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Sample records for additional candidate genes

  1. Candidate gene prioritization with Endeavour.

    PubMed

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; ElShal, Sarah; Alcaide, Daniel; Aerts, Jan; Auboeuf, Didier; Moreau, Yves

    2016-07-01

    Genomic studies and high-throughput experiments often produce large lists of candidate genes among which only a small fraction are truly relevant to the disease, phenotype or biological process of interest. Gene prioritization tackles this problem by ranking candidate genes by profiling candidates across multiple genomic data sources and integrating this heterogeneous information into a global ranking. We describe an extended version of our gene prioritization method, Endeavour, now available for six species and integrating 75 data sources. The performance (Area Under the Curve) of Endeavour on cross-validation benchmarks using 'gold standard' gene sets varies from 88% (for human phenotypes) to 95% (for worm gene function). In addition, we have also validated our approach using a time-stamped benchmark derived from the Human Phenotype Ontology, which provides a setting close to prospective validation. With this benchmark, using 3854 novel gene-phenotype associations, we observe a performance of 82%. Altogether, our results indicate that this extended version of Endeavour efficiently prioritizes candidate genes. The Endeavour web server is freely available at https://endeavour.esat.kuleuven.be/.

  2. Candidate gene prioritization with Endeavour

    PubMed Central

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; ElShal, Sarah; Alcaide, Daniel; Aerts, Jan; Auboeuf, Didier; Moreau, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies and high-throughput experiments often produce large lists of candidate genes among which only a small fraction are truly relevant to the disease, phenotype or biological process of interest. Gene prioritization tackles this problem by ranking candidate genes by profiling candidates across multiple genomic data sources and integrating this heterogeneous information into a global ranking. We describe an extended version of our gene prioritization method, Endeavour, now available for six species and integrating 75 data sources. The performance (Area Under the Curve) of Endeavour on cross-validation benchmarks using ‘gold standard’ gene sets varies from 88% (for human phenotypes) to 95% (for worm gene function). In addition, we have also validated our approach using a time-stamped benchmark derived from the Human Phenotype Ontology, which provides a setting close to prospective validation. With this benchmark, using 3854 novel gene–phenotype associations, we observe a performance of 82%. Altogether, our results indicate that this extended version of Endeavour efficiently prioritizes candidate genes. The Endeavour web server is freely available at https://endeavour.esat.kuleuven.be/. PMID:27131783

  3. HiTS additional supernova candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, F.; Maureira, J. C.; Points, S.; Medina, G.; Munoz, R.; Martin, J. San; Hamuy, M.; Estevez, P.; Smith, R. C.; Vivas, K.; Flores, S.; Huijse, P.; Cabrera, G.; Anderson, J.; Bufano, F.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Galbany, L.; Pignata, G.; de Jaeger, Th.; Martinez, J.; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.; Perez, C.

    2015-03-01

    HiTS, the High Cadence Transient Survey (see ATELs #5949, #7099), reports the discovery of additional supernova candidates detected using an image subtraction / classification pipeline developed at the Center for Mathematical Modelling (CMM) in collaboration with the Millennium Institute for Astrophysics (MAS).

  4. Mining biological databases for candidate disease genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Terry A.; Scheetz, Todd; Webster, Gregg L.; Casavant, Thomas L.

    2001-07-01

    The publicly-funded effort to sequence the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome, the Human Genome Project (HGP), has currently produced more than 93% of the 3 billion nucleotides of the human genome into a preliminary `draft' format. In addition, several valuable sources of information have been developed as direct and indirect results of the HGP. These include the sequencing of model organisms (rat, mouse, fly, and others), gene discovery projects (ESTs and full-length), and new technologies such as expression analysis and resources (micro-arrays or gene chips). These resources are invaluable for the researchers identifying the functional genes of the genome that transcribe and translate into the transcriptome and proteome, both of which potentially contain orders of magnitude more complexity than the genome itself. Preliminary analyses of this data identified approximately 30,000 - 40,000 human `genes.' However, the bulk of the effort still remains -- to identify the functional and structural elements contained within the transcriptome and proteome, and to associate function in the transcriptome and proteome to genes. A fortuitous consequence of the HGP is the existence of hundreds of databases containing biological information that may contain relevant data pertaining to the identification of disease-causing genes. The task of mining these databases for information on candidate genes is a commercial application of enormous potential. We are developing a system to acquire and mine data from specific databases to aid our efforts to identify disease genes. A high speed cluster of Linux of workstations is used to analyze sequence and perform distributed sequence alignments as part of our data mining and processing. This system has been used to mine GeneMap99 sequences within specific genomic intervals to identify potential candidate disease genes associated with Bardet-Biedle Syndrome (BBS).

  5. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P; Owen, M J; Ophoff, R A; O'Donovan, M C; Corvin, A; Cichon, S; Sullivan, P F

    2015-05-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of these genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published on these genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why historical candidate gene studies did not achieve their primary aims is inadequate statistical power. However, the considerable efforts embodied in these early studies unquestionably set the stage for current successes in genomic approaches to schizophrenia.

  6. Evaluating Historical Candidate Genes for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Martilias; Werge, Thomas; Sklar, Pamela; Owen, Michael J.; Ophoff, Roel; O’Donovan, Michael; Corvin, Aiden; Cichon, Sven; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (e.g., COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1, and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of these genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published on these genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why historical candidate gene studies did not achieve their primary aims is inadequate statistical power. However, the considerable efforts embodied in these early studies unquestionably set the stage for current successes in genomic approaches to schizophrenia. PMID:25754081

  7. Phenoscape: Identifying Candidate Genes for Evolutionary Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Richard C; Su, Baofeng; Balhoff, James P; Eames, B Frank; Dahdul, Wasila M; Lapp, Hilmar; Lundberg, John G; Vision, Todd J; Dunham, Rex A; Mabee, Paula M; Westerfield, Monte

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypes resulting from mutations in genetic model organisms can help reveal candidate genes for evolutionarily important phenotypic changes in related taxa. Although testing candidate gene hypotheses experimentally in nonmodel organisms is typically difficult, ontology-driven information systems can help generate testable hypotheses about developmental processes in experimentally tractable organisms. Here, we tested candidate gene hypotheses suggested by expert use of the Phenoscape Knowledgebase, specifically looking for genes that are candidates responsible for evolutionarily interesting phenotypes in the ostariophysan fishes that bear resemblance to mutant phenotypes in zebrafish. For this, we searched ZFIN for genetic perturbations that result in either loss of basihyal element or loss of scales phenotypes, because these are the ancestral phenotypes observed in catfishes (Siluriformes). We tested the identified candidate genes by examining their endogenous expression patterns in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. The experimental results were consistent with the hypotheses that these features evolved through disruption in developmental pathways at, or upstream of, brpf1 and eda/edar for the ancestral losses of basihyal element and scales, respectively. These results demonstrate that ontological annotations of the phenotypic effects of genetic alterations in model organisms, when aggregated within a knowledgebase, can be used effectively to generate testable, and useful, hypotheses about evolutionary changes in morphology. PMID:26500251

  8. Phenoscape: Identifying Candidate Genes for Evolutionary Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Richard C.; Su, Baofeng; Balhoff, James P.; Eames, B. Frank; Dahdul, Wasila M.; Lapp, Hilmar; Lundberg, John G.; Vision, Todd J.; Dunham, Rex A.; Mabee, Paula M.; Westerfield, Monte

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypes resulting from mutations in genetic model organisms can help reveal candidate genes for evolutionarily important phenotypic changes in related taxa. Although testing candidate gene hypotheses experimentally in nonmodel organisms is typically difficult, ontology-driven information systems can help generate testable hypotheses about developmental processes in experimentally tractable organisms. Here, we tested candidate gene hypotheses suggested by expert use of the Phenoscape Knowledgebase, specifically looking for genes that are candidates responsible for evolutionarily interesting phenotypes in the ostariophysan fishes that bear resemblance to mutant phenotypes in zebrafish. For this, we searched ZFIN for genetic perturbations that result in either loss of basihyal element or loss of scales phenotypes, because these are the ancestral phenotypes observed in catfishes (Siluriformes). We tested the identified candidate genes by examining their endogenous expression patterns in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. The experimental results were consistent with the hypotheses that these features evolved through disruption in developmental pathways at, or upstream of, brpf1 and eda/edar for the ancestral losses of basihyal element and scales, respectively. These results demonstrate that ontological annotations of the phenotypic effects of genetic alterations in model organisms, when aggregated within a knowledgebase, can be used effectively to generate testable, and useful, hypotheses about evolutionary changes in morphology. PMID:26500251

  9. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A Sorana; Taylor, Michael D; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Collier, Lara S

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma.

  10. Identification of genes from the Treacher Collins candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, M.; Dixon, J.; Edwards, S. |

    1994-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development. The TCOF1 locus has previously been mapped to chromosome 5q32-33. The candidate gene region has been defined as being between two flanking markers, ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14) and Annexin 6 (ANX6), by analyzing recombination events in affected individuals. It is estimated that the distance between these flanking markers is 500 kb by three separate analysis methods: (1) radiation hybrid mapping; (2) genetic linkage; and (3) YAC contig analysis. A cosmid contig which spans the candidate gene region for TCOF1 has been constructed by screening the Los Alamos National Laboratory flow-sorted chromosome 5 cosmid library. Cosmids were obtained by using a combination of probes generated from YAC end clones, Alu-PCR fragments from YACs, and asymmetric PCR fragments from both T7 and T3 cosmid ends. Exon amplifications, the selection of genomic coding sequences based upon the presence of functional splice acceptor and donor sites, was used to identify potential exon sequences. Sequences found to be conserved between species were then used to screen cDNA libraries in order to identify candidate genes. To date, four different cDNAs have been isolated from this region and are being analyzed as potential candidate genes for TCOF1. These include the genes encoding plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPX3), heparin sulfate sulfotransferase (HSST), a gene with homology to the ETS family of proteins and one which shows no homology to any known genes. Work is also in progress to identify and characterize additional cDNAs from the candidate gene region.

  11. CRISPLD2: a novel NSCLP candidate gene

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Brett T.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Stal, Samuel; Mulliken, John B.; Moreno, Lina M.; Arco-Burgos, Mauricio; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Blanton, Susan H.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.

    2013-01-01

    Non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) results from the complex interaction between genes and environmental factors. Candidate gene analysis and genome scans have been employed to identify the genes contributing to NSCLP. In this study, we evaluated the 16q24.1 chromosomal region, which has been identified by multiple genome scans as an NSCLP region of interest. Two candidate genes were found in the region: interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) and cysteine-rich secretory protein LCCL domain containing 2 (CRISPLD2). Initially, Caucasian and Hispanic NSCLP multiplex families and simplex parent–child trios were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both IRF8 and CRISPLD2. CRISPLD2 was subsequently genotyped in a data set comprised of NSCLP families from Colombia, South America. Linkage disequilibrium analysis identified a significant association between CRISPLD2 and NSCLP in both our Caucasian and Hispanic NSCLP cohorts. SNP rs1546124 and haplotypes between rs1546124 and either rs4783099 or rs16974880 were significant in the Caucasian multiplex population (P = 0.01, P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, respectively). An altered transmission of CRISPLD2 SNPs rs8061351 (P = 0.02) and rs2326398 (P = 0.06) was detected in the Hispanic population. No association was found between CRISPLD2 and our Colombian population or IRF8 and NSCLP. In situ hybridization showed that CRISPLD2 is expressed in the mandible, palate and nasopharynx regions during craniofacial development at E13.5–E17.5, respectively. Altogether, these data suggest that genetic variation in CRISPLD2 has a role in the etiology of NSCLP. PMID:17616516

  12. IBD Candidate Genes and Intestinal Barrier Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McCole, Declan F.

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances in the large scale analysis of human genetics have generated profound insights into possible genetic contributions to chronic diseases including the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. To date, 163 distinct genetic risk loci have been associated with either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, with a substantial degree of genetic overlap between these 2 conditions. Although many risk variants show a reproducible correlation with disease, individual gene associations only affect a subset of patients, and the functional contribution(s) of these risk variants to the onset of IBD is largely undetermined. Although studies in twins have demonstrated that the development of IBD is not mediated solely by genetic risk, it is nevertheless important to elucidate the functional consequences of risk variants for gene function in relevant cell types known to regulate key physiological processes that are compromised in IBD. This article will discuss IBD candidate genes that are known to be, or are suspected of being, involved in regulating the intestinal epithelial barrier and several of the physiological processes presided over by this dynamic and versatile layer of cells. This will include assembly and regulation of tight junctions, cell adhesion and polarity, mucus and glycoprotein regulation, bacterial sensing, membrane transport, epithelial differentiation, and restitution. PMID:25215613

  13. Candidate chemosensory genes in the Stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Nicolas; Gallot, Aurore; Legeai, Fabrice; Montagné, Nicolas; Poivet, Erwan; Harry, Myriam; Calatayud, Paul-André; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    The stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides is an important pest of maize in the Mediterranean Basin. Like other moths, this noctuid uses its chemosensory system to efficiently interact with its environment. However, very little is known on the molecular mechanisms that underlie chemosensation in this species. Here, we used next-generation sequencing (454 and Illumina) on different tissues from adult and larvae, including chemosensory organs and female ovipositors, to describe the chemosensory transcriptome of S. nonagrioides and identify key molecular components of the pheromone production and detection systems. We identified a total of 68 candidate chemosensory genes in this species, including 31 candidate binding-proteins and 23 chemosensory receptors. In particular, we retrieved the three co-receptors Orco, IR25a and IR8a necessary for chemosensory receptor functioning. Focusing on the pheromonal communication system, we identified a new pheromone-binding protein in this species, four candidate pheromone receptors and 12 carboxylesterases as candidate acetate degrading enzymes. In addition, we identified enzymes putatively involved in S. nonagrioides pheromone biosynthesis, including a ∆11-desaturase and different acetyltransferases and reductases. RNAseq analyses and RT-PCR were combined to profile gene expression in different tissues. This study constitutes the first large scale description of chemosensory genes in S. nonagrioides. PMID:23781142

  14. Candidate reference genes for gene expression studies in water lily.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huolin; Chen, Sumei; Wan, Hongjian; Chen, Fadi; Gu, Chunsun; Liu, Zhaolei

    2010-09-01

    The selection of an appropriate reference gene(s) is a prerequisite for the proper interpretation of quantitative Real-Time polymerase chain reaction data. We report the evaluation of eight candidate reference genes across various tissues and treatments in the water lily by the two software packages geNorm and NormFinder. Across all samples, clathrin adaptor complexes medium subunit (AP47) and actin 11 (ACT11) emerged as the most suitable reference genes. Across different tissues, ACT11 and elongation factor 1-alpha (EF1alpha) exhibited a stable expression pattern. ACT11 and AP47 also stably expressed in roots subjected to various treatments, but in the leaves of the same plants the most stably expressed genes were ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 16 (UBC16) and ACT11. PMID:20452325

  15. Candidate genes and potential targets for therapeutics in Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Christopher; Coppes, Max J; Narendran, Aru

    2010-09-01

    Wilms' tumour (WT) is the most common malignant renal tumour of childhood. During the past two decades or so, molecular studies carried out on biopsy specimens and tumour-derived cell lines have identified a multitude of chromosomal and epigenetic alterations in WT. In addition, a significant amount of evidence has been gathered to identify the genes and signalling pathways that play a defining role in its genesis, growth, survival and treatment responsiveness. As such, these molecules and mechanisms constitute potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies for refractory WT. In this report we aim to review some of the many candidate genes and intersecting pathways that underlie the complexities of WT biology.

  16. Candidate gene polymorphisms for behavioural adaptations during urbanization in blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Mueller, J C; Partecke, J; Hatchwell, B J; Gaston, K J; Evans, K L

    2013-07-01

    Successful urban colonization by formerly rural species represents an ideal situation in which to study adaptation to novel environments. We address this issue using candidate genes for behavioural traits that are expected to play a role in such colonization events. We identified and genotyped 16 polymorphisms in candidate genes for circadian rhythms, harm avoidance and migratory and exploratory behaviour in 12 paired urban and rural populations of the blackbird Turdus merula across the Western Palaearctic. An exonic microsatellite in the SERT gene, a candidate gene for harm avoidance behaviour, exhibited a highly significant association with habitat type in an analysis conducted across all populations. Genetic divergence at this locus was consistent in 10 of the 12 population pairs; this contrasts with previously reported stochastic genetic divergence between these populations at random markers. Our results indicate that behavioural traits related to harm avoidance and associated with the SERT polymorphism experience selection pressures during most blackbird urbanization events. These events thus appear to be influenced by homogeneous adaptive processes in addition to previously reported demographic founder events.

  17. Candidate gene polymorphisms for behavioural adaptations during urbanization in blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Mueller, J C; Partecke, J; Hatchwell, B J; Gaston, K J; Evans, K L

    2013-07-01

    Successful urban colonization by formerly rural species represents an ideal situation in which to study adaptation to novel environments. We address this issue using candidate genes for behavioural traits that are expected to play a role in such colonization events. We identified and genotyped 16 polymorphisms in candidate genes for circadian rhythms, harm avoidance and migratory and exploratory behaviour in 12 paired urban and rural populations of the blackbird Turdus merula across the Western Palaearctic. An exonic microsatellite in the SERT gene, a candidate gene for harm avoidance behaviour, exhibited a highly significant association with habitat type in an analysis conducted across all populations. Genetic divergence at this locus was consistent in 10 of the 12 population pairs; this contrasts with previously reported stochastic genetic divergence between these populations at random markers. Our results indicate that behavioural traits related to harm avoidance and associated with the SERT polymorphism experience selection pressures during most blackbird urbanization events. These events thus appear to be influenced by homogeneous adaptive processes in addition to previously reported demographic founder events. PMID:23495914

  18. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  19. Genetics of osteoporosis: searching for candidate genes for bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Braz, Manuela G M; Ferraz-de-Souza, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    The pathogenesis of osteoporosis, a common disease with great morbidity and mortality, comprises environmental and genetic factors. As with other complex disorders, the genetic basis of osteoporosis has been difficult to identify. Nevertheless, several approaches have been undertaken in the past decades in order to identify candidate genes for bone fragility, including the study of rare monogenic syndromes with striking bone phenotypes (e.g. osteogenesis imperfecta and osteopetroses), the analysis of individuals or families with extreme osteoporotic phenotypes (e.g. idiopathic juvenile and pregnancy-related osteoporosis), and, chiefly, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in large populations. Altogether, these efforts have greatly increased the understanding of molecular mechanisms behind bone remodelling, which has rapidly translated into the development of novel therapeutic strategies, exemplified by the tales of cathepsin K (CTSK) and sclerostin (SOST). Additional biological evidence of involvement in bone physiology still lacks for several candidate genes arisen from GWAS, opening an opportunity for the discovery of new mechanisms regulating bone strength, particularly with the advent of high-throughput genomic technologies. In this review, candidate genes for bone fragility will be presented in comprehensive tables and discussed with regard to how their association with osteoporosis emerged, highlighting key players such as LRP5, WNT1 and PLS3. Current limitations in our understanding of the genetic contribution to osteoporosis, such as yet unidentified genetic modifiers, may be overcome in the near future with better genotypic and phenotypic characterisation of large populations and the detailed study of candidate genes in informative individuals with marked phenotype. PMID:27533615

  20. Pathogenic Network Analysis Predicts Candidate Genes for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objective of our study was to predicate candidate genes in cervical cancer (CC) using a network-based strategy and to understand the pathogenic process of CC. Methods. A pathogenic network of CC was extracted based on known pathogenic genes (seed genes) and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between CC and normal controls. Subsequently, cluster analysis was performed to identify the subnetworks in the pathogenic network using ClusterONE. Each gene in the pathogenic network was assigned a weight value, and then candidate genes were obtained based on the weight distribution. Eventually, pathway enrichment analysis for candidate genes was performed. Results. In this work, a total of 330 DEGs were identified between CC and normal controls. From the pathogenic network, 2 intensely connected clusters were extracted, and a total of 52 candidate genes were detected under the weight values greater than 0.10. Among these candidate genes, VIM had the highest weight value. Moreover, candidate genes MMP1, CDC45, and CAT were, respectively, enriched in pathway in cancer, cell cycle, and methane metabolism. Conclusion. Candidate pathogenic genes including MMP1, CDC45, CAT, and VIM might be involved in the pathogenesis of CC. We believe that our results can provide theoretical guidelines for future clinical application. PMID:27034707

  1. ToppGene Suite for gene list enrichment analysis and candidate gene prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Bardes, Eric E.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Jegga, Anil G.

    2009-01-01

    ToppGene Suite (http://toppgene.cchmc.org; this web site is free and open to all users and does not require a login to access) is a one-stop portal for (i) gene list functional enrichment, (ii) candidate gene prioritization using either functional annotations or network analysis and (iii) identification and prioritization of novel disease candidate genes in the interactome. Functional annotation-based disease candidate gene prioritization uses a fuzzy-based similarity measure to compute the similarity between any two genes based on semantic annotations. The similarity scores from individual features are combined into an overall score using statistical meta-analysis. A P-value of each annotation of a test gene is derived by random sampling of the whole genome. The protein–protein interaction network (PPIN)-based disease candidate gene prioritization uses social and Web networks analysis algorithms (extended versions of the PageRank and HITS algorithms, and the K-Step Markov method). We demonstrate the utility of ToppGene Suite using 20 recently reported GWAS-based gene–disease associations (including novel disease genes) representing five diseases. ToppGene ranked 19 of 20 (95%) candidate genes within the top 20%, while ToppNet ranked 12 of 16 (75%) candidate genes among the top 20%. PMID:19465376

  2. Candidate genes for nicotine dependence via linkage, epistasis, and bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick F; Neale, Benjamin M; van den Oord, Edwin; Miles, Michael F; Neale, Michael C; Bulik, Cynthia M; Joyce, Peter R; Straub, Richard E; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2004-04-01

    Many smoking-related phenotypes are substantially heritable. One genome scan of nicotine dependence (ND) has been published and several others are in progress and should be completed in the next 5 years. The goal of this hypothesis-generating study was two-fold. First, we present further analyses of our genome scan data for ND published by Straub et al. [1999: Mol Psychiatry 4:129-144] (PMID: 10208445). Second, we used the method described by Cox et al. [1999: Nat Genet 21:213-215] (PMID: 9988276) to search for epistatic loci across the markers used in the genome scan. The overall results of the genome scan nearly reached the rigorous Lander and Kruglyak [1995: Nat Genet 11:241-247] criteria for "significant" linkage with the best findings on chromosomes 10 and 2. We then looked for correspondence between genes located in the 10 regions implicated in affected sibling pair (ASP) and epistatic linkage analyses with a list of genes suggested by microarray studies of experimental nicotine exposure and candidate genes from the literature. We found correspondence between linkage and microarray/candidate gene studies for genes involved with the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling system, nuclear factor kappa B (NFKB) complex, neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurotransmission, a nicotinic receptor subunit (CHRNA2), the vesicular monoamine transporter (SLC18A2), genes in pathways implicated in human anxiety (HTR7, TDO2, and the endozepine-related protein precursor, DKFZP434A2417), and the micro 1-opioid receptor (OPRM1). Although the hypotheses resulting from these linkage and bioinformatic analyses are plausible and intriguing, their ultimate worth depends on replication in additional linkage samples and in future experimental studies. PMID:15048644

  3. Adaptations to Climate in Candidate Genes for Common Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Angela M; Witonsky, David B; Gordon, Adam S; Eshel, Gidon; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Coop, Graham; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary pressures due to variation in climate play an important role in shaping phenotypic variation among and within species and have been shown to influence variation in phenotypes such as body shape and size among humans. Genes involved in energy metabolism are likely to be central to heat and cold tolerance. To test the hypothesis that climate shaped variation in metabolism genes in humans, we used a bioinformatics approach based on network theory to select 82 candidate genes for common metabolic disorders. We genotyped 873 tag SNPs in these genes in 54 worldwide populations (including the 52 in the Human Genome Diversity Project panel) and found correlations with climate variables using rank correlation analysis and a newly developed method termed Bayesian geographic analysis. In addition, we genotyped 210 carefully matched control SNPs to provide an empirical null distribution for spatial patterns of allele frequency due to population history alone. For nearly all climate variables, we found an excess of genic SNPs in the tail of the distributions of the test statistics compared to the control SNPs, implying that metabolic genes as a group show signals of spatially varying selection. Among our strongest signals were several SNPs (e.g., LEPR R109K, FABP2 A54T) that had previously been associated with phenotypes directly related to cold tolerance. Since variation in climate may be correlated with other aspects of environmental variation, it is possible that some of the signals that we detected reflect selective pressures other than climate. Nevertheless, our results are consistent with the idea that climate has been an important selective pressure acting on candidate genes for common metabolic disorders. PMID:18282109

  4. Oligonucleotide conjugates - Candidates for gene silencing therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Evans, James C; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-10-01

    The potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications of oligonucleotides (ONs) have attracted great attention in recent years. The capability of ONs to selectively inhibit target genes through antisense and RNA interference mechanisms, without causing un-intended sideeffects has led them to be investigated for various biomedical applications, especially for the treatment of viral diseases and cancer. In recent years, many researchers have focused on enhancing the stability and target specificity of ONs by encapsulating/complexing them with polymers or lipid chains to formulate nanoparticles/nanocomplexes/micelles. Also, chemical modification of nucleic acids has emerged as an alternative to impart stability to ONs against nucleases and other degrading enzymes and proteins found in blood. In addition to chemically modifying the nucleic acids directly, another strategy that has emerged, involves conjugating polymers/peptide/aptamers/antibodies/proteins, preferably to the sense strand (3'end) of siRNAs. Conjugation to the siRNA not only enhances the stability and targeting specificity of the siRNA, but also allows for the development of self-administering siRNA formulations, with a much smaller size than what is usually observed for nanoparticle (∼200nm). This review concentrates mainly on approaches and studies involving ON-conjugates for biomedical applications. PMID:27521696

  5. Oligonucleotide conjugates - Candidates for gene silencing therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Evans, James C; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-10-01

    The potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications of oligonucleotides (ONs) have attracted great attention in recent years. The capability of ONs to selectively inhibit target genes through antisense and RNA interference mechanisms, without causing un-intended sideeffects has led them to be investigated for various biomedical applications, especially for the treatment of viral diseases and cancer. In recent years, many researchers have focused on enhancing the stability and target specificity of ONs by encapsulating/complexing them with polymers or lipid chains to formulate nanoparticles/nanocomplexes/micelles. Also, chemical modification of nucleic acids has emerged as an alternative to impart stability to ONs against nucleases and other degrading enzymes and proteins found in blood. In addition to chemically modifying the nucleic acids directly, another strategy that has emerged, involves conjugating polymers/peptide/aptamers/antibodies/proteins, preferably to the sense strand (3'end) of siRNAs. Conjugation to the siRNA not only enhances the stability and targeting specificity of the siRNA, but also allows for the development of self-administering siRNA formulations, with a much smaller size than what is usually observed for nanoparticle (∼200nm). This review concentrates mainly on approaches and studies involving ON-conjugates for biomedical applications.

  6. LFG: a candidate apoptosis regulatory gene family.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lan; Smith, Temple F; Goldberger, Gabriel

    2009-11-01

    The expanding wealth of human, model and other organism's genomic data has allowed the identification of a distinct gene family of apoptotic related genes. Most of these genes are currently unannotated or have been subsumed under two questionably related gene families in the past. For example the transmembrane Bax inhibitor 1 (BI1) motif family has been reported to play a role in apoptosis and to consist of at least seven mammalian protein genes, GRINA, BI1, Lfg/FAIM2, Ghitm, RESC1/Tmbim1, GAAP/Tmbim4, and Tmbm1b. However, a detailed sequence and phylogenetic analysis shows that only five of these form a clear and unique protein family. This now provides information for understanding and investigating the biological roles of these proteins across a wide range of tissues in model organisms. The evolutionary relationships among these genes provide a powerful prospective for extrapolating to human conditions.

  7. Unifying Candidate Gene and GWAS Approaches in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Sven; Liang, Liming; Depner, Martin; Klopp, Norman; Ruether, Andreas; Kumar, Ashish; Schedel, Michaela; Vogelberg, Christian; von Mutius, Erika; von Berg, Andrea; Bufe, Albrecht; Rietschel, Ernst; Heinzmann, Andrea; Laub, Otto; Simma, Burkhard; Frischer, Thomas; Genuneit, Jon; Gut, Ivo G.; Schreiber, Stefan; Lathrop, Mark; Illig, Thomas; Kabesch, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first genome wide association study (GWAS) for childhood asthma identified a novel major susceptibility locus on chromosome 17q21 harboring the ORMDL3 gene, but the role of previous asthma candidate genes was not specifically analyzed in this GWAS. We systematically identified 89 SNPs in 14 candidate genes previously associated with asthma in >3 independent study populations. We re-genotyped 39 SNPs in these genes not covered by GWAS performed in 703 asthmatics and 658 reference children. Genotyping data were compared to imputation data derived from Illumina HumanHap300 chip genotyping. Results were combined to analyze 566 SNPs covering all 14 candidate gene loci. Genotyped polymorphisms in ADAM33, GSTP1 and VDR showed effects with p-values <0.0035 (corrected for multiple testing). Combining genotyping and imputation, polymorphisms in DPP10, EDN1, IL12B, IL13, IL4, IL4R and TNF showed associations at a significance level between p = 0.05 and p = 0.0035. These data indicate that (a) GWAS coverage is insufficient for many asthma candidate genes, (b) imputation based on these data is reliable but incomplete, and (c) SNPs in three previously identified asthma candidate genes replicate in our GWAS population with significance after correction for multiple testing in 14 genes. PMID:21103062

  8. Candidate gene discovery and prioritization in rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Jegga, Anil G

    2014-01-01

    A rare or orphan disorder is any disease that affects a small percentage of the population. Most genes and pathways underlying these disorders remain unknown. High-throughput techniques are frequently applied to detect disease candidate genes. The speed and affordability of sequencing following recent technological advances while advantageous are accompanied by the problem of data deluge. Furthermore, experimental validation of disease candidate genes is both time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, several computational approaches have been developed to identify the most promising candidates for follow-up studies. Based on the guilt by association principle, most of these approaches use prior knowledge about a disease of interest to discover and rank novel candidate genes. In this chapter, a brief overview of some of the in silico strategies for candidate gene prioritization is provided. To demonstrate their utility in rare disease research, a Web-based computational suite of tools that use integrated heterogeneous data sources for ranking disease candidate genes is used to demonstrate how to run typical queries using this system.

  9. A yeast functional screen predicts new candidate ALS disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Couthouis, Julien; Hart, Michael P.; Shorter, James; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Erion, Renske; Oristano, Rachel; Liu, Annie X.; Ramos, Daniel; Jethava, Niti; Hosangadi, Divya; Epstein, James; Chiang, Ashley; Diaz, Zamia; Nakaya, Tadashi; Ibrahim, Fadia; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Solski, Jennifer A.; Williams, Kelly L.; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Ingre, Caroline; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Clay-Falcone, Dana; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Greene, Robert; Kalb, Robert G.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ludolph, Albert; Robberecht, Wim; Andersen, Peter M.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Blair, Ian P.; King, Oliver D.; Bonini, Nancy M.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Rademakers, Rosa; Mourelatos, Zissimos; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating and universally fatal neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in two related RNA-binding proteins, TDP-43 and FUS, that harbor prion-like domains, cause some forms of ALS. There are at least 213 human proteins harboring RNA recognition motifs, including FUS and TDP-43, raising the possibility that additional RNA-binding proteins might contribute to ALS pathogenesis. We performed a systematic survey of these proteins to find additional candidates similar to TDP-43 and FUS, followed by bioinformatics to predict prion-like domains in a subset of them. We sequenced one of these genes, TAF15, in patients with ALS and identified missense variants, which were absent in a large number of healthy controls. These disease-associated variants of TAF15 caused formation of cytoplasmic foci when expressed in primary cultures of spinal cord neurons. Very similar to TDP-43 and FUS, TAF15 aggregated in vitro and conferred neurodegeneration in Drosophila, with the ALS-linked variants having a more severe effect than wild type. Immunohistochemistry of postmortem spinal cord tissue revealed mislocalization of TAF15 in motor neurons of patients with ALS. We propose that aggregation-prone RNA-binding proteins might contribute very broadly to ALS pathogenesis and the genes identified in our yeast functional screen, coupled with prion-like domain prediction analysis, now provide a powerful resource to facilitate ALS disease gene discovery. PMID:22065782

  10. A direct molecular link between the autism candidate gene RORa and the schizophrenia candidate MIR137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanna, Paolo; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-02-01

    Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha gene (RORa) and the microRNA MIR137 have both recently been identified as novel candidate genes for neuropsychiatric disorders. RORa encodes a ligand-dependent orphan nuclear receptor that acts as a transcriptional regulator and miR-137 is a brain enriched small non-coding RNA that interacts with gene transcripts to control protein levels. Given the mounting evidence for RORa in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and MIR137 in schizophrenia and ASD, we investigated if there was a functional biological relationship between these two genes. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-137 targets the 3'UTR of RORa in a site specific manner. We also provide further support for MIR137 as an autism candidate by showing that a large number of previously implicated autism genes are also putatively targeted by miR-137. This work supports the role of MIR137 as an ASD candidate and demonstrates a direct biological link between these previously unrelated autism candidate genes.

  11. Large-Scale Candidate Gene Analysis of HDL Particle Features

    PubMed Central

    Kaess, Bernhard M.; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Braund, Peter S.; Stark, Klaus; Rafelt, Suzanne; Fischer, Marcus; Hardwick, Robert; Nelson, Christopher P.; Debiec, Radoslaw; Huber, Fritz; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert; Rose, Lynda M.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Hopewell, Jemma; Clarke, Robert; Burton, Paul R.; Tobin, Martin D.

    2011-01-01

    Background HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) is an established marker of cardiovascular risk with significant genetic determination. However, HDL particles are not homogenous, and refined HDL phenotyping may improve insight into regulation of HDL metabolism. We therefore assessed HDL particles by NMR spectroscopy and conducted a large-scale candidate gene association analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings We measured plasma HDL-C and determined mean HDL particle size and particle number by NMR spectroscopy in 2024 individuals from 512 British Caucasian families. Genotypes were 49,094 SNPs in >2,100 cardiometabolic candidate genes/loci as represented on the HumanCVD BeadChip version 2. False discovery rates (FDR) were calculated to account for multiple testing. Analyses on classical HDL-C revealed significant associations (FDR<0.05) only for CETP (cholesteryl ester transfer protein; lead SNP rs3764261: p = 5.6*10−15) and SGCD (sarcoglycan delta; rs6877118: p = 8.6*10−6). In contrast, analysis with HDL mean particle size yielded additional associations in LIPC (hepatic lipase; rs261332: p = 6.1*10−9), PLTP (phospholipid transfer protein, rs4810479: p = 1.7*10−8) and FBLN5 (fibulin-5; rs2246416: p = 6.2*10−6). The associations of SGCD and Fibulin-5 with HDL particle size could not be replicated in PROCARDIS (n = 3,078) and/or the Women's Genome Health Study (n = 23,170). Conclusions We show that refined HDL phenotyping by NMR spectroscopy can detect known genes of HDL metabolism better than analyses on HDL-C. PMID:21283740

  12. Analysis of candidate genes for macular telangiectasia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Parmalee, Nancy L.; Schubert, Carl; Merriam, Joanna E.; Allikmets, Kaija; Bird, Alan C.; Gillies, Mark C.; Peto, Tunde; Figueroa, Maria; Friedlander, Martin; Fruttiger, Marcus; Greenwood, John; Moss, Stephen E.; Smith, Lois E.H.; Toomes, Carmel; Inglehearn, Chris F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To find the gene(s) responsible for macular telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel) by a candidate-gene screening approach. Methods Candidate genes were selected based on the following criteria: those known to cause or be associated with diseases with phenotypes similar to MacTel, genes with known function in the retinal vasculature or macular pigment transport, genes that emerged from expression microarray data from mouse models designed to mimic MacTel phenotype characteristics, and genes expressed in the retina that are also related to diabetes or hypertension, which have increased prevalence in MacTel patients. Probands from eight families with at least two affected individuals were screened by direct sequencing of 27 candidate genes. Identified nonsynonymous variants were analyzed to determine whether they co-segregate with the disease in families. Allele frequencies were determined by TaqMan analysis of the large MacTel and control cohorts. Results We identified 23 nonsynonymous variants in 27 candidate genes in at least one proband. Of these, eight were known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with allele frequencies of >0.05; these variants were excluded from further analyses. Three previously unidentified missense variants, three missense variants with reported disease association, and five rare variants were analyzed for segregation and/or allele frequencies. No variant fulfilled the criteria of being causal for MacTel. A missense mutation, p.Pro33Ser in frizzled homolog (Drosophila) 4 (FZD4), previously suggested as a disease-causing variant in familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, was determined to be a rare benign polymorphism. Conclusions We have ruled out the exons and flanking intronic regions in 27 candidate genes as harboring causal mutations for MacTel. PMID:21179236

  13. Association of candidate genes with antisocial drug dependence in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Robin P.; Zeiger, Joanna S.; Crowley, Thomas; Ehringer, Marissa A.; Hewitt, John K.; Hopfer, Christian J.; Lessem, Jeffrey; McQueen, Matthew B.; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Smolen, Andrew; Stallings, Michael C.; Young, Susan E.; Krauter, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    The Colorado Center for Antisocial Drug Dependence (CADD) is using several research designs and strategies in its study of the genetic basis for antisocial drug dependence in adolescents. This study reports Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) association results from a Targeted Gene Assay (SNP chip) of 231 Caucasian male probands in treatment with antisocial drug dependence and a matched set of community controls. The SNP chip was designed to assay 1500 SNPs distributed across 50 candidate genes that have had associations with substance use disorders and conduct disorder. There was an average gene-wide inter-SNP interval of 3000 base pairs. After eliminating SNPs with poor signals and low minor allele frequencies, 60 nominally significant associations were found among the remaining 1073 SNPs in 18 of 49 candidate genes. Although none of the SNPs achieved genome-wide association significance levels (defined as p < .000001), two genes probed with multiple SNPs (OPRM1 and CHRNA2) emerged as plausible candidates for a role in antisocial drug dependence after gene-based permutation tests. The custom-designed SNP chip served as an effective and flexible platform for rapid interrogation of a large number of plausible candidate genes. PMID:18384978

  14. Looking into flowering time in almond (Prunus dulcis (Mill) D. A. Webb): the candidate gene approach.

    PubMed

    Silva, C; Garcia-Mas, J; Sánchez, A M; Arús, P; Oliveira, M M

    2005-03-01

    Blooming time is one of the most important agronomic traits in almond. Biochemical and molecular events underlying flowering regulation must be understood before methods to stimulate late flowering can be developed. Attempts to elucidate the genetic control of this process have led to the identification of a major gene (Lb) and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) linked to observed phenotypic differences, but although this gene and these QTLs have been placed on the Prunus reference genetic map, their sequences and specific functions remain unknown. The aim of our investigation was to associate these loci with known genes using a candidate gene approach. Two almond cDNAs and eight Prunus expressed sequence tags were selected as candidate genes (CGs) since their sequences were highly identical to those of flowering regulatory genes characterized in other species. The CGs were amplified from both parental lines of the mapping population using specific primers. Sequence comparison revealed DNA polymorphisms between the parental lines, mainly of the single nucleotide type. Polymorphisms were used to develop co-dominant cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers or length polymorphisms based on insertion/deletion events for mapping the candidate genes on the Prunus reference map. Ten candidate genes were assigned to six linkage groups in the Prunus genome. The positions of two of these were compatible with the regions where two QTLs for blooming time were detected. One additional candidate was localized close to the position of the Evergrowing gene, which determines a non-deciduous behaviour in peach.

  15. Screening of three Usher syndrome type II candidate genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bloemker, B.K.; Swaroop, A.; Kimberling, W.J.

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndrome type II (US2) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa and congenital hearing loss. The disease affects approximately 1 in 20,000 individuals in the general population and is responsible for over 50% of all cases of deafness with blindness. The underlying US2 defect is unknown. The US2 gene has been localized to the 1q41 region of chromosome 1 by linkage studies. Three genes previously localized to 1q were analyzed to assess their candidacy as the US2 gene. These were evaluated by PCR assays using DNA from a YAC contig spanning the US2 region on chromosome 1. The first gene evaluated was the human choroideremia-like gene (hCHML), which had been mapped to chromosome 1q. The sequence on 1q is a homologue of the human choroideremia gene on chromosome X. Choroideremia is a degenerative disorder causing ocular pathology similar to that observed in US2 patients. Therefore, hCHML is a candidate for the US2 gene. Two cDNAs (A and B) from an enriched human retinal pigment epithelium library have been mapped to 1q41 by in situ hybridization. Both cDNAs are considered good candidates. The hCHML and cDNA A were ruled out as candidates for the US2 gene based on negative results from PCR assays performed on YACs spanning the US2 region. cDNA B could not be ruled out as a candidate for the US2 gene by these assays. Answers to many clinical questions regarding US2 will only be resolved after the gene is identified and characterized. Eventually, understanding the function and expression of the US2 gene will provide a basis for the development of therapy.

  16. Conceptual thinking for in silico prioritization of candidate disease genes.

    PubMed

    Tiffin, Nicki

    2011-01-01

    Prioritization of most likely etiological genes entails predicting and defining a set of characteristics that are most likely to fit the underlying disease gene and scoring candidates according to their fit to this "perfect disease gene" profile. This requires a full understanding of the disease phenotype, characteristics, and any available data on the underlying genetics of the disease. Public databases provide enormous and ever-growing amounts of information that can be relevant to the prioritization of etiological genes. Computational approaches allow this information to be retrieved in an automated and exhaustive way and can therefore facilitate the comprehensive mining of this information, including its combination with sets of empirically generated data, in the process of identifying most likely candidate disease genes.

  17. Prediction of causal candidate genes in coronary artery disease loci

    PubMed Central

    Brænne, Ingrid; Civelek, Mete; Vilne, Baiba; Di Narzo, Antonio; Johnson, Andrew D.; Zhao, Yuqi; Reiz, Benedikt; Codoni, Veronica; Webb, Thomas R.; Asl, Hassan Foroughi; Hamby, Stephen E.; Zeng, Lingyao; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Hao, Ke; Topol, Eric J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Yang, Xia; Samani, Nilesh J.; Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have so far identified 159 significant and suggestive loci for coronary artery disease (CAD). We now report comprehensive bioinformatics analyses of sequence variation in these loci to predict candidate causal genes. Approach and Results All annotated genes in the loci were evaluated with respect to protein coding SNPs and gene expression parameters. The latter included expression quantitative trait loci, tissue specificity, and miRNA binding. High priority candidate genes were further identified based on literature searches and our experimental data. We conclude that the great majority of causal variations affecting CAD risk occur in non-coding regions, with 41 % affecting gene expression robustly versus 6% leading to amino acid changes. Many of these genes differed from the traditionally annotated genes, which was usually based on proximity to the lead SNP. Indeed, we obtained evidence that genetic variants at CAD loci affect 98 genes which had not been linked to CAD previously. Conclusions Our results substantially revise the list of likely candidates for CAD and suggest that GWAS efforts in other diseases may benefit from similar bioinformatics analyses. PMID:26293461

  18. Exome Analyses of Long QT Syndrome Reveal Candidate Pathogenic Mutations in Calmodulin-Interacting Genes.

    PubMed

    Shigemizu, Daichi; Aiba, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Ozaki, Kouichi; Miya, Fuyuki; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kubo, Michiaki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Shimizu, Wataru; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an arrhythmogenic disorder that can lead to sudden death. To date, mutations in 15 LQTS-susceptibility genes have been implicated. However, the genetic cause for approximately 20% of LQTS patients remains elusive. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing analyses on 59 LQTS and 61 unaffected individuals in 35 families and 138 unrelated LQTS cases, after genetic screening of known LQTS genes. Our systematic analysis of familial cases and subsequent verification by Sanger sequencing identified 92 candidate mutations in 88 genes for 23 of the 35 families (65.7%): these included eleven de novo, five recessive (two homozygous and three compound heterozygous) and seventy-three dominant mutations. Although no novel commonly mutated gene was identified other than known LQTS genes, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analyses revealed ten new pathogenic candidates that directly or indirectly interact with proteins encoded by known LQTS genes. Furthermore, candidate gene based association studies using an independent set of 138 unrelated LQTS cases and 587 controls identified an additional novel candidate. Together, mutations in these new candidates and known genes explained 37.1% of the LQTS families (13 in 35). Moreover, half of the newly identified candidates directly interact with calmodulin (5 in 11; comparison with all genes; p=0.042). Subsequent variant analysis in the independent set of 138 cases identified 16 variants in the 11 genes, of which 14 were in calmodulin-interacting genes (87.5%). These results suggest an important role of calmodulin and its interacting proteins in the pathogenesis of LQTS. PMID:26132555

  19. Candidate genes for individual recognition in Polistes fuscatus paper wasps.

    PubMed

    Berens, A J; Tibbetts, E A; Toth, A L

    2016-02-01

    Few animals are known to individually recognize conspecifics, i.e. learn and recall unique individuals during subsequent encounters, and nearly all are social vertebrates. Remarkably, the social paper wasp Polistes fuscatus has recently been discovered to possess this ability, which is useful for remembering identities during competitive social interactions. We analyzed brain gene expression in staged encounters between pairs of individuals to explore potential mechanisms underlying wasps' ability to recall familiar individuals using real-time qRT-PCR. We identified four candidate genes (IP3K, IP3R, Nckx30C and Su(var)2-10) that were down-regulated in the presence of familiar individuals compared to single wasps and pairs of wasps meeting for the first time. These candidate genes are related to calcium signaling, therefore, we treated wasps with lithium chloride, a pharmacological agent that inhibits calcium signaling in neurons. This treatment decreased aggression in paper wasps, but did not affect expression of genes related to calcium signaling. The results suggest calcium signaling differences may be related to individual memory recall in wasps, and we present four promising candidate genes for future study. These data suggest genes associated with dominance behavior may be co-opted for individual recognition, but further work is needed to establish a causal association with the behavior.

  20. Evaluation of candidate gene effects for beef backfat via Bayesian model selection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Macneil, Michael D; De, Sachinadan; Xiao, Qian-Jun; Michal, Jennifer J; Gaskins, Charles T; Reeves, Jerry J; Busboom, Jan R; Wright, Raymond W; Jiang, Zhihua

    2005-09-01

    Candidate gene approaches provide tools for exploring and localizing causative genes affecting quantitative traits and the underlying variation may be better understood by determining the relative magnitudes of effects of their polymorphisms. Diacyglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1), fatty acid binding protein (heart) 3 (FABP3), growth hormone 1 (GH1), leptin (LEP) and thyroglobulin (TG) have been previously identified as genes contributing to genetic control of subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) in beef cattle. In the present research, Bayesian model selection was used to evaluate effects of these five candidate genes by comparing competing non-nested models and treating candidate gene effects as either random or fixed. The analyses were implemented in SAS to simplify the programming and computation. Phenotypic data were gathered from a F(2) population of Wagyu x Limousin cattle. The five candidate genes had significant but varied effects on SFT in this population. Bayesian model selection identified the DGAT1 model as the one with the greatest model probability, whether candidate gene effects were considered random or fixed, and DGAT1 had the greatest additive effect on SFT. The SAS codes developed in the study are freely available and can be downloaded at: http://www.ansci.wsu.edu/programs/.

  1. Candidate genes for COPD: current evidence and research

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jin; Lee, Sang Do

    2015-01-01

    COPD is a common complex disease characterized by progressive airflow limitation. Several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered genes that are associated with COPD. Recently, candidate genes for COPD identified by GWASs include CHRNA3/5 (cholinergic nicotine receptor alpha 3/5), IREB2 (iron regulatory binding protein 2), HHIP (hedgehog-interacting protein), FAM13A (family with sequence similarity 13, member A), and AGER (advanced glycosylation end product–specific receptor). Their association with COPD susceptibility has been replicated in multiple populations. Since these candidate genes have not been considered in COPD, their pathological roles are still largely unknown. Herein, we review some evidences that they can be effective drug targets or serve as biomarkers for diagnosis or subtyping. However, more study is required to understand the functional roles of these candidate genes. Future research is needed to characterize the effect of genetic variants, validate gene function in humans and model systems, and elucidate the genes’ transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26527870

  2. The cavefish genome reveals candidate genes for eye loss.

    PubMed

    McGaugh, Suzanne E; Gross, Joshua B; Aken, Bronwen; Blin, Maryline; Borowsky, Richard; Chalopin, Domitille; Hinaux, Hélène; Jeffery, William R; Keene, Alex; Ma, Li; Minx, Patrick; Murphy, Daniel; O'Quin, Kelly E; Rétaux, Sylvie; Rohner, Nicolas; Searle, Steve M J; Stahl, Bethany A; Tabin, Cliff; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Yoshizawa, Masato; Warren, Wesley C

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations subjected to strong environmental selection pressures offer a window into the genetic underpinnings of evolutionary change. Cavefish populations, Astyanax mexicanus (Teleostei: Characiphysi), exhibit repeated, independent evolution for a variety of traits including eye degeneration, pigment loss, increased size and number of taste buds and mechanosensory organs, and shifts in many behavioural traits. Surface and cave forms are interfertile making this system amenable to genetic interrogation; however, lack of a reference genome has hampered efforts to identify genes responsible for changes in cave forms of A. mexicanus. Here we present the first de novo genome assembly for Astyanax mexicanus cavefish, contrast repeat elements to other teleost genomes, identify candidate genes underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL), and assay these candidate genes for potential functional and expression differences. We expect the cavefish genome to advance understanding of the evolutionary process, as well as, analogous human disease including retinal dysfunction. PMID:25329095

  3. The cavefish genome reveals candidate genes for eye loss

    PubMed Central

    McGaugh, Suzanne E.; Gross, Joshua B.; Aken, Bronwen; Blin, Maryline; Borowsky, Richard; Chalopin, Domitille; Hinaux, Hélène; Jeffery, William R.; Keene, Alex; Ma, Li; Minx, Patrick; Murphy, Daniel; O’Quin, Kelly E.; Rétaux, Sylvie; Rohner, Nicolas; Searle, Steve M. J.; Stahl, Bethany A.; Tabin, Cliff; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Yoshizawa, Masato; Warren, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations subjected to strong environmental selection pressures offer a window into the genetic underpinnings of evolutionary change. Cavefish populations, Astyanax mexicanus (Teleostei: Characiphysi), exhibit repeated, independent evolution for a variety of traits including eye degeneration, pigment loss, increased size and number of taste buds and mechanosensory organs, and shifts in many behavioural traits. Surface and cave forms are interfertile making this system amenable to genetic interrogation; however, lack of a reference genome has hampered efforts to identify genes responsible for changes in cave forms of A. mexicanus. Here we present the first de novo genome assembly for Astyanax mexicanus cavefish, contrast repeat elements to other teleost genomes, identify candidate genes underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL), and assay these candidate genes for potential functional and expression differences. We expect the cavefish genome to advance understanding of the evolutionary process, as well as, analogous human disease including retinal dysfunction. PMID:25329095

  4. Candidate genes for hypertension: insights from the Dahl S rat.

    PubMed

    Rudemiller, Nathan P; Mattson, David L

    2015-12-15

    Human genetic linkage and association studies have nominated many genes as possible contributors to disease. Mutating or deleting these genes in a relevant disease model can validate their association with disease and potentially uncover novel mechanisms of pathogenesis. Targeted genetic mutagenesis has only recently been developed in the rat, and this technique has been applied in the Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rat to investigate human candidate genes associated with hypertension. This mini-review communicates the findings of these studies and displays how targeted genetic mutagenesis may contribute to the discovery of novel therapies for patients. PMID:25877508

  5. Exclusion of the PAX2 gene as a candidate gene for Crouzon craniofacial dysostosis

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.A.; Gorry, M.C.; Warman, M.

    1994-09-01

    Crouzon craniofacial dysostosis (CFD, MIM 123500) is an abnormality of craniofacial development characterized by premature craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, and shallow orbits. We have mapped the CFD gene locus using a candidate gene approach to a 7 centiMorgan region on chromosome 10q in three CFD families. A maximal multipoint LOD score of 12.33 was achieved for a locus 2 cM distal to the microsatellite marker D10S209. A comparison of several physical, cytogenetic, and linkage maps revealed that the cytogenetic bands, 10q25-q26, most likely contain this CFD locus. The PAX2 gene, which has been mapped near another marker which in turn has been mapped to 10q25, was analyzed as a candidate gene. PAX2 was chosen for analysis because mutations in other members of the PAX gene family have been identified with human craniofacial abnormalities (e.g. Waardenburg syndrome). A YAC contig, consisting of 5 overlapping groups and composed of 11 YACs that spans the entire 7 cM region, was assembled for PAX2 analyses. None of these YACs supported PAX2-specific amplification using primer sets for both the second and third PAX2 exons. Control amplifications for YAC vector sequences produced robust amplifications in all cases. In addition, SSCP analyses of amplification products generated from the second and third PAX2 exons and the 3{prime} untranslated region of the PAX2 gene from both affected and unaffected family members in two of the kindreds failed to reveal any polymorphisms. Although it remains theoretically possible, due to artifacts in the YAC contigs, it is unlikely that PAX2 is the CFD gene.

  6. Network Candidate Genes in Breeding for Drought Tolerant Crops.

    PubMed

    Krannich, Christoph Tim; Maletzki, Lisa; Kurowsky, Christina; Horn, Renate

    2015-07-17

    Climate change leading to increased periods of low water availability as well as increasing demands for food in the coming years makes breeding for drought tolerant crops a high priority. Plants have developed diverse strategies and mechanisms to survive drought stress. However, most of these represent drought escape or avoidance strategies like early flowering or low stomatal conductance that are not applicable in breeding for crops with high yields under drought conditions. Even though a great deal of research is ongoing, especially in cereals, in this regard, not all mechanisms involved in drought tolerance are yet understood. The identification of candidate genes for drought tolerance that have a high potential to be used for breeding drought tolerant crops represents a challenge. Breeding for drought tolerant crops has to focus on acceptable yields under water-limited conditions and not on survival. However, as more and more knowledge about the complex networks and the cross talk during drought is available, more options are revealed. In addition, it has to be considered that conditioning a crop for drought tolerance might require the production of metabolites and might cost the plants energy and resources that cannot be used in terms of yield. Recent research indicates that yield penalty exists and efficient breeding for drought tolerant crops with acceptable yields under well-watered and drought conditions might require uncoupling yield penalty from drought tolerance.

  7. Network Candidate Genes in Breeding for Drought Tolerant Crops

    PubMed Central

    Krannich, Christoph Tim; Maletzki, Lisa; Kurowsky, Christina; Horn, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Climate change leading to increased periods of low water availability as well as increasing demands for food in the coming years makes breeding for drought tolerant crops a high priority. Plants have developed diverse strategies and mechanisms to survive drought stress. However, most of these represent drought escape or avoidance strategies like early flowering or low stomatal conductance that are not applicable in breeding for crops with high yields under drought conditions. Even though a great deal of research is ongoing, especially in cereals, in this regard, not all mechanisms involved in drought tolerance are yet understood. The identification of candidate genes for drought tolerance that have a high potential to be used for breeding drought tolerant crops represents a challenge. Breeding for drought tolerant crops has to focus on acceptable yields under water-limited conditions and not on survival. However, as more and more knowledge about the complex networks and the cross talk during drought is available, more options are revealed. In addition, it has to be considered that conditioning a crop for drought tolerance might require the production of metabolites and might cost the plants energy and resources that cannot be used in terms of yield. Recent research indicates that yield penalty exists and efficient breeding for drought tolerant crops with acceptable yields under well-watered and drought conditions might require uncoupling yield penalty from drought tolerance. PMID:26193269

  8. Testing candidate genes for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in fruit flies using a high throughput assay for complex behavior.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Madsen, Lisbeth Strøm; Neumann Arvidson, Sandra Marie; Loeschcke, Volker; Demontis, Ditte; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard

    2016-01-01

    Fruit flies are important model organisms for functional testing of candidate genes in multiple disciplines, including the study of human diseases. Here we use a high-throughput locomotor activity assay to test the response on activity behavior of gene disruption in Drosophila melanogaster. The aim was to investigate the impact of disruption of 14 candidate genes for human attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on fly behavior. By obtaining a range of correlated measures describing the space of variables for behavioral activity we show, that some mutants display similar phenotypic responses, and furthermore, that the genes disrupted in those mutants had common molecular functions; namely processes related to cGMP activity, cation channels and serotonin receptors. All but one of the candidate genes resulted in aberrant behavioral activity, suggesting involvement of these genes in behavioral activity in fruit flies. Results provide additional support for the investigated genes being risk candidate genes for ADHD in humans.

  9. Testing candidate genes for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in fruit flies using a high throughput assay for complex behavior.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Madsen, Lisbeth Strøm; Neumann Arvidson, Sandra Marie; Loeschcke, Volker; Demontis, Ditte; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard

    2016-01-01

    Fruit flies are important model organisms for functional testing of candidate genes in multiple disciplines, including the study of human diseases. Here we use a high-throughput locomotor activity assay to test the response on activity behavior of gene disruption in Drosophila melanogaster. The aim was to investigate the impact of disruption of 14 candidate genes for human attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on fly behavior. By obtaining a range of correlated measures describing the space of variables for behavioral activity we show, that some mutants display similar phenotypic responses, and furthermore, that the genes disrupted in those mutants had common molecular functions; namely processes related to cGMP activity, cation channels and serotonin receptors. All but one of the candidate genes resulted in aberrant behavioral activity, suggesting involvement of these genes in behavioral activity in fruit flies. Results provide additional support for the investigated genes being risk candidate genes for ADHD in humans. PMID:26954609

  10. Genotype relative risks: Methods for design and analysis of candidate-gene association studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. )

    1993-11-01

    Design and analysis methods are presented for studying the association of a candidate gene with a disease by using parental data in place of nonrelated controls. This alternating design eliminates spurious differences in allele frequencies between cases and nonrelated controls resulting from different ethnic origins and population stratification for these two groups. The authors present analysis methods which are based on two genetic relative risks: (1) the relative risk of disease for homozygotes with two copies of the candidate gene versus homozygotes without the candidate gene and (2) the relative risk for heterozygotes with one copy of the candidate gene versus homozygotes without the candidate gene. In addition to estimating the magnitude of these relative risks, likelihood methods allow specific hypotheses to be tested, namely, a test for overall association of the candidate gene with disease, as well as specific genetic hypotheses, such as dominant or recessive inheritance. Two likelihood methods are presented: (1) a likelihood method appropriate when Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds and (2) a likelihood method in which the authors condition on parental genotype data when Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium does not hold. The results for the relative efficiency of these two methods suggest that the conditional approach may at times be preferable, even when equilibrium holds. Sample-size and power calculations are presented for a multitiered design. Tier 1 detects the presence of an abnormal sequence for a postulated candidate gene among a small group of cases. Tier 2 tests for association of the abnormal variant with disease, such as by the likelihood methods presented. Tier 3 confirms positive results from tier 2. Results indicate that required sample sizes are smaller when expression of disease is recessive, rather than dominant, and that, for recessive disease and large relative risks, necessary sample sizes may be feasible. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Parkinson's disease candidate gene prioritization based on expression profile of midbrain dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. The pathological hallmark of the disease is degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Genetic association studies have linked 13 human chromosomal loci to Parkinson's disease. Identification of gene(s), as part of the etiology of Parkinson's disease, within the large number of genes residing in these loci can be achieved through several approaches, including screening methods, and considering appropriate criteria. Since several of the indentified Parkinson's disease genes are expressed in substantia nigra pars compact of the midbrain, expression within the neurons of this area could be a suitable criterion to limit the number of candidates and identify PD genes. Methods In this work we have used the combination of findings from six rodent transcriptome analysis studies on the gene expression profile of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and the PARK loci in OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database, to identify new candidate genes for Parkinson's disease. Results Merging the two datasets, we identified 20 genes within PARK loci, 7 of which are located in an orphan Parkinson's disease locus and one, which had been identified as a disease gene. In addition to identifying a set of candidates for further genetic association studies, these results show that the criteria of expression in midbrain dopaminergic neurons may be used to narrow down the number of genes in PARK loci for such studies. PMID:20716345

  12. New DNA markers in the Huntington's disease gene candidate region.

    PubMed

    Lin, C S; Altherr, M; Bates, G; Whaley, W L; Read, A P; Harris, R; Lehrach, H; Wasmuth, J J; Gusella, J F; MacDonald, M E

    1991-09-01

    The search for the Huntington's disease (HD) gene has prompted construction of a complete long-range restriction map of a 2.5-Mb candidate region, distal to the DNA marker D4S10. To facilitate the procurement of cloned DNA from this candidate region, we have augmented the existing regional mapping panel of somatic cell hybrids with hybrid HHW1071 containing a t(4p16;12) chromosome from a patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. This translocation maps between D4S180 and D4S127, subdividing the HD candidate region and setting a proximal limit to the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome region. Using the expanded mapping panel, we have regionally assigned 14 independently cloned cosmids, five proximal to the t(4;12) breakpoint in the same region as D4S10 and nine distal to the breakpoint. By a combination of overlap with previously mapped cosmids and pulsed-field gel analysis, each of these cosmids has been positioned on the long-range restriction map of 4p16.3, increasing the clone coverage of the candidate region to approximately 40%. Single-copy probes from mapped cosmids were used to identify eight new DNA polymorphisms spanning the HD candidate region. These new DNA markers should prove valuable for analysis of recombination and linkage disequilibrium in HD, as well as for preclinical diagnosis of the disorder.

  13. The Genetics of Reading Disabilities: From Phenotypes to Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Raskind, Wendy H.; Peter, Beate; Richards, Todd; Eckert, Mark M.; Berninger, Virginia W.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of (a) issues in definition and diagnosis of specific reading disabilities at the behavioral level that may occur in different constellations of developmental and phenotypic profiles (patterns); (b) rapidly expanding research on genetic heterogeneity and gene candidates for dyslexia and other reading disabilities; (c) emerging research on gene-brain relationships; and (d) current understanding of epigenetic mechanisms whereby environmental events may alter behavioral expression of genetic variations. A glossary of genetic terms (denoted by bold font) is provided for readers not familiar with the technical terms. PMID:23308072

  14. Sequence Validation of Candidates for Selectively Important Genes in Sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Mark A.; Mandel, Jennifer R.; Burke, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses aimed at identifying genes that have been targeted by past selection provide a powerful means for investigating the molecular basis of adaptive differentiation. In the case of crop plants, such studies have the potential to not only shed light on important evolutionary processes, but also to identify genes of agronomic interest. In this study, we test for evidence of positive selection at the DNA sequence level in a set of candidate genes previously identified in a genome-wide scan for genotypic evidence of selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower. In the majority of cases, we were able to confirm the effects of selection in shaping diversity at these loci. Notably, the genes that were found to be under selection via our sequence-based analyses were devoid of variation in the cultivated sunflower gene pool. This result confirms a possible strategy for streamlining the search for adaptively-important loci process by pre-screening the derived population to identify the strongest candidates before sequencing them in the ancestral population. PMID:23991009

  15. Annual Killifish Transcriptomics and Candidate Genes for Metazoan Diapause.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew W; Ortí, Guillermo

    2016-09-01

    Dormancy has evolved in all major metazoan lineages. It is critical for survival when environmental stresses are not conducive to growth, maturation, or reproduction. Embryonic diapause is a form of dormancy where development is reversibly delayed and metabolism is depressed. We report the diapause transcriptome of the annual killifish Nematolebias whitei, and compare gene expression between diapause embryos and free-living larvae to identify a candidate set of 945 differentially expressed "diapause" genes for this species. Similarity of transcriptional patterns among N. whitei and other diapausing animals is striking for a small set of genes associated with stress resistance, circadian rhythm, and metabolism, while other genes show discordant patterns. Although convergent evolution of diapause may require shared molecular mechanisms for fundamental processes, similar physiological phenotypes also may arise through modification of alternative pathways. Annual killifishes are a tractable model system for comparative transcriptomic studies on the evolution of diapause. PMID:27297470

  16. Candidate Gene Association Mapping of Arabidopsis Flowering Time

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenreich, Ian M.; Hanzawa, Yoshie; Chou, Lucy; Roe, Judith L.; Kover, Paula X.; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    The pathways responsible for flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana comprise one of the best characterized genetic networks in plants. We harness this extensive molecular genetic knowledge to identify potential flowering time quantitative trait genes (QTGs) through candidate gene association mapping using 51 flowering time loci. We genotyped common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at these genes in 275 A. thaliana accessions that were also phenotyped for flowering time and rosette leaf number in long and short days. Using structured association techniques, we find that haplotype-tagging SNPs in 27 flowering time genes show significant associations in various trait/environment combinations. After correction for multiple testing, between 2 and 10 genes remain significantly associated with flowering time, with CO arguably possessing the most promising associations. We also genotyped a subset of these flowering time gene SNPs in an independent recombinant inbred line population derived from the intercrossing of 19 accessions. Approximately one-third of significant polymorphisms that were associated with flowering time in the accessions and genotyped in the outbred population were replicated in both mapping populations, including SNPs at the CO, FLC, VIN3, PHYD, and GA1 loci, and coding region deletions at the FRI gene. We conservatively estimate that ∼4–14% of known flowering time genes may harbor common alleles that contribute to natural variation in this life history trait. PMID:19581446

  17. Epidermal growth factor gene is a newly identified candidate gene for gout

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin; Cao, Chunwei; Jia, Zhaotong; Liu, Shiguo; Liu, Zhen; Xin, Ruosai; Wang, Can; Li, Xinde; Ren, Wei; Wang, Xuefeng; Li, Changgui

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 4q25 has been identified as a genomic region associated with gout. However, the associations of gout with the genes in this region have not yet been confirmed. Here, we performed two-stage analysis to determine whether variations in candidate genes in the 4q25 region are associated with gout in a male Chinese Han population. We first evaluated 96 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight inflammatory/immune pathway- or glucose/lipid metabolism-related genes in the 4q25 region in 480 male gout patients and 480 controls. The SNP rs12504538, located in the elongation of very-long-chain-fatty-acid-like family member 6 gene (Elovl6), was found to be associated with gout susceptibility (Padjusted = 0.00595). In the second stage of analysis, we performed fine mapping analysis of 93 tag SNPs in Elovl6 and in the epidermal growth factor gene (EGF) and its flanking regions in 1017 male patients gout and 1897 healthy male controls. We observed a significant association between the T allele of EGF rs2298999 and gout (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval = 0.67–0.88, Padjusted = 6.42 × 10−3). These results provide the first evidence for an association between the EGF rs2298999 C/T polymorphism and gout. Our findings should be validated in additional populations. PMID:27506295

  18. Epidermal growth factor gene is a newly identified candidate gene for gout.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin; Cao, Chunwei; Jia, Zhaotong; Liu, Shiguo; Liu, Zhen; Xin, Ruosai; Wang, Can; Li, Xinde; Ren, Wei; Wang, Xuefeng; Li, Changgui

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 4q25 has been identified as a genomic region associated with gout. However, the associations of gout with the genes in this region have not yet been confirmed. Here, we performed two-stage analysis to determine whether variations in candidate genes in the 4q25 region are associated with gout in a male Chinese Han population. We first evaluated 96 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight inflammatory/immune pathway- or glucose/lipid metabolism-related genes in the 4q25 region in 480 male gout patients and 480 controls. The SNP rs12504538, located in the elongation of very-long-chain-fatty-acid-like family member 6 gene (Elovl6), was found to be associated with gout susceptibility (Padjusted = 0.00595). In the second stage of analysis, we performed fine mapping analysis of 93 tag SNPs in Elovl6 and in the epidermal growth factor gene (EGF) and its flanking regions in 1017 male patients gout and 1897 healthy male controls. We observed a significant association between the T allele of EGF rs2298999 and gout (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval = 0.67-0.88, Padjusted = 6.42 × 10(-3)). These results provide the first evidence for an association between the EGF rs2298999 C/T polymorphism and gout. Our findings should be validated in additional populations. PMID:27506295

  19. Characterizations of 9p21 candidate genes in familial melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.J.; Flores, J.F.; Glendening, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    We have previously collected and characterized 16 melanoma families for the inheritance of a familial melanoma predisposition gene on 9p21. Clear evidence for genetic linkage has been detected in 8 of these families with the 9p21 markers D9S126 and 1FNA, while linkage of the remaining families to this region is less certain. A candidate for the 9p21 familial melanoma gene, the cyclin kinase inhibitor gene p16 (also known as the multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1) gene), has been recently indentified. Notably, a nonsense mutation within the p16 gene has been detected in the lymphoblastoid cell line DNA from a dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS), or familial melanoma, patient. The p16 gene is also known to be frequently deleted or mutated in a variety of tumor cell lines (including melanoma) and resides within a region that has been defined as harboring the 9p21 melanoma predisposition locus. This region is delineated on the distal side by the marker D9S736 (which resides just distal to the p16 gene) and extends in a proximal direction to the marker D9S171. Overall, the entire distance between these two loci is estimated at 3-5Mb. Preliminary analysis of our two largest 9p21-linked melanoma kindreds (by direct sequencing of PCR products) has not yet revealed mutations within the coding region of the p16 gene. Others have reported that 8/11 unrelated 9p21-linked melanoma families do not appear to carry p16 mutations; thus the possibility exists that p16 is not a melanoma susceptibility gene per se, although it appears to play some role in melanoma tumor progression. Our melanoma kindred DNAs are currently being analyzed by SSCP using primers that amplify exons of other candidate genes from the 9p21 region implicated in familial melanoma. These novel genes reside within a distinct critical region of homozygous loss in melanoma which is located >2 Mb from the p16 gene on 9p21.

  20. Mapping a candidate gene (MdMYB10) for red flesh and foliage colour in apple

    PubMed Central

    Chagné, David; Carlisle, Charmaine M; Blond, Céline; Volz, Richard K; Whitworth, Claire J; Oraguzie, Nnadozie C; Crowhurst, Ross N; Allan, Andrew C; Espley, Richard V; Hellens, Roger P; Gardiner, Susan E

    2007-01-01

    Background Integrating plant genomics and classical breeding is a challenge for both plant breeders and molecular biologists. Marker-assisted selection (MAS) is a tool that can be used to accelerate the development of novel apple varieties such as cultivars that have fruit with anthocyanin through to the core. In addition, determining the inheritance of novel alleles, such as the one responsible for red flesh, adds to our understanding of allelic variation. Our goal was to map candidate anthocyanin biosynthetic and regulatory genes in a population segregating for the red flesh phenotypes. Results We have identified the Rni locus, a major genetic determinant of the red foliage and red colour in the core of apple fruit. In a population segregating for the red flesh and foliage phenotype we have determined the inheritance of the Rni locus and DNA polymorphisms of candidate anthocyanin biosynthetic and regulatory genes. Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the candidate genes were also located on an apple genetic map. We have shown that the MdMYB10 gene co-segregates with the Rni locus and is on Linkage Group (LG) 09 of the apple genome. Conclusion We have performed candidate gene mapping in a fruit tree crop and have provided genetic evidence that red colouration in the fruit core as well as red foliage are both controlled by a single locus named Rni. We have shown that the transcription factor MdMYB10 may be the gene underlying Rni as there were no recombinants between the marker for this gene and the red phenotype in a population of 516 individuals. Associating markers derived from candidate genes with a desirable phenotypic trait has demonstrated the application of genomic tools in a breeding programme of a horticultural crop species. PMID:17608951

  1. Candidate Gene-Environment Interaction Research: Reflections and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Danielle M.; Agrawal, Arpana; Keller, Matthew C.; Adkins, Amy; Aliev, Fazil; Monroe, Scott; Hewitt, John K.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Sher, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Studying how genetic predispositions come together with environmental factors to contribute to complex behavioral outcomes has great potential for advancing our understanding of the development of psychopathology. It represents a clear theoretical advance over studying these factors in isolation. However, research at the intersection of multiple fields creates many challenges. We review several reasons why the rapidly expanding candidate gene-environment interaction (cGxE) literature should be considered with a degree of caution. We discuss lessons learned about candidate gene main effects from the evolving genetics literature and how these inform the study of cGxE. We review the importance of the measurement of the gene and environment of interest in cGxE studies. We discuss statistical concerns with modeling cGxE that are frequently overlooked. And we review other challenges that have likely contributed to the cGxE literature being difficult to interpret, including low power and publication bias. Many of these issues are similar to other concerns about research integrity (e.g., high false positive rates) that have received increasing attention in the social sciences. We provide recommendations for rigorous research practices for cGxE studies that we believe will advance its potential to contribute more robustly to the understanding of complex behavioral phenotypes. PMID:25620996

  2. Analysis of 34 candidate genes in bupropion and placebo remission.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Arun K; Zai, Clement C; Sajeev, Gautam; Arenovich, Tamara; Müller, Daniel J; Kennedy, James L

    2013-05-01

    There is considerable variability in the rate of response and remission following treatment with antidepressant drugs or placebo in depression patients. No pharmacogenetic studies of bupropion response have been done. We investigated 532 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 34 candidate genes for association with remission and response to either bupropion (n=319) or placebo (n=257) in patients with major depressive disorder. Analyses were performed using conditional logistic regression. Significant association (gene-wide correction) was observed for remission following treatment with bupropion for a SNP within the serotonin receptor 2A gene (HTR2A rs2770296, p(corrected)=0.02). Response to bupropion treatment was significantly associated with a SNP in the dopamine transporter gene (rs6347, p(corrected)=0.013). Among the patients who received placebo, marginal association for remission was observed between a SNP in HTR2A (rs2296972, p(corrected)=0.055) as well as in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT or SLC6A4 rs4251417, p(corrected)=0.050). Placebo response was associated with SNPs in the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1; rs1048261, p(corrected)=0.040) and monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA; rs6609257, p corrected=0.046). Although the above observations were significant after gene-wide corrections, none of these would be significant after a more conservative study-wide correction for multiple tests. These results suggest a possible role for HTR2A in remission to bupropion treatment. In accordance with bupropion pharmacology, dopamine transporter may play a role in response. The MAOA gene may be involved in placebo response.

  3. Gene-gene interactions among genetic variants from obesity candidate genes for nonobese and obese populations in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Pei, Dee; Huang, Yi-Jen; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that obesity may play a key role in modulating genetic predispositions to type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study examines the main effects of both single-locus and multilocus interactions among genetic variants in Taiwanese obese and nonobese individuals to test the hypothesis that obesity-related genes may contribute to the etiology of T2D independently and/or through such complex interactions. We genotyped 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms for 10 obesity candidate genes including adrenergic beta-2-receptor surface, adrenergic beta-3-receptor surface, angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein beta polypeptide 3 (GNB3), interleukin 6 receptor, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1), uncoupling protein 1, uncoupling protein 2, and uncoupling protein 3. There were 389 patients diagnosed with T2D and 186 age- and sex-matched controls. Single-locus analyses showed significant main effects of the GNB3 and PCSK1 genes on the risk of T2D among the nonobese group (p = 0.002 and 0.047, respectively). Further, interactions involving GNB3 and PCSK1 were suggested among the nonobese population using the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction method (p = 0.001). In addition, interactions among angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, GNB3, and uncoupling protein 3 genes were found in a significant four-locus generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction model among the obese population (p = 0.001). The results suggest that the single nucleotide polymorphisms from the obesity candidate genes may contribute to the risk of T2D independently and/or in an interactive manner according to the presence or absence of obesity.

  4. Candidate gene associated with a mutation causing recessive polycystic kidney disease in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, J.H.; Lee-Tischler, M.J.; Kwon, H.Y.; Schrick, J.J. ); Avner, E.D.; Sweeney, W.E. ); Godfrey, V.L.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Woychik, R.P. ); Wilkinson, J.E. )

    1994-05-27

    A line of transgenic mice was generated that contains an insertional mutation causing a phenotype similar to human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Homozygotes displayed a complex phenotype that included bilateral polycystic kidneys and an unusual liver lesion. The mutant locus was cloned and characterized through use of the transgene as a molecular marker. Additionally, a candidate polycystic kidney disease (PKD) gene was identified whose structure and expression are directly associated with the mutant locus. A complementary DNA derived from this gene predicted a peptide containing a motif that was originally identified in several genes involved in cell cycle control.

  5. Candidate-gene analysis of white matter hyperintensities on neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Theresa; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Yadav, Sunaina; Hasan, Nazeeha; Bentley, Paul; Levi, Christopher; Worrall, Bradford B; Meschia, James F; Rost, Natalia; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Background White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are a common radiographic finding and may be a useful endophenotype for small vessel diseases. Given high heritability of WMH, we hypothesised that certain genotypes may predispose individuals to these lesions and consequently, to an increased risk of stroke, dementia and death. We performed a meta-analysis of studies investigating candidate genes and WMH to elucidate the genetic susceptibility to WMH and tested associated variants in a new independent WMH cohort. We assessed a causal relationship of WMH to methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). Methods Database searches through March 2014 were undertaken and studies investigating candidate genes in WMH were assessed. Associated variants were tested in a new independent ischaemic cohort of 1202 WMH patients. Mendelian randomization was undertaken to assess a causal relationship between WMH and MTHFR. Results We identified 43 case-control studies interrogating eight polymorphisms in seven genes covering 6,314 WMH cases and 15,461 controls. Fixed-effects meta-analysis found that the C-allele containing genotypes of the aldosterone synthase CYP11B2 T(−344)C gene polymorphism were associated with a decreased risk of WMH (OR=0.61; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.84; p=0.003). Using mendelian randomisation the association among MTHFR C677T, homocysteine levels and WMH, approached, but did not reach, significance (expected OR=1.75; 95% CI, 0.90−3.41; observed OR=1.68; 95% CI, 0.97−2.94). Neither CYP11B2 T(−344)C nor MTHFR C677T were significantly associated when tested in a new independent cohort of 1202 patients with WMH. Conclusions There is a genetic basis to WMH but anonymous genome wide and exome studies are more likely to provide novel loci of interest. PMID:25835038

  6. Phenotypic plasticity toward water regime: response of leaf growth and underlying candidate genes in Populus.

    PubMed

    Bizet, François; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice; Montpied, Pierre; Christophe, Angélique; Ningre, Nathalie; Cohen, David; Hummel, Irène

    2015-05-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is considered as an important mechanism for plants to cope with environmental challenges. Leaf growth is one of the first macroscopic processes to be impacted by modification of soil water availability. In this study, we intended to analyze and compare plasticity at different scales. We examined the differential effect of water regime (optimal, moderate water deprivation and recovery) on growth and on the expression of candidate genes in leaves of different growth stages. Candidates were selected to assess components of growth response: abscisic acid signaling, water transport, cell wall modification and stomatal development signaling network. At the tree scale, the four studied poplar hybrids responded similarly to water regime. Meanwhile, leaf growth response was under genotype × environment interaction. Patterns of candidate gene expression enriched our knowledge about their functionality in poplars. For most candidates, transcript levels were strongly structured according to leaf growth performance while response to water regime was clearly dependent on genotype. The use of an index of plasticity revealed that the magnitude of the response was higher for gene expression than for macroscopic traits. In addition, the ranking of poplar genotypes for macroscopic traits well paralleled the one for gene expression.

  7. Syndrome to gene (S2G): in-silico identification of candidate genes for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Avitan; Cohen, Raphael; Birk, Ohad S

    2010-03-01

    The identification of genomic loci associated with human genetic syndromes has been significantly facilitated through the generation of high density SNP arrays. However, optimal selection of candidate genes from within such loci is still a tedious labor-intensive bottleneck. Syndrome to Gene (S2G) is based on novel algorithms which allow an efficient search for candidate genes in a genomic locus, using known genes whose defects cause phenotypically similar syndromes. S2G (http://fohs.bgu.ac.il/s2g/index.html) includes two components: a phenotype Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM)-based search engine that alleviates many of the problems in the existing OMIM search engine (negation phrases, overlapping terms, etc.). The second component is a gene prioritizing engine that uses a novel algorithm to integrate information from 18 databases. When the detailed phenotype of a syndrome is inserted to the web-based software, S2G offers a complete improved search of the OMIM database for similar syndromes. The software then prioritizes a list of genes from within a genomic locus, based on their association with genes whose defects are known to underlie similar clinical syndromes. We demonstrate that in all 30 cases of novel disease genes identified in the past year, the disease gene was within the top 20% of candidate genes predicted by S2G, and in most cases--within the top 10%. Thus, S2G provides clinicians with an efficient tool for diagnosis and researchers with a candidate gene prediction tool based on phenotypic data and a wide range of gene data resources. S2G can also serve in studies of polygenic diseases, and in finding interacting molecules for any gene of choice.

  8. Candidate gene analysis of osteochondrosis in Spanish Purebred horses.

    PubMed

    Sevane, N; Dunner, S; Boado, A; Cañon, J

    2016-10-01

    Equine osteochondrosis (OC) is a frequent developmental orthopaedic disease with high economic impact on the equine industry and may lead to premature retirement of the animal as a result of chronic pain and lameness. The genetic background of OC includes different genes affecting several locations; however, these genetic associations have been tested in only one or few populations, lacking the validation in others. The aim of this study was to identify the genetic determinants of OC in the Spanish Purebred horse breed. For that purpose, we used a candidate gene approach to study the association between loci previously implicated in the onset and development of OC in other breeds and different OC locations using radiographic data from 144 individuals belonging to the Spanish Purebred horse breed. Of the 48 polymorphisms analysed, three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the FAF1, FCN3 and COL1A2 genes were found to be associated with different locations of OC lesions. These data contribute insights into the complex gene networks underlying the multifactorial disease OC, and the associated SNPs could be used in a marker-assisted selection strategy to improve horse health, welfare and competitive lifespan.

  9. Investigation of two candidate genes for Hailey-Hailey disease

    SciTech Connect

    Peluso, A.M.; Ikeda, S.; Bonifas, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Hailey-Hailey disease (familial benign chronic pemphigus) is an autosomal dominant skin disease characterized by impaired keratinocyte cohesion and consequent blister formation. Recently we have used linkage to map the gene for this disease to a region of chromosome 3q between D3S1589 and D3S1316. The maximum combined two point lod score in four families studied was 14.60 at {theta} = 0 at the D3S1290 microsatellite repeat. Several genes have been mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, including cellular retinol binding protein (RBP1) and rhodopsin (RHO). Using microsatellite repeat for RHO we have found a recombinant with the RHO gene and Hailey-Hailey disease in one patient. Because of the profound effects of retinoids on epidermal differentiation, RBP1 could be considered as a possible candidate gene. We have amplified genomic DNA from patients from 14 individual families with Hailey-Hailey disease and 10 different control samples for each of the 4 exons of RBP1. Thus far, SSCP analysis has failed to detect different banding patterns in patients versus controls. We are now attempting to extend this RBP1 analysis and are collecting new families to use linkage analysis to narrow this still rather large (approximately 14 cM) interval.

  10. Candidate gene analysis of osteochondrosis in Spanish Purebred horses.

    PubMed

    Sevane, N; Dunner, S; Boado, A; Cañon, J

    2016-10-01

    Equine osteochondrosis (OC) is a frequent developmental orthopaedic disease with high economic impact on the equine industry and may lead to premature retirement of the animal as a result of chronic pain and lameness. The genetic background of OC includes different genes affecting several locations; however, these genetic associations have been tested in only one or few populations, lacking the validation in others. The aim of this study was to identify the genetic determinants of OC in the Spanish Purebred horse breed. For that purpose, we used a candidate gene approach to study the association between loci previously implicated in the onset and development of OC in other breeds and different OC locations using radiographic data from 144 individuals belonging to the Spanish Purebred horse breed. Of the 48 polymorphisms analysed, three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the FAF1, FCN3 and COL1A2 genes were found to be associated with different locations of OC lesions. These data contribute insights into the complex gene networks underlying the multifactorial disease OC, and the associated SNPs could be used in a marker-assisted selection strategy to improve horse health, welfare and competitive lifespan. PMID:27422688

  11. Novel Primary Immunodeficiency Candidate Genes Predicted by the Human Gene Connectome

    PubMed Central

    Itan, Yuval; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Germline genetic mutations underlie various primary immunodeficiency (PID) diseases. Patients with rare PID diseases (like most non-PID patients and healthy individuals) carry, on average, 20,000 rare and common coding variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. It is thus a major challenge to select only a few candidate disease-causing variants for experimental testing. One of the tools commonly used in the pipeline for estimating a potential PID-candidate gene is to test whether the specific gene is included in the list of genes that were already experimentally validated as PID-causing in previous studies. However, this approach is limited because it cannot detect the PID-causing mutation(s) in the many PID patients carrying causal mutations of as yet unidentified PID-causing genes. In this study, we expanded in silico the list of potential PID-causing candidate genes from 229 to 3,110. We first identified the top 1% of human genes predicted by the human genes connectome to be biologically close to the 229 known PID genes. We then further narrowed down the list of genes by retaining only the most biologically relevant genes, with functionally enriched gene ontology biological categories similar to those for the known PID genes. We validated this prediction by showing that 17 of the 21 novel PID genes published since the last IUIS classification fall into this group of 3,110 genes (p < 10−7). The resulting new extended list of 3,110 predicted PID genes should be useful for the discovery of novel PID genes in patients. PMID:25883595

  12. Promoter methylation of candidate genes associated with familial testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Mirabello, Lisa; Kratz, Christian P; Savage, Sharon A; Greene, Mark H

    2012-01-01

    Recent genomic studies have identified risk SNPs in or near eight genes associated with testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT). Mouse models suggest a role for Dnd1 epigenetics in TGCT susceptibility, and we have recently reported that transgenerational inheritance of epigenetic events may be associated with familial TGCT risk. We now investigate whether aberrant promoter methylation of selected candidate genes is associated with familial TGCT risk. Pyrosequencing assays were designed to evaluate CpG methylation in the promoters of selected genes in peripheral blood DNA from 153 TGCT affecteds and 116 healthy male relatives from 101 multiple-case families. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between promoter methylation and TGCT. We also quantified gene product expression of these genes, using quantitative PCR. We observed increased PDE11A, SPRY4 and BAK1 promoter methylation, and decreased KITLG promoter methylation, in familial TGCT cases versus healthy male family controls. A significant upward risk trend was observed for PDE11A when comparing the middle and highest tertiles of methylation to the lowest [odds ratio (OR) =1.55, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.82-2.93, and 1.94, 95% CI 1.03-3.66], respectively; P(trend)=0.042). A significant inverse association was observed for KITLG when comparing the middle and lowest tertiles to the highest (OR=2.15, 95% CI 1.12-4.11, and 2.15, 95% CI 1.12-4.14, respectively; P(trend)=0.031). There was a weak inverse correlation between promoter methylation and KITLG expression. Our results suggest that familial TGCT susceptibility may be associated with promoter methylation of previously-identified TGCT risk-modifying genes. Larger studies are warranted. PMID:23050052

  13. Achromatopsia as a potential candidate for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ji-Jing; Alexander, John; Lei, Bo; Deng, Wentao; Zhang, Keqing; Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W

    2010-01-01

    Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive retinal disease involving loss of cone function that afflicts approximately 1 in 30,000 individuals. Patients with achromatopsia usually have visual acuities lower than 20/200 because of the central vision loss, photophobia, complete color blindness and reduced cone-mediated electroretinographic (ERG) amplitudes. Mutations in three genes have been found to be the primary causes of achromatopsia, including CNGB3 (beta subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), CNGA3 (alpha subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), and GNAT2 (cone specific alpha subunit of transducin). Naturally occurring mouse models with mutations in Cnga3 (cpfl5 mice) and Gnat2 (cpfl3 mice) were discovered at The Jackson Laboratory. A natural occurring canine model with CNGB3 mutations has also been found. These animal models have many of the central phenotypic features of the corresponding human diseases. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy, we and others show that cone function can be restored in all three models. These data suggest that human achromatopsia may be a good candidate for corrective gene therapy. PMID:20238068

  14. Computational selection and prioritization of candidate genes for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, Zané; Tiffin, Nicki; Hofmann, Oliver; Bajic, Vladimir B; Hide, Winston; Ramsay, Michèle

    2007-01-01

    Background Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a serious global health problem and is observed at high frequencies in certain South African communities. Although in utero alcohol exposure is the primary trigger, there is evidence for genetic- and other susceptibility factors in FAS development. No genome-wide association or linkage studies have been performed for FAS, making computational selection and -prioritization of candidate disease genes an attractive approach. Results 10174 Candidate genes were initially selected from the whole genome using a previously described method, which selects candidate genes according to their expression in disease-affected tissues. Hereafter candidates were prioritized for experimental investigation by investigating criteria pertinent to FAS and binary filtering. 29 Criteria were assessed by mining various database sources to populate criteria-specific gene lists. Candidate genes were then prioritized for experimental investigation using a binary system that assessed the criteria gene lists against the candidate list, and candidate genes were scored accordingly. A group of 87 genes was prioritized as candidates and for future experimental validation. The validity of the binary prioritization method was assessed by investigating the protein-protein interactions, functional enrichment and common promoter element binding sites of the top-ranked genes. Conclusion This analysis highlighted a list of strong candidate genes from the TGF-β, MAPK and Hedgehog signalling pathways, which are all integral to fetal development and potential targets for alcohol's teratogenic effect. We conclude that this novel bioinformatics approach effectively prioritizes credible candidate genes for further experimental analysis. PMID:17961254

  15. Genetics and anorexia nervosa: a review of candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Gorwood, P; Bouvard, M; Mouren-Siméoni, M C; Kipman, A; Adès, J

    1998-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe disorder which seems likely to have a multifactorial aetiology. However, several studies have stressed that genetic factors play a significant role. Epidemiological studies have shown that the lifetime risk for first-degree relatives of a patient with an eating disorder is 6% compared to 1% among relatives of controls, and a twin study performed on 34 pairs of twins has shown a higher concordance rate in monozygotic twins (55%) compared to dizygotic twins (7%). The vulnerability component of anorexia nervosa that can be attributed to genetic influences has been estimated from twin studies to be around 70%. Despite this, few genetic studies have been performed testing the role of candidate genes which code for proteins potentially implicated in the aetiopathogenesis of the disorder. In this review, genes encoding components of the dopamine, serotonin, opiate, and noradrenaline systems are assessed for their role in anorexia nervosa. Attention is paid to psychological dimensions, clinical symptoms, co-morbidity frequency, pharmacological data, and biological measures that characterize anorexia nervosa.

  16. Linkage Mapping of 1454 New Maize Candidate Gene Loci

    PubMed Central

    Falque, Matthieu; Décousset, Laurent; Dervins, Delphine; Jacob, Anne-Marie; Joets, Johann; Martinant, Jean-Pierre; Raffoux, Xavier; Ribière, Nicolas; Ridel, Céline; Samson, Delphine; Charcosset, Alain; Murigneux, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Bioinformatic analyses of maize EST sequences have highlighted large numbers of candidate genes putatively involved in agriculturally important traits. To contribute to ongoing efforts toward mapping of these genes, we used two populations of intermated recombinant inbred lines (IRILs), which allow a higher map resolution than nonintermated RILs. The first panel (IBM), derived from B73 × Mo17, is publicly available from the Maize Genetics Cooperation Stock Center. The second panel (LHRF) was developed from F2 × F252 to map loci monomorphic on IBM. We built framework maps of 237 loci from the IBM panel and 271 loci from the LHRF panel. Both maps were used to place 1454 loci (1056 on map IBM_Gnp2004 and 398 on map LHRF_Gnp2004) that corresponded to 954 cDNA probes previously unmapped. RFLP was mostly used, but PCR-based methods were also performed for some cDNAs to map SNPs. Unlike in usual IRIL-based maps published so far, corrected meiotic centimorgan distances were calculated, taking into account the number of intermating generations undergone by the IRILs. The corrected sizes of our framework maps were 1825 cM for IBM_Gnp2004 and 1862 cM for LHRF_Gnp2004. All loci mapped on LHRF_Gnp2004 were also projected on a consensus map IBMconsensus_Gnp2004. cDNA loci formed clusters near the centromeres except for chromosomes 1 and 8. PMID:15937132

  17. Linkage mapping of 1454 new maize candidate gene Loci.

    PubMed

    Falque, Matthieu; Décousset, Laurent; Dervins, Delphine; Jacob, Anne-Marie; Joets, Johann; Martinant, Jean-Pierre; Raffoux, Xavier; Ribière, Nicolas; Ridel, Céline; Samson, Delphine; Charcosset, Alain; Murigneux, Alain

    2005-08-01

    Bioinformatic analyses of maize EST sequences have highlighted large numbers of candidate genes putatively involved in agriculturally important traits. To contribute to ongoing efforts toward mapping of these genes, we used two populations of intermated recombinant inbred lines (IRILs), which allow a higher map resolution than nonintermated RILs. The first panel (IBM), derived from B73 x Mo17, is publicly available from the Maize Genetics Cooperation Stock Center. The second panel (LHRF) was developed from F2 x F252 to map loci monomorphic on IBM. We built framework maps of 237 loci from the IBM panel and 271 loci from the LHRF panel. Both maps were used to place 1454 loci (1056 on map IBM_Gnp2004 and 398 on map LHRF_Gnp2004) that corresponded to 954 cDNA probes previously unmapped. RFLP was mostly used, but PCR-based methods were also performed for some cDNAs to map SNPs. Unlike in usual IRIL-based maps published so far, corrected meiotic centimorgan distances were calculated, taking into account the number of intermating generations undergone by the IRILs. The corrected sizes of our framework maps were 1825 cM for IBM_Gnp2004 and 1862 cM for LHRF_Gnp2004. All loci mapped on LHRF_Gnp2004 were also projected on a consensus map IBMconsensus_Gnp2004. cDNA loci formed clusters near the centromeres except for chromosomes 1 and 8.

  18. Reconstruction of a Functional Human Gene Network, with an Application for Prioritizing Positional Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Lude; Bakel, Harm van; Fokkens, Like; de Jong, Edwin D.; Egmont-Petersen, Michael; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2006-01-01

    Most common genetic disorders have a complex inheritance and may result from variants in many genes, each contributing only weak effects to the disease. Pinpointing these disease genes within the myriad of susceptibility loci identified in linkage studies is difficult because these loci may contain hundreds of genes. However, in any disorder, most of the disease genes will be involved in only a few different molecular pathways. If we know something about the relationships between the genes, we can assess whether some genes (which may reside in different loci) functionally interact with each other, indicating a joint basis for the disease etiology. There are various repositories of information on pathway relationships. To consolidate this information, we developed a functional human gene network that integrates information on genes and the functional relationships between genes, based on data from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, the Biomolecular Interaction Network Database, Reactome, the Human Protein Reference Database, the Gene Ontology database, predicted protein-protein interactions, human yeast two-hybrid interactions, and microarray coexpressions. We applied this network to interrelate positional candidate genes from different disease loci and then tested 96 heritable disorders for which the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database reported at least three disease genes. Artificial susceptibility loci, each containing 100 genes, were constructed around each disease gene, and we used the network to rank these genes on the basis of their functional interactions. By following up the top five genes per artificial locus, we were able to detect at least one known disease gene in 54% of the loci studied, representing a 2.8-fold increase over random selection. This suggests that our method can significantly reduce the cost and effort of pinpointing true disease genes in analyses of disorders for which numerous loci have been reported but for which

  19. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes residing under quantitative trait loci in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to assess the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) developed on candidate genes residing under previously identified quantitative trait loci for marbling score and meat tenderness. Two hundred five SNP were identified on twenty candidate genes. Genes selected under ...

  20. Candidate Gene Polymorphisms and their Association with Glycogen Content in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    She, Zhicai; Li, Li; Qi, Haigang; Song, Kai; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important cultivated shellfish that is rich in nutrients. It contains high levels of glycogen, which is of high nutritional value. To investigate the genetic basis of this high glycogen content and its variation, we conducted a candidate gene association analysis using a wild population, and confirmed our results using an independent population, via targeted gene resequencing and mRNA expression analysis. Results We validated 295 SNPs in the 90 candidate genes surveyed for association with glycogen content, 86 of were ultimately genotyped in all 144 experimental individuals from Jiaonan (JN). In addition, 732 SNPs were genotyped via targeted gene resequencing. Two SNPs (Cg_SNP_TY202 and Cg_SNP_3021) in Cg_GD1 (glycogen debranching enzyme) and one SNP (Cg_SNP_4) in Cg_GP1 (glycogen phosphorylase) were identified as being associated with glycogen content. The glycogen content of individuals with genotypes TT and TC in Cg_SNP_TY202 was higher than that of individuals with genotype CC. The transcript abundance of both glycogen-associated genes was differentially expressed in high glycogen content and low glycogen content individuals. Conclusions This study identified three polymorphisms in two genes associated with oyster glycogen content, via candidate gene association analysis. The transcript abundance differences in Cg_GD1 and Cg_GP1 between low- and the high-glycogen content individuals suggests that it is possible that transcript regulation is mediated by variations of Cg_SNP_TY202, Cg_SNP_3021, and Cg_SNP_4. These findings will not only provide insights into the genetic basis of oyster quality, but also promote research into the molecular breeding of oysters. PMID:25951187

  1. Identification of candidate genes in Populus cell wall biosynthesis using text-mining, co-expression network and comparative genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chuyu; Bisaria, Anjali; Tuskan, Gerald A; Kalluri, Udaya C

    2011-01-01

    Populus is an important bioenergy crop for bioethanol production. A greater understanding of cell wall biosynthesis processes is critical in reducing biomass recalcitrance, a major hindrance in efficient generation of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we report the identification of candidate cell wall biosynthesis genes through the development and application of a novel bioinformatics pipeline. As a first step, via text-mining of PubMed publications, we obtained 121 Arabidopsis genes that had the experimental evidences supporting their involvement in cell wall biosynthesis or remodeling. The 121 genes were then used as bait genes to query an Arabidopsis co-expression database and additional genes were identified as neighbors of the bait genes in the network, increasing the number of genes to 548. The 548 Arabidopsis genes were then used to re-query the Arabidopsis co-expression database and re-construct a network that captured additional network neighbors, expanding to a total of 694 genes. The 694 Arabidopsis genes were computationally divided into 22 clusters. Queries of the Populus genome using the Arabidopsis genes revealed 817 Populus orthologs. Functional analysis of gene ontology and tissue-specific gene expression indicated that these Arabidopsis and Populus genes are high likelihood candidates for functional genomics in relation to cell wall biosynthesis.

  2. Identification of drug candidate for osteoporosis by computational bioinformatics analysis of gene expression profile

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a condition of bones that leads to an increased susceptibility to fracture and consequent painful morbidity. It has become a major issue of life quality worldwide. However, until now, the molecular mechanism of this disease is far from being clear. Methods In this study, we obtained the gene expression profile of osteoporosis and controls from Gene Expression Omnibus and identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) using classical t-test method. Then, functional enrichment analyses were performed to identify the dysregulated Gene Ontology categories and dysfunctional pathways in osteoporosis patients compared to controls. Besides, the connectivity map was used to identify compounds that induced inverse gene changes to osteoporosis. Results A total of 5581 DEGs were identified. We found these DEGs were enriched in 9 pathways by pathway enrichment analysis, including focal adhesion and MAPK signaling pathway. Besides, sanguinarine was identified as a potential therapeutic drug candidate capable of targeting osteoporosis. Conclusion Although candidate agents identified by our approach may be premature for clinical trials, it is clearly a direction that warrants additional consideration. PMID:23448234

  3. SNP discovery in candidate adaptive genes using exon capture in a free-ranging alpine ungulate.

    PubMed

    Roffler, Gretchen H; Amish, Stephen J; Smith, Seth; Cosart, Ted; Kardos, Marty; Schwartz, Michael K; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-09-01

    Identification of genes underlying genomic signatures of natural selection is key to understanding adaptation to local conditions. We used targeted resequencing to identify SNP markers in 5321 candidate adaptive genes associated with known immunological, metabolic and growth functions in ovids and other ungulates. We selectively targeted 8161 exons in protein-coding and nearby 5' and 3' untranslated regions of chosen candidate genes. Targeted sequences were taken from bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) exon capture data and directly from the domestic sheep genome (Ovis aries v. 3; oviAri3). The bighorn sheep sequences used in the Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) exon capture aligned to 2350 genes on the oviAri3 genome with an average of 2 exons each. We developed a microfluidic qPCR-based SNP chip to genotype 476 Dall's sheep from locations across their range and test for patterns of selection. Using multiple corroborating approaches (lositan and bayescan), we detected 28 SNP loci potentially under selection. We additionally identified candidate loci significantly associated with latitude, longitude, precipitation and temperature, suggesting local environmental adaptation. The three methods demonstrated consistent support for natural selection on nine genes with immune and disease-regulating functions (e.g. Ovar-DRA, APC, BATF2, MAGEB18), cell regulation signalling pathways (e.g. KRIT1, PI3K, ORRC3), and respiratory health (CYSLTR1). Characterizing adaptive allele distributions from novel genetic techniques will facilitate investigation of the influence of environmental variation on local adaptation of a northern alpine ungulate throughout its range. This research demonstrated the utility of exon capture for gene-targeted SNP discovery and subsequent SNP chip genotyping using low-quality samples in a nonmodel species. PMID:27327375

  4. SNP discovery in candidate adaptive genes using exon capture in a free-ranging alpine ungulate.

    PubMed

    Roffler, Gretchen H; Amish, Stephen J; Smith, Seth; Cosart, Ted; Kardos, Marty; Schwartz, Michael K; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-09-01

    Identification of genes underlying genomic signatures of natural selection is key to understanding adaptation to local conditions. We used targeted resequencing to identify SNP markers in 5321 candidate adaptive genes associated with known immunological, metabolic and growth functions in ovids and other ungulates. We selectively targeted 8161 exons in protein-coding and nearby 5' and 3' untranslated regions of chosen candidate genes. Targeted sequences were taken from bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) exon capture data and directly from the domestic sheep genome (Ovis aries v. 3; oviAri3). The bighorn sheep sequences used in the Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) exon capture aligned to 2350 genes on the oviAri3 genome with an average of 2 exons each. We developed a microfluidic qPCR-based SNP chip to genotype 476 Dall's sheep from locations across their range and test for patterns of selection. Using multiple corroborating approaches (lositan and bayescan), we detected 28 SNP loci potentially under selection. We additionally identified candidate loci significantly associated with latitude, longitude, precipitation and temperature, suggesting local environmental adaptation. The three methods demonstrated consistent support for natural selection on nine genes with immune and disease-regulating functions (e.g. Ovar-DRA, APC, BATF2, MAGEB18), cell regulation signalling pathways (e.g. KRIT1, PI3K, ORRC3), and respiratory health (CYSLTR1). Characterizing adaptive allele distributions from novel genetic techniques will facilitate investigation of the influence of environmental variation on local adaptation of a northern alpine ungulate throughout its range. This research demonstrated the utility of exon capture for gene-targeted SNP discovery and subsequent SNP chip genotyping using low-quality samples in a nonmodel species.

  5. Next-generation sequencing for identification of candidate genes for Fusarium wilt and sterility mosaic disease in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan).

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikas K; Khan, Aamir W; Saxena, Rachit K; Kumar, Vinay; Kale, Sandip M; Sinha, Pallavi; Chitikineni, Annapurna; Pazhamala, Lekha T; Garg, Vanika; Sharma, Mamta; Sameer Kumar, Chanda Venkata; Parupalli, Swathi; Vechalapu, Suryanarayana; Patil, Suyash; Muniswamy, Sonnappa; Ghanta, Anuradha; Yamini, Kalinati Narasimhan; Dharmaraj, Pallavi Subbanna; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-05-01

    To map resistance genes for Fusarium wilt (FW) and sterility mosaic disease (SMD) in pigeonpea, sequencing-based bulked segregant analysis (Seq-BSA) was used. Resistant (R) and susceptible (S) bulks from the extreme recombinant inbred lines of ICPL 20096 × ICPL 332 were sequenced. Subsequently, SNP index was calculated between R- and S-bulks with the help of draft genome sequence and reference-guided assembly of ICPL 20096 (resistant parent). Seq-BSA has provided seven candidate SNPs for FW and SMD resistance in pigeonpea. In parallel, four additional genotypes were re-sequenced and their combined analysis with R- and S-bulks has provided a total of 8362 nonsynonymous (ns) SNPs. Of 8362 nsSNPs, 60 were found within the 2-Mb flanking regions of seven candidate SNPs identified through Seq-BSA. Haplotype analysis narrowed down to eight nsSNPs in seven genes. These eight nsSNPs were further validated by re-sequencing 11 genotypes that are resistant and susceptible to FW and SMD. This analysis revealed association of four candidate nsSNPs in four genes with FW resistance and four candidate nsSNPs in three genes with SMD resistance. Further, In silico protein analysis and expression profiling identified two most promising candidate genes namely C.cajan_01839 for SMD resistance and C.cajan_03203 for FW resistance. Identified candidate genomic regions/SNPs will be useful for genomics-assisted breeding in pigeonpea. PMID:26397045

  6. Three Additional Candidates for the Group of Very Wide Binary Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.

    2016-10-01

    The very wide binary asteroids (VWBA) are a subgroup of binary asteroids that exhibit very long primary periods and, mostly, short secondary periods that are similar to those of the primary of "normal" small binary asteroids. It is unlikely that confirming mutual events will be seen by photometric observations, mostly because the orbital periods of the assumed satellites will be on the order of days. This paper introduces three additional candidates for this subgroup: (215442) 2002 MQ3, 2009 EC, and 2016 BU13. All three are considered to be among the more convincing examples that such systems exist.

  7. An Association Analysis of Murine Anxiety Genes in Humans Implicates Novel Candidate Genes for Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Jonas; Pirkola, Sami; Silander, Kaisa; Kananen, Laura; Terwilliger, Joseph D.; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Peltonen, Leena; Hovatta, Iiris

    2008-01-01

    Background Human anxiety disorders are complex diseases with largely unknown etiology. We have taken a cross-species approach to identify genes that regulate anxiety-like behavior with inbred mouse strains that differ in their innate anxiety levels as a model. We previously identified 17 genes with expression levels that correlate with anxiety behavior across the studied strains. In the present study, we tested their 13 known human homologues as candidate genes for human anxiety disorders with a genetic association study. Methods We describe an anxiety disorder study sample derived from a Finnish population-based cohort and consisting of 321 patients and 653 carefully matched control subjects, all interviewed to obtain DSM-IV diagnoses. We genotyped altogether 208 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (all non-synonymous SNPs, SNPs that alter potential microRNA binding sites, and gap-filling SNPs selected on the basis of HapMap information) from the investigated anxiety candidate genes. Results Specific alleles and haplotypes of six of the examined genes revealed some evidence for association (p ≤ .01). The most significant evidence for association with different anxiety disorder subtypes were: p = .0009 with ALAD (δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase) in social phobia, p = .009 with DYNLL2 (dynein light chain 2) in generalized anxiety disorder, and p = .004 with PSAP (prosaposin) in panic disorder. Conclusions Our findings suggest that variants in these genes might predispose to specific human anxiety disorders. These results illustrate the potential utility of cross-species approaches in identification of candidate genes for psychiatric disorders. PMID:18639233

  8. Candidate Luminal B Breast Cancer Genes Identified by Genome, Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype. PMID:24416132

  9. Candidate luminal B breast cancer genes identified by genome, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Cornen, Stéphanie; Guille, Arnaud; Adélaïde, José; Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Raynaud, Stéphane; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype.

  10. Natural Genetic Variation and Candidate Genes for Morphological Traits in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Valeria Paula; Mensch, Julián; Hasson, Esteban; Fanara, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Body size is a complex character associated to several fitness related traits that vary within and between species as a consequence of environmental and genetic factors. Latitudinal and altitudinal clines for different morphological traits have been described in several species of Drosophila and previous work identified genomic regions associated with such variation in D. melanogaster. However, the genetic factors that orchestrate morphological variation have been barely studied. Here, our main objective was to investigate genetic variation for different morphological traits associated to the second chromosome in natural populations of D. melanogaster along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in Argentina. Our results revealed weak clinal signals and a strong population effect on morphological variation. Moreover, most pairwise comparisons between populations were significant. Our study also showed important within-population genetic variation, which must be associated to the second chromosome, as the lines are otherwise genetically identical. Next, we examined the contribution of different candidate genes to natural variation for these traits. We performed quantitative complementation tests using a battery of lines bearing mutated alleles at candidate genes located in the second chromosome and six second chromosome substitution lines derived from natural populations which exhibited divergent phenotypes. Results of complementation tests revealed that natural variation at all candidate genes studied, invected, Fasciclin 3, toucan, Reticulon-like1, jing and CG14478, affects the studied characters, suggesting that they are Quantitative Trait Genes for morphological traits. Finally, the phenotypic patterns observed suggest that different alleles of each gene might contribute to natural variation for morphological traits. However, non-additive effects cannot be ruled out, as wild-derived strains differ at myriads of second chromosome loci that may interact

  11. Natural Genetic Variation and Candidate Genes for Morphological Traits in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Valeria Paula; Mensch, Julián; Hasson, Esteban; Fanara, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Body size is a complex character associated to several fitness related traits that vary within and between species as a consequence of environmental and genetic factors. Latitudinal and altitudinal clines for different morphological traits have been described in several species of Drosophila and previous work identified genomic regions associated with such variation in D. melanogaster. However, the genetic factors that orchestrate morphological variation have been barely studied. Here, our main objective was to investigate genetic variation for different morphological traits associated to the second chromosome in natural populations of D. melanogaster along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in Argentina. Our results revealed weak clinal signals and a strong population effect on morphological variation. Moreover, most pairwise comparisons between populations were significant. Our study also showed important within-population genetic variation, which must be associated to the second chromosome, as the lines are otherwise genetically identical. Next, we examined the contribution of different candidate genes to natural variation for these traits. We performed quantitative complementation tests using a battery of lines bearing mutated alleles at candidate genes located in the second chromosome and six second chromosome substitution lines derived from natural populations which exhibited divergent phenotypes. Results of complementation tests revealed that natural variation at all candidate genes studied, invected, Fasciclin 3, toucan, Reticulon-like1, jing and CG14478, affects the studied characters, suggesting that they are Quantitative Trait Genes for morphological traits. Finally, the phenotypic patterns observed suggest that different alleles of each gene might contribute to natural variation for morphological traits. However, non-additive effects cannot be ruled out, as wild-derived strains differ at myriads of second chromosome loci that may interact

  12. Candidate Gene Analyses of Skeletal Variation in Malocclusion.

    PubMed

    da Fontoura, C S G; Miller, S F; Wehby, G L; Amendt, B A; Holton, N E; Southard, T E; Allareddy, V; Moreno Uribe, L M

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluated associations between craniofacial candidate genes and skeletal variation in patients with malocclusion. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of 269 untreated adults with skeletal classes I, II, and III malocclusion were digitized with 14 landmarks. Two-dimensional coordinates were analyzed using Procrustes fit and principal component (PC) analysis to generate continuous malocclusion phenotypes. Skeletal class classifications (I, II, or III) were used as a categorical phenotype. Individuals were genotyped for 198 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 71 craniofacial genes and loci. Phenotype-genotype associations were tested via multivariate linear regression for continuous phenotypes and multinomial logistic regression for skeletal malocclusion class. PC analysis resulted in 4 principal components (PCs) explaining 69% of the total skeletal facial variation. PC1 explained 32.7% of the variation and depicted vertical discrepancies ranging from skeletal deep to open bites. PC1 was associated with a SNP near PAX5 (P = 0.01). PC2 explained 21.7% and captured horizontal maxillomandibular discrepancies. PC2 was associated with SNPs upstream of SNAI3 (P = 0.0002) and MYO1H (P = 0.006). PC3 explained 8.2% and captured variation in ramus height, body length, and anterior cranial base orientation. PC3 was associated with TWIST1 (P = 0.000076). Finally, PC4 explained 6.6% and detected variation in condylar inclination as well as symphysis projection. PC4 was associated with PAX7 (P = 0.007). Furthermore, skeletal class II risk increased relative to class I with the minor alleles of SNPs in FGFR2 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1, P = 0.004) and declined with SNPs in EDN1 (OR = 0.5, P = 0.007). Conversely, skeletal class III risk increased versus class I with SNPs in FGFR2 (OR 2.2, P = 0.005) and COL1A1 (OR = 2.1, P = 0.008) and declined with SNPs in TBX5 (OR = 0.5, P = 0.014). PAX5, SNAI3, MYO1H, TWIST1, and PAX7 are associated with craniofacial skeletal variation

  13. Candidate Gene Analyses of Skeletal Variation in Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    da Fontoura, C.S.G.; Miller, S.F.; Wehby, G.L.; Amendt, B.A.; Holton, N.E.; Southard, T.E.; Allareddy, V.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated associations between craniofacial candidate genes and skeletal variation in patients with malocclusion. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of 269 untreated adults with skeletal classes I, II, and III malocclusion were digitized with 14 landmarks. Two-dimensional coordinates were analyzed using Procrustes fit and principal component (PC) analysis to generate continuous malocclusion phenotypes. Skeletal class classifications (I, II, or III) were used as a categorical phenotype. Individuals were genotyped for 198 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 71 craniofacial genes and loci. Phenotype-genotype associations were tested via multivariate linear regression for continuous phenotypes and multinomial logistic regression for skeletal malocclusion class. PC analysis resulted in 4 principal components (PCs) explaining 69% of the total skeletal facial variation. PC1 explained 32.7% of the variation and depicted vertical discrepancies ranging from skeletal deep to open bites. PC1 was associated with a SNP near PAX5 (P = 0.01). PC2 explained 21.7% and captured horizontal maxillomandibular discrepancies. PC2 was associated with SNPs upstream of SNAI3 (P = 0.0002) and MYO1H (P = 0.006). PC3 explained 8.2% and captured variation in ramus height, body length, and anterior cranial base orientation. PC3 was associated with TWIST1 (P = 0.000076). Finally, PC4 explained 6.6% and detected variation in condylar inclination as well as symphysis projection. PC4 was associated with PAX7 (P = 0.007). Furthermore, skeletal class II risk increased relative to class I with the minor alleles of SNPs in FGFR2 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1, P = 0.004) and declined with SNPs in EDN1 (OR = 0.5, P = 0.007). Conversely, skeletal class III risk increased versus class I with SNPs in FGFR2 (OR 2.2, P = 0.005) and COL1A1 (OR = 2.1, P = 0.008) and declined with SNPs in TBX5 (OR = 0.5, P = 0.014). PAX5, SNAI3, MYO1H, TWIST1, and PAX7 are associated with craniofacial skeletal variation

  14. Characterization of porcine autism susceptibility candidate 2 as a candidate gene for the number of corpora lutea in pigs.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shuji; Hayashi, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2011-07-01

    In a previous study, we mapped two quantitative trait loci (QTL) approximately 50cM apart, both influencing the number of corpora lutea in pigs on chromosome 3. One locus included functional candidate genes for proteins related to specific aspects of fertility, such as the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor and the luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor. However, specific genes related to the second locus have not yet been identified. This study aims to identify another candidate gene influencing the number of corpora lutea in pigs. Using 12 polymorphic markers, we fine-mapped a narrow region of pig chromosome 3 that had been shown to contain a QTL for corpora lutea. In the critical region, only 1 gene, autism susceptibility candidate 2 (AUTS2), was identified as a positional candidate. Our results demonstrate that the porcine AUTS2 gene consists of 19 exons with a complete open reading frame of 3768bp encoding an AUTS2 protein of 1256 amino acids. We screened the whole coding sequence and parts of the untranslated region for polymorphisms in an F(2) population of Duroc×Meishan crosses. We found 1 ins/del and 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), including 2 nonsynonymous variants, c.943C>T in exon 7 and c.2828C>T in exon 19, resulting in P315S and A943V, respectively. The SNP c.943C>T within a proline-rich domain was genotyped in several breeds; the C allele occurred in all breeds, whereas the T allele occurred only in Meishan pigs. Using in situ hybridization, the mRNA expression of the AUTS2 gene was observed on granulosa cells in the porcine ovary and thus may be associated with hormone sensitivity. PMID:21641132

  15. Identification of candidate susceptibility genes for colorectal cancer through eQTL analysis

    PubMed Central

    Closa, Adria; Cordero, David; Sanz-Pamplona, Rebeca; Solé, Xavier; Crous-Bou, Marta; Paré-Brunet, Laia; Berenguer, Antoni; Guino, Elisabet; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Guardiola, Jordi; Biondo, Sebastiano; Salazar, Ramon; Moreno, Victor

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aim to identify the genes responsible for colorectal cancer risk behind the loci identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These genes may be candidate targets for developing new strategies for prevention or therapy. We analyzed the association of genotypes for 26 GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the expression of genes within a 2 Mb region (cis-eQTLs). Affymetrix Human Genome U219 expression arrays were used to assess gene expression in two series of samples, one of healthy colonic mucosa (n = 47) and other of normal mucosa adjacent to colon cancer (n = 97, total 144). Paired tumor tissues (n = 97) were also analyzed but did not provide additional findings. Partial Pearson correlation (r), adjusted for sample type, was used for the analysis. We have found Bonferroni-significant cis-eQTLs in three loci: rs3802842 in 11q23.1 associated to C11orf53, COLCA1 (C11orf92) and COLCA2 (C11orf93; r = 0.60); rs7136702 in 12q13.12 associated to DIP2B (r = 0.63) and rs5934683 in Xp22.3 associated to SHROOM2 and GPR143 (r = 0.47). For loci in chromosomes 11 and 12, we have found other SNPs in linkage disequilibrium that are more strongly associated with the expression of the identified genes and are better functional candidates: rs7130173 for 11q23.1 (r = 0.66) and rs61927768 for 12q13.12 (r = 0.86). These SNPs are located in DNA regions that may harbor enhancers or transcription factor binding sites. The analysis of trans-eQTLs has identified additional genes in these loci that may have common regulatory mechanisms as shown by the analysis of protein–protein interaction networks. PMID:24760461

  16. DOCK4 and CEACAM21 as novel schizophrenia candidate genes in the Jewish population.

    PubMed

    Alkelai, Anna; Lupoli, Sara; Greenbaum, Lior; Kohn, Yoav; Kanyas-Sarner, Kyra; Ben-Asher, Edna; Lancet, Doron; Macciardi, Fabio; Lerer, Bernard

    2012-05-01

    It is well accepted that schizophrenia has a strong genetic component. Several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia have been published in recent years; most of them population based with a case-control design. Nevertheless, identifying the specific genetic variants which contribute to susceptibility to the disorder remains a challenging task. A family-based GWAS strategy may be helpful in the identification of schizophrenia susceptibility genes since it is protected against population stratification, enables better accounting for genotyping errors and is more sensitive for identification of rare variants which have a very low frequency in the general population. In this project we implemented a family-based GWAS of schizophrenia in a sample of 107 Jewish-Israeli families. We found one genome-wide significant association in the intron of the DOCK4 gene (rs2074127, p value=1.134×10⁻⁷) and six additional nominally significant association signals with p<1×10⁻⁵. One of the top single nucleotide polymorphisms (p<1×10⁻⁵) which is located in the predicted intron of the CEACAM21 gene was significantly replicated in independent family-based sample of Arab-Israeli origin (rs4803480: p value=0.002; combined p value=9.61×10⁻⁸), surviving correction for multiple testing. Both DOCK4 and CEACAM21 are biologically reasonable candidate genes for schizophrenia although generalizability of the association of DOCK4 with schizophrenia should be investigated in further studies. In addition, gene-wide significant associations were found within three schizophrenia candidate genes: PGBD1, RELN and PRODH, replicating previously reported associations. By application of a family-based strategy to GWAS, our study revealed new schizophrenia susceptibility loci in the Jewish-Israeli population.

  17. An association study of 20 candidate genes with cryptorchidism in Siberian Husky dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Du, Z-Q; Rothschild, M F

    2010-08-01

    Cryptorchidism (CO) as a common developmental defect in purebred dogs causes health concerns of reduced fertility and increases risk of testicular malignancies. A total of 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) discovered from 20 candidate genes was investigated to analyse their associations with CO in Siberian Huskies. The sibling-transmission disequilibrium test on 38 discordant full-sibs revealed seven SNPs in the collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1) gene were significantly (p < 0.05) or suggestively (p < 0.10) associated with CO. Further analyses showed that only one SNP (rs23358342) in this gene remained suggestively significant (p < 0.1) on a data set of full-sibs with additional related dogs, but not significant on all 156 Siberian Huskies. Based on the statistical results and the involvement of COL2A1 in the testicle development and descent, we could not exclude COL2A1 as a potential candidate gene for CO in Siberian Huskies. Further studies are necessary to clarify these results from our relatively small sample size.

  18. Identification of quantitative trait loci and candidate genes for cadmium tolerance in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Induri, Brahma R; Ellis, Danielle R; Slavov, Goncho T.; Yin, Tongming; Zhang, Xinye; Tuskan, Gerald A; DiFazio, Steven P

    2012-01-01

    Understanding genetic variation for the response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray and Populus deltoides Bart. was characterized for growth and performance traits after Cd exposure. A total of 16 quantitative trait loci (QTL) at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio 2.5 were detected for total dry weight, its components and root volume. Major QTL for Cd responses were mapped to two different linkage groups and the relative allelic effects were in opposing directions on the two chromosomes, suggesting differential mechanisms at these two loci. The phenotypic variance explained by Cd QTL ranged from 5.9 to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. A whole-genome microarray study led to the identification of nine Cd-responsive genes from these QTL. Promising candidates for Cd tolerance include an NHL repeat membrane-spanning protein, a metal transporter and a putative transcription factor. Additional candidates in the QTL intervals include a putative homolog of a glutamate cysteine ligase, and a glutathione-S-transferase. Functional characterization of these candidate genes should enhance our understanding of Cd metabolism and transport and phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  19. A Stratified Transcriptomics Analysis of Polygenic Fat and Lean Mouse Adipose Tissues Identifies Novel Candidate Obesity Genes

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Nicholas M.; Nelson, Yvonne B.; Michailidou, Zoi; Di Rollo, Emma M.; Ramage, Lynne; Hadoke, Patrick W. F.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Bunger, Lutz; Horvat, Simon; Kenyon, Christopher J.; Dunbar, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity and metabolic syndrome results from a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. In addition to brain-regulated processes, recent genome wide association studies have indicated that genes highly expressed in adipose tissue affect the distribution and function of fat and thus contribute to obesity. Using a stratified transcriptome gene enrichment approach we attempted to identify adipose tissue-specific obesity genes in the unique polygenic Fat (F) mouse strain generated by selective breeding over 60 generations for divergent adiposity from a comparator Lean (L) strain. Results To enrich for adipose tissue obesity genes a ‘snap-shot’ pooled-sample transcriptome comparison of key fat depots and non adipose tissues (muscle, liver, kidney) was performed. Known obesity quantitative trait loci (QTL) information for the model allowed us to further filter genes for increased likelihood of being causal or secondary for obesity. This successfully identified several genes previously linked to obesity (C1qr1, and Np3r) as positional QTL candidate genes elevated specifically in F line adipose tissue. A number of novel obesity candidate genes were also identified (Thbs1, Ppp1r3d, Tmepai, Trp53inp2, Ttc7b, Tuba1a, Fgf13, Fmr) that have inferred roles in fat cell function. Quantitative microarray analysis was then applied to the most phenotypically divergent adipose depot after exaggerating F and L strain differences with chronic high fat feeding which revealed a distinct gene expression profile of line, fat depot and diet-responsive inflammatory, angiogenic and metabolic pathways. Selected candidate genes Npr3 and Thbs1, as well as Gys2, a non-QTL gene that otherwise passed our enrichment criteria were characterised, revealing novel functional effects consistent with a contribution to obesity. Conclusions A focussed candidate gene enrichment strategy in the unique F and L model has identified novel adipose tissue-enriched genes

  20. Candidate Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis of Triterpenoid Saponins in Platycodon grandiflorum Identified by Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chun-Hua; Gao, Zheng-Jie; Zhang, Jia-Jin; Zhang, Wei; Shao, Jian-Hui; Hai, Mei-Rong; Chen, Jun-Wen; Yang, Sheng-Chao; Zhang, Guang-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Platycodon grandiflorum is the only species in the genus Platycodon of the family Campanulaceae, which has been traditionally used as a medicinal plant for its lung-heat-clearing, antitussive, and expectorant properties in China, Japanese, and Korean. Oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins were the main chemical components of P. grandiflorum and platycodin D was the abundant and main bioactive component, but little is known about their biosynthesis in plants. Hence, P. grandiflorum is an ideal medicinal plant for studying the biosynthesis of Oleanane-type saponins. In addition, the genomic information of this important herbal plant is unavailable. Principal findings: A total of 58,580,566 clean reads were obtained, which were assembled into 34,053 unigenes, with an average length of 936 bp and N50 of 1,661 bp by analyzing the transcriptome data of P. grandiflorum. Among these 34,053 unigenes, 22,409 unigenes (65.80%) were annotated based on the information available from public databases, including Nr, NCBI, Swiss-Prot, KOG, and KEGG. Furthermore, 21 candidate cytochrome P450 genes and 17 candidate UDP-glycosyltransferase genes most likely involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway were discovered from the transcriptome sequencing of P. grandiflorum. In addition, 10,626 SSRs were identified based on the transcriptome data, which would provide abundant candidates of molecular markers for genetic diversity and genetic map for this medicinal plant. Conclusion: The genomic data obtained from P. grandiflorum, especially the identification of putative genes involved in triterpenoid saponins biosynthesis pathway, will facilitate our understanding of the biosynthesis of triterpenoid saponins at molecular level. PMID:27242873

  1. Identification of candidate genes for drought tolerance by whole-genome resequencing in maize

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drought stress is one of the major limiting factors for maize production. With the availability of maize B73 reference genome and whole-genome resequencing of 15 maize inbreds, common variants (CV) and clustering analyses were applied to identify non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) and corresponding candidate genes for drought tolerance. Results A total of 524 nsSNPs that were associated with 271 candidate genes involved in plant hormone regulation, carbohydrate and sugar metabolism, signaling molecules regulation, redox reaction and acclimation of photosynthesis to environment were detected by CV and cluster analyses. Most of the nsSNPs identified were clustered in bin 1.07 region that harbored six previously reported QTL with relatively high phenotypic variation explained for drought tolerance. Genes Ontology (GO) analysis of candidate genes revealed that there were 35 GO terms related to biotic stimulus and membrane-bounded organelle, showing significant differences between the candidate genes and the reference B73 background. Changes of expression level in these candidate genes for drought tolerance were detected using RNA sequencing for fertilized ovary, basal leaf meristem tissue and roots collected under drought stressed and well-watered conditions. The results indicated that 70% of candidate genes showed significantly expression changes under two water treatments and our strategies for mining candidate genes are feasible and relatively efficient. Conclusions Our results successfully revealed candidate nsSNPs and associated genes for drought tolerance by comparative sequence analysis of 16 maize inbred lines. Both methods we applied were proved to be efficient for identifying candidate genes for complex traits through the next-generation sequencing technologies (NGS). These selected genes will not only facilitate understanding of genetic basis of drought stress response, but also accelerate genetic improvement through marker-assisted selection in maize

  2. Using the BITOLA system to identify candidate genes for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Karić, Amela; Karić, Alen

    2011-01-01

    Complexity of multifactorial diseases as Parkinson’s disease (PD) often complicate identifying causal genetic factors by traditional approaches such as positional cloning and candidate gene analyses. PD is etiologically and genetically complex disease and second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease. The most cases of PD are idiopathic and small growing subset of individuals have single gene defect as the cause. The main goal of this research was to identify the potential candidate genes for idiopathic PD by using biomedical discovery support system (BITOLA). For detecting the potential candidate genes for PD was used opened system of bioinformatics tool BITOLA. Data of chromosome location, tissue specific expression of potential candidate genes and their potential association with PD were obtained from Medline, Locus Link, Gene Cards and OMIM. By using BITOLA system is identified 17 genes as potential candidate genes for PD. The role of three genes (MAPT, PARK2, UCHL1) in PD were confirmed earlier. Discovering the novel candidate genes for multifactiorial diseases by using specially mentioned bioinformatics tool BITOLA could offer the new opportunity for researching genetics base of PD without using tissue samples of patients. PMID:21875422

  3. Molecular genetic gene-environment studies using candidate genes in schizophrenia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Modinos, Gemma; Iyegbe, Conrad; Prata, Diana; Rivera, Margarita; Kempton, Matthew J; Valmaggia, Lucia R; Sham, Pak C; van Os, Jim; McGuire, Philip

    2013-11-01

    The relatively high heritability of schizophrenia suggests that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of the disorder. On the other hand, a number of environmental factors significantly influence its incidence. As few direct genetic effects have been demonstrated, and there is considerable inter-individual heterogeneity in the response to the known environmental factors, interactions between genetic and environmental factors may be important in determining whether an individual develops the disorder. To date, a considerable number of studies of gene-environment interactions (G×E) in schizophrenia have employed a hypothesis-based molecular genetic approach using candidate genes, which have led to a range of different findings. This systematic review aims to summarize the results from molecular genetic candidate studies and to review challenges and opportunities of this approach in psychosis research. Finally, we discuss the potential of future prospects, such as new studies that combine hypothesis-based molecular genetic candidate approaches with agnostic genome-wide association studies in determining schizophrenia risk.

  4. Copy number variation analysis identifies novel CAKUT candidate genes in children with a solitary functioning kidney

    PubMed Central

    Westland, Rik; Verbitsky, Miguel; Vukojevic, Katarina; Perry, Brittany J.; Fasel, David A.; Zwijnenburg, Petra J.G.; Bökenkamp, Arend; Gille, Johan J.P.; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Schreuder, Michiel F.; Gharavi, Ali G.; van Wijk, Joanna A.E.; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations associate with different developmental phenotypes and represent a major cause of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). Because rare pathogenic copy number variations are often large and contain multiple genes, identification of the underlying genetic drivers has proven to be difficult. Here we studied the role of rare copy number variations in 80 patients from the KIMONO-study cohort for which pathogenic mutations in three genes commonly implicated in CAKUT were excluded. In total, 13 known or novel genomic imbalances in 11 of 80 patients were absent or extremely rare in 23,362 population controls. To identify the most likely genetic drivers for the CAKUT phenotype underlying these rare copy number variations, we used a systematic in silico approach based on frequency in a large dataset of controls, annotation with publicly available databases for developmental diseases, tolerance and haploinsufficiency scores, and gene expression profile in the developing kidney and urinary tract. Five novel candidate genes for CAKUT were identified that showed specific expression in the human and mouse developing urinary tract. Among these genes, DLG1 and KIF12 are likely novel susceptibility genes for CAKUT in humans. Thus, there is a significant role of genomic imbalance in the determination of kidney developmental phenotypes. Additionally, we defined a systematic strategy to identify genetic drivers underlying rare copy number variations. PMID:26352300

  5. Refined mapping of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder and sequencing of candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder with systemic manifestations in males (PDR) is very rare. Affected males are characterized by cutaneous and visceral symptoms suggestive of abnormally regulated inXammation. A genetic linkage study of a large Canadian kindred previously mapped the PDR gene to a greater than 40 Mb interval of Xp22–p21. The aim of this study was to identify the causative gene for PDR. The Canadian pedigree was expanded and additional PDR families recruited. Genetic linkage was performed using newer microsatellite markers. Positional and functional candidate genes were screened by PCR and sequencing of coding exons in affected males. The location of the PDR gene was narrowed to a ~4.9 Mb interval of Xp22.11–p21.3 between markers DXS1052 and DXS1061. All annotated coding exons within this interval were sequenced in one affected male from each of the three multiplex families as well as one singleton, but no causative mutation was identiWed. Sequencing of other X-linked genes outside of the linked interval also failed to identify the cause of PDR but revealed a novel nonsynonymous cSNP in the GRPR gene in the Maltese population. PDR is most likely due to a mutation within the linked interval not affecting currently annotated coding exons. PMID:18404279

  6. Utilizing Gene Tree Variation to Identify Candidate Effector Genes in Zymoseptoria tritici

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Megan C.; McGinness, Lachlan; Hane, James K.; Williams, Angela H.; Milgate, Andrew; Solomon, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    Zymoseptoria tritici is a host-specific, necrotrophic pathogen of wheat. Infection by Z. tritici is characterized by its extended latent period, which typically lasts 2 wks, and is followed by extensive host cell death, and rapid proliferation of fungal biomass. This work characterizes the level of genomic variation in 13 isolates, for which we have measured virulence on 11 wheat cultivars with differential resistance genes. Between the reference isolate, IPO323, and the 13 Australian isolates we identified over 800,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, of which ∼10% had an effect on the coding regions of the genome. Furthermore, we identified over 1700 probable presence/absence polymorphisms in genes across the Australian isolates using de novo assembly. Finally, we developed a gene tree sorting method that quickly identifies groups of isolates within a single gene alignment whose sequence haplotypes correspond with virulence scores on a single wheat cultivar. Using this method, we have identified < 100 candidate effector genes whose gene sequence correlates with virulence toward a wheat cultivar carrying a major resistance gene. PMID:26837952

  7. A small number of candidate gene SNPs reveal continental ancestry in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Kodaman, Nuri; Aldrich, Melinda C; Smith, Jeffrey R; Signorello, Lisa B; Bradley, Kevin; Breyer, Joan; Cohen, Sarah S; Long, Jirong; Cai, Qiuyin; Giles, Justin; Bush, William S; Blot, William J; Matthews, Charles E; Williams, Scott M

    2013-01-01

    Using genetic data from an obesity candidate gene study of self-reported African Americans and European Americans, we investigated the number of Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs) and candidate gene SNPs necessary to infer continental ancestry. Proportions of African and European ancestry were assessed with STRUCTURE (K = 2), using 276 AIMs. These reference values were compared to estimates derived using 120, 60, 30, and 15 SNP subsets randomly chosen from the 276 AIMs and from 1144 SNPs in 44 candidate genes. All subsets generated estimates of ancestry consistent with the reference estimates, with mean correlations greater than 0.99 for all subsets of AIMs, and mean correlations of 0.99 ± 0.003; 0.98 ± 0.01; 0.93 ± 0.03; and 0.81 ± 0.11 for subsets of 120, 60, 30, and 15 candidate gene SNPs, respectively. Among African Americans, the median absolute difference from reference African ancestry values ranged from 0.01 to 0.03 for the four AIMs subsets and from 0.03 to 0.09 for the four candidate gene SNP subsets. Furthermore, YRI/CEU Fst values provided a metric to predict the performance of candidate gene SNPs. Our results demonstrate that a small number of SNPs randomly selected from candidate genes can be used to estimate admixture proportions in African Americans reliably.

  8. Genetic diversity and population structure of genes encoding vaccine candidate antigens of Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A major concern in malaria vaccine development is genetic polymorphisms typically observed among Plasmodium isolates in different geographical areas across the world. Highly polymorphic regions have been observed in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax antigenic surface proteins such as Circumsporozoite protein (CSP), Duffy-binding protein (DBP), Merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1), Apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) and Thrombospondin related anonymous protein (TRAP). Methods Genetic variability was assessed in important polymorphic regions of various vaccine candidate antigens in P. vivax among 106 isolates from the Amazon Region of Loreto, Peru. In addition, genetic diversity determined in Peruvian isolates was compared to population studies from various geographical locations worldwide. Results The structured diversity found in P. vivax populations did not show a geographic pattern and haplotypes from all gene candidates were distributed worldwide. In addition, evidence of balancing selection was found in polymorphic regions of the trap, dbp and ama-1 genes. Conclusions It is important to have a good representation of the haplotypes circulating worldwide when implementing a vaccine, regardless of the geographic region of deployment since selective pressure plays an important role in structuring antigen diversity. PMID:22417572

  9. Engineering mouse models with myelodysplastic syndrome human candidate genes; how relevant are they?

    PubMed Central

    Beurlet, Stephanie; Chomienne, Christine; Padua, Rose Ann

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes represent particularly challenging hematologic malignancies that arise from a large spectrum of genetic events resulting in a disease characterized by a range of different presentations and outcomes. Despite efforts to classify and identify the key genetic events, little improvement has been made in therapies that will increase patient survival. Animal models represent powerful tools to model and study human diseases and are useful pre-clinical platforms. In addition to enforced expression of candidate oncogenes, gene inactivation has allowed the consequences of the genetic effects of human myelodysplastic syndrome to be studied in mice. This review aims to examine the animal models expressing myelodysplastic syndrome-associated genes that are currently available and to highlight the most appropriate model to phenocopy myelodysplastic syndrome disease and its risk of transformation to acute myelogenous leukemia. PMID:23065517

  10. Candidate Genes That May Be Responsible for the Unusual Resistances Exhibited by Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 Spores

    PubMed Central

    Tirumalai, Madhan R.; Rastogi, Rajat; Zamani, Nader; O’Bryant Williams, Elisha; Allen, Shamail; Diouf, Fatma; Kwende, Sharon; Weinstock, George M.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Fox, George E.

    2013-01-01

    The spores of several Bacillus species, including Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 and B. safensis FO-36b, which were isolated from the spacecraft assembly facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, are unusually resistant to UV radiation and hydrogen peroxide. In order to identify candidate genes that might be associated with these resistances, the whole genome of B. pumilus SAFR-032, and the draft genome of B. safensis FO-36b were compared in detail with the very closely related type strain B. pumilus ATCC7061T. 170 genes are considered characteristic of SAFR-032, because they are absent from both FO-36b and ATCC7061T. Forty of these SAFR-032 characteristic genes are entirely unique open reading frames. In addition, four genes are unique to the genomes of the resistant SAFR-032 and FO-36b. Fifty three genes involved in spore coat formation, regulation and germination, DNA repair, and peroxide resistance, are missing from all three genomes. The vast majority of these are cleanly deleted from their usual genomic context without any obvious replacement. Several DNA repair and peroxide resistance genes earlier reported to be unique to SAFR-032 are in fact shared with ATCC7061T and no longer considered to be promising candidates for association with the elevated resistances. Instead, several SAFR-032 characteristic genes were identified, which along with one or more of the unique SAFR-032 genes may be responsible for the elevated resistances. These new candidates include five genes associated with DNA repair, namely, BPUM_0608 a helicase, BPUM_0652 an ATP binding protein, BPUM_0653 an endonuclease, BPUM_0656 a DNA cytosine-5- methyltransferase, and BPUM_3674 a DNA helicase. Three of these candidate genes are in immediate proximity of two conserved hypothetical proteins, BPUM_0654 and BPUM_0655 that are also absent from both FO-36b and ATCC7061T. This cluster of five genes is considered to be an especially promising target for future experimental work. PMID:23799069

  11. Degrees of separation as a statistical tool for evaluating candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ronald M; Pettersson, Mats E

    2014-12-01

    Selection of candidate genes is an important step in the exploration of complex genetic architecture. The number of gene networks available is increasing and these can provide information to help with candidate gene selection. It is currently common to use the degree of connectedness in gene networks as validation in Genome Wide Association (GWA) and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping studies. However, it can cause misleading results if not validated properly. Here we present a method and tool for validating the gene pairs from GWA studies given the context of the network they co-occur in. It ensures that proposed interactions and gene associations are not statistical artefacts inherent to the specific gene network architecture. The CandidateBacon package provides an easy and efficient method to calculate the average degree of separation (DoS) between pairs of genes to currently available gene networks. We show how these empirical estimates of average connectedness are used to validate candidate gene pairs. Validation of interacting genes by comparing their connectedness with the average connectedness in the gene network will provide support for said interactions by utilising the growing amount of gene network information available.

  12. A candidate gene association study for growth performance in an improved giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii ) culture line.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyungtaek; Lyons, Russell E; Li, Yutao; Thanh, Nguyen Minh; Dinh, Hung; Hurwood, David A; Salin, Krishna R; Mather, Peter B

    2014-04-01

    A candidate gene approach using type I single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers can provide an effective method for detecting genes and gene regions that underlie phenotypic variation in adaptively significant traits. In the absence of available genomic data resources, transcriptomes were recently generated in Macrobrachium rosenbergii to identify candidate genes and markers potentially associated with growth. The characterisation of 47 candidate loci by ABI re-sequencing of four cultured and eight wild samples revealed 342 putative SNPs. Among these, 28 SNPs were selected in 23 growth-related candidate genes to genotype in 200 animals selected for improved growth performance in an experimental GFP culture line in Vietnam. The associations between SNP markers and individual growth performance were then examined. For additive and dominant effects, a total of three exonic SNPs in glycogen phosphorylase (additive), heat shock protein 90 (additive and dominant) and peroxidasin (additive), and a total of six intronic SNPs in ankyrin repeats-like protein (additive and dominant), rolling pebbles (dominant), transforming growth factor-β induced precursor (dominant), and UTP-glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase 2 (dominant) genes showed significant associations with the estimated breeding values in the experimental animals (P =0.001-0.031). Individually, they explained 2.6-4.8 % of the genetic variance (R²=0.026-0.048). This is the first large set of SNP markers reported for M. rosenbergii and will be useful for confirmation of associations in other samples or culture lines as well as having applications in marker-assisted selection in future breeding programs.

  13. Dynamic QTL Analysis and Candidate Gene Mapping for Waterlogging Tolerance at Maize Seedling Stage

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Khalid A.; Tang, Bin; Wang, Yaping; Chen, Juanhua; Yu, Feng; Li, Liu; Han, Xuesong; Zhang, Zuxin; Yan, Jianbin; Zheng, Yonglian; Yue, Bing; Qiu, Fazhan

    2013-01-01

    Soil waterlogging is one of the major abiotic stresses adversely affecting maize growth and yield. To identify dynamic expression of genes or quantitative trait loci (QTL), QTL associated with plant height, root length, root dry weight, shoot dry weight and total dry weight were identified via conditional analysis in a mixed linear model and inclusive composite interval mapping method at three respective periods under waterlogging and control conditions. A total of 13, 19 and 23 QTL were detected at stages 3D|0D (the period during 0–3 d of waterlogging), 6D|3D and 9D|6D, respectively. The effects of each QTL were moderate and distributed over nine chromosomes, singly explaining 4.14–18.88% of the phenotypic variation. Six QTL (ph6-1, rl1-2, sdw4-1, sdw7-1, tdw4-1 and tdw7-1) were identified at two consistent stages of seedling development, which could reflect a continuous expression of genes; the remaining QTL were detected at only one stage. Thus, expression of most QTL was influenced by the developmental status. In order to provide additional evidence regarding the role of corresponding genes in waterlogging tolerance, mapping of Expressed Sequence Tags markers and microRNAs were conducted. Seven candidate genes were observed to co-localize with the identified QTL on chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 7 and 9, and may be important candidate genes for waterlogging tolerance. These results are a good starting point for understanding the genetic basis for selectively expressing of QTL in different stress periods and the common genetic control mechanism of the co-localized traits. PMID:24244474

  14. Exclusion of candidate genes for coat colour phenotypes of the American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Anistoroaei, R; Markakis, M N; Vissenberg, K; Christensen, K

    2012-12-01

    In a previous project, we screened the American mink Bacterial Artificial Chromosome library, CHORI-231, for genes potentially involved in various coat colour phenotypes in the American mink. Subsequently, we 454 sequenced the inserts containing these genes and developed microsatellite markers for each of these genes. Here, we describe a lack of association between three different 'roan-type' phenotypes represented by Cross, Stardust and Cinnamon in American mink and six different genes that we considered to be potentially linked to these phenotypes. Thus, c-KIT (HUGO-approved symbol KIT), ATOH-1 (HUGO-approved symbol ATOH1) and POMC were excluded as potential candidates for these three phenotypes. In addition, MITF and SLC24A5 were excluded for Cross and Cinnamon, and KITL (HUGO-approved symbol KITLG) for Cross and Stardust. Although most of these genes have been implicated as the cause of similar phenotypes in other mammals, including horses, pigs, cows, dogs, cats, mice and humans, they do not appear to be responsible for comparable phenotypes found in American mink.

  15. Combining gene expression and genetic analyses to identify candidate genes involved in cold responses in pea.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Sylvain; Marque, Gilles; Blassiau, Christelle; Bluteau, Aurélie; Canoy, Anne-Sophie; Fontaine, Véronique; Jaminon, Odile; Bahrman, Nasser; Mautord, Julie; Morin, Julie; Petit, Aurélie; Baranger, Alain; Rivière, Nathalie; Wilmer, Jeroen; Delbreil, Bruno; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle

    2013-09-01

    Cold stress affects plant growth and development. In order to better understand the responses to cold (chilling or freezing tolerance), we used two contrasted pea lines. Following a chilling period, the Champagne line becomes tolerant to frost whereas the Terese line remains sensitive. Four suppression subtractive hybridisation libraries were obtained using mRNAs isolated from pea genotypes Champagne and Terese. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) performed on 159 genes, 43 and 54 genes were identified as differentially expressed at the initial time point and during the time course study, respectively. Molecular markers were developed from the differentially expressed genes and were genotyped on a population of 164 RILs derived from a cross between Champagne and Terese. We identified 5 candidate genes colocalizing with 3 different frost damage quantitative trait loci (QTL) intervals and a protein quantity locus (PQL) rich region previously reported. This investigation revealed the role of constitutive differences between both genotypes in the cold responses, in particular with genes related to glycine degradation pathway that could confer to Champagne a better frost tolerance. We showed that freezing tolerance involves a decrease of expression of genes related to photosynthesis and the expression of a gene involved in the production of cysteine and methionine that could act as cryoprotectant molecules. Although it remains to be confirmed, this study could also reveal the involvement of the jasmonate pathway in the cold responses, since we observed that two genes related to this pathway were mapped in a frost damage QTL interval and in a PQL rich region interval, respectively.

  16. Gene defect in hypodontia: exclusion of EGF, EGFR, and FGF-3 as candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Arte, S; Nieminen, P; Pirinen, S; Thesleff, I; Peltonen, L

    1996-06-01

    Hypodontia, congenital absence of one or a few permanent teeth without any systemic disorders, is regarded as an autosomally inherited dominant condition with varying expression and incomplete penetrance. Many studies have reported that the prevalence of hypodontia varies from 5% to 10% among European and Asian populations. The teeth most often missing are second premolars, upper lateral incisors, and lower central incisors. Consequently, we call this trait incisor-premolar hypodontia. Peg-shaped or strongly mesio-distally reduced upper lateral incisors demonstrate variation in the expression of the trait. The gene or genes causing incisorpremolar hypodontia are not known. We have begun the genetic mapping of hypodontia by using linkage analyses in seven Finnish three-generation families with 77 individuals, 31 affected with incisor-premolar hypodontia. As the first step, we studied the possibility of linkage between hypodontia and some candidate genes which have been suggested to have important functions during tooth development. Here we report the exclusion of EGF, EGFR, and FGF-3 loci as possible sites for gene mutation causing incisor-premolar hypodontia in our family material. Because of the close location of the FGF-3 and FGF-4 genes, the results also suggest the exclusion of the FGF-4 locus.

  17. Exploring novel candidate genes from the Mouse Genome Informatics database: Potential implications for avian migration research.

    PubMed

    Contina, Andrea; Bridge, Eli S; Kelly, Jeffrey F

    2016-07-01

    To search for genes associated with migratory phenotypes in songbirds, we selected candidate genes through annotations from the Mouse Genome Informatics database and assembled an extensive candidate-gene library. Then, we implemented a next-generation sequencing approach to obtain DNA sequences from the Painted Bunting genome. We focused on those sequences that were conserved across avian species and that aligned with candidate genes in our mouse library. We genotyped short sequence repeats from the following candidate genes: ADRA1d, ANKRD17, CISH and MYH7. We studied the possible correlations between allelic variations occurring in these novel candidate migration genes and avian migratory phenotypes available from the published literature. We found that allele variation at MYH7 correlated with a calculated index of speed of migration (km/day) across 11 species of songbirds. We highlight the potential of the Mouse Genome Informatics database in providing new candidate genes that might play a crucial role in regulating migration in birds and possibly in other taxa. Our research effort shows the benefits and limitations of working with extensive genomic datasets and offers a snapshot of the challenges related to cross-species validation in behavioral and molecular ecology studies.

  18. Exploring novel candidate genes from the Mouse Genome Informatics database: Potential implications for avian migration research.

    PubMed

    Contina, Andrea; Bridge, Eli S; Kelly, Jeffrey F

    2016-07-01

    To search for genes associated with migratory phenotypes in songbirds, we selected candidate genes through annotations from the Mouse Genome Informatics database and assembled an extensive candidate-gene library. Then, we implemented a next-generation sequencing approach to obtain DNA sequences from the Painted Bunting genome. We focused on those sequences that were conserved across avian species and that aligned with candidate genes in our mouse library. We genotyped short sequence repeats from the following candidate genes: ADRA1d, ANKRD17, CISH and MYH7. We studied the possible correlations between allelic variations occurring in these novel candidate migration genes and avian migratory phenotypes available from the published literature. We found that allele variation at MYH7 correlated with a calculated index of speed of migration (km/day) across 11 species of songbirds. We highlight the potential of the Mouse Genome Informatics database in providing new candidate genes that might play a crucial role in regulating migration in birds and possibly in other taxa. Our research effort shows the benefits and limitations of working with extensive genomic datasets and offers a snapshot of the challenges related to cross-species validation in behavioral and molecular ecology studies. PMID:27061206

  19. Integrative Analysis of Metabolomic, Proteomic and Genomic Data to Reveal Functional Pathways and Candidate Genes for Drip Loss in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Welzenbach, Julia; Neuhoff, Christiane; Heidt, Hanna; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Tholen, Ernst; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to integrate multi omics data to characterize underlying functional pathways and candidate genes for drip loss in pigs. The consideration of different omics levels allows elucidating the black box of phenotype expression. Metabolite and protein profiling was applied in Musculus longissimus dorsi samples of 97 Duroc × Pietrain pigs. In total, 126 and 35 annotated metabolites and proteins were quantified, respectively. In addition, all animals were genotyped with the porcine 60 k Illumina beadchip. An enrichment analysis resulted in 10 pathways, amongst others, sphingolipid metabolism and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, with significant influence on drip loss. Drip loss and 22 metabolic components were analyzed as intermediate phenotypes within a genome-wide association study (GWAS). We detected significantly associated genetic markers and candidate genes for drip loss and for most of the metabolic components. On chromosome 18, a region with promising candidate genes was identified based on SNPs associated with drip loss, the protein "phosphoglycerate mutase 2" and the metabolite glycine. We hypothesize that association studies based on intermediate phenotypes are able to provide comprehensive insights in the genetic variation of genes directly involved in the metabolism of performance traits. In this way, the analyses contribute to identify reliable candidate genes. PMID:27589727

  20. Isolation of candidate genes and physical mapping in the Familial Dysautonomia region of chromosome 9q31

    SciTech Connect

    Slaugenhaupt, S.A.; Liebert, C.B.; Monahan, M.

    1994-09-01

    Familial Dysautonomia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the developmental loss of both sensory and autonomic neurons. We have mapped the DYS gene to human chromosome 9q31-33 by genetic linkage analysis of 26 Ashkenazi Jewish pedigrees. The gene is located in a 3 cM interval between D9S310 and D9S105. We have examined several new SSCP and repeat polymorphisms and have successfully narrowed the minimum candidate region to approximately 300 kb using linkage disequilibrium. A YAC contig that spans 1.5 Mb has been constructed using both Alu-PCR and STS screening methods. In addition, the YACs were used to isolate cosmids by direct hybridization to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory chromosome 9 flow-sorted cosmid library. Having cloned the minimal candidate region, we are now constructing a detailed transcription map of the DYS region of chromosome 9. Using exon amplification, we have rapidly identified exon sequences and have used these as probes to isolate three candidate genes. These genes are currently being sequenced and will be assessed for mutations using both SSCP analysis and direct sequencing. A detailed physical map of the DYS region, as well as sequence and homology information for DYS candidate genes, will be presented.

  1. Integrative Analysis of Metabolomic, Proteomic and Genomic Data to Reveal Functional Pathways and Candidate Genes for Drip Loss in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Welzenbach, Julia; Neuhoff, Christiane; Heidt, Hanna; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Looft, Christian; Schellander, Karl; Tholen, Ernst; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to integrate multi omics data to characterize underlying functional pathways and candidate genes for drip loss in pigs. The consideration of different omics levels allows elucidating the black box of phenotype expression. Metabolite and protein profiling was applied in Musculus longissimus dorsi samples of 97 Duroc × Pietrain pigs. In total, 126 and 35 annotated metabolites and proteins were quantified, respectively. In addition, all animals were genotyped with the porcine 60 k Illumina beadchip. An enrichment analysis resulted in 10 pathways, amongst others, sphingolipid metabolism and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, with significant influence on drip loss. Drip loss and 22 metabolic components were analyzed as intermediate phenotypes within a genome-wide association study (GWAS). We detected significantly associated genetic markers and candidate genes for drip loss and for most of the metabolic components. On chromosome 18, a region with promising candidate genes was identified based on SNPs associated with drip loss, the protein “phosphoglycerate mutase 2” and the metabolite glycine. We hypothesize that association studies based on intermediate phenotypes are able to provide comprehensive insights in the genetic variation of genes directly involved in the metabolism of performance traits. In this way, the analyses contribute to identify reliable candidate genes. PMID:27589727

  2. Defining a new candidate gene for amelogenesis imperfecta: from molecular genetics to biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Blanca; Ortega-Pinto, Ana; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2011-02-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic conditions that affect the structure and clinical appearance of tooth enamel. The types (hypoplastic, hypocalcified, and hypomature) are correlated with defects in different stages of the process of enamel synthesis. Autosomal dominant, recessive, and X-linked types have been previously described. These disorders are considered clinically and genetically heterogeneous in etiology, involving a variety of genes, such as AMELX, ENAM, DLX3, FAM83H, MMP-20, KLK4, and WDR72. The mutations identified within these causal genes explain less than half of all cases of amelogenesis imperfecta. Most of the candidate and causal genes currently identified encode proteins involved in enamel synthesis. We think it is necessary to refocus the search for candidate genes using biochemical processes. This review provides theoretical evidence that the human SLC4A4 gene (sodium bicarbonate cotransporter) may be a new candidate gene.

  3. Candidate genes for limiting cholestatic intestinal injury identified by gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Alaish, Samuel M; Timmons, Jennifer; Smith, Alexis; Buzza, Marguerite S; Murphy, Ebony; Zhao, Aiping; Sun, Yezhou; Turner, Douglas J; Shea-Donahue, Terez; Antalis, Toni M; Cross, Alan; Dorsey, Susan G

    2013-01-01

    The lack of bile flow from the liver into the intestine can have devastating complications including hepatic failure, sepsis, and even death. This pathologic condition known as cholestasis can result from etiologies as diverse as total parenteral nutrition (TPN), hepatitis, and pancreatic cancer. The intestinal injury associated with cholestasis has been shown to result in decreased intestinal resistance, increased bacterial translocation, and increased endotoxemia. Anecdotal clinical evidence suggests a genetic predisposition to exaggerated injury. Recent animal research on two different strains of inbred mice demonstrating different rates of bacterial translocation with different mortality rates supports this premise. In this study, a microarray analysis of intestinal tissue following common bile duct ligation (CBDL) performed under general anesthesia on these same two strains of inbred mice was done with the goal of identifying the potential molecular mechanistic pathways responsible. Over 500 genes were increased more than 2.0-fold following CBDL. The most promising candidate genes included major urinary proteins (MUPs), serine protease-1-inhibitor (Serpina1a), and lipocalin-2 (LCN-2). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) validated the microarray results for these candidate genes. In an in vitro experiment using differentiated intestinal epithelial cells, inhibition of MUP-1 by siRNA resulted in increased intestinal epithelial cell permeability. Diverse novel mechanisms involving the growth hormone pathway, the acute phase response, and the innate immune response are thus potential avenues for limiting cholestatic intestinal injury. Changes in gene expression were at times found to be not only due to the CBDL but also due to the murine strain. Should further studies in cholestatic patients demonstrate interindividual variability similar to what we have shown in mice, then a “personalized medicine” approach to cholestatic patients may become

  4. Using the candidate gene approach for detecting genes underlying seed oil concentration and yield in soybean.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Mehrzad; Cober, Elroy R; Rajcan, Istvan

    2013-07-01

    Increasing the oil concentration in soybean seeds has been given more attention in recent years because of demand for both edible oil and biodiesel production. Oil concentration in soybean is a complex quantitative trait regulated by many genes as well as environmental conditions. To identify genes governing seed oil concentration in soybean, 16 putative candidate genes of three important gene families (GPAT: acyl-CoA:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, DGAT: acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, and PDAT: phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase) involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis pathways were selected and their sequences retrieved from the soybean database ( http://www.phytozome.net/soybean ). Three sequence mutations were discovered in either coding or noncoding regions of three DGAT soybean isoforms when comparing the parents of a 203 recombinant inbreed line (RIL) population; OAC Wallace and OAC Glencoe. The RIL population was used to study the effects of these mutations on seed oil concentration and other important agronomic and seed composition traits, including seed yield and protein concentration across three field locations in Ontario, Canada, in 2009 and 2010. An insertion/deletion (indel) mutation in the GmDGAT2B gene in OAC Wallace was significantly associated with reduced seed oil concentration across three environments and reduced seed yield at Woodstock in 2010. A mutation in the 3' untranslated (3'UTR) region of GmDGAT2C was associated with seed yield at Woodstock in 2009. A mutation in the intronic region of GmDGAR1B was associated with seed yield and protein concentration at Ottawa in 2010. The genes identified in this study had minor effects on either seed yield or oil concentration, which was in agreement with the quantitative nature of the traits. However, the novel gene-specific markers designed in the present study can be used in soybean breeding for marker-assisted selection aimed at increasing seed yield and oil

  5. Using the candidate gene approach for detecting genes underlying seed oil concentration and yield in soybean.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Mehrzad; Cober, Elroy R; Rajcan, Istvan

    2013-07-01

    Increasing the oil concentration in soybean seeds has been given more attention in recent years because of demand for both edible oil and biodiesel production. Oil concentration in soybean is a complex quantitative trait regulated by many genes as well as environmental conditions. To identify genes governing seed oil concentration in soybean, 16 putative candidate genes of three important gene families (GPAT: acyl-CoA:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, DGAT: acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, and PDAT: phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase) involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis pathways were selected and their sequences retrieved from the soybean database ( http://www.phytozome.net/soybean ). Three sequence mutations were discovered in either coding or noncoding regions of three DGAT soybean isoforms when comparing the parents of a 203 recombinant inbreed line (RIL) population; OAC Wallace and OAC Glencoe. The RIL population was used to study the effects of these mutations on seed oil concentration and other important agronomic and seed composition traits, including seed yield and protein concentration across three field locations in Ontario, Canada, in 2009 and 2010. An insertion/deletion (indel) mutation in the GmDGAT2B gene in OAC Wallace was significantly associated with reduced seed oil concentration across three environments and reduced seed yield at Woodstock in 2010. A mutation in the 3' untranslated (3'UTR) region of GmDGAT2C was associated with seed yield at Woodstock in 2009. A mutation in the intronic region of GmDGAR1B was associated with seed yield and protein concentration at Ottawa in 2010. The genes identified in this study had minor effects on either seed yield or oil concentration, which was in agreement with the quantitative nature of the traits. However, the novel gene-specific markers designed in the present study can be used in soybean breeding for marker-assisted selection aimed at increasing seed yield and oil

  6. Quantitative DNA Methylation Analysis of Candidate Genes in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M.; Riggs, Bridget M.; Delmas, Amber L.; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97–1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated. PMID:25826459

  7. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  8. Association of CVD Candidate Gene Polymorphisms with Ischemic Stroke and Cerebral Hemorrhage in Chinese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yue; Li, Jiana; He, Lingbin; Yuan, Yuan; Tan, Xuerui; Liu, Lisheng; Zhao, Jingbo; Wang, Xingyu

    2014-01-01

    Background Contribution of cardiovascular disease related genetic risk factors for stroke are not clearly defined. We performed a genetic association study to assess the association of 56 previously characterized gene variants in 34 candidate genes from cardiovascular disease related biological pathways with ischemic stroke and cerebral hemorrhage in a Chinese population. Methods There were 1280 stroke patients (1101 with ischemic stroke and 179 with cerebral hemorrhage) and 1380 controls in the study. The genotypes for 56 polymorphisms of 34 candidate genes were determined by the immobilized probe approach and the associations of gene polymorphisms with ischemic stroke and cerebral hemorrhage were performed by logistic regression under an allelic model. Results After adjusting for age, sex, BMI and hypertension status by logistic regression analysis, we found that NPPA rs5063 was significantly associated with both ischemic stroke (odds ratio [OR] 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52 to 0.90; P = 0.006) and cerebral hemorrhage(OR = 0.39; 95%CI, 0.19 to 0.78; P = 0.007). In addition, MTHFR rs1801133 also was associated with cerebral hemorrhage (OR = 1.48; 95%CI, 1.16 to1.89; P = 0.001) but not with ischemic stroke (OR = 1.08; 95%CI, 0.96 to1.22; P = 0.210). After false discovery rate (FDR) correction, the association of NPPA rs5063 and MTHFR rs1801133 with cerebral hemorrhage remained significant. Conclusions The NPPA rs5063 is associated with reduced risk for cerebral hemorrhage and MTHFR rs1801133 is associated with increased risk of cerebral hemorrhage in a Chinese population. PMID:25144711

  9. Identification of Candidate Genes Associated with Leaf Senescence in Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Moschen, Sebastian; Bengoa Luoni, Sofia; Paniego, Norma B.; Hopp, H. Esteban; Dosio, Guillermo A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), an important source of edible vegetable oil, shows rapid onset of senescence, which limits production by reducing photosynthetic capacity under specific growing conditions. Carbon for grain filling depends strongly on light interception by green leaf area, which diminishes during grain filling due to leaf senescence. Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the progression of leaf senescence in plants and have been well explored in model systems, but information for many agronomic crops remains limited. Here, we characterize the expression profiles of a set of putative senescence associated genes (SAGs) identified by a candidate gene approach and sunflower microarray expression studies. We examined a time course of sunflower leaves undergoing natural senescence and used quantitative PCR (qPCR) to measure the expression of 11 candidate genes representing the NAC, WRKY, MYB and NF-Y TF families. In addition, we measured physiological parameters such as chlorophyll, total soluble sugars and nitrogen content. The expression of Ha-NAC01, Ha-NAC03, Ha-NAC04, Ha-NAC05 and Ha-MYB01 TFs increased before the remobilization rate increased and therefore, before the appearance of the first physiological symptoms of senescence, whereas Ha-NAC02 expression decreased. In addition, we also examined the trifurcate feed-forward pathway (involving ORE1, miR164, and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 2) previously reported for Arabidopsis. We measured transcription of Ha-NAC01 (the sunflower homolog of ORE1) and Ha-EIN2, along with the levels of miR164, in two leaves from different stem positions, and identified differences in transcription between basal and upper leaves. Interestingly, Ha-NAC01 and Ha-EIN2 transcription profiles showed an earlier up-regulation in upper leaves of plants close to maturity, compared with basal leaves of plants at pre-anthesis stages. These results suggest that the H. annuus TFs characterized in this work could play important

  10. Identification of candidate genes associated with leaf senescence in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Moschen, Sebastian; Bengoa Luoni, Sofia; Paniego, Norma B; Hopp, H Esteban; Dosio, Guillermo A A; Fernandez, Paula; Heinz, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    Cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), an important source of edible vegetable oil, shows rapid onset of senescence, which limits production by reducing photosynthetic capacity under specific growing conditions. Carbon for grain filling depends strongly on light interception by green leaf area, which diminishes during grain filling due to leaf senescence. Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the progression of leaf senescence in plants and have been well explored in model systems, but information for many agronomic crops remains limited. Here, we characterize the expression profiles of a set of putative senescence associated genes (SAGs) identified by a candidate gene approach and sunflower microarray expression studies. We examined a time course of sunflower leaves undergoing natural senescence and used quantitative PCR (qPCR) to measure the expression of 11 candidate genes representing the NAC, WRKY, MYB and NF-Y TF families. In addition, we measured physiological parameters such as chlorophyll, total soluble sugars and nitrogen content. The expression of Ha-NAC01, Ha-NAC03, Ha-NAC04, Ha-NAC05 and Ha-MYB01 TFs increased before the remobilization rate increased and therefore, before the appearance of the first physiological symptoms of senescence, whereas Ha-NAC02 expression decreased. In addition, we also examined the trifurcate feed-forward pathway (involving ORE1, miR164, and ethylene insensitive 2) previously reported for Arabidopsis. We measured transcription of Ha-NAC01 (the sunflower homolog of ORE1) and Ha-EIN2, along with the levels of miR164, in two leaves from different stem positions, and identified differences in transcription between basal and upper leaves. Interestingly, Ha-NAC01 and Ha-EIN2 transcription profiles showed an earlier up-regulation in upper leaves of plants close to maturity, compared with basal leaves of plants at pre-anthesis stages. These results suggest that the H. annuus TFs characterized in this work could play important

  11. Identification of candidate target genes for human peripheral arterial disease using weighted gene co‑expression network analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, De-Xin; Zhao, Hao-Min; Sun, Da-Jun; Yao, Jian; Ding, Da-Yong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the potential treatment targets of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and provide further insights into the underlying mechanism of PAD, based on a weighted gene co‑expression network analysis (WGCNA) method. The mRNA expression profiles (accession. no. GSE27034), which included 19 samples from patients with PAD and 18 samples from normal control individuals were extracted from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Subsequently, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were obtained using the Limma package and the co‑expression network modules were screened using the WGCNA approach. In addition, the protein‑protein interaction network for the DEGs in the most significant module was constructed using Cytoscape software. Functional enrichment analyses of the DEGs in the most significant module were also performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Orthology‑Based Annotation System, respectively. A total of 148 DEGs were identified in PAD, which were used to construct the WGCN, in which two modules (gray module and turquoise module) were identified, with the gray module exhibiting a higher gene significance (GS) value than the turquoise module. In addition, a co‑expression network was constructed for 60 DEGs in the gray module. The functional enrichment results showed that the DEGs in the gray module were enriched in five Gene Ontology terms and four KEGG pathways. For example, cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) and prostaglandin‑endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) were enriched in response to glucocorticoid stimulus. The results of the present study suggested that DEGs in the gray module, including CDKN1A, FOS and PTGS2, may be associated with the pathogenesis of PAD, by modulating the cell cycle, and may offer potential for use as candidate treatment

  12. Identification of candidate target genes for human peripheral arterial disease using weighted gene co‑expression network analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, De-Xin; Zhao, Hao-Min; Sun, Da-Jun; Yao, Jian; Ding, Da-Yong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the potential treatment targets of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and provide further insights into the underlying mechanism of PAD, based on a weighted gene co‑expression network analysis (WGCNA) method. The mRNA expression profiles (accession. no. GSE27034), which included 19 samples from patients with PAD and 18 samples from normal control individuals were extracted from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Subsequently, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were obtained using the Limma package and the co‑expression network modules were screened using the WGCNA approach. In addition, the protein‑protein interaction network for the DEGs in the most significant module was constructed using Cytoscape software. Functional enrichment analyses of the DEGs in the most significant module were also performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Orthology‑Based Annotation System, respectively. A total of 148 DEGs were identified in PAD, which were used to construct the WGCN, in which two modules (gray module and turquoise module) were identified, with the gray module exhibiting a higher gene significance (GS) value than the turquoise module. In addition, a co‑expression network was constructed for 60 DEGs in the gray module. The functional enrichment results showed that the DEGs in the gray module were enriched in five Gene Ontology terms and four KEGG pathways. For example, cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) and prostaglandin‑endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) were enriched in response to glucocorticoid stimulus. The results of the present study suggested that DEGs in the gray module, including CDKN1A, FOS and PTGS2, may be associated with the pathogenesis of PAD, by modulating the cell cycle, and may offer potential for use as candidate treatment

  13. Isolation and characterization of the human CDX1 gene: A candidate gene for diastrophic dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, C.; Loftus, S.; Wasmuth, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, dislocation of the joints, spinal deformities and malformation of the hands and feet. Multipoint linkage analysis places the diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) locus in 5q31-5q34. Linkage disequilibrium mapping places the DTD locus near CSFIR in the direction of PDGFRB (which is tandem to CSFIR). This same study tentatively placed PDGFRB and DTD proximal to CSFIR. Our results, as well as recently reported work from other laboratories, suggest that PDGFRB (and possibly DTD) is distal rather than proximal to CSFIR. We have constructed a cosmid contig covering approximately 200 kb of the region containing CSFIR. Several exons have been {open_quotes}trapped{close_quotes} from these cosmids using exon amplification. One of these exons was trapped from a cosmid isolated from a walk from PDGFRB, approximately 80 kb from CSFIR. This exon was sequenced and was determined to be 89% identical to the nucleotide sequence of exon two of the murine CDX1 gene (100% amino acid identity). The exon was used to isolate the human CDX gene. Sequence analysis of the human CDX1 gene indicates a very high degree of homology to the murine gene. CDX1 is a caudal type homeobox gene expressed during gastrulation. In the mouse, expression during gastrulation begins in the primitive streak and subsequently localizes to the ectodermal and mesodermal cells of the primitive streak, neural tube, somites, and limb buds. Later in gastrulation, CDX1 expression becomes most prominent in the mesoderm of the forelimbs, and, to a lesser extent, the hindlimbs. CDX1 is an intriguing candidate gene for diastrophic dysplasia. We are currently screening DNA from affected individuals and hope to shortly determine whether CDX1 is involved in this disorder.

  14. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice W.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Stram, Douglas A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K.H.; van Altena, Anne M.; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D.; Cook, Linda S.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McLaughlin, John R.; Risch, Harvey A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C.; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Methods Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. Results We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p = 0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p = 0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p = 0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p = 0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p = 0.060, overall invasive). Conclusions Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. PMID:25528498

  15. Saturation mapping of QTL regions and identification of putative candidate genes for drought tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T T T; Klueva, N; Chamareck, V; Aarti, A; Magpantay, G; Millena, A C M; Pathan, M S; Nguyen, H T

    2004-08-01

    We have developed 85 new markers (50 RFLPs, 5 SSRs, 12 DD cDNAs, 9 ESTs, 8 HSP-encoding cDNAs and one BSA-derived AFLP marker) for saturation mapping of QTL regions for drought tolerance in rice, in our efforts to identify putative candidate genes. Thirteen of the markers were localized in the close vicinity of the targeted QTL regions. Fifteen of the additional markers mapped, respectively, inside one QTL region controlling osmotic adjustment on chromosome 3 ( oa3.1) and 14 regions that affect root traits on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 12. Differential display was used to identify more putative candidate genes and to saturate the QTL regions of the genetic map. Eleven of the isolated cDNA clones were found to be derived from drought-inducible genes. Two of them were unique and did not match any genes in the GenBank, while nine were highly similar to cDNAs encoding known proteins, including a DnaJ-related protein, a zinc-finger protein, a protease inhibitor, a glutathione-S-transferase, a DNA recombinase, and a protease. Twelve new cDNA fragments were mapped onto the genetic linkage map; seven of these mapped inside, or in close proximity to, the targeted QTL regions determining root thickness and osmotic adjustment capacity. The gene I12A1, which codes for a UDP-glucose 4-epimerase homolog, was identified as a putative target gene within the prt7.1/brt7.1 QTL region, as it is involved in the cell wall biogenesis pathway and hence may be implicated in modulating the ability of rice roots to penetrate further into the substratum when exposed to drought conditions. RNAs encoding elongation factor 1beta, a DnaJ-related protein, and a homolog of wheat zinc-finger protein were more prominently induced in the leaves of IR62266 (the lowland rice parent of the mapping materials used) than in those of CT9993 (the upland rice parent) under drought conditions. Homologs of 18S ribosomal RNA, and mRNAs for a multiple-stress induced zinc-finger protein, a protease

  16. Saturation mapping of QTL regions and identification of putative candidate genes for drought tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T T T; Klueva, N; Chamareck, V; Aarti, A; Magpantay, G; Millena, A C M; Pathan, M S; Nguyen, H T

    2004-08-01

    We have developed 85 new markers (50 RFLPs, 5 SSRs, 12 DD cDNAs, 9 ESTs, 8 HSP-encoding cDNAs and one BSA-derived AFLP marker) for saturation mapping of QTL regions for drought tolerance in rice, in our efforts to identify putative candidate genes. Thirteen of the markers were localized in the close vicinity of the targeted QTL regions. Fifteen of the additional markers mapped, respectively, inside one QTL region controlling osmotic adjustment on chromosome 3 ( oa3.1) and 14 regions that affect root traits on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 12. Differential display was used to identify more putative candidate genes and to saturate the QTL regions of the genetic map. Eleven of the isolated cDNA clones were found to be derived from drought-inducible genes. Two of them were unique and did not match any genes in the GenBank, while nine were highly similar to cDNAs encoding known proteins, including a DnaJ-related protein, a zinc-finger protein, a protease inhibitor, a glutathione-S-transferase, a DNA recombinase, and a protease. Twelve new cDNA fragments were mapped onto the genetic linkage map; seven of these mapped inside, or in close proximity to, the targeted QTL regions determining root thickness and osmotic adjustment capacity. The gene I12A1, which codes for a UDP-glucose 4-epimerase homolog, was identified as a putative target gene within the prt7.1/brt7.1 QTL region, as it is involved in the cell wall biogenesis pathway and hence may be implicated in modulating the ability of rice roots to penetrate further into the substratum when exposed to drought conditions. RNAs encoding elongation factor 1beta, a DnaJ-related protein, and a homolog of wheat zinc-finger protein were more prominently induced in the leaves of IR62266 (the lowland rice parent of the mapping materials used) than in those of CT9993 (the upland rice parent) under drought conditions. Homologs of 18S ribosomal RNA, and mRNAs for a multiple-stress induced zinc-finger protein, a protease

  17. Effects of candidate gene polymorphisms on the detailed fatty acids profile determined by gas chromatography in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Pegolo, S; Cecchinato, A; Mele, M; Conte, G; Schiavon, S; Bittante, G

    2016-06-01

    Association analyses between candidate genes and bovine milk fatty acids can improve our understanding of genetic variation in milk fatty acid profiles and reveal potential opportunities to tailor milk fat composition through selection strategies. In this work, we investigated the association of 51 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) selected from 37 candidate genes using a functional and positional approach, with 47 fatty acids, 9 fatty acid groups, and 5 Δ(9)-desaturation indices in milk samples from Brown Swiss cows. Individual milk samples were collected from 1,158 Italian Brown Swiss cows, and gas chromatography was used to obtain detailed milk fatty acid compositions. A GoldenGate assay system (Illumina, San Diego, CA) was used to perform genotype 96 selected SNP located in 54 genes across 22 chromosomes. In total, 51 polymorphic SNP in 37 candidate genes were retained for the association analysis. A Bayesian linear animal model was used to estimate the contribution of each SNP. A total of 129 tests indicated relevant additive effects between a given SNP and a single fatty acid trait; 38 SNP belonging to 30 genes were relevant for a total of 57 fatty acid traits. Most of the studied fatty acid traits (~81%) were relevantly associated with multiple SNP. Relevantly associated SNP were mainly found in genes related to fat metabolism, linked to or contained in previously identified quantitative trait loci for fat yield or content, or associated with genes previously identified in association analyses with milk fatty acid profiles in other cow breeds. The most representative candidate genes were LEP, PRL, STAT5A, CCL3, ACACA, GHR, ADRB2, LPIN1, STAT1, FABP4, and CSN2. In particular, relevant associations with SNP located on bovine chromosome 19 (BTA19) were found. Two candidate genes on BTA19 (CCL3 and ACACA) were relevantly associated with de novo short- and medium-chain fatty acids, likely explaining the high heritability values found for these fatty acids

  18. Parallel bacterial evolution within multiple patients identifies candidate pathogenicity genes

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Tami D.; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Aingaran, Mythili; Potter-Bynoe, Gail; Roux, Damien; Davis, Michael R.; Skurnik, David; Leiby, Nicholas; LiPuma, John J.; Goldberg, Joanna B.; McAdam, Alexander J.; Priebe, Gregory P.; Kishony, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens evolve during the infection of their human hosts1-8, but separating adaptive and neutral mutations remains challenging9-11. Here, we identify bacterial genes under adaptive evolution by tracking recurrent patterns of mutations in the same pathogenic strain during the infection of multiple patients. We conducted a retrospective study of a Burkholderia dolosa outbreak among people with cystic fibrosis, sequencing the genomes of 112 isolates collected from 14 individuals over 16 years. We find that 17 bacterial genes acquired non-synonymous mutations in multiple individuals, which indicates parallel adaptive evolution. Mutations in these genes illuminate the genetic basis of important pathogenic phenotypes, including antibiotic resistance and bacterial membrane composition, and implicate oxygen-dependent gene regulation as paramount in lung infections. Several genes have not been previously implicated in pathogenesis, suggesting new therapeutic targets. The identification of parallel molecular evolution suggests key selection forces acting on pathogens within humans and can help predict and prepare for their future evolutionary course. PMID:22081229

  19. Prioritization of candidate cancer genes--an aid to oncogenomic studies.

    PubMed

    Furney, Simon J; Calvo, Borja; Larrañaga, Pedro; Lozano, Jose A; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria

    2008-10-01

    The development of techniques for oncogenomic analyses such as array comparative genomic hybridization, messenger RNA expression arrays and mutational screens have come to the fore in modern cancer research. Studies utilizing these techniques are able to highlight panels of genes that are altered in cancer. However, these candidate cancer genes must then be scrutinized to reveal whether they contribute to oncogenesis or are coincidental and non-causative. We present a computational method for the prioritization of candidate (i) proto-oncogenes and (ii) tumour suppressor genes from oncogenomic experiments. We constructed computational classifiers using different combinations of sequence and functional data including sequence conservation, protein domains and interactions, and regulatory data. We found that these classifiers are able to distinguish between known cancer genes and other human genes. Furthermore, the classifiers also discriminate candidate cancer genes from a recent mutational screen from other human genes. We provide a web-based facility through which cancer biologists may access our results and we propose computational cancer gene classification as a useful method of prioritizing candidate cancer genes identified in oncogenomic studies.

  20. Unravelling enzymatic discoloration in potato through a combined approach of candidate genes, QTL, and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Werij, Jeroen S; Kloosterman, Bjorn; Celis-Gamboa, Carolina; de Vos, C H Ric; America, Twan; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B

    2007-07-01

    Enzymatic discoloration (ED) of potato tubers was investigated in an attempt to unravel the underlying genetic factors. Both enzyme and substrate concentration have been reported to influence the degree of discoloration and as such this trait can be regarded as polygenic. The diploid mapping population C x E, consisting of 249 individuals, was assayed for the degree of ED and levels of chlorogenic acid and tyrosine. Using this data, Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) analysis was performed. Three QTLs for ED have been found on parental chromosomes C3, C8, E1, and E8. For chlorogenic acid a QTL has been identified on C2 and for tyrosine levels, a QTL has been detected on C8. None of the QTLs overlap, indicating the absence of genetic correlations between these components underlying ED, in contrast to earlier reports in literature. An obvious candidate gene for the QTL for ED on Chromosome 8 is polyphenol oxidase (PPO), which was previously mapped on chromosome 8. With gene-specific primers for PPO gene POT32 a CAPS marker was developed. Three different alleles (POT32-1, -2, and -3) could be discriminated. The segregating POT32 alleles were used to map the POT32 CAPS marker and QTL analysis was redone, showing that POT32 coincides with the QTL peak. A clear correlation between allele combinations and degree of discoloration was observed. In addition, analysis of POT32 gene expression in a subset of genotypes indicated a correlation between the level of gene expression and allele composition. On average, genotypes having two copies of allele 1 had both the highest degree of discoloration as well as the highest level of POT32 gene expression. PMID:17492422

  1. Unravelling enzymatic discoloration in potato through a combined approach of candidate genes, QTL, and expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kloosterman, Bjorn; Celis-Gamboa, Carolina; de Vos, C. H. Ric; America, Twan; Visser, Richard G. F.; Bachem, Christian W. B.

    2007-01-01

    Enzymatic discoloration (ED) of potato tubers was investigated in an attempt to unravel the underlying genetic factors. Both enzyme and substrate concentration have been reported to influence the degree of discoloration and as such this trait can be regarded as polygenic. The diploid mapping population C × E, consisting of 249 individuals, was assayed for the degree of ED and levels of chlorogenic acid and tyrosine. Using this data, Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) analysis was performed. Three QTLs for ED have been found on parental chromosomes C3, C8, E1, and E8. For chlorogenic acid a QTL has been identified on C2 and for tyrosine levels, a QTL has been detected on C8. None of the QTLs overlap, indicating the absence of genetic correlations between these components underlying ED, in contrast to earlier reports in literature. An obvious candidate gene for the QTL for ED on Chromosome 8 is polyphenol oxidase (PPO), which was previously mapped on chromosome 8. With gene-specific primers for PPO gene POT32 a CAPS marker was developed. Three different alleles (POT32-1, -2, and -3) could be discriminated. The segregating POT32 alleles were used to map the POT32 CAPS marker and QTL analysis was redone, showing that POT32 coincides with the QTL peak. A clear correlation between allele combinations and degree of discoloration was observed. In addition, analysis of POT32 gene expression in a subset of genotypes indicated a correlation between the level of gene expression and allele composition. On average, genotypes having two copies of allele 1 had both the highest degree of discoloration as well as the highest level of POT32 gene expression. PMID:17492422

  2. X-Linked Candidate Genes for a Ciliopathy-Like Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pavey, Ashleigh R.; Vilboux, Thierry; Babcock, Holly E.; Ahronovich, Margot; Solomon, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to interrogate the genome via chromosomal microarray and sequencing-based technologies has accelerated the ability to rapidly and accurately define etiologies as well as new candidate genes related to genetic conditions. We describe a male patient with a lethal presentation of a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome that appeared consistent with a ciliopathy phenotype. The patient was found to have a novel maternally inherited 1.9-Mb X chromosome deletion including 4 known genes. Presently, the biological functions of these genes are not well delineated. However, at least one of these genes may be a promising candidate gene for this pattern of anomalies based on the function of related genes and information from publicly available copy number variant databases of control and affected individuals. These genes would bear further scrutiny in larger cohorts of patients with similar phenotypes. PMID:27194972

  3. Mapping and candidate genes associated with saccharification yield in sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is a potentially high-yielding hardy energy crop to produce lignocellulosic biofuels. Saccharification is a process by which hydrolytic enzymes break down lignocellulosic materials to fermentable sugars for biofuel production. Mapping and identifying genes und...

  4. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium)

    PubMed Central

    Le Dantec, Loïck; Quero-García, José; Barreneche, Teresa; Wenden, Bénédicte; Dirlewanger, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies ‘Regina’ × ‘Garnet’ and ‘Regina’ × ‘Lapins’, and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions. PMID:26587668

  5. Test for positional candidate genes for body composition on pig chromosome 6

    PubMed Central

    Cristina, Óvilo; Oliver, Angels; Noguera, José Luis; Clop, Alex; Barragán, Carmen; Varona, Luis; Rodríguez, Carmen; Toro, Miguel; Sánchez, Armand; Pérez-Enciso, Miguel; Silió, Luis

    2002-01-01

    One QTL affecting backfat thickness (BF), intramuscular fat content (IMF) and eye muscle area (MA) was previously localized on porcine chromosome 6 in an F2 cross between Iberian and Landrace pigs. This work was done to study the effect of two positional candidate genes on these traits: H-FABP and LEPR genes. The QTL mapping analysis was repeated with a regression method using genotypes for seven microsatellites and two PCR-RFLPs in the H-FABP and LEPR genes. H-FABP and LEPR genes were located at 85.4 and 107 cM respectively, by linkage analysis. The effects of the candidate gene polymorphisms were analyzed in two ways. When an animal model was fitted, both genes showed significant effects on fatness traits, the H-FABP polymorphism showed significant effects on IMF and MA, and the LEPR polymorphism on BF and IMF. But when the candidate gene effect was included in a QTL regression analysis these associations were not observed, suggesting that they must not be the causal mutations responsible for the effects found. Differences in the results of both analyses showed the inadequacy of the animal model approach for the evaluation of positional candidate genes in populations with linkage disequilibrium, when the probabilities of the parental origin of the QTL alleles are not included in the model. PMID:12270105

  6. Candidate Gene Analysis of Mortality in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verschuren, Jeffrey J. W.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Rabelink, Ton J.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Rotmans, Joris I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dialysis patients have high cardiovascular mortality risk. This study aimed to investigate the association between SNPs of genes involved in vascular processes and mortality in dialysis patients. Methods Forty two SNPs in 25 genes involved in endothelial function, vascular remodeling, cell proliferation, inflammation, coagulation and calcium/phosphate metabolism were genotyped in 1330 incident dialysis patients. The effect of SNPs on 5-years cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality was investigated. Results The mortality rate was 114/1000 person-years and 49.4% of total mortality was cardiovascular. After correction for multiple testing, VEGF rs699947 was associated with all-cause mortality (HR1.48, 95% CI 1.14–1.92). The other SNPs were not associated with mortality. Conclusions This study provides further evidence that a SNP in the VEGF gene may contribute to the comorbid conditions of dialysis patients. Future studies should unravel the underlying mechanisms responsible for the increase in mortality in these patients. PMID:26587841

  7. Sex steroid-related candidate genes in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Westberg, Lars; Eriksson, Elias

    2008-07-01

    Sex steroids readily pass the blood-brain barrier, and receptors for them are abundant in brain areas important for the regulation of emotions, cognition and behaviour. Animal experiments have revealed both important early effects of these hormones on brain development and their ongoing influence on brain morphology and neurotransmission in the adult organism. The important effects of sex steroids on human behaviour are illustrated by, for example, the effect of reduced levels of these hormones on sexual drive and conditions such as premenstrual dysphoric disorder, perimenopausal dysphoria, postpartum depression, postpartum psychosis, dysphoria induced by oral contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and anabolic steroid-induced aggression. The fact that men and women (as groups) differ with respect to the prevalence of several psychiatric disorders, certain aspects of cognitive function and certain personality traits may possibly also reflect an influence of sex steroids on human behaviour. The heritability of most behavioural traits, including personality, cognitive abilities and susceptibility to psychiatric illness, is considerable, but as yet, only few genes of definite importance in this context have been identified. Given the important role of sex steroids for brain function, it is unfortunate that relatively few studies so far have addressed the possible influence of sex steroid-related genes on interindividual differences with respect to personality, cognition and susceptibility to psychiatric disorders. To facilitate further research in this area, this review provides information on several such genes and summarizes what is currently known with respect to their possible influence on brain function.

  8. Identification of candidate genes associated with porcine meat color traits by genome-wide transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bojiang; Dong, Chao; Li, Pinghua; Ren, Zhuqing; Wang, Han; Yu, Fengxiang; Ning, Caibo; Liu, Kaiqing; Wei, Wei; Huang, Ruihua; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wangjun; Liu, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    Meat color is considered to be the most important indicator of meat quality, however, the molecular mechanisms underlying traits related to meat color remain mostly unknown. In this study, to elucidate the molecular basis of meat color, we constructed six cDNA libraries from biceps femoris (Bf) and soleus (Sol), which exhibit obvious differences in meat color, and analyzed the whole-transcriptome differences between Bf (white muscle) and Sol (red muscle) using high-throughput sequencing technology. Using DEseq2 method, we identified 138 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between Bf and Sol. Using DEGseq method, we identified 770, 810, and 476 DEGs in comparisons between Bf and Sol in three separate animals. Of these DEGs, 52 were overlapping DEGs. Using these data, we determined the enriched GO terms, metabolic pathways and candidate genes associated with meat color traits. Additionally, we mapped 114 non-redundant DEGs to the meat color QTLs via a comparative analysis with the porcine quantitative trait loci (QTL) database. Overall, our data serve as a valuable resource for identifying genes whose functions are critical for meat color traits and can accelerate studies of the molecular mechanisms of meat color formation. PMID:27748458

  9. Prioritization of candidate disease genes by enlarging the seed set and fusing information of the network topology and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Wu; Shao, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Song-Yao; Wang, Yi-Bin

    2014-06-01

    The identification of disease genes is very important not only to provide greater understanding of gene function and cellular mechanisms which drive human disease, but also to enhance human disease diagnosis and treatment. Recently, high-throughput techniques have been applied to detect dozens or even hundreds of candidate genes. However, experimental approaches to validate the many candidates are usually time-consuming, tedious and expensive, and sometimes lack reproducibility. Therefore, numerous theoretical and computational methods (e.g. network-based approaches) have been developed to prioritize candidate disease genes. Many network-based approaches implicitly utilize the observation that genes causing the same or similar diseases tend to correlate with each other in gene-protein relationship networks. Of these network approaches, the random walk with restart algorithm (RWR) is considered to be a state-of-the-art approach. To further improve the performance of RWR, we propose a novel method named ESFSC to identify disease-related genes, by enlarging the seed set according to the centrality of disease genes in a network and fusing information of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network topological similarity and the gene expression correlation. The ESFSC algorithm restarts at all of the nodes in the seed set consisting of the known disease genes and their k-nearest neighbor nodes, then walks in the global network separately guided by the similarity transition matrix constructed with PPI network topological similarity properties and the correlational transition matrix constructed with the gene expression profiles. As a result, all the genes in the network are ranked by weighted fusing the above results of the RWR guided by two types of transition matrices. Comprehensive simulation results of the 10 diseases with 97 known disease genes collected from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database show that ESFSC outperforms existing methods for

  10. A putative greigite-type magnetosome gene cluster from the candidate phylum Latescibacteria.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Pan, Yongxin

    2015-04-01

    The intracellular biomineralization of magnetite and/or greigite magnetosomes in magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) is strictly controlled by a group of conserved genes, termed magnetosome genes, which are organized as clusters (or islands) in MTB genomes. So far, all reported MTB are affiliated within the Proteobacteria phylum, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3. Here, we report the discovery of a putative magnetosome gene cluster structure from the draft genome of an uncultivated bacterium belonging to the candidate phylum Latescibacteria (formerly candidate division WS3) recently recovered by Rinke and colleagues, which contains 10 genes with homology to magnetosome mam genes of magnetotactic Proteobacteria and Nitrospirae. Moreover, these genes are phylogenetically closely related to greigite-type magnetosome genes that were only found from the Deltaproteobacteria MTB before, suggesting that the greigite genes may originate earlier than previously imagined. These findings indicate that some members of Latescibacteria may be capable of forming greigite magnetosomes, and thus may play previously unrecognized roles in environmental iron and sulfur cycles. The conserved genomic structure of magnetosome gene cluster in Latescibacteria phylum supports the hypothesis of horizontal transfer of these genes among distantly related bacterial groups in nature.

  11. Spectroscopic confirmation and additional photometry of the M31 nova candidate PNV J00423972+4120117

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, G.; Rodriguez-Gil, P.; Henze, M.; Shore, S. N.; Hernanz, M.; Casares, J.; Hornoch, K.; Skarka, M.; Vrastil, J.; Kucakova, H.; Rezba, L.; Wolf, M.

    2014-10-01

    We report the spectroscopic confirmation of the M31 nova candidate PNV J00423972+4120117 (#ATel 6563). The object was observed on 2014 Oct 16.88 (UT) with the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope on La Palma using the ACAM imager/spectrograph with the V400 grism and the 1.5-arcsec slit.

  12. Systematic validation of candidate reference genes for qRT-PCR normalization under iron deficiency in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Yang, Zheng; Samma, Muhammad Kaleem; Wang, Ren; Shen, Wenbiao

    2013-06-01

    A reliable result obtained by qRT-PCR highly depends on accurate transcript normalization using stably expressed reference genes. However, the transcript levels of traditional reference genes are not always stable. Also, the inaccurate normalization could easily lead to the false conclusions. In this report, by using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms, 12 candidate reference genes were evaluated in Arabidopsis under iron deficiency. Our results revealed that three novel reference genes (SAND, YLS8 and TIP41-like) were identified and validated as suitable reference genes for qRT-PCR normalization in both iron deprivation (the addition of Ferrozine to the medium) and starvation (withdrawal of iron from the medium) conditions. This conclusion was also confirmed by publicly available microarray data. In addition, when using SAND, YLS8 and TIP41-like as multiple reference genes, the expression patterns of FIT1 and IRT1, two iron deficiency marker genes, were approximately similar with that reported previously. However, a weaker inducible response was obtained from qRT-PCR by normalizating EF-1α alone. Together, we proposed that the combination of SAND, YLS8 and TIP41-like can be used for accurate normalization of gene expression in iron deficiency research. These results provide a valuable evidence for the importance of adequate reference genes in qRT-PCR normalization, insisting on the use of appropriate reference gene validation in all transcriptional analyses.

  13. A potato skin SSH library yields new candidate genes for suberin biosynthesis and periderm formation.

    PubMed

    Soler, Marçal; Serra, Olga; Fluch, Silvia; Molinas, Marisa; Figueras, Mercè

    2011-05-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers are underground storage organs covered by the skin or periderm, a suberized layer that protects inner flesh from dehydration and pathogens. Understanding the molecular processes associated with periderm formation is of great importance for a better knowledge of this protective tissue and for improving the storage life of tubers. Here, to isolate new candidate genes for potato periderm, a suppression subtractive hybridization library from potato skin was performed. This library yielded a comprehensive list of 108 candidate genes that were manually sorted in functional categories according to the main cellular and metabolic processes in periderm. As expected, the list contains Suberin and wax genes, including some genes with a demonstrated role in the biosynthesis of these cell wall aliphatic compounds. Moreover, Regulation and Stress and defence genes are highly abundant in the library in general agreement with previous potato skin proteomic studies. The putative function of the genes in periderm is discussed.

  14. Bioinformatics-Based Identification of Candidate Genes from QTLs Associated with Cell Wall Traits in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, Priya; Yin, Tongming; Zhang, Xinye; Kalluri, Udaya C; Yang, Xiaohan; Jawdy, Sara; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2009-11-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies are an integral part of plant research and are used to characterize the genetic basis of phenotypic variation observed in structured populations and inform marker-assisted breeding efforts. These QTL intervals can span large physical regions on a chromosome comprising hundreds of genes, thereby hampering candidate gene identification. Genome history, evolution, and expression evidence can be used to narrow the genes in the interval to a smaller list that is manageable for detailed downstream functional genomics characterization. Our primary motivation for the present study was to address the need for a research methodology that identifies candidate genes within a broad QTL interval. Here we present a bioinformatics-based approach for subdividing candidate genes within QTL intervals into alternate groups of high probability candidates. Application of this approach in the context of studying cell wall traits, specifically lignin content and S/G ratios of stem and root in Populus plants, resulted in manageable sets of genes of both known and putative cell wall biosynthetic function. These results provide a roadmap for future experimental work leading to identification of new genes controlling cell wall recalcitrance and, ultimately, in the utility of plant biomass as an energy feedstock.

  15. An extensive candidate gene approach to speciation: diversity, divergence and linkage disequilibrium in candidate pigmentation genes across the European crow hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Poelstra, J W; Ellegren, H; Wolf, J B W

    2013-12-01

    Colouration patterns have an important role in adaptation and speciation. The European crow system, in which all-black carrion crows and grey-coated hooded crows meet in a narrow hybrid zone, is a prominent example. The marked phenotypic difference is maintained by assortative mating in the absence of neutral genetic divergence, suggesting the presence of few pigmentation genes of major effect. We made use of the rich phenotypic and genetic resources in mammals and identified a comprehensive panel of 95 candidate pigmentation genes for birds. Based on functional annotation, we chose a subset of the most promising 37 candidates, for which we developed a marker system that demonstrably works across the avian phylogeny. In total, we sequenced 107 amplicons (∼3 loci per gene, totalling 60 kb) in population samples of crows (n=23 for each taxon). Tajima's D, Fu's FS, DHEW and HKA (Hudson-Kreitman-Aguade) statistics revealed several amplicons that deviated from neutrality; however, none of these showed significantly elevated differentiation between the two taxa. Hence, colour divergence in this system may be mediated by uncharacterized pigmentation genes or regulatory regions outside genes. Alternatively, the observed high population recombination rate (4Ner∼0.03), with overall linkage disequilibrium dropping rapidly within the order of few 100 bp, may compromise the power to detect causal loci with nearby markers. Our results add to the debate as to the utility of candidate gene approaches in relation to genomic features and the genetic architecture of the phenotypic trait in question. PMID:23881172

  16. An extensive candidate gene approach to speciation: diversity, divergence and linkage disequilibrium in candidate pigmentation genes across the European crow hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Poelstra, J W; Ellegren, H; Wolf, J B W

    2013-12-01

    Colouration patterns have an important role in adaptation and speciation. The European crow system, in which all-black carrion crows and grey-coated hooded crows meet in a narrow hybrid zone, is a prominent example. The marked phenotypic difference is maintained by assortative mating in the absence of neutral genetic divergence, suggesting the presence of few pigmentation genes of major effect. We made use of the rich phenotypic and genetic resources in mammals and identified a comprehensive panel of 95 candidate pigmentation genes for birds. Based on functional annotation, we chose a subset of the most promising 37 candidates, for which we developed a marker system that demonstrably works across the avian phylogeny. In total, we sequenced 107 amplicons (∼3 loci per gene, totalling 60 kb) in population samples of crows (n=23 for each taxon). Tajima's D, Fu's FS, DHEW and HKA (Hudson-Kreitman-Aguade) statistics revealed several amplicons that deviated from neutrality; however, none of these showed significantly elevated differentiation between the two taxa. Hence, colour divergence in this system may be mediated by uncharacterized pigmentation genes or regulatory regions outside genes. Alternatively, the observed high population recombination rate (4Ner∼0.03), with overall linkage disequilibrium dropping rapidly within the order of few 100 bp, may compromise the power to detect causal loci with nearby markers. Our results add to the debate as to the utility of candidate gene approaches in relation to genomic features and the genetic architecture of the phenotypic trait in question.

  17. Replication of type 2 diabetes candidate genes variations in three geographically unrelated Indian population groups.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shafat; Chopra, Rupali; Manvati, Siddharth; Singh, Yoginder Pal; Kaul, Nabodita; Behura, Anita; Mahajan, Ankit; Sehajpal, Prabodh; Gupta, Subash; Dhar, Manoj K; Chainy, Gagan B N; Bhanwer, Amarjit S; Sharma, Swarkar; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a syndrome of multiple metabolic disorders and is genetically heterogeneous. India comprises one of the largest global populations with highest number of reported type 2 diabetes cases. However, limited information about T2D associated loci is available for Indian populations. It is, therefore, pertinent to evaluate the previously associated candidates as well as identify novel genetic variations in Indian populations to understand the extent of genetic heterogeneity. We chose to do a cost effective high-throughput mass-array genotyping and studied the candidate gene variations associated with T2D in literature. In this case-control candidate genes association study, 91 SNPs from 55 candidate genes have been analyzed in three geographically independent population groups from India. We report the genetic variants in five candidate genes: TCF7L2, HHEX, ENPP1, IDE and FTO, are significantly associated (after Bonferroni correction, p<5.5E-04) with T2D susceptibility in combined population. Interestingly, SNP rs7903146 of the TCF7L2 gene passed the genome wide significance threshold (combined P value = 2.05E-08) in the studied populations. We also observed the association of rs7903146 with blood glucose (fasting and postprandial) levels, supporting the role of TCF7L2 gene in blood glucose homeostasis. Further, we noted that the moderate risk provided by the independently associated loci in combined population with Odds Ratio (OR)<1.38 increased to OR = 2.44, (95%CI = 1.67-3.59) when the risk providing genotypes of TCF7L2, HHEX, ENPP1 and FTO genes were combined, suggesting the importance of gene-gene interactions evaluation in complex disorders like T2D.

  18. Characterization of a candidate tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, M.C.; Xiang, R.H.; Hensel, C.H.

    1994-09-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumors frequently display deletions on the short arm of chromosome 3 suggesting the existence of a tumor suppressor gene(s) within that region. The hybrid, HA(3)BB9F, contains a small fragment of human chromosome 3(p22-p21) in mouse A9 cells and is suppressed for tumor formation. Further we have identified a SCLC cell line, NCI H740, that bears a homozygous deletion involving the loss of 6 markers that map to the region 3p21.3-p21.2 and all but one are located within the 3p fragment exhibiting properties of tumor suppression in the HA(3)BB9F hybrid. A homozygous deletion overlapping found in NCI H740 has been identified in a Dutch SCLC cell line. To define the extent of the deletion in NCI H740, we have constructed a YAC and P1 contig spanning 2 Mb. The order of markers within the contig is as follows: -D8-(1,2)-D3S1235-ALU5-ALU342-ALU6-DDI-(3,4)-GNAI2. An SstII fragment corresponding to a CpG island from P1 170 was used to isolate 5 overlapping cDNA clones. These clones detect both DNA rearrangements and altered expression patterns in a proportion of SCLC cell lines. SSCP analysis is being used to identify mutations in those SCLC cell lines which express the gene as assessed by both Northern and RT-PCR analyses. As functional evidence is final proof for tumor suppressor activity, the P1 clones and cDNA have been transfected into a mouse fibrosarcoma (A9) and a human SCLC cell line. A9 transfectants containing the P1 170 clone exhibit both altered morphology and a high frequency of apoptosis when compared to the non-transfected A9 cells. Stable transfectants will be injected into nude mice to assess the ability of the P1 clones to suppress tumorigenesis in vivo.

  19. Identification of New Candidate Genes and Chemicals Related to Esophageal Cancer Using a Hybrid Interaction Network of Chemicals and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junbao; Li, Li-Peng; He, Yi-Chun; Gao, Ru-Jian; Cai, Yu-Dong; Jiang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a serious disease responsible for many deaths every year in both developed and developing countries. One reason is that the mechanisms underlying most types of cancer are still mysterious, creating a great block for the design of effective treatments. In this study, we attempted to clarify the mechanism underlying esophageal cancer by searching for novel genes and chemicals. To this end, we constructed a hybrid network containing both proteins and chemicals, and generalized an existing computational method previously used to identify disease genes to identify new candidate genes and chemicals simultaneously. Based on jackknife test, our generalized method outperforms or at least performs at the same level as those obtained by a widely used method - the Random Walk with Restart (RWR). The analysis results of the final obtained genes and chemicals demonstrated that they highly shared gene ontology (GO) terms and KEGG pathways with direct and indirect associations with esophageal cancer. In addition, we also discussed the likelihood of selected candidate genes and chemicals being novel genes and chemicals related to esophageal cancer. PMID:26058041

  20. Gene Duplication and Gene Expression Changes Play a Role in the Evolution of Candidate Pollen Feeding Genes in Heliconius Butterflies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert; Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2016-01-01

    Heliconius possess a unique ability among butterflies to feed on pollen. Pollen feeding significantly extends their lifespan, and is thought to have been important to the diversification of the genus. We used RNA sequencing to examine feeding-related gene expression in the mouthparts of four species of Heliconius and one nonpollen feeding species, Eueides isabella We hypothesized that genes involved in morphology and protein metabolism might be upregulated in Heliconius because they have longer proboscides than Eueides, and because pollen contains more protein than nectar. Using de novo transcriptome assemblies, we tested these hypotheses by comparing gene expression in mouthparts against antennae and legs. We first looked for genes upregulated in mouthparts across all five species and discovered several hundred genes, many of which had functional annotations involving metabolism of proteins (cocoonase), lipids, and carbohydrates. We then looked specifically within Heliconius where we found eleven common upregulated genes with roles in morphology (CPR cuticle proteins), behavior (takeout-like), and metabolism (luciferase-like). Closer examination of these candidates revealed that cocoonase underwent several duplications along the lineage leading to heliconiine butterflies, including two Heliconius-specific duplications. Luciferase-like genes also underwent duplication within lepidopterans, and upregulation in Heliconius mouthparts. Reverse-transcription PCR confirmed that three cocoonases, a peptidase, and one luciferase-like gene are expressed in the proboscis with little to no expression in labial palps and salivary glands. Our results suggest pollen feeding, like other dietary specializations, was likely facilitated by adaptive expansions of preexisting genes-and that the butterfly proboscis is involved in digestive enzyme production. PMID:27553646

  1. Gene Duplication and Gene Expression Changes Play a Role in the Evolution of Candidate Pollen Feeding Genes in Heliconius Butterflies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert; Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2016-09-02

    Heliconius possess a unique ability among butterflies to feed on pollen. Pollen feeding significantly extends their lifespan, and is thought to have been important to the diversification of the genus. We used RNA sequencing to examine feeding-related gene expression in the mouthparts of four species of Heliconius and one nonpollen feeding species, Eueides isabella We hypothesized that genes involved in morphology and protein metabolism might be upregulated in Heliconius because they have longer proboscides than Eueides, and because pollen contains more protein than nectar. Using de novo transcriptome assemblies, we tested these hypotheses by comparing gene expression in mouthparts against antennae and legs. We first looked for genes upregulated in mouthparts across all five species and discovered several hundred genes, many of which had functional annotations involving metabolism of proteins (cocoonase), lipids, and carbohydrates. We then looked specifically within Heliconius where we found eleven common upregulated genes with roles in morphology (CPR cuticle proteins), behavior (takeout-like), and metabolism (luciferase-like). Closer examination of these candidates revealed that cocoonase underwent several duplications along the lineage leading to heliconiine butterflies, including two Heliconius-specific duplications. Luciferase-like genes also underwent duplication within lepidopterans, and upregulation in Heliconius mouthparts. Reverse-transcription PCR confirmed that three cocoonases, a peptidase, and one luciferase-like gene are expressed in the proboscis with little to no expression in labial palps and salivary glands. Our results suggest pollen feeding, like other dietary specializations, was likely facilitated by adaptive expansions of preexisting genes-and that the butterfly proboscis is involved in digestive enzyme production.

  2. Candidate gene loci in asthmatic and allergic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, J.; Holgate, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    New techniques for scanning the human genome promise great advances in tracking the origins of disorders caused by multiple genes. However, it is clear from the studies presented in this overview that we are far from understanding the genetic basis of asthma and atopy and their interaction with the environment. It is also clear that agreement must be reached on definition of the phenotype and methods of ascertainment in order to carry out large multicentre collaborative studies. Positive findings need to be validated in different populations selected for the presence of the disease and then confirmed in a random population where the prevalence of asthma and atopy will also be expected to be significant. PMID:8658365

  3. Targeted resequencing of candidate genes using selector probes

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, H.; Isaksson, M.; Sörqvist, E. Falk; Roos, F.; Stenberg, J.; Sjöblom, T.; Botling, J.; Micke, P.; Edlund, K.; Fredriksson, S.; Kultima, H. Göransson; Ericsson, Olle; Nilsson, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Targeted genome enrichment is a powerful tool for making use of the massive throughput of novel DNA-sequencing instruments. We herein present a simple and scalable protocol for multiplex amplification of target regions based on the Selector technique. The updated version exhibits improved coverage and compatibility with next-generation-sequencing (NGS) library-construction procedures for shotgun sequencing with NGS platforms. To demonstrate the performance of the technique, all 501 exons from 28 genes frequently involved in cancer were enriched for and sequenced in specimens derived from cell lines and tumor biopsies. DNA from both fresh frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsies were analyzed and 94% specificity and 98% coverage of the targeted region was achieved. Reproducibility between replicates was high (R2 = 0, 98) and readily enabled detection of copy-number variations. The procedure can be carried out in <24 h and does not require any dedicated instrumentation. PMID:21059679

  4. Association analysis of GWAS and candidate gene loci in a Pakistani population with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Munir, Saeeda; ber Rahman, Simeen; Rehman, Sadia; Saba, Nusrat; Ahmad, Wasim; Nilsson, Staffan; Mazhar, Kehkashan; Naluai, Åsa Torinsson

    2015-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory and hyper proliferative condition of the skin and a serious chronic systemic autoimmune disease. We undertook an association study to investigate the genetic etiology of psoriasis in a Pakistani population by genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported to be associated in genome-wide association (GWAS) or in candidate gene studies of psoriasis. Fifty seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 42 loci were genotyped in 533 psoriasis patients and 373 controls. Our results showed genome wide significant association of the MHC region (rs1265181 being the most significant from five SNPs used with overall OR=3.38; p=2.97E-18), as well as nominally significant associations at ten other loci (p<0.05) in the Pakistani population (LCE3B, REL, IL13/IL4, TNIP1, IL12B, TRAF3IP2, ZC3H12C, NOS2 and RNF114 from GWAS and PRR9 from a previous candidate gene study). Overall, only nine SNPs out of the 42 GWAS loci, displayed an odds ratio in the opposite allelic direction and only three did not reach similar odds ratio within 95% confidence interval as previously reported (SLC45A1/TNFRSF9, ELMO1 and IL28RA). This indicates similar genetic risk factors and molecular mechanisms behind disease in Pakistani psoriasis patients as in other populations. In addition, we show that the MHC and TNIP1 regions are significantly different in patients with psoriasis onset before the age of 40 (type I) compared to after 40 years of age (type II). MHC being associated mainly with type I while TNIP1 with type II patients.

  5. A computational framework for the prioritization of disease-gene candidates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The identification of genes and uncovering the role they play in diseases is an important and complex challenge. Genome-wide linkage and association studies have made advancements in identifying genetic variants that underpin human disease. An important challenge now is to identify meaningful disease-associated genes from a long list of candidate genes implicated by these analyses. The application of gene prioritization can enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and aid in the discovery of drug targets. The integration of protein-protein interaction networks along with disease datasets and contextual information is an important tool in unraveling the molecular basis of diseases. Results In this paper we propose a computational pipeline for the prioritization of disease-gene candidates. Diverse heterogeneous data including: gene-expression, protein-protein interaction network, ontology-based similarity and topological measures and tissue-specific are integrated. The pipeline was applied to prioritize Alzheimer's Disease (AD) genes, whereby a list of 32 prioritized genes was generated. This approach correctly identified key AD susceptible genes: PSEN1 and TRAF1. Biological process enrichment analysis revealed the prioritized genes are modulated in AD pathogenesis including: regulation of neurogenesis and generation of neurons. Relatively high predictive performance (AUC: 0.70) was observed when classifying AD and normal gene expression profiles from individuals using leave-one-out cross validation. Conclusions This work provides a foundation for future investigation of diverse heterogeneous data integration for disease-gene prioritization. PMID:26330267

  6. Assessment of Osteoarthritis Candidate Genes in a Meta-Analysis of Nine Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Fontenla, Cristina; Calaza, Manuel; Evangelou, Evangelos; Valdes, Ana M; Arden, Nigel; Blanco, Francisco J; Carr, Andrew; Chapman, Kay; Deloukas, Panos; Doherty, Michael; Esko, Tõnu; Garcés Aletá, Carlos M; Gomez-Reino Carnota, Juan J; Helgadottir, Hafdis; Hofman, Albert; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Kerkhof, Hanneke J M; Kloppenburg, Margreet; McCaskie, Andrew; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Ollier, William E R; Oreiro, Natividad; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Ralston, Stuart H; Ramos, Yolande F; Riancho, Jose A; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Slagboom, P Eline; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tsezou, Aspasia; Uitterlinden, André G; Wallis, Gillian A; Wilkinson, J Mark; Zhai, Guangju; Zhu, Yanyan; Felson, David T; Ioannidis, John P A; Loughlin, John; Metspalu, Andres; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Stefansson, Kari; van Meurs, Joyce B; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Spector, Timothy D; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess candidate genes for association with osteoarthritis (OA) and identify promising genetic factors and, secondarily, to assess the candidate gene approach in OA. Methods A total of 199 candidate genes for association with OA were identified using Human Genome Epidemiology (HuGE) Navigator. All of their single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with an allele frequency of >5% were assessed by fixed-effects meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that included 5,636 patients with knee OA and 16,972 control subjects and 4,349 patients with hip OA and 17,836 control subjects of European ancestry. An additional 5,921 individuals were genotyped for significantly associated SNPs in the meta-analysis. After correction for the number of independent tests, P values less than 1.58 × 10−5 were considered significant. Results SNPs at only 2 of the 199 candidate genes (COL11A1 and VEGF) were associated with OA in the meta-analysis. Two SNPs in COL11A1 showed association with hip OA in the combined analysis: rs4907986 (P = 1.29 × 10−5, odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.06−1.17) and rs1241164 (P = 1.47 × 10−5, OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.74−0.89). The sex-stratified analysis also showed association of COL11A1 SNP rs4908291 in women (P = 1.29 × 10−5, OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.82−0.92); this SNP showed linkage disequilibrium with rs4907986. A single SNP of VEGF, rs833058, showed association with hip OA in men (P = 1.35 × 10−5, OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.79−0.91). After additional samples were genotyped, association at one of the COL11A1 signals was reinforced, whereas association at VEGF was slightly weakened. Conclusion Two candidate genes, COL11A1 and VEGF, were significantly associated with OA in this focused meta-analysis. The remaining candidate genes were not associated. PMID:24757145

  7. Identification of candidate lung cancer susceptibility genes in mouse using oligonucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, W; Bernert, H; Sun, H; Wang, Y; You, M

    2002-01-01

    We applied microarray gene expression profiling to lungs from mouse strains having variable susceptibility to lung tumour development as a means to identify, within known quantitative trait loci (QTLs), candidate genes responsible for susceptibility or resistance to lung cancer. At least eight chromosomal regions of mice have been mapped and verified to be linked with lung tumour susceptibility or resistance. In this study, high density oligonucleotide arrays were used to measure the relative expression levels of >36 000 genes and ESTs in lung tissues of A/J, BALB/cJ, SM/J, C3H/HeJ, and C57BL/6J mice. A number of differentially expressed genes were found in each of the lung cancer susceptibility QTLs. Bioinformatic analysis of the differentially expressed genes located within QTLs produced 28 susceptibility candidates and 22 resistance candidates. These candidates may be extremely helpful in the ultimate identification of the precise genes responsible for lung tumour susceptibility or resistance in mice and, through follow up, humans. Complete data sets are available at http://thinker.med.ohio-state.edu. PMID:12205107

  8. Replacing and Additive Horizontal Gene Transfer in Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sang Chul; Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Hubisz, Melissa J.; Gronau, Ilan; Stanhope, Michael J.; Siepel, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The prominent role of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) in the evolution of bacteria is now well documented, but few studies have differentiated between evolutionary events that predominantly cause genes in one lineage to be replaced by homologs from another lineage (“replacing HGT”) and events that result in the addition of substantial new genomic material (“additive HGT”). Here in, we make use of the distinct phylogenetic signatures of replacing and additive HGTs in a genome-wide study of the important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (SPY) and its close relatives S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDE) and S. dysgalactiae subspecies dysgalactiae (SDD). Using recently developed statistical models and computational methods, we find evidence for abundant gene flow of both kinds within each of the SPY and SDE clades and of reduced levels of exchange between SPY and SDD. In addition, our analysis strongly supports a pronounced asymmetry in SPY–SDE gene flow, favoring the SPY-to-SDE direction. This finding is of particular interest in light of the recent increase in virulence of pathogenic SDE. We find much stronger evidence for SPY–SDE gene flow among replacing than among additive transfers, suggesting a primary influence from homologous recombination between co-occurring SPY and SDE cells in human hosts. Putative virulence genes are correlated with transfer events, but this correlation is found to be driven by additive, not replacing, HGTs. The genes affected by additive HGTs are enriched for functions having to do with transposition, recombination, and DNA integration, consistent with previous findings, whereas replacing HGTs seen to influence a more diverse set of genes. Additive transfers are also found to be associated with evidence of positive selection. These findings shed new light on the manner in which HGT has shaped pathogenic bacterial genomes. PMID:22617954

  9. Candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility show enriched association within a large genome-wide association study for BMI

    PubMed Central

    Vimaleswaran, Karani S.; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Zhao, Jing Hua; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Dudbridge, Frank; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Before the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWASs), hundreds of candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility had been identified through a variety of approaches. We examined whether those obesity candidate genes are enriched for associations with body mass index (BMI) compared with non-candidate genes by using data from a large-scale GWAS. A thorough literature search identified 547 candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility based on evidence from animal studies, Mendelian syndromes, linkage studies, genetic association studies and expression studies. Genomic regions were defined to include the genes ±10 kb of flanking sequence around candidate and non-candidate genes. We used summary statistics publicly available from the discovery stage of the genome-wide meta-analysis for BMI performed by the genetic investigation of anthropometric traits consortium in 123 564 individuals. Hypergeometric, rank tail-strength and gene-set enrichment analysis tests were used to test for the enrichment of association in candidate compared with non-candidate genes. The hypergeometric test of enrichment was not significant at the 5% P-value quantile (P = 0.35), but was nominally significant at the 25% quantile (P = 0.015). The rank tail-strength and gene-set enrichment tests were nominally significant for the full set of genes and borderline significant for the subset without SNPs at P < 10−7. Taken together, the observed evidence for enrichment suggests that the candidate gene approach retains some value. However, the degree of enrichment is small despite the extensive number of candidate genes and the large sample size. Studies that focus on candidate genes have only slightly increased chances of detecting associations, and are likely to miss many true effects in non-candidate genes, at least for obesity-related traits. PMID:22791748

  10. Candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility show enriched association within a large genome-wide association study for BMI.

    PubMed

    Vimaleswaran, Karani S; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Zhao, Jing Hua; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Dudbridge, Frank; Loos, Ruth J F

    2012-10-15

    Before the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWASs), hundreds of candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility had been identified through a variety of approaches. We examined whether those obesity candidate genes are enriched for associations with body mass index (BMI) compared with non-candidate genes by using data from a large-scale GWAS. A thorough literature search identified 547 candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility based on evidence from animal studies, Mendelian syndromes, linkage studies, genetic association studies and expression studies. Genomic regions were defined to include the genes ±10 kb of flanking sequence around candidate and non-candidate genes. We used summary statistics publicly available from the discovery stage of the genome-wide meta-analysis for BMI performed by the genetic investigation of anthropometric traits consortium in 123 564 individuals. Hypergeometric, rank tail-strength and gene-set enrichment analysis tests were used to test for the enrichment of association in candidate compared with non-candidate genes. The hypergeometric test of enrichment was not significant at the 5% P-value quantile (P = 0.35), but was nominally significant at the 25% quantile (P = 0.015). The rank tail-strength and gene-set enrichment tests were nominally significant for the full set of genes and borderline significant for the subset without SNPs at P < 10(-7). Taken together, the observed evidence for enrichment suggests that the candidate gene approach retains some value. However, the degree of enrichment is small despite the extensive number of candidate genes and the large sample size. Studies that focus on candidate genes have only slightly increased chances of detecting associations, and are likely to miss many true effects in non-candidate genes, at least for obesity-related traits.

  11. Gene Duplication and Gene Expression Changes Play a Role in the Evolution of Candidate Pollen Feeding Genes in Heliconius Butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gilbert; Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Briscoe, Adriana D.

    2016-01-01

    Heliconius possess a unique ability among butterflies to feed on pollen. Pollen feeding significantly extends their lifespan, and is thought to have been important to the diversification of the genus. We used RNA sequencing to examine feeding-related gene expression in the mouthparts of four species of Heliconius and one nonpollen feeding species, Eueides isabella. We hypothesized that genes involved in morphology and protein metabolism might be upregulated in Heliconius because they have longer proboscides than Eueides, and because pollen contains more protein than nectar. Using de novo transcriptome assemblies, we tested these hypotheses by comparing gene expression in mouthparts against antennae and legs. We first looked for genes upregulated in mouthparts across all five species and discovered several hundred genes, many of which had functional annotations involving metabolism of proteins (cocoonase), lipids, and carbohydrates. We then looked specifically within Heliconius where we found eleven common upregulated genes with roles in morphology (CPR cuticle proteins), behavior (takeout-like), and metabolism (luciferase-like). Closer examination of these candidates revealed that cocoonase underwent several duplications along the lineage leading to heliconiine butterflies, including two Heliconius-specific duplications. Luciferase-like genes also underwent duplication within lepidopterans, and upregulation in Heliconius mouthparts. Reverse-transcription PCR confirmed that three cocoonases, a peptidase, and one luciferase-like gene are expressed in the proboscis with little to no expression in labial palps and salivary glands. Our results suggest pollen feeding, like other dietary specializations, was likely facilitated by adaptive expansions of preexisting genes—and that the butterfly proboscis is involved in digestive enzyme production. PMID:27553646

  12. Genomic analysis of Meckel-Gruber syndrome in Arabs reveals marked genetic heterogeneity and novel candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Alshammari, Muneera J; Swaid, Abdulrahman; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Mardawi, Elham; Ansari, Shinu; Sogaty, Sameera; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z; AlMotairi, Muhammed I; Farra, Chantal; Kurdi, Wesam; Al-Rasheed, Shatha; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2013-07-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS, OMIM #249000) is a multiple congenital malformation syndrome that represents the severe end of the ciliopathy phenotypic spectrum. Despite the relatively common occurrence of this syndrome among Arabs, little is known about its genetic architecture in this population. This is a series of 18 Arab families with MKS, who were evaluated clinically and studied using autozygome-guided mutation analysis and exome sequencing. We show that autozygome-guided candidate gene analysis identified the underlying mutation in the majority (n=12, 71%). Exome sequencing revealed a likely pathogenic mutation in three novel candidate MKS disease genes. These include C5orf42, Ellis-van-Creveld disease gene EVC2 and SEC8 (also known as EXOC4), which encodes an exocyst protein with an established role in ciliogenesis. This is the largest and most comprehensive genomic study on MKS in Arabs and the results, in addition to revealing genetic and allelic heterogeneity, suggest that previously reported disease genes and the novel candidates uncovered by this study account for the overwhelming majority of MKS patients in our population.

  13. Combined Linkage and Association Mapping Reveals QTL and Candidate Genes for Plant and Ear Height in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Zijian; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Yabin; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Ruixia; Ma, Jinliang; Wang, Shiwei; Zhang, Xuecai; Xia, Zongliang; Chen, Jiafa; Wu, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    Plant height (PH) and ear height (EH) are two very important agronomic traits related to the population density and lodging in maize. In order to better understand of the genetic basis of nature variation in PH and EH, two bi-parental populations and one genome-wide association study (GWAS) population were used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both traits. Phenotypic data analysis revealed a wide normal distribution and high heritability for PH and EH in the three populations, which indicated that maize height is a highly polygenic trait. A total of 21 QTL for PH and EH in three common genomic regions (bin 1.05, 5.04/05, and 6.04/05) were identified by QTL mapping in the two bi-parental populations under multiple environments. Additionally, 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified for PH and EH by GWAS, of which 29 SNPs were located in 19 unique candidate gene regions. Most of the candidate genes were related to plant growth and development. One QTL on Chromosome 1 was further verified in a near-isogenic line (NIL) population, and GWAS identified a C2H2 zinc finger family protein that maybe the candidate gene for this QTL. These results revealed that nature variation of PH and EH are strongly controlled by multiple genes with low effect and facilitated a better understanding of the underlying mechanism of height in maize.

  14. Combined Linkage and Association Mapping Reveals QTL and Candidate Genes for Plant and Ear Height in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Zijian; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Yabin; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Ruixia; Ma, Jinliang; Wang, Shiwei; Zhang, Xuecai; Xia, Zongliang; Chen, Jiafa; Wu, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    Plant height (PH) and ear height (EH) are two very important agronomic traits related to the population density and lodging in maize. In order to better understand of the genetic basis of nature variation in PH and EH, two bi-parental populations and one genome-wide association study (GWAS) population were used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both traits. Phenotypic data analysis revealed a wide normal distribution and high heritability for PH and EH in the three populations, which indicated that maize height is a highly polygenic trait. A total of 21 QTL for PH and EH in three common genomic regions (bin 1.05, 5.04/05, and 6.04/05) were identified by QTL mapping in the two bi-parental populations under multiple environments. Additionally, 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified for PH and EH by GWAS, of which 29 SNPs were located in 19 unique candidate gene regions. Most of the candidate genes were related to plant growth and development. One QTL on Chromosome 1 was further verified in a near-isogenic line (NIL) population, and GWAS identified a C2H2 zinc finger family protein that maybe the candidate gene for this QTL. These results revealed that nature variation of PH and EH are strongly controlled by multiple genes with low effect and facilitated a better understanding of the underlying mechanism of height in maize. PMID:27379126

  15. Combined Linkage and Association Mapping Reveals QTL and Candidate Genes for Plant and Ear Height in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Zijian; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Yabin; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Ruixia; Ma, Jinliang; Wang, Shiwei; Zhang, Xuecai; Xia, Zongliang; Chen, Jiafa; Wu, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    Plant height (PH) and ear height (EH) are two very important agronomic traits related to the population density and lodging in maize. In order to better understand of the genetic basis of nature variation in PH and EH, two bi-parental populations and one genome-wide association study (GWAS) population were used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both traits. Phenotypic data analysis revealed a wide normal distribution and high heritability for PH and EH in the three populations, which indicated that maize height is a highly polygenic trait. A total of 21 QTL for PH and EH in three common genomic regions (bin 1.05, 5.04/05, and 6.04/05) were identified by QTL mapping in the two bi-parental populations under multiple environments. Additionally, 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified for PH and EH by GWAS, of which 29 SNPs were located in 19 unique candidate gene regions. Most of the candidate genes were related to plant growth and development. One QTL on Chromosome 1 was further verified in a near-isogenic line (NIL) population, and GWAS identified a C2H2 zinc finger family protein that maybe the candidate gene for this QTL. These results revealed that nature variation of PH and EH are strongly controlled by multiple genes with low effect and facilitated a better understanding of the underlying mechanism of height in maize. PMID:27379126

  16. Leveraging model legume information to find candidate genes for soybean sudden death syndrome using the legume information system.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Michael D; Gajendran, Kamal; Farmer, Andrew D; Archuleta, Eric; Beavis, William D

    2007-01-01

    Comparative genomics is an emerging and powerful approach to achieve crop improvement. Using comparative genomics, information from model plant species can accelerate the discovery of genes responsible for disease and pest resistance, tolerance to plant stresses such as drought, and enhanced nutritional value including production of anti-oxidants and anti-cancer compounds. We demonstrate here how to use the Legume Information System for a comparative genomics study, leveraging genomic information from Medicago truncatula (barrel medic), the model legume, to find candidate genes involved with sudden death syndrome (SDS) in Glycine max (soybean). Specifically, genetic maps, physical maps, and annotated tentative consensus and expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences from G. max and M. truncatula can be compared. In addition, the recently published M. truncatula genomic sequences can be used to identify M. truncatula candidate genes in a genomic region syntenic to a quantitative trait loci region for SDS in soybean. Genomic sequences of candidate genes from M. truncatula can then be used to identify ESTs with sequence similarities from soybean for primer design and cloning of potential soybean disease causing alleles. PMID:18287696

  17. Candidate gene polymorphisms and risk of psoriasis: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    VILLARREAL-MARTÍNEZ, ALEJANDRA; GALLARDO-BLANCO, HUGO; CERDA-FLORES, RICARDO; TORRES-MUÑOZ, IRIS; GÓMEZ-FLORES, MINERVA; SALAS-ALANÍS, JULIO; OCAMPO-CANDIANI, JORGE; MARTÍNEZ-GARZA, LAURA

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a complex genetic disease, which has previously been associated with numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are implicated in various processes, including skin barrier functions and in the regulation of inflammatory and immune responses. The present study aimed to investigate the genotypic and allelic frequencies of 32 SNPs at 24 genetic loci, and their association with psoriasis in a Mexican population. These SNPs, which were associated with psoriasis in previous studies, included the following genes: Major histocompatibility complex class I-C (HLA-C), interleukin (IL)-12B, IL-23R, IL-23A, IL-28RA, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, ring finger protein-114 (RNF114), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 1-like 1, late cornified envelope 3B/3C, signal transducer and activator of transcription 4, LINC01185, interferon induced with helicase C domain 1, IL-13, TNF-α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), TNFAIP3 interacting protein 1, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1, TNF receptor-associated factor interacting protein 2, Leptin, nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor-alpha, F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 19, nitric oxide synthase 2, cluster of differentiation 40, nuclear receptor coactivator 5, and ADAM metallopeptidase domain 33. A total of 32 male and 14 female subjects with a clinical diagnosis of chronic plaque psoriasis, as well as 103 control subjects, were analyzed. Molecular analyses were performed using TaqMan® assays in a TaqMan® OpenArray® Genotyping system. Results were analyzed using the Golden Helix SNP and Variation Suite 7 program. Of the 32 SNPs, six were associated with an increased risk of developing psoriasis, including: HLA-C rs10484554 [allele T: odds ratio (OR) 3.51], IL-12B rs3212227 (allele T: OR 1.88), IL-12B rs3213094 (allele C: OR 1.94), HLA complex group 27 rs1265181 (allele C: OR 2.83), annexin A6 rs17728338 (allele A: OR 2.41), and RNF114 rs

  18. Pharmacogenetic Association of Hypertension Candidate Genes with Fasting Glucose in the GenHAT Study

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Marguerite R.; Lynch, Amy I.; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Barzilay, Joshua I.; Eckfeldt, John H.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Davis, Barry R.; Ford, Charles E.; Arnett, Donna K.

    2010-01-01

    Several clinical studies report increased risk of diabetes mellitus (DM) with pharmacologic treatment for hypertension (HTN). HTN genes may modify glycemic response to antihypertensive treatment. The current study examined the association of 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 11 HTN candidate genes with fasting glucose measured at 2, 4, and 6 years after treatment initiation. The study sample included participants free of diabetes at baseline in the Genetics of Hypertension Associated Treatment (GenHAT) study (N=9,309). GenHAT participants were randomized to receive treatment with a diuretic (chlorthalidone), calcium channel blocker (amlodipine), or ACE inhibitor (lisinopril). Mixed models for repeated measures were employed to test for gene and pharmacogenetic associations with fasting glucose during follow-up. Fasting glucose at year 2 increased on average 6.8 mg/dL, 4.8 mg/dL and 3.0 mg/dL from baseline in the chlorthalidone, amlodipine and lisinopril groups, respectively. Carrying the I allele (rs1799752) of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphism was associated with lower fasting glucose levels (P=0.02). Additionally, an ACE promoter polymorphism (−262, rs4291) was associated with lower fasting glucose for the model AA/AT vs. TT which remained significant after correction for multiple testing (P=0.001). Finally, a SNP in the α-subunit of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (SCNN1A, rs2228576) modified the association of amlodipine versus chlorthalidone treatment with fasting glucose (P<0.001). Further examination of these genes and their relationships with cardiometabolic disease could foster development of pharmacogenetic guidelines aimed to prevent increases in fasting glucose during antihypertensive treatment. PMID:20577119

  19. High-throughput analysis of candidate imprinted genes and allele-specific gene expression in the human term placenta

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Imprinted genes show expression from one parental allele only and are important for development and behaviour. This extreme mode of allelic imbalance has been described for approximately 56 human genes. Imprinting status is often disrupted in cancer and dysmorphic syndromes. More subtle variation of gene expression, that is not parent-of-origin specific, termed 'allele-specific gene expression' (ASE) is more common and may give rise to milder phenotypic differences. Using two allele-specific high-throughput technologies alongside bioinformatics predictions, normal term human placenta was screened to find new imprinted genes and to ascertain the extent of ASE in this tissue. Results Twenty-three family trios of placental cDNA, placental genomic DNA (gDNA) and gDNA from both parents were tested for 130 candidate genes with the Sequenom MassArray system. Six genes were found differentially expressed but none imprinted. The Illumina ASE BeadArray platform was then used to test 1536 SNPs in 932 genes. The array was enriched for the human orthologues of 124 mouse candidate genes from bioinformatics predictions and 10 human candidate imprinted genes from EST database mining. After quality control pruning, a total of 261 informative SNPs (214 genes) remained for analysis. Imprinting with maternal expression was demonstrated for the lymphocyte imprinted gene ZNF331 in human placenta. Two potential differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were found in the vicinity of ZNF331. None of the bioinformatically predicted candidates tested showed imprinting except for a skewed allelic expression in a parent-specific manner observed for PHACTR2, a neighbour of the imprinted PLAGL1 gene. ASE was detected for two or more individuals in 39 candidate genes (18%). Conclusions Both Sequenom and Illumina assays were sensitive enough to study imprinting and strong allelic bias. Previous bioinformatics approaches were not predictive of new imprinted genes in the human term

  20. Identifying candidate genes affecting developmental time in Drosophila melanogaster: pervasive pleiotropy and gene-by-environment interaction

    PubMed Central

    Mensch, Julián; Lavagnino, Nicolás; Carreira, Valeria Paula; Massaldi, Ana; Hasson, Esteban; Fanara, Juan José

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding the genetic architecture of ecologically relevant adaptive traits requires the contribution of developmental and evolutionary biology. The time to reach the age of reproduction is a complex life history trait commonly known as developmental time. In particular, in holometabolous insects that occupy ephemeral habitats, like fruit flies, the impact of developmental time on fitness is further exaggerated. The present work is one of the first systematic studies of the genetic basis of developmental time, in which we also evaluate the impact of environmental variation on the expression of the trait. Results We analyzed 179 co-isogenic single P[GT1]-element insertion lines of Drosophila melanogaster to identify novel genes affecting developmental time in flies reared at 25°C. Sixty percent of the lines showed a heterochronic phenotype, suggesting that a large number of genes affect this trait. Mutant lines for the genes Merlin and Karl showed the most extreme phenotypes exhibiting a developmental time reduction and increase, respectively, of over 2 days and 4 days relative to the control (a co-isogenic P-element insertion free line). In addition, a subset of 42 lines selected at random from the initial set of 179 lines was screened at 17°C. Interestingly, the gene-by-environment interaction accounted for 52% of total phenotypic variance. Plastic reaction norms were found for a large number of developmental time candidate genes. Conclusion We identified components of several integrated time-dependent pathways affecting egg-to-adult developmental time in Drosophila. At the same time, we also show that many heterochronic phenotypes may arise from changes in genes involved in several developmental mechanisms that do not explicitly control the timing of specific events. We also demonstrate that many developmental time genes have pleiotropic effects on several adult traits and that the action of most of them is sensitive to temperature during

  1. Meta-Analysis of Candidate Gene Effects Using Bayesian Parametric and Non-Parametric Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Gianola, Daniel; Rosa, Guilherme J. M.; Weigel, Kent A.

    2014-01-01

    Candidate gene (CG) approaches provide a strategy for identification and characterization of major genes underlying complex phenotypes such as production traits and susceptibility to diseases, but the conclusions tend to be inconsistent across individual studies. Meta-analysis approaches can deal with these situations, e.g., by pooling effect-size estimates or combining P values from multiple studies. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of two types of statistical models, parametric and non-parametric, for meta-analysis of CG effects using simulated data. Both models estimated a “central” effect size while taking into account heterogeneity over individual studies. The empirical distribution of study-specific CG effects was multi-modal. The parametric model assumed a normal distribution for the study-specific CG effects whereas the non-parametric model relaxed this assumption by posing a more general distribution with a Dirichlet process prior (DPP). Results indicated that the meta-analysis approaches could reduce false positive or false negative rates by pooling strengths from multiple studies, as compared to individual studies. In addition, the non-parametric, DPP model captured the variation of the “data” better than its parametric counterpart. PMID:25057320

  2. A Candidate Gene Association Study of 77 Polymorphisms in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Schürks, Markus; Kurth, Tobias; Buring, Julie E.; Zee, Robert Y.L.

    2009-01-01

    Population-based studies have established an association between migraine and cardiovascular disease (CVD). We sought to investigate whether genetic variants implicated in CVD are associated with migraine. We performed an association study among 25,713 women, participating in the Women’s Health Study, with information on 77 previously characterized polymorphisms. Migraine and migraine aura status were self-reported. We used logistic regression to investigate the genotype-migraine association. At baseline, 4,705 (18.3%) women reported history of migraine; 39.6% of the 3,306 women with active migraine indicated aura. Regarding any history of migraine, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for TNF rs673 were 0.52 (0.30-0.89), for TGFB1 rs1800469 0.93 (0.89-0.98), and for CCR2 rs1799864 1.12 (1.03-1.21). Among active migraine with aura the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.35 (1.0-1.81) for TNF rs1800750, 1.13 (1.02-1.26) for TNF rs1800629, and 1.22 (1.07-1.40) for CCR2 rs1799864; among active migraine without aura 0.9 (0.84-0.97) for TGFB1 rs1800469, 1.13 (1.01-1.27) for NOS3 rs3918226, and 1.12 (1.02-1.24) for IL9 rs2069885. After correction for multiple testing using the false discovery rate, none of the results remained significant. Our data suggest an association of polymorphisms implicated in inflammatory pathways and migraine in women. TNF, CCR2, TGFB1, NOS3, and IL9 warrant further investigation. Perspective This article presents results from an association study of 77 polymorphisms, implicated in CVD, and migraine. Variants in TNF, CCR2, TGFB1, NOS3, and IL9 were found to be associated with migraine, but did not remain significant after adjustment for multiple testing. Variations in these genes warrant further investigation. PMID:19559392

  3. Grass cell wall feruloylation: distribution of bound ferulate and candidate gene expression in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Hugo B C; Pellny, Till K; Freeman, Jackie; Shewry, Peter R; Mitchell, Rowan A C

    2013-01-01

    The cell walls of grasses such as wheat, maize, rice, and sugar cane, contain large amounts of ferulate that is ester-linked to the cell wall polysaccharide glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX). This ferulate is considered to limit the digestibility of polysaccharide in grass biomass as it forms covalent linkages between polysaccharide and lignin components. Candidate genes within a grass-specific clade of the BAHD acyl-coA transferase superfamily have been identified as being responsible for the ester linkage of ferulate to GAX. Manipulation of these BAHD genes may therefore be a biotechnological target for increasing efficiency of conversion of grass biomass into biofuel. Here, we describe the expression of these candidate genes and amounts of bound ferulate from various tissues and developmental stages of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon. BAHD candidate transcripts and significant amounts of bound ferulate were present in every tissue and developmental stage. We hypothesize that BAHD candidate genes similar to the recently described Oryza sativa p-coumarate monolignol transferase (OsPMT) gene (PMT sub-clade) are principally responsible for the bound para-coumaric acid (pCA), and that other BAHD candidates (non-PMT sub-clade) are responsible for bound ferulic acid (FA). There were some similarities with between the ratio of expression non-PMT/PMT genes and the ratio of bound FA/pCA between tissue types, compatible with this hypothesis. However, much further work to modify BAHD genes in grasses and to characterize the heterologously expressed proteins is required to demonstrate their function.

  4. Linkage and candidate gene studies of autism spectrum disorders in European populations.

    PubMed

    Holt, Richard; Barnby, Gabrielle; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Brocklebank, Denise; Sousa, Inês; Mulder, Erik J; Kantojärvi, Katri; Järvelä, Irma; Klauck, Sabine M; Poustka, Fritz; Bailey, Anthony J; Monaco, Anthony P

    2010-09-01

    Over the past decade, research on the genetic variants underlying susceptibility to autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has focused on linkage and candidate gene studies. This research has implicated various chromosomal loci and genes. Candidate gene studies have proven to be particularly intractable, with many studies failing to replicate previously reported associations. In this paper, we investigate previously implicated genomic regions for a role in ASD susceptibility, using four cohorts of European ancestry. Initially, a 384 SNP Illumina GoldenGate array was used to examine linkage at six previously implicated loci. We identify linkage approaching genome-wide suggestive levels on chromosome 2 (rs2885116, MLOD=1.89). Association analysis showed significant associations in MKL2 with ASD (rs756472, P=4.31 x 10(-5)) and between SND1 and strict autism (rs1881084, P=7.76 x 10(-5)) in the Finnish and Northern Dutch populations, respectively. Subsequently, we used a second 384 SNP Illumina GoldenGate array to examine the association in seven candidate genes, and evidence for association was found in RELN (rs362780, P=0.00165). Further increasing the sample size strengthened the association with RELN (rs362780, P=0.001) and produced a second significant result in GRIK2 (rs2518261, P=0.008). Our results strengthen the case for a more detailed study of the role of RELN and GRIK2 in autism susceptibility, as well as identifying two new potential candidate genes, MKL2 and SND1.

  5. Identification and Analyses of Candidate Genes for Rpp4-Mediated Resistance to Asian Soybean Rust in Soybean1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Jenelle D.F.; Silva, Danielle C.G.; Yang, Chunling; Pedley, Kerry F.; Zhang, Chunquan; van de Mortel, Martijn; Hill, John H.; Shoemaker, Randy C.; Abdelnoor, Ricardo V.; Whitham, Steven A.; Graham, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    Asian soybean rust is a formidable threat to soybean (Glycine max) production in many areas of the world, including the United States. Only five sources of resistance have been identified (Resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi1 [Rpp1], Rpp2, Rpp3, Rpp4, and Rpp5). Rpp4 was previously identified in the resistant genotype PI459025B and mapped within 2 centimorgans of Satt288 on soybean chromosome 18 (linkage group G). Using simple sequence repeat markers, we developed a bacterial artificial chromosome contig for the Rpp4 locus in the susceptible cv Williams82 (Wm82). Sequencing within this region identified three Rpp4 candidate disease resistance genes (Rpp4C1–Rpp4C3 [Wm82]) with greatest similarity to the lettuce (Lactuca sativa) RGC2 family of coiled coil-nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat disease resistance genes. Constructs containing regions of the Wm82 Rpp4 candidate genes were used for virus-induced gene silencing experiments to silence resistance in PI459025B, confirming that orthologous genes confer resistance. Using primers developed from conserved sequences in the Wm82 Rpp4 candidate genes, we identified five Rpp4 candidate genes (Rpp4C1–Rpp4C5 [PI459025B]) from the resistant genotype. Additional markers developed from the Wm82 Rpp4 bacterial artificial chromosome contig further defined the region containing Rpp4 and eliminated Rpp4C1 (PI459025B) and Rpp4C3 (PI459025B) as candidate genes. Sequencing of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction products revealed that Rpp4C4 (PI459025B) was highly expressed in the resistant genotype, while expression of the other candidate genes was nearly undetectable. These data support Rpp4C4 (PI459025B) as the single candidate gene for Rpp4-mediated resistance to Asian soybean rust. PMID:19251904

  6. In silico identification of genetically attenuated vaccine candidate genes for Plasmodium liver stage.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hirdesh; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Mair, Gunnar R; Gomes, James

    2015-12-01

    Genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) that lack genes essential for the liver stage of the malaria parasite, and therefore cause developmental arrest, have been developed as live vaccines in rodent malaria models and recently been tested in humans. The genes targeted for deletion were often identified by trial and error. Here we present a systematic gene - protein and transcript - expression analyses of several Plasmodium species with the aim to identify candidate genes for the generation of novel GAPs. With a lack of liver stage expression data for human malaria parasites, we used data available for liver stage development of Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model, to identify proteins expressed in the liver stage but absent from blood stage parasites. An orthology-based search was then employed to identify orthologous proteins in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum resulting in a total of 310 genes expressed in the liver stage but lacking evidence of protein expression in blood stage parasites. Among these 310 possible GAP candidates, we further studied Plasmodium liver stage proteins by phyletic distribution and functional domain analyses and shortlisted twenty GAP-candidates; these are: fabB/F, fabI, arp, 3 genes encoding subunits of the PDH complex, dnaJ, urm1, rS5, ancp, mcp, arh, gk, lisp2, valS, palm, and four conserved Plasmodium proteins of unknown function. Parasites lacking one or several of these genes might yield new attenuated malaria parasites for experimental vaccination studies.

  7. Profiling candidate genes involved in wax biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Costaglioli, Patricia; Joubès, Jérôme; Garcia, Christel; Stef, Marianne; Arveiler, Benoît; Lessire, René; Garbay, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    Plant epidermal wax forms a hydrophobic layer covering aerial plant organs which constitutes a barrier against uncontrolled water loss and biotic stresses. Wax biosynthesis requires the coordinated activity of a large number of enzymes for the formation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids and their further transformation in several aliphatic compounds. We found in the available database 282 candidate genes that may play a role in wax synthesis, regulation and transport. To identify the most interesting candidates, we measured the level of expression of 204 genes in the aerial parts of 15-day-old Arabidopsis seedlings by performing microarray experiments. We showed that only 25% of the putative candidates were expressed to significant levels in our samples, thus significantly reducing the number of genes which will be worth studying using reverse genetics to demonstrate their involvement in wax accumulation. We identified a beta-keto acyl-CoA synthase gene, At5g43760, which is co-regulated with the wax gene CER6 in a number of conditions and organs. By contrast, we showed that neither the fatty acyl-CoA reductase genes nor the wax synthase genes were expressed in 15-day-old leaves and stems, raising questions about the identity of the enzymes involved in the acyl-reduction pathway that accounts for 20% of the total wax amount. PMID:15914083

  8. Collaborative Meta-analysis: Associations of 150 Candidate Genes With Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Richards, J. Brent; Kavvoura, Fotini K.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Styrkársdóttir, Unnur; Estrada, Karol; Halldórsson, Bjarni V.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Zillikens, M. Carola; Wilson, Scott G.; Mullin, Benjamin H.; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Demissie, Serkalem; Hofman, Albert; Kong, Augustine; Karasik, David; van Meurs, Joyce B.; Oostra, Ben A.; Pols, Huibert A.P.; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Soranzo, Nicole; Williams, Frances M.K.; Zhou, Yanhua; Ralston, Stuart H.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G.; Ioannidis, John P.A.; Spector, Tim D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a highly heritable trait. Many candidate genes have been proposed as being involved in regulating bone mineral density (BMD). Few of these findings have been replicated in independent studies. Objective To assess the relationship between BMD and fracture and all common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in previously proposed osteoporosis candidate genes. Design Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data. Setting 5 international, multicenter, population-based studies. Participants Data on BMD were obtained from 19 195 participants (14 277 women) from 5 populations of European origin. Data on fracture were obtained from a prospective cohort (n = 5974) from the Netherlands. Measurements Systematic literature review using the Human Genome Epidemiology Navigator identified autosomal genes previously evaluated for association with osteoporosis. We explored the common SNPs arising from the haplotype map of the human genome (HapMap) across all these genes. BMD at the femoral neck and lumbar spine was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Fractures were defined as clinically apparent, site-specific, validated nonvertebral and vertebral low-energy fractures. Results 150 candidate genes were identified and 36 016 SNPs in these loci were assessed. SNPs from 9 gene loci (ESR1, LRP4, ITGA1, LRP5, SOST, SPP1, TNFRSF11A, TNFRSF11B, and TN-FSF11) were associated with BMD at either site. For most genes, no SNP was statistically significant. For statistically significant SNPs (n = 241), effect sizes ranged from 0.04 to 0.18 SD per allele. SNPs from the LRP5, SOST, SPP1, and TNFRSF11A loci were significantly associated with fracture risk; odds ratios ranged from 1.13 to 1.43 per allele. These effects on fracture were partially independent of BMD at SPP1 and SOST. Limitation Only common polymorphisms in linkage disequilibrium with SNPs in HapMap could be assessed, and previously reported associations for SNPs in some candidate

  9. Molecular evolution of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jennifer R; McAssey, Edward V; Nambeesan, Savithri; Garcia-Navarro, Elena; Burke, John M

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary analyses aimed at detecting the molecular signature of selection during crop domestication and/or improvement can be used to identify genes or genomic regions of likely agronomic importance. Here, we describe the DNA sequence-based characterization of a pool of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower. These genes, which were identified based on homology to genes of known effect in other study systems, were initially sequenced from a panel of improved lines. All genes that exhibited a paucity of sequence diversity, consistent with the possible effects of selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower, were then sequenced from a panel of wild sunflower accessions an outgroup. These data enabled formal tests for the effects of selection in shaping sequence diversity at these loci. When selection was detected, we further sequenced these genes from a panel of primitive landraces, thereby allowing us to investigate the likely timing of selection (i.e., domestication vs. improvement). We ultimately identified seven genes that exhibited the signature of positive selection during either domestication or improvement. Genetic mapping of a subset of these genes revealed co-localization between candidates for genes involved in the determination of flowering time, seed germination, plant growth/development, and branching and QTL that were previously identified for these traits in cultivated × wild sunflower mapping populations. PMID:24914686

  10. Molecular Evolution of Candidate Genes for Crop-Related Traits in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Jennifer R.; McAssey, Edward V.; Nambeesan, Savithri; Garcia-Navarro, Elena; Burke, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary analyses aimed at detecting the molecular signature of selection during crop domestication and/or improvement can be used to identify genes or genomic regions of likely agronomic importance. Here, we describe the DNA sequence-based characterization of a pool of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower. These genes, which were identified based on homology to genes of known effect in other study systems, were initially sequenced from a panel of improved lines. All genes that exhibited a paucity of sequence diversity, consistent with the possible effects of selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower, were then sequenced from a panel of wild sunflower accessions an outgroup. These data enabled formal tests for the effects of selection in shaping sequence diversity at these loci. When selection was detected, we further sequenced these genes from a panel of primitive landraces, thereby allowing us to investigate the likely timing of selection (i.e., domestication vs. improvement). We ultimately identified seven genes that exhibited the signature of positive selection during either domestication or improvement. Genetic mapping of a subset of these genes revealed co-localization between candidates for genes involved in the determination of flowering time, seed germination, plant growth/development, and branching and QTL that were previously identified for these traits in cultivated × wild sunflower mapping populations. PMID:24914686

  11. A Candidate Gene Analysis of Methylphenidate Response in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, James J.; McCracken, James T.; Loo, Sandra K.; Manganiello, Marc; Leung, Michael C.; Tietjens, Jeremy R.; Trinh, Thao; Baweja, Shilpa; Suddath, Robert; Smalley, Susan L.; Hellemann, Gerhard; Sugar, Catherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the potential role of candidate genes in moderating treatment effects of methylphenidate (MPH) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Eighty-two subjects with ADHD aged 6 to 17 years participated in a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose, crossover titration trial of…

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes related to daughter pregnancy rate in Holstein cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT: Previously, a candidate gene approach identified 40 SNPs associated with daughter pregnancy rate (DPR) in dairy bulls. We evaluated 39 of these SNPs for relationship to DPR in a separate population of Holstein cows grouped on their predicted transmitting ability for DPR: <= -1 (n=1266) a...

  13. Candidate fire blight resistance genes in Malus identified with the use of genomic tools and approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this research is to utilize current advances in Rosaceae genomics to identify DNA markers for use in marker-assisted selection of durable resistance to fire blight. Candidate fire blight resistance genes were selected and ranked based upon differential expression after inoculation with ...

  14. Candidate gene association mapping for winter survival and spring regrowth in perennial ryegrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is a widely cultivated cool-season grass species because of its high quality for forage and turf. Susceptibility to freezing damage limits its further use in temperate zones. The objective of this study was to identify candidate genes significantly associated w...

  15. Population Stratification in the Candidate Gene Study: Fatal Threat or Red Herring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Kent E.; Stallings, Michael; McGeary, John; Bryan, Angela

    2004-01-01

    Advances in molecular genetics have provided behavioral scientists with a means of investigating the influence of genetic factors on human behavior. Unfortunately, recent candidate gene studies have produced inconsistent results, and a frequent scapegoat for the lack of replication across studies is the threat of population stratification. This…

  16. SRGAP1 Is a Candidate Gene for Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    He, Huiling; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Nagy, Rebecca; Li, Wei; Huang, Yungui; Akagi, Keiko; Saji, Motoyasu; Kula, Dorota; Wojcicka, Anna; Sebastian, Nikhil; Wen, Bernard; Puch, Zbigniew; Kalemba, Michal; Stachlewska, Elzbieta; Czetwertynska, Malgorzata; Dlugosinska, Joanna; Dymecka, Kinga; Ploski, Rafal; Krawczyk, Marek; Morrison, Patrick J.; Ringel, Matthew D.; Kloos, Richard T.; Jazdzewski, Krystian; Symer, David E.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Ostrowski, Michael; Jarząb, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background: Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) shows high heritability, yet efforts to find predisposing genes have been largely negative. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify susceptibility genes for PTC. Methods: A genome-wide linkage analysis was performed in 38 families. Targeted association study and screening were performed in 2 large cohorts of PTC patients and controls. Candidate DNA variants were tested in functional studies. Results: Linkage analysis and association studies identified the Slit-Robo Rho GTPase activating protein 1 gene (SRGAP1) in the linkage peak as a candidate gene. Two missense variants, Q149H and A275T, localized in the Fes/CIP4 homology domain segregated with the disease in 1 family each. One missense variant, R617C, located in the RhoGAP domain occurred in 1 family. Biochemical assays demonstrated that the ability to inactivate CDC42, a key function of SRGAP1, was severely impaired by the Q149H and R617C variants. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that SRGAP1 is a candidate gene in PTC susceptibility. SRGAP1 is likely a low-penetrant gene, possibly of a modifier type. PMID:23539728

  17. Obstructive heart defects associated with candidate genes, maternal obesity, and folic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xinyu; Cleves, Mario A; Nick, Todd G; Li, Ming; MacLeod, Stewart L; Erickson, Stephen W; Li, Jingyun; Shaw, Gary M; Mosley, Bridget S; Hobbs, Charlotte A

    2015-06-01

    Right-sided and left-sided obstructive heart defects (OHDs) are subtypes of congenital heart defects, in which the heart valves, arteries, or veins are abnormally narrow or blocked. Previous studies have suggested that the development of OHDs involved a complex interplay between genetic variants and maternal factors. Using the data from 569 OHD case families and 1,644 control families enrolled in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS) between 1997 and 2008, we conducted an analysis to investigate the genetic effects of 877 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 60 candidate genes for association with the risk of OHDs, and their interactions with maternal use of folic acid supplements, and pre-pregnancy obesity. Applying log-linear models based on the hybrid design, we identified a SNP in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene (C677T polymorphism) with a main genetic effect on the occurrence of OHDs. In addition, multiple SNPs in betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT and BHMT2) were also identified to be associated with the occurrence of OHDs through significant main infant genetic effects and interaction effects with maternal use of folic acid supplements. We also identified multiple SNPs in glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (GCLC) and DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 beta (DNMT3B) that were associated with elevated risk of OHDs among obese women. Our findings suggested that the risk of OHDs was closely related to a combined effect of variations in genes in the folate, homocysteine, or glutathione/transsulfuration pathways, maternal use of folic acid supplements and pre-pregnancy obesity. PMID:25846410

  18. Obstructive Heart Defects Associated with Candidate Genes, Maternal Obesity, and Folic Acid Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xinyu; Cleves, Mario A.; Nick, Todd G.; Li, Ming; MacLeod, Stewart L.; Erickson, Stephen W.; Li, Jingyun; Shaw, Gary M.; Mosley, Bridget S.; Hobbs, Charlotte A.

    2015-01-01

    Right-sided and left-sided obstructive heart defects (OHDs) are subtypes of congenital heart defects, in which the heart valves, arteries, or veins are abnormally narrow or blocked. Previous studies have suggested that the development of OHDs involved a complex interplay between genetic variants and maternal factors. Using the data from 569 OHD case families and 1644 control families enrolled in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS) between 1997 and 2008, we conducted an analysis to investigate the genetic effects of 877 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 60 candidate genes for association with the risk of OHDs, and their interactions with maternal use of folic acid supplements, and pre-pregnancy obesity. Applying log-linear models based on the hybrid design, we identified a SNP in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene (C677T polymorphism) with a main genetic effect on the occurrence of OHDs. In addition, multiple SNPs in betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT and BHMT2) were also identified to be associated with the occurrence of OHDs through significant main infant genetic effects and interaction effects with maternal use of folic acid supplements. We also identified multiple SNPs in glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (GCLC) and DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 beta (DNMT3B) that were associated with elevated risk of OHDs among obese women. Our findings suggested that the risk of OHDs was closely related to a combined effect of variations in genes in the folate, homocysteine, or glutathione/transsulfuration pathways, maternal use of folic acid supplements and pre-pregnancy obesity. PMID:25846410

  19. Isolation of candidate genes of Friedreich`s ataxia on chromosome 9q13

    SciTech Connect

    Montermini, L.; Zara, F.; Pandolfo, M.

    1994-09-01

    Friedreich`s ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive degenerative disease involving the central and peripheral nervous system and the heart. The mutated gene in FRDA has recently been localized within a 450 Kb interval on chromosome 9q13 between the markers D9S202/FR1/FR8. We have been able to confirm such localization for the disease gene by analysis of extended haplotype in consanguineous families. Cases of loss of marker homozygosity, which are likely to be due to ancient recombinations, have been found to involve D9S110, D9S15, and D9S111 on the telomeric side, and FR5 on the centromeric side, while homozygosity was always found for a core haplotype including D9S5, FD1, and D9S202. We constructed a YAC contig spanning the region between the telomeric markers and FR5, and cosmids have been obtained from the YACs. In order to isolate transcribed sequences from the FRDA candidate region we are utilizing a combination of approaches, including hybridization of YACs and cosmids to an arrayed human heart cDNA library, cDNA direct selection, and exon amplification. A transcribed sequence near the telomeric end of the region has been isolated by cDNA direct selection using pooled cosmids as genomic template and primary human heart, muscle, brain, liver and placenta cDNAs as cDNA source. We have shown this sequence to be the human equivalent of ZO-2, a tight junction protein previously described in the dog. No mutations of this gene have been found in FRDA subjects. Additional cDNA have recently been isolated and they are currently being evaluated.

  20. Obstructive heart defects associated with candidate genes, maternal obesity, and folic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xinyu; Cleves, Mario A; Nick, Todd G; Li, Ming; MacLeod, Stewart L; Erickson, Stephen W; Li, Jingyun; Shaw, Gary M; Mosley, Bridget S; Hobbs, Charlotte A

    2015-06-01

    Right-sided and left-sided obstructive heart defects (OHDs) are subtypes of congenital heart defects, in which the heart valves, arteries, or veins are abnormally narrow or blocked. Previous studies have suggested that the development of OHDs involved a complex interplay between genetic variants and maternal factors. Using the data from 569 OHD case families and 1,644 control families enrolled in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS) between 1997 and 2008, we conducted an analysis to investigate the genetic effects of 877 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 60 candidate genes for association with the risk of OHDs, and their interactions with maternal use of folic acid supplements, and pre-pregnancy obesity. Applying log-linear models based on the hybrid design, we identified a SNP in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene (C677T polymorphism) with a main genetic effect on the occurrence of OHDs. In addition, multiple SNPs in betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT and BHMT2) were also identified to be associated with the occurrence of OHDs through significant main infant genetic effects and interaction effects with maternal use of folic acid supplements. We also identified multiple SNPs in glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (GCLC) and DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 beta (DNMT3B) that were associated with elevated risk of OHDs among obese women. Our findings suggested that the risk of OHDs was closely related to a combined effect of variations in genes in the folate, homocysteine, or glutathione/transsulfuration pathways, maternal use of folic acid supplements and pre-pregnancy obesity.

  1. Cryptosporidium hominis gene catalog: a resource for the selection of novel Cryptosporidium vaccine candidates

    PubMed Central

    Ifeonu, Olukemi O.; Simon, Raphael; Tennant, Sharon M.; Sheoran, Abhineet S.; Daly, Maria C.; Felix, Victor; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Widmer, Giovanni; Levine, Myron M.; Tzipori, Saul; Silva, Joana C.

    2016-01-01

    Human cryptosporidiosis, caused primarily by Cryptosporidium hominis and a subset of Cryptosporidium parvum, is a major cause of moderate-to-severe diarrhea in children under 5 years of age in developing countries and can lead to nutritional stunting and death. Cryptosporidiosis is particularly severe and potentially lethal in immunocompromised hosts. Biological and technical challenges have impeded traditional vaccinology approaches to identify novel targets for the development of vaccines against C. hominis, the predominant species associated with human disease. We deemed that the existence of genomic resources for multiple species in the genus, including a much-improved genome assembly and annotation for C. hominis, makes a reverse vaccinology approach feasible. To this end, we sought to generate a searchable online resource, termed C. hominis gene catalog, which registers all C. hominis genes and their properties relevant for the identification and prioritization of candidate vaccine antigens, including physical attributes, properties related to antigenic potential and expression data. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified ∼400 C. hominis genes containing properties typical of surface-exposed antigens, such as predicted glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor motifs, multiple transmembrane motifs and/or signal peptides targeting the encoded protein to the secretory pathway. This set can be narrowed further, e.g. by focusing on potential GPI-anchored proteins lacking homologs in the human genome, but with homologs in the other Cryptosporidium species for which genomic data are available, and with low amino acid polymorphism. Additional selection criteria related to recombinant expression and purification include minimizing predicted post-translation modifications and potential disulfide bonds. Forty proteins satisfying these criteria were selected from 3745 proteins in the updated C. hominis annotation. The immunogenic potential of a few of these is

  2. Analysis of IFT74 as a candidate gene for chromosome 9p-linked ALS-FTD

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Parastoo; Schymick, Jennifer; Jain, Shushant; Cookson, Mark R; Cairns, Nigel J; Greggio, Elisa; Greenway, Matthew J; Berger, Stephen; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Chiò, Adriano; Fung, Hon Chung; Holtzman, David M; Huey, Edward D; Wassermann, Eric M; Adamson, Jennifer; Hutton, Michael L; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Hardiman, Orla; Grafman, Jordan; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Traynor, Bryan J

    2006-01-01

    Background A new locus for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD) has recently been ascribed to chromosome 9p. Methods We identified chromosome 9p segregating haplotypes within two families with ALS-FTD (F476 and F2) and undertook mutational screening of candidate genes within this locus. Results Candidate gene sequencing at this locus revealed the presence of a disease segregating stop mutation (Q342X) in the intraflagellar transport 74 (IFT74) gene in family 476 (F476), but no mutation was detected within IFT74 in family 2 (F2). While neither family was sufficiently informative to definitively implicate or exclude IFT74 mutations as a cause of chromosome 9-linked ALS-FTD, the nature of the mutation observed within F476 (predicted to truncate the protein by 258 amino acids) led us to sequence the open reading frame of this gene in a large number of ALS and FTD cases (n = 420). An additional sequence variant (G58D) was found in a case of sporadic semantic dementia. I55L sequence variants were found in three other unrelated affected individuals, but this was also found in a single individual among 800 Human Diversity Gene Panel samples. Conclusion Confirmation of the pathogenicity of IFT74 sequence variants will require screening of other chromosome 9p-linked families. PMID:17166276

  3. Identifying candidate genes for 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome using clinical, genomic, and functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Hani; Badduke, Chansonette; Qiao, Ying; Colnaghi, Rita; Abramowicz, Iga; Alcantara, Diana; Dunham, Christopher; Wen, Jiadi; Wildin, Robert S.; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.M.; Eichmeyer, Jennifer; Lehman, Anna; Maranda, Bruno; Martell, Sally; Shan, Xianghong; Lewis, Suzanne M.E.; O’Driscoll, Mark; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y.

    2016-01-01

    The 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome has a core phenotype consisting of intellectual disability, microcephaly, hypotonia, delayed growth, common craniofacial features, and digital anomalies. So far, more than 20 cases of 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome have been reported in the literature; however, the size of the deletions and their breakpoints vary, making it difficult to identify the candidate genes. Recent reports pointed to 4 genes (XPO1, USP34, BCL11A, and REL) that were included, alone or in combination, in the smallest deletions causing the syndrome. Here, we describe 8 new patients with the 2p15p16.1 deletion and review all published cases to date. We demonstrate functional deficits for the above 4 candidate genes using patients’ lymphoblast cell lines (LCLs) and knockdown of their orthologs in zebrafish. All genes were dosage sensitive on the basis of reduced protein expression in LCLs. In addition, deletion of XPO1, a nuclear exporter, cosegregated with nuclear accumulation of one of its cargo molecules (rpS5) in patients’ LCLs. Other pathways associated with these genes (e.g., NF-κB and Wnt signaling as well as the DNA damage response) were not impaired in patients’ LCLs. Knockdown of xpo1a, rel, bcl11aa, and bcl11ab resulted in abnormal zebrafish embryonic development including microcephaly, dysmorphic body, hindered growth, and small fins as well as structural brain abnormalities. Our multifaceted analysis strongly implicates XPO1, REL, and BCL11A as candidate genes for 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:27699255

  4. Identifying candidate genes for 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome using clinical, genomic, and functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Hani; Badduke, Chansonette; Qiao, Ying; Colnaghi, Rita; Abramowicz, Iga; Alcantara, Diana; Dunham, Christopher; Wen, Jiadi; Wildin, Robert S.; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.M.; Eichmeyer, Jennifer; Lehman, Anna; Maranda, Bruno; Martell, Sally; Shan, Xianghong; Lewis, Suzanne M.E.; O’Driscoll, Mark; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y.

    2016-01-01

    The 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome has a core phenotype consisting of intellectual disability, microcephaly, hypotonia, delayed growth, common craniofacial features, and digital anomalies. So far, more than 20 cases of 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome have been reported in the literature; however, the size of the deletions and their breakpoints vary, making it difficult to identify the candidate genes. Recent reports pointed to 4 genes (XPO1, USP34, BCL11A, and REL) that were included, alone or in combination, in the smallest deletions causing the syndrome. Here, we describe 8 new patients with the 2p15p16.1 deletion and review all published cases to date. We demonstrate functional deficits for the above 4 candidate genes using patients’ lymphoblast cell lines (LCLs) and knockdown of their orthologs in zebrafish. All genes were dosage sensitive on the basis of reduced protein expression in LCLs. In addition, deletion of XPO1, a nuclear exporter, cosegregated with nuclear accumulation of one of its cargo molecules (rpS5) in patients’ LCLs. Other pathways associated with these genes (e.g., NF-κB and Wnt signaling as well as the DNA damage response) were not impaired in patients’ LCLs. Knockdown of xpo1a, rel, bcl11aa, and bcl11ab resulted in abnormal zebrafish embryonic development including microcephaly, dysmorphic body, hindered growth, and small fins as well as structural brain abnormalities. Our multifaceted analysis strongly implicates XPO1, REL, and BCL11A as candidate genes for 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome.

  5. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  6. Identification of candidates for human disease genes using large-scale PCR mapping of gene-based STSs

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, R.; Stevens, T.J.; Wilcox, A.S.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a strategy for the rapid identification of possible human disease/syndrome genes. Using this procedure we found candidates for 45 human disease/syndrome genes from the first 200 genes mapped. New human genes are identified through automated single-pass sequencing into the 3{prime} untranslated (3{prime}UT) regions of human cDNAs. Primers derived from the 3{prime}UT region sequences, representing gene-based STSs, are used for PCR analyses of the CEPH megabase YAC DNA pools. With this approach {approximately}18,000 megabase YACs can be screened and a single YAC identified using only 52 PCR reactions. The YAC localization in conjunction with other mapping approaches, such as PCR mapping to chromosomes by means of somatic hybrids, allows mapping to chromosomal band locations. In this manner, each gene can be associated with its own STS which in turn specifies both a corresponding genomic clone and a specific location in the genome. These locations can be compared to purported locations of disease genes listed in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. Using our current collection of >3,000 human brain cDNA sequences as a resource, we have carried out a proof of principle study in which {approximately}200 cDNAs were mapped to YACs within a few months. Appropriate scale up of this strategy could permit mapping of most human genes and identification of many candidate disease genes over the next few years.

  7. The Candidate Cancer Gene Database: a database of cancer driver genes from forward genetic screens in mice.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Kenneth L; Nyre, Erik T; Abrahante, Juan; Ho, Yen-Yi; Isaksson Vogel, Rachel; Starr, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Identification of cancer driver gene mutations is crucial for advancing cancer therapeutics. Due to the overwhelming number of passenger mutations in the human tumor genome, it is difficult to pinpoint causative driver genes. Using transposon mutagenesis in mice many laboratories have conducted forward genetic screens and identified thousands of candidate driver genes that are highly relevant to human cancer. Unfortunately, this information is difficult to access and utilize because it is scattered across multiple publications using different mouse genome builds and strength metrics. To improve access to these findings and facilitate meta-analyses, we developed the Candidate Cancer Gene Database (CCGD, http://ccgd-starrlab.oit.umn.edu/). The CCGD is a manually curated database containing a unified description of all identified candidate driver genes and the genomic location of transposon common insertion sites (CISs) from all currently published transposon-based screens. To demonstrate relevance to human cancer, we performed a modified gene set enrichment analysis using KEGG pathways and show that human cancer pathways are highly enriched in the database. We also used hierarchical clustering to identify pathways enriched in blood cancers compared to solid cancers. The CCGD is a novel resource available to scientists interested in the identification of genetic drivers of cancer.

  8. Gene expression profiling and candidate gene resequencing identifies pathways and mutations important for malignant transformation caused by leukemogenic fusion genes.

    PubMed

    Novak, Rachel L; Harper, David P; Caudell, David; Slape, Christopher; Beachy, Sarah H; Aplan, Peter D

    2012-12-01

    NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) and CALM-AF10 (CA10) are oncogenic fusion proteins produced by recurrent chromosomal translocations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Transgenic mice that express these fusions develop AML with a long latency and incomplete penetrance, suggesting that collaborating genetic events are required for leukemic transformation. We employed genetic techniques to identify both preleukemic abnormalities in healthy transgenic mice as well as collaborating events leading to leukemic transformation. Candidate gene resequencing revealed that 6 of 27 (22%) CA10 AMLs spontaneously acquired a Ras pathway mutation and 8 of 27 (30%) acquired an Flt3 mutation. Two CA10 AMLs acquired an Flt3 internal-tandem duplication, demonstrating that these mutations can be acquired in murine as well as human AML. Gene expression profiles revealed a marked upregulation of Hox genes, particularly Hoxa5, Hoxa9, and Hoxa10 in both NHD13 and CA10 mice. Furthermore, mir196b, which is embedded within the Hoxa locus, was overexpressed in both CA10 and NHD13 samples. In contrast, the Hox cofactors Meis1 and Pbx3 were differentially expressed; Meis1 was increased in CA10 AMLs but not NHD13 AMLs, whereas Pbx3 was consistently increased in NHD13 but not CA10 AMLs. Silencing of Pbx3 in NHD13 cells led to decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and decreased colony formation in vitro, suggesting a previously unexpected role for Pbx3 in leukemic transformation.

  9. Expression of candidate genes for residual feed intake in Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Al-Husseini, W; Gondro, C; Quinn, K; Herd, R M; Gibson, J P; Chen, Y

    2014-02-01

    Residual feed intake (RFI) has been adopted in Australia for the purpose of genetic improvement in feed efficiency in beef cattle. RFI is the difference between the observed feed intake of an animal and the predicted feed intake based on its size and growth rate over a test period. Gene expression of eight candidate genes (AHSG, GHR, GSTM1, INHBA, PCDH19, S100A10, SERPINI2 and SOD3), previously identified as differentially expressed between divergent lines of high- and low-RFI animals, was measured in an unselected population of 60 steers from the Angus Society Elite Progeny Test Program using quantitative real-time PCR. Results showed that the levels of gene expression were significantly correlated with RFI. The genes explain around 33.2% of the phenotypic variance in RFI, and prediction equations using the expression data are reasonably accurate estimators of RFI. The association of these genes with economically important traits, such as other feed efficiency-related traits and fat, growth and carcass traits, was investigated as well. The expression of these candidate genes was significantly correlated with feed conversion ratio and daily feed intake, which are highly associated with RFI, suggesting a functional role for these genes in modulating feed utilisation. The expression of these genes did not show any association with average daily gain, eye muscle area and carcass composition.

  10. Candidate genes for the development of hair follicles in Hu sheep.

    PubMed

    Lv, X Y; Ni, R; Sun, W; Su, R; Musa, H H; Yin, J F; Wang, Q Z; Gao, W; Chen, L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect candidate genes for the development of hair follicles in the Hu sheep breed. Seven genes have been detected in large, medium, and small wave follicles of Hu sheep using gene chip technology. The histological features of the follicles of newborn Hu-lambs were combined with fluorescence quantitative PCR technology to detect the correlation between the expression of the seven genes and hair follicle development. Among the genes studied, matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2), bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7), and sideroflexin 1 (SFXN1) showed a significantly different pattern of expression in large, medium, and small wave follicles (P < 0.05). The expression of MMP2 had a significant positive correlation with secondary follicles in large waves (P < 0.05), while the expression of BMP7 had a significant correlation with primary follicle diameter in small wave follicles, and a highly significant positive correlation with the number of secondary follicles in the small waves (P < 0.01). The expression of SFXN1 was significantly and positively correlated with the diameters of small wave primary follicles; it also showed a highly significant positive correlation with secondary follicle diameters. Although other genes are associated with hair follicles, their expression in large, medium, and small wave follicles was not significant. We propose that BMP7, MMP2, and SFXN1 genes could be important candidate genes for use in breeding Hu lambs with early coat development. PMID:27525902

  11. Photoreceptor dysplasia (pd) in miniature schnauzer dogs: evaluation of candidate genes by molecular genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Baldwin, V J; Acland, G M; Parshall, C J; Haskel, J; Aguirre, G D; Ray, K

    1999-01-01

    Photoreceptor dysplasia (pd) is one of a group of at least six distinct autosomal and one X-linked retinal disorders identified in dogs which are collectively known as progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). It is an early onset retinal disease identified in miniature schnauzer dogs, and pedigree analysis and breeding studies have established autosomal recessive inheritance of the disease. Using a gene-based approach, a number of retina-expressed genes, including some members of the phototransduction pathway, have been causally implicated in retinal diseases of humans and other animals. Here we examined seven such potential candidate genes (opsin, RDS/peripherin, ROM1, rod cGMP-gated cation channel alpha-subunit, and three subunits of transducin) for their causal association with the pd locus by testing segregation of intragenic markers with the disease locus, or, in the absence of informative polymorphisms, sequencing of the coding regions of the genes. Based on these results, we have conclusively excluded four photoreceptor-specific genes as candidates for pd by linkage analysis. For three other photoreceptor-specific genes, we did not find any mutation in the coding sequences of the genes and have excluded them provisionally. Formal exclusion would require investigation of the levels of expression of the candidate genes in pd-affected dogs relative to age-matched controls. At present we are building suitable informative pedigrees for the disease locus with a sufficient number of meiosis to be useful for genomewide screening. This should identify markers linked to the disease locus and eventually permit progress toward the identification of the photoreceptor dysplasia gene and the disease-causing mutation.

  12. Association of existing and new candidate genes for anxiety, depression and personality traits in older people.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Michelle; Houlihan, Lorna M; Harris, Sarah E; Gow, Alan J; Hayward, Caroline; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J

    2010-07-01

    Genetic variants that have previously been associated with personality traits and/or psychological distress, or inflammatory marker levels were investigated for their relationship to self-rated personality traits, anxiety, and depression in two elderly Scottish cohorts. Ten genes (29 SNPs) were investigated in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (approximately 70 years, N = 1,091). Four of these genes and seven others (35 SNPs) were tested in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1921 who were measured on the same traits and states on two occasions (approximately 80 years, N = 550; 87 years, N = 229). For previously investigated candidate genes, some support (at a nominal significance level of 0.05/0.01) was found for association between NOS1 and personality traits (especially extraversion), PSEN1 and depression/neuroticism, and GRIK3 and depression. Of the inflammatory marker candidate genes, TF showed some association with psychological distress. No SNPs withstood the correction to significance level for multiple testing. Nevertheless, the results will be of importance to future meta-analyses of these candidate genes in relation to psychological distress and personality. PMID:20052609

  13. The MORPH Algorithm: Ranking Candidate Genes for Membership in Arabidopsis and Tomato Pathways[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Tzfadia, Oren; Amar, David; Bradbury, Louis M.T.; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.; Shamir, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Closing gaps in our current knowledge about biological pathways is a fundamental challenge. The development of novel computational methods along with high-throughput experimental data carries the promise to help in the challenge. We present an algorithm called MORPH (for module-guided ranking of candidate pathway genes) for revealing unknown genes in biological pathways. The method receives as input a set of known genes from the target pathway, a collection of expression profiles, and interaction and metabolic networks. Using machine learning techniques, MORPH selects the best combination of data and analysis method and outputs a ranking of candidate genes predicted to belong to the target pathway. We tested MORPH on 230 known pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana and 93 known pathways in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and obtained high-quality cross-validation results. In the photosynthesis light reactions, homogalacturonan biosynthesis, and chlorophyll biosynthetic pathways of Arabidopsis, genes ranked highly by MORPH were recently verified to be associated with these pathways. MORPH candidates ranked for the carotenoid pathway from Arabidopsis and tomato are derived from pathways that compete for common precursors or from pathways that are coregulated with or regulate the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. PMID:23204403

  14. QTLs and candidate genes for desiccation and abscisic acid content in maize kernels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Kernel moisture at harvest is an important trait since a low value is required to prevent unexpected early germination and ensure seed preservation. It is also well known that early germination occurs in viviparous mutants, which are impaired in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis. To provide some insight into the genetic determinism of kernel desiccation in maize, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected for traits related to kernel moisture and ABA content in both embryo and endosperm during kernel desiccation. In parallel, the expression and mapping of genes involved in kernel desiccation and ABA biosynthesis, were examined to detect candidate genes. Results The use of an intermated recombinant inbred line population allowed for precise QTL mapping. For 29 traits examined in an unreplicated time course trial of days after pollination, a total of 78 QTLs were detected, 43 being related to kernel desiccation, 15 to kernel weight and 20 to ABA content. Multi QTL models explained 35 to 50% of the phenotypic variation for traits related to water status, indicating a large genetic control amenable to breeding. Ten of the 20 loci controlling ABA content colocated with previously detected QTLs controlling water status and ABA content in water stressed leaves. Mapping of candidate genes associated with kernel desiccation and ABA biosynthesis revealed several colocations between genes with putative functions and QTLs. Parallel investigation via RT-PCR experiments showed that the expression patterns of the ABA-responsive Rab17 and Rab28 genes as well as the late embryogenesis abundant Emb5 and aquaporin genes were related to desiccation rate and parental allele effect. Database searches led to the identification and mapping of two zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP) and five novel 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) related genes, both gene families being involved in ABA biosynthesis. The expression of these genes appeared independent in the embryo and endosperm

  15. Localization of the VHR phosphatase gene and its analysis as a candidate for BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Kamb, A.; Rosenthal, J.; Tran, T.

    1994-09-01

    The VH1-related human protein (VHR) gene was localized to human chromosome 17q21 in a region thought to contain the BCRA1 locus, a locus that confers susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. VHR encodes a phosphatase with dual specificity for tyrosine and serine residues. Thus it is a plausible candidate for a tumor suppressor gene such as BRCA1. To test this possibility, the VHR coding sequence was screened in individuals with familial breast cancer and in sporadic breast tumor and breast cancer cell lines. No mutations were detected, suggesting that the VHR gene is not BRCA1. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Genomic analysis reveals MATH gene(s) as candidate(s) for Plum pox virus (PPV) resistance in apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.).

    PubMed

    Zuriaga, Elena; Soriano, José Miguel; Zhebentyayeva, Tetyana; Romero, Carlos; Dardick, Chris; Cañizares, Joaquín; Badenes, Maria Luisa

    2013-09-01

    Sharka disease, caused by Plum pox virus (PPV), is the most important viral disease affecting Prunus species. A major PPV resistance locus (PPVres) has been mapped to the upper part of apricot (Prunus armeniaca) linkage group 1. In this study, a physical map of the PPVres locus in the PPV-resistant cultivar 'Goldrich' was constructed. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones belonging to the resistant haplotype contig were sequenced using 454/GS-FLX Titanium technology. Concurrently, the whole genome of seven apricot varieties (three PPV-resistant and four PPV-susceptible) and two PPV-susceptible apricot relatives (P. sibirica var. davidiana and P. mume) were obtained using the Illumina-HiSeq2000 platform. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the mapped interval, recorded from alignments against the peach genome, allowed us to narrow down the PPVres locus to a region of ∼196 kb. Searches for polymorphisms linked in coupling with the resistance led to the identification of 68 variants within 23 predicted transcripts according to peach genome annotation. Candidate resistance genes were ranked combining data from variant calling and predicted functions inferred from sequence homology. Together, the results suggest that members of a cluster of meprin and TRAF-C homology domain (MATHd)-containing proteins are the most likely candidate genes for PPV resistance in apricot. Interestingly, MATHd proteins are hypothesized to control long-distance movement (LDM) of potyviruses in Arabidopsis, and restriction for LDM is also a major component of PPV resistance in apricot. Although the PPV resistance gene(s) remains to be unambiguously identified, these results pave the way to the determination of the underlying mechanism and to the development of more accurate breeding strategies.

  17. Phytoremediation of chromium using Salix species: cloning ESTs and candidate genes involved in the Cr response.

    PubMed

    Quaggiotti, Silvia; Barcaccia, Gianni; Schiavon, Michela; Nicolé, Silvia; Galla, Giulio; Rossignolo, Virginia; Soattin, Marica; Malagoli, Mario

    2007-11-01

    In this research a differential display based on the detection of cDNA-AFLP markers was used to identify candidate genes potentially involved in the regulation of the response to chromium in four different willow species (Salix alba, Salix eleagnos, Salix fragilis and Salix matsudana) chosen on the basis of their suitability in phytoremediation techniques. Our approach enabled the assay of a large set of mRNA-related fragments and increased the reliability of amplification-based transcriptome analysis. The vast majority of transcript-derived fragments were shared among samples within species and thus attributable to constitutively expressed genes. However, a number of differentially expressed mRNAs were scored in each species and a total of 68 transcripts displaying an altered expression in response to Cr were isolated and sequenced. Public database querying revealed that 44.1% and 4.4% of the cloned ESTs score significant similarity with genes encoding proteins having known or putative function, or with genes coding for unknown proteins, respectively, whereas the remaining 51.5% did not retrieve any homology. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of seven candidate genes fully confirmed the expression patterns obtained by cDNA-AFLP. Our results indicate the existence of common mechanisms of gene regulation in response to Cr, pathogen attack and senescence-mediated programmed cell death, and suggest a role for the genes isolated in the cross-talk of the signaling pathways governing the adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  18. Evolutionary conservation of candidate osmoregulation genes in plant phloem sap-feeding insects.

    PubMed

    Jing, X; White, T A; Luan, J; Jiao, C; Fei, Z; Douglas, A E

    2016-06-01

    The high osmotic pressure generated by sugars in plant phloem sap is reduced in phloem-feeding aphids by sugar transformations and facilitated water flux in the gut. The genes mediating these osmoregulatory functions have been identified and validated empirically in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum: sucrase 1 (SUC1), a sucrase in glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13), and aquaporin 1 (AQP1), a member of the Drosophila integral protein (DRIP) family of aquaporins. Here, we describe molecular analysis of GH13 and AQP genes in phloem-feeding representatives of the four phloem-feeding groups: aphids (Myzus persicae), coccids (Planococcus citri), psyllids (Diaphorina citri, Bactericera cockerelli) and whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 and MED). A single candidate GH13-SUC gene and DRIP-AQP gene were identified in the genome/transcriptome of most insects tested by the criteria of sequence motif and gene expression in the gut. Exceptionally, the psyllid Ba. cockerelli transcriptome included a gut-expressed Pyrocoelia rufa integral protein (PRIP)-AQP, but has no DRIP-AQP transcripts, suggesting that PRIP-AQP is recruited for osmoregulatory function in this insect. This study indicates that phylogenetically related SUC and AQP genes may generally mediate osmoregulatory functions in these diverse phloem-feeding insects, and provides candidate genes for empirical validation and development as targets for osmotic disruption of pest species. PMID:26896054

  19. Large-Scale candidate gene analysis of spontaneous hepatitis C virus clearance

    PubMed Central

    Mosbruger, Timothy L; Duggal, Priya; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D; Hoots, W. Keith; Tobler, Leslie H; Busch, Michael; Peters, Marion G.; Rosen, Hugo R; Thomas, David L; Thio, Chloe L

    2010-01-01

    Human genetic variation is a determinant of recovery from an acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but, to date, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a limited number of genes have been studied with respect to HCV clearance. We determined whether SNPs in 112 selected immune-response genes are important for HCV clearance by genotyping 1536 SNPs in a cohort of 343 persons with natural HCV clearance and 547 persons with HCV persistence. PLINK and Haploview software packages were used to perform association, permutation, and haplotype analyses stratified by African-American (AA) and European-American (EA) race. Of the 1536 SNPs tested, 1426 were successfully genotyped (92.8%). In AAs, we identified 18 SNPs located in 11 gene regions that were associated with HCV outcome (empirical p-value < 0.01). In EAs, there were 20 SNPs located in eight gene regions associated with HCV outcome. Four of the gene regions studied (TNFSF18, TANK, HAVCR1 and IL18BP) contained SNPs with empirical p-values < 0.01 in both of the race groups. Conclusion In this large-scale analysis of 1426 genotyped SNPs in 112 candidate genes, we identified four gene regions that are likely candidates for a role in HCV clearance or persistence in both AAs and EAs. PMID:20331378

  20. Characterization of cellulose structure of Populus plants modified in candidate cellulose biosynthesis genes

    DOE PAGES

    Bali, Garima; Khunsupat, Ratayakorn; Akinosho, Hannah; Payyavula, Raja S.; Samuel, Reichel; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-09-10

    Here, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass is a combined effect of several factors such as high crystallinity and high degree of polymerization of cellulose, lignin content and structure, and the available surface area for enzymatic degradation (i.e., accessibility). Genetic improvement of feedstock cell wall properties is a path to reducing recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass and improving conversion to various biofuels. An advanced understanding of the cellulose biosynthesis pathway is essential to precisely modify cellulose properties of plant cell walls. Here we report on the impact of modified expression of candidate cellulose biosynthesis pathway genes on the ultra-structure of cellulose,more » a key carbohydrate polymer of Populus cell wall using advanced nuclear magnetic resonance approaches. Noteworthy changes were observed in the cell wall characteristics of downregulated KORRIGAN 1 (KOR) and KOR 2 transgenic plants in comparison to the wild-type control. It was observed that all of the transgenic lines showed variation in cellulose ultrastructure, increase in cellulose crystallinity and decrease in the cellulose degree of polymerization. Additionally, the properties of cellulose allomorph abundance and accessibility were found to be variable. Application of such cellulose characterization techniques beyond the traditional measurement of cellulose abundance to comprehensive studies of cellulose properties in larger transgenic and naturally variable populations is expected to provide deeper insights into the complex nature of lignocellulosic material, which can significantly contribute to the development of precisely tailored plants for enhanced biofuels production.« less

  1. Cloning and sequence analysis of candidate human natural killer-enhancing factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Shau, H.; Butterfield, L.H.; Chiu, R.; Kim, A.

    1994-12-31

    A cytosol factor from human red blood cells enhances natural killer (NK) activity. This factor, termed NK-enhancing factor (NKEF), is a protein of 44000 M{sub r} consisting of two subunits of equal size linked by disulfide bonds. NKEF is expressed in the NK-sensitive erythroleukemic cell line K562. Using an antibody specific for NKEF as a probe for immunoblot screening, we isolated several clones from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library of K562. Additional subcloning and sequencing revealed that the candidate NKEF cDNAs fell into one of two categories of closely related but non-identical genes, referred to as NKEF A and B. They are 88% identical in amino acid sequence and 71% identical in nucleotide sequence. Southern blot analysis suggests that there are two to three NKEF family members in the genome. Analysis of predicted amino acid sequences indicates that both NKEF A and B are cytosol proteins with several phosphorylation sites each, but that they have no glycosylation sites. They are significantly homologous to several other proteins from a wide variety of organisms ranging from prokaryotes to mammals, especially with regard to several well-conserved motifs within the amino acid sequences. The biological functions of these proteins in other species are mostly unknown, but some of them were reported to be induced by oxidative stress. Therefore, as well as for immunoregulation of NK activity, NKEF may be important for cells in coping with oxidative insults. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Molecular evolution of candidate genes involved in post-mating-prezygotic reproductive isolation.

    PubMed

    Bono, J M; Matzkin, L M; Hoang, K; Brandsmeier, L

    2015-02-01

    Traits involved in post-copulatory interactions between the sexes may evolve rapidly as a result of sexual selection and/or sexual conflict, leading to post-mating-prezygotic (PMPZ) reproductive isolating barriers between diverging lineages. Although the importance of PMPZ isolation is recognized, the molecular basis of such incompatibilities is not well understood. Here, we investigate molecular evolution of a subset of Drosophila mojavensis and Drosophila arizonae reproductive tract genes. These include genes that are transcriptionally regulated by conspecific mating in females, many of which are misregulated in heterospecific crosses, and a set of male genes whose transcripts are transferred to females during mating. As a group, misregulated female genes are not more divergent and do not appear to evolve under different selection pressures than other female reproductive genes. Male transferred genes evolve at a higher rate than testis-expressed genes, and at a similar rate compared to accessory gland protein genes, which are known to evolve rapidly. Four of the individual male transferred genes show patterns of divergent positive selection between D. mojavensis and D. arizonae. Three of the four genes belong to the sperm-coating protein-like family, including an ortholog of antares, which influences female fertility and receptivity in Drosophila melanogaster. Synthesis of these molecular evolutionary analyses with transcriptomics and predicted functional information makes these genes candidates for involvement in PMPZ reproductive incompatibilities between D. mojavensis and D. arizonae.

  3. A candidate gene approach to identify modifiers of the palatal phenotype in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Widdershoven, Josine C.C.; Bowser, Mark; Sheridan, Molly B.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Solot, Cynthia B.; Kirschner, Richard E.; Beemer, Frits A.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Devoto, Marcella; Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Palatal anomalies are one of the identifying features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) affecting about one third of patients. To identify genetic variants that increase the risk of cleft or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients, we performed a candidate gene association study in 101 patients with 22q11.2DS genotyped with the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0. Methods Patients from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, USA and Wilhelmina Children's Hospital Utrecht, The Netherlands were stratified based on palatal phenotype (overt cleft, submucosal cleft, bifid uvula). SNPs in 21 candidate genes for cleft palate were analyzed for genotype-phenotype association. In addition, TBX1 sequencing was carried out. Quality control and association analyses were conducted using the software package PLINK. Results Genotype and phenotype data of 101 unrelated patients (63 non-cleft subjects (62.4%), 38 cleft subjects (37.6%)) were analyzed. A Total of 39 SNPs on 10 genes demonstrated a p-value ≤0.05 prior to correction. The most significant SNPs were found on FGF10. However none of the SNPs remained significant after correcting for multiple testing. Conclusions Although these results are promising, analysis of additional samples will be required to confirm that variants in these regions influence risk for cleft palate or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients. PMID:23121717

  4. No Association between Personality and Candidate Gene Polymorphisms in a Wild Bird Population

    PubMed Central

    Durieux, Gillian; Burke, Terry; Dugdale, Hannah L.

    2015-01-01

    Consistency of between-individual differences in behaviour or personality is a phenomenon in populations that can have ecological consequences and evolutionary potential. One way that behaviour can evolve is to have a genetic basis. Identifying the molecular genetic basis of personality could therefore provide insight into how and why such variation is maintained, particularly in natural populations. Previously identified candidate genes for personality in birds include the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4), and serotonin transporter (SERT). Studies of wild bird populations have shown that exploratory and bold behaviours are associated with polymorphisms in both DRD4 and SERT. Here we tested for polymorphisms in DRD4 and SERT in the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis) population on Cousin Island, Seychelles, and then investigated correlations between personality and polymorphisms in these genes. We found no genetic variation in DRD4, but identified four polymorphisms in SERT that clustered into five haplotypes. There was no correlation between bold or exploratory behaviours and SERT polymorphisms/haplotypes. The null result was not due to lack of power, and indicates that there was no association between these behaviours and variation in the candidate genes tested in this population. These null findings provide important data to facilitate representative future meta-analyses on candidate personality genes. PMID:26473495

  5. The effects of polymorphisms in 7 candidate genes on resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis in native chickens.

    PubMed

    Tohidi, R; Idris, I B; Malar Panandam, J; Hair Bejo, M

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection is a common concern in poultry production for its negative effects on growth as well as food safety for humans. Identification of molecular markers that are linked to resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis may lead to appropriate solutions to control Salmonella infection in chickens. This study investigated the association of candidate genes with resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis in young chickens. Two native breeds of Malaysian chickens, namely, Village Chickens and Red Junglefowl, were evaluated for bacterial colonization after Salmonella Enteritidis inoculation. Seven candidate genes were selected on the basis of their physiological role in immune response, as determined by prior studies in other genetic lines: natural resistance-associated protein 1 (NRAMP1), transforming growth factor β3 (TGFβ3), transforming growth factor β4 (TGFβ4), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (IAP1), caspase 1 (CASP1), lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α factor (LITAF), and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Polymerase chain reaction-RFLP was used to identify polymorphisms in the candidate genes; all genes exhibited polymorphisms in at least one breed. The NRAMP1-SacI polymorphism correlated with the differences in Salmonella Enteritidis load in the cecum (P = 0.002) and spleen (P = 0.01) of Village Chickens. Polymorphisms in the restriction sites of TGFβ3-BsrI, TGFβ4-MboII, and TRAIL-StyI were associated with Salmonella Enteritidis burden in the cecum, spleen, and liver of Village Chickens and Red Junglefowl (P < 0.05). These results indicate that the NRAMP1, TGFβ3, TGFβ4, and TRAIL genes are potential candidates for use in selection programs for increasing genetic resistance against Salmonella Enteritidis in native Malaysian chickens. PMID:23472012

  6. Linkage and candidate gene studies of autism spectrum disorders in European populations.

    PubMed

    Holt, Richard; Barnby, Gabrielle; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Brocklebank, Denise; Sousa, Inês; Mulder, Erik J; Kantojärvi, Katri; Järvelä, Irma; Klauck, Sabine M; Poustka, Fritz; Bailey, Anthony J; Monaco, Anthony P

    2010-09-01

    Over the past decade, research on the genetic variants underlying susceptibility to autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has focused on linkage and candidate gene studies. This research has implicated various chromosomal loci and genes. Candidate gene studies have proven to be particularly intractable, with many studies failing to replicate previously reported associations. In this paper, we investigate previously implicated genomic regions for a role in ASD susceptibility, using four cohorts of European ancestry. Initially, a 384 SNP Illumina GoldenGate array was used to examine linkage at six previously implicated loci. We identify linkage approaching genome-wide suggestive levels on chromosome 2 (rs2885116, MLOD=1.89). Association analysis showed significant associations in MKL2 with ASD (rs756472, P=4.31 x 10(-5)) and between SND1 and strict autism (rs1881084, P=7.76 x 10(-5)) in the Finnish and Northern Dutch populations, respectively. Subsequently, we used a second 384 SNP Illumina GoldenGate array to examine the association in seven candidate genes, and evidence for association was found in RELN (rs362780, P=0.00165). Further increasing the sample size strengthened the association with RELN (rs362780, P=0.001) and produced a second significant result in GRIK2 (rs2518261, P=0.008). Our results strengthen the case for a more detailed study of the role of RELN and GRIK2 in autism susceptibility, as well as identifying two new potential candidate genes, MKL2 and SND1. PMID:20442744

  7. Identifying Candidate Genes for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity through Gene Expression Profiling in Multiple Tissues or Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yuhuan; Zhou, Jinghui; Zhuo, Min; Ling, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Du, Hongli; Wang, Xiaoning

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and obesity have become increasingly prevalent in recent years. Recent studies have focused on identifying causal variations or candidate genes for obesity and T2DM via analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) within a single tissue. T2DM and obesity are affected by comprehensive sets of genes in multiple tissues. In the current study, gene expression levels in multiple human tissues from GEO datasets were analyzed, and 21 candidate genes displaying high percentages of differential expression were filtered out. Specifically, DENND1B, LYN, MRPL30, POC1B, PRKCB, RP4-655J12.3, HIBADH, and TMBIM4 were identified from the T2DM-control study, and BCAT1, BMP2K, CSRNP2, MYNN, NCKAP5L, SAP30BP, SLC35B4, SP1, BAP1, GRB14, HSP90AB1, ITGA5, and TOMM5 were identified from the obesity-control study. The majority of these genes are known to be involved in T2DM and obesity. Therefore, analysis of gene expression in various tissues using GEO datasets may be an effective and feasible method to determine novel or causal genes associated with T2DM and obesity. PMID:24455749

  8. Identifying candidate genes for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and obesity through gene expression profiling in multiple tissues or cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junhui; Meng, Yuhuan; Zhou, Jinghui; Zhuo, Min; Ling, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Du, Hongli; Wang, Xiaoning

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and obesity have become increasingly prevalent in recent years. Recent studies have focused on identifying causal variations or candidate genes for obesity and T2DM via analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) within a single tissue. T2DM and obesity are affected by comprehensive sets of genes in multiple tissues. In the current study, gene expression levels in multiple human tissues from GEO datasets were analyzed, and 21 candidate genes displaying high percentages of differential expression were filtered out. Specifically, DENND1B, LYN, MRPL30, POC1B, PRKCB, RP4-655J12.3, HIBADH, and TMBIM4 were identified from the T2DM-control study, and BCAT1, BMP2K, CSRNP2, MYNN, NCKAP5L, SAP30BP, SLC35B4, SP1, BAP1, GRB14, HSP90AB1, ITGA5, and TOMM5 were identified from the obesity-control study. The majority of these genes are known to be involved in T2DM and obesity. Therefore, analysis of gene expression in various tissues using GEO datasets may be an effective and feasible method to determine novel or causal genes associated with T2DM and obesity.

  9. Identification of candidate genes for Fusarium yellows resistance in Chinese cabbage by differential expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Motoki; Fujimoto, Ryo; Ying, Hua; Pu, Zi-jing; Ebe, Yusuke; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Saeki, Natsumi; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kaji, Makoto; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Fusarium yellows caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans is an important disease of Brassica worldwide. To identify a resistance (R) gene against Fusarium yellows in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa var. pekinensis), we analyzed differential expression at the whole genome level between resistant and susceptible inbred lines using RNA sequencing. Four hundred and eighteen genes were significantly differentially expressed, and these were enriched for genes involved in response to stress or stimulus. Seven dominant DNA markers at putative R-genes were identified. Presence and absence of the sequence of the putative R-genes, Bra012688 and Bra012689, correlated with the resistance of six inbred lines and susceptibility of four inbred lines, respectively. In F(2) populations derived from crosses between resistant and susceptible inbred lines, presence of Bra012688 and Bra012689 cosegregated with resistance, suggesting that Bra012688 and Bra012689 are good candidates for fusarium yellows resistance in Chinese cabbage.

  10. Transcriptomic Analysis Using Olive Varieties and Breeding Progenies Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in Plant Architecture.

    PubMed

    González-Plaza, Juan J; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; García-López, Carmen; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Luque, Francisco; Trelles, Oswaldo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; De La Rosa, Raúl; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2016-01-01

    Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2252 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species.

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Candidate Genes for Starch Content Regulation in Maize Kernels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Xue, Yadong; Guo, Zhanyong; Li, Weihua; Tang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Kernel starch content is an important trait in maize (Zea mays L.) as it accounts for 65-75% of the dry kernel weight and positively correlates with seed yield. A number of starch synthesis-related genes have been identified in maize in recent years. However, many loci underlying variation in starch content among maize inbred lines still remain to be identified. The current study is a genome-wide association study that used a set of 263 maize inbred lines. In this panel, the average kernel starch content was 66.99%, ranging from 60.60 to 71.58% over the three study years. These inbred lines were genotyped with the SNP50 BeadChip maize array, which is comprised of 56,110 evenly spaced, random SNPs. Population structure was controlled by a mixed linear model (MLM) as implemented in the software package TASSEL. After the statistical analyses, four SNPs were identified as significantly associated with starch content (P ≤ 0.0001), among which one each are located on chromosomes 1 and 5 and two are on chromosome 2. Furthermore, 77 candidate genes associated with starch synthesis were found within the 100-kb intervals containing these four QTLs, and four highly associated genes were within 20-kb intervals of the associated SNPs. Among the four genes, Glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase (APS1; Gene ID GRMZM2G163437) is known as an important regulator of kernel starch content. The identified SNPs, QTLs, and candidate genes may not only be readily used for germplasm improvement by marker-assisted selection in breeding, but can also elucidate the genetic basis of starch content. Further studies on these identified candidate genes may help determine the molecular mechanisms regulating kernel starch content in maize and other important cereal crops. PMID:27512395

  12. Retinoblastoma-associated protein 140 as a candidate for a novel etiological gene to hypertension.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Kimberley; Ménard, Annie; Deng, Alan Y

    2016-01-01

    Gene discovery in animal models may lead to the revelation of therapeutic targets for essential hypertension as well as mechanistic insights into blood pressure (BP) regulation. Our aim was to identify a disease-causing gene for a component of polygenic hypertension contrasting inbred hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS) and normotensive Lewis rats. The chromosome segment harboring a quantitative trait locus (QTL), C16QTL, was first isolated from the rat genome via congenic strains. A candidate gene responsible for C16QTL causing a BP difference between DSS and Lewis rats was then identified using molecular analyses combining our independently-conducted total genome and gene-specific sequencings. The retinoblastoma-associated protein 140 (Rap140)/family with sequence similarity 208 member A (Fam208a) is the only candidate gene supported to be C16QTL among three genes in genome block 1 present in the C16QTL-residing interval. A mode of its actions could be to influence the expressions of genes that are downstream in a pathway potentially leading to BP regulation such as that encoding the solute carrier family 7 (cationic amino acid transporter, y+ system) member 12 (Slc7a12), which is specifically expressed in kidneys. Thus, Rap140/Fam208a probably encoding a transcription factor is the strongest candidate for a novel BP QTL that acts via a putative Rap140/Fam208a-Slc7a12-BP pathway. These data implicate a premier physiological role for Rap140/Fam208 beyond development and a first biological function for the Slc7a12 protein in any organism. PMID:27391979

  13. Transcriptomic Analysis Using Olive Varieties and Breeding Progenies Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in Plant Architecture.

    PubMed

    González-Plaza, Juan J; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; García-López, Carmen; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Luque, Francisco; Trelles, Oswaldo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; De La Rosa, Raúl; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2016-01-01

    Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2252 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species. PMID:26973682

  14. Identification of candidate genes for dissecting complex branch number trait in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Deepak; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Das, Shouvik; Kumar, Vinod; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-04-01

    The present study exploited integrated genomics-assisted breeding strategy for genetic dissection of complex branch number quantitative trait in chickpea. Candidate gene-based association analysis in a branch number association panel was performed by utilizing the genotyping data of 401 SNP allelic variants mined from 27 known cloned branch number gene orthologs of chickpea. The genome-wide association study (GWAS) integrating both genome-wide GBS- (4556 SNPs) and candidate gene-based genotyping information of 4957 SNPs in a structured population of 60 sequenced desi and kabuli accessions (with 350-400 kb LD decay), detected 11 significant genomic loci (genes) associated (41% combined PVE) with branch number in chickpea. Of these, seven branch number-associated genes were further validated successfully in two inter (ICC 4958 × ICC 17160)- and intra (ICC 12299 × ICC 8261)-specific mapping populations. The axillary meristem and shoot apical meristem-specific expression, including differential up- and down-regulation (4-5 fold) of the validated seven branch number-associated genes especially in high branch number as compared to the low branch number-containing parental accessions and homozygous individuals of two aforesaid mapping populations was apparent. Collectively, this combinatorial genomic approach delineated diverse naturally occurring novel functional SNP allelic variants in seven potential known/candidate genes [PIN1 (PIN-FORMED protein 1), TB1 (teosinte branched 1), BA1/LAX1 (BARREN STALK1/LIKE AUXIN1), GRAS8 (gibberellic acid insensitive/GAI, Repressor of ga13/RGA and Scarecrow8/SCR8), ERF (ethylene-responsive element-binding factor), MAX2 (more axillary growth 2) and lipase] governing chickpea branch number. The useful information generated from this study have potential to expedite marker-assisted genetic enhancement by developing high-yielding cultivars with more number of productive (pods and seeds) branches in chickpea. PMID:26940492

  15. Transcriptomic Analysis Using Olive Varieties and Breeding Progenies Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in Plant Architecture

    PubMed Central

    González-Plaza, Juan J.; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; García-López, Carmen; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F.; Luque, Francisco; Trelles, Oswaldo; Bejarano, Eduardo R.; De La Rosa, Raúl; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R.

    2016-01-01

    Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2252 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species. PMID:26973682

  16. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Candidate Genes for Starch Content Regulation in Maize Kernels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Xue, Yadong; Guo, Zhanyong; Li, Weihua; Tang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Kernel starch content is an important trait in maize (Zea mays L.) as it accounts for 65–75% of the dry kernel weight and positively correlates with seed yield. A number of starch synthesis-related genes have been identified in maize in recent years. However, many loci underlying variation in starch content among maize inbred lines still remain to be identified. The current study is a genome-wide association study that used a set of 263 maize inbred lines. In this panel, the average kernel starch content was 66.99%, ranging from 60.60 to 71.58% over the three study years. These inbred lines were genotyped with the SNP50 BeadChip maize array, which is comprised of 56,110 evenly spaced, random SNPs. Population structure was controlled by a mixed linear model (MLM) as implemented in the software package TASSEL. After the statistical analyses, four SNPs were identified as significantly associated with starch content (P ≤ 0.0001), among which one each are located on chromosomes 1 and 5 and two are on chromosome 2. Furthermore, 77 candidate genes associated with starch synthesis were found within the 100-kb intervals containing these four QTLs, and four highly associated genes were within 20-kb intervals of the associated SNPs. Among the four genes, Glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase (APS1; Gene ID GRMZM2G163437) is known as an important regulator of kernel starch content. The identified SNPs, QTLs, and candidate genes may not only be readily used for germplasm improvement by marker-assisted selection in breeding, but can also elucidate the genetic basis of starch content. Further studies on these identified candidate genes may help determine the molecular mechanisms regulating kernel starch content in maize and other important cereal crops. PMID:27512395

  17. Candidate gene association study in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia evaluated by Bayesian network based Bayesian multilevel analysis of relevance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We carried out a candidate gene association study in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to identify possible genetic risk factors in a Hungarian population. Methods The results were evaluated with traditional statistical methods and with our newly developed Bayesian network based Bayesian multilevel analysis of relevance (BN-BMLA) method. We collected genomic DNA and clinical data from 543 children, who underwent chemotherapy due to ALL, and 529 healthy controls. Altogether 66 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 19 candidate genes were genotyped. Results With logistic regression, we identified 6 SNPs in the ARID5B and IKZF1 genes associated with increased risk to B-cell ALL, and two SNPs in the STAT3 gene, which decreased the risk to hyperdiploid ALL. Because the associated SNPs were in linkage in each gene, these associations corresponded to one signal per gene. The odds ratio (OR) associated with the tag SNPs were: OR = 1.69, P = 2.22x10-7 for rs4132601 (IKZF1), OR = 1.53, P = 1.95x10-5 for rs10821936 (ARID5B) and OR = 0.64, P = 2.32x10-4 for rs12949918 (STAT3). With the BN-BMLA we confirmed the findings of the frequentist-based method and received additional information about the nature of the relations between the SNPs and the disease. E.g. the rs10821936 in ARID5B and rs17405722 in STAT3 showed a weak interaction, and in case of T-cell lineage sample group, the gender showed a weak interaction with three SNPs in three genes. In the hyperdiploid patient group the BN-BMLA detected a strong interaction among SNPs in the NOTCH1, STAT1, STAT3 and BCL2 genes. Evaluating the survival rate of the patients with ALL, the BN-BMLA showed that besides risk groups and subtypes, genetic variations in the BAX and CEBPA genes might also influence the probability of survival of the patients. Conclusions In the present study we confirmed the roles of genetic variations in ARID5B and IKZF1 in the susceptibility to B-cell ALL

  18. Identification of candidate genes related to rice grain weight under high-temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiang-Lin; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Liu, Jun-Bao; Zhong, Ping-An; Huang, Ying-Jin

    2012-11-01

    The rise of global warming presents a problem for all living organisms, including rice and other staple plants. High temperatures impair rice grain weight by inhibiting the filling of the caryopses during the milky stage. The molecular mechanism behind this process, however, is poorly understood. Identifying candidate genes involved in responses to high-temperature stress may provide a basis for the improvement of heat tolerance in rice. Using paired, genetically similar heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive rice lines as plant materials, cDNA-AFLP analysis revealed a total of 54 transcript derived fragments (TDFs), mainly from the heat-tolerant lines. This clearly indicated variations in gene expression between the two rice lines. BLAST results showed that 28 of the 54 TDFs were homologous sequences. These homologous genes were found to encode proteins involved in signal transduction, oxidation, transcriptional regulation, transport, and metabolism. The functions and differential expression patterns of some important genes are further discussed. High temperature stress may trigger a wide range of changes in gene expression in rice caryopses, in turn affecting functions ranging from signal transduction to cellular metabolism. Forty-five of the 54 TDFs were mapped to rice chromosomes. The genes identified in the present study would make good candidates for further study into the molecular mechanisms underlying rice adaptation to high-temperature stress.

  19. Oil-Miscible and Non-Corrosive Phosphonium Ionic Liquids as Candidate Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Bo; Bansal, Dinesh G; Qu, Jun; Sun, Xiaoqi; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng; Blau, Peter Julian; Bunting, Bruce G; Mordukhovich, Gregory; Smolenski, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been receiving considerable attention from the lubricants industry as potential friction and wear-reducing additives, but their solubility in oils is an issue. Unlike most ionic liquids that are insoluble in non-polar hydrocarbon oils, this study reports phosphonium-based ILs (PP-ILs) that are fully miscible with both mineral oil-based and synthetic lubricants. Both the cation and anion in quaternary structures, long alkyl chains, and capability of pairing the cation and the anion via a H-O bond are hypothesized to improve the compatibility between ions and neutral oil molecules. The measured viscosities of the oil-IL blends agree well with the Refutas equation that is for solutions containing multiple components. High thermal stability and non-corrosiveness were observed for the PP-ILs. Effective friction reduction and anti-wear functionality have been demonstrated in tribological tests when adding 5 wt% of a PP-IL into a base oil, suggesting potential applications for using the oil-miscible PP-ILs as lubricant additives.

  20. Isolation of genes from the Batten candidate region using exon amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, T.J.; D`Arigo, K.L.; Haines, J.L.

    1995-06-05

    In order to identify genes originating from the Batten disease candidate region, we have used the technique of exon amplification to identify transcribed sequences. This procedure produces trapped exon clones, which can represent single exons or multiple exons spliced together and is an efficient method for obtaining probes for physical mapping and for screening cDNA libraries. The source of DNA for these experiments was a collection of chromosome 16 cosmid contigs isolated by the direct subcloning of region-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) and hybridization of inter-alu PCR products from these YACs to the flow-sorted Los Alamos chromosome 16 cosmid library. We are now using the resulting exon probes to screen retina and brain cDNA libraries for candidate JNCL genes. 23 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Validation of candidate genes associated with cardiovascular risk factors in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Windemuth, Andreas; de Leon, Jose; Goethe, John W; Schwartz, Harold I; Woolley, Stephen; Susce, Margaret; Kocherla, Mohan; Bogaard, Kali; Holford, Theodore R; Seip, Richard L; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2012-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants predictive of cardiovascular risk factors in a psychiatric population treated with second generation antipsychotics (SGA). 924 patients undergoing treatment for severe mental illness at four US hospitals were genotyped at 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms. Patients were assessed for fasting serum lipid (low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDLc], high density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDLc], and triglycerides) and obesity phenotypes (body mass index, BMI). Thirteen candidate genes from previous studies of the same phenotypes in non-psychiatric populations were tested for association. We confirmed 8 of the 13 candidate genes at the 95% confidence level. An increased genetic effect size was observed for triglycerides in the psychiatric population compared to that in the cardiovascular population.

  2. RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes for Ontogenic Resistance in Malus-Venturia Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Gusberti, Michele; Gessler, Cesare; Broggini, Giovanni A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Ontogenic scab resistance in apple leaves and fruits is a horizontal resistance against the plant pathogen Venturia inaequalis and is expressed as a decrease in disease symptoms and incidence with the ageing of the leaves. Several studies at the biochemical level tried to unveil the nature of this resistance; however, no conclusive results were reported. We decided therefore to investigate the genetic origin of this phenomenon by performing a full quantitative transcriptome sequencing and comparison of young (susceptible) and old (ontogenic resistant) leaves, infected or not with the pathogen. Two time points at 72 and 96 hours post-inoculation were chosen for RNA sampling and sequencing. Comparison between the different conditions (young and old leaves, inoculated or not) should allow the identification of differentially expressed genes which may represent different induced plant defence reactions leading to ontogenic resistance or may be the cause of a constitutive (uninoculated with the pathogen) shift toward resistance in old leaves. Differentially expressed genes were then characterised for their function by homology to A. thaliana and other plant genes, particularly looking for genes involved in pathways already suspected of appertaining to ontogenic resistance in apple or other hosts, or to plant defence mechanisms in general. In this work, five candidate genes putatively involved in the ontogenic resistance of apple were identified: a gene encoding an “enhanced disease susceptibility 1 protein” was found to be down-regulated in both uninoculated and inoculated old leaves at 96 hpi, while the other four genes encoding proteins (metallothionein3-like protein, lipoxygenase, lipid transfer protein, and a peroxidase 3) were found to be constitutively up-regulated in inoculated and uninoculated old leaves. The modulation of the five candidate genes has been validated using the real-time quantitative PCR. Thus, ontogenic resistance may be the result of the

  3. Exome sequencing identifies potential novel candidate genes in patients with unexplained colorectal adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Spier, Isabel; Kerick, Martin; Drichel, Dmitriy; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Adam, Ronja; Zhao, Bixiao; Becker, Tim; Lifton, Richard P; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Perner, Sven; Thiele, Holger; Nöthen, Markus M; Hoffmann, Per; Timmermann, Bernd; Schweiger, Michal R; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In up to 30% of patients with colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutation in the known genes APC, causing familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH, causing MUTYH-associated polyposis, and POLE or POLD1, causing Polymerase-Proofreading-associated polyposis can be identified, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover new causative genes, exome sequencing was performed using DNA from leukocytes and a total of 12 colorectal adenomas from seven unrelated patients with unexplained sporadic adenomatous polyposis. For data analysis and variant filtering, an established bioinformatics pipeline including in-house tools was applied. Variants were filtered for rare truncating point mutations and copy-number variants assuming a dominant, recessive, or tumor suppressor model of inheritance. Subsequently, targeted sequence analysis of the most promising candidate genes was performed in a validation cohort of 191 unrelated patients. All relevant variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. The analysis of exome sequencing data resulted in the identification of rare loss-of-function germline mutations in three promising candidate genes (DSC2, PIEZO1, ZSWIM7). In the validation cohort, further variants predicted to be pathogenic were identified in DSC2 and PIEZO1. According to the somatic mutation spectra, the adenomas in this patient cohort follow the classical pathways of colorectal tumorigenesis. The present study identified three candidate genes which might represent rare causes for a predisposition to colorectal adenoma formation. Especially PIEZO1 (FAM38A) and ZSWIM7 (SWS1) warrant further exploration. To evaluate the clinical relevance of these genes, investigation of larger patient cohorts and functional studies are required. PMID:26780541

  4. Transcriptome and Proteome Data Reveal Candidate Genes for Pollinator Attraction in Sexually Deceptive Orchids

    PubMed Central

    Sedeek, Khalid E. M.; Qi, Weihong; Schauer, Monica A.; Gupta, Alok K.; Poveda, Lucy; Xu, Shuqing; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Schiestl, Florian P.; Schlüter, Philipp M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sexually deceptive orchids of the genus Ophrys mimic the mating signals of their pollinator females to attract males as pollinators. This mode of pollination is highly specific and leads to strong reproductive isolation between species. This study aims to identify candidate genes responsible for pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation between three closely related species, O. exaltata, O. sphegodes and O. garganica. Floral traits such as odour, colour and morphology are necessary for successful pollinator attraction. In particular, different odour hydrocarbon profiles have been linked to differences in specific pollinator attraction among these species. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in these traits is important for understanding the molecular basis of pollinator attraction by sexually deceptive orchids. Results We have created floral reference transcriptomes and proteomes for these three Ophrys species using a combination of next-generation sequencing (454 and Solexa), Sanger sequencing, and shotgun proteomics (tandem mass spectrometry). In total, 121 917 unique transcripts and 3531 proteins were identified. This represents the first orchid proteome and transcriptome from the orchid subfamily Orchidoideae. Proteome data revealed proteins corresponding to 2644 transcripts and 887 proteins not observed in the transcriptome. Candidate genes for hydrocarbon and anthocyanin biosynthesis were represented by 156 and 61 unique transcripts in 20 and 7 genes classes, respectively. Moreover, transcription factors putatively involved in the regulation of flower odour, colour and morphology were annotated, including Myb, MADS and TCP factors. Conclusion Our comprehensive data set generated by combining transcriptome and proteome technologies allowed identification of candidate genes for pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among sexually deceptive orchids. This includes genes for hydrocarbon and anthocyanin biosynthesis and

  5. Quantitative trait loci and candidate genes associated with starch pasting viscosity characteristics in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Thanyasiriwat, T; Sraphet, S; Whankaew, S; Boonseng, O; Bao, J; Lightfoot, D A; Tangphatsornruang, S; Triwitayakorn, K

    2014-01-01

    Starch pasting viscosity is an important quality trait in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivars. The aim here was to identify loci and candidate genes associated with the starch pasting viscosity. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for seven pasting viscosity parameters was carried out using 100 lines of an F1 mapping population from a cross between two cassava cultivars Huay Bong 60 and Hanatee. Starch samples were obtained from roots of cassava grown in 2008 and 2009 at Rayong, and in 2009 at Lop Buri province, Thailand. The traits showed continuous distribution among the F1 progeny with transgressive variation. Fifteen QTL were identified from mean trait data, with Logarithm of Odds (LOD) values from 2.77-13.01 and phenotype variations explained (PVE) from10.0-48.4%. In addition, 48 QTL were identified in separate environments. The LOD values ranged from 2.55-8.68 and explained 6.6-43.7% of phenotype variation. The loci were located on 19 linkage groups. The most important QTL for pasting temperature (PT) (qPT.1LG1) from mean trait values showed largest effect with highest LOD value (13.01) and PVE (48.4%). The QTL co-localised with PT and pasting time (PTi) loci that were identified in separate environments. Candidate genes were identified within the QTL peak regions. However, the major genes of interest, encoding the family of glycosyl or glucosyl transferases and hydrolases, were located at the periphery of QTL peaks. The loci identified could be effectively applied in breeding programmes to improve cassava starch quality. Alleles of candidate genes should be further studied in order to better understand their effects on starch quality traits.

  6. Association of genetic variation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure among African Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource study

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ervin R.; Young, J. Hunter; Li, Yali; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Keating, Brendan J.; Musani, Solomon K.; Liu, Kiang; Morrison, Alanna C.; Ganesh, Santhi; Kutlar, Abdullah; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Polak, Josef F.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Dries, Daniel L.; Farlow, Deborah N.; Redline, Susan; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Hirschorn, Joel N.; Sun, Yan V.; Wyatt, Sharon B.; Penman, Alan D.; Palmas, Walter; Rotter, Jerome I.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Lyon, Helen N.; Kang, Sun J.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Cooper, Richard S.; Franceschini, Nora; Curb, J. David; Martin, Lisa W.; Eaton, Charles B.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Taylor, Herman A.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Ehret, Georg B.; Johnson, Toby; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Albert V.; Tobin, Martin D.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L.; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A.; Jackson, Anne U.; Peden, John F.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H.; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N.; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C.; Kumari, Meena; JinGo, Min; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D.G.; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H.; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R.; Charlotte Onland-Moret, N.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Platou, Carl G.P.; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S.P.M.; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Arking, Dan E.; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Day, Ian N.M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Beilby, John P.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Rory; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ongen, Halit; Bis, Joshua C.; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette R.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Hoffman Bolton, Judith A.; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M.; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F.; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B.; Hunt, Steven C.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Scott, Laura J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Burton, Paul R.; SolerArtigas, Maria; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K.; Rudock, Megan E.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairajan; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; MariaCorsi, Anna; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A.; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S.; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J.; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Chris; Schwartz, Steven M.; Arfan Ikram, M.; Longstreth, Will T.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R.G.; Wain, Louise V.; Morken, Mario A.; Swift, Amy J.; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J.L.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Radha Mani, K.; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S.; Oostra, Ben A.; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G.; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würz, Peter; Twee-Hee Ong, Rick; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D.; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kranthi Kumar, M.J.; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Fowkes, Gerald R.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Bots, Michiel L.; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J.; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Casas, Juan P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Wong, Tien Y.; Shyong Tai, E.; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Harris, Tamara B.; Morris, Richard W.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G.; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn , Cornelia M.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in African Americans (AAs) is higher than in other US groups; yet, few have performed genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in AA. Among people of European descent, GWASs have identified genetic variants at 13 loci that are associated with blood pressure. It is unknown if these variants confer susceptibility in people of African ancestry. Here, we examined genome-wide and candidate gene associations with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium consisting of 8591 AAs. Genotypes included genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data utilizing the Affymetrix 6.0 array with imputation to 2.5 million HapMap SNPs and candidate gene SNP data utilizing a 50K cardiovascular gene-centric array (ITMAT-Broad-CARe [IBC] array). For Affymetrix data, the strongest signal for DBP was rs10474346 (P= 3.6 × 10−8) located near GPR98 and ARRDC3. For SBP, the strongest signal was rs2258119 in C21orf91 (P= 4.7 × 10−8). The top IBC association for SBP was rs2012318 (P= 6.4 × 10−6) near SLC25A42 and for DBP was rs2523586 (P= 1.3 × 10−6) near HLA-B. None of the top variants replicated in additional AA (n = 11 882) or European-American (n = 69 899) cohorts. We replicated previously reported European-American blood pressure SNPs in our AA samples (SH2B3, P= 0.009; TBX3-TBX5, P= 0.03; and CSK-ULK3, P= 0.0004). These genetic loci represent the best evidence of genetic influences on SBP and DBP in AAs to date. More broadly, this work supports that notion that blood pressure among AAs is a trait with genetic underpinnings but also with significant complexity. PMID:21378095

  7. Discovery of New Candidate Genes Related to Brain Development Using Protein Interaction Information

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Chu, Chen; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Human brain development is a dramatic process composed of a series of complex and fine-tuned spatiotemporal gene expressions. A good comprehension of this process can assist us in developing the potential of our brain. However, we have only limited knowledge about the genes and gene functions that are involved in this biological process. Therefore, a substantial demand remains to discover new brain development-related genes and identify their biological functions. In this study, we aimed to discover new brain-development related genes by building a computational method. We referred to a series of computational methods used to discover new disease-related genes and developed a similar method. In this method, the shortest path algorithm was executed on a weighted graph that was constructed using protein-protein interactions. New candidate genes fell on at least one of the shortest paths connecting two known genes that are related to brain development. A randomization test was then adopted to filter positive discoveries. Of the final identified genes, several have been reported to be associated with brain development, indicating the effectiveness of the method, whereas several of the others may have potential roles in brain development. PMID:25635857

  8. Candidate gene association studies in syndromic and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    SciTech Connect

    Daack-Hirsch, S.; Basart, A.; Frischmeyer, P.

    1994-09-01

    Using ongoing case ascertainment through a birth defects registry, we have collected 219 nuclear families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate and 111 families with a collection of syndromic forms. Syndromic cases include 24 with recognized forms and 72 with unrecognized syndromes. Candidate gene studies as well as genome-wide searches for evidence of microdeletions and isodisomy are currently being carried out. Candidate gene association studies, to date, have made use of PCR-based polymorphisms for TGFA, MSX1, CLPG13 (a CA repeat associated with a human homologue of a locus that results in craniofacial dysmorphogenesis in the mouse) and an STRP found in a Van der Woude syndrome microdeletion. Control tetranucleotide repeats, which insure that population-based differences are not responsible for any observed associations, are also tested. Studies of the syndromic cases have included the same list of candidate genes searching for evidence of microdeletions and a genome-wide search using tri- and tetranucleotide polymorphic markers to search for isodisomy or structural rearrangements. Significant associations have previously been identified for TGFA, and, in this report, identified for MSX1 and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (p = 0.04, uncorrected). Preliminary results of the genome-wide scan for isodisomy has returned no true positives and there has been no evidence for microdeletion cases.

  9. Identification of candidate target genes of genomic aberrations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian-Yun; Mei, Li-Li; Qiu, Yun-Tan; Shi, Zhi-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the candidate target genes of genomic aberrations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were applied to analyze the copy number changes and expression level of candidate genes, respectively. Integrative analysis revealed that homozygous deletions of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKN) 2A and CDKN2B and gains of fascin actin-bundling protein 1 (FSCN1) and homer scaffolding protein 3 (HOMER3) occurred frequently in ESCC. The results demonstrated that the homozygous deletion of CDKN2A or CDKN2B was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis. Notably, the expression of CDKN2A and CDKN2B was lower in dysplasia than in normal esophageal epithelium. We also observed that the copy number increase of FSCN1 was significantly associated with pT, pN and pStage, and that the gain of HOMER3 was significantly linked with pN and pStage. We further revealed that FSCN1 and HOMER3 were overexpressed in ESCC, and that their overexpression was correlated with copy number increase. In conclusion, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, FSCN1 and HOMER3 are candidate cancer-associated genes and may play a tumorigenic role in ESCC.

  10. Identification of candidate target genes of genomic aberrations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian-Yun; Mei, Li-Li; Qiu, Yun-Tan; Shi, Zhi-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the candidate target genes of genomic aberrations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were applied to analyze the copy number changes and expression level of candidate genes, respectively. Integrative analysis revealed that homozygous deletions of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKN) 2A and CDKN2B and gains of fascin actin-bundling protein 1 (FSCN1) and homer scaffolding protein 3 (HOMER3) occurred frequently in ESCC. The results demonstrated that the homozygous deletion of CDKN2A or CDKN2B was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis. Notably, the expression of CDKN2A and CDKN2B was lower in dysplasia than in normal esophageal epithelium. We also observed that the copy number increase of FSCN1 was significantly associated with pT, pN and pStage, and that the gain of HOMER3 was significantly linked with pN and pStage. We further revealed that FSCN1 and HOMER3 were overexpressed in ESCC, and that their overexpression was correlated with copy number increase. In conclusion, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, FSCN1 and HOMER3 are candidate cancer-associated genes and may play a tumorigenic role in ESCC. PMID:27698883

  11. Biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers associated with quality-of-life domains: an update

    PubMed Central

    Sprangers, Mirjam A.G.; Thong, Melissa S.Y.; Bartels, Meike; Barsevick, Andrea; Ordoñana, Juan; Shi, Qiuling; Wang, Xin Shelley; Klepstad, Pål; Wierenga, Eddy A.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Sloan, Jeff A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is compelling evidence of a genetic foundation of patient-reported QOL. Given the rapid development of substantial scientific advances in this area of research, the current paper updates and extends reviews published in 2010. Objectives The objective is to provide an updated overview of the biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers involved in fatigue, pain, negative (depressed mood) and positive (well-being/happiness) emotional functioning, social functioning, and overall QOL. Methods We followed a purposeful search algorithm of existing literature to capture empirical papers investigating the relationship between biological pathways and molecular markers and the identified QOL domains. Results Multiple major pathways are involved in each QOL domain. The inflammatory pathway has the strongest evidence as a controlling mechanism underlying fatigue. Inflammation and neurotransmission are key processes involved in pain perception and the COMT gene is associated with multiple sorts of pain. The neurotransmitter and neuroplasticity theories have the strongest evidence for their relationship with depression. Oxytocin-related genes and genes involved in the serotonergic and dopaminergic pathways play a role in social functioning. Inflammatory pathways, via cytokines, also play an important role in overall QOL. Conclusions Whereas the current findings need future experiments and replication efforts, they will provide researchers supportive background information when embarking on studies relating candidate genes and/or molecular markers to QOL domains. The ultimate goal of this area of research is to enhance patients’ QOL. PMID:24604075

  12. Early embryonic failure: Expression and imprinted status of candidate genes on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.S.; Bennett, P.R.; Moore, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    Two cases of maternal uniparental (hetero)disomy for human chromosome 21 (mUPD21) have been identified in a systematic search for UPD in 23 cases of early embryonic failure (EEF). Bi-parental origin of the other chromosome pairs was confirmed using specific VNTR probes or dinucleotide repeat analysis. Both maternally and paternally derived isochromosomes 21q have previously been identified in two individuals with normal phenotypes. Full UPD21 has a different mechanism of origin than uniparental isochromosome 21q and its effect on imprinted genes and phenotypic outcome will therefore not necessarily be the same. EEF associated with mUPD21 suggests that developmentally important genes on HSA 21 may be imprinted such that they are only expressed from either the maternally or paternally derived alleles. We have searched for monoallelic expression of candidate genes on HSA 21 in human pregnancy (CBS, IFNAR, COL6A1) using intragenic DNA polymorphisms. These genes were chosen either because their murine homologues lie in imprinted regions or because they are potentially important in embryogenesis. Once imprinted candidate genes have been identified, their methylation status and expression in normal, early embryonic failure and uniparental disomy 21 pregnancies will be studied. At the same time, a larger number of cases of EEF are being examined to further investigate the incidence of UPD21 in this group.

  13. Addictions Biology: Haplotype-Based Analysis for 130 Candidate Genes on a Single Array

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Yuan, Qiaoping; Xu, Ke; Shen, Pei-Hong; Heinz, Elizabeth; Lobos, Elizabeth A.; Binder, Elizabeth B.; Cubells, Joe; Ehlers, Cindy L.; Gelernter, Joel; Mann, John; Riley, Brien; Roy, Alec; Tabakoff, Boris; Todd, Richard D.; Zhou, Zhifeng; Goldman, David

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To develop a panel of markers able to extract full haplotype information for candidate genes in alcoholism, other addictions and disorders of mood and anxiety. Methods: A total of 130 genes were haplotype tagged and genotyped in 7 case/control populations and 51 reference populations using Illumina GoldenGate SNP genotyping technology, determining haplotype coverage. We also constructed and determined the efficacy of a panel of 186 ancestry informative markers. Results: An average of 1465 loci were genotyped at an average completion rate of 91.3%, with an average call rate of 98.3% and replication rate of 99.7%. Completion and call rates were lowered by the performance of two datasets, highlighting the importance of the DNA quality in high throughput assays. A comparison of haplotypes captured by the Addictions Array tagging SNPs and commercially available whole-genome arrays from Illumina and Affymetrix shows comparable performance of the tag SNPs to the best whole-genome array in all populations for which data are available. Conclusions: Arrays of haplotype-tagged candidate genes, such as this addictions-focused array, represent a cost-effective approach to generate high-quality SNP genotyping data useful for the haplotype-based analysis of panels of genes such as these 130 genes of interest to alcohol and addictions researchers. The inclusion of the 186 ancestry informative markers allows for the detection and correction for admixture and further enhances the utility of the array. PMID:18477577

  14. A family with X-linked anophthalmia: exclusion of SOX3 as a candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, Anne; Lee, Stephen S; Hamilton, Steven P

    2005-10-01

    We report on a four-generation family with X-linked anophthalmia in four affected males and show that this family has LOD scores consistent with linkage to Xq27, the third family reported to be linked to the ANOP1 locus. We sequenced the SOX3 gene at Xq27 as a candidate gene for the X-linked anophthalmia based on the high homology of this gene to SOX2, a gene previously mutated in bilateral anophthlamia. However, no amino acid sequence alterations were identified in SOX3. We have improved the definition of the phenotype in males with anophthalmia linked to the ANOP1 locus, as microcephaly, ocular colobomas, and severe renal malformations have not been described in families linked to ANOP1.

  15. NOBOX is a strong autosomal candidate gene in Tunisian patients with primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Bouali, N; Francou, B; Bouligand, J; Lakhal, B; Malek, I; Kammoun, M; Warszawski, J; Mougou, S; Saad, A; Guiochon-Mantel, A

    2016-05-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) affects approximately 1% of women before the age of 40. Genetic contribution is a significant component of POI. In this context, heterozygous mutations in NOBOX, BMP15 and GDF9 have been reported. The objective of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of these genes mutations in 125 unrelated Tunisian patients diagnosed with POI. The screening of NOBOX gene revealed three missense mutations (p.Arg117Trp; p.Gly91Trp and p.Pro619Leu) in eight patients. These mutations were not found in a 200 ethnically matched women without fertility problem. The sequencing of BMP15 and GDF9 gene revealed only previously reported variants. In contrast to previous studies, the prevalence of BMP15 variations is not higher than in the control population. Conversely, 6.4% of the cases present a NOBOX mutations; this high prevalence strengthens the consideration of NOBOX gene as strong autosomal candidate for POI.

  16. Association between SNPs within candidate genes and compounds related to boar taint and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Maren; Lien, Sigbjørn; Aasmundstad, Torunn; Meuwissen, Theo HE; Hansen, Marianne HS; Bendixen, Christian; Grindflek, Eli

    2009-01-01

    Background Boar taint is an unpleasant odour and flavour of the meat from some uncastrated male pigs primarily caused by elevated levels of androstenone and skatole in adipose tissue. Androstenone is produced in the same biochemical pathway as testosterone and estrogens, which represents a particular challenge when selecting against high levels of androstenone in the breeding programme, without simultaneously decreasing levels of other steroids. Detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with compounds affecting boar taint is important both for gaining a better understanding of the complex regulation of the trait and for the purpose of identifying markers that can be used to improve the gain of breeding. The beneficial SNPs to be used in breeding would have the combinational effects of reducing levels of boar taint without affecting fertility of the animals. The aim of this study was to detect SNPs in boar taint candidate genes and to perform association studies for both single SNPs and haplotypes with levels of boar taint compounds and phenotypes related to reproduction. Results An association study involving 275 SNPs in 121 genes and compounds related to boar taint and reproduction were carried out in Duroc and Norwegian Landrace boars. Phenotypes investigated were levels of androstenone, skatole and indole in adipose tissue, levels of androstenone, testosterone, estrone sulphate and 17β-estradiol in plasma, and length of bulbo urethralis gland. The SNPs were genotyped in more than 2800 individuals and several SNPs were found to be significantly (LRT > 5.4) associated with the different phenotypes. Genes with significant SNPs in either of the traits investigated include cytochrome P450 members CYP2E1, CYP21, CYP2D6 and CYP2C49, steroid 5α-reductase SRD5A2, nuclear receptor NGFIB, catenin CTNND1, BRCA1 associated protein BAP1 and hyaluronoglucosaminidase HYAL2. Haplotype analysis provided additional evidence for an effect of CYP2E1 on levels

  17. Targeted Re-Sequencing Approach of Candidate Genes Implicates Rare Potentially Functional Variants in Tourette Syndrome Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, John; Potamianou, Hera; Xing, Jinchuan; Deng, Li; Karagiannidis, Iordanis; Tsetsos, Fotis; Drineas, Petros; Tarnok, Zsanett; Rizzo, Renata; Wolanczyk, Tomasz; Farkas, Luca; Nagy, Peter; Szymanska, Urszula; Androutsos, Christos; Tsironi, Vaia; Koumoula, Anastasia; Barta, Csaba; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L.; Tischfield, Jay; Paschou, Peristera; Heiman, Gary A.; Georgitsi, Marianthi

    2016-01-01

    Although the genetic basis of Tourette Syndrome (TS) remains unclear, several candidate genes have been implicated. Using a set of 382 TS individuals of European ancestry we investigated four candidate genes for TS (HDC, SLITRK1, BTBD9, and SLC6A4) in an effort to identify possibly causal variants using a targeted re-sequencing approach by next generation sequencing technology. Identification of possible disease causing variants under different modes of inheritance was performed using the algorithms implemented in VAAST. We prioritized variants using Variant ranker and validated five rare variants via Sanger sequencing in HDC and SLITRK1, all of which are predicted to be deleterious. Intriguingly, one of the identified variants is in linkage disequilibrium with a variant that is included among the top hits of a genome-wide association study for response to citalopram treatment, an antidepressant drug with off-label use also in obsessive compulsive disorder. Our findings provide additional evidence for the implication of these two genes in TS susceptibility and the possible role of these proteins in the pathobiology of TS should be revisited. PMID:27708560

  18. Candidate gene analysis of GH1 for effects on growth and carcass composition of cattle.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J F; Coutinho, L L; Herring, K L; Gallagher, D S; Brenneman, R A; Burney, N; Sanders, J O; Turner, J W; Smith, S B; Miller, R K; Savell, J W; Davis, S K

    1998-06-01

    We present an approach to evaluate the support for candidate genes as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) within the context of genome-wide map-based cloning strategies. To establish candidacy, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone containing a putative candidate gene is physically assigned to an anchored linkage map to localise the gene relative to an identified QTL effect. Microsatellite loci derived from BAC clones containing an established candidate gene are integrated into the linkage map facilitating the evaluation by interval analysis of the statistical support for QTL identity. Permutation analysis is employed to determine experiment-wise statistical support. The approach is illustrated for the growth hormone 1 (GH1) gene and growth and carcass phenotypes in cattle. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers which amplify a 441 bp fragment of GH1 were used to systematically screen a bovine BAC library comprising 60,000 clones and with a 95% probability of containing a single copy sequence. The presence of GH1 in BAC-110R2C3 was confirmed by sequence analysis of the PCR product from this clone and by the physical assignment of BAC110R2C3 to bovine chromosome 19 (BTA19) band 22 by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). Microsatellite KHGH1 was isolated from BAC110R2C3 and scored in 529 reciprocal backcross and F2 fullsib progeny from 41 resource families derived from Angus (Bos taurus) and Brahman (Bos indicus). The microsatellite KHGH1 was incorporated into a framework genetic map of BTA19 comprising 12 microsatellite loci, the erythrocyte antigen T and a GH1-TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Interval analysis localised effects of taurus vs. indicus alleles on subcutaneous fat and the percentage of either extractable fat from the Iongissimus dorsi muscle to the region of BTA19 harbouring GH1. PMID:9720178

  19. Identification of candidate genes affecting Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol biosynthesis in Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Marks, M. David; Tian, Li; Wenger, Jonathan P.; Omburo, Stephanie N.; Soto-Fuentes, Wilfredo; He, Ji; Gang, David R.; Weiblen, George D.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    RNA isolated from the glands of a Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA)-producing strain of Cannabis sativa was used to generate a cDNA library containing over 100 000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Sequencing of over 2000 clones from the library resulted in the identification of over 1000 unigenes. Candidate genes for almost every step in the biochemical pathways leading from primary metabolites to THCA were identified. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that many of the pathway genes are preferentially expressed in the glands. Hexanoyl-CoA, one of the metabolites required for THCA synthesis, could be made via either de novo fatty acids synthesis or via the breakdown of existing lipids. qPCR analysis supported the de novo pathway. Many of the ESTs encode transcription factors and two putative MYB genes were identified that were preferentially expressed in glands. Given the similarity of the Cannabis MYB genes to those in other species with known functions, these Cannabis MYBs may play roles in regulating gland development and THCA synthesis. Three candidates for the polyketide synthase (PKS) gene responsible for the first committed step in the pathway to THCA were characterized in more detail. One of these was identical to a previously reported chalcone synthase (CHS) and was found to have CHS activity. All three could use malonyl-CoA and hexanoyl-CoA as substrates, including the CHS, but reaction conditions were not identified that allowed for the production of olivetolic acid (the proposed product of the PKS activity needed for THCA synthesis). One of the PKS candidates was highly and specifically expressed in glands (relative to whole leaves) and, on the basis of these expression data, it is proposed to be the most likely PKS responsible for olivetolic acid synthesis in Cannabis glands. PMID:19581347

  20. Identification of a strawberry flavor gene candidate using an integrated genetic-genomic-analytical chemistry approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is interest in improving the flavor of commercial strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) varieties. Fruit flavor is shaped by combinations of sugars, acids and volatile compounds. Many efforts seek to use genomics-based strategies to identify genes controlling flavor, and then designing durable molecular markers to follow these genes in breeding populations. In this report, fruit from two cultivars, varying for presence-absence of volatile compounds, along with segregating progeny, were analyzed using GC/MS and RNAseq. Expression data were bulked in silico according to presence/absence of a given volatile compound, in this case γ-decalactone, a compound conferring a peach flavor note to fruits. Results Computationally sorting reads in segregating progeny based on γ-decalactone presence eliminated transcripts not directly relevant to the volatile, revealing transcripts possibly imparting quantitative contributions. One candidate encodes an omega-6 fatty acid desaturase, an enzyme known to participate in lactone production in fungi, noted here as FaFAD1. This candidate was induced by ripening, was detected in certain harvests, and correlated with γ-decalactone presence. The FaFAD1 gene is present in every genotype where γ-decalactone has been detected, and it was invariably missing in non-producers. A functional, PCR-based molecular marker was developed that cosegregates with the phenotype in F1 and BC1 populations, as well as in many other cultivars and wild Fragaria accessions. Conclusions Genetic, genomic and analytical chemistry techniques were combined to identify FaFAD1, a gene likely controlling a key flavor volatile in strawberry. The same data may now be re-sorted based on presence/absence of any other volatile to identify other flavor-affecting candidates, leading to rapid generation of gene-specific markers. PMID:24742080

  1. Candidate gene analysis of GH1 for effects on growth and carcass composition of cattle.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J F; Coutinho, L L; Herring, K L; Gallagher, D S; Brenneman, R A; Burney, N; Sanders, J O; Turner, J W; Smith, S B; Miller, R K; Savell, J W; Davis, S K

    1998-06-01

    We present an approach to evaluate the support for candidate genes as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) within the context of genome-wide map-based cloning strategies. To establish candidacy, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone containing a putative candidate gene is physically assigned to an anchored linkage map to localise the gene relative to an identified QTL effect. Microsatellite loci derived from BAC clones containing an established candidate gene are integrated into the linkage map facilitating the evaluation by interval analysis of the statistical support for QTL identity. Permutation analysis is employed to determine experiment-wise statistical support. The approach is illustrated for the growth hormone 1 (GH1) gene and growth and carcass phenotypes in cattle. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers which amplify a 441 bp fragment of GH1 were used to systematically screen a bovine BAC library comprising 60,000 clones and with a 95% probability of containing a single copy sequence. The presence of GH1 in BAC-110R2C3 was confirmed by sequence analysis of the PCR product from this clone and by the physical assignment of BAC110R2C3 to bovine chromosome 19 (BTA19) band 22 by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). Microsatellite KHGH1 was isolated from BAC110R2C3 and scored in 529 reciprocal backcross and F2 fullsib progeny from 41 resource families derived from Angus (Bos taurus) and Brahman (Bos indicus). The microsatellite KHGH1 was incorporated into a framework genetic map of BTA19 comprising 12 microsatellite loci, the erythrocyte antigen T and a GH1-TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Interval analysis localised effects of taurus vs. indicus alleles on subcutaneous fat and the percentage of either extractable fat from the Iongissimus dorsi muscle to the region of BTA19 harbouring GH1.

  2. Characterization of candidate genes in inflammatory bowel disease-associated risk loci.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, Joanna M; Goel, Gautam; Kong, Lingjia; Huang, Hailiang; Haritunians, Talin; Sartor, R Balfour; Daly, Mark J; Newberry, Rodney D; McGovern, Dermot P; Yajnik, Vijay; Lira, Sergio A; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-01-01

    GWAS have linked SNPs to risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but a systematic characterization of disease-associated genes has been lacking. Prior studies utilized microarrays that did not capture many genes encoded within risk loci or defined expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) using peripheral blood, which is not the target tissue in IBD. To address these gaps, we sought to characterize the expression of IBD-associated risk genes in disease-relevant tissues and in the setting of active IBD. Terminal ileal (TI) and colonic mucosal tissues were obtained from patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis and from healthy controls. We developed a NanoString code set to profile 678 genes within IBD risk loci. A subset of patients and controls were genotyped for IBD-associated risk SNPs. Analyses included differential expression and variance analysis, weighted gene coexpression network analysis, and eQTL analysis. We identified 116 genes that discriminate between healthy TI and colon samples and uncovered patterns in variance of gene expression that highlight heterogeneity of disease. We identified 107 coexpressed gene pairs for which transcriptional regulation is either conserved or reversed in an inflammation-independent or -dependent manner. We demonstrate that on average approximately 60% of disease-associated genes are differentially expressed in inflamed tissue. Last, we identified eQTLs with either genotype-only effects on expression or an interaction effect between genotype and inflammation. Our data reinforce tissue specificity of expression in disease-associated candidate genes, highlight genes and gene pairs that are regulated in disease-relevant tissue and inflammation, and provide a foundation to advance the understanding of IBD pathogenesis. PMID:27668286

  3. Characterization of candidate genes in inflammatory bowel disease–associated risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Peloquin, Joanna M.; Sartor, R. Balfour; Newberry, Rodney D.; McGovern, Dermot P.; Yajnik, Vijay; Lira, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    GWAS have linked SNPs to risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but a systematic characterization of disease-associated genes has been lacking. Prior studies utilized microarrays that did not capture many genes encoded within risk loci or defined expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) using peripheral blood, which is not the target tissue in IBD. To address these gaps, we sought to characterize the expression of IBD-associated risk genes in disease-relevant tissues and in the setting of active IBD. Terminal ileal (TI) and colonic mucosal tissues were obtained from patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis and from healthy controls. We developed a NanoString code set to profile 678 genes within IBD risk loci. A subset of patients and controls were genotyped for IBD-associated risk SNPs. Analyses included differential expression and variance analysis, weighted gene coexpression network analysis, and eQTL analysis. We identified 116 genes that discriminate between healthy TI and colon samples and uncovered patterns in variance of gene expression that highlight heterogeneity of disease. We identified 107 coexpressed gene pairs for which transcriptional regulation is either conserved or reversed in an inflammation-independent or -dependent manner. We demonstrate that on average approximately 60% of disease-associated genes are differentially expressed in inflamed tissue. Last, we identified eQTLs with either genotype-only effects on expression or an interaction effect between genotype and inflammation. Our data reinforce tissue specificity of expression in disease-associated candidate genes, highlight genes and gene pairs that are regulated in disease-relevant tissue and inflammation, and provide a foundation to advance the understanding of IBD pathogenesis. PMID:27668286

  4. Gene-level integrated metric of negative selection (GIMS) prioritizes candidate genes for nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Matthew G; Gillies, Christopher E; Ju, Wenjun; Kretzler, Matthias; Kang, Hyun Min

    2013-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) gene discovery efforts are now occurring in small kindreds and cohorts of sporadic cases. Power to identify causal variants in these groups beyond a statistical significance threshold is challenging due to small sample size and/or lack of family information. There is a need to develop novel methods to identify NS-associated variants. One way to determine putative functional relevance of a gene is to measure its strength of negative selection, as variants in genes under strong negative selection are more likely to be deleterious. We created a gene-level, integrated metric of negative selection (GIMS) score for 20,079 genes by combining multiple comparative genomics and population genetics measures. To understand the utility of GIMS for NS gene discovery, we examined this score in a diverse set of NS-relevant gene sets. These included genes known to cause monogenic forms of NS in humans as well as genes expressed in the cells of the glomerulus and, particularly, the podocyte. We found strong negative selection in the following NS-relevant gene sets: (1) autosomal-dominant Mendelian focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) genes (p = 0.03 compared to reference), (2) glomerular expressed genes (p = 4×10(-23)), and (3) predicted podocyte genes (p = 3×10(-9)). Eight genes causing autosomal dominant forms of FSGS had a stronger combined score of negative selection and podocyte enrichment as compared to all other genes (p = 1 x 10(-3)). As a whole, recessive FSGS genes were not enriched for negative selection. Thus, we also created a transcript-level, integrated metric of negative selection (TIMS) to quantify negative selection on an isoform level. These revealed transcripts of known autosomal recessive disease-causing genes that were nonetheless under strong selection. We suggest that a filtering strategy that includes measuring negative selection on a gene or isoform level could aid in identifying NS-related genes. Our GIMS and TIMS scores are

  5. Gallus gallus orthologous to human alpha-dystroglycanopathies candidate genes: Gene expression and characterization during chicken embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Lahuerta, Adriana; de Luis, Oscar; Gómez-Esquer, Francisco; Cruces, Jesús; Coloma, Antonio

    2016-09-23

    Alpha-dystroglycanopathies are a heterogenic group of human rare diseases that have in common defects of α-dystroglycan O-glycosylation. These congenital disorders share common features as muscular dystrophy, malformations on central nervous system and more rarely altered ocular development, as well as mutations on a set of candidate genes involved on those syndromes. Severity of the syndromes is variable, appearing Walker-Warburg as the most severe where mutations at protein O-mannosyl transferases POMT1 and POMT2 genes are frequently described. When studying the lack of MmPomt1 in mouse embryonic development, as a murine model of Walker-Warburg syndrome, MmPomt1 null phenotype was lethal because Reitchert's membrane fails during embryonic development. Here, we report gene expression from Gallus gallus orthologous genes to human candidates on alpha-dystroglycanopathies POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, FKTN, FKRP and LARGE, making special emphasis in expression and localization of GgPomt1. Results obtained by quantitative RT-PCR, western-blot and immunochemistry revealed close gene expression patterns among human and chicken at key tissues affected during development when suffering an alpha-dystroglycanopathy, leading us to stand chicken as a useful animal model for molecular characterization of glycosyltransferases involved in the O-glycosylation of α-Dystroglycan and its role in embryonic development.

  6. Gallus gallus orthologous to human alpha-dystroglycanopathies candidate genes: Gene expression and characterization during chicken embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Lahuerta, Adriana; de Luis, Oscar; Gómez-Esquer, Francisco; Cruces, Jesús; Coloma, Antonio

    2016-09-23

    Alpha-dystroglycanopathies are a heterogenic group of human rare diseases that have in common defects of α-dystroglycan O-glycosylation. These congenital disorders share common features as muscular dystrophy, malformations on central nervous system and more rarely altered ocular development, as well as mutations on a set of candidate genes involved on those syndromes. Severity of the syndromes is variable, appearing Walker-Warburg as the most severe where mutations at protein O-mannosyl transferases POMT1 and POMT2 genes are frequently described. When studying the lack of MmPomt1 in mouse embryonic development, as a murine model of Walker-Warburg syndrome, MmPomt1 null phenotype was lethal because Reitchert's membrane fails during embryonic development. Here, we report gene expression from Gallus gallus orthologous genes to human candidates on alpha-dystroglycanopathies POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, FKTN, FKRP and LARGE, making special emphasis in expression and localization of GgPomt1. Results obtained by quantitative RT-PCR, western-blot and immunochemistry revealed close gene expression patterns among human and chicken at key tissues affected during development when suffering an alpha-dystroglycanopathy, leading us to stand chicken as a useful animal model for molecular characterization of glycosyltransferases involved in the O-glycosylation of α-Dystroglycan and its role in embryonic development. PMID:27553274

  7. Complex repetitive arrangements of gene sequence in the candidate region of the spinal muscular atrophy gene in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Theodosiou, A.M.; Nesbit, A.M.; Daniels, R.J.; Campbell, L.; Francis, M.J.; Christodoulou, Z.; Morrison, K.E.; Davies, K.E. |

    1994-12-01

    Childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a heritable neurological disorder, which has been mapped by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 5q13, in the interval between markers D5S435 and D5S557. Here, we present gene sequences that have been isolated from this interval, several of which show sequence homologies to exons of {beta}-glucuronidase. These gene sequences are repeated several times across the candidate region and are also present on chromosome 5p. The arrangement of these repetitive gene motifs is polymorphic between individuals. The high degree of variability observed may have some influence on the expression of the genes in the region. Since SMA is not inherited as a classical autosomal recessive disease, novel genomic rearrangements arising from aberrant recombination events between the complex repeats may be associated with the phenotype observed.

  8. Selection in the dopamine receptor 2 gene: a candidate SNP study

    PubMed Central

    Fieder, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine is a major neurotransmitter in the human brain and is associated with various diseases. Schizophrenia, for example, is treated by blocking the dopamine receptors type 2. Shaner, Miller & Mintz (2004) stated that schizophrenia was the low fitness variant of a highly variable mental trait. We therefore explore whether the dopamine receptor 2 gene (DRD2) underwent any selection processes. We acquired genotype data of the 1,000 Genomes project (phase I), which contains 1,093 individuals from 14 populations. We included single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with two minor allele frequencies (MAFs) in the analysis: MAF over 0.05 and over 0.01. This is equivalent to 151 SNPs (MAF > 0.05) and 246 SNPs (MAF > 0.01) for DRD2. We used two different approaches (an outlier approach and a Bayesian approach) to detect loci under selection. The combined results of both approaches yielded nine (MAF > 0.05) and two candidate SNPs (MAF > 0.01), under balancing selection. We also found weak signs for directional selection on DRD2, but in our opinion these were too weak to draw any final conclusions on directional selection in DRD2. All candidates for balancing selection are in the intronic region of the gene and only one (rs12574471) has been mentioned in the literature. Two of our candidate SNPs are located in specific regions of the gene: rs80215768 lies within a promoter flanking region and rs74751335 lies within a transcription factor binding site. We strongly encourage research on our candidate SNPs and their possible effects. PMID:26290802

  9. The systematic functional characterisation of Xq28 genes prioritises candidate disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Mehrle, Alexander; Bechtel, Stephanie; Simpson, Jeremy C; Kioschis, Petra; Wiemann, Stefan; Wellenreuther, Ruth; Poustka, Annemarie

    2006-01-01

    Background Well known for its gene density and the large number of mapped diseases, the human sub-chromosomal region Xq28 has long been a focus of genome research. Over 40 of approximately 300 X-linked diseases map to this region, and systematic mapping, transcript identification, and mutation analysis has led to the identification of causative genes for 26 of these diseases, leaving another 17 diseases mapped to Xq28, where the causative gene is still unknown. To expedite disease gene identification, we have initiated the functional characterisation of all known Xq28 genes. Results By using a systematic approach, we describe the Xq28 genes by RNA in situ hybridisation and Northern blotting of the mouse orthologs, as well as subcellular localisation and data mining of the human genes. We have developed a relational web-accessible database with comprehensive query options integrating all experimental data. Using this database, we matched gene expression patterns with affected tissues for 16 of the 17 remaining Xq28 linked diseases, where the causative gene is unknown. Conclusion By using this systematic approach, we have prioritised genes in linkage regions of Xq28-mapped diseases to an amenable number for mutational screens. Our database can be queried by any researcher performing highly specified searches including diseases not listed in OMIM or diseases that might be linked to Xq28 in the future. PMID:16503986

  10. Ornithine decarboxylase gene is a positional candidate gene affecting growth and carcass traits in F₂ intercross chickens.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, Y; Sato, S; Ohtake, T; Sato, S; Okumura, Y; Kobayashi, E

    2011-01-01

    The ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene is a candidate gene for growth and carcass traits. It is located on chicken chromosome 3 in a region where QTL for growth and carcass traits have previously been detected in the F₂ population. The objectives of this study were to identify polymorphisms of the ODC gene in an F₂ resource population and to examine the effects of these ODC polymorphisms on growth and carcass traits. The F₂ resource population was obtained by crossing a Shamo male and White Plymouth Rock females. The F₂ population was then measured for growth and carcass traits and used for positional candidate gene analysis. A total of 6 novel SNP and a novel indel mutation were identified in the parental population. Three SNP (g.-638A>G, g.-465C>T, and g.-353C>T) and a 4-bp indel mutation (g.-633_-632ins) in the promoter region of the ODC gene were identified in the parental population, and 2 haplotypes composed of these mutations were segregated in the parental population. A QTL analysis was performed, and the QTL for some growth and carcass traits were detected at a significant level and on a similar position to the ODC gene. Significant associations were found between haplotypes in the promoter region of the ODC gene and these traits in the F₂ population, and the effect of haplotype on BW at 9 wk of age was the most significant. The haplotypes of the ODC gene found in this study might help in understanding the genetic structure of growth and carcass traits and in improving these traits directly by MAS. Therefore, further functional studies are necessary to evaluate the effects of promoter mutations at a molecular level. PMID:21177441

  11. Sequence variants in oxytocin pathway genes and preterm birth: a candidate gene association study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preterm birth (PTB) is a complex disorder associated with significant neonatal mortality and morbidity and long-term adverse health consequences. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that genetic factors play an important role in its etiology. This study was designed to identify genetic variation associated with PTB in oxytocin pathway genes whose role in parturition is well known. Methods To identify common genetic variants predisposing to PTB, we genotyped 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the oxytocin (OXT), oxytocin receptor (OXTR), and leucyl/cystinyl aminopeptidase (LNPEP) genes in 651 case infants from the U.S. and one or both of their parents. In addition, we examined the role of rare genetic variation in susceptibility to PTB by conducting direct sequence analysis of OXTR in 1394 cases and 1112 controls from the U.S., Argentina, Denmark, and Finland. This study was further extended to maternal triads (maternal grandparents-mother of a case infant, N=309). We also performed in vitro analysis of selected rare OXTR missense variants to evaluate their functional importance. Results Maternal genetic effect analysis of the SNP genotype data revealed four SNPs in LNPEP that show significant association with prematurity. In our case–control sequence analysis, we detected fourteen coding variants in exon 3 of OXTR, all but four of which were found in cases only. Of the fourteen variants, three were previously unreported novel rare variants. When the sequence data from the maternal triads were analyzed using the transmission disequilibrium test, two common missense SNPs (rs4686302 and rs237902) in OXTR showed suggestive association for three gestational age subgroups. In vitro functional assays showed a significant difference in ligand binding between wild-type and two mutant receptors. Conclusions Our study suggests an association between maternal common polymorphisms in LNPEP and susceptibility to PTB. Maternal OXTR missense SNPs rs4686302

  12. The human homolog of a candidate mouse t complex responder gene: conserved motifs and evolution with punctuated equilibria.

    PubMed

    Islam, S D; Pilder, S H; Decker, C L; Cebra-Thomas, J A; Silver, L M

    1993-12-01

    The mouse Tcp-10 gene has been established as a molecular candidate for the t complex responder locus which plays a central role in the transmission ratio distortion phenotype expressed by males heterozygous for a t haplotype. Here we describe a comparison of the mouse and human TCP10 coding sequences. The results show that whole exons have been added or eliminated from the transcripts expressed in each species, suggesting an evolutionary process of punctuated equilibria for this gene. Two of the polypeptide regions that are most conserved between the two species contain specific peptide motifs. The conserved C-terminal region contains a unique nonapeptide repeat of unknown function and the conserved N-terminal region contains a pair of leucine zippers within a region that shows additional similarity to the coiled-coil regions of various cytosolic polypeptides. These results are discussed in terms of the possible function of the TCP10 protein.

  13. Fine mapping and candidate gene analysis of the nuclear restorer gene Rfp for pol CMS in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Liu, Pingwu; Long, Furong; Hong, Dengfeng; He, Qingbiao; Yang, Guangsheng

    2012-08-01

    The Polima (pol) system of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in rapeseed is widely used in China for commercial hybrid seed production. Genetic studies have shown that its fertility restorer gene (Rfp) is monogenic dominant. For fine mapping of the Rfp gene, a near isogenic line comprising 3,662 individuals of BC(14)F(1) generation segregating for the Rfp gene was created. Based on the sequences of two SCAR markers, SCAP0612ST and SCAP0612EM2, developed by Zhao et al. (Genes Genom 30(3):191-196, 2008) and the synteny region of Brassica napus and other Brassica species, 13 markers strongly linked with the Rfp gene were identified. By integrating three of these markers to the published linkage map, the Rfp gene was mapped on linkage group N9 of B. napus. Using these markers, the Rfp locus was narrowed down to a 29.2-kb genomic region of Brassica rapa. Seven open reading frames (ORFs) were predicted in the target region, of these, ORF2, encoding a PPR protein, was the most likely candidate gene of Rfp. These results lay a solid foundation for map-based cloning of the Rfp gene and will be helpful for marker-assisted selection of elite CMS restorer lines.

  14. Additive functions in boolean models of gene regulatory network modules.

    PubMed

    Darabos, Christian; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Tomassini, Marco; Moore, Jason H; Provero, Paolo; Giacobini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Gene-on-gene regulations are key components of every living organism. Dynamical abstract models of genetic regulatory networks help explain the genome's evolvability and robustness. These properties can be attributed to the structural topology of the graph formed by genes, as vertices, and regulatory interactions, as edges. Moreover, the actual gene interaction of each gene is believed to play a key role in the stability of the structure. With advances in biology, some effort was deployed to develop update functions in boolean models that include recent knowledge. We combine real-life gene interaction networks with novel update functions in a boolean model. We use two sub-networks of biological organisms, the yeast cell-cycle and the mouse embryonic stem cell, as topological support for our system. On these structures, we substitute the original random update functions by a novel threshold-based dynamic function in which the promoting and repressing effect of each interaction is considered. We use a third real-life regulatory network, along with its inferred boolean update functions to validate the proposed update function. Results of this validation hint to increased biological plausibility of the threshold-based function. To investigate the dynamical behavior of this new model, we visualized the phase transition between order and chaos into the critical regime using Derrida plots. We complement the qualitative nature of Derrida plots with an alternative measure, the criticality distance, that also allows to discriminate between regimes in a quantitative way. Simulation on both real-life genetic regulatory networks show that there exists a set of parameters that allows the systems to operate in the critical region. This new model includes experimentally derived biological information and recent discoveries, which makes it potentially useful to guide experimental research. The update function confers additional realism to the model, while reducing the complexity

  15. Additive Functions in Boolean Models of Gene Regulatory Network Modules

    PubMed Central

    Darabos, Christian; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Tomassini, Marco; Moore, Jason H.; Provero, Paolo; Giacobini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Gene-on-gene regulations are key components of every living organism. Dynamical abstract models of genetic regulatory networks help explain the genome's evolvability and robustness. These properties can be attributed to the structural topology of the graph formed by genes, as vertices, and regulatory interactions, as edges. Moreover, the actual gene interaction of each gene is believed to play a key role in the stability of the structure. With advances in biology, some effort was deployed to develop update functions in Boolean models that include recent knowledge. We combine real-life gene interaction networks with novel update functions in a Boolean model. We use two sub-networks of biological organisms, the yeast cell-cycle and the mouse embryonic stem cell, as topological support for our system. On these structures, we substitute the original random update functions by a novel threshold-based dynamic function in which the promoting and repressing effect of each interaction is considered. We use a third real-life regulatory network, along with its inferred Boolean update functions to validate the proposed update function. Results of this validation hint to increased biological plausibility of the threshold-based function. To investigate the dynamical behavior of this new model, we visualized the phase transition between order and chaos into the critical regime using Derrida plots. We complement the qualitative nature of Derrida plots with an alternative measure, the criticality distance, that also allows to discriminate between regimes in a quantitative way. Simulation on both real-life genetic regulatory networks show that there exists a set of parameters that allows the systems to operate in the critical region. This new model includes experimentally derived biological information and recent discoveries, which makes it potentially useful to guide experimental research. The update function confers additional realism to the model, while reducing the complexity

  16. Identification of the novel candidate genes and variants in boar liver tissues with divergent skatole levels using RNA deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Asep; Sahadevan, Sudeep; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Neuhoff, Christiane; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Frieden, Luc; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Looft, Christian; Wondim, Dessie Salilew; Hölker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim

    2013-01-01

    Boar taint is the unpleasant odour of meat derived from non-castrated male pigs, caused by the accumulation of androstenone and skatole in fat. Skatole is a tryptophan metabolite produced by intestinal bacteria in gut and catabolised in liver. Since boar taint affects consumer's preference, the aim of this study was to perform transcriptome profiling in liver of boars with divergent skatole levels in backfat by using RNA-Seq. The total number of reads produced for each liver sample ranged from 11.8 to 39.0 million. Approximately 448 genes were differentially regulated (p-adjusted <0.05). Among them, 383 genes were up-regulated in higher skatole group and 65 were down-regulated (p<0.01, FC>1.5). Differentially regulated genes in the high skatole liver samples were enriched in metabolic processes such as small molecule biochemistry, protein synthesis, lipid and amino acid metabolism. Pathway analysis identified the remodeling of epithelial adherens junction and TCA cycle as the most dominant pathways which may play important roles in skatole metabolism. Differential gene expression analysis identified candidate genes in ATP synthesis, cytochrome P450, keratin, phosphoglucomutase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and solute carrier family. Additionally, polymorphism and association analysis revealed that mutations in ATP5B, KRT8, PGM1, SLC22A7 and IDH1 genes could be potential markers for skatole levels in boars. Furthermore, expression analysis of exon usage of three genes (ATP5B, KRT8 and PGM1) revealed significant differential expression of exons of these genes in different skatole levels. These polymorphisms and exon expression differences may have impacts on the gene activity ultimately leading to skatole variation and could be used as genetic marker for boar taint related traits. However, further validation is required to confirm the effect of these genetic markers in other pig populations in order to be used in genomic selection against boar taint in pig breeding

  17. Identification of the Novel Candidate Genes and Variants in Boar Liver Tissues with Divergent Skatole Levels Using RNA Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gunawan, Asep; Sahadevan, Sudeep; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Neuhoff, Christiane; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Frieden, Luc; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Looft, Christian; Wondim, Dessie Salilew; Hölker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim

    2013-01-01

    Boar taint is the unpleasant odour of meat derived from non-castrated male pigs, caused by the accumulation of androstenone and skatole in fat. Skatole is a tryptophan metabolite produced by intestinal bacteria in gut and catabolised in liver. Since boar taint affects consumer’s preference, the aim of this study was to perform transcriptome profiling in liver of boars with divergent skatole levels in backfat by using RNA-Seq. The total number of reads produced for each liver sample ranged from 11.8 to 39.0 million. Approximately 448 genes were differentially regulated (p-adjusted <0.05). Among them, 383 genes were up-regulated in higher skatole group and 65 were down-regulated (p<0.01, FC>1.5). Differentially regulated genes in the high skatole liver samples were enriched in metabolic processes such as small molecule biochemistry, protein synthesis, lipid and amino acid metabolism. Pathway analysis identified the remodeling of epithelial adherens junction and TCA cycle as the most dominant pathways which may play important roles in skatole metabolism. Differential gene expression analysis identified candidate genes in ATP synthesis, cytochrome P450, keratin, phosphoglucomutase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and solute carrier family. Additionally, polymorphism and association analysis revealed that mutations in ATP5B, KRT8, PGM1, SLC22A7 and IDH1 genes could be potential markers for skatole levels in boars. Furthermore, expression analysis of exon usage of three genes (ATP5B, KRT8 and PGM1) revealed significant differential expression of exons of these genes in different skatole levels. These polymorphisms and exon expression differences may have impacts on the gene activity ultimately leading to skatole variation and could be used as genetic marker for boar taint related traits. However, further validation is required to confirm the effect of these genetic markers in other pig populations in order to be used in genomic selection against boar taint in pig breeding

  18. An integrated linkage map reveals candidate genes underlying adaptive variation in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    McKinney, G J; Seeb, L W; Larson, W A; Gomez-Uchida, D; Limborg, M T; Brieuc, M S O; Everett, M V; Naish, K A; Waples, R K; Seeb, J E

    2016-05-01

    Salmonids are an important cultural and ecological resource exhibiting near worldwide distribution between their native and introduced range. Previous research has generated linkage maps and genomic resources for several species as well as genome assemblies for two species. We first leveraged improvements in mapping and genotyping methods to create a dense linkage map for Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha by assembling family data from different sources. We successfully mapped 14 620 SNP loci including 2336 paralogs in subtelomeric regions. This improved map was then used as a foundation to integrate genomic resources for gene annotation and population genomic analyses. We anchored a total of 286 scaffolds from the Atlantic salmon genome to the linkage map to provide a framework for the placement 11 728 Chinook salmon ESTs. Previously identified thermotolerance QTL were found to colocalize with several candidate genes including HSP70, a gene known to be involved in thermal response, as well as its inhibitor. Multiple regions of the genome with elevated divergence between populations were also identified, and annotation of ESTs in these regions identified candidate genes for fitness related traits such as stress response, growth and behaviour. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of combining genomic resources with linkage maps to enhance evolutionary inferences. PMID:26490135

  19. DGAT1, a new positional and functional candidate gene for intramuscular fat deposition in cattle.

    PubMed

    Thaller, G; Kühn, C; Winter, A; Ewald, G; Bellmann, O; Wegner, J; Zühlke, H; Fries, R

    2003-10-01

    Intramuscular fat content, also assessed as marbling of meat, represents an important beef quality trait. Recent work has mapped a quantitative trait locus (QTL) with an effect on marbling to the centromeric region of bovine chromosome 14, with the gene encoding thyroglobulin (TG) being proposed as a positional and functional candidate gene for this QTL. Recently, the gene encoding diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase (DGAT1), which also has been mapped within the region of the marbling QTL, has been demonstrated to affect the fat content of milk. In the present study, the effects of a 5'-polymorphism of TG and of a lysine/alanine polymorphism of DGAT1 on the fat content of musculus (m.) semitendinosus and m. longissimus dorsi in 55 bovine animals (28 German Holstein and 27 Charolais) has been investigated. Significant effects were found for both candidate genes in both the breeds. These effects seem to be independent of one another because the alleles of the two polymorphisms showed no statistically significant disequilibrium. The DGAT1 effect is mainly on the m. semitendinosus. The TG polymorphism only affects m. longissimus dorsi. However, both intramuscular fat enhancing effects seem to be recessive. The possibility of two linked loci, acting recessively on intramuscular fat content, will require special strategies when selecting for higher marbling scores. PMID:14510671

  20. Candidate genes of Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia: current evidence and research

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Giada; Sacco, Antonio; Kumar, Shaji; Rossi, Giuseppe; Ghobrial, Irene; Roccaro, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM) is a relatively uncommon, indolent malignancy of immunoglobulin M-producing B cells. The World Health Organization classifies it as a lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and patients typically present with anemia, hepatosplenomegaly and diffuse lymphadenopathies. Historically, the genetic characterization of the disease has been hampered by the relatively low proliferative rate of WM cells, thus making karyotyping challenging. The use of novel technologies such as fluorescence in situ hybridization, gene array, and whole genome sequencing has contributed greatly to establishing candidate genes in the pathophysiology of WM and to identifying potential treatment targets, such as L265P MYD88. The discovery of microRNAs and the recognition of epigenetics as a major modulatory mechanism of oncogene expression and/or oncosuppressor silencing have aided in further understanding the pathogenesis of WM. Once thought to closely resemble multiple myeloma, a cancer of terminally differentiated, immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells, WM appears to genetically cluster with other indolent B-cell lymphomas such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small cell lymphoma. The relative high incidence of familial cases of WM and other B-cell malignancies has been helpful in identifying high-risk gene candidates. In this review, we focus on the established genes involved in the pathogenesis of WM, with special emphasis on the key role of derangement of the nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway and epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:23935380

  1. Microbial Dark Matter: Unusual intervening sequences in 16S rRNA genes of candidate phyla from the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Jarett, Jessica; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Kieft, Thomas; Onstott, Tullis; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The Microbial Dark Matter project has sequenced genomes from over 200 single cells from candidate phyla, greatly expanding our knowledge of the ecology, inferred metabolism, and evolution of these widely distributed, yet poorly understood lineages. The second phase of this project aims to sequence an additional 800 single cells from known as well as potentially novel candidate phyla derived from a variety of environments. In order to identify whole genome amplified single cells, screening based on phylogenetic placement of 16S rRNA gene sequences is being conducted. Briefly, derived 16S rRNA gene sequences are aligned to a custom version of the Greengenes reference database and added to a reference tree in ARB using parsimony. In multiple samples from deep subsurface habitats but not from other habitats, a large number of sequences proved difficult to align and therefore to place in the tree. Based on comparisons to reference sequences and structural alignments using SSU-ALIGN, many of these ?difficult? sequences appear to originate from candidate phyla, and contain intervening sequences (IVSs) within the 16S rRNA genes. These IVSs are short (39 - 79 nt) and do not appear to be self-splicing or to contain open reading frames. IVSs were found in the loop regions of stem-loop structures in several different taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic placement of sequences is strongly affected by IVSs; two out of three groups investigated were classified as different phyla after their removal. Based on data from samples screened in this project, IVSs appear to be more common in microbes occurring in deep subsurface habitats, although the reasons for this remain elusive.

  2. Protein expression analysis of chromosome 12 candidate genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

    PubMed

    Winkler, D; Schneider, C; Kröber, A; Pasqualucci, L; Lichter, P; Döhner, H; Stilgenbauer, S

    2005-07-01

    The pathogenic role of trisomy 12 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains unresolved, but recently an upregulated RNA expression level has been observed for chromosome 12 candidate genes. In the current study, the protein expression of chromosome 12 candidate genes was characterized by comparing CLL cases with (n=58) or without (n=16) trisomy 12, CD19+-B-cells and cell lines (JVM-2, EHEB, JURKAT). Immunoblotting was performed to quantify the levels of AID, APAF-1, ARF3, CCND2, CDK2, CKD4, GLI, MDM-2, p27, Smac/DIABLO and STAT6 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 6). The cell lines showed distinct expression patterns for CCND2, MDM-2, p27, Smac/DIABLO and STAT6, and displayed higher levels of CDK2 and CDK4 than the CLL cases. JURKAT and the CLL cases expressed uniformly high levels of p27, but low levels of CCND2. AID expression in the CLL cases was weak with slight variations regardless of the subgroup affiliation. The expression of the investigated proteins was independent of the trisomy 12 status as well as of the VH mutation status. The comparison of CD19+-B-cells with CLL revealed higher protein levels in CLL for CDK4, p27, Smac/DIABLO and STAT6. Further studies including protein expression experiments in genetic high-risk subgroups of CLL have to elucidate whether these proteins qualify as candidates for targeted CLL therapies. PMID:15902296

  3. Whole Exome Sequencing in Females with Autism Implicates Novel and Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G.; Rafi, Syed K.; Hossain, Waheeda; Stephan, Dietrich A.; Manzardo, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Classical autism or autistic disorder belongs to a group of genetically heterogeneous conditions known as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Heritability is estimated as high as 90% for ASD with a recently reported compilation of 629 clinically relevant candidate and known genes. We chose to undertake a descriptive next generation whole exome sequencing case study of 30 well-characterized Caucasian females with autism (average age, 7.7 ± 2.6 years; age range, 5 to 16 years) from multiplex families. Genomic DNA was used for whole exome sequencing via paired-end next generation sequencing approach and X chromosome inactivation status. The list of putative disease causing genes was developed from primary selection criteria using machine learning-derived classification score and other predictive parameters (GERP2, PolyPhen2, and SIFT). We narrowed the variant list to 10 to 20 genes and screened for biological significance including neural development, function and known neurological disorders. Seventy-eight genes identified met selection criteria ranging from 1 to 9 filtered variants per female. Five females presented with functional variants of X-linked genes (IL1RAPL1, PIR, GABRQ, GPRASP2, SYTL4) with cadherin, protocadherin and ankyrin repeat gene families most commonly altered (e.g., CDH6, FAT2, PCDH8, CTNNA3, ANKRD11). Other genes related to neurogenesis and neuronal migration (e.g., SEMA3F, MIDN), were also identified. PMID:25574603

  4. Candidate Resistant Genes of Sand Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) to Alternaria alternata Revealed by Transcriptome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoping; Hu, Hongju; Yu, Dazhao; Sun, Zhonghai; He, Xiujuan; Zhang, Jingguo; Chen, Qiliang; Tian, Rui; Fan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Pear black spot (PBS) disease, which is caused by Alternaria alternata (Aa), is one of the most serious diseases affecting sand pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) cultivation worldwide. To investigate the defense mechanisms of sand pear in response to Aa, the transcriptome of a sand pear germplasm with differential resistance to Aa was analyzed using Illumina paired-end sequencing. Four libraries derived from PBS-resistant and PBS-susceptible sand pear leaves were characterized through inoculation or mock-inoculation. In total, 20.5 Gbp of sequence data and 101,632,565 reads were generated, representing 44717 genes. Approximately 66% of the genes or sequenced reads could be aligned to the pear reference genome. A large number (5213) of differentially expressed genes related to PBS resistance were obtained; 34 microsatellites were detected in these genes, and 28 genes were found to be closely related to PBS resistance. Using a transcriptome analysis in response to PBS inoculation and comparison analysis to the PHI database, 4 genes (Pbr039001, Pbr001627, Pbr025080 and Pbr023112) were considered to be promising candidates for sand pear resistance to PBS. This study provides insight into changes in the transcriptome of sand pear in response to PBS infection, and the findings have improved our understanding of the resistance mechanism of sand pear to PBS and will facilitate future gene discovery and functional genome studies of sand pear.

  5. Candidate Resistant Genes of Sand Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) to Alternaria alternata Revealed by Transcriptome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoping; Hu, Hongju; Yu, Dazhao; Sun, Zhonghai; He, Xiujuan; Zhang, Jingguo; Chen, Qiliang; Tian, Rui; Fan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Pear black spot (PBS) disease, which is caused by Alternaria alternata (Aa), is one of the most serious diseases affecting sand pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) cultivation worldwide. To investigate the defense mechanisms of sand pear in response to Aa, the transcriptome of a sand pear germplasm with differential resistance to Aa was analyzed using Illumina paired-end sequencing. Four libraries derived from PBS-resistant and PBS-susceptible sand pear leaves were characterized through inoculation or mock-inoculation. In total, 20.5 Gbp of sequence data and 101,632,565 reads were generated, representing 44717 genes. Approximately 66% of the genes or sequenced reads could be aligned to the pear reference genome. A large number (5213) of differentially expressed genes related to PBS resistance were obtained; 34 microsatellites were detected in these genes, and 28 genes were found to be closely related to PBS resistance. Using a transcriptome analysis in response to PBS inoculation and comparison analysis to the PHI database, 4 genes (Pbr039001, Pbr001627, Pbr025080 and Pbr023112) were considered to be promising candidates for sand pear resistance to PBS. This study provides insight into changes in the transcriptome of sand pear in response to PBS infection, and the findings have improved our understanding of the resistance mechanism of sand pear to PBS and will facilitate future gene discovery and functional genome studies of sand pear. PMID:26292286

  6. Fine Mapping of Two Additive Effect Genes for Awn Development in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinjie; Yao, Guoxin; Pan, Huiqiao; Hu, Guanglong; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Zichao

    2016-01-01

    Awns, important domestication and agronomic traits in rice (Oryza sativa L.), are conferred by polygenes and the environment. Near isogenic line (NIL) pairs BM33 and BM38 were constructed from crosses between awnless japonica cv Nipponbare as recurrent parent, and lines SLG or Funingxiaohongmang (awned japonica accessions), respectively, as donors. In order to study the genetic and molecular mechanism of awning, two unknown, independent genes with additive effects were identified in a cross between the NILs. To map and clone the two genes, a BC4F4 population of 8,103 individuals and a BC4F6 population of 11,206 individuals were constructed. Awn3-1 was fine mapped to a 101.13 kb genomic region between Indel marker In316 and SNP marker S9-1 on chromosome 3. Nine predicted genes in the interval were annotated in the Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB), and Os03g0418600 was identified as the most likely candidate for Awn3-1 through sequence comparisons and RT-PCR assays. Awn4-2 was fine mapped to a 62.4 kb genomic region flanked by simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker M1126 and Indel maker In73 on chromosome 4L. This region contained the previously reported gene An-1 that regulates awn development. Thus, An-1 may be the candidate gene of Awn4-2. These results will facilitate cloning of the awn genes and thereby provide an understanding of the molecular basis of awn development. PMID:27494628

  7. Fine Mapping of Two Additive Effect Genes for Awn Development in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Ben; Zhang, Yanpei; Li, Jinjie; Yao, Guoxin; Pan, Huiqiao; Hu, Guanglong; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Zichao

    2016-01-01

    Awns, important domestication and agronomic traits in rice (Oryza sativa L.), are conferred by polygenes and the environment. Near isogenic line (NIL) pairs BM33 and BM38 were constructed from crosses between awnless japonica cv Nipponbare as recurrent parent, and lines SLG or Funingxiaohongmang (awned japonica accessions), respectively, as donors. In order to study the genetic and molecular mechanism of awning, two unknown, independent genes with additive effects were identified in a cross between the NILs. To map and clone the two genes, a BC4F4 population of 8,103 individuals and a BC4F6 population of 11,206 individuals were constructed. Awn3-1 was fine mapped to a 101.13 kb genomic region between Indel marker In316 and SNP marker S9-1 on chromosome 3. Nine predicted genes in the interval were annotated in the Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB), and Os03g0418600 was identified as the most likely candidate for Awn3-1 through sequence comparisons and RT-PCR assays. Awn4-2 was fine mapped to a 62.4 kb genomic region flanked by simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker M1126 and Indel maker In73 on chromosome 4L. This region contained the previously reported gene An-1 that regulates awn development. Thus, An-1 may be the candidate gene of Awn4-2. These results will facilitate cloning of the awn genes and thereby provide an understanding of the molecular basis of awn development. PMID:27494628

  8. Association between Variants in Atopy-Related Immunologic Candidate Genes and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cotterchio, Michelle; Lowcock, Elizabeth; Bider-Canfield, Zoe; Lemire, Mathieu; Greenwood, Celia; Gallinger, Steven; Hudson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Many epidemiology studies report that atopic conditions such as allergies are associated with reduced pancreas cancer risk. The reason for this relationship is not yet understood. This is the first study to comprehensively evaluate the association between variants in atopy-related candidate genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Methods A population-based case-control study of pancreas cancer cases diagnosed during 2011-2012 (via Ontario Cancer Registry), and controls recruited using random digit dialing utilized DNA from 179 cases and 566 controls. Following an exhaustive literature review, SNPs in 180 candidate genes were pre-screened using dbGaP pancreas cancer GWAS data; 147 SNPs in 56 allergy-related immunologic genes were retained and genotyped. Logistic regression was used to estimate age-adjusted odd ratio (AOR) for each variant and false discovery rate was used to adjust Wald p-values for multiple testing. Subsequently, a risk allele score was derived based on statistically significant variants. Results 18 SNPs in 14 candidate genes (CSF2, DENND1B, DPP10, FLG, IL13, IL13RA2, LRP1B, NOD1, NPSR1, ORMDL3, RORA, STAT4, TLR6, TRA) were significantly associated with pancreas cancer risk. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, two LRP1B SNPs remained statistically significant; for example, LRP1B rs1449477 (AA vs. CC: AOR=0.37, 95% CI: 0.22-0.62; p (adjusted)=0.04). Furthermore, the risk allele score was associated with a significant reduction in pancreas cancer risk (p=0.0007). Conclusions Preliminary findings suggest certain atopy-related variants may be associated with pancreas cancer risk. Further studies are needed to replicate this, and to elucidate the biology behind the growing body of epidemiologic evidence suggesting allergies may reduce pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:25945796

  9. Root Transcriptome Analysis of Wild Peanut Reveals Candidate Genes for Nematode Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Patricia M.; Guimaraes, Larissa A.; Morgante, Carolina V.; Silva, Orzenil B.; Araujo, Ana Claudia G.; Martins, Andressa C. Q.; Saraiva, Mario A. P.; Oliveira, Thais N.; Togawa, Roberto C.; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C. M.; Bertioli, David J.; Brasileiro, Ana Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Wild peanut relatives (Arachis spp.) are genetically diverse and were adapted to a range of environments during the evolution course, constituting an important source of allele diversity for resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The wild diploid A. stenosperma harbors high levels of resistance to a variety of pathogens, including the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne arenaria, through the onset of the Hypersensitive Response (HR). In order to identify genes and regulators triggering this defense response, a comprehensive root transcriptome analysis during the first stages of this incompatible interaction was conducted using Illumina Hi-Seq. Overall, eight cDNA libraries were produced generating 28.2 GB, which were de novo assembled into 44,132 contigs and 37,882 loci. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified and clustered according to their expression profile, with the majority being downregulated at 6 DAI, which coincides with the onset of the HR. Amongst these DEGs, 27 were selected for further qRT-PCR validation allowing the identification of nematode-responsive candidate genes that are putatively related to the resistance response. Those candidates are engaged in the salycilic (NBS-LRR, lipocalins, resveratrol synthase) and jasmonic (patatin, allene oxidase cyclase) acids pathways, and also related to hormonal balance (auxin responsive protein, GH3) and cellular plasticity and signaling (tetraspanin, integrin, expansin), with some of them showing contrasting expression behavior between Arachis RKN-resistant and susceptible genotypes. As these candidate genes activate different defensive signaling systems, the genetic (HR) and the induced resistance (IR), their pyramidding in one genotype via molecular breeding or transgenic strategy might contribute to a more durable resistance, thus improving the long-term control of RKN in peanut. PMID:26488731

  10. Root Transcriptome Analysis of Wild Peanut Reveals Candidate Genes for Nematode Resistance.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Patricia M; Guimaraes, Larissa A; Morgante, Carolina V; Silva, Orzenil B; Araujo, Ana Claudia G; Martins, Andressa C Q; Saraiva, Mario A P; Oliveira, Thais N; Togawa, Roberto C; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C M; Bertioli, David J; Brasileiro, Ana Cristina M

    2015-01-01

    Wild peanut relatives (Arachis spp.) are genetically diverse and were adapted to a range of environments during the evolution course, constituting an important source of allele diversity for resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The wild diploid A. stenosperma harbors high levels of resistance to a variety of pathogens, including the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne arenaria, through the onset of the Hypersensitive Response (HR). In order to identify genes and regulators triggering this defense response, a comprehensive root transcriptome analysis during the first stages of this incompatible interaction was conducted using Illumina Hi-Seq. Overall, eight cDNA libraries were produced generating 28.2 GB, which were de novo assembled into 44,132 contigs and 37,882 loci. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified and clustered according to their expression profile, with the majority being downregulated at 6 DAI, which coincides with the onset of the HR. Amongst these DEGs, 27 were selected for further qRT-PCR validation allowing the identification of nematode-responsive candidate genes that are putatively related to the resistance response. Those candidates are engaged in the salycilic (NBS-LRR, lipocalins, resveratrol synthase) and jasmonic (patatin, allene oxidase cyclase) acids pathways, and also related to hormonal balance (auxin responsive protein, GH3) and cellular plasticity and signaling (tetraspanin, integrin, expansin), with some of them showing contrasting expression behavior between Arachis RKN-resistant and susceptible genotypes. As these candidate genes activate different defensive signaling systems, the genetic (HR) and the induced resistance (IR), their pyramidding in one genotype via molecular breeding or transgenic strategy might contribute to a more durable resistance, thus improving the long-term control of RKN in peanut. PMID:26488731

  11. Haplotype structure enables prioritization of common markers and candidate genes in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Vardarajan, B N; Eran, A; Jung, J-Y; Kunkel, L M; Wall, D P

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition that results in behavioral, social and communication impairments. ASD has a substantial genetic component, with 88–95% trait concordance among monozygotic twins. Efforts to elucidate the causes of ASD have uncovered hundreds of susceptibility loci and candidate genes. However, owing to its polygenic nature and clinical heterogeneity, only a few of these markers represent clear targets for further analyses. In the present study, we used the linkage structure associated with published genetic markers of ASD to simultaneously improve candidate gene detection while providing a means of prioritizing markers of common genetic variation in ASD. We first mined the literature for linkage and association studies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, copy-number variations and multi-allelic markers in Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) families. From markers that reached genome-wide significance, we calculated male-specific genetic distances, in light of the observed strong male bias in ASD. Four of 67 autism-implicated regions, 3p26.1, 3p26.3, 3q25-27 and 5p15, were enriched with differentially expressed genes in blood and brain from individuals with ASD. Of 30 genes differentially expressed across multiple expression data sets, 21 were within 10 cM of an autism-implicated locus. Among them, CNTN4, CADPS2, SUMF1, SLC9A9, NTRK3 have been previously implicated in autism, whereas others have been implicated in neurological disorders comorbid with ASD. This work leverages the rich multimodal genomic information collected on AGRE families to present an efficient integrative strategy for prioritizing autism candidates and improving our understanding of the relationships among the vast collection of past genetic studies. PMID:23715297

  12. Pharmacological Validation of Candidate Causal Sleep Genes Identified in an N2 Cross

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Joseph I.; Gotter, Anthony L.; Millstein, Joshua; Garson, Susan; Binns, Jacquelyn; Fox, Steven V.; Savitz, Alan T.; Yang, He S.; Fitzpatrick, Karrie; Zhou, Lili; Owens, Joseph R.; Webber, Andrea L.; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Kasarskis, Andrew; Uebele, Victor N.; Turek, Fred; Renger, John J.; Winrow, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the substantial impact of sleep disturbances on human health and the many years of study dedicated to understanding sleep pathologies, the underlying genetic mechanisms that govern sleep and wake largely remain unknown. Recently, we completed large scale genetic and gene expression analyses in a segregating inbred mouse cross and identified candidate causal genes that regulate the mammalian sleep-wake cycle, across multiple traits including total sleep time, amounts of REM, non-REM, sleep bout duration and sleep fragmentation. Here we describe a novel approach toward validating candidate causal genes, while also identifying potential targets for sleep-related indications. Select small molecule antagonists and agonists were used to interrogate candidate causal gene function in rodent sleep polysomnography assays to determine impact on overall sleep architecture and to evaluate alignment with associated sleep-wake traits. Significant effects on sleep architecture were observed in validation studies using compounds targeting the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 subunit (Chrm3)(wake promotion), nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha4 subunit (Chrna4)(wake promotion), dopamine receptor D5 subunit (Drd5)(sleep induction), serotonin 1D receptor (Htr1d)(altered REM fragmentation), glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (Glp1r)(light sleep promotion and reduction of deep sleep), and Calcium channel, voltage-dependent, T type, alpha 1I subunit (Cacna1i)(increased bout duration slow wave sleep). Taken together, these results show the complexity of genetic components that regulate sleep-wake traits and highlight the importance of evaluating this complex behavior at a systems level. Pharmacological validation of genetically identified putative targets provides a rapid alternative to generating knock out or transgenic animal models, and may ultimately lead towards new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:22091728

  13. Sequence Diversity in Coding Regions of Candidate Genes in the Glycoalkaloid Biosynthetic Pathway of Wild Potato Species

    PubMed Central

    Manrique-Carpintero, Norma C.; Tokuhisa, James G.; Ginzberg, Idit; Holliday, Jason A.; Veilleux, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Natural variation in five candidate genes of the steroidal glycoalkaloid (SGA) metabolic pathway and whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping were studied in six wild [Solanum chacoense (chc 80-1), S. commersonii, S. demissum, S. sparsipilum, S. spegazzinii, S. stoloniferum] and cultivated S. tuberosum Group Phureja (phu DH) potato species with contrasting levels of SGAs. Amplicons were sequenced for five candidate genes: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase 1 and 2 (HMG1, HMG2) and 2.3-squalene epoxidase (SQE) of primary metabolism, and solanidine galactosyltransferase (SGT1), and glucosyltransferase (SGT2) of secondary metabolism. SNPs (n = 337) producing 354 variations were detected within 3.7 kb of sequenced DNA. More polymorphisms were found in introns than exons and in genes of secondary compared to primary metabolism. Although no significant deviation from neutrality was found, dN/dS ratios < 1 and negative values of Tajima’s D test suggested purifying selection and genetic hitchhiking in the gene fragments. In addition, patterns of dN/dS ratios across the SGA pathway suggested constraint by natural selection. Comparison of nucleotide diversity estimates and dN/dS ratios showed stronger selective constraints for genes of primary rather than secondary metabolism. SNPs (n = 24) with an exclusive genotype for either phu DH (low SGA) or chc 80-1 (high SGA) were identified for HMG2, SQE, SGT1 and SGT2. The SolCAP 8303 Illumina Potato SNP chip genotyping revealed eight informative SNPs on six pseudochromosomes, with homozygous and heterozygous genotypes that discriminated high, intermediate and low levels of SGA accumulation. These results can be used to evaluate SGA accumulation in segregating or association mapping populations. PMID:23853090

  14. Semantic interrogation of a multi knowledge domain ontological model of tendinopathy identifies four strong candidate risk genes.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Colleen J; Jalali Sefid Dashti, Mahjoubeh; Gamieldien, Junaid

    2016-01-25

    Tendinopathy is a multifactorial syndrome characterised by tendon pain and thickening, and impaired performance during activity. Candidate gene association studies have identified genetic factors that contribute to intrinsic risk of developing tendinopathy upon exposure to extrinsic factors. Bioinformatics approaches that data-mine existing knowledge for biological relationships may assist with the identification of candidate genes. The aim of this study was to data-mine functional annotation of human genes and identify candidate genes by ontology-seeded queries capturing the features of tendinopathy. Our BioOntological Relationship Graph database (BORG) integrates multiple sources of genomic and biomedical knowledge into an on-disk semantic network where human genes and their orthologs in mouse and rat are central concepts mapped to ontology terms. The BORG was used to screen all human genes for potential links to tendinopathy. Following further prioritisation, four strong candidate genes (COL11A2, ELN, ITGB3, LOX) were identified. These genes are differentially expressed in tendinopathy, functionally linked to features of tendinopathy and previously implicated in other connective tissue diseases. In conclusion, cross-domain semantic integration of multiple sources of biomedical knowledge, and interrogation of phenotypes and gene functions associated with disease, may significantly increase the probability of identifying strong and unobvious candidate genes in genetic association studies.

  15. Semantic interrogation of a multi knowledge domain ontological model of tendinopathy identifies four strong candidate risk genes

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Colleen J.; Jalali Sefid Dashti, Mahjoubeh; Gamieldien, Junaid

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a multifactorial syndrome characterised by tendon pain and thickening, and impaired performance during activity. Candidate gene association studies have identified genetic factors that contribute to intrinsic risk of developing tendinopathy upon exposure to extrinsic factors. Bioinformatics approaches that data-mine existing knowledge for biological relationships may assist with the identification of candidate genes. The aim of this study was to data-mine functional annotation of human genes and identify candidate genes by ontology-seeded queries capturing the features of tendinopathy. Our BioOntological Relationship Graph database (BORG) integrates multiple sources of genomic and biomedical knowledge into an on-disk semantic network where human genes and their orthologs in mouse and rat are central concepts mapped to ontology terms. The BORG was used to screen all human genes for potential links to tendinopathy. Following further prioritisation, four strong candidate genes (COL11A2, ELN, ITGB3, LOX) were identified. These genes are differentially expressed in tendinopathy, functionally linked to features of tendinopathy and previously implicated in other connective tissue diseases. In conclusion, cross-domain semantic integration of multiple sources of biomedical knowledge, and interrogation of phenotypes and gene functions associated with disease, may significantly increase the probability of identifying strong and unobvious candidate genes in genetic association studies. PMID:26804977

  16. Identification of novel type 2 diabetes candidate genes involved in the crosstalk between the mitochondrial and the insulin signaling systems.

    PubMed

    Mercader, Josep M; Puiggros, Montserrat; Segrè, Ayellet V; Planet, Evarist; Sorianello, Eleonora; Sebastian, David; Rodriguez-Cuenca, Sergio; Ribas, Vicent; Bonàs-Guarch, Sílvia; Draghici, Sorin; Yang, Chenjing; Mora, Sílvia; Vidal-Puig, Antoni; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C; Zorzano, Antonio; Torrents, David

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a highly prevalent chronic metabolic disease with strong co-morbidity with obesity and cardiovascular diseases. There is growing evidence supporting the notion that a crosstalk between mitochondria and the insulin signaling cascade could be involved in the etiology of T2D and insulin resistance. In this study we investigated the molecular basis of this crosstalk by using systems biology approaches. We combined, filtered, and interrogated different types of functional interaction data, such as direct protein-protein interactions, co-expression analyses, and metabolic and signaling dependencies. As a result, we constructed the mitochondria-insulin (MITIN) network, which highlights 286 genes as candidate functional linkers between these two systems. The results of internal gene expression analysis of three independent experimental models of mitochondria and insulin signaling perturbations further support the connecting roles of these genes. In addition, we further assessed whether these genes are involved in the etiology of T2D using the genome-wide association study meta-analysis from the DIAGRAM consortium, involving 8,130 T2D cases and 38,987 controls. We found modest enrichment of genes associated with T2D amongst our linker genes (p = 0.0549), including three already validated T2D SNPs and 15 additional SNPs, which, when combined, were collectively associated to increased fasting glucose levels according to MAGIC genome wide meta-analysis (p = 8.12×10(-5)). This study highlights the potential of combining systems biology, experimental, and genome-wide association data mining for identifying novel genes and related variants that increase vulnerability to complex diseases. PMID:23236286

  17. Identification of Novel Type 2 Diabetes Candidate Genes Involved in the Crosstalk between the Mitochondrial and the Insulin Signaling Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mercader, Josep M.; Puiggros, Montserrat; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Planet, Evarist; Sorianello, Eleonora; Sebastian, David; Rodriguez-Cuenca, Sergio; Ribas, Vicent; Bonàs-Guarch, Sílvia; Draghici, Sorin; Yang, Chenjing; Mora, Sílvia; Vidal-Puig, Antoni; Dupuis, Josée; Florez, Jose C.; Zorzano, Antonio; Torrents, David

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a highly prevalent chronic metabolic disease with strong co-morbidity with obesity and cardiovascular diseases. There is growing evidence supporting the notion that a crosstalk between mitochondria and the insulin signaling cascade could be involved in the etiology of T2D and insulin resistance. In this study we investigated the molecular basis of this crosstalk by using systems biology approaches. We combined, filtered, and interrogated different types of functional interaction data, such as direct protein–protein interactions, co-expression analyses, and metabolic and signaling dependencies. As a result, we constructed the mitochondria-insulin (MITIN) network, which highlights 286 genes as candidate functional linkers between these two systems. The results of internal gene expression analysis of three independent experimental models of mitochondria and insulin signaling perturbations further support the connecting roles of these genes. In addition, we further assessed whether these genes are involved in the etiology of T2D using the genome-wide association study meta-analysis from the DIAGRAM consortium, involving 8,130 T2D cases and 38,987 controls. We found modest enrichment of genes associated with T2D amongst our linker genes (p = 0.0549), including three already validated T2D SNPs and 15 additional SNPs, which, when combined, were collectively associated to increased fasting glucose levels according to MAGIC genome wide meta-analysis (p = 8.12×10−5). This study highlights the potential of combining systems biology, experimental, and genome-wide association data mining for identifying novel genes and related variants that increase vulnerability to complex diseases. PMID:23236286

  18. Gene defect in hypodontia: exclusion of MSX1 and MSX2 as candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, P; Arte, S; Pirinen, S; Peltonen, L; Thesleff, I

    1995-09-01

    Hypodontia, congenital lack of one or a few teeth, is an autosomally inherited dominant trait. Homeobox genes MSX1 and MSX2 are expressed in presumptive dental tissues at the stage of initiation of tooth development. Recently, tooth development was shown to be inhibited in transgenic mice lacking a functional Msx1 gene. Here, we studied the relationship of the MSX1 and MSX2 genes to familial hypodontia in five Finnish families with a total of 20 affected individuals, by linkage analysis. The pairwise lod-scores regarding the intragenic microsatellites in the MSX1 and MSX2 genes at a recombination fraction of 0.0 were -3.1 and -3.0, respectively, thus excluding these genes as causative loci for hypodontia in these families.

  19. Exploiting Differential Gene Expression and Epistasis to Discover Candidate Genes for Drought-Associated QTLs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, John T.; Mullen, Jack L.; Lowry, David B.; Awole, Kedija; Richards, James H.; Sen, Saunak; Verslues, Paul E.; Juenger, Thomas E.; McKay, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Soil water availability represents one of the most important selective agents for plants in nature and the single greatest abiotic determinant of agricultural productivity, yet the genetic bases of drought acclimation responses remain poorly understood. Here, we developed a systems-genetic approach to characterize quantitative trait loci (QTLs), physiological traits and genes that affect responses to soil moisture deficit in the TSUxKAS mapping population of Arabidopsis thaliana. To determine the effects of candidate genes underlying QTLs, we analyzed gene expression as a covariate within the QTL model in an effort to mechanistically link markers, RNA expression, and the phenotype. This strategy produced ranked lists of candidate genes for several drought-associated traits, including water use efficiency, growth, abscisic acid concentration (ABA), and proline concentration. As a proof of concept, we recovered known causal loci for several QTLs. For other traits, including ABA, we identified novel loci not previously associated with drought. Furthermore, we documented natural variation at two key steps in proline metabolism and demonstrated that the mitochondrial genome differentially affects genomic QTLs to influence proline accumulation. These findings demonstrate that linking genome, transcriptome, and phenotype data holds great promise to extend the utility of genetic mapping, even when QTL effects are modest or complex. PMID:25873386

  20. Analysis of SSH library of rice variety Aganni reveals candidate gall midge resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Divya, Dhanasekar; Singh, Y Tunginba; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, J S

    2016-03-01

    The Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae, is a serious insect pest causing extensive yield loss. Interaction between the gall midge and rice genotypes is known to be on a gene-for-gene basis. Here, we report molecular basis of HR- (hypersensitive reaction-negative) type of resistance in Aganni (an indica rice variety possessing gall midge resistance gene Gm8) through the construction and analysis of a suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH) cDNA library. In all, 2,800 positive clones were sequenced and analyzed. The high-quality ESTs were assembled into 448 non-redundant gene sequences. Homology search with the NCBI databases, using BlastX and BlastN, revealed that 73% of the clones showed homology to genes with known function and majority of ESTs belonged to the gene ontology category 'biological process'. Validation of 27 putative candidate gall midge resistance genes through real-time PCR, following gall midge infestation, in contrasting parents and their derived pre-NILs (near isogenic lines) revealed induction of specific genes related to defense and metabolism. Interestingly, four genes, belonging to families of leucine-rich repeat (LRR), heat shock protein (HSP), pathogenesis related protein (PR), and NAC domain-containing protein, implicated in conferring HR+ type of resistance, were found to be up-regulated in Aganni. Two of the reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI)-scavenging-enzyme-coding genes Cytosolic Ascorbate Peroxidase1, 2 (OsAPx1 and OsAPx2) were found up-regulated in Aganni in incompatible interaction possibly suppressing HR. We suggest that Aganni has a deviant form of inducible, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance but without HR. PMID:26801786

  1. Molecular Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis for Numerous Spines on the Fruit of Cucumber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengping; Liu, Shulin; Miao, Han; Wang, Min; Liu, Panna; Wehner, Todd C; Gu, Xingfang

    2016-09-01

    Number of spines on the fruit is an important quality trait in cucumber. The inheritance and identification of molecular markers for fruit spine density gene can provide a basis for breeding and lay the foundation for gene cloning. Cucumber inbred lines NCG-122 with numerous spines and NCG-121 with few spines were used for genetic analysis and gene mapping in this study. Genetic analysis showed that the numerous spines trait in NCG-122 was qualitative, and a single recessive nuclear gene (ns) controlled this trait. The few spines trait was dominant over the numerous spines trait. In the preliminary genetic mapping of the ns gene, 8 SSR markers were found to be linked to ns, which mapped to chromosome 2 (Chr.2) of cucumber. The closest flanking markers SSR22338 and SSR11596 were linked to the ns gene, with genetic distances of 10.2 and 1.7cM, respectively. One-hundred and thirty pairs of new SSR primers and 28 pairs of Indel primers were developed based on sequence information in the preliminary mapping region of ns Fifteen SSR markers and 2 Indel markers were identified to be linked to the ns gene after analysis on the F2 mapping population using the new molecular markers. The 2 closest flanking markers, SSRns-127 and SSR04219, were 0.7 and 2.4 cM from ns, respectively. The physical distance between SSRns-127 and SSR04219 was 266.1kb, containing 27 predicted genes. Csa2G285390 was speculated as the probable candidate gene for numerous spines. The accuracy of the closest linked marker to the ns gene, SSRns-127, for MAS breeding was 95.0%. PMID:27317924

  2. Analysis of SSH library of rice variety Aganni reveals candidate gall midge resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Divya, Dhanasekar; Singh, Y Tunginba; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, J S

    2016-03-01

    The Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae, is a serious insect pest causing extensive yield loss. Interaction between the gall midge and rice genotypes is known to be on a gene-for-gene basis. Here, we report molecular basis of HR- (hypersensitive reaction-negative) type of resistance in Aganni (an indica rice variety possessing gall midge resistance gene Gm8) through the construction and analysis of a suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH) cDNA library. In all, 2,800 positive clones were sequenced and analyzed. The high-quality ESTs were assembled into 448 non-redundant gene sequences. Homology search with the NCBI databases, using BlastX and BlastN, revealed that 73% of the clones showed homology to genes with known function and majority of ESTs belonged to the gene ontology category 'biological process'. Validation of 27 putative candidate gall midge resistance genes through real-time PCR, following gall midge infestation, in contrasting parents and their derived pre-NILs (near isogenic lines) revealed induction of specific genes related to defense and metabolism. Interestingly, four genes, belonging to families of leucine-rich repeat (LRR), heat shock protein (HSP), pathogenesis related protein (PR), and NAC domain-containing protein, implicated in conferring HR+ type of resistance, were found to be up-regulated in Aganni. Two of the reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI)-scavenging-enzyme-coding genes Cytosolic Ascorbate Peroxidase1, 2 (OsAPx1 and OsAPx2) were found up-regulated in Aganni in incompatible interaction possibly suppressing HR. We suggest that Aganni has a deviant form of inducible, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance but without HR.

  3. Selection on Plant Male Function Genes Identifies Candidates for Reproductive Isolation of Yellow Monkeyflowers

    PubMed Central

    Aagaard, Jan E.; George, Renee D.; Fishman, Lila; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of reproductive isolation promises insight into speciation and the origins of biological diversity. While progress has been made in identifying genes underlying barriers to reproduction that function after fertilization (post-zygotic isolation), we know much less about earlier acting pre-zygotic barriers. Of particular interest are barriers involved in mating and fertilization that can evolve extremely rapidly under sexual selection, suggesting they may play a prominent role in the initial stages of reproductive isolation. A significant challenge to the field of speciation genetics is developing new approaches for identification of candidate genes underlying these barriers, particularly among non-traditional model systems. We employ powerful proteomic and genomic strategies to study the genetic basis of conspecific pollen precedence, an important component of pre-zygotic reproductive isolation among yellow monkeyflowers (Mimulus spp.) resulting from male pollen competition. We use isotopic labeling in combination with shotgun proteomics to identify more than 2,000 male function (pollen tube) proteins within maternal reproductive structures (styles) of M. guttatus flowers where pollen competition occurs. We then sequence array-captured pollen tube exomes from a large outcrossing population of M. guttatus, and identify those genes with evidence of selective sweeps or balancing selection consistent with their role in pollen competition. We also test for evidence of positive selection on these genes more broadly across yellow monkeyflowers, because a signal of adaptive divergence is a common feature of genes causing reproductive isolation. Together the molecular evolution studies identify 159 pollen tube proteins that are candidate genes for conspecific pollen precedence. Our work demonstrates how powerful proteomic and genomic tools can be readily adapted to non-traditional model systems, allowing for genome-wide screens towards the

  4. Identification of novel candidate genes associated with cleft lip and palate using array comparative genomic hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Vessere, Gery M.; Utami, Kagistia Hana; Mansilla, Maria Adela; Johnson, Marla K.; Riley, Bridget M.; L’Heureux, Jamie; Pfundt, Rolph; Staaf, Johan; van der Vliet, Walter A.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Schoenmakers, Eric F. P. M.; Borg, Ake; Schutte, Brian C.; Lammer, Edward J.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; de Jong, Pieter J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and methods We analyzed DNA samples isolated from individuals born with cleft lip and cleft palate to identify deletions and duplications of candidate gene loci using array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). Results Of 83 syndromic cases analyzed we identified one subject with a previously unknown 2.7 Mb deletion at 22q11.21 coinciding with the DiGeorge syndrome region. Eighteen of the syndromic cases had clinical features of Van der Woude syndrome and deletions were identified in 5 of these, all of which encompassed the interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) gene. In a series of 104 nonsyndromic cases we found one subject with a 3.2 Mb deletion at chromosome 6q25.1-25.2 and another with a 2.2 Mb deletion at 10q26.11-26.13. Analyses of parental DNA demonstrated that the two deletion cases at 22q11.21 and 6q25.1-25.2 were de novo, while the deletion of 10q26.11-26.13 was inherited from the mother, who also has cleft lip. These deletions appear likely to be causally associated with the phenotypes of the subjects. Estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) genes from the 6q25.1-25.2 and 10q26.11-26.13, respectively, were identified as likely causative genes using a gene prioritization software. Discussion We have shown that array-CGH analysis of DNA samples derived from cleft lip and palate subjects is an efficient and productive method for identifying candidate chromosomal loci and genes, complementing traditional genetic mapping strategies. PMID:17873121

  5. Gene expression profile analysis of testis and ovary of oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, reveals candidate reproduction-related genes.

    PubMed

    Qiao, H; Xiong, Y W; Jiang, S F; Fu, H T; Sun, S M; Jin, S B; Gong, Y S; Zhang, W Y

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized high-throughput RNA sequencing technology to identify reproduction- and development-related genes of Macrobrachium nipponense by analyzing gene expression profiles of testis and ovary. More than 20 million 1 x 51-bp reads were obtained by Illumina sequencing, generating more than 7.7 and 11.7 million clean reads in the testis and ovary library, respectively. As a result, 10,018 unitags were supposed to be differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between ovary and testis. Compared to the ovary library, 4563 (45.5%) of these DEGs exhibited at least 6-fold upregulated expression, while 5455 (54.5%) DEGs exhibited at least 2-fold downregulated expression in the testis. The Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis showed that 113 GO terms had potential molecular functions in reproduction. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes results revealed that the most important pathways may be relevant to reproduction and included 7 pathways. Forty-two genes were identified as reproduction-, development-, and sex-related genes based on GO classification and sequence comparison with other publications, including male reproductive-related LIM protein, spermatogenesis-associated protein, gametocyte-specific factor 1, VASA-like protein, vitellogenin, sex-determining protein fem-1, and other potential candidates. These results will advance research in the field of molecular genetics in M. nipponense and offer a valuable resource for further research related to reproduction in crustaceans. PMID:25867350

  6. Gene expression profile analysis of testis and ovary of oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, reveals candidate reproduction-related genes.

    PubMed

    Qiao, H; Xiong, Y W; Jiang, S F; Fu, H T; Sun, S M; Jin, S B; Gong, Y S; Zhang, W Y

    2015-03-20

    This study utilized high-throughput RNA sequencing technology to identify reproduction- and development-related genes of Macrobrachium nipponense by analyzing gene expression profiles of testis and ovary. More than 20 million 1 x 51-bp reads were obtained by Illumina sequencing, generating more than 7.7 and 11.7 million clean reads in the testis and ovary library, respectively. As a result, 10,018 unitags were supposed to be differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between ovary and testis. Compared to the ovary library, 4563 (45.5%) of these DEGs exhibited at least 6-fold upregulated expression, while 5455 (54.5%) DEGs exhibited at least 2-fold downregulated expression in the testis. The Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis showed that 113 GO terms had potential molecular functions in reproduction. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes results revealed that the most important pathways may be relevant to reproduction and included 7 pathways. Forty-two genes were identified as reproduction-, development-, and sex-related genes based on GO classification and sequence comparison with other publications, including male reproductive-related LIM protein, spermatogenesis-associated protein, gametocyte-specific factor 1, VASA-like protein, vitellogenin, sex-determining protein fem-1, and other potential candidates. These results will advance research in the field of molecular genetics in M. nipponense and offer a valuable resource for further research related to reproduction in crustaceans.

  7. A genome-wide association study on androstenone levels in pigs reveals a cluster of candidate genes on chromosome 6

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In many countries, male piglets are castrated shortly after birth because a proportion of un-castrated male pigs produce meat with an unpleasant flavour and odour. Main compounds of boar taint are androstenone and skatole. The aim of this high-density genome-wide association study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with androstenone levels in a commercial sire line of pigs. The identification of major genetic effects causing boar taint would accelerate the reduction of boar taint through breeding to finally eliminate the need for castration. Results The Illumina Porcine 60K+SNP Beadchip was genotyped on 987 pigs divergent for androstenone concentration from a commercial Duroc-based sire line. The association analysis with 47,897 SNPs revealed that androstenone levels in fat tissue were significantly affected by 37 SNPs on pig chromosomes SSC1 and SSC6. Among them, the 5 most significant SNPs explained together 13.7% of the genetic variance in androstenone. On SSC6, a larger region of 10 Mb was shown to be associated with androstenone covering several candidate genes potentially involved in the synthesis and metabolism of androgens. Besides known candidate genes, such as cytochrome P450 A19 (CYP2A19), sulfotransferases SULT2A1, and SULT2B1, also new members of the cytochrome P450 CYP2 gene subfamilies and of the hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenases (HSD17B14) were found. In addition, the gene encoding the ß-chain of the luteinizing hormone (LHB) which induces steroid synthesis in the Leydig cells of the testis at onset of puberty maps to this area on SSC6. Interestingly, the gene encoding the α-chain of LH is also located in one of the highly significant areas on SSC1. Conclusions This study reveals several areas of the genome at high resolution responsible for variation of androstenone levels in intact boars. Major genetic factors on SSC1 and SSC6 showing moderate to large effects on androstenone concentration were identified in

  8. Identification of Putative Candidate Genes for Water Stress Tolerance in Canola (Brassica napus)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Mason, Annaliese S.; Wu, Jian; Liu, Sheng; Zhang, Xuechen; Luo, Tao; Redden, Robert; Batley, Jacqueline; Hu, Liyong; Yan, Guijun

    2015-01-01

    Drought stress can directly inhibit seedling establishment in canola (Brassica napus), resulting in lower plant densities and reduced yields. To dissect this complex trait, 140 B. napus accessions were phenotyped under normal (0.0 MPa, S0) and water-stressed conditions simulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 (−0.5 MPa, S5) in a hydroponic system. Phenotypic variation and heritability indicated that the root to shoot length ratio was a reliable indicator for water stress tolerance. Thereafter, 66 accessions (16 water stress tolerant, 34 moderate and 16 sensitive lines) were genotyped using 25,495 Brassica single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified 16 loci significantly associated with water stress response. Two B. napus accessions were used for RNA sequencing, with differentially-expressed genes under normal and water-stressed conditions examined. By combining differentially-expressed genes detected by RNA sequencing with significantly associated loci from GWAS, 79 candidate genes were identified, of which eight were putatively associated with drought tolerance based on gene ontology of Arabidopsis. Functional validation of these genes may confirm key drought-related genes for selection and breeding in B. napus. Our results provide insight into the genetic basis of water stress tolerance in canola. PMID:26640475

  9. Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Potential Candidate Genes in a Human Eating Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Ubadah; Mullegama, Saman; Wyckoff, Gerald J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find genes linked with eating disorders and associated with both metabolic and neural systems. Our operating hypothesis was that there are genetic factors underlying some eating disorders resting in both those pathways. Specifically, we are interested in disorders that may rest in both sleep and metabolic function, generally called Night Eating Syndrome (NES). A meta-analysis of the Gene Expression Omnibus targeting the mammalian nervous system, sleep, and obesity studies was performed, yielding numerous genes of interest. Through a text-based analysis of the results, a number of potential candidate genes were identified. VGF, in particular, appeared to be relevant both to obesity and, broadly, to brain or neural development. VGF is a highly connected protein that interacts with numerous targets via proteolytically digested peptides. We examined VGF from an evolutionary perspective to determine whether other available evidence supported a role for the gene in human disease. We conclude that some of the already identified variants in VGF from human polymorphism studies may contribute to eating disorders and obesity. Our data suggest that there is enough evidence to warrant eGWAS and GWAS analysis of these genes in NES patients in a case-control study.

  10. Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Potential Candidate Genes in a Human Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mullegama, Saman; Wyckoff, Gerald J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find genes linked with eating disorders and associated with both metabolic and neural systems. Our operating hypothesis was that there are genetic factors underlying some eating disorders resting in both those pathways. Specifically, we are interested in disorders that may rest in both sleep and metabolic function, generally called Night Eating Syndrome (NES). A meta-analysis of the Gene Expression Omnibus targeting the mammalian nervous system, sleep, and obesity studies was performed, yielding numerous genes of interest. Through a text-based analysis of the results, a number of potential candidate genes were identified. VGF, in particular, appeared to be relevant both to obesity and, broadly, to brain or neural development. VGF is a highly connected protein that interacts with numerous targets via proteolytically digested peptides. We examined VGF from an evolutionary perspective to determine whether other available evidence supported a role for the gene in human disease. We conclude that some of the already identified variants in VGF from human polymorphism studies may contribute to eating disorders and obesity. Our data suggest that there is enough evidence to warrant eGWAS and GWAS analysis of these genes in NES patients in a case-control study. PMID:27088090

  11. Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Potential Candidate Genes in a Human Eating Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Ubadah; Mullegama, Saman; Wyckoff, Gerald J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find genes linked with eating disorders and associated with both metabolic and neural systems. Our operating hypothesis was that there are genetic factors underlying some eating disorders resting in both those pathways. Specifically, we are interested in disorders that may rest in both sleep and metabolic function, generally called Night Eating Syndrome (NES). A meta-analysis of the Gene Expression Omnibus targeting the mammalian nervous system, sleep, and obesity studies was performed, yielding numerous genes of interest. Through a text-based analysis of the results, a number of potential candidate genes were identified. VGF, in particular, appeared to be relevant both to obesity and, broadly, to brain or neural development. VGF is a highly connected protein that interacts with numerous targets via proteolytically digested peptides. We examined VGF from an evolutionary perspective to determine whether other available evidence supported a role for the gene in human disease. We conclude that some of the already identified variants in VGF from human polymorphism studies may contribute to eating disorders and obesity. Our data suggest that there is enough evidence to warrant eGWAS and GWAS analysis of these genes in NES patients in a case-control study. PMID:27088090

  12. Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Potential Candidate Genes in a Human Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mullegama, Saman; Wyckoff, Gerald J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find genes linked with eating disorders and associated with both metabolic and neural systems. Our operating hypothesis was that there are genetic factors underlying some eating disorders resting in both those pathways. Specifically, we are interested in disorders that may rest in both sleep and metabolic function, generally called Night Eating Syndrome (NES). A meta-analysis of the Gene Expression Omnibus targeting the mammalian nervous system, sleep, and obesity studies was performed, yielding numerous genes of interest. Through a text-based analysis of the results, a number of potential candidate genes were identified. VGF, in particular, appeared to be relevant both to obesity and, broadly, to brain or neural development. VGF is a highly connected protein that interacts with numerous targets via proteolytically digested peptides. We examined VGF from an evolutionary perspective to determine whether other available evidence supported a role for the gene in human disease. We conclude that some of the already identified variants in VGF from human polymorphism studies may contribute to eating disorders and obesity. Our data suggest that there is enough evidence to warrant eGWAS and GWAS analysis of these genes in NES patients in a case-control study. PMID:27088090

  13. Identification of Putative Candidate Genes for Water Stress Tolerance in Canola (Brassica napus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Mason, Annaliese S; Wu, Jian; Liu, Sheng; Zhang, Xuechen; Luo, Tao; Redden, Robert; Batley, Jacqueline; Hu, Liyong; Yan, Guijun

    2015-01-01

    Drought stress can directly inhibit seedling establishment in canola (Brassica napus), resulting in lower plant densities and reduced yields. To dissect this complex trait, 140 B. napus accessions were phenotyped under normal (0.0 MPa, S0) and water-stressed conditions simulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 (-0.5 MPa, S5) in a hydroponic system. Phenotypic variation and heritability indicated that the root to shoot length ratio was a reliable indicator for water stress tolerance. Thereafter, 66 accessions (16 water stress tolerant, 34 moderate and 16 sensitive lines) were genotyped using 25,495 Brassica single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified 16 loci significantly associated with water stress response. Two B. napus accessions were used for RNA sequencing, with differentially-expressed genes under normal and water-stressed conditions examined. By combining differentially-expressed genes detected by RNA sequencing with significantly associated loci from GWAS, 79 candidate genes were identified, of which eight were putatively associated with drought tolerance based on gene ontology of Arabidopsis. Functional validation of these genes may confirm key drought-related genes for selection and breeding in B. napus. Our results provide insight into the genetic basis of water stress tolerance in canola. PMID:26640475

  14. Candidate genes underlying heritable differences in reproductive seasonality between wild and domestic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Miguel; Piorno, Vicente; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Alves, Joel M; Ferrand, Nuno; Alves, Paulo C; Andersson, Leif

    2015-08-01

    Reproductive seasonality is a trait that often differs between domestic animals and their wild ancestors, with domestic animals showing prolonged or even continuous breeding seasons. However, the genetic basis underlying this trait is still poorly understood for most species, and because environmental factors and resource availability are known to play an important role in determining breeding seasons, it is also not clear in most cases to what extent this phenotypic shift is determined by the more lenient captive conditions or by genetic factors. Here, using animals resulting from an initial cross between wild and domestic rabbits followed by two consecutive backcrosses (BC1 and BC2) to wild rabbits, we evaluated the yearly distribution of births for the different generations. Similar to domestic rabbits, F1 animals could be bred all year round but BC1 and BC2 animals showed a progressive and significant reduction in the span of the breeding season, providing experimental evidence that reduced seasonal breeding in domestic rabbits has a clear genetic component and is not a simple by-product of rearing conditions. We then took advantage of a recently published genome-wide scan of selection in the domesticated lineage and searched for candidate genes potentially associated with this phenotypic shift. Candidate genes located within regions targeted by selection include well-known examples of genes controlling clock functions (CRY1 and NR3C1) and reproduction (PRLR).

  15. Genomic Analysis of Differentiation between Soil Types Reveals Candidate Genes for Local Adaptation in Arabidopsis lyrata

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Thomas L.; von Wettberg, Eric J.; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.

    2008-01-01

    Serpentine soil, which is naturally high in heavy metal content and has low calcium to magnesium ratios, comprises a difficult environment for most plants. An impressive number of species are endemic to serpentine, and a wide range of non-endemic plant taxa have been shown to be locally adapted to these soils. Locating genomic polymorphisms which are differentiated between serpentine and non-serpentine populations would provide candidate loci for serpentine adaptation. We have used the Arabidopsis thaliana tiling array, which has 2.85 million probes throughout the genome, to measure genetic differentiation between populations of Arabidopsis lyrata growing on granitic soils and those growing on serpentinic soils. The significant overrepresentation of genes involved in ion transport and other functions provides a starting point for investigating the molecular basis of adaptation to soil ion content, water retention, and other ecologically and economically important variables. One gene in particular, calcium-exchanger 7, appears to be an excellent candidate gene for adaptation to low Ca∶Mg ratio in A. lyrata. PMID:18784841

  16. Identification of Novel Candidate Genes for Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Weren, Robbert D. A.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Gilissen, Christian; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Kets, C. Marleen; Zhang, Junxiao; Venselaar, Hanka; Vreede, Lilian; Schubert, Nil; Tychon, Marloes; Derks, Ronny; Schackert, Hans K.; Geurts van Kessel, Ad; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Kuiper, Roland P.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25–30% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases are expected to result from a genetic predisposition, but in only 5–10% of these cases highly penetrant germline mutations are found. The remaining CRC heritability is still unexplained, and may be caused by a hitherto-undefined set of rare variants with a moderately penetrant risk. Here we aimed to identify novel risk factors for early-onset CRC using whole-exome sequencing, which was performed on a cohort of CRC individuals (n = 55) with a disease onset before 45 years of age. We searched for genes that were recurrently affected by rare variants (minor allele frequency ≤0.001) with potentially damaging effects and, subsequently, re-sequenced the candidate genes in a replication cohort of 174 early-onset or familial CRC individuals. Two functionally relevant genes with low frequency variants with potentially damaging effects, PTPN12 and LRP6, were found in at least three individuals. The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST, encoded by PTPN12, is a regulator of cell motility and LRP6 is a component of the WNT-FZD-LRP5-LRP6 complex that triggers WNT signaling. All variants in LRP6 were identified in individuals with an extremely early-onset of the disease (≤30 years of age), and two of the three variants showed increased WNT signaling activity in vitro. In conclusion, we present PTPN12 and LRP6 as novel candidates contributing to the heterogeneous susceptibility to CRC. PMID:26901136

  17. Candidate Gene Approach for Parasite Resistance in Sheep – Variation in Immune Pathway Genes and Association with Fecal Egg Count

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Kathiravan; Pichler, Rudolf; Poli, Mario; Cristel, Silvina; Cetrá, Bibiana; Medus, Daniel; Basar, Muladno; A. K., Thiruvenkadan; Ramasamy, Saravanan; Ellahi, Masroor Babbar; Mohammed, Faruque; Teneva, Atanaska; Shamsuddin, Mohammed; Podesta, Mario Garcia; Diallo, Adama

    2014-01-01

    Sheep chromosome 3 (Oar3) has the largest number of QTLs reported to be significantly associated with resistance to gastro-intestinal nematodes. This study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within candidate genes located in sheep chromosome 3 as well as genes involved in major immune pathways. A total of 41 SNPs were identified across 38 candidate genes in a panel of unrelated sheep and genotyped in 713 animals belonging to 22 breeds across Asia, Europe and South America. The variations and evolution of immune pathway genes were assessed in sheep populations across these macro-environmental regions that significantly differ in the diversity and load of pathogens. The mean minor allele frequency (MAF) did not vary between Asian and European sheep reflecting the absence of ascertainment bias. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clusters with most of South Asian, South East Asian and South West Asian breeds clustering together while European and South American sheep breeds clustered together distinctly. Analysis of molecular variance revealed strong phylogeographic structure at loci located in immune pathway genes, unlike microsatellite and genome wide SNP markers. To understand the influence of natural selection processes, SNP loci located in chromosome 3 were utilized to reconstruct haplotypes, the diversity of which showed significant deviations from selective neutrality. Reduced Median network of reconstructed haplotypes showed balancing selection in force at these loci. Preliminary association of SNP genotypes with phenotypes recorded 42 days post challenge revealed significant differences (P<0.05) in fecal egg count, body weight change and packed cell volume at two, four and six SNP loci respectively. In conclusion, the present study reports strong phylogeographic structure and balancing selection operating at SNP loci located within immune pathway genes. Further, SNP loci identified in the study were found to have potential for

  18. Distilling a Visual Network of Retinitis Pigmentosa Gene-Protein Interactions to Uncover New Disease Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Boloc, Daniel; Castillo-Lara, Sergio; Marfany, Gemma; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser; Abril, Josep F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a highly heterogeneous genetic visual disorder with more than 70 known causative genes, some of them shared with other non-syndromic retinal dystrophies (e.g. Leber congenital amaurosis, LCA). The identification of RP genes has increased steadily during the last decade, and the 30% of the cases that still remain unassigned will soon decrease after the advent of exome/genome sequencing. A considerable amount of genetic and functional data on single RD genes and mutations has been gathered, but a comprehensive view of the RP genes and their interacting partners is still very fragmentary. This is the main gap that needs to be filled in order to understand how mutations relate to progressive blinding disorders and devise effective therapies. Methodology We have built an RP-specific network (RPGeNet) by merging data from different sources: high-throughput data from BioGRID and STRING databases, manually curated data for interactions retrieved from iHOP, as well as interactions filtered out by syntactical parsing from up-to-date abstracts and full-text papers related to the RP research field. The paths emerging when known RP genes were used as baits over the whole interactome have been analysed, and the minimal number of connections among the RP genes and their close neighbors were distilled in order to simplify the search space. Conclusions In contrast to the analysis of single isolated genes, finding the networks linking disease genes renders powerful etiopathological insights. We here provide an interactive interface, RPGeNet, for the molecular biologist to explore the network centered on the non-syndromic and syndromic RP and LCA causative genes. By integrating tissue-specific expression levels and phenotypic data on top of that network, a more comprehensive biological view will highlight key molecular players of retinal degeneration and unveil new RP disease candidates. PMID:26267445

  19. Genetic‐Genomic Replication to Identify Candidate Mouse Atherosclerosis Modifier Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jeffrey; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Genetics plays a large role in atherosclerosis susceptibility in humans and mice. We attempted to confirm previously determined mouse atherosclerosis‐associated loci and use bioinformatics and transcriptomics to create a catalog of candidate atherosclerosis modifier genes at these loci. Methods and Results A strain intercross was performed between AKR and DBA/2 mice on the apoE−/− background generating 166 F2 progeny. Using the phenotype log10 of the aortic root lesion area, we identified 3 suggestive atherosclerosis quantitative trait loci (Ath QTLs). When combined with our prior strain intercross, we confirmed 3 significant Ath QTLs on chromosomes 2, 15, and 17, with combined logarithm of odds scores of 5.9, 5.3, and 5.6, respectively, which each met the genome‐wide 5% false discovery rate threshold. We identified all of the protein coding differences between these 2 mouse strains within the Ath QTL intervals. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed on macrophages and endothelial cells from this intercross to identify expression QTLs (eQTLs), the loci that are associated with variation in the expression levels of specific transcripts. Cross tissue eQTLs and macrophage eQTLs that replicated from a prior strain intercross were identified. These bioinformatic and eQTL analyses produced a comprehensive list of candidate genes that may be responsible for the Ath QTLs. Conclusions Replication studies for clinical traits as well as gene expression traits are worthwhile in identifying true versus false genetic associations. We have replicated 3 loci on mouse chromosomes 2, 15, and 17 that are associated with atherosclerosis. We have also identified protein coding differences and multiple replicated eQTLs, which may be useful in the identification of atherosclerosis modifier genes. PMID:23525445

  20. Linkage analysis of candidate obesity genes among the Mexican-American population of Starr County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Bray, M S; Boerwinkle, E; Hanis, C L

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in the molecular basis of body fat regulation have identified several genes in which genetic variation may influence obesity and related measures in human populations. Genes that have been shown to have a regulatory function in the control of body fat utilization, eating behavior, and/or metabolic rate in rodent models of obesity include leptin (LEP), leptin receptor (LEPR), neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY Y1 receptor (NPYY1), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), GLP-1 receptor (GLP1R), and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). We have typed microsatellite markers located within or near these seven candidate obesity genes in 302 non-diabetic individuals from 59 Mexican-American families from Starr County, Texas. Sib pair linkage analysis was used to examine linkage between these genes and obesity status (obese siblings only; n = 170 pairs) and several obesity-related quantitative variables (all siblings; n = 545 total sibling pairs). Significant linkage (P = 0.042) was found between obesity and NPY within the obese sibling pairs. No other candidate gene was linked to obesity status in this subsample. Consistent with the obese sib pair linkage results, NPY showed evidence of linkage to body weight (P = 0.020), abdominal circumference (P = 0.031), hip circumference (P = 0.012), diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.005), and a composite measure of body mass and size (P = 0.048) in the entire sibling sample. Other significant linkages observed were between LEP and waist/hip ratio (P = 0.010), total cholesterol (P = 0.030), and HDL cholesterol (P = 0.026) and between LEPR and fasting blood glucose (P = 0.018) and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.003). These results support further investigation of NPY, LEP, and LEPR to identify genetic variation that may influence obesity status, glucose and lipid metabolism, and blood pressure in Mexican Americans. PMID:10207720

  1. Candidate gene association study for diabetic retinopathy in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiufen; Deng, Yu; Gu, Hong; Ren, Xuetao; Li, Na; Lim, Apiradee; Snellingen, Torkel; Liu, Xipu; Wang, Ningli

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether variants in a set of eight candidate genes are associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) in a cohort of Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods Case-control study. Patients with T2DM were recruited from the Desheng community in urban Beijing and assigned into a DR group or diabetic without retinopathy (DWR) group, based on the duration of diabetes and grading of fundus images. Twenty-six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within eight candidate genes, including PPARγ, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), erythropoietin, aldose reductase, protein kinase C-β, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, were analyzed using the MassARRAY genotyping system. Results A total of 500 patients with T2DM (216 with DR and 284 with DWR) were enrolled in the study. Significant associations of DR were noted with genotypes of four SNPs—rs699947 (p<0.001), rs833061 (p=0.001), rs13207351 (p<0.001), and rs2146323 (p=0.006)—in the VEGF gene and one variant, rs2071559, in the KDR gene (p=0.034). After adjustment for covariates, significant association of DR remained with the homozygous genotype of the minor allele for the SNPs rs699947 (odds ratio [OR] = 3.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12–11.19), rs833061 (OR = 3.72, 95% CI: 1.17–11.85), rs13207351 (OR = 3.76, 95% CI: 1.21–11.71), and rs2146323 (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.46–5.37) in the VEGF gene as well as the SNP rs2071559 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.08–2.41) in the KDR gene. However, only rs699947 and rs13207351 in the VEGF gene remained statistically significant after Bonferroni correction. No associations were found in other genes tested. Conclusions These data expanded previous observations on the association of DR with variants in the VEGF gene in Chinese patients with T2DM. Moreover, a possible association between DR and KDR polymorphisms is suggested. PMID:24623964

  2. Candidate Gene Study of TRAIL and TRAIL Receptors: Association with Response to Interferon Beta Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Órpez-Zafra, Teresa; Pinto-Medel, María Jesús; Oliver-Martos, Begoña; Ortega-Pinazo, Jesús; Arnáiz, Carlos; Guijarro-Castro, Cristina; Varadé, Jezabel; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Urcelay, Elena; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    TRAIL and TRAIL Receptor genes have been implicated in Multiple Sclerosis pathology as well as in the response to IFN beta therapy. The objective of our study was to evaluate the association of these genes in relation to the age at disease onset (AAO) and to the clinical response upon IFN beta treatment in Spanish MS patients. We carried out a candidate gene study of TRAIL, TRAILR-1, TRAILR-2, TRAILR-3 and TRAILR-4 genes. A total of 54 SNPs were analysed in 509 MS patients under IFN beta treatment, and an additional cohort of 226 MS patients was used to validate the results. Associations of rs1047275 in TRAILR-2 and rs7011559 in TRAILR-4 genes with AAO under an additive model did not withstand Bonferroni correction. In contrast, patients with the TRAILR-1 rs20576-CC genotype showed a better clinical response to IFN beta therapy compared with patients carrying the A-allele (recessive model: p = 8.88×10−4, pc = 0.048, OR = 0.30). This SNP resulted in a non synonymous substitution of Glutamic acid to Alanine in position 228 (E228A), a change previously associated with susceptibility to different cancer types and risk of metastases, suggesting a lack of functionality of TRAILR-1. In order to unravel how this amino acid change in TRAILR-1 would affect to death signal, we performed a molecular modelling with both alleles. Neither TRAIL binding sites in the receptor nor the expression levels of TRAILR-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets (monocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells) were modified, suggesting that this SNP may be altering the death signal by some other mechanism. These findings show a role for TRAILR-1 gene variations in the clinical outcome of IFN beta therapy that might have relevance as a biomarker to predict the response to IFN beta in MS. PMID:23658636

  3. Gene expression profiling of candidate genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells for predicting toxicity of diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ankita; Sharma, Amit; Yadav, Sanjay; Flora, Swaran J S; Dwivedi, Uppendra N; Parmar, Devendra

    2014-02-01

    To validate gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a surrogate for monitoring tissue expression, this study using RT-PCR-based TaqMan low-density array (TLDA) was initiated to investigate similarities in the mRNA expression of target genes altered by exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) in freshly prepared PBMCs and in lungs. Adult Wistar rats were treated transtracheally with a single dose of 7.5 or 15 or 30mg/kg DEPs and sacrificed 24h later. Blood and lungs were immediately taken out and processed for RT-PCR. DEP treatment induced similar patterns of increase in the expression of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-responsive cytochrome P450s, the phase II enzymes, and their associated transcription factors in both lungs and PBMCs, at all doses. Similar to that seen in lungs, a dose-dependent increase was observed in the expression of genes involved in inflammation, such as cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, in PBMCs. The expression of various genes involved in DNA repair and apoptosis was also increased in a dose-dependent manner in PBMCs and lungs. The present TLDA data indicating similarities in the responsiveness of candidate genes involved in the toxicity of DEPs between PBMCs and lungs after exposure to DEPs demonstrate that expression profiles of genes in PBMCs could be used as a surrogate for monitoring the acute toxicity of fine and ultrafine particulate matter present in vehicular emissions. PMID:24216475

  4. Gene expression profiling of candidate genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells for predicting toxicity of diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ankita; Sharma, Amit; Yadav, Sanjay; Flora, Swaran J S; Dwivedi, Uppendra N; Parmar, Devendra

    2014-02-01

    To validate gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a surrogate for monitoring tissue expression, this study using RT-PCR-based TaqMan low-density array (TLDA) was initiated to investigate similarities in the mRNA expression of target genes altered by exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) in freshly prepared PBMCs and in lungs. Adult Wistar rats were treated transtracheally with a single dose of 7.5 or 15 or 30mg/kg DEPs and sacrificed 24h later. Blood and lungs were immediately taken out and processed for RT-PCR. DEP treatment induced similar patterns of increase in the expression of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-responsive cytochrome P450s, the phase II enzymes, and their associated transcription factors in both lungs and PBMCs, at all doses. Similar to that seen in lungs, a dose-dependent increase was observed in the expression of genes involved in inflammation, such as cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, in PBMCs. The expression of various genes involved in DNA repair and apoptosis was also increased in a dose-dependent manner in PBMCs and lungs. The present TLDA data indicating similarities in the responsiveness of candidate genes involved in the toxicity of DEPs between PBMCs and lungs after exposure to DEPs demonstrate that expression profiles of genes in PBMCs could be used as a surrogate for monitoring the acute toxicity of fine and ultrafine particulate matter present in vehicular emissions.

  5. Problems and Pit-Falls in Testing for G × E and Epistasis in Candidate Gene Studies of Human Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions about the genetic architecture of a phenotype relating to the contributions of genetic additivity, dominance, epistasis or genotype × environment interaction, depend upon the statistical and distributional properties of the measured trait. This dependence is frequently ignored in contemporary genetic studies and can radically change the conclusions that may be drawn from the data. The interdependence of the conclusions about genetic architecture and instruments used for behavioral measurement is explored by simulated studies of the interaction between candidate genes and measured environment in psychiatric genetics. Trait values are simulated (N = 100,000) under several commonly encountered scenarios and subjected to two simulated 20-item psychological tests each comprising items with different patterns of difficulty and sensitivity to variation (discriminating power) in the latent trait. Test scores are generated for each test by summing the binary responses across all items. The full model for digenic additive and non-additive genetic effects and G × E is fitted to the trait values and test scores under a range of different simulated genetic architectures. Untransformed test scores show complex patterns of epistasis and G × E even when the underlying effects of genes and environment are purely additive and the transformation of symptom counts does not fully recover the simulated underlying genetic architecture. Accordingly, failing to allow for the theory of measurement when analyzing details of genetic architecture may frequently lead to replicable over-reporting of interactions and mislead potential investigators and funding agencies. PMID:25195167

  6. Evaluation of the porcine ACSL4 gene as a candidate gene for meat quality traits in pigs.

    PubMed

    Corominas, J; Ramayo-Caldas, Y; Castelló, A; Muñoz, M; Ibáñez-Escriche, N; Folch, J M; Ballester, M

    2012-12-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family members catalyse the formation of long-chain acyl-CoA from fatty acid, ATP and CoA, thus playing an important role in both de novo lipid synthesis and fatty acid catabolism. Previous studies in our group evaluated ACSL4 as a positional candidate gene for quantitative trait loci located on chromosome X in an Iberian × Landrace cross. A DQ144454:c.2645G>A SNP located in the 3' untranslated region of the ACSL4 gene was associated with the percentages of oleic and monounsaturated fatty acids. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the functional implication of this genetic variant. An expression analysis was performed for 120 individuals with different genotypes for the DQ144454:c.2645G>A polymorphism using real-time quantitative PCR. Differences between genotypes were identified in liver, with the ACSL4 mRNA expression levels higher in animals with the G allele than in animals with the A allele. A SNP genome-wide association study with ACSL4 relative expression levels showed significant positions on chromosomes 6 and 12. Description of positional candidate genes for ACSL4 regulation on chromosomes 6 and 12 is provided.

  7. Characterization of a dwarf gene in Brassica rapa, including the identification of a candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Muangprom, A; Osborn, T C

    2004-05-01

    Dwarf genes have been valuable for improving harvestable yield of several crop plants and may be useful in oilseed Brassica. We evaluated a dwarf gene, dwf2, from Brassica rapa in order to determine its phenotypic effects and genetic characteristics. The dwf2 mutant was insensitive to exogenous GA(3) for both plant height and flowering time, suggesting that it is not a mutation in the gibberellin biosynthesis pathway. The dwarf phenotype was controlled by a semidominant allele at a single locus. Near-isogenic lines that were homozygous or heterozygous for dwf2 had 47.4% or 30.0% reduction in plant height, respectively, compared to the tall wild-type line, and the reduction was due to reduced internode length and number of nodes. The dwf2 homozygous and heterozygous lines had the same or significantly higher numbers of primary branches than the wild-type line, but did not differ in flowering time. The DWF2 gene was mapped to the bottom of linkage group R6, in a region having homology to the top of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 2. The map position of DWF2 in comparison to markers in A. thaliana suggests it is a homolog of RGA ( repressor of ga1-3), which is a homolog of the wheat "Green Revolution" gene. This dwarf gene could be used to gain more insight on the gibberellin pathway and to reduce lodging problems in hybrid oilseed Brassica cultivars.

  8. Shared Pathways Among Autism Candidate Genes Determined by Co-expression Network Analysis of the Developing Human Brain Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Ahmed; Ziats, Mark N; Rennert, Owen M; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Reinders, Marcel J T

    2015-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental syndrome known to have a significant but complex genetic etiology. Hundreds of diverse genes have been implicated in ASD; yet understanding how many genes, each with disparate function, can all be linked to a single clinical phenotype remains unclear. We hypothesized that understanding functional relationships between autism candidate genes during normal human brain development may provide convergent mechanistic insight into the genetic heterogeneity of ASD. We analyzed the co-expression relationships of 455 genes previously implicated in autism using the BrainSpan human transcriptome database, across 16 anatomical brain regions spanning prenatal life through adulthood. We discovered modules of ASD candidate genes with biologically relevant temporal co-expression dynamics, which were enriched for functional ontologies related to synaptogenesis, apoptosis, and GABA-ergic neurons. Furthermore, we also constructed co-expression networks from the entire transcriptome and found that ASD candidate genes were enriched in modules related to mitochondrial function, protein translation, and ubiquitination. Hub genes central to these ASD-enriched modules were further identified, and their functions supported these ontological findings. Overall, our multi-dimensional co-expression analysis of ASD candidate genes in the normal developing human brain suggests the heterogeneous set of ASD candidates share transcriptional networks related to synapse formation and elimination, protein turnover, and mitochondrial function.

  9. Localization of candidate regions for a novel gene for Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Roelens, Ilse; Sluysmans, Thierry; Jorissen, Mark; Amyere, Mustapha; Vikkula, Miikka

    2006-07-01

    Asymmetric positioning of internal organs is a characteristics of vertebrates. The normal left-right anatomic positioning, situs solitus, sometimes does not occur normaly, leading to laterality defects. Studies in animal models have shown that laterality decisions are mediated by a cascade of genes that lead to the asymmetric expression of Nodal, LEFTA, LEFTB and PITX2 in the lateral plate mesoderm. A search for mutations in genes implicated in left-right patterning in animal models allowed genes associated with heterotaxia defects in humans to be identified. However, these genes explain only a small percentage of human situs defects, suggesting that other genes must play a role. In this study, we report a consanguineous family of Turkish origin, composed of two unaffected parents and three children, two of whom presented Kartagener syndrome. On the basis of their family history, we hypothesize autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A genotype analysis with polymorphic markers did not show linkage with any known genes or loci causing laterality disorders. Array CGH did not detect a duplication or microdeletion greater than 1 Mb as a possible cause. Genome wide screening using 10 K Affymetrix SNP chips was performed, allowing the identification of two regions of autozygosity, one in chromosome 1 and the other on chromosome 7. In the chromosome 1 locus, a strong candidate gene, encoding the kinesin-associated protein 3 (KIF3AP) was not mutated, based on SSCP/heteroduplex analysis and direct sequencing. These data provide a basis for the identification of a novel gene implicated in Kartagener syndrome.

  10. Co-localization of growth QTL with differentially expressed candidate genes in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Kocmarek, Andrea L; Ferguson, Moira M; Danzmann, Roy G

    2015-09-01

    We tested whether genes differentially expressed between large and small rainbow trout co-localized with familial QTL regions for body size. Eleven chromosomes, known from previous work to house QTL for weight and length in rainbow trout, were examined for QTL in half-sibling families produced in September (1 XY male and 1 XX neomale) and December (1 XY male). In previous studies, we identified 108 candidate genes for growth expressed in the liver and white muscle in a subset of the fish used in this study. These gene sequences were BLASTN aligned against the rainbow trout and stickleback genomes to determine their location (rainbow trout) and inferred location based on synteny with the stickleback genome. Across the progeny of all three males used in the study, 63.9% of the genes with differential expression appear to co-localize with the QTL regions on 6 of the 11 chromosomes tested in these males. Genes that co-localized with QTL in the mixed-sex offspring of the two XY males primarily showed up-regulation in the muscle of large fish and were related to muscle growth, metabolism, and the stress response.

  11. Identification of Candidate Genes Underlying an Iron Efficiency Quantitative Trait Locus in Soybean1

    PubMed Central

    Peiffer, Gregory A.; King, Keith E.; Severin, Andrew J.; May, Gregory D.; Cianzio, Silvia R.; Lin, Shun Fu; Lauter, Nicholas C.; Shoemaker, Randy C.

    2012-01-01

    Prevalent on calcareous soils in the United States and abroad, iron deficiency is among the most common and severe nutritional stresses in plants. In soybean (Glycine max) commercial plantings, the identification and use of iron-efficient genotypes has proven to be the best form of managing this soil-related plant stress. Previous studies conducted in soybean identified a significant iron efficiency quantitative trait locus (QTL) explaining more than 70% of the phenotypic variation for the trait. In this research, we identified candidate genes underlying this QTL through molecular breeding, mapping, and transcriptome sequencing. Introgression mapping was performed using two related near-isogenic lines in which a region located on soybean chromosome 3 required for iron efficiency was identified. The region corresponds to the previously reported iron efficiency QTL. The location was further confirmed through QTL mapping conducted in this study. Transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction identified two genes encoding transcription factors within the region that were significantly induced in soybean roots under iron stress. The two induced transcription factors were identified as homologs of the subgroup lb basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes that are known to regulate the strategy I response in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Resequencing of these differentially expressed genes unveiled a significant deletion within a predicted dimerization domain. We hypothesize that this deletion disrupts the Fe-DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT)/bHLH heterodimer that has been shown to induce known iron acquisition genes. PMID:22319075

  12. Preliminary assessment of differential expression of candidate genes associated with atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Blin, Joan; Ahmad, Zalinah; Rampal, Lekhraj Rampal S O Gyanchand; Mohtarrudin, Norhafizah; Tajudin, Abdul Karim Haji; Adnan, Rohayu Shahar

    2013-01-01

    Identifying susceptible genes associated with the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis (ATH) may contribute toward better management of this condition. This preliminary study was aimed at assessing the expression levels of 11 candidate genes, namely tumor protein (TP53), transforming growth factor, beta receptor II (TGFBR2), cysthathionenine-beta-synthase (CBS), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), thrombomodulin (THBD), lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (ALOX5AP) genes associated with ATH. Twelve human coronary artery tissues (HCATs) were obtained from deceased subjects who underwent post-mortem procedures. Six atherosclerotic coronary artery tissue (ACAT) samples representing the cases and non-atherosclerotic coronary artery tissue (NCAT) samples as controls were gathered based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Gene expression levels were assessed using the GenomeLab Genetic Analysis System (GeXP). The results showed that LDLR, TP53, and MMP9 expression levels were significantly increased in ACAT compared to NCAT samples (p < 0.05). Thus, LDLR, TP53, and MMP9 genes may play important roles in the development of ATH in a Malaysian study population. PMID:24025248

  13. An integrated genomic approach for rapid delineation of candidate genes regulating agro-morphological traits in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Maneesha S; Bajaj, Deepak; Das, Shouvik; Kujur, Alice; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Mohar; Bansal, Kailash C; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2014-12-01

    The identification and fine mapping of robust quantitative trait loci (QTLs)/genes governing important agro-morphological traits in chickpea still lacks systematic efforts at a genome-wide scale involving wild Cicer accessions. In this context, an 834 simple sequence repeat and single-nucleotide polymorphism marker-based high-density genetic linkage map between cultivated and wild parental accessions (Cicer arietinum desi cv. ICC 4958 and Cicer reticulatum wild cv. ICC 17160) was constructed. This inter-specific genetic map comprising eight linkage groups spanned a map length of 949.4 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 1.14 cM. Eleven novel major genomic regions harbouring 15 robust QTLs (15.6-39.8% R(2) at 4.2-15.7 logarithm of odds) associated with four agro-morphological traits (100-seed weight, pod and branch number/plant and plant hairiness) were identified and mapped on chickpea chromosomes. Most of these QTLs showed positive additive gene effects with effective allelic contribution from ICC 4958, particularly for increasing seed weight (SW) and pod and branch number. One robust SW-influencing major QTL region (qSW4.2) has been narrowed down by combining QTL mapping with high-resolution QTL region-specific association analysis, differential expression profiling and gene haplotype-based association/LD mapping. This enabled to delineate a strong SW-regulating ABI3VP1 transcription factor (TF) gene at trait-specific QTL interval and consequently identified favourable natural allelic variants and superior high seed weight-specific haplotypes in the upstream regulatory region of this gene showing increased transcript expression during seed development. The genes (TFs) harbouring diverse trait-regulating QTLs, once validated and fine-mapped by our developed rapid integrated genomic approach and through gene/QTL map-based cloning, can be utilized as potential candidates for marker-assisted genetic enhancement of chickpea.

  14. Development of candidate gene markers associated to common bacterial blight resistance in common bean.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chun; Yu, Kangfu; Xie, Weilong; Perry, Gregory; Navabi, Alireza; Pauls, K Peter; Miklas, Phillip N; Fourie, Deidré

    2012-11-01

    Common bacterial blight (CBB), caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap), is a major yield-limiting factor of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production around the world. Two major CBB-resistant quantitative trait loci (QTL), linked to the sequence characterized amplified region markers BC420 and SU91, are located at chromosomes 6 and 8, respectively. Using map-based cloning approach, four bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the BC420-QTL locus and one BAC clone containing SU91 were sequenced by Roche 454 technique and subsequently assembled using merged assemblies from three different programs. Based on the quality of the assembly, only the sequences of BAC 32H6 and 4K7 were used for candidate gene marker (CGM) development and candidate gene (CG) selection. For the BC420-QTL locus, 21 novel genes were predicted in silico by FGENESH using Medicago gene model, whereas 16 genes were identified in the SU91-QTL locus. For each putative gene, one or more primer pairs were designed and tested in the contrasting near isogenic lines. Overall, six and nine polymorphic markers were found in the SU91- and BC420-QTL loci, respectively. Afterwards, association mapping was conducted in a breeding population of 395 dry bean lines to discover marker-trait associations. Two CGMs per each locus showed better association with CBB resistance than the BC420 and SU91 markers, which include BC420-CG10B and BC420-CG14 for BC420_QTL locus, and SU91-CG10 and SU91-CG11 for SU91_QTL locus. The strong associations between CBB resistance and the CGs 10 and 14 from BC420_QTL locus and the CGs 10 and 11 from SU91_QTL locus indicate that the genes 10 and 14 from the BC420 locus are potential CGs underlying the BC420_QTL locus, whereas the genes 10 and 11 from the SU91 locus are potential CGs underlying the SU91_QTL locus. The superiority of SU91-CG11 was further validated in a recombinant inbred line population Sanilac × OAC 09-3. Thus, co-dominant CGMs, BC420-CG14 and

  15. Analysis of genetic variants of dyslexia candidate genes KIAA0319 and DCDC2 in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Shyamala K; Siddaiah, Anand; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2013-08-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a heritable, complex genetic disorder associated with impairment in reading and writing skills despite having normal intellectual ability and appropriate educational opportunities. Chromosome 6p23-21.3 at DYX2 locus has showed the most consistent evidence of linkage for DD and two susceptible genes KIAA0319 and DCDC2 for DD at DYX2 locus showed significant association. Specific candidate gene-association studies have identified variants, risk haplotypes and microsatellites of KIAA0319 and DCDC2 correlated with wide range of reading-related traits. In this study, we used a case-control approach for analyzing single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in KIAA0319 and DCDC2. Our study demonstrated the association of DD with SNP rs4504469 of KIAA0319 and not with any SNPs of DCDC2. PMID:23677054

  16. Organ-Specific Quantitative Genetics and Candidate Genes of Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Marta; Ali, Mahmoud; Ferreres, Federico; Moreno, Diego A.; Velasco, Pablo; Soengas, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are proving to be increasingly important for human health and in crop development, defense and adaptation. In spite of the economical importance of Brassica crops in agriculture, the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds presents in these species remain unknown. The genetic and metabolic basis of phenolics accumulation was dissected through analysis of total phenolics concentration and its individual components in leaves, flower buds, and seeds of a double haploid (DH) mapping population of Brassica oleracea. The quantitative trait loci (QTL) that had an effect on phenolics concentration in each organ were integrated, resulting in 33 consensus QTLs controlling phenolics traits. Most of the studied compounds had organ-specific genomic regulation. Moreover, this information allowed us to propose candidate genes and to predict the function of genes underlying the QTL. A number of previously unknown potential regulatory regions involved in phenylpropanoid metabolism were identified and this study illustrates how plant ontogeny can affect a biochemical pathway. PMID:26858727

  17. A strong candidate for the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, Y.; Swenson, J.; Yakumo, K.; Lewis, C.; Neuhausen, S.; Goldgar, D.; Shattuck-Eidens, D.; Harshman, K.; Tavtigian, S.; Liu, Q.

    1994-10-07

    A strong candidate for the 17q-linked BRCA1 gene, which influences susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer, has been identified by positional cloning methods. Probable predisposing mutations have been detected in five of eight kindreds presumed to segregate BRCA1 susceptibility alleles. The mutations include an 11-base pair deletion, a 1-base pair insertion, a stop codon, a missense substitution, and an inferred regulatory mutation. The BRCA1 gene is expressed in numerous tissues, including breast and ovary, and encodes a predicted protein of 1863 amino acids. This protein contains a zinc finger domain in its amino-terminal region, but is otherwise unrelated to previously described proteins. Identification of BRCA1 should facilitate early diagnosis of breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility in some individuals as well as a better understanding of breast cancer biology.

  18. Methods for detecting additional genes underlying Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Locke, P.A.; Haines, J.L.; Ter-Minassian, M.

    1994-09-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is a complex inherited disorder with proven genetic heterogeneity. To date, genes on chromosome 21 (APP) and 14 (not yet identified) are associated with early-onset familial AD, while the APOE gene on chromosome 19 is associated with both late onset familial and sporadic AD and early onset sporadic AD. Although these genes likely account for the majority of AD, many familial cases cannot be traced to any of these genes. From a set of 127 late-onset multiplex families screened for APOE, 43 (34%) families have at least one affected individual with no APOE-4 allele, suggesting an alternative genetic etiology. Simulation studies indicated that additional loci could be identified through a genomic screen with a 10 cM sieve on a subset of 21 well documented, non-APOE-4 families. Given the uncertainties in the mode of inheritance, reliance on a single analytical method could result in a missed linkage. Therefore, we have developed a strategy of using multiple overlapping yet complementary methods to detect linkage. These include sib-pair analysis and affected-pedigree-member analysis, neither of which makes assumptions about mode of inheritance, and lod score analysis (using two predefined genetic models). In order for a marker to qualify for follow-up, it must fit at least two of three criteria. These are nominal P values of 0.05 or less for the non-parametric methods, and/or a lod score greater than 1.0. Adjacent markers each fulfilling a single criterion also warrant follow-up. To date, we have screened 61 markers on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 18, 19, 21, and 22. One marker, D2S163, generated a lod score of 1.06 ({theta} = 0.15) and an APMT statistic of 3.68 (P < 0.001). This region is currently being investigated in more detail. Updated results of this region plus additional screening data will be presented.

  19. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Culm Cellulose Content in Barley Reveals Candidate Genes Co-Expressed with Members of the CELLULOSE SYNTHASE A Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Kelly; Burton, Rachel A.; Sznajder, Beata; Rafalski, Antoni J.; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S.; Mather, Diane E.; Taylor, Jillian; Steffenson, Brian J.; Waugh, Robbie; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is a fundamentally important component of cell walls of higher plants. It provides a scaffold that allows the development and growth of the plant to occur in an ordered fashion. Cellulose also provides mechanical strength, which is crucial for both normal development and to enable the plant to withstand both abiotic and biotic stresses. We quantified the cellulose concentration in the culm of 288 two – rowed and 288 six – rowed spring type barley accessions that were part of the USDA funded barley Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP) program in the USA. When the population structure of these accessions was analysed we identified six distinct populations, four of which we considered to be comprised of a sufficient number of accessions to be suitable for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These lines had been genotyped with 3072 SNPs so we combined the trait and genetic data to carry out GWAS. The analysis allowed us to identify regions of the genome containing significant associations between molecular markers and cellulose concentration data, including one region cross-validated in multiple populations. To identify candidate genes we assembled the gene content of these regions and used these to query a comprehensive RNA-seq based gene expression atlas. This provided us with gene annotations and associated expression data across multiple tissues, which allowed us to formulate a supported list of candidate genes that regulate cellulose biosynthesis. Several regions identified by our analysis contain genes that are co-expressed with CELLULOSE SYNTHASE A (HvCesA) across a range of tissues and developmental stages. These genes are involved in both primary and secondary cell wall development. In addition, genes that have been previously linked with cellulose synthesis by biochemical methods, such as HvCOBRA, a gene of unknown function, were also associated with cellulose levels in the association panel. Our analyses provide new insights into the

  20. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Culm Cellulose Content in Barley Reveals Candidate Genes Co-Expressed with Members of the CELLULOSE SYNTHASE A Gene Family.

    PubMed

    Houston, Kelly; Burton, Rachel A; Sznajder, Beata; Rafalski, Antoni J; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S; Mather, Diane E; Taylor, Jillian; Steffenson, Brian J; Waugh, Robbie; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is a fundamentally important component of cell walls of higher plants. It provides a scaffold that allows the development and growth of the plant to occur in an ordered fashion. Cellulose also provides mechanical strength, which is crucial for both normal development and to enable the plant to withstand both abiotic and biotic stresses. We quantified the cellulose concentration in the culm of 288 two--rowed and 288 six--rowed spring type barley accessions that were part of the USDA funded barley Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP) program in the USA. When the population structure of these accessions was analysed we identified six distinct populations, four of which we considered to be comprised of a sufficient number of accessions to be suitable for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These lines had been genotyped with 3072 SNPs so we combined the trait and genetic data to carry out GWAS. The analysis allowed us to identify regions of the genome containing significant associations between molecular markers and cellulose concentration data, including one region cross-validated in multiple populations. To identify candidate genes we assembled the gene content of these regions and used these to query a comprehensive RNA-seq based gene expression atlas. This provided us with gene annotations and associated expression data across multiple tissues, which allowed us to formulate a supported list of candidate genes that regulate cellulose biosynthesis. Several regions identified by our analysis contain genes that are co-expressed with cellulose synthase A (HvCesA) across a range of tissues and developmental stages. These genes are involved in both primary and secondary cell wall development. In addition, genes that have been previously linked with cellulose synthesis by biochemical methods, such as HvCOBRA, a gene of unknown function, were also associated with cellulose levels in the association panel. Our analyses provide new insights into the genes that

  1. Flower Development and Perianth Identity Candidate Genes in the Basal Angiosperm Aristolochia fimbriata (Piperales: Aristolochiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Pabón-Mora, Natalia; Suárez-Baron, Harold; Ambrose, Barbara A.; González, Favio

    2015-01-01

    Aristolochia fimbriata (Aristolochiaceae: Piperales) exhibits highly synorganized flowers with a single convoluted structure forming a petaloid perianth that surrounds the gynostemium, putatively formed by the congenital fusion between stamens and the upper portion of the carpels. Here we present the flower development and morphology of A. fimbriata, together with the expression of the key regulatory genes that participate in flower development, particularly those likely controlling perianth identity. A. fimbriata is a member of the magnoliids, and thus gene expression detected for all ABCE MADS-box genes in this taxon, can also help to elucidate patterns of gene expression prior the independent duplications of these genes in eudicots and monocots. Using both floral development and anatomy in combination with the isolation of MADS-box gene homologs, gene phylogenetic analyses and expression studies (both by reverse transcription PCR and in situ hybridization), we present hypotheses on floral organ identity genes involved in the formation of this bizarre flower. We found that most MADS-box genes were expressed in vegetative and reproductive tissues with the exception of AfimSEP2, AfimAGL6, and AfimSTK transcripts that are only found in flowers and capsules but are not detected in leaves. Two genes show ubiquitous expression; AfimFUL that is found in all floral organs at all developmental stages as well as in leaves and capsules, and AfimAG that has low expression in leaves and is found in all floral organs at all stages with a considerable reduction of expression in the limb of anthetic flowers. Our results indicate that expression of AfimFUL is indicative of pleiotropic roles and not of a perianth identity specific function. On the other hand, expression of B-class genes, AfimAP3 and AfimPI, suggests their conserved role in stamen identity and corroborates that the perianth is sepal and not petal-derived. Our data also postulates an AGL6 ortholog as a candidate

  2. Gene sequence, localization, and evolutionary conservation of DAZLA, a candidate male sterility gene.

    PubMed

    Seboun, E; Barbaux, S; Bourgeron, T; Nishi, S; Agulnik, A; Egashira, M; Nikkawa, N; Bishop, C; Fellous, M; McElreavey, K; Kasahara, M; Algonik, A

    1997-04-15

    We have isolated the human homologue of the mouse germ cell-specific transcript Tpx2, which we had previously mapped to mouse chromosome 17. Sequence analysis shows that the human gene is part of the DAZ (Deleted in Azoospermia) family, represents the human homologue of the mouse Dazla and Drosophila boule genes, and is termed DAZLA. Like Dazla and boule, DAZLA is single copy and maps to 3p25. This defines a new region of synteny between mouse chromosome 17 and human chromosome 3. Unlike DAZ, which has multiple DAZ repeats, DAZLA encodes a putative RNA-binding protein with a single RNA-binding motif and a single DAZ repeat. DAZLA is more closely related to Dazla in the mouse than to the Y-linked homologue DAZ (88% identity overall with mouse Dazla compared to 76% identity with the human DAZ protein sequence). Southern blot analysis showed that DAZLA is autosomal in all mammals tested and that DAZ has been recently translocated to the Y chromosome, sometime after the divergence of Old World and New World primates. To investigate the evolutionary relatedness of DAZLA and DAZ further, their partial genomic structures were obtained and compared. This revealed that the genomic organization of both genes in the 5' region is highly conserved. DAZLA is a new member of the DAZ family of genes, which is associated with spermatogenesis and male sterility. Familial cases of male infertility in humans show an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. It is possible that some of these families may carry mutations in the DAZLA gene.

  3. Gene Expression in Experimental Aortic Coarctation and Repair: Candidate Genes for Therapeutic Intervention?

    PubMed Central

    LaDisa, John F.; Bozdag, Serdar; Olson, Jessica; Ramchandran, Ramani; Kersten, Judy R.; Eddinger, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is a constriction of the proximal descending thoracic aorta and is one of the most common congenital cardiovascular defects. Treatments for CoA improve life expectancy, but morbidity persists, particularly due to the development of chronic hypertension (HTN). Identifying the mechanisms of morbidity is difficult in humans due to confounding variables such as age at repair, follow-up duration, coarctation severity and concurrent anomalies. We previously developed an experimental model that replicates aortic pathology in humans with CoA without these confounding variables, and mimics correction at various times using dissolvable suture. Here we present the most comprehensive description of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) to date from the pathology of CoA, which were obtained using this model. Aortic samples (n=4/group) from the ascending aorta that experiences elevated blood pressure (BP) from induction of CoA, and restoration of normal BP after its correction, were analyzed by gene expression microarray, and enriched genes were converted to human orthologues. 51 DEGs with >6 fold-change (FC) were used to determine enriched Gene Ontology terms, altered pathways, and association with National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headers (MeSH) IDs for HTN, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CoA. The results generated 18 pathways, 4 of which (cell cycle, immune system, hemostasis and metabolism) were shared with MeSH ID’s for HTN and CVD, and individual genes were associated with the CoA MeSH ID. A thorough literature search further uncovered association with contractile, cytoskeletal and regulatory proteins related to excitation-contraction coupling and metabolism that may explain the structural and functional changes observed in our experimental model, and ultimately help to unravel the mechanisms responsible for persistent morbidity after treatment for CoA. PMID:26207811

  4. A Candidate Gene Association Study Further Corroborates Involvement of Contactin Genes in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Poot, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorder (ASD) shows a high degree of heritability, only a few mutated genes and mostly de novo copy number variations (CNVs) with a high phenotypic impact have as yet been identified. In families with multiple ASD patients, transmitted CNVs often do not appear to cosegregate with disease. Therefore, also transmitted single nucleotide variants which escape detection if genetic analyses were limited to CNVs may contribute to disease risk. In several studies of ASD patients, CNVs covering at least one gene of the contactin gene family were found. To determine whether there is evidence for a contribution of transmitted variants in contactin genes, a cohort of 67 ASD patients and a population-based reference of 117 healthy individuals, who were not related to the ASD families, were compared. In total, 1,648 SNPs, spanning 12.1 Mb of genomic DNA, were examined. After Bonferroni correction for multiple testing, the strongest signal was found for a SNP located within the CNTN5 gene (rs6590473 [G], p = 4.09 × 10-7; OR = 3.117; 95% CI = 1.603-6.151). In the ASD cohort, a combination of risk alleles of SNPs in CNTN6 (rs9878022 [A]; OR = 3.749) and in CNTNAP2 (rs7804520 [G]; OR = 2.437) was found more frequently than would be expected under random segregation, albeit this association was not statistically significant. The latter finding is consistent with a polygenic disease model in which multiple mutagenic mechanisms, operating concomitantly, elicit the ASD phenotype. Altogether, this study corroborates the possible involvement of contactins in ASD, which has been indicated by earlier studies of CNVs. PMID:25337070

  5. Candidate Genes for Respiratory Disease Associated with Markers of Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction in Elderly Men

    PubMed Central

    Wilker, Elissa H.; Alexeeff, Stacey E.; Poon, Audrey; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Schwartz, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We hypothesized that candidate genes selected for a study of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) are associated with markers of systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in an aging population. Methods Plasma levels of circulating C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were obtained from 679 elderly male participants in the Normative Aging Study. Blood samples were analyzed for 202 SNPs in 25 candidate genes and included both haplotype tagSNPs and functional SNPs based on literature review. Data were stratified into discovery and replication cohorts for 2-stage analysis. In the discovery cohort, the relationship between biomarker level and genotype was analyzed using linear mixed effects with random intercepts for each subject and models were adjusted for age and BMI. A positive outcome in the discovery cohort was defined as a p-value <0.1 for the SNP. SNPs that met this criterion were analyzed in the replication cohort and confirmed for those which met a criterion of significance (p<0.025). Results In our analyses, SNPs in the CRHR1, ITPR2, and VDR genes met criteria of significant effects. Conclusions Our results suggest that genes thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma and COPD may influence levels of serum markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction via novel SNP associations which have not previously been associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:19409562

  6. Voluntary wheel running reduces voluntary consumption of ethanol in mice: identification of candidate genes through striatal gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Darlington, T M; McCarthy, R D; Cox, R J; Miyamoto-Ditmon, J; Gallego, X; Ehringer, M A

    2016-06-01

    Hedonic substitution, where wheel running reduces voluntary ethanol consumption, has been observed in prior studies. Here, we replicate and expand on previous work showing that mice decrease voluntary ethanol consumption and preference when given access to a running wheel. While earlier work has been limited mainly to behavioral studies, here we assess the underlying molecular mechanisms that may account for this interaction. From four groups of female C57BL/6J mice (control, access to two-bottle choice ethanol, access to a running wheel, and access to both two-bottle choice ethanol and a running wheel), mRNA-sequencing of the striatum identified differential gene expression. Many genes in ethanol preference quantitative trait loci were differentially expressed due to running. Furthermore, we conducted Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis and identified gene networks corresponding to each effect behavioral group. Candidate genes for mediating the behavioral interaction between ethanol consumption and wheel running include multiple potassium channel genes, Oprm1, Prkcg, Stxbp1, Crhr1, Gabra3, Slc6a13, Stx1b, Pomc, Rassf5 and Camta2. After observing an overlap of many genes and functional groups previously identified in studies of initial sensitivity to ethanol, we hypothesized that wheel running may induce a change in sensitivity, thereby affecting ethanol consumption. A behavioral study examining Loss of Righting Reflex to ethanol following exercise trended toward supporting this hypothesis. These data provide a rich resource for future studies that may better characterize the observed transcriptional changes in gene networks in response to ethanol consumption and wheel running. PMID:27063791

  7. Murine candidate bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis susceptibility genes identified by gene expression and sequence analysis of linkage regions

    PubMed Central

    Haston, C; Tomko, T; Godin, N; Kerckhoff, L; Hallett, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary fibrosis is a complex disease for which the predisposing genetic variants remain unknown. In a prior study, susceptibility to bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis was mapped to loci Blmpf1 and Blmpf2 on chromosomes 17 and 11, respectively, in a C57BL/6J (B6, susceptible) and C3Hf/KAM (C3H, resistant) mouse cross. Methods: Herein, the genetic basis of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis was investigated in an approach combining gene expression and sequencing data with previously mapped linkage intervals. Results: In this study, gene expression analysis with microarrays revealed 1892 genes or ESTs (expressed sequence tags) to be differentially expressed between bleomycin treated B6 and C3H mice and 67 of these genetic elements map to Blmpf1 or Blmpf2. This group included genes involved in an oxidative stress response, in apoptosis, and in immune regulation. A comparison of the B6 and C3H sequence, for Blmpf1 and Blmpf2, made using the NCBI database and available C3H sequence, revealed approximately 35% of the genes in these regions contain non-synonymous coding sequence changes. An assessment of genotype/phenotype correlation among other inbred strains revealed 36% of these B6/C3H sequence variations predict for the known bleomycin induced fibrosis susceptibility of the DBA (susceptible) and A/J (resistant) mouse strains. Conclusions: Combining genomics approaches of differential gene expression and sequence variation potentially identifies approximately 5% the linked genes as fibrosis susceptibility candidate genes in this mouse cross. PMID:15937080

  8. Voluntary wheel running reduces voluntary consumption of ethanol in mice: identification of candidate genes through striatal gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Darlington, T M; McCarthy, R D; Cox, R J; Miyamoto-Ditmon, J; Gallego, X; Ehringer, M A

    2016-06-01

    Hedonic substitution, where wheel running reduces voluntary ethanol consumption, has been observed in prior studies. Here, we replicate and expand on previous work showing that mice decrease voluntary ethanol consumption and preference when given access to a running wheel. While earlier work has been limited mainly to behavioral studies, here we assess the underlying molecular mechanisms that may account for this interaction. From four groups of female C57BL/6J mice (control, access to two-bottle choice ethanol, access to a running wheel, and access to both two-bottle choice ethanol and a running wheel), mRNA-sequencing of the striatum identified differential gene expression. Many genes in ethanol preference quantitative trait loci were differentially expressed due to running. Furthermore, we conducted Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis and identified gene networks corresponding to each effect behavioral group. Candidate genes for mediating the behavioral interaction between ethanol consumption and wheel running include multiple potassium channel genes, Oprm1, Prkcg, Stxbp1, Crhr1, Gabra3, Slc6a13, Stx1b, Pomc, Rassf5 and Camta2. After observing an overlap of many genes and functional groups previously identified in studies of initial sensitivity to ethanol, we hypothesized that wheel running may induce a change in sensitivity, thereby affecting ethanol consumption. A behavioral study examining Loss of Righting Reflex to ethanol following exercise trended toward supporting this hypothesis. These data provide a rich resource for future studies that may better characterize the observed transcriptional changes in gene networks in response to ethanol consumption and wheel running.

  9. Search of phenotype related candidate genes using gene ontology-based semantic similarity and protein interaction information: application to Brugada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Massanet, Raimon; Gallardo-Chacon, Joan-Josep; Caminal, Pere; Perera, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a methodology for finding phenotype candidate genes starting from a set of known related genes. This is accomplished by automatically mining and organizing the available scientific literature using Gene Ontology-based semantic similarity. As a case study, Brugada syndrome related genes have been used as input in order to obtain a list of other possible candidate genes related with this disease. Brugada anomaly produces a typical alteration in the Electrocardiogram and carriers of the disease show an increased probability of sudden death. Results show a set of semantically coherent proteins that are shown to be related with synaptic transmission and muscle contraction physiological processes.

  10. Transcriptome analysis reveals candidate genes involved in luciferin metabolism in Luciola aquatilis (Coleoptera: Lampyridae)

    PubMed Central

    Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Chumnanpuen, Pramote

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence, which living organisms such as fireflies emit light, has been studied extensively for over half a century. This intriguing reaction, having its origins in nature where glowing insects can signal things such as attraction or defense, is now widely used in biotechnology with applications of bioluminescence and chemiluminescence. Luciferase, a key enzyme in this reaction, has been well characterized; however, the enzymes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of its substrate, luciferin, remains unsolved at present. To elucidate the luciferin metabolism, we performed a de novo transcriptome analysis using larvae of the firefly species, Luciola aquatilis. Here, a comparative analysis is performed with the model coleopteran insect Tribolium casteneum to elucidate the metabolic pathways in L. aquatilis. Based on a template luciferin biosynthetic pathway, combined with a range of protein and pathway databases, and various prediction tools for functional annotation, the candidate genes, enzymes, and biochemical reactions involved in luciferin metabolism are proposed for L. aquatilis. The candidate gene expression is validated in the adult L. aquatilis using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). This study provides useful information on the bio-production of luciferin in the firefly and will benefit to future applications of the valuable firefly bioluminescence system. PMID:27761329

  11. Identification of QTLs and possible candidate genes conferring sheath blight resistance in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shailesh; Anuradha, Ghanta; Kumar, Ravi Ranjan; Vemireddy, Lakshminaryana Reddy; Sudhakar, Ravuru; Donempudi, Krishnaveni; Venkata, Durgarani; Jabeen, Farzana; Narasimhan, Yamini Kalinati; Marathi, Balram; Siddiq, Ebrahimali Abubacker

    2015-01-01

    Sheath blight, caused by the pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani Kühn, is one of the most devastating diseases in rice. Breeders have always faced challenges in acquiring reliable and absolute resistance to this disease in existing rice germplasm. In this context, 40 rice germplasm including eight wild, four landraces, twenty- six cultivated and two advanced breeding lines were screened utilizing the colonized bits of typha. Except Tetep and ARC10531 which expressed moderate level of resistance to the disease, none could be found to be authentically resistant. In order to map the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) governing the sheath blight resistance, two mapping populations (F2 and BC1F2) were developed from the cross BPT-5204/ARC10531. Utilizing composite interval mapping analysis, 9 QTLs mapped to five different chromosomes were identified with phenotypic variance ranging from 8.40 to 21.76%. Two SSR markers namely RM336 and RM205 were found to be closely associated with the major QTLs qshb7.3 and qshb9.2 respectively and were attested as well in BC1F2 population by bulk segregant analysis approach. A hypothetical β 1-3 glucanase with other 31 candidate genes were identified in silico utilizing rice database RAP-DB within the identified QTL region qshb9.2. A detailed insight into these candidate genes will facilitate at molecular level the intricate nature of sheath blight, a step forward towards functional genomics.

  12. Pentatricopeptide repeat 336 as the candidate gene for paternal sorting of mitochondria (Psm) in cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Del Valle-Echevarria, A. R.; Sanseverino, W.; Garcia-Mas, J.

    2016-01-01

    Key message Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) 336 was identified as the candidate gene for Paternal Sorting of Mitochondria (Psm), a nuclear locus that affects the predominant mitochondria transmitted to progenies. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is a useful plant to study organellar-nuclear interactions because its organelles show differential transmission, maternal for chloroplasts and paternal for mitochondria. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of cucumber is relatively large due in part to accumulation of repetitive DNAs and recombination among these repetitive regions produces structurally polymorphic mtDNAs associated with paternally transmitted mosaic (MSC) phenotypes. The mitochondrial mutant MSC16 possesses an under-representation of ribosomal protein S7 (rps7), a key component of the small ribosomal subunit in the mitochondrion. A nuclear locus, Paternal Sorting of Mitochondria (Psm), affects the predominant mitochondria transmitted to progenies generated from crosses with MSC16 as the male parent. Using single nucleotide polymorphisms, Psm was mapped to a 170 kb region on chromosome 3 of cucumber and pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) 336 was identified as the likely candidate gene. PPR336 stabilizes mitochondrial ribosomes in Arabidopsis thaliana and because MSC16 shows reduced transcription of rps7, the cucumber homolog of PPR336 (CsPPR336) as the candidate for Psm is consistent with a nuclear effect on ribosome assembly or stability in the mitochondrion. We used polymorphisms in CsPPR336 to genotype progenies segregating at Psm and recovered only one Psm−/− plant with the MSC phenotype, indicating that the combination of the Psm− allele with mitochondria from MSC16 is almost always lethal. This research illustrates the usefulness of the MSC mutants of cucumber to reveal and study unique interactions between the mitochondrion and nucleus. PMID:27423873

  13. GDF9 as a candidate gene for prolificacy of Small Tail Han sheep.

    PubMed

    Chu, M X; Yang, J; Feng, T; Cao, G L; Fang, L; Di, R; Huang, D W; Tang, Q Q; Ma, Y H; Li, K; Li, N

    2011-11-01

    Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) which controls the fecundity of Belclare, Cambridge, Santa Ines, Moghani, Ghezel and Thoka ewes was studied as a candidate gene for the prolificacy of Small Tail Han sheep. According to the sequence of ovine GDF9 gene, six pairs of primers were designed to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms of two exons of GDF9 gene in both high fecundity breed (Small Tail Han sheep) and low fecundity breed (Dorset sheep) by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). Only the products amplified by primers 2-1 and 2-2 displayed polymorphisms. For primer 2-1, three genotypes (AA, AB and BB) were detected in both sheep breeds. Sequencing revealed one silent mutation (G477A) in exon 2 of GDF9 gene in the BB genotype in comparison with the AA, which was known as G3 mutation of GDF9 gene in Belclare and Cambridge ewes. The relationship of least squares means for litter size was AA > AB > BB in Small Tail Han sheep (P > 0.05). For primer 2-2, two genotypes (CC and CD) were detected in both sheep breeds. Sequencing revealed one novel single nucleotide mutation (G729T) in exon 2 of GDF9 gene in the CD genotype in comparison with the CC, which resulted in an amino acid change (Gln243His). The ewes with mutation heterozygous genotype CD had 0.77 (P < 0.01) lambs more than those with wild type CC in Small Tail Han sheep. These results preliminarily indicated that allele D of GDF9 gene was a potential genetic marker for improving litter size in Small Tail Han sheep.

  14. High resolution ArrayCGH and expression profiling identifies PTPRD and PCDH17/PCH68 as tumor suppressor gene candidates in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Giefing, Maciej; Zemke, Natalia; Brauze, Damian; Kostrzewska-Poczekaj, Magdalena; Luczak, Magdalena; Szaumkessel, Marcin; Pelinska, Kinga; Kiwerska, Katarzyna; Tönnies, Holger; Grenman, Reidar; Figlerowicz, Marek; Siebert, Reiner; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Jarmuz, Malgorzata

    2011-03-01

    Many classical tumor suppressor genes (TSG) were identified by delineation of bi-allelic losses called homozygous deletions. To identify systematically homozygous deletions in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and to unravel novel putative tumor suppressor genes, we screened 10 LSCC cell lines using high resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH) and array based expression analysis. ArrayCGH identified altogether 113 regions harboring protein coding genes that showed strong reduction in copy number indicating a potential homozygous deletion. Out of the 113 candidate regions, 22 novel homozygous deletions that affected the coding sequences of 15 genes were confirmed by multiplexPCR. Three genes were homozygously lost in two cell lines: PCDH17/PCH68, PRR20, and PTPRD. For the 15 homozygously deleted genes, four showed statistically significant downregulation of expression in LSCC cell lines as compared with normal human laryngeal controls. These were ATG7 (1/10 cell line), ZMYND11 (BS69) (1/10 cell line), PCDH17/PCH68 (9/10 cell lines), and PTPRD (7/10 cell lines). Quantitative real-time PCR was used to confirm the downregulation of the candidate genes in 10 expression array-studied cell lines and an additional cohort of cell lines; statistical significant downregulation of PCDH17/PCH68 and PTPRD was observed. In line with this also Western blot analyses demonstrated a complete absence of the PCDH17 and PTPRD proteins. Thus, expression profiling confirmed recurrent alterations of two genes identified primarily by delineation of homozygous deletions. These were PCDH17/PCH68, the protocadherin gene, and the STAT3 inhibiting receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase gene PTPRD. These genes are good candidates for novel TSG in LSCC.

  15. Genetic susceptibility to heroin addiction; a candidate-gene association study

    PubMed Central

    Levran, O.; Londono, D.; O’Hara, K.; Nielsen, D. A.; Peles, E.; Rotrosen, J.; Casadonte, P.; Linzy, S.; Randesi, M.; Ott, J.; Adelson, M.; Kreek, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a chronic complex disease with a substantial genetic contribution. This study was designed to identify genetic variants that are associated with susceptibility to develop heroin addiction, by analyzing 1350 variants in 130 candidate genes. All subjects had Caucasian ancestry. The sample consisted of 412 former severe heroin addicts in methadone treatment, and 184 healthy controls with no history of drug abuse. Nine variants, in six genes, showed the lowest nominal P values in the association tests (P < 0.01). These variants were in non-coding regions of the genes encoding the mu (OPRM1; rs510769, rs3778151), kappa (OPRK1; rs6473797), and delta opioid receptors, (OPRD1; rs2236861, rs2236857 and rs3766951), the neuropeptide galanin (GAL; rs694066), the serotonin receptor subtype 3B (HTR3B; rs3758987) and the casein kinase 1 isoform epsilon (CSNK1E; rs1534891). Several haplotypes and multi-locus genotype patterns showed nominally significant associations (e.g. OPRM1; P = 0.0006 and CSNK1E; P = 0.0007). Analysis of a combined effect of OPRM1 and OPRD1 showed that rs510769 and rs2236861 increase the risk of heroin addiction (P = 0.0005). None of these associations remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. This study suggests the involvement of several genes and variants in heroin addiction that is worthy of future study. PMID:18518925

  16. Evaluation of position effect variegation of the transcription of genes from the FSHD candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, S.T.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Altherr, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    The gene for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) lies in close proximity to the telomere of 4q. Deletion of several copies of a 3.2 kb tandem repeat have been associated with FSHD, although no genes have been identified within this repeat. We have shown that this repeat, as well as other repeats in the FSHD region, resemble constitutive heterochromatin both by sequence analysis and FISH cross-hybridization. We hypothesize that alterations in chromatin structure near the telomere of 4q due to deletion of these heterochromatic elements may lead to a position effect variegation of nearby genes. To test this hypothesis, we have isolated exons and candidate cDNAs from the FSHD region. A 2 kb polyadenylated cDNA was isolated from both fetal and infant brain cDNA libraries. Another cDNA hybridizes to a 7 kb skeletal muscle transcript on a Northern blot. Both of these cDNAs are chromosome 4-specific and map to the FSHD region. We have examined the expression pattern of these genes by RT-PCR, RNase protection and Northern analysis. Total RNA was isolated from normal and FSHD-affected lymphoblasts and from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids in which the normal and affected chromosomes 4 from FSHD patients were segregated. RT-PCR and RNase protection were then employed as quantitive assays to evaluate the potential for position effect variegation on RNA production in FSHD patients.

  17. High-density polymorphisms analysis of 23 candidate genes for association with bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Sylvie; Elfassihi, Latifa; Clément, Valérie; Bussières, Johanne; Bureau, Alexandre; Cole, David E C; Rousseau, François

    2010-11-01

    Osteoporosis is a bone disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD), a highly heritable and polygenic trait. Women are more prone than men to develop osteoporosis due to a lower peak bone mass and accelerated bone loss at menopause. Peak bone mass has been convincingly shown to be due to genetic factors with heritability up to 80%. Menopausal bone loss has been shown to have around 38% to 49% heritability depending on the site studied. To have more statistical power to detect small genetic effects we focused on premenopausal women. We studied 23 candidate genes, some involved in calcium and vitamin-D regulation and others because estrogens strongly induced their gene expression in mice where it was correlated with humerus trabecular bone density. High-density polymorphisms were selected to cover the entire gene variability and 231 polymorphisms were genotyped in a first sample of 709 premenopausal women. Positive associations were retested in a second, independent, sample of 673 premenopausal women. Ten polymorphisms remained associated with BMD in the combined samples and one was further associated in a large sample of postmenopausal women (1401 women). This associated polymorphism was located in the gene CSF3R (granulocyte colony stimulating factor receptor) that had never been associated with BMD before. The results reported in this study suggest a role for CSF3R in the determination of bone density in women.

  18. Molecular basis of albinism in India: evaluation of seven potential candidate genes and some new findings.

    PubMed

    Mondal, M; Sengupta, M; Samanta, S; Sil, A; Ray, K

    2012-12-15

    Albinism represents a group of genetic disorders with a broad spectrum of hypopigmentary phenotypes dependent on the genetic background of the patients. Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) patients have little or no pigment in their eyes, skin and hair, whereas ocular albinism (OA) primarily presents the ocular symptoms, and the skin and hair color may vary from near normal to very fair. Mutations in genes directly or indirectly regulating melanin production are responsible for different forms of albinism with overlapping clinical features. In this study, 27 albinistic individuals from 24 families were screened for causal variants by a PCR-sequencing based approach. TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, SLC45A2, SLC24A5, TYRP2 and SILV were selected as candidate genes. We identified 5 TYR and 3 OCA2 mutations, majority in homozygous state, in 8 unrelated patients including a case of autosomal recessive ocular albinism (AROA). A homozygous 4-nucleotide novel insertion in SLC24A5 was detected in a person showing with extreme cutaneous hypopigmentation. A potential causal variant was identified in the TYRP2 gene in a single patient. Haplotype analyses in the patients carrying homozygous mutations in the classical OCA genes suggested founder effect. This is the first report of an Indian AROA patient harboring a mutation in OCA2. Our results also reveal for the first time that mutations in SLC24A5 could contribute to extreme hypopigmentation in humans. PMID:23010199

  19. Refining the locus for Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and mutation analysis of the candidate gene ROM1

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, B.E.; Stone, E.M.; Sheffield, V.C. ); McInnes, R.; Bascom, R. ); Litt, M. )

    1994-01-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease) is an autosomal dominant macular dystrophy which shares important clinical features with age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of legal blindness in the elderly. Unfortunately, understanding and treatment for this common age-related disorder is limited. Discovery of the gene which causes Best disease has the potential to increase the understanding of the pathogenesis of all types of macular degeneration, including the common age-related form. Best disease has recently been mapped to chromosome 11q13. The photoreceptor-specific protein ROM1 has also been recently mapped to this location, and the ROM1 gene is a candidate gene for Best disease. Using highly polymorphic markers, the authors have narrowed the genetic region which contains the Best disease gene to the 10-cM region between markers D11S871 and PYGM. Marker D11S956 demonstrated no recombinants with Best disease in three large families and resulted in a lod score of 18.2. In addition, a polymorphism within the ROM1 gene also demonstrated no recombinants and resulted in a lod score of 10.0 in these same three families. The authors used a combination of SSCP analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing to screen the entire coding region of the ROM1 gene in 11 different unrelated patients affected with Best disease. No nucleotide changes were found in the coding sequence of any affected patient, indicating that mutations within the coding sequence are unlikely to cause Best disease. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Fine Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis of the Leaf-Color Gene ygl-1 in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Haiying; Xu, Xiangbo; He, Chunmei; Liu, Chunxiao; Liu, Qiang; Dong, Rui; Liu, Tieshan; Wang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A novel yellow-green leaf mutant yellow-green leaf-1 (ygl-1) was isolated in self-pollinated progenies from the cross of maize inbred lines Ye478 and Yuanwu02. The mutant spontaneously showed yellow-green character throughout the lifespan. Meanwhile, the mutant reduced contents of chlorophyll and Car, arrested chloroplast development and lowered the capacity of photosynthesis compared with the wild-type Lx7226. Genetic analysis revealed that the mutant phenotype was controlled by a recessive nuclear gene. The ygl-1 locus was initially mapped to an interval of about 0.86 Mb in bin 1.01 on the short arm of chromosome 1 using 231 yellow-green leaf individuals of an F2 segregating population from ygl-1/Lx7226. Utilizing four new polymorphic SSR markers, the ygl-1 locus was narrowed down to a region of about 48 kb using 2930 and 2247 individuals of F2 and F3 mapping populations, respectively. Among the three predicted genes annotated within this 48 kb region, GRMZM2G007441, which was predicted to encode a cpSRP43 protein, had a 1-bp nucleotide deletion in the coding region of ygl-1 resulting in a frame shift mutation. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that YGL-1 was constitutively expressed in all tested tissues and its expression level was not significantly affected in the ygl-1 mutant from early to mature stages, while light intensity regulated its expression both in the ygl-1 mutant and wild type seedlings. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of some genes involved in chloroplast development were affected in the six-week old ygl-1 plants. These findings suggested that YGL-1 plays an important role in chloroplast development of maize. PMID:27100184

  1. Fine Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis of the Leaf-Color Gene ygl-1 in Maize.

    PubMed

    Guan, Haiying; Xu, Xiangbo; He, Chunmei; Liu, Chunxiao; Liu, Qiang; Dong, Rui; Liu, Tieshan; Wang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A novel yellow-green leaf mutant yellow-green leaf-1 (ygl-1) was isolated in self-pollinated progenies from the cross of maize inbred lines Ye478 and Yuanwu02. The mutant spontaneously showed yellow-green character throughout the lifespan. Meanwhile, the mutant reduced contents of chlorophyll and Car, arrested chloroplast development and lowered the capacity of photosynthesis compared with the wild-type Lx7226. Genetic analysis revealed that the mutant phenotype was controlled by a recessive nuclear gene. The ygl-1 locus was initially mapped to an interval of about 0.86 Mb in bin 1.01 on the short arm of chromosome 1 using 231 yellow-green leaf individuals of an F2 segregating population from ygl-1/Lx7226. Utilizing four new polymorphic SSR markers, the ygl-1 locus was narrowed down to a region of about 48 kb using 2930 and 2247 individuals of F2 and F3 mapping populations, respectively. Among the three predicted genes annotated within this 48 kb region, GRMZM2G007441, which was predicted to encode a cpSRP43 protein, had a 1-bp nucleotide deletion in the coding region of ygl-1 resulting in a frame shift mutation. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that YGL-1 was constitutively expressed in all tested tissues and its expression level was not significantly affected in the ygl-1 mutant from early to mature stages, while light intensity regulated its expression both in the ygl-1 mutant and wild type seedlings. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of some genes involved in chloroplast development were affected in the six-week old ygl-1 plants. These findings suggested that YGL-1 plays an important role in chloroplast development of maize.

  2. Genome-Wide Scans for Delineation of Candidate Genes Regulating Seed-Protein Content in Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Bajaj, Deepak; Narnoliya, Laxmi; Das, Shouvik; Kumar, Vinod; Gowda, C. L. L.; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of potential genes/alleles governing complex seed-protein content (SPC) is essential in marker-assisted breeding for quality trait improvement of chickpea. Henceforth, the present study utilized an integrated genomics-assisted breeding strategy encompassing trait association analysis, selective genotyping in traditional bi-parental mapping population and differential expression profiling for the first-time to understand the complex genetic architecture of quantitative SPC trait in chickpea. For GWAS (genome-wide association study), high-throughput genotyping information of 16376 genome-based SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism) discovered from a structured population of 336 sequenced desi and kabuli accessions [with 150–200 kb LD (linkage disequilibrium) decay] was utilized. This led to identification of seven most effective genomic loci (genes) associated [10–20% with 41% combined PVE (phenotypic variation explained)] with SPC trait in chickpea. Regardless of the diverse desi and kabuli genetic backgrounds, a comparable level of association potential of the identified seven genomic loci with SPC trait was observed. Five SPC-associated genes were validated successfully in parental accessions and homozygous individuals of an intra-specific desi RIL (recombinant inbred line) mapping population (ICC 12299 × ICC 4958) by selective genotyping. The seed-specific expression, including differential up-regulation (>four fold) of six SPC-associated genes particularly in accessions, parents and homozygous individuals of the aforementioned mapping population with a high level of contrasting SPC (21–22%) was evident. Collectively, the integrated genomic approach delineated diverse naturally occurring novel functional SNP allelic variants in six potential candidate genes regulating SPC trait in chickpea. Of these, a non-synonymous SNP allele-carrying zinc finger transcription factor gene exhibiting strong association with SPC trait was found to be the most

  3. Characterization of DOK1, a candidate tumor suppressor gene, in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Pierre-Luc; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Ghani, Karim; Têtu, Bernard; Bairati, Isabelle; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2011-10-01

    In attempt to discover novel aberrantly hypermethylated genes with putative tumor suppressor function in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), we applied expression profiling following pharmacologic inhibition of DNA methylation in EOC cell lines. Among the genes identified, one of particular interest was DOK1, or downstream of tyrosine kinase 1, previously recognized as a candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) for leukemia and other human malignancies. Using bisulfite sequencing, we determined that a 5'-non-coding DNA region (located at nt -1158 to -850, upstream of the DOK1 translation start codon) was extensively hypermethylated in primary serous EOC tumors compared with normal ovarian specimens; however, this hypermethylation was not associated with DOK1 suppression. On the contrary, DOK1 was found to be strongly overexpressed in serous EOC tumors as compared to normal tissue and importantly, DOK1 overexpression significantly correlated with improved progression-free survival (PFS) values of serous EOC patients. Ectopic modulation of DOK1 expression in EOC cells and consecutive functional analyses pointed toward association of DOK1 expression with increased EOC cell migration and proliferation, and better sensitivity to cisplatin treatment. Gene expression profiling and consecutive network and pathway analyses were also confirmative for DOK1 association with EOC cell migration and proliferation. These analyses were also indicative for DOK1 protective role in EOC tumorigenesis, linked to DOK1-mediated induction of some tumor suppressor factors and its suppression of pro-metastasis genes. Taken together, our findings are suggestive for a possible tumor suppressor role of DOK1 in EOC; however its implication in enhanced EOC cell migration and proliferation restrain us to conclude that DOK1 represents a true TSG in EOC. Further studies are needed to more completely elucidate the functional implications of DOK1 and other members of the DOK gene family in ovarian

  4. Identification of candidate genes for familial early-onset essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinmin; Hernandez, Nora; Kisselev, Sergey; Floratos, Aris; Sawle, Ashley; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Ottman, Ruth; Louis, Elan D; Clark, Lorraine N

    2016-07-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common causes of tremor in humans. Despite its high heritability and prevalence, few susceptibility genes for ET have been identified. To identify ET genes, whole-exome sequencing was performed in 37 early-onset ET families with an autosomal-dominant inheritance pattern. We identified candidate genes for follow-up functional studies in five ET families. In two independent families, we identified variants predicted to affect function in the nitric oxide (NO) synthase 3 gene (NOS3) that cosegregated with disease. NOS3 is highly expressed in the central nervous system (including cerebellum), neurons and endothelial cells, and is one of three enzymes that converts l-arginine to the neurotransmitter NO. In one family, a heterozygous variant, c.46G>A (p.(Gly16Ser)), in NOS3, was identified in three affected ET cases and was absent in an unaffected family member; and in a second family, a heterozygous variant, c.164C>T (p.(Pro55Leu)), was identified in three affected ET cases (dizygotic twins and their mother). Both variants result in amino-acid substitutions of highly conserved amino-acid residues that are predicted to be deleterious and damaging by in silico analysis. In three independent families, variants predicted to affect function were also identified in other genes, including KCNS2 (KV9.2), HAPLN4 (BRAL2) and USP46. These genes are highly expressed in the cerebellum and Purkinje cells, and influence function of the gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic system. This is in concordance with recent evidence that the pathophysiological process in ET involves cerebellar dysfunction and possibly cerebellar degeneration with a reduction in Purkinje cells, and a decrease in GABA-ergic tone. PMID:26508575

  5. A combination of transcriptome and methylation analyses reveals embryologically-relevant candidate genes in MRKH patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is present in at least 1 out of 4,500 female live births and is the second most common cause for primary amenorrhea. It is characterized by vaginal and uterine aplasia in an XX individual with normal secondary characteristics. It has long been considered a sporadic anomaly, but familial clustering occurs. Several candidate genes have been studied although no single factor has yet been identified. Cases of discordant monozygotic twins suggest that the involvement of epigenetic factors is more likely. Methods Differences in gene expression and methylation patterns of uterine tissue between eight MRKH patients and eight controls were identified using whole-genome microarray analyses. Results obtained by expression and methylation arrays were confirmed by qRT-PCR and pyrosequencing. Results We delineated 293 differentially expressed and 194 differentially methylated genes of which nine overlap in both groups. These nine genes are mainly embryologically relevant for the development of the female genital tract. Conclusion Our study used, for the first time, a combined whole-genome expression and methylation approach to reveal the etiology of the MRKH syndrome. The findings suggest that either deficient estrogen receptors or the ectopic expression of certain HOXA genes might lead to abnormal development of the female reproductive tract. In utero exposure to endocrine disruptors or abnormally high maternal hormone levels might cause ectopic expression or anterior transformation of HOXA genes. It is, however, also possible that different factors influence the anti-Mullerian hormone promoter activity during embryological development causing regression of the Müllerian ducts. Thus, our data stimulate new research directions to decipher the pathogenic basis of MRKH syndrome. PMID:21619687

  6. Microarray analysis identifies candidate genes for key roles in coral development

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Lauretta C; Maindonald, John; Rudd, Stephen; Hayward, David C; Saint, Robert; Miller, David J; Ball, Eldon E

    2008-01-01

    Background Anthozoan cnidarians are amongst the simplest animals at the tissue level of organization, but are surprisingly complex and vertebrate-like in terms of gene repertoire. As major components of tropical reef ecosystems, the stony corals are anthozoans of particular ecological significance. To better understand the molecular bases of both cnidarian development in general and coral-specific processes such as skeletogenesis and symbiont acquisition, microarray analysis was carried out through the period of early development – when skeletogenesis is initiated, and symbionts are first acquired. Results Of 5081 unique peptide coding genes, 1084 were differentially expressed (P ≤ 0.05) in comparisons between four different stages of coral development, spanning key developmental transitions. Genes of likely relevance to the processes of settlement, metamorphosis, calcification and interaction with symbionts were characterised further and their spatial expression patterns investigated using whole-mount in situ hybridization. Conclusion This study is the first large-scale investigation of developmental gene expression for any cnidarian, and has provided candidate genes for key roles in many aspects of coral biology, including calcification, metamorphosis and symbiont uptake. One surprising finding is that some of these genes have clear counterparts in higher animals but are not present in the closely-related sea anemone Nematostella. Secondly, coral-specific processes (i.e. traits which distinguish corals from their close relatives) may be analogous to similar processes in distantly related organisms. This first large-scale application of microarray analysis demonstrates the potential of this approach for investigating many aspects of coral biology, including the effects of stress and disease. PMID:19014561

  7. Genome-Wide Scans for Delineation of Candidate Genes Regulating Seed-Protein Content in Chickpea.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Hari D; Bajaj, Deepak; Narnoliya, Laxmi; Das, Shouvik; Kumar, Vinod; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-01-01

    Identification of potential genes/alleles governing complex seed-protein content (SPC) is essential in marker-assisted breeding for quality trait improvement of chickpea. Henceforth, the present study utilized an integrated genomics-assisted breeding strategy encompassing trait association analysis, selective genotyping in traditional bi-parental mapping population and differential expression profiling for the first-time to understand the complex genetic architecture of quantitative SPC trait in chickpea. For GWAS (genome-wide association study), high-throughput genotyping information of 16376 genome-based SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism) discovered from a structured population of 336 sequenced desi and kabuli accessions [with 150-200 kb LD (linkage disequilibrium) decay] was utilized. This led to identification of seven most effective genomic loci (genes) associated [10-20% with 41% combined PVE (phenotypic variation explained)] with SPC trait in chickpea. Regardless of the diverse desi and kabuli genetic backgrounds, a comparable level of association potential of the identified seven genomic loci with SPC trait was observed. Five SPC-associated genes were validated successfully in parental accessions and homozygous individuals of an intra-specific desi RIL (recombinant inbred line) mapping population (ICC 12299 × ICC 4958) by selective genotyping. The seed-specific expression, including differential up-regulation (>four fold) of six SPC-associated genes particularly in accessions, parents and homozygous individuals of the aforementioned mapping population with a high level of contrasting SPC (21-22%) was evident. Collectively, the integrated genomic approach delineated diverse naturally occurring novel functional SNP allelic variants in six potential candidate genes regulating SPC trait in chickpea. Of these, a non-synonymous SNP allele-carrying zinc finger transcription factor gene exhibiting strong association with SPC trait was found to be the most

  8. A candidate gene for X-linked Ocular Albinism (OA1)

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, M.T.; Schiaffino, V.; Rugarli, E.

    1994-09-01

    Ocular Albinism of the Nettleship-Fall type 1 (OA1) is the most common form of ocular albinism. It is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait with affected males showing severe reduction of visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, photophobia. Ophthalmologic examination reveals foveal hypoplasia, hypopigmentation of the retina and iris translucency. Microscopic examination of melanocytes suggests that the underlying defect in OA1 is an abnormality in melanosome formation. Recently we assembled a 350 kb cosmid contig spanning the entire critical region on Xp22.3, which measures approximately 110 kb. A minimum set of cosmids was used to identify transcribed sequences using both cDNA selection and exon amplification. Two putative exons recovered by exon amplification strategy were found to be highly conserved throughout evolution and, therefore, they were used as probes for the screening of fetal and adult retina cDNA libraries. This led to the isolation of clones spanning a full-length cDNA which measures 7.6 kb. Sequence analysis revealed that the predicted protein product shows homology with syntrophines and a Xenopus laevis apical protein. The gene covers approximately 170 kb of DNA and spans the entire critical region for OA1, being deleted in two patients with contiguous gene deletion including OA1 and in one patient with isolated OA1. Therefore, this new gene represents a very strong candidate for involvement in OA1 (an alternative, but unlikely possibility to be considered is that the true OA1 gene lies within an intron of the former). Northern analysis revealed very high level of expression in retina and melanoma. Unlike most Xp22.3 genes, this gene is conserved in the mouse. We are currently performing SSCP analysis and direct sequencing of exons on DNAs from approximately 60 unrelated patients with OA1 for mutation detection.

  9. Identification of Arabidopsis Candidate Genes in Response to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses Using Comparative Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Sham, Arjun; Moustafa, Khaled; Al-Ameri, Salma; Al-Azzawi, Ahmed; Iratni, Rabah; AbuQamar, Synan

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved with intricate mechanisms to cope with multiple environmental stresses. To adapt with biotic and abiotic stresses, plant responses involve changes at the cellular and molecular levels. The current study was designed to investigate the effects of combinations of different environmental stresses on the transcriptome level of Arabidopsis genome using public microarray databases. We investigated the role of cyclopentenones in mediating plant responses to environmental stress through TGA (TGACG motif-binding factor) transcription factor, independently from jasmonic acid. Candidate genes were identified by comparing plants inoculated with Botrytis cinerea or treated with heat, salt or osmotic stress with non-inoculated or non-treated tissues. About 2.5% heat-, 19% salinity- and 41% osmotic stress-induced genes were commonly upregulated by B. cinerea-treatment; and 7.6%, 19% and 48% of genes were commonly downregulated by B. cinerea-treatment, respectively. Our results indicate that plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses are mediated by several common regulatory genes. Comparisons between transcriptome data from Arabidopsis stressed-plants support our hypothesis that some molecular and biological processes involved in biotic and abiotic stress response are conserved. Thirteen of the common regulated genes to abiotic and biotic stresses were studied in detail to determine their role in plant resistance to B. cinerea. Moreover, a T-DNA insertion mutant of the Responsive to Dehydration gene (rd20), encoding for a member of the caleosin (lipid surface protein) family, showed an enhanced sensitivity to B. cinerea infection and drought. Overall, the overlapping of plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses, coupled with the sensitivity of the rd20 mutant, may provide new interesting programs for increased plant resistance to multiple environmental stresses, and ultimately increases its chances to survive. Future research directions towards a

  10. Mosaic zebrafish transgenesis for functional genomic analysis of candidate cooperative genes in tumor pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ung, Choong Yong; Guo, Feng; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Zhihui; Zhu, Shizhen

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive genomic analysis has uncovered surprisingly large numbers of genetic alterations in various types of cancers. To robustly and efficiently identify oncogenic "drivers" among these tumors and define their complex relationships with concurrent genetic alterations during tumor pathogenesis remains a daunting task. Recently, zebrafish have emerged as an important animal model for studying human diseases, largely because of their ease of maintenance, high fecundity, obvious advantages for in vivo imaging, high conservation of oncogenes and their molecular pathways, susceptibility to tumorigenesis and, most importantly, the availability of transgenic techniques suitable for use in the fish. Transgenic zebrafish models of cancer have been widely used to dissect oncogenic pathways in diverse tumor types. However, developing a stable transgenic fish model is both tedious and time-consuming, and it is even more difficult and more time-consuming to dissect the cooperation of multiple genes in disease pathogenesis using this approach, which requires the generation of multiple transgenic lines with overexpression of the individual genes of interest followed by complicated breeding of these stable transgenic lines. Hence, use of a mosaic transient transgenic approach in zebrafish offers unique advantages for functional genomic analysis in vivo. Briefly, candidate transgenes can be coinjected into one-cell-stage wild-type or transgenic zebrafish embryos and allowed to integrate together into each somatic cell in a mosaic pattern that leads to mixed genotypes in the same primarily injected animal. This permits one to investigate in a faster and less expensive manner whether and how the candidate genes can collaborate with each other to drive tumorigenesis. By transient overexpression of activated ALK in the transgenic fish overexpressing MYCN, we demonstrate here the cooperation of these two oncogenes in the pathogenesis of a pediatric cancer, neuroblastoma that has

  11. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) and Candidate Genes for Cadmium Tolerance in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Induri, Brahma R; Ellis, Danielle R; Slavov, Gancho; Yin, Tongming; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A; DiFazio, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of genetic variation in response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in understanding the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa and Populus deltoides was characterized for Cd exposure. The pedigree showed significant variation for Cd tolerance thus enabling the identification of relatively tolerant and susceptible genotypes for intensive characterization. A total of 16 QTLs at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio > 2.5, were found to be associated with total dry weight, its components, and root volume. Four major QTLs for total dry weight were mapped to different linkage groups in control (LG III) and Cd conditions (LG XVI) and had opposite allelic effects on Cd tolerance, suggesting that these genomic regions were differentially controlled. The phenotypic variation explained by Cd QTL for all traits under study varied from 5.9% to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. Leaf Cd contents also showed significant variation suggesting the phytoextraction potential of Populus genotypes, though heritability of this trait was low (0.22). A whole-genome microarray study was conducted by using two genotypes with extreme responses for Cd tolerance in the above study and differentially expressed genes were identified. Candidate genes including CAD2 (CADMIUM SENSITIVE 2), HMA5 (HEAVY METAL ATPase5), ATGTST1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Glutathione S-Transferase1), ATGPX6 (Glutathione peroxidase 6), and ATMRP 14 (Arabidopsis thaliana Multidrug Resistance associated Protein 14) were identified from QTL intervals and microarray study. Functional characterization of these candidate genes could enhance phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  12. Identification and characterization of candidate Rlm4 blackleg resistance genes in Brassica napus using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tollenaere, Reece; Hayward, Alice; Dalton-Morgan, Jessica; Campbell, Emma; Lee, Joanne R M; Lorenc, Michal T; Manoli, Sahana; Stiller, Jiri; Raman, Rosy; Raman, Harsh; Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline

    2012-08-01

    A thorough understanding of the relationships between plants and pathogens is essential if we are to continue to meet the agricultural needs of the world's growing population. The identification of genes underlying important quantitative trait loci is extremely challenging in complex genomes such as Brassica napus (canola, oilseed rape or rapeseed). However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) enable much quicker identification of candidate genes for traits of interest. Here, we demonstrate this with the identification of candidate disease resistance genes from B. napus for its most devastating fungal pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans (blackleg fungus). These two species are locked in an evolutionary arms race whereby a gene-for-gene interaction confers either resistance or susceptibility in the plant depending on the genotype of the plant and pathogen. Preliminary analysis of the complete genome sequence of Brassica rapa, the diploid progenitor of B. napus, identified numerous candidate genes with disease resistance characteristics, several of which were clustered around a region syntenic with a major locus (Rlm4) for blackleg resistance on A7 of B. napus. Molecular analyses of the candidate genes using B. napus NGS data are presented, and the difficulties associated with identifying functional gene copies within the highly duplicated Brassica genome are discussed.

  13. Using Association Mapping in Teosinte (Zea Mays ssp Parviglumis) to Investigate the Function of Selection-Candidate Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large-scale screens of the maize genome identified 48 genes that show the putative signature of artificial selection during maize domestication or improvement. These selection-candidate genes may act as quantitative trait loci (QTL) that control the phenotypic differences between maize and its proge...

  14. Integrated Metabolo-Transcriptomics Reveals Fusarium Head Blight Candidate Resistance Genes in Wheat QTL-Fhb2

    PubMed Central

    Dhokane, Dhananjay; Karre, Shailesh; Kushalappa, Ajjamada C.; McCartney, Curt

    2016-01-01

    Background Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by Fusarium graminearum not only causes severe losses in yield, but also reduces quality of wheat grain by accumulating mycotoxins. Breeding for host plant resistance is considered as the best strategy to manage FHB. Resistance in wheat to FHB is quantitative in nature, involving cumulative effects of many genes governing resistance. The poor understanding of genetics and lack of precise phenotyping has hindered the development of FHB resistant cultivars. Though more than 100 QTLs imparting FHB resistance have been reported, none discovered the specific genes localized within the QTL region, nor the underlying mechanisms of resistance. Findings In our study recombinant inbred lines (RILs) carrying resistant (R-RIL) and susceptible (S-RIL) alleles of QTL-Fhb2 were subjected to metabolome and transcriptome profiling to discover the candidate genes. Metabolome profiling detected a higher abundance of metabolites belonging to phenylpropanoid, lignin, glycerophospholipid, flavonoid, fatty acid, and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways in R-RIL than in S-RIL. Transcriptome analysis revealed up-regulation of several receptor kinases, transcription factors, signaling, mycotoxin detoxification and resistance related genes. The dissection of QTL-Fhb2 using flanking marker sequences, integrating metabolomic and transcriptomic datasets, identified 4-Coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL), callose synthase (CS), basic Helix Loop Helix (bHLH041) transcription factor, glutathione S-transferase (GST), ABC transporter-4 (ABC4) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) as putative resistance genes localized within the QTL-Fhb2 region. Conclusion Some of the identified genes within the QTL region are associated with structural resistance through cell wall reinforcement, reducing the spread of pathogen through rachis within a spike and few other genes that detoxify DON, the virulence factor, thus eventually reducing disease severity. In conclusion, we

  15. Prioritization of candidate genes for cattle reproductive traits, based on protein-protein interactions, gene expression, and text-mining.

    PubMed

    Hulsegge, Ina; Woelders, Henri; Smits, Mari; Schokker, Dirkjan; Jiang, Li; Sørensen, Peter

    2013-05-15

    Reproduction is of significant economic importance in dairy cattle. Improved understanding of mechanisms that control estrous behavior and other reproduction traits could help in developing strategies to improve and/or monitor these traits. The objective of this study was to predict and rank genes and processes in brain areas and pituitary involved in reproductive traits in cattle using information derived from three different data sources: gene expression, protein-protein interactions, and literature. We identified 59, 89, 53, 23, and 71 genes in bovine amygdala, dorsal hypothalamus, hippocampus, pituitary, and ventral hypothalamus, respectively, potentially involved in processes underlying estrus and estrous behavior. Functional annotation of the candidate genes points to a number of tissue-specific processes of which the "neurotransmitter/ion channel/synapse" process in the amygdala, "steroid hormone receptor activity/ion binding" in the pituitary, "extracellular region" in the ventral hypothalamus, and "positive regulation of transcription/metabolic process" in the dorsal hypothalamus are most prominent. The regulation of the functional processes in the various tissues operate at different biological levels, including transcriptional, posttranscriptional, extracellular, and intercellular signaling levels.

  16. Candidate Gene Identification with SNP Marker-Based Fine Mapping of Anthracnose Resistance Gene Co-4 in Common Bean.

    PubMed

    Burt, Andrew J; William, H Manilal; Perry, Gregory; Khanal, Raja; Pauls, K Peter; Kelly, James D; Navabi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is an important fungal disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Alleles at the Co-4 locus confer resistance to a number of races of C. lindemuthianum. A population of 94 F4:5 recombinant inbred lines of a cross between resistant black bean genotype B09197 and susceptible navy bean cultivar Nautica was used to identify markers associated with resistance in bean chromosome 8 (Pv08) where Co-4 is localized. Three SCAR markers with known linkage to Co-4 and a panel of single nucleotide markers were used for genotyping. A refined physical region on Pv08 with significant association with anthracnose resistance identified by markers was used in BLAST searches with the genomic sequence of common bean accession G19833. Thirty two unique annotated candidate genes were identified that spanned a physical region of 936.46 kb. A majority of the annotated genes identified had functional similarity to leucine rich repeats/receptor like kinase domains. Three annotated genes had similarity to 1, 3-β-glucanase domains. There were sequence similarities between some of the annotated genes found in the study and the genes associated with phosphoinositide-specific phosphilipases C associated with Co-x and the COK-4 loci found in previous studies. It is possible that the Co-4 locus is structured as a group of genes with functional domains dominated by protein tyrosine kinase along with leucine rich repeats/nucleotide binding site, phosphilipases C as well as β-glucanases. PMID:26431031

  17. Cell number regulator genes in Prunus provide candidate genes for the control of fruit size in sweet and sour cherry.

    PubMed

    De Franceschi, P; Stegmeir, T; Cabrera, A; van der Knaap, E; Rosyara, U R; Sebolt, A M; Dondini, L; Dirlewanger, E; Quero-Garcia, J; Campoy, J A; Iezzoni, A F

    2013-01-01

    Striking increases in fruit size distinguish cultivated descendants from small-fruited wild progenitors for fleshy fruited species such as Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Prunus spp. (peach, cherry, plum, and apricot). The first fruit weight gene identified as a result of domestication and selection was the tomato FW2.2 gene. Members of the FW2.2 gene family in corn (Zea mays) have been named CNR (Cell Number Regulator) and two of them exert their effect on organ size by modulating cell number. Due to the critical roles of FW2.2/CNR genes in regulating cell number and organ size, this family provides an excellent source of candidates for fruit size genes in other domesticated species, such as those found in the Prunus genus. A total of 23 FW2.2/CNR family members were identified in the peach genome, spanning the eight Prunus chromosomes. Two of these CNRs were located within confidence intervals of major quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously discovered on linkage groups 2 and 6 in sweet cherry (Prunus avium), named PavCNR12 and PavCNR20, respectively. An analysis of haplotype, sequence, segregation and association with fruit size strongly supports a role of PavCNR12 in the sweet cherry linkage group 2 fruit size QTL, and this QTL is also likely present in sour cherry (P. cerasus). The finding that the increase in fleshy fruit size in both tomato and cherry associated with domestication may be due to changes in members of a common ancestral gene family supports the notion that similar phenotypic changes exhibited by independently domesticated taxa may have a common genetic basis. PMID:23976873

  18. Candidate Gene Identification with SNP Marker-Based Fine Mapping of Anthracnose Resistance Gene Co-4 in Common Bean

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Andrew J.; William, H. Manilal; Perry, Gregory; Khanal, Raja; Pauls, K. Peter; Kelly, James D.; Navabi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is an important fungal disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Alleles at the Co–4 locus confer resistance to a number of races of C. lindemuthianum. A population of 94 F4:5 recombinant inbred lines of a cross between resistant black bean genotype B09197 and susceptible navy bean cultivar Nautica was used to identify markers associated with resistance in bean chromosome 8 (Pv08) where Co–4 is localized. Three SCAR markers with known linkage to Co–4 and a panel of single nucleotide markers were used for genotyping. A refined physical region on Pv08 with significant association with anthracnose resistance identified by markers was used in BLAST searches with the genomic sequence of common bean accession G19833. Thirty two unique annotated candidate genes were identified that spanned a physical region of 936.46 kb. A majority of the annotated genes identified had functional similarity to leucine rich repeats/receptor like kinase domains. Three annotated genes had similarity to 1, 3-β-glucanase domains. There were sequence similarities between some of the annotated genes found in the study and the genes associated with phosphoinositide-specific phosphilipases C associated with Co-x and the COK–4 loci found in previous studies. It is possible that the Co–4 locus is structured as a group of genes with functional domains dominated by protein tyrosine kinase along with leucine rich repeats/nucleotide binding site, phosphilipases C as well as β-glucanases. PMID:26431031

  19. Effect of polymorphisms in candidate genes on carcass and meat quality traits in double muscled Piemontese cattle.

    PubMed

    Ribeca, C; Bonfatti, V; Cecchinato, A; Albera, A; Gallo, L; Carnier, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between 10 candidate genes and carcass weight and conformation, carcass daily gain, and meat quality (pH, color, cooking loss, drip loss and shear force) in 990 double-muscled Piemontese young bulls. Animals were genotyped at each of the following genes: growth hormone, growth hormone receptor, pro-opiomelanocortin, pro-opiomelanocortin class 1 homeobox 1, melanocortin-4 receptor, corticotrophin-releasing hormone, diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase-1, thyroglobulin, carboxypeptidase E and gamma-3 regulatory subunit of the AMP-activated protein kinase. All the investigated SNPs had additive effects which were relevant for at least one of the traits. Relevant associations between the investigated SNPs and carcass weight, carcass daily gain and carcass conformation were detected, whereas associations of SNPs with meat quality were moderate. Results confirmed some of previously reported associations, but diverged for others. Validation in other cattle breeds is required to use these SNPs in gene-assisted selection programs for enhancement of carcass traits and meat quality.

  20. Analysis of the chromosome X exome in patients with autism spectrum disorders identified novel candidate genes, including TMLHE

    PubMed Central

    Nava, C; Lamari, F; Héron, D; Mignot, C; Rastetter, A; Keren, B; Cohen, D; Faudet, A; Bouteiller, D; Gilleron, M; Jacquette, A; Whalen, S; Afenjar, A; Périsse, D; Laurent, C; Dupuits, C; Gautier, C; Gérard, M; Huguet, G; Caillet, S; Leheup, B; Leboyer, M; Gillberg, C; Delorme, R; Bourgeron, T; Brice, A; Depienne, C

    2012-01-01

    The striking excess of affected males in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggests that genes located on chromosome X contribute to the etiology of these disorders. To identify new X-linked genes associated with ASD, we analyzed the entire chromosome X exome by next-generation sequencing in 12 unrelated families with two affected males. Thirty-six possibly deleterious variants in 33 candidate genes were found, including PHF8 and HUWE1, previously implicated in intellectual disability (ID). A nonsense mutation in TMLHE, which encodes the ɛ-N-trimethyllysine hydroxylase catalyzing the first step of carnitine biosynthesis, was identified in two brothers with autism and ID. By screening the TMLHE coding sequence in 501 male patients with ASD, we identified two additional missense substitutions not found in controls and not reported in databases. Functional analyses confirmed that the mutations were associated with a loss-of-function and led to an increase in trimethyllysine, the precursor of carnitine biosynthesis, in the plasma of patients. This study supports the hypothesis that rare variants on the X chromosome are involved in the etiology of ASD and contribute to the sex-ratio disequilibrium. PMID:23092983

  1. A Multiple Interaction Analysis Reveals ADRB3 as a Potential Candidate for Gallbladder Cancer Predisposition via a Complex Interaction with Other Candidate Gene Variations

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rajani; Kim, Jong Joo; Misra, Sanjeev; Kumar, Ashok; Mittal, Balraj

    2015-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is the most common and a highly aggressive biliary tract malignancy with a dismal outcome. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial, comprising the combined effect of multiple genetic variations of mild consequence along with numerous dietary and environmental risk factors. Previously, we demonstrated the association of several candidate gene variations with GBC risk. In this study, we aimed to identify the combination of gene variants and their possible interactions contributing towards genetic susceptibility of GBC. Here, we performed Multifactor-Dimensionality Reduction (MDR) and Classification and Regression Tree Analysis (CRT) to investigate the gene–gene interactions and the combined effect of 14 SNPs in nine genes (DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634); FAS (rs2234767); FASL (rs763110); DCC (rs2229080, rs4078288, rs7504990, rs714); PSCA (rs2294008, rs2978974); ADRA2A (rs1801253); ADRB1 (rs1800544); ADRB3 (rs4994); CYP17 (rs2486758)) involved in various signaling pathways. Genotyping was accomplished by PCR-RFLP or Taqman allelic discrimination assays. SPSS software version 16.0 and MDR software version 2.0 were used for all the statistical analysis. Single locus investigation demonstrated significant association of DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634), DCC (rs714, rs2229080, rs4078288) and ADRB3 (rs4994) polymorphisms with GBC risk. MDR analysis revealed ADRB3 (rs4994) to be crucial candidate in GBC susceptibility that may act either alone (p < 0.0001, CVC = 10/10) or in combination with DCC (rs714 and rs2229080, p < 0.0001, CVC = 9/10). Our CRT results are in agreement with the above findings. Further, in-silico results of studied SNPs advocated their role in splicing, transcriptional and/or protein coding regulation. Overall, our result suggested complex interactions amongst the studied SNPs and ADRB3 rs4994 as candidate influencing GBC susceptibility. PMID:26602921

  2. Fructan accumulation and transcription of candidate genes during cold acclimation in three varieties of Poa pratensis.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Shyama Prasad; Andersen, Jeppe Reitan; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Boelt, Birte

    2011-03-01

    Poa pratensis, a type species for the grass family (Poaceae), is an important cool season grass that accumulates fructans as a polysaccharide reserve. We studied fructan contents and expression of candidate fructan metabolism genes during cold acclimation in three varieties of P. pratensis adapted to different environments: Northern Norway, Denmark, and the Netherlands. Fructan content increased significantly during cold acclimation and varieties showed significant differences in the level of fructan accumulation. cDNA sequences of putative fructosyltransferase (FT), fructan exohydrolase (FEH), and cold acclimation protein (CAP) genes were identified and cloned. In agreement with a function in fructan biosynthesis, transcription of a putative sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (Pp6-SFT) gene was induced during cold acclimation and fructan accumulation in all three P. pratensis varieties. Transcription of putative PpFEH and PpCAP genes was also induced by cold acclimation; however, transcription of these two genes was several-fold higher in the variety from Norway compared to the other two varieties. The results presented here suggest that Pp6-SFT is involved in fructan biosynthesis in P. pratensis. FEHs have previously been suggested to be involved in fructan biosynthesis and freezing tolerance, and induced expression of PpFEH during fructan accumulation could also suggest a role in fructan biosynthesis. However, based on the different PpFEH transcription rates among varieties and similar expression of PpFEH and PpCAP, we suggest that PpFEH is more likely to be involved in mediating freezing tolerance, e.g., by regulating the cell osmotic potential through fructan degradation.

  3. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes involved in Blister Blight defense in Tea (Camellia sinensis (L) Kuntze)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaswall, Kuldip; Mahajan, Pallavi; Singh, Gagandeep; Parmar, Rajni; Seth, Romit; Raina, Aparnashree; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Singh, Anil Kumar; Shankar, Ravi; Sharma, Ram Kumar

    2016-07-01

    To unravel the molecular mechanism of defense against blister blight (BB) disease caused by an obligate biotrophic fungus, Exobasidium vexans, transcriptome of BB interaction with resistance and susceptible tea genotypes was analysed through RNA-seq using Illumina GAIIx at four different stages during ~20-day disease cycle. Approximately 69 million high quality reads were assembled de novo, yielding 37,790 unique transcripts with more than 55% being functionally annotated. Differentially expressed, 149 defense related transcripts/genes, namely defense related enzymes, resistance genes, multidrug resistant transporters, transcription factors, retrotransposons, metacaspases and chaperons were observed in RG, suggesting their role in defending against BB. Being present in the major hub, putative master regulators among these candidates were identified from predetermined protein-protein interaction network of Arabidopsis thaliana. Further, confirmation of abundant expression of well-known RPM1, RPS2 and RPP13 in quantitative Real Time PCR indicates salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, possibly induce synthesis of antimicrobial compounds, required to overcome the virulence of E. vexans. Compendiously, the current study provides a comprehensive gene expression and insights into the molecular mechanism of tea defense against BB to serve as a resource for unravelling the possible regulatory mechanism of immunity against various biotic stresses in tea and other crops.

  4. Exome Sequencing in 53 Sporadic Cases of Schizophrenia Identifies 18 Putative Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Guipponi, Michel; Santoni, Federico A.; Setola, Vincent; Gehrig, Corinne; Rotharmel, Maud; Cuenca, Macarena; Guillin, Olivier; Dikeos, Dimitris; Georgantopoulos, Georgios; Papadimitriou, George; Curtis, Logos; Méary, Alexandre; Schürhoff, Franck; Jamain, Stéphane; Avramopoulos, Dimitri; Leboyer, Marion; Rujescu, Dan; Pulver, Ann; Campion, Dominique; Siderovski, David P.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe, debilitating mental illness which has a significant genetic component. The identification of genetic factors related to SCZ has been challenging and these factors remain largely unknown. To evaluate the contribution of de novo variants (DNVs) to SCZ, we sequenced the exomes of 53 individuals with sporadic SCZ and of their non-affected parents. We identified 49 DNVs, 18 of which were predicted to alter gene function, including 13 damaging missense mutations, 2 conserved splice site mutations, 2 nonsense mutations, and 1 frameshift deletion. The average number of exonic DNV per proband was 0.88, which corresponds to an exonic point mutation rate of 1.7×10−8 per nucleotide per generation. The non-synonymous-to-synonymous mutation ratio of 2.06 did not differ from neutral expectations. Overall, this study provides a list of 18 putative candidate genes for sporadic SCZ, and when combined with the results of similar reports, identifies a second proband carrying a non-synonymous DNV in the RGS12 gene. PMID:25420024

  5. Identification of candidate genes and natural allelic variants for QTLs governing plant height in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Kujur, Alice; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Bajaj, Deepak; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-06-20

    In the present study, molecular mapping of high-resolution plant height QTLs was performed by integrating 3625 desi genome-derived GBS (genotyping-by-sequencing)-SNPs on an ultra-high resolution intra-specific chickpea genetic linkage map (dwarf/semi-dwarf desi cv. ICC12299 x tall kabuli cv. ICC8261). The identified six major genomic regions harboring six robust QTLs (11.5-21.3 PVE), associated with plant height, were mapped within <0.5 cM average marker intervals on six chromosomes. Five SNPs-containing genes tightly linked to the five plant height QTLs, were validated based upon their high potential for target trait association (12.9-20.8 PVE) in 65 desi and kabuli chickpea accessions. The vegetative tissue-specific expression, including higher differential up-regulation (>5-fold) of five genes especially in shoot, young leaf, shoot apical meristem of tall mapping parental accession (ICC8261) as compared to that of dwarf/semi-dwarf parent (ICC12299) was apparent. Overall, combining high-resolution QTL mapping with genetic association analysis and differential expression profiling, delineated natural allelic variants in five candidate genes (encoding cytochrome-c-biosynthesis protein, malic oxidoreductase, NADH dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein, expressed protein and bZIP transcription factor) regulating plant height in chickpea. These molecular tags have potential to dissect complex plant height trait and accelerate marker-assisted genetic enhancement for developing cultivars with desirable plant height ideotypes in chickpea.

  6. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes involved in Blister Blight defense in Tea (Camellia sinensis (L) Kuntze)

    PubMed Central

    Jayaswall, Kuldip; Mahajan, Pallavi; Singh, Gagandeep; Parmar, Rajni; Seth, Romit; Raina, Aparnashree; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Singh, Anil Kumar; Shankar, Ravi; Sharma, Ram Kumar

    2016-01-01

    To unravel the molecular mechanism of defense against blister blight (BB) disease caused by an obligate biotrophic fungus, Exobasidium vexans, transcriptome of BB interaction with resistance and susceptible tea genotypes was analysed through RNA-seq using Illumina GAIIx at four different stages during ~20-day disease cycle. Approximately 69 million high quality reads were assembled de novo, yielding 37,790 unique transcripts with more than 55% being functionally annotated. Differentially expressed, 149 defense related transcripts/genes, namely defense related enzymes, resistance genes, multidrug resistant transporters, transcription factors, retrotransposons, metacaspases and chaperons were observed in RG, suggesting their role in defending against BB. Being present in the major hub, putative master regulators among these candidates were identified from predetermined protein-protein interaction network of Arabidopsis thaliana. Further, confirmation of abundant expression of well-known RPM1, RPS2 and RPP13 in quantitative Real Time PCR indicates salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, possibly induce synthesis of antimicrobial compounds, required to overcome the virulence of E. vexans. Compendiously, the current study provides a comprehensive gene expression and insights into the molecular mechanism of tea defense against BB to serve as a resource for unravelling the possible regulatory mechanism of immunity against various biotic stresses in tea and other crops. PMID:27465480

  7. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes involved in Blister Blight defense in Tea (Camellia sinensis (L) Kuntze).

    PubMed

    Jayaswall, Kuldip; Mahajan, Pallavi; Singh, Gagandeep; Parmar, Rajni; Seth, Romit; Raina, Aparnashree; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Singh, Anil Kumar; Shankar, Ravi; Sharma, Ram Kumar

    2016-01-01

    To unravel the molecular mechanism of defense against blister blight (BB) disease caused by an obligate biotrophic fungus, Exobasidium vexans, transcriptome of BB interaction with resistance and susceptible tea genotypes was analysed through RNA-seq using Illumina GAIIx at four different stages during ~20-day disease cycle. Approximately 69 million high quality reads were assembled de novo, yielding 37,790 unique transcripts with more than 55% being functionally annotated. Differentially expressed, 149 defense related transcripts/genes, namely defense related enzymes, resistance genes, multidrug resistant transporters, transcription factors, retrotransposons, metacaspases and chaperons were observed in RG, suggesting their role in defending against BB. Being present in the major hub, putative master regulators among these candidates were identified from predetermined protein-protein interaction network of Arabidopsis thaliana. Further, confirmation of abundant expression of well-known RPM1, RPS2 and RPP13 in quantitative Real Time PCR indicates salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, possibly induce synthesis of antimicrobial compounds, required to overcome the virulence of E. vexans. Compendiously, the current study provides a comprehensive gene expression and insights into the molecular mechanism of tea defense against BB to serve as a resource for unravelling the possible regulatory mechanism of immunity against various biotic stresses in tea and other crops. PMID:27465480

  8. Exome sequencing in 53 sporadic cases of schizophrenia identifies 18 putative candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Guipponi, Michel; Santoni, Federico A; Setola, Vincent; Gehrig, Corinne; Rotharmel, Maud; Cuenca, Macarena; Guillin, Olivier; Dikeos, Dimitris; Georgantopoulos, Georgios; Papadimitriou, George; Curtis, Logos; Méary, Alexandre; Schürhoff, Franck; Jamain, Stéphane; Avramopoulos, Dimitri; Leboyer, Marion; Rujescu, Dan; Pulver, Ann; Campion, Dominique; Siderovski, David P; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe, debilitating mental illness which has a significant genetic component. The identification of genetic factors related to SCZ has been challenging and these factors remain largely unknown. To evaluate the contribution of de novo variants (DNVs) to SCZ, we sequenced the exomes of 53 individuals with sporadic SCZ and of their non-affected parents. We identified 49 DNVs, 18 of which were predicted to alter gene function, including 13 damaging missense mutations, 2 conserved splice site mutations, 2 nonsense mutations, and 1 frameshift deletion. The average number of exonic DNV per proband was 0.88, which corresponds to an exonic point mutation rate of 1.7×10(-8) per nucleotide per generation. The non-synonymous-to-synonymous mutation ratio of 2.06 did not differ from neutral expectations. Overall, this study provides a list of 18 putative candidate genes for sporadic SCZ, and when combined with the results of similar reports, identifies a second proband carrying a non-synonymous DNV in the RGS12 gene. PMID:25420024

  9. Systematic identification of molecular links between core and candidate genes in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Rodrigo; Suñé, Guillermo; Zanzoni, Andreas; Duran-Frigola, Miquel; Alcalde, Víctor; Stracker, Travis H; Soler-López, Montserrat; Aloy, Patrick

    2015-03-27

    Despite the remarkable progress achieved in the identification of specific genes involved in breast cancer (BC), our understanding of their complex functioning is still limited. In this manuscript, we systematically explore the existence of direct physical interactions between the products of BC core and associated genes. Our aim is to generate a protein interaction network of BC-associated gene products and suggest potential molecular mechanisms to unveil their role in the disease. In total, we report 599 novel high-confidence interactions among 44 BC core, 54 BC candidate/associated and 96 newly identified proteins. Our findings indicate that this network-based approach is indeed a robust inference tool to pinpoint new potential players and gain insight into the underlying mechanisms of those proteins with previously unknown roles in BC. To illustrate the power of our approach, we provide initial validation of two BC-associated proteins on the alteration of DNA damage response as a result of specific re-wiring interactions. Overall, our BC-related network may serve as a framework to integrate clinical and molecular data and foster novel global therapeutic strategies.

  10. Identification of candidate genes and natural allelic variants for QTLs governing plant height in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Kujur, Alice; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Bajaj, Deepak; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, molecular mapping of high-resolution plant height QTLs was performed by integrating 3625 desi genome-derived GBS (genotyping-by-sequencing)-SNPs on an ultra-high resolution intra-specific chickpea genetic linkage map (dwarf/semi-dwarf desi cv. ICC12299 x tall kabuli cv. ICC8261). The identified six major genomic regions harboring six robust QTLs (11.5-21.3 PVE), associated with plant height, were mapped within <0.5 cM average marker intervals on six chromosomes. Five SNPs-containing genes tightly linked to the five plant height QTLs, were validated based upon their high potential for target trait association (12.9-20.8 PVE) in 65 desi and kabuli chickpea accessions. The vegetative tissue-specific expression, including higher differential up-regulation (>5-fold) of five genes especially in shoot, young leaf, shoot apical meristem of tall mapping parental accession (ICC8261) as compared to that of dwarf/semi-dwarf parent (ICC12299) was apparent. Overall, combining high-resolution QTL mapping with genetic association analysis and differential expression profiling, delineated natural allelic variants in five candidate genes (encoding cytochrome-c-biosynthesis protein, malic oxidoreductase, NADH dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein, expressed protein and bZIP transcription factor) regulating plant height in chickpea. These molecular tags have potential to dissect complex plant height trait and accelerate marker-assisted genetic enhancement for developing cultivars with desirable plant height ideotypes in chickpea. PMID:27319304

  11. Association analysis of GWAS and candidate gene loci in a Chinese population with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Tang, Haiqin; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zhou, Fusheng; Lu, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Coronary heart disease (CHD), the most severe form of coronary artery disease (CAD), is a complex disease that involves a variety of genetic and environmental factors. Recently, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with CAD in Caucasians by genome-wide association (GWA) studies.However, the association of these SNPs with CHD in Asian populations has not yet been established. Here, we aim to investigate the genetic etiology of CHD in a Chinese population by genotyping SNPs previously been associated with CHD in other ethic origin in GWAS or candidate gene studies. Methods: Five SNPs, rs17114036, rs9369640, rs515135, rs579459 and rs8055236, from 5 different loci were genotyped using a sequenom Mass array system in 545CHD patients and 1008 unrelated controls from a Chinese population. Results: Our study showed that SNP rs515135 is strongly associated with CHD in a Chinese Han population (P-value=0.00333, OR=1.48). We also detected significant difference of SNP rs579459 in APOB gene in patients withsevere CAD compared to patients with mild CAD. Conclusion: SNP rs515135 is associated with the susceptibility of CHD in Chinese Han population. The location of rs515135 in the APOB gene supports its potential involvement in the pathogenesis of CAD. Our study data also support that SNP rs579459 may be associated with the severity of CHD. PMID:26221293

  12. Clinical phenotype and candidate genes for the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hosoki, Kana; Ohta, Tohru; Natsume, Jun; Imai, Sumiko; Okumura, Akihisa; Matsui, Takeshi; Harada, Naoki; Bacino, Carlos A; Scaglia, Fernando; Jones, Jeremy Y; Niikawa, Norio; Saitoh, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Array-based technologies have led to the identification of many novel microdeletion and microduplication syndromes demonstrating multiple congenital anomalies and intellectual disability (MCA/ID). We have used chromosomal microarray analysis for the evaluation of patients with MCA/ID and/or neonatal hypotonia. Three overlapping de novo microdeletions at 5q31.3 with the shortest region of overlap (SRO) of 370 kb were detected in three unrelated patients. These patients showed similar clinical features including severe neonatal hypotonia, neonatal feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, characteristic facial features, and severe developmental delay. These features are consistent with the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome originally proposed by Shimojima et al., providing further evidence that this syndrome is clinically discernible. The 370 kb SRO encompasses only four RefSeq genes including neuregulin 2 (NRG2) and purine-rich element binding protein A (PURA). NRG2 is one of the members of the neuregulin family related to neuronal and glial cell growth and differentiation, thus making NRG2 a good candidate for the observed phenotype. Moreover, PURA is also a good candidate because Pura-deficient mice demonstrate postnatal neurological manifestations.

  13. Discovery of candidate genes for muscle traits based on GWAS supported by eQTL-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Murani, Eduard; Trakooljul, Nares; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical and biophysical processes that take place in muscle under relaxed and stressed conditions depend on the abundance and activity of gene products of metabolic and structural pathways. In livestock at post-mortem, these muscle properties determine aspects of meat quality and are measurable. The conversion of muscle to meat mimics pathological processes associated with muscle ischemia, injury or damage in humans and it is an economic factor in pork production. Linkage, association, and expression analyses independently contributed to the identification of trait-associated molecular pathways and genes. We aim at providing multiple evidences for the role of specific genes in meat quality by integrating a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for meat quality traits and the detection of eQTL based on trait-correlated expressed genes and trait-associated markers. The GWAS revealed 51 and 200 SNPs significantly associated with meat quality in a crossbred Pietrain×(German Landrace×Large White) (Pi×(GL×LW)) and a purebred German Landrace (GL) population, respectively. Most significant SNPs in Pi×(GL×LW) were located on chromosomes (SSC) 4 and 6. The data of 47,836 eQTLs at a significance level of p<10(-5) were used to scale down the number candidate genes located in these regions. These SNPs on SSC4 showed association with expression levels of ZNF704, IMPA1, and OXSR1; SSC6 SNPs were associated with expression of SIGLEC10 and PIH1D1. Most significant SNPs in GL were located on SSC6 and associated with expression levels of PIH1D1, SIGLEC10, TBCB, LOC100518735, KIF1B, LOC100514845, and two unknown genes. The abundance of transcripts of these genes in muscle, in turn, is significantly correlated with meat quality traits. We identified several genes with evidence for their candidacy for meat quality arising from the integrative approach of a genome-wide association study and eQTL analysis. PMID:24643240

  14. A candidate gene approach for the genetic analysis of susceptibility to tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, K.; Liu, J.; Boothroyd, L.

    1994-09-01

    Tuberculosis is the most frequent and severe human disease caused by mycobacteria. In the mouse a candidate gene for innate resistance to mycobacteria (Bcg) was recently isolated and termed Nramp. We used SSCA and DNA sequencing to identify mutations in the human homologue, NRAMP, in chromosome region 2q35 in order to test if NRAMP contributes to susceptibility to tuberculosis. We have identified 16 sequence variants in or near NRAMP and defined haplotypes segregating in multiplex tuberculosis families from Canada, Columbia and Hong Kong. We defined a recessive susceptibility model for linkage analysis with four liability classes which take into account clinical status, age, exposure, and BCG vaccination. Our preliminary results support a role of NRAMP in tuberculosis susceptibility in an epidemic situation. This research was supported by grants from the Medical Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Genetic Diseases Network.

  15. Analysis of thirteen trinucleotide repeat loci as candidate genes for Schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, S.; Leggo, J.; Ferguson-Smith, M.A.; Rubinsztein, D.C.

    1996-04-09

    A group of diseases are due to abnormal expansions of trinucleotide repeats. These diseases all affect the nervous system. In addition, they manifest the phenomenon of anticipation, in which the disease tends to present at an earlier age or with greater severity in successive generations. Many additional genes with trinucleotide repeats are believed to be expressed in the human brain. As anticipation has been reported in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder, we have examined allele distributions of 13 trinucleotide repeat-containing genes, many novel and all expressed in the brain, in genomic DNA from schizophrenic (n = 20-97) and bipolar affective disorder patients (23-30) and controls (n = 43-146). No evidence was obtained to implicate expanded alleles in these 13 genes as causal factors in these diseases. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Colostrogenesis: candidate genes for IgG1 transcytosis mechanisms in primary bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stark, A; Vachkova, E; Wellnitz, O; Bruckmaier, R; Baumrucker, C

    2013-12-01

    Bovine colostrogenesis is distinguished by the specific transfer of IgG1 from the blood to mammary secretions. The process has been shown to be initiated by hormones and occurs during the last weeks of pregnancy when steroid concentrations of estradiol (E2 ) and progesterone (P4 ) are highly elevated. Rodent intestinal uptake of immunoglobulin G is mediated by a receptor termed Fc fragment of IgG, Receptor, Transporter, alpha (FcGRT) and supported by light chain Beta-2-Microglobulin (β2M). We hypothesized that steroid hormone treatments (E2 and P4 ) of bovine mammary epithelial cells in vitro would induce up-regulation of IgG1 transcytosis candidate gene mRNA expression suggesting involvement in IgG1 transcytosis. Two different primary bovine mammary epithelial cell cultures were cultured on plastic and rat tail collagen and treated with hormonal combinations (steroids/lactogenic hormones). Evaluated mRNA components were bLactoferrin (bLf: a control), bFcGRT, β2M, and various small GTPases; the latter components are reported to direct endosomal movements in eukaryotic cells. All tested transcytosis components showed strong expression of mRNA in the cells. Expression of bFcGRT, bRab25 and bRhoB were significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05) by steroid hormones. bRab25 and bRhoB showed increased expression by steroid treatments, but also with lactogenic hormones. Analysis for the oestrogen receptor (ER) mRNA was mostly negative, but 25% of the cultures tested exhibited weak expression, while the progesterone receptor (PR) mRNA was always detected. bRab25 and bRhoB and likely bFcGRT are potential candidate genes for IgG1 transcytosis in bovine mammary cells. PMID:23279563

  17. QTL Analysis and Candidate Gene Mapping for the Polyphenol Content in Cider Apple

    PubMed Central

    Verdu, Cindy F.; Guyot, Sylvain; Childebrand, Nicolas; Bahut, Muriel; Celton, Jean-Marc; Gaillard, Sylvain; Lasserre-Zuber, Pauline; Troggio, Michela; Guilet, David; Laurens, François

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have favorable antioxidant potential on human health suggesting that their high content is responsible for the beneficial effects of apple consumption. They control the quality of ciders as they predominantly account for astringency, bitterness, color and aroma. In this study, we identified QTLs controlling phenolic compound concentrations and the average polymerization degree of flavanols in a cider apple progeny. Thirty-two compounds belonging to five groups of phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by reversed phase liquid chromatography on both fruit extract and juice, over three years. The average polymerization degree of flavanols was estimated in fruit by phloroglucinolysis coupled to HPLC. Parental maps were built using SSR and SNP markers and used for the QTL analysis. Sixty-nine and 72 QTLs were detected on 14 and 11 linkage groups of the female and male maps, respectively. A majority of the QTLs identified in this study are specific to this population, while others are consistent with previous studies. This study presents for the first time in apple, QTLs for the mean polymerization degree of procyanidins, for which the mechanisms involved remains unknown to this day. Identification of candidate genes underlying major QTLs was then performed in silico and permitted the identification of 18 enzymes of the polyphenol pathway and six transcription factors involved in the apple anthocyanin regulation. New markers were designed from sequences of the most interesting candidate genes in order to confirm their co-localization with underlying QTLs by genetic mapping. Finally, the potential use of these QTLs in breeding programs is discussed. PMID:25271925

  18. QTL analysis and candidate gene mapping for the polyphenol content in cider apple.

    PubMed

    Verdu, Cindy F; Guyot, Sylvain; Childebrand, Nicolas; Bahut, Muriel; Celton, Jean-Marc; Gaillard, Sylvain; Lasserre-Zuber, Pauline; Troggio, Michela; Guilet, David; Laurens, François

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have favorable antioxidant potential on human health suggesting that their high content is responsible for the beneficial effects of apple consumption. They control the quality of ciders as they predominantly account for astringency, bitterness, color and aroma. In this study, we identified QTLs controlling phenolic compound concentrations and the average polymerization degree of flavanols in a cider apple progeny. Thirty-two compounds belonging to five groups of phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by reversed phase liquid chromatography on both fruit extract and juice, over three years. The average polymerization degree of flavanols was estimated in fruit by phloroglucinolysis coupled to HPLC. Parental maps were built using SSR and SNP markers and used for the QTL analysis. Sixty-nine and 72 QTLs were detected on 14 and 11 linkage groups of the female and male maps, respectively. A majority of the QTLs identified in this study are specific to this population, while others are consistent with previous studies. This study presents for the first time in apple, QTLs for the mean polymerization degree of procyanidins, for which the mechanisms involved remains unknown to this day. Identification of candidate genes underlying major QTLs was then performed in silico and permitted the identification of 18 enzymes of the polyphenol pathway and six transcription factors involved in the apple anthocyanin regulation. New markers were designed from sequences of the most interesting candidate genes in order to confirm their co-localization with underlying QTLs by genetic mapping. Finally, the potential use of these QTLs in breeding programs is discussed. PMID:25271925

  19. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence. PMID:27597847

  20. Genetic Determinants for Promoter Hypermethylation in the Lungs of Smokers: A Candidate Gene-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuguang; Stidley, Christine A.; Liu, Yushi; Edlund, Christopher K.; Willink, Randall P.; Han, Younghun; Landi, Maria Teresa; Thun, Michael; Picchi, Maria A.; Bruse, Shannon E.; Crowell, Richard E.; Van Den Berg, David; Caporaso, Neil E.; Amos, Christopher I.; Siegfried, Jill M.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Gilliland, Frank D.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of tumor suppressor gene promoter methylation in sputum-derived exfoliated cells predicts early lung cancer. Here we identified genetic determinants for this epigenetic process and examined their biological effects on gene regulation. A two-stage approach involving discovery and replication was employed to assess the association between promoter hypermethylation of a 12-gene panel and common variation in 40 genes involved in carcinogen metabolism, regulation of methylation, and DNA damage response in members of the Lovelace Smokers Cohort (n=1434). Molecular validation of three identified variants was conducted using primary bronchial epithelial cells. Association of study-wide significance (P<8.2×10−5) was identified for rs1641511, rs3730859, and rs1883264 in TP53, LIG1, and BIK, respectively. These SNPs were significantly associated with altered expression of the corresponding genes in primary bronchial epithelial cells. In addition, rs3730859 in LIG1 was also moderately associated with increased risk for lung cancer among Caucasian smokers. Together, our findings suggest that genetic variation in DNA replication and apoptosis pathways impacts the propensity for gene promoter hypermethylation in the aerodigestive tract of smokers. The incorporation of genetic biomarkers for gene promoter hypermethylation with clinical and somatic markers may improve risk assessment models for lung cancer. PMID:22139380

  1. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence.

  2. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence. PMID:27597847

  3. Molecular characterization of the leptin receptor gene as a candidate gene in the pulmonary hypertension syndrome in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Bamidele, O; Van As, P; Elferink, M G

    2012-12-15

    Leptin Receptor Gene (LEPR) is a candidate gene in understanding the genetic basis of the Pulmonary Hypertension Syndrome (PHS) in broilers. Identification and evaluation of genetic polymorphisms in LEPR may provide a link between traits like Body Weight (BW) and Total Ventricle weight (TV) to the development of PHS. In this study, primers were designed in exons, upstream and downstream sequences to identify mutations in the LEPR on four broilers selected with respect to the PHS-related traits. About 77% of the 11,820 bp of the LEPR gene covered by the primers were sequenced. No mutations were found between the chickens associating the traits to the occurrence of PHS. However, 42 single nucleotide polymorphisms and four Indels were found between the reference sequences of the red jungle fowl and the experimental population. Ten of these mutations were not previously reported in LEPR at the genomic and transcript sequences (NP_989654.1, ENSGALT00000018009). The 10 mutations include six SNPs in intron regions, two Indels and two non-synonymous SNPs. The two new non-synonymous SNPs; G301A and A1637G, led to amino acid change A89T and N534S, respectively. PMID:23755410

  4. Geographic differentiation of polymorphism in the Plasmodium falciparum malaria vaccine candidate gene SERA5.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Arisue, Nobuko; Palacpac, Nirianne M Q; Yagi, Masanori; Tougan, Takahiro; Honma, Hajime; Ferreira, Marcelo U; Färnert, Anna; Björkman, Anders; Kaneko, Akira; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Hirayama, Kenji; Mita, Toshihiro; Horii, Toshihiro

    2012-02-21

    SERA5 is regarded as a promising malaria vaccine candidate of the most virulent human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. SERA5 is a 120 kDa abundantly expressed blood-stage protein containing a papain-like protease. Since substantial polymorphism in blood-stage vaccine candidates may potentially limit their efficacy, it is imperative to fully investigate polymorphism of the SERA5 gene (sera5). In this study, we performed evolutionary and population genetic analysis of sera5. The level of inter-species divergence (kS=0.076) between P. falciparum and Plasmodium reichenowi, a closely related chimpanzee malaria parasite is comparable to that of housekeeping protein genes. A signature of purifying selection was detected in the proenzyme and enzyme domains. Analysis of 445 near full-length P. falciparum sera5 sequences from nine countries in Africa, Southeast Asia, Oceania and South America revealed extensive variations in the number of octamer repeat (OR) and serine repeat (SR) regions as well as substantial level of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in non-repeat regions (2562 bp). Remarkably, a 14 amino acid sequence of SERA5 (amino acids 59-72) that is known to be the in vitro target of parasite growth inhibitory antibodies was found to be perfectly conserved in all 445 worldwide isolates of P. falciparum evaluated. Unlike other major vaccine target antigen genes such as merozoite surface protein-1, apical membrane antigen-1 or circumsporozoite protein, no strong evidence for positive selection was detected for SNPs in the non-repeat regions of sera5. A biased geographical distribution was observed in SNPs as well as in the haplotypes of the sera5 OR and SR regions. In Africa, OR- and SR-haplotypes with low frequency (<5%) and SNPs with minor allele frequency (<5%) were abundant and were mostly continent-specific. Consistently, significant genetic differentiation, assessed by the Wright's fixation index (Fst) of inter-population variance in allele frequencies

  5. Multi-Trait GWAS and New Candidate Genes Annotation for Growth Curve Parameters in Brahman Cattle.

    PubMed

    Crispim, Aline Camporez; Kelly, Matthew John; Guimarães, Simone Eliza Facioni; Fonseca e Silva, Fabyano; Fortes, Marina Rufino Salinas; Wenceslau, Raphael Rocha; Moore, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of beef cattle growth cannot be limited simply to the genome-wide association study (GWAS) for body weight at any specific ages, but should be extended to a more general purpose by considering the whole growth trajectory over time using a growth curve approach. For such an approach, the parameters that are used to describe growth curves were treated as phenotypes under a GWAS model. Data from 1,255 Brahman cattle that were weighed at birth, 6, 12, 15, 18, and 24 months of age were analyzed. Parameter estimates, such as mature weight (A) and maturity rate (K) from nonlinear models are utilized as substitutes for the original body weights for the GWAS analysis. We chose the best nonlinear model to describe the weight-age data, and the estimated parameters were used as phenotypes in a multi-trait GWAS. Our aims were to identify and characterize associated SNP markers to indicate SNP-derived candidate genes and annotate their function as related to growth processes in beef cattle. The Brody model presented the best goodness of fit, and the heritability values for the parameter estimates for mature weight (A) and maturity rate (K) were 0.23 and 0.32, respectively, proving that these traits can be a feasible alternative when the objective is to change the shape of growth curves within genetic improvement programs. The genetic correlation between A and K was -0.84, indicating that animals with lower mature body weights reached that weight at younger ages. One hundred and sixty seven (167) and two hundred and sixty two (262) significant SNPs were associated with A and K, respectively. The annotated genes closest to the most significant SNPs for A had direct biological functions related to muscle development (RAB28), myogenic induction (BTG1), fetal growth (IL2), and body weights (APEX2); K genes were functionally associated with body weight, body height, average daily gain (TMEM18), and skeletal muscle development (SMN1). Candidate

  6. Multi-Trait GWAS and New Candidate Genes Annotation for Growth Curve Parameters in Brahman Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Crispim, Aline Camporez; Kelly, Matthew John; Guimarães, Simone Eliza Facioni; e Silva, Fabyano Fonseca; Fortes, Marina Rufino Salinas; Wenceslau, Raphael Rocha; Moore, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of beef cattle growth cannot be limited simply to the genome-wide association study (GWAS) for body weight at any specific ages, but should be extended to a more general purpose by considering the whole growth trajectory over time using a growth curve approach. For such an approach, the parameters that are used to describe growth curves were treated as phenotypes under a GWAS model. Data from 1,255 Brahman cattle that were weighed at birth, 6, 12, 15, 18, and 24 months of age were analyzed. Parameter estimates, such as mature weight (A) and maturity rate (K) from nonlinear models are utilized as substitutes for the original body weights for the GWAS analysis. We chose the best nonlinear model to describe the weight-age data, and the estimated parameters were used as phenotypes in a multi-trait GWAS. Our aims were to identify and characterize associated SNP markers to indicate SNP-derived candidate genes and annotate their function as related to growth processes in beef cattle. The Brody model presented the best goodness of fit, and the heritability values for the parameter estimates for mature weight (A) and maturity rate (K) were 0.23 and 0.32, respectively, proving that these traits can be a feasible alternative when the objective is to change the shape of growth curves within genetic improvement programs. The genetic correlation between A and K was -0.84, indicating that animals with lower mature body weights reached that weight at younger ages. One hundred and sixty seven (167) and two hundred and sixty two (262) significant SNPs were associated with A and K, respectively. The annotated genes closest to the most significant SNPs for A had direct biological functions related to muscle development (RAB28), myogenic induction (BTG1), fetal growth (IL2), and body weights (APEX2); K genes were functionally associated with body weight, body height, average daily gain (TMEM18), and skeletal muscle development (SMN1). Candidate

  7. Prioritization of candidate genes in “QTL-hotspot” region for drought tolerance in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sandip M; Jaganathan, Deepa; Ruperao, Pradeep; Chen, Charles; Punna, Ramu; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Roorkiwal, Manish; Katta, Mohan AVSK; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Garg, Vanika; Kishor, P B Kavi; Gaur, Pooran M; Nguyen, Henry T; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Sutton, Tim; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    A combination of two approaches, namely QTL analysis and gene enrichment analysis were used to identify candidate genes in the “QTL-hotspot” region for drought tolerance present on the Ca4 pseudomolecule in chickpea. In the first approach, a high-density bin map was developed using 53,223 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of ICC 4958 (drought tolerant) and ICC 1882 (drought sensitive) cross. QTL analysis using recombination bins as markers along with the phenotyping data for 17 drought tolerance related traits obtained over 1–5 seasons and 1–5 locations split the “QTL-hotspot” region into two subregions namely “QTL-hotspot_a” (15 genes) and “QTL-hotspot_b” (11 genes). In the second approach, gene enrichment analysis using significant marker trait associations based on SNPs from the Ca4 pseudomolecule with the above mentioned phenotyping data, and the candidate genes from the refined “QTL-hotspot” region showed enrichment for 23 genes. Twelve genes were found common in both approaches. Functional validation using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated four promising candidate genes having functional implications on the effect of “QTL-hotspot” for drought tolerance in chickpea. PMID:26478518

  8. Focal Chromosomal Copy Number Aberrations Identify CMTM8 and GPR177 as New Candidate Driver Genes in Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Bras, Johannes; Schaap, Gerard R.; Baas, Frank; Ylstra, Bauke; Hulsebos, Theo J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive bone tumor that preferentially develops in adolescents. The tumor is characterized by an abundance of genomic aberrations, which hampers the identification of the driver genes involved in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. Our study aims to identify these genes by the investigation of focal copy number aberrations (CNAs, <3 Mb). For this purpose, we subjected 26 primary tumors of osteosarcoma patients to high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and identified 139 somatic focal CNAs. Of these, 72 had at least one gene located within or overlapping the focal CNA, with a total of 94 genes. For 84 of these genes, the expression status in 31 osteosarcoma samples was determined by expression microarray analysis. This enabled us to identify the genes of which the over- or underexpression was in more than 35% of cases in accordance to their copy number status (gain or loss). These candidate genes were subsequently validated in an independent set and furthermore corroborated as driver genes by verifying their role in other tumor types. We identified CMTM8 as a new candidate tumor suppressor gene and GPR177 as a new candidate oncogene in osteosarcoma. In osteosarcoma, CMTM8 has been shown to suppress EGFR signaling. In other tumor types, CMTM8 is known to suppress the activity of the oncogenic protein c-Met and GPR177 is known as an overexpressed upstream regulator of the Wnt-pathway. Further studies are needed to determine whether these proteins also exert the latter functions in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. PMID:25551557

  9. Prioritization of candidate genes in "QTL-hotspot" region for drought tolerance in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Kale, Sandip M; Jaganathan, Deepa; Ruperao, Pradeep; Chen, Charles; Punna, Ramu; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Roorkiwal, Manish; Katta, Mohan A V S K; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Garg, Vanika; Kishor, P B Kavi; Gaur, Pooran M; Nguyen, Henry T; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Sutton, Tim; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-10-19

    A combination of two approaches, namely QTL analysis and gene enrichment analysis were used to identify candidate genes in the "QTL-hotspot" region for drought tolerance present on the Ca4 pseudomolecule in chickpea. In the first approach, a high-density bin map was developed using 53,223 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of ICC 4958 (drought tolerant) and ICC 1882 (drought sensitive) cross. QTL analysis using recombination bins as markers along with the phenotyping data for 17 drought tolerance related traits obtained over 1-5 seasons and 1-5 locations split the "QTL-hotspot" region into two subregions namely "QTL-hotspot_a" (15 genes) and "QTL-hotspot_b" (11 genes). In the second approach, gene enrichment analysis using significant marker trait associations based on SNPs from the Ca4 pseudomolecule with the above mentioned phenotyping data, and the candidate genes from the refined "QTL-hotspot" region showed enrichment for 23 genes. Twelve genes were found common in both approaches. Functional validation using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated four promising candidate genes having functional implications on the effect of "QTL-hotspot" for drought tolerance in chickpea.

  10. A shell regeneration assay to identify biomineralization candidate genes in mytilid mussels.

    PubMed

    Hüning, Anne K; Lange, Skadi M; Ramesh, Kirti; Jacob, Dorrit E; Jackson, Daniel J; Panknin, Ulrike; Gutowska, Magdalena A; Philipp, Eva E R; Rosenstiel, Philip; Lucassen, Magnus; Melzner, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Biomineralization processes in bivalve molluscs are still poorly understood. Here we provide an analysis of specifically expressed sequences from a mantle transcriptome of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. We then developed a novel, integrative shell injury assay to test, whether biomineralization candidate genes highly expressed in marginal and pallial mantle could be induced in central mantle tissue underlying the damaged shell areas. This experimental approach makes it possible to identify gene products that control the chemical micro-environment during calcification as well as organic matrix components. This is unlike existing methodological approaches that work retroactively to characterize calcification relevant molecules and are just able to examine organic matrix components that are present in completed shells. In our assay an orthogonal array of nine 1mm holes was drilled into the left valve, and mussels were suspended in net cages for 20, 29 and 36days to regenerate. Structural observations using stereo-microscopy, SEM and Raman spectroscopy revealed organic sheet synthesis (day 20) as the first step of shell-repair followed by the deposition of calcite crystals (days 20 and 29) and aragonite tablets (day 36). The regeneration period was characterized by time-dependent shifts in gene expression in left central mantle tissue underlying the injured shell, (i) increased expression of two tyrosinase isoforms (TYR3: 29-fold and TYR6: 5-fold) at day 20 with a decline thereafter, (ii) an increase in expression of a gene encoding a nacrein-like protein (max. 100-fold) on day 29. The expression of an acidic Asp-Ser-rich protein was enhanced during the entire regeneration process. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates that genes that are specifically expressed in pallial and marginal mantle tissue can be induced (4 out of 10 genes) in central mantle following experimental injury of the overlying shell. Our findings suggest that regeneration assays can be used

  11. Genetic subdivision and candidate genes under selection in North American grey wolves.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Rena M; vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Harrigan, Ryan; Knowles, James C; Musiani, Marco; Coltman, David; Novembre, John; Wayne, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    Previous genetic studies of the highly mobile grey wolf (Canis lupus) found population structure that coincides with habitat and phenotype differences. We hypothesized that these ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes) should exhibit signatures of selection in genes related to morphology, coat colour and metabolism. To test these predictions, we quantified population structure related to habitat using a genotyping array to assess variation in 42 036 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 111 North American grey wolves. Using these SNP data and individual-level measurements of 12 environmental variables, we identified six ecotypes: West Forest, Boreal Forest, Arctic, High Arctic, British Columbia and Atlantic Forest. Next, we explored signals of selection across these wolf ecotypes through the use of three complementary methods to detect selection: FST /haplotype homozygosity bivariate percentilae, bayescan, and environmentally correlated directional selection with bayenv. Across all methods, we found consistent signals of selection on genes related to morphology, coat coloration, metabolism, as predicted, as well as vision and hearing. In several high-ranking candidate genes, including LEPR, TYR and SLC14A2, we found variation in allele frequencies that follow environmental changes in temperature and precipitation, a result that is consistent with local adaptation rather than genetic drift. Our findings show that local adaptation can occur despite gene flow in a highly mobile species and can be detected through a moderately dense genomic scan. These patterns of local adaptation revealed by SNP genotyping likely reflect high fidelity to natal habitats of dispersing wolves, strong ecological divergence among habitats, and moderate levels of linkage in the wolf genome. PMID:26333947

  12. Dynamic Compression of Chondrocyte-Agarose Constructs Reveals New Candidate Mechanosensitive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bougault, Carole; Aubert-Foucher, Elisabeth; Paumier, Anne; Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Huot, Ludovic; Hot, David; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage is physiologically exposed to repeated loads. The mechanical properties of cartilage are due to its extracellular matrix, and homeostasis is maintained by the sole cell type found in cartilage, the chondrocyte. Although mechanical forces clearly control the functions of articular chondrocytes, the biochemical pathways that mediate cellular responses to mechanical stress have not been fully characterised. The aim of our study was to examine early molecular events triggered by dynamic compression in chondrocytes. We used an experimental system consisting of primary mouse chondrocytes embedded within an agarose hydrogel; embedded cells were pre-cultured for one week and subjected to short-term compression experiments. Using Western blots, we demonstrated that chondrocytes maintain a differentiated phenotype in this model system and reproduce typical chondrocyte-cartilage matrix interactions. We investigated the impact of dynamic compression on the phosphorylation state of signalling molecules and genome-wide gene expression. After 15 min of dynamic compression, we observed transient activation of ERK1/2 and p38 (members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways) and Smad2/3 (members of the canonical transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathways). A microarray analysis performed on chondrocytes compressed for 30 min revealed that only 20 transcripts were modulated more than 2-fold. A less conservative list of 325 modulated genes included genes related to the MAPK and TGF-β pathways and/or known to be mechanosensitive in other biological contexts. Of these candidate mechanosensitive genes, 85% were down-regulated. Down-regulation may therefore represent a general control mechanism for a rapid response to dynamic compression. Furthermore, modulation of transcripts corresponding to different aspects of cellular physiology was observed, such as non-coding RNAs or primary cilium. This study provides new insight into how chondrocytes respond

  13. Candidate Gene Analysis Suggests Untapped Genetic Complexity in Melanin-Based Pigmentation in Birds.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Yann X C; Bertrand, Joris A M; Delahaie, Boris; Cornuault, Josselin; Duval, Thomas; Milá, Borja; Thébaud, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Studies on melanin-based color variation in a context of natural selection have provided a wealth of information on the link between phenotypic and genetic variation. Here, we evaluated associations between melanic plumage patterns and genetic polymorphism in the Réunion grey white-eye (Zosterops borbonicus), a species in which mutations on MC1R do not seem to play any role in explaining melanic variation. This species exhibits 5 plumage color variants that can be grouped into 3 color forms which occupy discrete geographic regions in the lowlands of Réunion, and a fourth high-elevation form which comprises 2 color morphs (grey and brown) and represents a true color polymorphism. We conducted a comprehensive survey of sequence variation in 96 individuals at a series of 7 candidate genes other than MC1R that have been previously shown to influence melanin-based color patterns in vertebrates, including genes that have rarely been studied in a wild