxic non-thermal RF-EMF effects should also be monitored by measuring activities of labile intracellular enzymes and/or levels of their metabolites before the threshold for the heat shock response is reached. In addition, non-thermal induction of the stress response via promoter elements distinct from the heat shock element (HSE) should be analysed using HSE-mutated heat shock promoter reporter constructs. Screening for non-thermal RF-EMF effects in the absence of a classical stress response should be performed by transcriptomics and proteomics. Recent approaches demonstrate that due to their high-throughput characteristics, these methods inherently generate false positive results and require statistical evaluation based on quantitative expression analysis from a sufficient

  16. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil methane uptake in disturbed forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Mianhai; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Xiankai; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is generally thought to suppress soil methane (CH4) uptake in natural forests, and phosphorus (P) input may alleviate this negative effect. However, it remains unclear how N and P inputs control soil CH4 uptake in disturbed forests. In this study, soil CH4 uptake rates were measured in two disturbed forests, including a secondary forest (with previous, but not recent, disturbance) and a plantation forest (with recent continuous disturbance), in southern China for 34 months of N and/or P additions: control, N addition (150 kg N ha-1 yr-1), P addition (150 kg P ha-1 yr-1), and NP addition (150 kg N ha-1 yr-1 plus 150 kg P ha-1 yr-1). Mean CH4 uptake rate in control plots was significantly higher in the secondary forest (24.40 ± 0.81 µg CH4-C m-2 h-1) than in the plantation forest (17.07 ± 0.70 µg CH4-C m-2 h-1). CH4 uptake rate had negative relationships with soil water-filled pore space in both forests. In the secondary forest, N, P, and NP additions significantly decreased CH4 uptake by 39.7%, 27.8%, and 37.6%, respectively, but had no significant effects in the plantation forest, indicating that P input does not alleviate the suppression of CH4 uptake by N deposition. Taken together, our findings suggest that reducing anthropogenic disturbance, including harvesting of forest floor, and anthropogenic N and P inputs will increase soil CH4 uptake in disturbed forests, which is important in view of the increased trends in global warming during recent decades.

  17. Potential Additives to Promote Seal Swell in Synthetic Fuels and Their Effect on Thermal Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Link, D.D.; Gormley, R.J.; Baltrus, J.P.; Anderson, R.R.; Zandhuis, P.H.

    2008-03-01

    Synthetic fuels derived from the Fischer–Tropsch (F-T) process using natural gas or coal-derived synthesis gas as feedstocks can be used for powering ground vehicles, aircraft, and ships. Because of their chemical and physical properties, F-T fuels will probably require additives in order to meet specifications with respect to lubricity and seal swell capability for use in ground and air vehicles. Using both experimental and computational studies, the propensity of certain species to enhance the seal swell characteristics of synthetic fuels and surrogates has been determined, and promising additives have been identified. Important structural characteristics for potential additives, namely an aromatic ring along with a polar constituent, are described. The thermal stability of synthetic and surrogate fuels containing the single-component additive benzyl alcohol, which is representative of this structural class, has been determined by batch stressing of the mixtures at 350 °C for up to 12 h. Synthetic fuels spiked with benzyl alcohol at concentrations (vol %) of 1.0, 0.75, and 0.5 have demonstrated the ability to swell nitrile rubber o-rings to a comparable degree as petroleum jet fuel. Further, batch reactor studies have shown that addition of benzyl alcohol does not degrade the thermal oxidative stability of the fuel based on gravimetric analysis of the solid deposits after stressing. GC-MS was used to characterize the products from thermal stressing of neat and additized surrogate jet fuel, and their compositions were compared with respect to the creation of certain species and their potential effect on deposition.

  18. Synergistic effect between nano-ceramic lubricating additives and electroless deposited Ni-W-P coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Cheng, Wushan; Zhao, Zuxin; Huang, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    The major solving ways for the material wear are surface modification and lubrication. Currently, the researches at home and abroad are all limited to the single study of either nano-lubricating oil additive or electroless deposited coating. The surface coating has high hardness and high wear resistance, however, the friction reduction performance of the coating with high hardness is not good, the thickness of the coating is limited, and the coating can not regenerate after wearing. The nano-lubricating additives have good tribological performance and self-repair function, but under heavy load, the self-repair rate to the worn surface with the nano-additives is smaller than the wearing rate of the friction pair. To solve the above problems, the Ni-W-P alloy coating and deposition process with excellent anti-wear, and suitable for industrial application were developed, the optimum bath composition and process can be obtained by studying the influence of the bath composition, temperature and PH value to the deposition rate and the plating solution stability. The tribological properties as well as anti-wear and friction reduction mechanism of wear self-repair nano-ceramic lubricating additives are also studied. The ring-block abrasion testing machine and energy dispersive spectrometer are used to explore the internal relation between the coating and the nano-lubricating oil additives, and the tribology mechanism, to seek the synergetic effect between the two. The test results show that the wear resistance of Ni-W-P alloy coating (with heat treatment and in oil with nano-ceramic additives) has increased hundreds times than 45 steel as the metal substrate in basic oil, the friction reduction performance is improved. This research breaks through the bottleneck of previous separate research of the above-mentioned two methods, and explores the combination use of the two methods in industrial field.

  19. The Role of Non-Targeted Effects as Mediators in the Biological Effects of Proton Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Dicello, John F.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the hypothesis that non-DNA targets are primary initiators and mediators of the biological effects of ionizing radiation, such as proton beams and heavy ions, has gained much interest. These phenomena have been denoted as non-targeted or bystander effects to distinguish them from the more traditionally studied model that focuses on direct damage to DNA causing chromosomal rearrangements and mutations as causative of most biological endpoints such as cell killing, tissue damage, and cancer. We review cellular and extra-cellular structures and signal transduction pathways that have been implemented in these recent studies. Non-targeted effects of interest include oxidative damage to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, disruption of the extra-cellular matrix, and modification of cytokine signaling including TGF-beta, and gap junction communication. We present an introduction to these targets and pathways, and contrast there role with DNA damage pathways.

  20. Effect of relative humidity and additives on the reaction of sulfur dioxide with calcium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Alsop, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of process variables and additives on the reaction rate of Ca(OH)/sub 2/ with SO/sub 2/ at conditions similar to these encountered in the bag filters used to collect solids following flue gas desulfurization by spray drying. The effect of Ca(OH)/sub 2/ loading, temperature, relative humidity, and inlet SO/sub 2/ concentration were investigated. Of these variables, relative humidity showed the greatest impact on the reaction rate. The effect of small amounts of additives were also investigated. Of the additives tried (buffer acids, organic deliquescents, and inorganic deliquescents) deliquescent salts were the only additives that improved reactivity. A shrinking core model with zero order kinetics in SO/sub 2/ was used to model experimental data. An empirical correlation was included in the model to account for shape and surface roughness of the Ca(OH)/sub 2/ particles. The diffusion coefficient of the SO/sub 2/ through the product layer was found to increase linearly with relative humidity, and the kinetic rate constant increases exponentially with relative humidity. With a few exceptions the model was able to predict the experimental data within the margin of experimental error (+/- 10%). At high relative humidity and/or high SO/sub 2/ concentration, reaction kinetics control the overall reaction rate, while at low relative humidity and/or low SO/sub 2/ concentration, SO/sub 2/ diffusion through the product layer controls the rate. The reaction solids were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, powder x-ray diffraction, Coulter counter size distribution BET (N/sub 2/) surface area, energy dispersive spectrometry, and differential scanning calorimetry.

  1. The effect of graphic organizers on students' attitudes and academic performance in undergraduate general biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Lacy

    High attrition among undergraduate Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) majors has led national and business leaders in the United States to call for both research and educational reform within the collegiate STEM classrooms. Included among suggestions for reform are ideas to improve retention of first-year students and to improve critical thinking and depth of knowledge, instead of covering large quantities of materials. Past research on graphic organizers suggest these tools assist students in learning information and facilitate conceptual and critical thinking. Despite their widespread use in high school science departments, collegiate humanities departments, and even medical schools, their use is considerably less prevalent in the undergraduate biology classroom. In addition to their lack of use, little research has been conducted on their academic benefits in the collegiate classroom. Based on national calls for improving retention among undergraduate STEM majors and research suggesting that academic success during an individual first major's related course highly determine if that individual will continue on in their intended major, the researcher of this dissertation chose to conduct research on an introductory general biology class. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, the research in this dissertation examines the effectiveness of graphic organizers in promoting academic success and also examines their influence on student attitudes. This research is grounded in the theories of constructivism and cognitive load theory. Constructivism suggests that individuals must build their knowledge from their personal experiences, while the cognitive load theory recognizes the limited nature of one's working memory and suggests that instructional practices minimize cognitive overload. The results of this dissertation suggest that the use of graphic organizers in an undergraduate general biology classroom can increase students' academic

  2. Effects of emulsifier addition on the crystallization and melting behavior of palm olein and coconut oil.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Jessica Mayumi; Soares, Fabiana Andreia Schafer De Martini; D'Agostinho, Natalia Roque; Gonçalves, Maria Inês Almeida; Gioielli, Luiz Antonio; da Silva, Roberta Claro

    2014-03-12

    Two commercial emulsifiers (EM1 and EM2), containing predominantly monoacylglycerols (MAGs), were added in proportiond of 1.0 and 3.0% (w/w) to coconut oil and palm olein. EM1 consisted of approximately 90% MAGs, whereas EM2 consisted of approximately 50% MAGs. The crystallization behavior of these systems was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and microscopy under polarized light. On the basis of DSC results, it was clear that the addition of EM2 accelerated the crystallization of coconut oil and delayed the crystallization of palm olein. In both oils EM2 addition led to the formation of smaller spherulites, and these effects improved the possibilities for using these fats as ingredients. In coconut oil the spherulites were maintained even at higher temperatures (20 °C). The addition of EM1 to coconut oil changed the crystallization pattern. In palm olein, the addition of 3.0% (w/w) of this emulsifier altered the pattern of crystallization of this fat.

  3. Soluble organic additive effects on stress development during drying of calcium carbonate suspensions.

    PubMed

    Wedin, Pär; Lewis, Jennifer A; Bergström, Lennart

    2005-10-01

    The effect of polymer, plasticizer, and surfactant additives on stress development during drying of calcium carbonate particulate coatings was studied using a controlled-environment apparatus that simultaneously monitors drying stress, weight loss, and relative humidity. We found that the calcium carbonate coatings display a drying stress evolution typical of granular films, which is characterized by a sharp capillary-induced stress rise followed by a rapid stress relaxation. The addition of a soluble polymer to the CaCO3 suspension resulted in a two-stage stress evolution process. The initial stress rise stems from capillary-pressure-induced stresses within the film, while the second, larger stress rise occurs due to solidification and shrinkage of the polymeric species. Measurements on the corresponding pure polymer solutions established a clear correlation between the magnitude of residual stress in both the polymer and CaCO3-polymer films to the physical properties of the polymer phase, i.e. its glass transition temperature, T(g), and Young's modulus. The addition of small organic molecules can reduce the residual stress observed in the CaCO3-polymer films; e.g., glycerol, which acts as a plasticizer, reduces the drying stress by lowering T(g), while surfactant additions reduce the surface tension of the liquid phase, and, hence, the magnitude of the capillary pressure within the film.

  4. Nitrogen-addition effects on leaf traits and photosynthetic carbon gain of boreal forest understory shrubs.

    PubMed

    Palmroth, Sari; Bach, Lisbet Holm; Nordin, Annika; Palmqvist, Kristin

    2014-06-01

    Boreal coniferous forests are characterized by fairly open canopies where understory vegetation is an important component of ecosystem C and N cycling. We used an ecophysiological approach to study the effects of N additions on uptake and partitioning of C and N in two dominant understory shrubs: deciduous Vaccinium myrtillus in a Picea abies stand and evergreen Vaccinium vitis-idaea in a Pinus sylvestris stand in northern Sweden. N was added to these stands for 16 and 8 years, respectively, at rates of 0, 12.5, and 50 kg N ha(-1) year(-1). N addition at the highest rate increased foliar N and chlorophyll concentrations in both understory species. Canopy cover of P. abies also increased, decreasing light availability and leaf mass per area of V. myrtillus. Among leaves of either shrub, foliar N content did not explain variation in light-saturated CO2 exchange rates. Instead photosynthetic capacity varied with stomatal conductance possibly reflecting plant hydraulic properties and within-site variation in water availability. Moreover, likely due to increased shading under P. abies and due to water limitations in the sandy soil under P. sylvestris, individuals of the two shrubs did not increase their biomass or shift their allocation between above- and belowground parts in response to N additions. Altogether, our results indicate that the understory shrubs in these systems show little response to N additions in terms of photosynthetic physiology or growth and that changes in their performance are mostly associated with responses of the tree canopy.

  5. Effect of additives on tribochemical stability of greases with easter base oil

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonorov, E.M.; Demina, L.V.; Skryabina, T.G.; Sosulina, L.N.

    1984-03-01

    This article investigates the possibility of improving the tribochemical stability of soap-base grease formulated with polyol ester oils, by the use of additives of the phenol and amine types. Model greases formulated with a pentaerythritol ester (PET) and the polyester PAK, taken in a 9:1 ratio, were examined. The tribochemical stability of the greases was evaluated according to the rate of conversion of their dispersion medium in a rolling friction zone. The rate of additive exhaustion was evaluated by analogy with the rate of triboconversion of the dispersion medium. The additives used were phenyl-..cap alpha..-naphthylamine (PAN), diphenylamine (DPA), 2, 6-di-tert-butyl-p-cresol (ionol), a technical-grade dialkylated diphenylamine (DAT), and mixtures of the inhibitors. It is determined that the greatest effect in increasing the tribochemical stability is achieved by the introduction of combinations of additives: DAT + ionol (in Li and cCa greases) and PAN + DAT (in cCa grease).

  6. Effect of additives on the anisotropic etching of silicon by using a TMAH based solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Ki-Hwa; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Jung-Sik

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the anisotropic etching properties of single crystal silicon were examined using a tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH). The variations in the Si etching rate and surface morphology at different etching temperatures and TMAH concentrations were evaluated. The effects of different additives were also examined. As the THAM concentration (10-25 wt. %) decreased, the etching rate increased from 10 μm/h to 70 μm/h at temperatures between 70°C and 90°C. On the other hand, the etched surface roughness became degraded as the hillock density and corner undercut ratio increased. To solve these problems, four additives, pyrazine, ammonium persulfate (AP), ammonium hydrogen sulfate (AHS), and isopropyl alcohol (IPA), were added to the TMAH solution. The experimental results showed that these additives play an important role in increasing the etching rate up to 10-20%. The etched surface was also improved significantly by the decreased hillock density on the surface. The addition of IPA to the TMAH solution showed excellent results in improving the etched surface flatness and the undercutting compensation. On the other hand, one of the characteristics of IPA is the decrease in etching rate with increasing amount of IPA. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Effect of dietary addition of seaweed and licorice on the immune performance of pigs.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Masafumi; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Okamura, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Eisaku; Tamura, Katsuo; Shimizu, Yuuko; Suda, Yoshihito; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2011-04-01

    In pig production, dietary additive antibiotics are usually used for growth stimulation and disease prevention, although there is public concern about the increased incidence of resistant antibiotics and food safety. It is possible that such antibiotics might be replaced by naturally derived products such as seaweed and licorice. In this study, we evaluated the effect of dietary addition of seaweed and licorice on enhancing the immune function in swine. The animals of each group (eight animals per group) were sensitized at day 42 and 49, and the immunoglobulin production and the expression of cytokines were detected by the ELISA and real-time PCR. As the results, saliva IgA production of the seaweed-treated group increased around five times compared to that of control (day 56). Delayed hypersensitivity reaction and IgG production of the seaweed-treated group increased around 1.8-2.0 times. In addition, enhanced saliva IgA production was detected at day 50 (around two times) and day 51 (around five times) by the licorice treatment, and lower expression level of tumor necrosis factor-α messenger RNA at day 51 (around 1/25) was observed in the licorice treatment. We conclude that the replacement of antibiotics by naturally derived dietary additives might be feasible for immune system enhancement.

  8. Long term effect of MnO2 powder addition on nitrogen removal by anammox process.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Sen; Bi, Zhen; Zhou, Jiti; Cheng, Yingjun; Zhang, Jie; Bhatti, Zafar

    2012-11-01

    This study examined long-term effect of MnO(2) powder (average diameter of 4-7 μm) on nitrogen removal in anammox process. Two lab-scale up-flow anammox reactors were operated for 380 days, one with and one without MnO(2) powder addition. During the period when only substrate concentrations varied, the maximum nitrogen removal rate in the reactor with MnO(2) addition reached 920.9 g-N/m(3)/d. This value was 2-folds higher than that (464.6 g-N/m(3)/d) of the reactor without MnO(2) addition. The crude enzyme activities of the anammox biomass from the two reactors was measured as 0.531±0.019 and 0.298±0.007 μmol cytochrome c reduced/mg protein/min, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy observation demonstrated more undefined particles existing inside anammox bacterial cell in the reactor with MnO(2) powder addition. Furthermore, filament-like structures inside anammoxosome were observed, which formed a net-like structure with particles as the connecting nodes. The experiment results demonstrated that MnO(2) improved nitrogen removal performance of anammox process.

  9. Effect of the Additives on the Desulphurization Rate of Flash Hydrated and Agglomerated CFB Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. X.; Li, H. L.; Xu, M.; Lu, J. F.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, J. S.; Yue, G. X.

    CFB fly ash from separators was mixed with water or the mixture of water and additives under the temperature of 363K by use of a blender. Then, this compound of fly ash and water or additives was pumped into a CFB combustion chamber by a sludge pump. Because the temperature of flue gas was high in CFB, the fly ash was hydrated fast and agglomerated in the same time. Through this process, the size of agglomerating fly ash is larger than the original particle and the relative residence time of agglomerated fly ash in CFB becomes longer. Therefore, the rate of utility of calcium in fly ash improves and the content of carbon in fly ash decreases. This results in a low Ca/S and low operational cost for CFB boiler. The additive is one key factor, which affects the rate of desulfurization of agglomerated fly ash. Effect of different additives on rate of desulfurization is not same. Cement and limestone are beneficiated to sulfur removal of agglomerated fly ash, but sodium silicate does not devote to the rate of sulfur removal of agglomerated fly ash.

  10. Rheological behavior and organoleptic effects of ovalbumin addition in yogurt mousse production.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, M; Paredes, B; Iglesias, O; Rendueles, M; Díaz, M

    2006-03-01

    Yogurt mousse is a novel, high added-value dairy product that has been well received by the market. This paper presents a study of the effect of the addition of ovalbumin to the product on its rheological and organoleptic qualities. The ovalbumin was previously separated from egg white with a high grade of purity using an ion exchange resin synthesized by the authors. Diverse rheological tests at different temperatures and corresponding sensorial assessments were conducted to compare samples without and with added ovalbumin. The obtained results confirm that the product is viscoelastic and combines the properties of foams and emulsions; the elastic component is greater than the viscous component. Moreover, at temperatures ranging from 5 to 15 degrees C, a usual interval of consumption, the product behaves rheologically in a similar way. Conversely, the addition of ovalbumin under the assayed conditions also makes the elastic character of the product increase at a given temperature. Finally, the sensorial assessment tests and determinations of stability and volume yield enabled us to verify that the addition of ovalbumin at an amount of 1.3% hardly alters the stability, resistance to shear stress, or the texture and improves the degree of foaming. Therefore, the product with additive is of good commercial quality.

  11. Effects of beta-glucan addition to a probiotic containing yogurt.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, T; Kealy, T; Mishra, V K

    2007-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of addition of beta-glucan from 2 different cereal sources (oat and barley) on growth and metabolic activity of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis (Bb-12) as determined by plating on a selective medium in yogurt during prolonged cold storage. These yogurt batches were compared to unsupplemented and inulin supplemented controls. All batches were also assessed for syneresis. Oat beta-glucan addition resulted in improved probiotic viability and stability comparable to that of inulin. It also enhanced lactic and propionic acid production. The barley beta-glucan addition suppressed proteolytic activity more than that from oat. These improvements were hindered by greater syneresis caused likely by thermodynamic incompatibility. Small amplitude oscillatory measurements of acidified model mixture of beta-glucan/skim milk solids showed formation of casein gel within the beta-glucan network. Binary mixtures of beta-glucan and skim milk solids had apparent pseudoplastic and non-Newtonian behavior governed mainly by beta-glucan contribution. Above critical concentrations, the mixtures underwent phase separation with the lower phase rich in protein. The phase diagram also showed that the addition of beta-glucan may be possible at or below 0.24 w/w%.

  12. EFFECTS OF ADDITION RATE AND ACID MATRIX ON THE DESTRUCTION OF AMMONIUM BY THE SEMI-CONTINUOUS ADDITION OF SODIUM NITRITE DURING EVAPORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2007-08-27

    The destruction of ammonium by the semi-continuous addition of sodium nitrite during acidic evaporation can be achieved with a wide range of waste compositions. The efficiency of nitrite utilization for ammonium destruction was observed to vary from less than 20% to 60% depending on operating conditions. The effects of nitric acid concentration and nitrite addition rate are dominant factors that affect the efficiency of nitrite utilization for ammonium destruction. Reducing the acid concentration by performing acid recovery via steam stripping prior to performing nitrite destruction of ammonium will require more nitrite due to the low destruction efficiency. The scale-up of the baseline rate nitrite addition rate from the 100 mL to the 1600 gallon batch size has significant uncertainty and poses the risk of lower efficiency at the plant scale. Experience with plant scale processing will improve confidence in the application of nitrite destruction of ammonium to different waste streams.

  13. Radon exposure of the skin: I. Biological effects.

    PubMed

    Charles, M W

    2007-09-01

    Radon progeny can plate out on skin and give rise to exposure of the superficial epidermis from alpha emitters Po-218 (7.7 MeV, range approximately 66 microm) and Po-214 (6 MeV, range approximately 44 microm). Dose rates from beta/gamma emitters Pb-214 and Bi-214 are low and only predominate at depths in excess of the alpha range. This paper reviews the evidence for a causal link between exposure from radon and its progeny, and deterministic and stochastic biological effects in human skin. Radiation induced skin effects such as ulceration and dermal atrophy, which require irradiation of the dermis, are ruled out for alpha irradiation from radon progeny because the target cells are considerably deeper than the range of alpha particles. They have not been observed in man or animals. Effects such as erythema and acute epidermal necrosis have been observed in a few cases of very high dose alpha particle exposures in man and after acute high dose exposure in animals from low energy beta radiations with similar depth doses to radon progeny. The required skin surface absorbed doses are in excess of 100 Gy. Such effects would require extremely high levels of radon progeny. They would involve quite exceptional circumstances, way outside the normal range of radon exposures in man. There is no definitive identification of the target cells for skin cancer induction in animals or man. The stem cells in the basal layer which maintain the epidermis are the most plausible contenders for target cells. The majority of these cells are near the end of the range of radon progeny alpha particles, even on the thinnest body sites. The nominal depth of these cells, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), is 70 microm. There is evidence however that some irradiation of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is also necessary for skin cancer induction. Alpha irradiation of rodent skin that is

  14. Combined effect of sourdough lactic acid bacteria and additives on bread firmness and staling.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, A; Gobbetti, M; De Marco, B; Balestrieri, F; Paoletti, F; Russi, L; Rossi, J

    2000-07-01

    The effect of various sourdoughs and additives on bread firmness and staling was studied. Compared to the bread produced with Saccharomyces cerevisiae 141, the chemical acidification of dough fermented by S. cerevisiae 141 or the use of sourdoughs increased the volume of the breads. Only sourdough fermentation was effective in delaying starch retrogradation. The effect depended on the level of acidification and on the lactic acid bacteria strain. The effect of sourdough made of S. cerevisiae 141-Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis 57-Lactobacillus plantarum 13 was improved when fungal alpha-amylase or amylolytic strains such as L. amylovorus CNBL1008 or engineered L. sanfranciscensis CB1 Amy were added. When pentosans or pentosans, endoxylanase enzyme, and L. hilgardii S32 were added to the same sourdough, a greater delay of the bread firmness and staling was found. When pentosans were in part hydrolyzed by the endoxylanase enzyme, the bread also had the highest titratable acidity, due to the fermentation of pentoses by L. hilgardii S32. The addition of the bacterial protease to the sourdough increased the bread firmness and staling.

  15. Additive and non-additive effects of mixtures of short-acting intravenous anaesthetic agents and their significance for theories of anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Richards, C.D.; White, Ann E.

    1981-01-01

    1 The potency of a series of short-acting anaesthetics was established by measuring the duration of the loss of righting reflex following a single bolus injection into the tail vein of male Wistar rats. The agents were, in order of potency, etomidate, alphaxalone, methohexitone, alphadalone acetate and propanidid. 2 The potency of binary mixtures of these agents was also assessed to see whether the anaesthetic effects of different agents were additive as classical theories of anaesthesia suggest. Mixtures of alphaxalone and alphadalone acetate, alphaxalone and propanidid and methohexitone and propanidid all showed simple additive effects. Mixtures of alphaxalone and etomidate and of alphaxalone and methohexitone showed a greater potency than would be expected if their effects were simply additive. Mixtures of etomidate and methohexitone were not examined. 3 Mixtures of alphaxalone and either methohexitone or pentobarbitone produced a greater depression of synaptic transmission in in vitro preparations of guinea-pig olfactory cortex than would have been expected from the sum of the activities of the individual anaesthetics. Other combinations of anaesthetics did not show similar effects although the interaction between alphaxalone and etomidate was not examined. 4 Neither alphaxalone nor pentobarbitone affected the membrane: buffer partition coefficient of the other for a model membrane system. 5 These results are interpreted as evidence against the classical unitary hypotheses of anaesthetic action based on correlations of anaesthetic potency with lipid solubility and as supporting the view that different anaesthetics act on different structures in the neuronal membranes to produce anaesthesia. PMID:6268237

  16. Effect of alcohol addition on the movement of petroleum hydrocarbon fuels in soil.

    PubMed

    Adam, Gillian; Gamoh, Keiji; Morris, David G; Duncan, Harry

    2002-03-08

    Groundwater contamination by fuel spills from aboveground and underground storage tanks has been of growing concern in recent years. This problem has been magnified by the addition of oxygenates, such as ethanol and methyl-tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) to fuels to reduce vehicular emissions to the atmosphere. These additives, although beneficial in reducing atmospheric pollution, may, however, increase groundwater contamination due to the co-solvency of petroleum hydrocarbons and by the provision of a preferential substrate for microbial utilisation. With the introduction of ethanol to diesel fuel imminent and the move away from MTBE use in many states of the USA, the environmental implications associated with ethanol additive fuels must be thoroughly investigated. Diesel fuel movement was followed in a 1-m soil column and the effect of ethanol addition to diesel fuel on this movement determined. The addition of 5% ethanol to diesel fuel was found to enhance the downward migration of the diesel fuel components, thus increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A novel method using soil packed HPLC columns allowed the influence of ethanol on individual aromatic hydrocarbon movement to be studied. The levels of ethanol addition investigated were at the current additive level (approx. 25%) for ethanol additive fuels in Brazil and values above (50%) and below (10%) this level. An aqueous ethanol concentration above 10% was required for any movement to occur. At 25% aqueous ethanol, the majority of hydrocarbons were mobilised and the retention behaviour of the soil column lessened. At 50% aqueous ethanol, all the hydrocarbons were found to move unimpeded through the columns. The retention behaviour of the soil was found to change significantly when both organic matter content and silt/clay content was reduced. Unexpectedly, sandy soil with low organic matter and low silt/clay was found to have a retentive behaviour similar to sandy subsoil with moderate silt

  17. Effect of combined herbal feed additives on methane, total gas production and rumen fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Indu; Dutta, Tapas Kumar; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Sharma, Ashwani

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to evaluate effect of herbal feed additives on methane and total gas production during the rumen fermentation for environment and animal health concern. Different parts of the five medicinal plants were selected such as leaf and small stems of Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi), roots of Curcuma longa (Haldi), fruits of Emblica officinalis (Amla), leaves of Azadirachta indica (Neem) and leaves and small stem of Clerodendrum phlomidis (Arni) for our study. Addition of different herbal additive combinations did not influence IVDMD and total gas production however methane production (mg/g of substrate DM) was significantly (P<0.05) reduced in Amla: Neem and Neem: Arni combinations. Total nitrogen significantly (P<0.01) increased in the combinations of Tulsi: Haldi and Amla: Neem. TCA–ppt-N is significantly (P<0.01) increased in Tulsi: Haldi, Haldi: Amla, Amla: Neem and Neem: Arni however NH3-N (mg/dl) significantly decreased in all treatments. We conclude that the screening of plant combinations, Amla: Neem and Neem: Arni have potential to decrease methane production and our herbal feed supplements have no side-effects on the ruminant in small amount. PMID:26124571

  18. Effects of native species diversity and resource additions on invader impact.

    PubMed

    Maron, John L; Marler, Marilyn

    2008-07-01

    Theory and empirical work have demonstrated that diverse communities can inhibit invasion. Yet, it is unclear how diversity influences invader impact, how impact varies among exotics, and what the relative importance of diversity is versus extrinsic factors that themselves can influence invasion. To address these issues, we established plant assemblages that varied in native species and functional richness and crossed this gradient in diversity with resource (water) addition. Identical assemblages were either uninvaded or invaded with one of three exotic forbs: spotted knapweed (Centaurea maculosa), dalmatian toadflax (Linaria dalmatica), or sulfur cinquefoil (Potentilla recta). To determine impacts, we measured the effects of exotics on native biomass and, for spotted knapweed, on soil moisture and nitrogen levels. Assemblages with high species richness were less invaded and less impacted than less diverse assemblages. Impact scaled with exotic biomass; spotted knapweed had the largest impact on native biomass compared with the other exotics. Although invasion depressed native biomass, the net result was to increase total community yield. Water addition increased invasibility (for knapweed only) but had no effect on invader impact. Together, these results suggest that diversity inhibits invasion and reduces impact more than resource additions facilitate invasion or impact.

  19. Effect of medium additives during liquid storage on developmental competence of in vitro matured bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Suttirojpattana, Tayita; Somfai, Tamas; Matoba, Satoko; Parnpai, Rangsun; Nagai, Takashi; Geshi, Masaya

    2017-02-01

    Our aim was to improve the developmental competence of bovine oocytes during their liquid storage by using additives. In vitro matured oocytes were stored for 20 h at 25°C in HEPES buffered TCM 199 medium (base medium). After storage, in vitro embryo development after in vitro fertilization was compared to those of non-stored (control) ones. Addition of 10% (v/v) newborn calf serum or 10.27 mmol/L pyruvate alone to the base medium did not improve blastocyst formation rates in stored oocytes; however, their simultaneous addition significantly improved the rate compared with those stored in base medium (P < 0.05). Supplementation of the holding medium with dithiothreitol (DTT) at any concentrations did not improve embryo development from stored oocytes. Although supplementation with cyclosporine A (CsA) significantly reduced apoptosis and membrane damage rates during storage, it did not improve the developmental competence of oocytes. 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis-acetoxymethyl ester and ruthenium red had no effect on oocyte apoptotic rates. Blastocyst formation rates in all stored groups remained significantly lower than that of the control. In conclusion, pyruvate and serum had a synergic effect to moderate the reduction of oocyte quality during storage, whereas mitochondrial membrane pore inhibitor CsA and the antioxidant DTT did not affect their developmental competence.

  20. Effect of organic residues addition on the technological properties of clay bricks.

    PubMed

    Demir, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the utilization potential of several organic residues in clay bricks. Sawdust, tobacco residues, and grass are widespread by-products of industrial and agricultural processes in Turkey. These residue materials have long cellulose fibres. Sawdust and tobacco residues generally are used as fuel, and the grass is utilized for agricultural purposes. The insulation capacity of brick increases with the increasing porosity of the clay body. Combustible, organic types of pore-forming additives are most frequently used for this purpose. For this reason, increasing amounts of organic residues (0%, 2.5%, 5% and 10% in wt.) were mixed with raw brick-clay. All samples were fired at 900 degrees C. Effects on shaping, plasticity, density, and mechanical properties were investigated. The organic residue additions were found to be effective for pore-forming in the clay body with the clay maintaining acceptable mechanical properties. It was observed that the fibrous nature of the residues did not create extrusion problems. However, higher residue addition required a higher water content to ensure the right plasticity. As a result, sawdust, tobacco residues, and grass can be utilized in an environmentally safe way as organic pore-forming agents in brick-clay.

  1. Effect of medium additives during liquid storage on developmental competence of in vitro matured bovine oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Suttirojpattana, Tayita; Matoba, Satoko; Parnpai, Rangsun; Nagai, Takashi; Geshi, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our aim was to improve the developmental competence of bovine oocytes during their liquid storage by using additives. In vitro matured oocytes were stored for 20 h at 25°C in HEPES buffered TCM 199 medium (base medium). After storage, in vitro embryo development after in vitro fertilization was compared to those of non‐stored (control) ones. Addition of 10% (v/v) newborn calf serum or 10.27 mmol/L pyruvate alone to the base medium did not improve blastocyst formation rates in stored oocytes; however, their simultaneous addition significantly improved the rate compared with those stored in base medium (P < 0.05). Supplementation of the holding medium with dithiothreitol (DTT) at any concentrations did not improve embryo development from stored oocytes. Although supplementation with cyclosporine A (CsA) significantly reduced apoptosis and membrane damage rates during storage, it did not improve the developmental competence of oocytes. 1,2‐bis(2‐aminophenoxy) ethane N,N,N’,N’‐tetraacetic acid tetrakis‐acetoxymethyl ester and ruthenium red had no effect on oocyte apoptotic rates. Blastocyst formation rates in all stored groups remained significantly lower than that of the control. In conclusion, pyruvate and serum had a synergic effect to moderate the reduction of oocyte quality during storage, whereas mitochondrial membrane pore inhibitor CsA and the antioxidant DTT did not affect their developmental competence. PMID:27169667

  2. Effect of the La alloying addition on the antibacterial capability of 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Yuan, J P; Li, W; Wang, C

    2013-01-01

    316L stainless steel is widely used for fashion jewelry but it can carry a large number of bacteria and cause the potential risk of infection since it has no antimicrobial ability. In this paper, La is used as an alloying addition. The antibacterial capability, corrosion resistance and processability of the La-modified 316L are investigated by microscopic observation, thin-film adhering quantitative bacteriostasis, electrochemical measurement and mechanical test. The investigations reveal that the La-containing 316L exhibits the Hormesis effect against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Escherichia coli DH5α, 0.05 wt.% La stimulates their growth, as La increases, the modified 316L exhibits the improved antibacterial effect. The more amount of La is added, the better antibacterial ability is achieved, and 0.42 wt.% La shows excellent antibacterial efficacy. No more than 0.11 wt.% La addition improves slightly the corrosion resistance in artificial sweat and has no observable impact on the processability of 316L, while a larger La content degrades them. Therefore, the addition of La alone in 316L is difficult to obtain the optimal combination of corrosion resistance, antibacterial capability and processability. In spite of that, 0.15 wt.% La around is inferred to be the trade-off for the best overall performance.

  3. Biologic plausibility, cellular effects, and molecular mechanisms of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Borow, Kenneth M; Nelson, John R; Mason, R Preston

    2015-09-01

    Residual cardiovascular (CV) risk remains in dyslipidemic patients despite intensive statin therapy, underscoring the need for additional intervention. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is incorporated into membrane phospholipids and atherosclerotic plaques and exerts beneficial effects on the pathophysiologic cascade from onset of plaque formation through rupture. Specific salutary actions have been reported relating to endothelial function, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, inflammation, plaque formation/progression, platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, and plaque rupture. EPA also improves atherogenic dyslipidemia characterized by reduction of triglycerides without raising low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Other beneficial effects of EPA include vasodilation, resulting in blood pressure reductions, as well as improved membrane fluidity. EPA's effects are at least additive to those of statins when given as adjunctive therapy. In this review, we present data supporting the biologic plausibility of EPA as an anti-atherosclerotic agent with potential clinical benefit for prevention of CV events, as well as its cellular effects and molecular mechanisms of action. REDUCE-IT is an ongoing, randomized, controlled study evaluating whether the high-purity ethyl ester of EPA (icosapent ethyl) at 4 g/day combined with statin therapy is superior to statin therapy alone for reducing CV events in high-risk patients with mixed dyslipidemia. The results from this study are expected to clarify the role of EPA as adjunctive therapy to a statin for reduction of residual CV risk.

  4. Effect of the chlortetracycline addition method on methane production from the anaerobic digestion of swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Wen, Xin; Wang, Yan; Zou, Yongde; Ma, Baohua; Liao, Xindi; Liang, Juanboo; Wu, Yinbao

    2014-10-01

    Effects of antibiotic residues on methane production in anaerobic digestion are commonly studied using the following two antibiotic addition methods: (1) adding manure from animals that consume a diet containing antibiotics, and (2) adding antibiotic-free animal manure spiked with antibiotics. This study used chlortetracycline (CTC) as a model antibiotic to examine the effects of the antibiotic addition method on methane production in anaerobic digestion under two different swine wastewater concentrations (0.55 and 0.22mg CTC/g dry manure). The results showed that CTC degradation rate in which manure was directly added at 0.55mg CTC/g (HSPIKE treatment) was lower than the control values and the rest of the treatment groups. Methane production from the HSPIKE treatment was reduced (p<0.05) by 12% during the whole experimental period and 15% during the first 7days. The treatments had no significant effect on the pH and chemical oxygen demand value of the digesters, and the total nitrogen of the 0.55mg CTC/kg manure collected from mediated swine was significantly higher than the other values. Therefore, different methane production under different antibiotic addition methods might be explained by the microbial activity and the concentrations of antibiotic intermediate products and metabolites. Because the primary entry route of veterinary antibiotics into an anaerobic digester is by contaminated animal manure, the most appropriate method for studying antibiotic residue effects on methane production may be using manure from animals that are given a particular antibiotic, rather than adding the antibiotic directly to the anaerobic digester.

  5. Effect of calcium chloride addition on ice cream structure and quality.

    PubMed

    Costa, F F; Resende, J V; Abreu, L R; Goff, H D

    2008-06-01

    The influence of calcium fortification by the addition of calcium chloride on quality parameters of ice cream based on physical properties was investigated, as was the effect of kappa-carrageenan at modifying the effects of this calcium fortification. Four ice cream mixes of conventional composition, with added kappa-carrageenan (0 or 0.025%) and added calcium chloride (0 or 4.4 g L(-1) = 40 mM of added Ca(2+)), were prepared. Modulated temperature-differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate the effect of calcium chloride on the nucleation temperature, enthalpy of melting, and freezing point depression. The protein composition of 15.4% (wt/wt) reconstituted skim milk powder solutions with or without 4.4 g L(-1) added CaCl(2) and in the supernatant after ultracentrifugation was determined. Fat particle size distributions in ice cream were characterized by light scattering. Ice crystal sizes before and after temperature cycling were determined by cold-stage light microscopy. The results demonstrated that the addition of calcium chloride led to a substantial increase in ice crystal sizes and in fat partial coalescence, which were exacerbated by the addition of kappa-carrageenan. These results can be explained by the interaction between Ca(2+) ions and casein micelles, rather than any effects on freezing point depression. The calcium ions led to a more compact micelle, less serum beta-casein, and high fat destabilization, all of which would be expected to reduce macromolecular structure and volume occupancy in the unfrozen phase, which led to increased rates of ice recrystallization.

  6. Experimental study on agitated drying characteristics of sewage sludge under the effects of different additive agents.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenyi; Su, Yaxin

    2014-07-01

    Drying experiments of dewatered sewage sludge (DSS) were conducted on a agitated paddle dryer, and the effects of additive agents, i.e., CaO, pulverized coal (PC), heavy oil (HO), and dried sludge ("DS" through back mixing) on the agitated drying characteristics of DSS were investigated. The results indicated that CaO can significantly increase the drying rate of DSS. The drying rate at CaO/DSS (mass ratio)=1/100 was 135% higher than that of CaO/DSS=0. Pulverized coal has no obvious effect on drying rate, but the increase of PC/DSS can promote breaking up of sludge lump. Heavy oil was found to be slightly effective in improving the drying rate of DSS in the examined experimental range of HO/DSS=0-1/20. It is also found that HO can reduce the torque of the dryer shaft, due to its lubrication effect. Back mixing of DS was found to be effective in alleviating the unfavorable effect of the lumpy phase by improving the mixing effect of the paddle dryer. There was a marked increase of drying rate with an increase of the DS/DSS in the experimental range of DS/DSS=0-1/3.

  7. Effect of Addition of Fentanyl to Xylocaine Hydrochloride in Brachial Plexus Block by Supraclavicular Approach

    PubMed Central

    Paluvadi, Venkata Raghavendra; Manne, Venkata Sesha Sai Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to quantitatively compare the effects of 1.5% xylocaine with 1.5% xylocaine and fentanyl (1 μg/kg) mixture for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients between the age group of 20–60 and scheduled for upper limb surgery were divided into two groups (xylocaine group and xylocaine plus fentanyl group). After performing supraclavicular brachial plexus block, an assessment was made for onset of analgesia, duration and degree of analgesia, block intensity, and for any other side effects. Results: Mean duration of analgesia is Group I is 2.1 h and in Group II is 8.1 h; a four-fold increase in duration of analgesia. Conclusion: Addition of fentanyl to xylocaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has no significant effect on onset or quality of analgesia, but duration of analgesia is significantly prolonged. PMID:28298769

  8. Effects of maternally exposed food coloring additives on laryngeal histology in rats.

    PubMed

    Başak, Kayhan; Doguç, Duygu Kumbul; Aylak, Firdevs; Karadayi, Nimet; Gültekin, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Experimental reports showed carcinogenic effects of artificial food colors and additives (AFCAs) on many organs, including the head and neck region. We aimed to investigate the effect of AFCAs on laryngeal histomorphology and immunohistochemical expression in maternally exposed rats. "No observable adverse effect levels" of commonly used AFCAs as a mixture were given to female rats before and during gestation. Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings were evaluated in their offspring. Significant decreasing in goblet cell count and cilia loss were observed with AFCAs in maternally exposed rats (p<0.05). Immunohistochemically, the Ki67 index was significantly increased and villin expression was significantly reduced in laryngeal epithelium in the study group (p<0.05), whereas expression of cyclooxygenase type 2, Muc-2, Muc-5AC, p53, and epidermal growth factor receptors did not differ between the groups. This study demonstrated that maternal exposure of AFCAs plays a role in the mucosal defense system and possibly in carcinogenesis.

  9. Effect of metal oxides addition on the superconducting properties of YBaCuO.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Heon; Choi, Yong

    2011-07-01

    The superconducting properties of YBCO superconductor with ZrO2 addition prepared by different contents were prepared by a unique method so called thermal pyrolysis process to study the effect of the zirconium oxide on the electromagnetic properties and superconducting mechanism of the superconductor. The critical temperature of YBCO superconductor was not predominately dependent upon the zirconium oxide. The maximum magnetism was observed by adding 2% zirconium oxide. The addition of zirconium oxide forming a pinning center of magnetic flux due to ZrO2 phase which was related to the change of electromagnetic properties of the YBCO superconductor. The result indicates that magnetization is proportional to the number of magnetic flux lines passing through the sample. The added ZrO2 appear to contribute the increasing Vickers hardness.

  10. Effect of Pd Additions on the Invariant Reactions in the Ag-CuOx System

    SciTech Connect

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2006-02-01

    Palladium was added as a ternary component to a series of copper oxide-silver alloys in an effort increase the use temperature of these materials for potential ceramic brazing applications. Phase equilibria at low palladium and copper oxide concentrations in the Pd-CuOx-Ag system were determined experimentally using differential scanning calorimetry, microstructural analysis, and X-ray diffraction. Small additions of palladium were generally found to increase the temperature of the eutectic reaction present in the pseudobinary system, but have little effect on a higher temperature monotectic reaction. However once enough palladium was added (~5 mol%) to increase the new eutectic temperature to that of the original pseudobinary monotectic reaction, the pseudoternary monotectic temperature correspondingly began to move upward as well. The addition of palladium also forced the eutectic point to slightly lower silver concentrations, again causing a convergence with the former monotectic line.

  11. Noiseless intensity amplification of repetitive signals by coherent addition using the temporal Talbot effect

    PubMed Central

    Maram, Reza; Van Howe, James; Li, Ming; Azaña, José

    2014-01-01

    Amplification of signal intensity is essential for initiating physical processes, diagnostics, sensing, communications and measurement. During traditional amplification, the signal is amplified by multiplying the signal carriers through an active gain process, requiring the use of an external power source. In addition, the signal is degraded by noise and distortions that typically accompany active gain processes. We show noiseless intensity amplification of repetitive optical pulse waveforms with gain from 2 to ~20 without using active gain. The proposed method uses a dispersion-induced temporal self-imaging (Talbot) effect to redistribute and coherently accumulate energy of the original repetitive waveforms into fewer replica waveforms. In addition, we show how our passive amplifier performs a real-time average of the wave-train to reduce its original noise fluctuation, as well as enhances the extinction ratio of pulses to stand above the noise floor. Our technique is applicable to repetitive waveforms in any spectral region or wave system. PMID:25319207

  12. Effects on stress rupture life and tensile strength of tin additions to Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Johnson, W.

    1982-01-01

    Because Inconel 718 represents a major use of columbium and a large potential source of columbium for aerospace alloys could be that of columbium derived from tin slags, the effects of tin additions to Inconel 718 at levels which might be typical of or exceed those anticipated if tin slag derived columbium were used as a melting stock were investigated. Tin was added to 15 pound Inconel 718 heats at levels varying from none added to approximately 10,000 ppm (1 wt%). Limited 1200 F stress rupture testing was performed at stresses from 68,000 to 115,000 psi and a few tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 800 and 1200 F. Additions of tin in excess of 800 ppm were detrimental to ductility and stress rupture life.

  13. Effect of additions of aluminosilicate and silicate materials on the softening temperature of chromite ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, A. V.; Nurmaganbetova, B. N.; Pavlov, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    The temperatures of the beginning and end of softening and the temperature range of softening of the fines o