Science.gov

Sample records for additional capital investment

  1. 9 CFR 201.216 - Additional capital investments criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional capital investments... STOCKYARDS ACT Poultry-Packers and Live Poultry Dealers § 201.216 Additional capital investments criteria... or swine production contract grower make additional capital investments over the life of a...

  2. Capital disadvantage: America's failing capital investment system.

    PubMed

    Porter, M E

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. system of allocating investment capital is failing, putting American companies at a serious disadvantage and threatening the long-term growth of the nation's economy. The problem, says Michael Porter, goes beyond the usual formulation of the issue: accusations of "short-termism" by U.S. managers, ineffective corporate governance by directors, or a high cost of capital. The problem involves the external capital allocation system by which capital is provided to companies, as well as the system by which companies allocate capital internally. America's system is marked by fluid capital and a financial focus. Other countries--notably Japan and Germany--have systems with dedicated capital and a focus on corporate position. In global competition, where investment increasingly determines a company's capacity to upgrade and innovate, the U.S. system does not measure up. These conclusions come out of a two-year research project sponsored by the Harvard Business School and the Council on Competitiveness. Porter recommends five far-reaching reforms to make the U.S. system superior to Japan's and Germany's: 1. Improve the present macroeconomic environment. 2. Expand true ownership throughout the system so that directors, managers, employees, and even customers and suppliers hold positions as owners. 3. Align the goals of capital providers, corporations, directors, managers, employees, customers, suppliers, and society. 4. Improve the information used in decision making. 5. Foster more productive modes of interaction and influence among capital providers, corporations, and business units. PMID:10121317

  3. Measuring Social Capital Investment: Scale Development and Examination of Links to Social Capital and Perceived Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, Rhiana; Gong, Jie; Fang, Xiaoyi; Kaljee, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with greater social capital have better health outcomes. Investment in social capital likely increases one’s own social capital, bearing great implications for disease prevention and health promotion. In this study, the authors developed and validated the Social Capital Investment Inventory (SCII). Direct effects of social capital investment on perceived stress, and indirect effects through social capital were examined. 397 Participants from Beijing and Wuhan, China completed surveys. Analyses demonstrated that the SCII has a single factor structure and strong internal consistency. Structural equation modeling showed that individuals who invested more in social capital had greater bonding social capital, and subsequently less perceived stress. Results suggest that disease prevention and health promotion programs should consider approaches to encourage social capital investment; individuals may be able to reduce stress by increasing their investment in social capital. Future research is needed to provide additional empirical support for the SCII and observed structural relationships. PMID:25648725

  4. 75 FR 33757 - Major Capital Investment Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration 49 CFR Part 611 RIN 2132-AB02 Major Capital Investment Projects AGENCY... June 3, 2010 (75 FR 31383), noting that additional meetings would be announced in subsequent...

  5. 75 FR 39492 - Major Capital Investment Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration 49 CFR Part 611 RIN 2132-AB02 Major Capital Investment Projects AGENCY... published on June 3, 2010 (75 FR 31383), noting that additional meetings would be announced in...

  6. Leasing equipment minimizes capital investment.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, M E; Maier, R A

    1989-03-01

    As consumers continue to demand the most advanced technology at the lowest cost, healthcare organizations are turning to leasing as a way of acquiring equipment with a minimum amount of capital investment. Institutions considering leasing should determine their balance sheet constraints, compare the relative costs of debt financing and leasing, and assess the residual value of the equipment at the end of its use. Comparing potential lessors requires careful analysis of rate structures and the capability of the companies to commit to a contract promptly.

  7. Capital investment analysis: three methods.

    PubMed

    Gapenski, L C

    1993-08-01

    Three cash flow/discount rate methods can be used when conducting capital budgeting financial analyses: the net operating cash flow method, the net cash flow to investors method, and the net cash flow to equity holders method. The three methods differ in how the financing mix and the benefits of debt financing are incorporated. This article explains the three methods, demonstrates that they are essentially equivalent, and recommends which method to use under specific circumstances.

  8. 31 CFR 223.7 - Investment of capital and assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITH THE UNITED STATES § 223.7 Investment of capital and assets. The cash capital and other funds of every such company must be safely invested in accordance with the laws of the State in which it is... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Investment of capital and assets....

  9. 77 FR 5750 - Major Capital Investment Projects (NPRM); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... Federal Transit Administration 49 CFR Part 611 RIN 2132-AB02 Major Capital Investment Projects (NPRM... Major Capital Investment Projects at 49 CFR 611. The docket for comments on the NPRM is open through... Transit Administration (FTA) for its discretionary Major Capital Investments program (``New Starts''...

  10. 31 CFR 223.7 - Investment of capital and assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Investment of capital and assets. 223... WITH THE UNITED STATES § 223.7 Investment of capital and assets. The cash capital and other funds of... periodically issue instructions for the guidance of companies with respect to investments and other...

  11. 12 CFR 931.3 - Minimum investment in capital stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum investment in capital stock. 931.3 Section 931.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK RISK MANAGEMENT AND CAPITAL STANDARDS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CAPITAL STOCK § 931.3 Minimum investment in capital stock. (a)...

  12. 12 CFR 931.3 - Minimum investment in capital stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum investment in capital stock. 931.3 Section 931.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK RISK MANAGEMENT AND CAPITAL STANDARDS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CAPITAL STOCK § 931.3 Minimum investment in capital stock. (a)...

  13. 12 CFR 931.3 - Minimum investment in capital stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum investment in capital stock. 931.3 Section 931.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK RISK MANAGEMENT AND CAPITAL STANDARDS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CAPITAL STOCK § 931.3 Minimum investment in capital stock. (a)...

  14. 12 CFR 931.3 - Minimum investment in capital stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum investment in capital stock. 931.3 Section 931.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK RISK MANAGEMENT AND CAPITAL STANDARDS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CAPITAL STOCK § 931.3 Minimum investment in capital stock. (a)...

  15. 12 CFR 931.3 - Minimum investment in capital stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum investment in capital stock. 931.3 Section 931.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK RISK MANAGEMENT AND CAPITAL STANDARDS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CAPITAL STOCK § 931.3 Minimum investment in capital stock. (a)...

  16. How to invest in social capital.

    PubMed

    Prusak, L; Cohen, D

    2001-06-01

    Business runs better when people within a company have close ties and trust one another. But the relationships that make organizations work effectively are under assault for several reasons. Building such "social capital" is difficult in volatile times. Disruptive technologies spawn new markets daily, and organizations respond with constantly changing structures. The problem is worsened by the virtuality of many of today's workplaces, with employees working off-site or on their own. What's more, few managers know how to invest in such social capital. The authors describe how managers can help their organizations thrive by making effective investments in social capital. For instance, companies that value social capital demonstrate a commitment to retention as a way of limiting workplace volatility. The authors cite SAS's extensive efforts to signal to employees that it sees them as human beings, not just workers. Managers can build trust by showing trust themselves, as well as by rewarding trust and sending clear signals to employees. They can foster cooperation by giving employees a common sense of purpose through good strategic communication and inspirational leadership. Johnson & Johnson's well-known credo, which says the company's first responsibility is to the people who use its products, has helped the company in time of adversity, as in 1982 when cyanide in Tylenol capsules killed seven people. Other methods of fostering cooperation include rewarding the behavior with cash and establishing rules that get people into the habit of cooperating. Social capital, once a given in organizations, is now rare and endangered. By investing in it, companies will be better positioned to seize the opportunities in today's volatile, virtual business environment.

  17. Venture Capital Investment Base on Grey Relational Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xubo

    This paper builds a venture capital investment projects selection evaluation model base on risk-weight investment return using grey relational analysis. The risk and return in venture capital investment projects selection process is analyses. These risk and return mainly constricted in management ability, operation ability, market ability, exit obtain and investment cost. The 18 sub-indicators are the impact factors contributed to these five evaluation aspects. Grey relation analysis is use to evaluate the venture capital investment selection. Get the optimal solution of risk-weight double objective investment selection evaluation model. An example is used to demonstrate the model in this paper.

  18. Venture Capital Investment in the Life Sciences in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Hosang, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Innovation is one of the main driving factors for continuous and healthy economic growth and welfare. Switzerland as a resource-poor country is particularly dependent on innovation, and the life sciences, which comprise biotechnologies, (bio)pharmaceuticals, medical technologies and diagnostics, are one of the key areas of innovative strength of Switzerland. Venture capital financing and venture capitalists (frequently called 'VCs') and investors in public equities have played and still play a pivotal role in financing the Swiss biotechnology industry. In the following some general features of venture capital investment in life sciences as well as some opportunities and challenges which venture capital investors in Switzerland are facing are highlighted. In addition certain means to counteract these challenges including the 'Zukunftsfonds Schweiz' are discussed.

  19. Venture Capital Investment in the Life Sciences in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Hosang, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Innovation is one of the main driving factors for continuous and healthy economic growth and welfare. Switzerland as a resource-poor country is particularly dependent on innovation, and the life sciences, which comprise biotechnologies, (bio)pharmaceuticals, medical technologies and diagnostics, are one of the key areas of innovative strength of Switzerland. Venture capital financing and venture capitalists (frequently called 'VCs') and investors in public equities have played and still play a pivotal role in financing the Swiss biotechnology industry. In the following some general features of venture capital investment in life sciences as well as some opportunities and challenges which venture capital investors in Switzerland are facing are highlighted. In addition certain means to counteract these challenges including the 'Zukunftsfonds Schweiz' are discussed. PMID:26508600

  20. 76 FR 17736 - Major Capital Investment Program-New Starts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... discretionary selection of projects for funding using unallocated Major Capital Investment (New Starts) program... Federal Transit Administration Major Capital Investment Program--New Starts AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of discretionary selection of New Starts projects for Funding....

  1. The future for healthcare capital investments.

    PubMed

    Betz, R

    1992-03-01

    Hospitals have entered into a new era of capital planning. A number of factors will influence hospital buying behavior now that the Medicare capital regulations are being implemented. As purchasing responsibility for additional departments is continually folded into hospitals' central purchasing function there will be increased opportunities for group contracts. As resources shrink and demand for services increases, GPOs will be relied upon for their expertise and financial finesse. The emphasis will be on boosting the use of group contracts among existing members, rather then seeking additional members in a shrinking hospital market. Through effective purchasing, it is generally recognized that a hospital can recover and keep, at best, 5-10 percent of the cost of all purchased goods and services. Group purchasing organizations need to develop better strategies of cooperation with vendors, distributors and hospitals to help providers control capital costs. In this challenging environment, GPOs will aggressively target markets other than acute care as the source of their future growth, just as healthcare facilities are branching out. To accommodate changing needs, the strongest GPOs will continue their evolution into structures more like alliances, offering an array of other cooperative and support programs beyond the purchase of goods and services. PMID:10116769

  2. Investment in Human Capital. Schooling Supply Constraints in Rural Ghana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavy, Victor

    This paper hypothesizes that the cost differential between primary school and middle or secondary schooling will affect household decisions to invest in any one schooling level in Ghana. Human capital investment is usually modeled in an intertemporal optimization framework in which households or individuals maximize the present value of life-time…

  3. provider venture capital funds: investing in innovation.

    PubMed

    Potter, Mary Jo; Wesslund, Rick

    2016-05-01

    As health systems continue to embrace disruptive innovation, they are increasingly likely to consider making a move into venture capital. Working in venture capital can benefit a health system in several ways, including: Allowing it to operate outside of bureaucracy and align projects with its core values. Encouraging innovation within the organization. Enabling it to respond quickly to changes in the market.

  4. Physical activity: an underestimated investment in human capital?

    PubMed

    Bailey, Richard; Hillman, Charles; Arent, Shawn; Petitpas, Albert

    2013-03-01

    Despite the fact that physical activity is universally acknowledged to be an important part of healthy functioning and well-being, the full scope of its value is rarely appreciated. This article introduces a novel framework for understanding the relationships between physical activity (and specifically sport-related forms of physical activity) and different aspects of human development. It proposes that the outcomes of physical activity can be framed as differential 'capitals' that represent investments in domain-specific assets: Emotional, Financial, Individual, Intellectual, Physical, and Social. These investments, especially when made early in the life course, can yield significant rewards, both at that time and for years to come. The paper presents a new model-the Human Capital Model-that makes sense of these effects, outlines the different capitals, and briefly articulates the conditions necessary for the realization of Human Capital growth through physical activity.

  5. Toward an American Rural Renaissance. The Role of Investment Capital in Rural Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brace, Lloyd

    This essay examines the role of investment capital in rural development. The development of government capitalism is traced. Outlined next are the premises for private and public investment. Geographic/geopolitical concerns in the formation of investment priorities are described. The need for greater availability of investment capital for small…

  6. Venture Capital Investment Selection Decision-making Base on Fuzzy Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xubo

    Venture capital investment decision-making is the most important issue in venture capital investment selection. There are higher uncertainty and complexity in venture capital investment decision-making process. This paper analysis these uncertain risk in venture capital investment decision-making base the previous studies. Attributed the venture capital candidate firms' select to fuzzy optimal decision-making. Build a risk-weight fuzzy optimal return model to avoid the decision-making risk. Get the optimal solution set.

  7. Investing in Training and Development. Turning Interest into Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pont, Tony

    This book, which is intended for individuals responsible for human resource development (HRD) programs, examines a number of issues in turning investments in training and development into human capital and examines ways of making the workplace an arena for development. The following topics are discussed: the nature and role of training and…

  8. 31 CFR 223.7 - Investment of capital and assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Investment of capital and assets. 223.7 Section 223.7 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE SURETY COMPANIES DOING...

  9. Taking Human Capital Investment Seriously: Reflections on Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Trivina

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the 2002 Junior College/Upper Secondary Review in Singapore in the context of the nation-state's commitment to human capital investment. It discusses how these changes have led to a radically altered upper secondary educational landscape through the implementation of the Integrated Programme, the establishment of Specialized…

  10. Capital Investment by Independent and System-Affiliated Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Nathan W; Smith, Dean G; Wheeler, John R C

    2015-01-01

    Capital expenditures are a critical part of hospitals' efforts to maintain quality of patient care and financial stability. Over the past 20 years, finding capital to fund these expenditures has become increasingly challenging for hospitals, particularly independent hospitals. Independent hospitals struggling to find ways to fund necessary capital investment are often advised that their best strategy is to join a multi-hospital system. There is scant empirical evidence to support the idea that system membership improves independent hospitals' ability to make capital expenditures. Using data from the American Hospital Association and Medicare Cost Reports, we use difference-in-difference methods to examine changes in capital expenditures for independent hospitals that joined multi-hospital systems between 1997 and 2008. We find that in the first 5 years after acquisition, capital expenditures increase by an average of almost $16,000 per bed annually, as compared with non-acquired hospitals. In later years, the difference in capital expenditure is smaller and not statistically significant. Our results do not suggest that increases in capital expenditures vary by asset age or the size of the acquiring system.

  11. The role of financial market performance in hospital capital investment.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Kristin L; Song, Paula H

    2011-01-01

    Many not-for-profit hospitals hold large portfolios of financial investments, making them vulnerable to fluctuations in market performance. This article examines the association of bond and equity market performance with investment in property, plant, and equipment by 194 not-for-profit general hospitals in California over the period 1997 to 2006. The study combines retrospective panel data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development with year-end returns on the S&P 500 and ten-year US Treasury bonds. Using fixed-effects regression, we find a significant positive association between S&P 500 performance and hospitals' capital investment; investment is not correlated with ten-year Treasury bond performance. PMID:21528832

  12. Housing market capitalization of energy-saving durable good investments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.C.

    1981-07-01

    Rising energy prices provide an economic incentive to substitute capital for fuel in production processes, where the extent of substitution that is feasible is constrained by existing technologies. In the residential sector, such capital-fuel substitution depends upon the willingness of builders and homeowners to invest in the durable goods that make the house energy conserving. Since these durable goods become permanently attached to the dwelling unit and since ownership is likely to change over the lifetime of the house, the incentive to carry out an investment in energy conservation depends critically upon the efficiency of the housing market in capitalizing the financial benefits of future fuel savings. In this study of the Knoxville housing market during 1978, an hedonic price equation of the form P = f(U, X) was estimated, where P is the sale price of the house, U is the annual utility (fuel) bill, and X is a vector of structural, locational, and neighborhood attributes. The estimated hedonic price index reveals that, holding other influences constant, the marginal effect of a one-dollar savings in the annual fuel bill is to increase the sale price of the house by approximately $21. Estimates of implicit market discount rates, under various assumptions about fuel escalation rates and remaining lifetimes of the houses, indicate that the housing market performed in a manner consistent with a social discount rate of about 10 percent. The results of the study do not show whether or not investment in energy conservation is proceeding at a socially optimum rate, only that the housing market, in this location and period of time, did operate efficiently in capitalizing the investments.

  13. The Power of Professional Capital: With an Investment in Collaboration, Teachers Become Nation Builders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Andrew; Fullan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the powerful idea of capital and articulates its importance for professional work, professional capacity, and professional effectiveness. Systems that invest in professional capital recognize that education spending is an investment in developing human capital from early childhood to adulthood, leading to rewards of economic…

  14. Improvements in ecosystem services from investments in natural capital.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Zhiyun; Zheng, Hua; Xiao, Yi; Polasky, Stephen; Liu, Jianguo; Xu, Weihua; Wang, Qiao; Zhang, Lu; Xiao, Yang; Rao, Enming; Jiang, Ling; Lu, Fei; Wang, Xiaoke; Yang, Guangbin; Gong, Shihan; Wu, Bingfang; Zeng, Yuan; Yang, Wu; Daily, Gretchen C

    2016-06-17

    In response to ecosystem degradation from rapid economic development, China began investing heavily in protecting and restoring natural capital starting in 2000. We report on China's first national ecosystem assessment (2000-2010), designed to quantify and help manage change in ecosystem services, including food production, carbon sequestration, soil retention, sandstorm prevention, water retention, flood mitigation, and provision of habitat for biodiversity. Overall, ecosystem services improved from 2000 to 2010, apart from habitat provision. China's national conservation policies contributed significantly to the increases in those ecosystem services.

  15. Decision models for capital investment and financing decisions in hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Vraciu, R A

    1980-01-01

    The literature on capital investment and financing decisions for hospitals has suggested several approaches to analyzing sets of options. In this paper, I present a taxonomy of the different approaches; analyze and compare the different elements of the taxonomy; and illustrate and discuss the information that can be gained by using each approach. I view these different analytic methods as complementary rather than competing methods of providing information to decision makers, and argue that the complex nature of hospital objectives demands the use of more than one approach. Failure to do this may lead to biased evaluations and poor decision making. PMID:6768699

  16. Improvements in ecosystem services from investments in natural capital.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Zhiyun; Zheng, Hua; Xiao, Yi; Polasky, Stephen; Liu, Jianguo; Xu, Weihua; Wang, Qiao; Zhang, Lu; Xiao, Yang; Rao, Enming; Jiang, Ling; Lu, Fei; Wang, Xiaoke; Yang, Guangbin; Gong, Shihan; Wu, Bingfang; Zeng, Yuan; Yang, Wu; Daily, Gretchen C

    2016-06-17

    In response to ecosystem degradation from rapid economic development, China began investing heavily in protecting and restoring natural capital starting in 2000. We report on China's first national ecosystem assessment (2000-2010), designed to quantify and help manage change in ecosystem services, including food production, carbon sequestration, soil retention, sandstorm prevention, water retention, flood mitigation, and provision of habitat for biodiversity. Overall, ecosystem services improved from 2000 to 2010, apart from habitat provision. China's national conservation policies contributed significantly to the increases in those ecosystem services. PMID:27313045

  17. Trends in U.S. Venture Capital Investments Related to Energy: 1980-2007

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.

    2008-10-10

    This report documents trends in U.S. venture capital investments over the period 1980-2008. Particular attention is given to U.S. venture capital investments for “internet-specific”, biotechnology, and energy / industrial sectors over the period 1980-2007. During the early 1980s, U.S. venture capital investments in the energy / industrial area accounted for more than 20% of all venture capital investments. However subsequent periods of low energy prices and the emergence of fast growing new industries like computers (both hardware and software), biotechnology and the Internet quickly reduced the priority accorded to energy / industrial investments as by 2000 these investments accounted for only 1% of the $119 billion dollars invested that year by the U.S. venture capital community. The significant increase in the real price of oil that began in 2003-2004 correlates with renewed interest and increased investment by the venture capital community in energy / industrial investment opportunities. Venture capital investments in 2007 for the energy / industrial sector accounted for $3 billion or slightly more than 10% of all venture capital invested that year.

  18. Investment in Human Capital through Institutions of Higher Education for the Revival of Kenya's Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawire, Nelson W.; Nafukho, Fredrick M.

    2006-01-01

    Despite economic theory postulating that increases in investment in human capital and physical capital leads to increase in economic growth, in the Kenyan case, this has not been true. This paper empirically examines the contribution of human capital and physical capital to economic growth in Kenya. Measures to be undertaken by higher education…

  19. Liquidity, Technological Opportunities, and the Stage Distribution of Venture Capital Investments

    PubMed Central

    Lahr, Henry; Mina, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the determinants of the stage distribution of European venture capital investments from 1990 to 2011. Consistent with liquidity risk theory, we find that the likelihood of investing in earlier stages increases relative to all private equity investments during liquidity crisis years. While liquidity is the main driver of acquisition investments and, to some extent, of expansion financings, technological opportunities are overall the main driver of early and late stage venture capital investments. In contrast to the dotcom crash, the recent financial crisis negatively affected the relative likelihood of expansion investments, but not of early and late stage investments. PMID:26166906

  20. 26 CFR 1.857-2 - Real estate investment trust taxable income and net capital gain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Real estate investment trust taxable income and... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.857-2 Real estate investment trust taxable income and net capital gain. (a) Real estate investment trust...

  1. 38 CFR 61.15 - Capital grants-obtaining additional information and awarding capital grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Capital grants-obtaining additional information and awarding capital grants. 61.15 Section 61.15 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM Capital Grants § 61.15...

  2. Performance of the Higher Education Students Loans Board in Human Capital Investment from 2005-2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memba, Albert Zephaniah; Feng, Zhao Zun

    2016-01-01

    Many studies conducted on the Higher Education Students Loans Board (HESLB) have mostly concentrated on its success, sustainability and effectiveness on loans issuance and repayment. None had focused on its performance towards human capital investment. This study sought to explain and analyze HESLB's performance in human capital investment, which…

  3. AACP Special Taskforce on Diversifying Our Investment in Human Capital Interim Update

    PubMed Central

    White, Carla; Adams, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The 2015-2017 AACP Special Taskforce on Diversifying our Investment in Human Capital was appointed for a two-year term, therefore the interim update from the Taskforce. A full report will be provided in 2017 in the form of a white paper for academic pharmacy on diversifying our investment in human capital. PMID:27756938

  4. 12 CFR 956.4 - Risk-based capital requirement for investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Risk-based capital requirement for investments. 956.4 Section 956.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK ASSETS AND OFF-BALANCE SHEET ITEMS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK INVESTMENTS § 956.4 Risk-based capital requirement...

  5. Managing Debt and Capital Investments: A Toolbox for Private Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsley, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    All private colleges and universities make strategic capital investments and consider the use of debt to fund those investments. From the commonplace purchase of photocopiers to the construction of new academic buildings or dormitories, investment decisions that yield long-term financial benefits must follow on the heels of careful analysis. To…

  6. 12 CFR 956.4 - Risk-based capital requirement for investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... OFF-BALANCE SHEET ITEMS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK INVESTMENTS § 956.4 Risk-based capital requirement for... below the second highest credit rating, in an amount equal to or greater than the outstanding balance...

  7. Does Human Capital Investment Impact the Earning Mobility of the Near Poor?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasik, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    This secondary analysis of the earning mobility of the near poor examined the impact of human capital investment on the earning mobility of the near poor between 2005 and 2009. The theory framing this study is Human Capital Theory (Shultz, 1961). Other demographic and socioeconomic variables were included in this study to further explore factors…

  8. Investing in Schools: Capital Spending, Facility Conditions, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martorell, Paco; Stange, Kevin; McFarlin, Isaac, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Public investments in repairs, modernization, and construction of schools cost billions. However, little is known about the nature of school facility investments, whether it actually changes the physical condition of public schools, and the subsequent causal impacts on student achievement. We study the achievement effects of nearly 1,400 capital…

  9. Simulating the Risk of Investment in Human Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartog, Joop; Van Ophem, Hans; Bajdechi, Simona Maria

    2007-01-01

    The risk of investment in schooling has largely been ignored. We mimic the investment decision facing a student and simulate risky earnings profiles in alternative options, with parameters taken from the very limited evidence. The distribution of rates of return appears positively skewed. Our best estimate of "ex ante" risk in university education…

  10. Investments in social capital--implications of social interactions for the production of health.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Kristian; Lindgren, Björn; Lindström, Martin; Nystedt, Paul

    2003-06-01

    This paper develops a theoretical model of the family as producer of health- and social capital. There are both direct and indirect returns on the production and accumulation of health- and social capital. Direct returns (the consumption motives) result since health and social capital both enhance individual welfare per se. Indirect returns (the investment motives) result since health capital increases the amount of productive time, and social capital improves the efficiency of the production technology used for producing health capital. The main prediction of the theoretical model is that the amount of social capital is positively related to the level of health; individuals with high levels of social capital are healthier than individuals with lower levels of social capital, ceteris paribus. An empirical model is estimated, using a set of individual panel data from three different time periods in Sweden. We find that social capital is positively related to the level of health capital, which supports the theoretical model. Further, we find that the level of social capital (1) declines with age, (2) is lower for those married or cohabiting, and (3) is lower for men than for women. PMID:12742602

  11. Investing private capital in private-public partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadd, Courtney A.

    1996-03-01

    Businesses must invest in technology to sustain and enhance their profitability over the long-term. Two of today's greatest challenges are rapidly emerging new technologies and rapidly changing customer preferences. To meet these challenges, businesses must recoup technology investments over shorter product life cycles and reduce new product development times. The associated risk is extraordinary. Businesses reduce this risk through partnerships, strategic alliances, and joint ventures; however, public sector partners are not routinely included in new technology and product development decisions. This paper discusses general decision criteria for technology investment and how decisions may be enhanced through the use of private-public partnerships.

  12. Trends in U.S. Venture Capital Investments Related to Energy: 1980 through the Third Quarter of 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.

    2010-11-08

    This report documents trends in U.S. venture capital investments over the period 1980 through the third quarter of calendar year 2010 (2010 Q1+Q2+Q3). Particular attention is given to U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector over the period 1980-2010 Q1+Q2+Q3 as well as in the more recently created cross-cutting category of CleanTech over the period 1995-2010 Q1+Q2+Q3. During the early 1980s, U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector accounted for more than 20% of all venture capital investments. However subsequent periods of low energy prices, the deregulation of large aspects of the energy industry, and the emergence of fast growing new industries like computers (both hardware and software), biotechnology and the Internet quickly reduced the priority accorded to energy/industrial investments. To wit, venture capital investments related to the energy/industrial sector accounted for only 1% of the $132 billion (in real 2010 US$) invested in 2000 by the U.S. venture capital community. The significant increase in the real price of oil that began in 2003-2004 correlates with renewed interest and increased investment by the venture capital community in energy/industrial investment opportunities. Venture capital investments for 2009 for the energy/industrial sector accounted for $2.4 billion or slightly more than 13% of all venture capital invested that year. The total venture capital invested in energy/industrial during the first three quarters of 2010 is close to $2.4 billion accounting for slightly less than 15% of all venture capital investments during the first three quarters of 2010. In 2009, the aggregate amount invested in CleanTech was $2.1 billion (11% of the total US venture capital invested in that lean year) and for the first three quarters of 2010 US venture capital investments in CleanTech have already exceeded $2.8 billion (18% of all US venture capital investments made during the first three quarters of

  13. Trends in U.S. Venture Capital Investments Related to Energy: 1980 through the Second Quarter of 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.

    2010-07-29

    This report documents trends in U.S. venture capital investments over the period 1980 through the second quarter of calendar year 2010 (2010Q1+Q2). Particular attention is given to U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector over the period 1980-2010Q1+Q2 as well as in the more recently created cross-cutting category of CleanTech over the period 1995-2010Q1+Q2. During the early 1980s, U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector accounted for more than 20% of all venture capital investments. However subsequent periods of low energy prices, the deregulation of large aspects of the energy industry, and the emergence of fast growing new industries like computers (both hardware and software), biotechnology and the Internet quickly reduced the priority accorded to energy/industrial investments. To wit, venture capital investments related to the energy/industrial sector accounted for only 1% of the $119 billion dollars invested in 2000 by the U.S. venture capital community. The significant increase in the real price of oil that began in 2003-2004 correlates with renewed interest and increased investment by the venture capital community in energy/industrial investment opportunities. Venture capital investments for 2009 for the energy/industrial sector accounted for $2.1 billion or slightly more than 13% of all venture capital invested that year. The total venture capital invested in energy/industrial during the first two quarters of 2010 is close to $1.8 billion accounting for 17% of all venture capital investments during the first two quarters of 2010. In 2009, the aggregate amount invested in CleanTech was $1.8 billion (30% of the total US venture capital invested in that lean year) and for the first two quarters of 2010 US venture capital investments in CleanTech have already exceeded $1.9 billion (19% of all US venture capital investments made during the first half of 2010). Between 2004 and 2009, U.S. venture capital

  14. Study on Venture Capital Investment Risk Avoiding Base on Option Pricing in Agricultural Production and Processing Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xubo

    This paper uses the approaches and models of option theory to analyze two-stage venture capital investment in agricultural production and processing enterprises decision-making under uncertainty. Mathematics expressions of this two-stage venture capital investment decision-making are presented. An option value model about two-stage venture capital investment decision-making base on options pricing theory under the uncertainty is presented. Get the solution of option pricing model which we present.

  15. 31 CFR 223.7 - Investment of capital and assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... periodically issue instructions for the guidance of companies with respect to investments and other matters. These guidelines may be updated from time to time to meet changing conditions in the industry....

  16. 9 CFR 201.216 - Additional capital investments criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... contract or growing arrangement constitutes a violation of the Act. These criteria include, but are not... the slaughter plant or processing facility or intends or does substantially reduce or end...

  17. 9 CFR 201.216 - Additional capital investments criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... contract or growing arrangement constitutes a violation of the Act. These criteria include, but are not... the slaughter plant or processing facility or intends or does substantially reduce or end...

  18. Capital investment requirements for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation in power generation on near term to century time scales and global to regional spatial scales

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-11-01

    Electrification plays a crucial role in cost-effective greenhouse gas emissions mitigation strategies. Such strategies in turn carry implications for financial capital markets. This paper explores the implication of climate mitigation policy for capital investment demands by the electric power sector on decade to century time scales. We go further to explore the implications of technology performance and the stringency of climate policy for capital investment demands by the power sector. Finally, we discuss the regional distribution of investment demands. We find that stabilizing GHG emissions will require additional investment in the electricity generation sector over and above investments that would be need in the absence of climate policy, in the range of 16 to 29 Trillion US$ (60-110%) depending on the stringency of climate policy during the period 2015 to 2095 under default technology assumptions. This increase reflects the higher capital intensity of power systems that control emissions. Limits on the penetration of nuclear and carbon capture and storage technology could increase costs substantially. Energy efficiency improvements can reduce the investment requirement by 8 to21 Trillion US$ (default technology assumptions), depending on climate policy scenario with higher savings being obtained under the most stringent climate policy. The heaviest investments in power generation were observed in the China, India, SE Asia and Africa regions with the latter three regions dominating in the second half of the 21st century.

  19. Retaining Educational Fundraisers: Reducing Turnover by Investing in Human Capital Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Christy

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines an approach to reducing gift officer turnover during comprehensive campaigns by investing in the human capital management (HCM) program. While many universities have begun to create HCM programs, I suggest creating a position specifically focused on the retention of gift offices to ensure that universities and non-profits can…

  20. Education and the Labour Market: Subjective Aspects of Human Capital Investment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killeen, John; Turton, Richard; Diamond, Wayne; Dosnon, Odile; Wach, Monique

    1999-01-01

    Explores subjective aspects of human-capital investment decisions in education. Explores connections that 11th- and 13th-year British students perceive between their education and the labor market, and between qualifications mechanisms and life chances. Most students believe education plays a market-signaling role and a marginal role in raising…

  1. Life Expectancy and Human Capital Investments: Evidence from Maternal Mortality Declines. NBER Working Paper No. 13947

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayachandran, Seema; Lleras-Muney, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    Longer life expectancy should encourage human capital accumulation, since a longer time horizon increases the value of investments that pay out over time. Previous work has been unable to determine the empirical importance of this life-expectancy effect due to the difficulty of isolating it from other effects of health on education. We examine a…

  2. Resource adequacy, capital adequacy and investment uncertainty in the Australian power market

    SciTech Connect

    Simshauser, Paul

    2010-01-15

    Ignoring the importance of capital markets risks overlooking one of the most fundamental drivers of investment and price in the utilities industry. While the worst effects of the financial crisis are beginning to subside, the residual fallout will be more than a passing fad for energy utilities. (author)

  3. Outward Foreign Direct Investment and Human Capital Development: A Small Country Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the pattern of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) by Irish MNCs, and more specifically, to investigate their approach to human capital development and how these correspond to foreign MNCs in Ireland. In particular, it seeks to investigate training and development expenditure, adoption of…

  4. Geography and the costs of urban energy infrastructure: The case of electricity and natural gas capital investments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyel, Muzeyyen Anil

    Investments in the urban energy infrastructure for distributing electricity and natural gas are analyzed using (1) property data measuring distribution plant value at the local/tax district level, and (2) system outputs such as sectoral numbers of customers and energy sales, input prices, company-specific characteristics such as average wages and load factor. Socio-economic and site-specific urban and geographic variables, however, often been neglected in past studies. The purpose of this research is to incorporate these site-specific characteristics of electricity and natural gas distribution into investment cost model estimations. These local characteristics include (1) socio-economic variables, such as income and wealth; (2) urban-related variables, such as density, land-use, street pattern, housing pattern; (3) geographic and environmental variables, such as soil, topography, and weather, and (4) company-specific characteristics such as average wages, and load factor. The classical output variables include residential and commercial-industrial customers and sales. In contrast to most previous research, only capital investments at the local level are considered. In addition to aggregate cost modeling, the analysis focuses on the investment costs for the system components: overhead conductors, underground conductors, conduits, poles, transformers, services, street lighting, and station equipment for electricity distribution; and mains, services, regular and industrial measurement and regulation stations for natural gas distribution. The Box-Cox, log-log and additive models are compared to determine the best fitting cost functions. The Box-Cox form turns out to be superior to the other forms at the aggregate level and for network components. However, a linear additive form provides a better fit for end-user related components. The results show that, in addition to output variables and company-specific variables, various site-specific variables are statistically

  5. Rising Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility: The Role of Public Investments in Human Capital

    PubMed Central

    Aizer, Anna

    2014-01-01

    One consequence of the rise in inequality witnessed over the past 40 years is its potentially negative impact on intergenerational mobility if parents at the bottom of the income distribution invest significantly less in their children's human capital. I consider whether public investments in children can potentially offset the inequality of private investments. Specifically, examining changes in public spending in 25 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries over the period 2000–2009, I find that increases in spending on health are most strongly associated with reductions in the importance of family background and declines in inequality in the production of child human capital as measured by the Program for International Student Assessment test scores among 15-year-olds. Public spending on family support, housing, and education are also moderately related. In contrast, increased spending on the elderly is associated with increases in the importance of parental background and inequality of child test scores. These results suggest that public investments in child human capital have the potential to offset the potentially negative impact of increasing income inequality on intergenerational mobility and inequality of the next generation. Further research firmly establishing a causal relationship is needed. PMID:25419203

  6. Rising Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility: The Role of Public Investments in Human Capital.

    PubMed

    Aizer, Anna

    2014-06-01

    One consequence of the rise in inequality witnessed over the past 40 years is its potentially negative impact on intergenerational mobility if parents at the bottom of the income distribution invest significantly less in their children's human capital. I consider whether public investments in children can potentially offset the inequality of private investments. Specifically, examining changes in public spending in 25 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries over the period 2000-2009, I find that increases in spending on health are most strongly associated with reductions in the importance of family background and declines in inequality in the production of child human capital as measured by the Program for International Student Assessment test scores among 15-year-olds. Public spending on family support, housing, and education are also moderately related. In contrast, increased spending on the elderly is associated with increases in the importance of parental background and inequality of child test scores. These results suggest that public investments in child human capital have the potential to offset the potentially negative impact of increasing income inequality on intergenerational mobility and inequality of the next generation. Further research firmly establishing a causal relationship is needed.

  7. 76 FR 61769 - Destra Capital Investments LLC and Destra Unit Investment Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... represent more than 3% of the total outstanding voting stock of the acquired company, more than 5% of the... any broker or dealer registered under the Exchange Act, from selling the shares of the investment... the acquired company's voting stock, or if the sale will cause more than 10% of the acquired...

  8. The impact of activity based cost accounting on health care capital investment decisions.

    PubMed

    Greene, J K; Metwalli, A

    2001-01-01

    For the future survival of the rural hospitals in the U.S., there is a need to make sound financial decisions. The Activity Based Cost Accounting (ABC) provides more accurate and detailed cost information to make an informed capital investment decision taking into consideration all the costs and revenue reimbursement from third party payors. The paper analyzes, evaluates and compares two scenarios of acquiring capital equipment and attempts to show the importance of utilizing the ABC method in making a sound financial decision as compared to the traditional cost method. PMID:11794757

  9. Economic Competitiveness and the Human-Capital Investment Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faux, Jeff

    Educational performance has become a crucial element in the United States' capacity to prosper in a new global economy of fierce competition. In addition to the traditional question of how the educational system contributes to students' intellectual growth, a new question is being asked: How does the educational system contribute to national…

  10. Venture Capital Investments for Life Sciences Start-ups in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Gantenbein, Pascal; Herold, Nils

    2014-12-01

    Despite its economic and technological importance, the Swiss life sciences sector faces severe challenges in attracting enough venture capital for its own development. Although biotechnology and medical technology have been the most important areas of venture financing from 1999 through 2012 according to our own data, average investment volumes nevertheless remain on a low level of only 0.05 percent of Swiss GDP. After 2008, there was a pronounced shift away from early-stage financing. While business angels still play an important role at the early stage, venture capitalists are the most important investor type by volumes having their main focus on expansion financing. The industry faces predominant challenges in securing capital availability for entrepreneurs, in transforming the highly skewed and back-loaded payoff profile of investments into a more stable return stream, and in defining appropriate business and collaboration models.

  11. Venture Capital Investments for Life Sciences Start-ups in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Gantenbein, Pascal; Herold, Nils

    2014-12-01

    Despite its economic and technological importance, the Swiss life sciences sector faces severe challenges in attracting enough venture capital for its own development. Although biotechnology and medical technology have been the most important areas of venture financing from 1999 through 2012 according to our own data, average investment volumes nevertheless remain on a low level of only 0.05 percent of Swiss GDP. After 2008, there was a pronounced shift away from early-stage financing. While business angels still play an important role at the early stage, venture capitalists are the most important investor type by volumes having their main focus on expansion financing. The industry faces predominant challenges in securing capital availability for entrepreneurs, in transforming the highly skewed and back-loaded payoff profile of investments into a more stable return stream, and in defining appropriate business and collaboration models. PMID:26508597

  12. Exploring Best Practice Skills to Predict Uncertainties in Venture Capital Investment Decision-Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, David Arthur

    Algae biodiesel is the sole sustainable and abundant transportation fuel source that can replace petrol diesel use; however, high competition and economic uncertainties exist, influencing independent venture capital decision making. Technology, market, management, and government action uncertainties influence competition and economic uncertainties in the venture capital industry. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to identify the best practice skills at IVC firms to predict uncertainty between early and late funding stages. The basis of the study was real options theory, a framework used to evaluate and understand the economic and competition uncertainties inherent in natural resource investment and energy derived from plant-based oils. Data were collected from interviews of 24 venture capital partners based in the United States who invest in algae and other renewable energy solutions. Data were analyzed by coding and theme development interwoven with the conceptual framework. Eight themes emerged: (a) expected returns model, (b) due diligence, (c) invest in specific sectors, (d) reduced uncertainty-late stage, (e) coopetition, (f) portfolio firm relationships, (g) differentiation strategy, and (h) modeling uncertainty and best practice. The most noteworthy finding was that predicting uncertainty at the early stage was impractical; at the expansion and late funding stages, however, predicting uncertainty was possible. The implications of these findings will affect social change by providing independent venture capitalists with best practice skills to increase successful exits, lessen uncertainty, and encourage increased funding of renewable energy firms, contributing to cleaner and healthier communities throughout the United States..

  13. The association of debt financing with not-for-profit hospitals' operational and capital-investment efficiency.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Stephen A; Wheeler, John R C; Smith, Dean G

    2004-01-01

    Increased debt in companies can motivate both operational and capital-investment efficiency. This positive influence of debt is attributed to creditors' oversight of corporate behavior and the need to generate cash flows to service debt. Our study investigates whether debt has a similar relationship with efficiency in not-for-profit hospitals. Using statistical analysis of a database of audited financial statements of not-for-profit hospitals, we test whether debt is associated with six distinct measures of operational and capital-investment efficiency. We find that debt either has no association with efficiency or predicts decreased efficiency. Possible explanations are that creditors' oversight is less tight in the not-for-profit setting and that debt may at times motivate excessive capital investment because of a legal requirement to tie tax-exempt debt with a capital-investment project. PMID:15682951

  14. The association of debt financing with not-for-profit hospitals' operational and capital-investment efficiency.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Stephen A; Wheeler, John R C; Smith, Dean G

    2004-01-01

    Increased debt in companies can motivate both operational and capital-investment efficiency. This positive influence of debt is attributed to creditors' oversight of corporate behavior and the need to generate cash flows to service debt. Our study investigates whether debt has a similar relationship with efficiency in not-for-profit hospitals. Using statistical analysis of a database of audited financial statements of not-for-profit hospitals, we test whether debt is associated with six distinct measures of operational and capital-investment efficiency. We find that debt either has no association with efficiency or predicts decreased efficiency. Possible explanations are that creditors' oversight is less tight in the not-for-profit setting and that debt may at times motivate excessive capital investment because of a legal requirement to tie tax-exempt debt with a capital-investment project.

  15. 76 FR 50813 - Major Capital Investment Projects; Guidance on News Starts/Small Starts Policies and Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... Federal Transit Administration Major Capital Investment Projects; Guidance on News Starts/Small Starts... policy guidance on the New and Small Starts capital project review and evaluation process and criteria...) published by FTA in June 2010, which sought public comment on the New Starts and Small Starts...

  16. 75 FR 3502 - KLH Capital, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under 312 of the Small Business Investment Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION KLH Capital, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that KLH Capital, L.P., 101 East Kennedy Boulevard, Suite 3925, Tampa, Florida 33602, a Federal Licensee...

  17. 47 CFR 32.4520 - Additional paid-in capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.4520... includable in Account 4510, Capital Stock, unless such difference results in a debit balance for that...

  18. [Financing problems of capital goods. Part 2: procedure for investment appraisal].

    PubMed

    Clausen, C C; Bauer, M; Saleh, A; Picker, O

    2008-07-01

    In part 1 of this series about problems of financing capital goods the multiple and partly diametric economic effects of financing instruments were presented using the leasing procedure as an example. The result indicated that due to the complexity of these effects the choice of a specific financing instrument requires an individual consideration. Therefore, part 2 of the series introduces the method of dynamic capital budgeting which allows the instruments discussed in part 1 to be compared with each other and helps to evaluate their economic benefits. More precisely this paper focuses on a comparative analysis of the most common alternatives, leasing, credit financing and investment financing by the state. In this context, after having identified the total costs of ownership of anesthesia devices, the final asset values of the three financing instruments can be compared with each other using the method of dynamic capital budgeting. In contrast to the prevailing opinion, the results show that from a purely fiscal perspective leasing anesthesia devices is the most expensive alternative. Given the fact that no financial support is available from the state, the option of credit financing turns out to be the most preferable alternative from a relatively limited pool of possibilities. However, it still remains to be answered whether credit financing can defend this position against further, innovative forms of debt financing (e.g., factoring, asset-backed securities, hedge funds, mezzanine capital, etc.).

  19. User's manual for the INDCEPT code for estimating industrial steam boiler plant capital investment costs

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, H I; Fuller, L C; Hudson, II, C R

    1982-09-01

    The INDCEPT computer code package was developed to provide conceptual capital investment cost estimates for single- and multiple-unit industrial steam boiler plants. Cost estimates can be made as a function of boiler type, size, location, and date of initial operation. The output includes a detailed breakdown of the estimate into direct and indirect costs. Boiler plant cost models are provided to reflect various types and sources of coal and alternate means of sulfur and particulate removal. Cost models are also included for low-Btu and medium-Btu gas produced in coal gasification plants.

  20. Joint venture capital investment for clean technologies and their problems in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Doelle, H W

    1996-09-01

    All technological developments are aimed at improving the quality of life of a community of people. Biotechnology is a technology which allows the exploitation of microorganisms, plants and animal cells to take place within an economic framework. Developing countries are looking for programmes achieving sustainable, economical growth conducive to a higher per capita income of the community. Any joint venture which promises social advances and economic benefits will have to be rural-based. This presentation discusses the need for a change in fermentation industry attitudes to allow joint venture capital investment in clean technologies together with the problems developing countries face for the implementation of such technologies.

  1. Natural Capital Management: An Evolutionary Paradigm for Sustainable Restoration Investment - 13455

    SciTech Connect

    Koetz, Maureen T.

    2013-07-01

    capacity and value generated by EM projects and other investment and operational programming can be recorded and then allocated to mission and/or ecosystem needs as part of overall site, complex, and Federal decision-making. NCAM{sup TM} can also document post-restoration asset capability and value for use in weighing loss mitigation and ecosystem damage claims arising from past operational activities. A prototype NCAM{sup TM} evaluation developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) demonstrates use of this framework as an advanced paradigm for NCA accounting and decision-making for the larger DOE complex and other enterprise using natural capital in operations. Applying a quantified value paradigm, the framework catalogues the results of activities that sustain, restore, and modernize natural assets for enterprise-wide value beyond that of compliance milestones. Capturing and assigning recapitalization value using NCAM{sup TM} concepts and tools improves effective reuse of taxpayer-sustained assets, records ecosystem service value, enables mission and enterprise optimization, and assures the sustainability of shared natural capital assets in regional pools vital to both complex sites and local and regional economies. (authors)

  2. 13 CFR 120.462 - What are SBA's additional requirements on capital maintenance for SBA Supervised Lenders?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...'s additional requirements on capital maintenance for SBA Supervised Lenders? (a) Capital adequacy... adequacy goals; that is, the total amount of capital needed to assure the SBA Supervised Lender's continued... interim capital targets that are necessary to achieve the SBA Supervised Lender's capital adequacy...

  3. Promoting and Disseminating Good Practice in the Planning and Management of Educational Facilities: Capital Investment Strategic Planning - A Case Study, Gold Coast Institute of TAFE, Queensland, Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crump, Kelvin

    This paper presents a case study of the process of capital investment strategic planning at the Gold Coast Institute of Technical and Further Education (TAFE), Queensland, Australia. Capital investment strategic planning is a means of contributing to success by providing strategies to ensure that assets are managed efficiently, effectively, and…

  4. Energy Conservation. The Capital Investment Needs for Building Rehabilitation for Non-Profit Educational Institutions. Paper No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Task Force, Washington, DC.

    This paper is one of several reports being prepared by the Energy Task Force on the impact of energy supply and cost trends on nonprofit educational institutions. This particular report focuses on the need to render educational facilities more energy-efficient through a program of capital investments focused on the rehabilitation of existing…

  5. Are Returns to Investment Lower for the Poor? Human and Physical Capital Interactions in Rural Vietnam. Policy Research Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Walle, Dominique

    Unless disparities in education are addressed, market-oriented reforms in Vietnam will generate inequitable agricultural growth. It is argued that if the marginal gains from investment in physical capital depend positively on knowledge, but a household cannot hire skilled labor to compensate for low skills, then even if it has access to credit,…

  6. Evolution of Gender Differences in Post-Secondary Human Capital Investments: College Majors. Working Paper #03-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gemici, Ahu; Wiswall, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the level of human capital investments has changed substantially for men and women. Changes in the intensive margin of college major selection have been also been substantial, as the number of graduates in humanities, social science, and teaching has declined, and the number in science, engineering, and business has…

  7. Limiting the financial risks of electricity generation capital investments under carbon constraints: Applications and opportunities for public policies and private investments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomer, Adam

    Increasing demand for electricity and an aging fleet of generators are the principal drivers behind an increasing need for a large amount of capital investments in the US electric power sector in the near term. The decisions (or lack thereof) by firms, regulators and policy makers in response to this challenge have long lasting consequences, incur large economic and environmental risks, and must be made despite large uncertainties about the future operating and business environment. Capital investment decisions are complex: rates of return are not guaranteed; significant uncertainties about future environmental legislation and regulations exist at both the state and national levels---particularly about carbon dioxide emissions; there is an increasing number of shareholder mandates requiring public utilities to reduce their exposure to potentially large losses from stricter environmental regulations; and there are significant concerns about electricity and fuel price levels, supplies, and security. Large scale, low carbon electricity generation facilities using coal, such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facilities coupled with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies, have been technically proven but are unprofitable in the current regulatory and business environment where there is no explicit or implicit price on carbon dioxide emissions. The paper examines two separate scenarios that are actively discussed by policy and decision makers at corporate, state and national levels: a future US electricity system where coal plays a role; and one where the role of coal is limited or nonexistent. The thesis intends to provide guidance for firms and policy makers and outline applications and opportunities for public policies and for private investment decisions to limit financial risks of electricity generation capital investments under carbon constraints.

  8. The decline of venture capital investment in early-stage life sciences poses a challenge to continued innovation.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Jonathan J

    2015-02-01

    A key element required for translating new knowledge into effective therapies is early-stage venture capital that finances the work needed to identify a lead molecule or medical device prototype and to develop it to the proof-of-concept stage. This early investment is distinguished by great uncertainty over whether the molecule or prototype is safe and effective, the stability of the regulatory standards to which clinical trials are designed, and the likelihood that large follow-on investments for commercial development can be secured. Regulatory and reimbursement policies have a profound impact on the amount of capital and the types of life science projects that investors pursue. In this article I analyze several recent trends in early-stage venture capital funding, describe how these trends are influenced by regulatory and reimbursement policies, and discuss the role of policy makers in bringing new treatments to market. Policy makers can foster renewed private investment into critically needed early-stage products by increasing Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding and public support for clinical trials in targeted areas of interest; creating regulatory pathways to enable early testing of experimental compounds in limited populations; and offering economic incentives for investors and developers in designated therapeutic areas.

  9. The decline of venture capital investment in early-stage life sciences poses a challenge to continued innovation.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Jonathan J

    2015-02-01

    A key element required for translating new knowledge into effective therapies is early-stage venture capital that finances the work needed to identify a lead molecule or medical device prototype and to develop it to the proof-of-concept stage. This early investment is distinguished by great uncertainty over whether the molecule or prototype is safe and effective, the stability of the regulatory standards to which clinical trials are designed, and the likelihood that large follow-on investments for commercial development can be secured. Regulatory and reimbursement policies have a profound impact on the amount of capital and the types of life science projects that investors pursue. In this article I analyze several recent trends in early-stage venture capital funding, describe how these trends are influenced by regulatory and reimbursement policies, and discuss the role of policy makers in bringing new treatments to market. Policy makers can foster renewed private investment into critically needed early-stage products by increasing Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding and public support for clinical trials in targeted areas of interest; creating regulatory pathways to enable early testing of experimental compounds in limited populations; and offering economic incentives for investors and developers in designated therapeutic areas. PMID:25646107

  10. The Relationship between Capital Investment and Pupil Performance: An Analysis by the United Kingdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEB Exchange, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses a United Kingdom comparative study showing a positive link between educational capital spending and student performance. The study, which compared both qualitative and quantitative research, further reveals a positive link between capital spending and teacher and pupil motivation. (GR)

  11. Investing in People: Building Social Capital. Profiles of Excellence in Business and Education Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Ralph S.

    One of the challenges that faces business and education leaders today is creating an environment in their workplaces and classrooms that is conducive to the "New Realities of Learning." Social capital is a third asset that should be added to the list of key competitive advantages that includes knowledge and human capital. Social capital refers to…

  12. Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

  13. Rolling capital: managing investments in a value-based care world.

    PubMed

    Jasuta, Lynette

    2016-06-01

    The importance of capital planning is increasing as the healthcare industry moves toward value-based care. Replacing unwieldy and inflexible traditional capital planning processes with a rolling capital planning approach can result in: Greater standardization, facilitating better strategic planning across the whole system. Reduced labor intensity in the planning and budgeting process. Reduced costs through being able to plan better for replacement purchases and take advantage of group purchasing and bundling opportunities. Increased transparency in the decision-making process.

  14. Rolling capital: managing investments in a value-based care world.

    PubMed

    Jasuta, Lynette

    2016-06-01

    The importance of capital planning is increasing as the healthcare industry moves toward value-based care. Replacing unwieldy and inflexible traditional capital planning processes with a rolling capital planning approach can result in: Greater standardization, facilitating better strategic planning across the whole system. Reduced labor intensity in the planning and budgeting process. Reduced costs through being able to plan better for replacement purchases and take advantage of group purchasing and bundling opportunities. Increased transparency in the decision-making process. PMID:27451571

  15. 26 CFR 1.851-6 - Investment companies furnishing capital to development corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... capital to other corporations which are principally engaged in the development or exploitation of... the development or exploitation of inventions, technological improvements, new processes, or...

  16. 26 CFR 1.851-6 - Investment companies furnishing capital to development corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... capital to other corporations which are principally engaged in the development or exploitation of... the development or exploitation of inventions, technological improvements, new processes, or...

  17. 26 CFR 1.851-6 - Investment companies furnishing capital to development corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... capital to other corporations which are principally engaged in the development or exploitation of... the development or exploitation of inventions, technological improvements, new processes, or...

  18. 26 CFR 1.612-2 - Allowable capital additions in case of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Allowable capital additions in case of mines. 1... in case of mines. (a) In general. Expenditures for improvements and for replacements, not including... the recession of the working faces of the mine and which: (1) Do not increase the value of the...

  19. 26 CFR 1.612-2 - Allowable capital additions in case of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Allowable capital additions in case of mines. 1... in case of mines. (a) In general. Expenditures for improvements and for replacements, not including... the recession of the working faces of the mine and which: (1) Do not increase the value of the...

  20. 26 CFR 1.612-2 - Allowable capital additions in case of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allowable capital additions in case of mines. 1... in case of mines. (a) In general. Expenditures for improvements and for replacements, not including... the recession of the working faces of the mine and which: (1) Do not increase the value of the...

  1. State Education as High-Yield Investment: Human Capital Theory in European Policy Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillies, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Human Capital Theory has been an increasingly important phenomenon in economic thought over the last 50 years. The central role it affords to education has become even more marked in recent years as the concept of the "knowledge economy" has become a global concern. In this paper, the prevalence of Human Capital Theory within European…

  2. Investing in People: The Human Capital Needs of Rural America. Rural Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaulieu, Lionel J., Ed.; Mulkey, David, Ed.

    This book provides an overview of existing human resource conditions in rural America; examines key economic, social, and technological forces shaping the future viability of rural areas; describes human capital issues for rural women and minority groups; and outlines strategies to strengthen rural human capital resources. Chapters are: (1)…

  3. 78 FR 61404 - Stellus Capital Investment Corporation, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... lien, second lien, unitranche and mezzanine debt financing and corresponding equity investments. The... disadvantage the Company, and participation by the Company would not be on a basis different from or...

  4. Capital access.

    PubMed

    Towne, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    To maintain their viability, hospitals are being compelled to invest in big capital projects such as information technology and renovation and construction. This gatefold examines the trends in credit and capital, and how they affect hospitals' access to money.

  5. Investment Avenues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Priyanka

    2012-11-01

    Investors are a heterogeneous group, they may be large or small, rich or poor, expert or lay man and not all investors need equal degree of protection (Mayya, 1996). An investor has three objectives while investing his money, namely safety of invested money, liquidity position of invested money and return on investment. The return on investment may further be divided into capital gain and the rate of return on investment as interest or dividend. Among all investment options available, securities are considered the most challenging as well as rewarding. Securities include shares, debentures, derivatives, units of mutual funds, Government securities etc. An investor may be an individual or corporate legal entity investing funds with a view to derive maximum economic advantage from investment such as rate of return, capital appreciation, marketability, tax advantage and convenience of investment.The Capital market facilitates mobilization of savings of individuals and pools them into reservoir of capital which can be used for the economic development of a country. An efficient capital market is essential for raising capital by the corporate sector of the economy and for the protection of the interest of investors in corporate securities. There arises a need to strike a balance between raising of capital for economic development on one side and protection of investors on the other. Unless the interests of investors are protected, raising of capital, by corporates is not possible. Like, the primary objective of a senior citizenís asset allocation is the generation of regular income.

  6. Capital investment in semiconductors: The lifeblood of the US semiconductor industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finan, William F.

    1990-09-01

    An analysis is given of four proposals designed to improve capital formation for U.S. industry in general, and the semiconductor industry in particular. The National Advisory Committee on Semiconductors recommendations were to make the current research and experimentation (R and E) tax credit more effective, to reduce taxes on capital gains, to increase personal savings incentives, and to improve semiconductor manufacturing equipment depreciation rules. The results of the qualitative analysis of the proposals as well as a description of the methodology employed are given.

  7. National HRD and Investment in Human Capital: Opportunity Costs of U.S. Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornachione, Edgard; Daugherty, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    This study explores opportunity costs of postsecondary education in the U.S. in the past three decades. Based on human capital theory, data from the U.S. Census, along with parameters for high education achievement (involving bachelors and advanced degrees), were fed into a forecasting model developed for this purpose. Beyond descriptive…

  8. The Strategic Management of Human Capital: Making the Smart Investments in Teachers and Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Barnett

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the author summarizes some of the most relevant issues, evidence, and divergent thinking relative to the strategic management of human capital in education. This paper has been built upon the most recent research, interviews with 20 of the leading experts around the nation, and structured conversations with leading-edge educators in…

  9. States' Investment in Human Capital: Higher Education Funding Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Diminishing state support for higher education threatens human capital development. This quantitative study undertook to determine the state factors that influence higher education funding and to what degree they do so, what level of funding is required to satisfy higher education expenditure need, and what can help to ensure that those funding…

  10. Michigan's Infrastructure: Priorities for the Future. Capital Investment Needs 1985-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Infrastructure Coalition, Lansing.

    The Michigan Infrastructure Coalition was formed to review needs and make judgments concerning priorities for future infrastructure investments in Michigan. This report describes the coalition's findings and is intended to serve as the guidelines for state elected officials. Contents include: (1) an introduction (specifying priority areas); (2)…

  11. Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the role of direct foreign ownership of U.S. energy enterprises with respect to their energy operations, capital investments, and net foreign investment flows (including net loans). In addition, since energy investments are made in a global context, the report examines patterns of direct investment in foreign energy enterprises by U.S.-based companies.

  12. Credit Enhancements and Capital Markets to Fund Solar Deployment: Leveraging Public Funds to Open Private Sector Investment

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.; Urdanick, M.; Joshi, J.

    2015-02-01

    Credit enhancements represent a variety of financial support structures that are designed to reduce risk to those holding the debt, including debt raised via a securitization process, and thus lower the required yield associated with the security. The purpose of all forms of credit enhancement is to increase the collateral against which notes are secured (Lin,1999). The following section evaluates is not guaranteed. Perceived risks of the solar asset class--including those related to technology, offtaker creditworthiness, and regulatory policy--can increase the required yield, increase probability of investor loss of interest and/or principal, or both. In many cases, this is a cyclical phenomenon: risk perception is fed by lack of historical knowledge, which is in turn fed by risk perception. Therefore, successful access to capital market investment in order to spur low-cost solar deployment depends on the success of this initial fledgling period.

  13. Evaluation of NASA-sponsored research on capital investment decision making in the civil aviation industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Significant findings of three studies undertaken to provide the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Office with information regarding how aircraft manufacturers and commercial airlines make investment decisions concerning the acquisition of new and derivative technology are analyzed and their general implications explored. Topics discussed include: the market for airline aircraft, factors affecting the corporate decision making process of air transport manufacturers, and flight equipment purchasing practices of representative air carriers.

  14. Human Capital Formation and Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Countries. OECD Development Centre Working Paper No. 211 (Formerly Technical Paper No. 211)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyamoto, Koji

    2003-01-01

    This paper synthesises the existing literature on human capital formation and foreign direct investment (FDI) in developing countries. The aim is to take a bird's eye view of the complex linkages between the activities of multinational enterprises (MNEs) and policies of host developing countries. In doing so, general trends, best practices and…

  15. Investigation of an investment casting method combined with additive manufacturing methods for manufacturing lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodira, Ganapathy D.

    Cellular metals exhibit combinations of mechanical, thermal and acoustic properties that provide opportunities for various implementations and applications; light weight aerospace and automobile structures, impact and noise absorption, heat dissipation, and heat exchange. Engineered cell topologies enable one to control mechanical, thermal, and acoustic properties of the gross cell structures. A possible way to manufacture complex 3D metallic cellular solids for mass production with a relatively low cost, the investment casting (IC) method may be used by combining the rapid prototyping (RP) of wax or injection molding. In spite of its potential to produce mass products of various 3D cellular metals, the method is known to have significant casting porosity as a consequence of the complex cellular topology which makes continuous fluid's access to the solidification interface difficult. The effects of temperature on the viscosity of the fluids were studied. A comparative cost analysis between AM-IC and additive manufacturing methods is carried out. In order to manufacture 3D cellular metals with various topologies for multi-functional applications, the casting porosity should be resolved. In this study, the relations between casting porosity and processing conditions of molten metals while interconnecting with complex cellular geometries are investigated. Temperature and pressure conditions on the rapid prototyping -- investment casting (RP-IC) method are reported, thermal stresses induced are also studied. The manufactured samples are compared with those made by additive manufacturing methods.

  16. 13 CFR 120.462 - What are SBA's additional requirements on capital maintenance for SBA Supervised Lenders?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What are SBA's additional requirements on capital maintenance for SBA Supervised Lenders? 120.462 Section 120.462 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Lenders Sba Supervised Lenders § 120.462 What are SBA's additional requirements on...

  17. Intellectual Capital: For 20 Years, American Indian College Fund Has Been Investing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwedel, Dina M.

    2009-01-01

    For 20 years, the American Indian College Fund (the Fund) has been helping students to afford a higher education. In addition to providing more than 4,000 scholarships for American Indian students last year, it also provides tribal colleges with funding and programmatic support. The Fund was created in 1989 by the tribal colleges and universities…

  18. 77 FR 11618 - Solutions Capital I, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under the Small Business Investment Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... from MCG Capital Corporation in Advanced Sleep Concepts, Inc., 195 Chatillon Road NE., Rome, GA, 30162... Solutions Capital I, L.P., has a greater than 10% equity interest in Advanced Sleep Concepts, Inc., thereby making Advanced Sleep Concepts, Inc., an Associate of Solutions Capital I, L.P., as defined in Sec....

  19. 42 CFR 411.362 - Additional requirements concerning physician ownership and investment in hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... an exception is granted by the Secretary pursuant to section 1877(i)(3) of the Social Security Act... public Web site for the hospital and in any public advertising that the hospital is owned or invested...

  20. Investing in Family Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Most discussions about narrowing the achievement gap focus on ways to provide disadvantaged children with schooling comparable to that received by middle-class kids. Addressing deficiencies in children's social environment, health, housing, and family income would be more effective and would probably reduce special-education spending. (MLH)

  1. 26 CFR 1.46-9 - Requirements for taxpayers electing an extra one-half percent additional investment credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in... (e) of the Tax Reduction Act of 1975 (“1975 TRA”). The plan must meet the additional formal... section 803(j)(2)(A) of the Tax Reform Act of 1976. (b) Definitions—(1) One-percent terms. When used...

  2. 26 CFR 1.46-9 - Requirements for taxpayers electing an extra one-half percent additional investment credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in... (e) of the Tax Reduction Act of 1975 (“1975 TRA”). The plan must meet the additional formal... section 803(j)(2)(A) of the Tax Reform Act of 1976. (b) Definitions—(1) One-percent terms. When used...

  3. African-American Communities in Economic Crisis: Adult Educators Investing in the Human Capital Development of the Urban Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Mattyna L.

    2010-01-01

    Through discourse analysis the research will unearth the tension between the Theories of Human Capital (HCT) and the Work First Policy (WFP), Policies Informing Education (PIE), and Human Capital Development (HCD) as they relate to the labor market. The application of discourse analysis demonstrates how the tenants of HCT are missing components…

  4. Financing Human Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juffras, Jason; Sawhill, Isabel V.

    This paper examines the government's role in financing human capital investments. It first examines why private investments in education, training, and other forms of human capital are likely to fall short of socially desirable levels. It then reviews past trends in public support for human resource investments. Finally, it discusses current…

  5. A three pronged approach to community scale renewable energy: Education, incremental capital investment and smart grid technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeo, Anna E.

    ; first hand exposure to technology, providing a sense of independence that strengthens communities, and developing a direct link between the energy people use and how that energy is created. Ultimately community scale renewable energy projects help bolster support for large-scale projects that are imperative to making real and lasting progress towards reducing emissions. Finally, technological advancements in renewable energy generation, energy storage and distribution systems, are imperative to replacing fossil fuels. The shift towards a higher penetration of renewable energy into the electric grid can be realized with the implementation of a more sophisticated smart grid, which uses dynamic demand response to alter demand to follow generation. Introduction of tidal power can serve to further stabilize the grid and reduce the amount of storage required. This work describes an interdisciplinary approach to addressing issues of energy, and thereby climate, through substantive efforts in three concentrations; energy literacy education, community driven renewable energy projects based on incremental capital investment and a smart, micro grid encompassing tidal power and other renewable energy source.

  6. How venture capital works.

    PubMed

    Zider, B

    1998-01-01

    The popular mythology surrounding the U.S. venture-capital industry derives from a previous era. Venture capitalists who nurtured the computer industry in its infancy were legendary both for their risk taking and for their hands-on operating experience. But today things are different, and separating the myths from the realities is crucial to understanding this important piece of the U.S. economy. Today's venture capitalists are more like conservative bankers than the risk takers of days past. They have carved out a specialized niche in the capital markets, filling a void that other institutions cannot serve. They are the linch-pins in an efficient system for meeting the needs of institutional investors looking for high returns, of entrepreneurs seeking funding, and of investment bankers looking for companies to sell. Venture capitalists must earn a consistently superior return on investments in inherently risky businesses. The myth is that they do so by investing in good ideas and good plans. In reality, they invest in good industries--that is, industries that are more competitively forgiving than the market as a whole. And they structure their deals in a way that minimizes their risk and maximizes their returns. Although many entrepreneurs expect venture capitalists to provide them with sage guidance as well as capital, that expectation is unrealistic. Given a typical portfolio of ten companies and a 2,000-hour work year, a venture capital partner spends on average less than two hours per week on any given company. In addition to analyzing the current venture-capital system, the author offers practical advice to entrepreneurs thinking about venture funding. PMID:10187243

  7. How venture capital works.

    PubMed

    Zider, B

    1998-01-01

    The popular mythology surrounding the U.S. venture-capital industry derives from a previous era. Venture capitalists who nurtured the computer industry in its infancy were legendary both for their risk taking and for their hands-on operating experience. But today things are different, and separating the myths from the realities is crucial to understanding this important piece of the U.S. economy. Today's venture capitalists are more like conservative bankers than the risk takers of days past. They have carved out a specialized niche in the capital markets, filling a void that other institutions cannot serve. They are the linch-pins in an efficient system for meeting the needs of institutional investors looking for high returns, of entrepreneurs seeking funding, and of investment bankers looking for companies to sell. Venture capitalists must earn a consistently superior return on investments in inherently risky businesses. The myth is that they do so by investing in good ideas and good plans. In reality, they invest in good industries--that is, industries that are more competitively forgiving than the market as a whole. And they structure their deals in a way that minimizes their risk and maximizes their returns. Although many entrepreneurs expect venture capitalists to provide them with sage guidance as well as capital, that expectation is unrealistic. Given a typical portfolio of ten companies and a 2,000-hour work year, a venture capital partner spends on average less than two hours per week on any given company. In addition to analyzing the current venture-capital system, the author offers practical advice to entrepreneurs thinking about venture funding.

  8. Urban College Graduates: Their Investments in and Returns for Strong Quantitative Skills, Social Capital Skills, and Soft Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Marie Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined strong quantitative skills, social capital skills, and soft skills of urban college graduates using data from the Multi-City Study of Urban Inequality Household Survey. The urban college graduates lived in Atlanta, Boston, or Los Angeles and had bachelor's, master's, PhD, and professional degrees. Among the three skills…

  9. A synopsis of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) investment in additive manufacture and what challenges remain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Michael; Smith, Adrien; Margiotta, Jesse

    2014-03-01

    DARPA's interest in additive manufacture dates back to the mid-80s with seedling programs that developed the foundational knowledge and equipment that led to the Solid Freeform Fabrication program in 1990. The drivers for this program included reducing development times by enabling "tool-less" manufacturing as well as integration of design and fabrication tools. DARPA consistently pushed the boundaries of additive manufacture with follow-on programs that expanded the material suite available for 3-D printing as well as new processes that expanded the technology's capability base. Programs such as the Mesoscopic Integrated Conformal Electronics (MICE) program incorporated functionality to the manufacturing processes through direct write of electronics. DARPA's investment in additive manufacture continues to this day but the focus has changed. DARPA's early investments were focused on developing and demonstrating the technology's capabilities. Now that the technology has been demonstrated, there is serious interest in taking advantage of the attributes unique to the processing methodology (such as customization and new design possibilities) for producing production parts. Accordingly, today's investment at DARPA addresses the systematic barriers to implementation rather than the technology itself. The Open Manufacturing program is enabling rapid qualification of new technologies for the manufacturing environment through the development of new modeling and informatics tools. While the technology is becoming more mainstream, there are plenty of challenges that need to be addressed. And as the technology continues to mature, the agency will continue to look for those "DARPA-hard" challenges that enable revolutionary changes in capability and performance for the Department of Defense.

  10. 77 FR 15145 - Ares Capital Corporation et al.;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ...: Ares Capital Corporation (the ``Company''), Ares Capital Management LLC (``ACM'') and Ivy Hill Asset Management, L.P. (``Ivy Hill''). SUMMARY: Summary of Application: Applicants request an order (``Order'') to... interests of Ivy Hill and (b) make additional investments in Ivy Hill, in each case, following such time...

  11. Fuzzy inference systems, ASKE, knowledge value added, and Monte Carlo risk simulation for evaluating intangible human capital investments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Johnathan; de Albuquerque, Nelson R.; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Salleh, Abdul Razak

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the ASKE-Risk method, coupled with Fuzzy Inference Systems, and Monte Carlo Risk Simulation to measure and prioritize Individual Technical Competence of a value chain to assess changes in the human capital of a company. ASKE is an extension of the method Knowledge Value Added, which proposes the use of a proxy variable for measuring the flow of knowledge used in a key process, creating a relationship between the company's financial results and the resources used in each of the business processes.

  12. 13 CFR 120.462 - What are SBA's additional requirements on capital maintenance for SBA Supervised Lenders?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... until differences between the two calculations are resolved. (e) Capital restoration plan. (1) Filing requirement. An SBA Supervised Lender must file a written capital restoration plan with SBA within 45 days of... Supervised Lender charged with carrying out the capital restoration plan. (3) SBA response. SBA will...

  13. 13 CFR 120.462 - What are SBA's additional requirements on capital maintenance for SBA Supervised Lenders?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... until differences between the two calculations are resolved. (e) Capital restoration plan. (1) Filing requirement. An SBA Supervised Lender must file a written capital restoration plan with SBA within 45 days of... Supervised Lender charged with carrying out the capital restoration plan. (3) SBA response. SBA will...

  14. 26 CFR 1.46-8 - Requirements for taxpayers electing additional one-percent investment credit (TRASOP's).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... investment, or (ii) In the case of a return filed before December 31, 1975, to an amended return filed on or... one-percent investment credit (TRASOP's). 1.46-8 Section 1.46-8 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Investment...

  15. 12 CFR 211.9 - Investment procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Investment procedures. 211.9 Section 211.9... Investment procedures. (a) General provisions. 5 Direct and indirect investments shall be made in accordance... investments in excess of the limitations therein based on capital and surplus. (1) Minimum capital...

  16. 12 CFR 211.9 - Investment procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Investment procedures. 211.9 Section 211.9... Investment procedures. (a) General provisions. 5 Direct and indirect investments shall be made in accordance... investments in excess of the limitations therein based on capital and surplus. (1) Minimum capital...

  17. 12 CFR 211.9 - Investment procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Investment procedures. 211.9 Section 211.9... Investment procedures. (a) General provisions. 5 Direct and indirect investments shall be made in accordance... investments in excess of the limitations therein based on capital and surplus. (1) Minimum capital...

  18. The Economic Importance of Human Capital in Modernization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Theodore W.

    1993-01-01

    Human capital invests in new forms of physical capital, hence, human capital is key to economic progress. Lists eight attributes of human capital; for example, human capital cannot be separated from person who has it, and human capital is not visible. Human capital is necessary component when attempting to improve a person's income and welfare in…

  19. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  20. Capital Improvements for Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Alan C.

    1981-01-01

    Although colleges and universities have been aggressive in making capital improvements to conserve energy, their efforts have been hampered by limited capital funds. Decisions about capital investments tend to be complex because of the interrelatedness of conservation strategies and the need to consider the cost advantage of alternatives.…

  1. The electric utility as investment bank for energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Wiel, S. )

    1991-05-01

    The author feels that regulators have the opportunity to direct electric utility companies to serve as investment bankers for cost-effective energy-efficiency improvements. If they do this, a number of serious barriers to an economically efficient energy services market would disappear. Capital would be widely available for investment in efficiency devices and systems. Better life-cycle cost information would be available to customers. Building contractors and landlords would be less reluctant to install energy-efficiency improvements. Manufacturers would have greater incentive to introduce better energy-efficiency features sooner. And investment imbalances caused by the gap between public and private investment discount rates would not longer exist. Electric utilities could even guarantee the performance of the installed demand-management measures. Additionally, utility companies would not longer have an economic preference for investment in traditional sources of supply. They would become able to earn their authorized rate of return on large amounts of investment in demand management.

  2. 77 FR 5613 - C3 Capital Partners II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under 312 of the Small Business Investment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that C3 Capital Partners II, L.P., 4520 Main Street... exemption under section 312 of the Act and section 107.730, Financings Which Constitute Conflicts...

  3. 76 FR 17180 - C3 Capital Partners II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under 312 of the Small Business Investment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that C3 Capital Partners IT, L.P., 4520 Main Street... an exemption under section 312 of the Act and section 107.730, Financings Which Constitute...

  4. Applying Organizational Commitment and Human Capital Theories to Emigration Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verkhohlyad, Olga; McLean, Gary N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to bring some additional insight into the issue of emigration by establishing a relationship between emigration and psychic return of citizens to their human capital investment in the country. Design/methodology/approach: The article adopts a quantitative research strategy. It applies organizational commitment and human…

  5. 12 CFR 211.9 - Investment procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... investments in excess of the limitations therein based on capital and surplus. (1) Minimum capital adequacy... bank shall be in compliance with applicable minimum standards for capital adequacy set out in the Capital Adequacy Guidelines; provided that, if the investor is an Edge or agreement corporation,...

  6. 78 FR 16715 - Renaissance Capital Greenwich Funds, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... COMMISSION Renaissance Capital Greenwich Funds, et al.; Notice of Application March 11, 2013. AGENCY... companies as the series to acquire Shares. Applicants: Renaissance Capital Greenwich Funds (``Trust''), Renaissance Capital LLC (``Adviser''), and Renaissance Capital Investments, Inc. (``Renaissance...

  7. Capital structure strategy in health care systems.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, J R; Smith, D G; Rivenson, H L; Reiter, K L

    2000-01-01

    The capital structures (the relative use of debt and equity to support assets) of leading health care systems are viewed as a strategic component of their financial plans. While not-for-profit hospitals as a group have maintained nearly constant levels of debt over the past decade, investor-owned hospitals and a group of leading health care systems have reduced their relative use of debt. Chief financial officers indicated that in addition to reducing debt because of less favorable reimbursement incentives, there was a focus on maintaining high bond ratings. Debt levels have not been reduced as sharply in these health care systems as they have in investor-owned hospitals, in part due to the use of debt to support investments in financial markets. Because these health care systems do not have easy access to equity, high bond ratings and solid investment earnings are central to their capital structure policies of preserving access to debt markets.

  8. Capital Expert System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Laurie; Gary, Jack; Illingworth, Bill; Sargent, Tom

    1987-05-01

    Gathering information, necessary forms, and financial calculations needed to generate a "capital investment proposal" is an extremely complex and difficult process. The intent of the capital investment proposal is to ensure management that the proposed investment has been thoroughly investigated and will have a positive impact on corporate goals. Meeting this requirement typically takes four or five experts a total of 12 hours to generate a "Capital Package." A Capital Expert System was therefore developed using "Personal Consultant." The completed system is hybrid and as such does not depend solely on rules but incorporates several different software packages that communicate through variables and functions passed from one to another. This paper describes the use of expert system techniques, methodology in building the knowledge base, contexts, LISP functions, data base, and special challenges that had to be overcome to create this system. The Capital Expert System is the successful result of a unique integration of artificial intelligence with business accounting, financial forms generation, and investment proposal expertise.

  9. 26 CFR 1.46-9 - Requirements for taxpayers electing an extra one-half percent additional investment credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (e) of the Tax Reduction Act of 1975 (“1975 TRA”). The plan must meet the additional formal... 1975 TRA and this subparagraph (3) of TRASOP securities contributed by the employer. These allocations... 1975 TRA. In applying § 1.46-8(d)(6) to this section, only subdivisions (ii), (iv), (ix), (x), (xi)...

  10. 26 CFR 1.46-9 - Requirements for taxpayers electing an extra one-half percent additional investment credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (e) of the Tax Reduction Act of 1975 (“1975 TRA”). The plan must meet the additional formal... 1975 TRA and this subparagraph (3) of TRASOP securities contributed by the employer. These allocations... 1975 TRA. In applying § 1.46-8(d)(6) to this section, only subdivisions (ii), (iv), (ix), (x), (xi)...

  11. 26 CFR 1.46-9 - Requirements for taxpayers electing an extra one-half percent additional investment credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (e) of the Tax Reduction Act of 1975 (“1975 TRA”). The plan must meet the additional formal... 1975 TRA and this subparagraph (3) of TRASOP securities contributed by the employer. These allocations... 1975 TRA. In applying § 1.46-8(d)(6) to this section, only subdivisions (ii), (iv), (ix), (x), (xi)...

  12. The most influential investment.

    PubMed

    Summers, L

    1993-01-01

    Investment in women's education possibly has a greater return than investing in areas such as power generation. Education is an economic issue. When the self-fulfilling prophecy of girls' lack of education yielding lower economic worth is compared with the self-fulfilling prophecy of educated women having healthy children and greater earning ability, there is no doubt which scenario is more beneficial to the individual and society. Wages of educated female workers rise by 20%, and personal hygiene and public health improvements contribute to lower fertility and infant mortality. In Pakistan, educating an additional 1000 girls/year would cost $40,000 in 1990 prices. Each year of schooling would reduce the under-5 year child mortality rate by 10%. 1000 women with an extra year of schooling would prevent 60 infant deaths, which if prevented through health care interventions would cost an estimated $48,000. Female fertility would be reduced by about 10% for an extra year of schooling, and thus would avert 660 births or a saving $43,000. Social improvement alone is worth the extra cost. Investing in female education means establishing scholarship funds, providing more free books and other supplies, adapting curricula to cultural and practical concerns, and hiring female teachers. Increasing female primary school enrollment to equal boys enrollment in low income countries would mean educating an extra 25 million girls every/year at a total cost of about $938 million. Equalizing secondary school enrollment would entail educating an extra 21 million girls at a cost of $1.4 billion. The total cost of $2.4 billion constitutes less than .25% of the gross domestic product of low income countries, less than 1% of investment in new capital goods, and less than 10% of defense spending. Investment statistics on power plants in a sample of 57 developing countries showed a return on physical plant assets of less than 4% over the past 3 years and less than 6% over the past 10 years

  13. Does observed fertility maximize fitness among New Mexican men? : A test of an optimality model and a new theory of parental investment in the embodied capital of offspring.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, H S; Lancaster, J B; Johnson, S E; Bock, J A

    1995-12-01

    Our objective is to test an optimality model of human fertility that specifies the behavioral requirements for fitness maximization in order (a) to determine whether current behavior does maximize fitness and, if not, (b) to use the specific nature of the behavioral deviations from fitness maximization towards the development of models of evolved proximate mechanisms that may have maximized fitness in the past but lead to deviations under present conditions. To test the model we use data from a representative sample of 7,107 men living in Albuquerque, New Mexico, between 1990 and 1993. The model we test proposes that low fertility in modern settings maximizes number of grandchildren as a result of a trade-off between parental fertility and next generation fertility. Results do not show the optimization, although the data do reveal a trade-off between parental fertility and offspring education and income.We propose that two characteristics of modern economies have led to a period of sustained fertility reduction and to a corresponding lack of association between income and fertility. The first is the direct link between costs of investment and wage rates due to the forces of supply and demand for labor in competitive economies. The second is the increasing emphasis on cumulative knowledge, skills, and technologies in the production of resources. Together they produce historically novel conditions. These two features of modern economies may interact with evolved psychological and physiological mechanisms governing fertility and parental investment to produce behavior that maximizes the economic productivity of lineages at the expense of fitness. If cognitive processes evolved to track diminishing returns to parental investment and if physiological processes evolved to regulate fertility in response to nutritional state and patterns of breast feeding, we might expect non-adaptive responses when returns from parental investment do not diminish until extremely high

  14. Universities Venture into Venture Capitalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desruisseaux, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Reports that some universities are starting their own venture-capital funds to develop campus companies, or are investing endowment funds with established venture-capital firms inclined to finance potential spinoffs from campus research. Examples cited are from the University of Alabama, Vanderbilt University (Tennessee), University of…

  15. Intellectual Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Herbert W.; Pierce, Jennifer Burek

    2002-01-01

    This review focuses on intellectual capital and its relationship to information professionals. Discusses asset recognition; national practices and the acceptance of intellectual capital; definitions of intellectual capital; measuring intellectual capital, including multiple and single variable measures; managing intellectual capital; and knowledge…

  16. 75 FR 16211 - MCG Capital Corporation; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ...) of the Act. \\1\\ MCG Capital Corporation, Investment Company Act Release Nos. 27258 (Mar. 8, 2006... Investment Company Act of 1940 (the ``Act'') for an exemption from section 23(c) of the Act. SUMMARY: Summary...'') pursuant to the MCG Capital Corporation 2006 Employee Restricted Stock Plan and the MCG Capital...

  17. Investment in Green Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Gupta, Supratim

    Since the middle of the 1970's, there has been considerable research about how to deal with exhaustible natural resources which are essential to production. In the absence of substitution possibilities, the finite stock of these resources acts as a limiting factor to continued growth of output and hence consumption possibilities. In our first chapter, we combine a finite natural resource and human capital in the production function and look at the possibility of maintaining a non-declining or sustainable level of consumption for an infinite horizon. Our results show that the return to human capital accumulation plays a key role in ensuring this objective. In our model without physical capital, we obtain a similar result where this return must be such that the fraction of time devoted to acquiring human capital each period is at least as much as the share of natural resources in output. Our second chapter focuses on the transition from a relatively cheap exhaustible natural resource (coal, gasoline) to an expensive alternative technology assumed to be in nearly unlimited supply (wind, solar). Due to significant cost differences between fossil-fuel based energy sources and these alternative (backstop) technologies, their use is not as widespread. Public subsidies to research can however bring about innovation through cheaper production techniques which would significantly reduce the operating costs of these backstop technologies. But without sufficient incentives for investment and patent protections, individual firms typically underinvest in backstop technologies relative to the socially optimal level. In our paper, we find that this underinvestment in the backstop also leads to an under-extraction of the exhaustible natural resource. This imply firms would conserve the natural resource for too long and switch later to the alternative technology relative to the socially optimal solution. We extend the chapter to include pollution as a flow variable. Pollution from

  18. Factor investing based on Musharakah principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Shahril; Omar, Mohd; Lazam, Norazliani Md; Amin, Mohd Nazrul Mohd

    2015-10-01

    Shariah stock investing has become a widely discussed topic in financial industry as part of today's investment strategy. The strategy primarily applies market capitalization allocations. However, some researchers have argued that market capitalization weighting is inherently flawed and have advocated replacing market capitalization allocations with factor allocations. In this paper, we discuss the rationale for factor investing based on Musharakah principle. The essential elements or factors of Musharakah principle such as business sector, management capability, profitability growth and capital efficiency are embedded in the Shariah-compliant stock. We then transform these factors into indexation for better analysis and performance measurement. Investment universe for this research covers Malaysian stocks for the period of January 2009 to December 2013. We found out that these factor indexes have historically earned excess returns over market capitalization weighted indexes and experienced higher Sharpe Ratios.

  19. [Several problems concerning population investment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Z

    1982-07-29

    Population investment is a major topic in the studies of population and economic relations. In this particular area, numerous theoretical and practical problems are still in need of solution. Concerning the problem of population concept, there are three different approaches: (1) to determine the definition of population investment from the relationship between the population growth and the capital from national income used for investment, including investment in the newly increased population and investment in the entire population; (2) to explain population investment from the economic viewpoint that people are producers; and (3) to explain population investment from the expense needed to change a simple labor force to a skillful labor force. The expenses include educational costs, maintanance spending, wages needed to compensate workers in labor, costs for workers to master and learn modern scientific techniques to be used for production, and the costs of keeping a young labor force in the next generation.

  20. 12 CFR 567.4 - Capital directives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Capital directives. 567.4 Section 567.4 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL Regulatory Capital Requirements § 567.4 Capital directives. (a) Issuance of a Capital Directive—(1) Purpose. In addition to...

  1. Human Capital Accumulation: The Role of Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garavan, Thomas N.; Morley, Michael; Gunnigle, Patrick; Collins, Eammon

    2001-01-01

    Presents definitions of intellectual and human capital. Examines human capital from the individual perspective (employability, performance, career development) and organization perspective (investment, ownership, knowledge management). Reviews papers in the theme issue. (Contains 117 references.) (SK)

  2. 12 CFR 933.5 - Disclosure to members concerning capital plan and capital stock conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK RISK MANAGEMENT AND CAPITAL STANDARDS BANK CAPITAL STRUCTURE PLANS § 933.5... its risk-based capital requirement, calculated in accordance with § 932.3 of this chapter, and of its... dividends, product volumes, investment volumes, new business lines and risk profile. (3) A description...

  3. 12 CFR 933.5 - Disclosure to members concerning capital plan and capital stock conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK RISK MANAGEMENT AND CAPITAL STANDARDS BANK CAPITAL STRUCTURE PLANS § 933.5... its risk-based capital requirement, calculated in accordance with § 932.3 of this chapter, and of its... dividends, product volumes, investment volumes, new business lines and risk profile. (3) A description...

  4. 12 CFR 933.5 - Disclosure to members concerning capital plan and capital stock conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK RISK MANAGEMENT AND CAPITAL STANDARDS BANK CAPITAL STRUCTURE PLANS § 933.5... its risk-based capital requirement, calculated in accordance with § 932.3 of this chapter, and of its... dividends, product volumes, investment volumes, new business lines and risk profile. (3) A description...

  5. 12 CFR 933.5 - Disclosure to members concerning capital plan and capital stock conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK RISK MANAGEMENT AND CAPITAL STANDARDS BANK CAPITAL STRUCTURE PLANS § 933.5... its risk-based capital requirement, calculated in accordance with § 932.3 of this chapter, and of its... dividends, product volumes, investment volumes, new business lines and risk profile. (3) A description...

  6. 29 CFR 2510.3-101 - Definition of “plan assets”-plan investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... company to which the existing venture capital investment relates, or (2) A merger or reorganization of the operating company to which the existing venture capital investment relates, provided that such merger or...-offered security nor a security issued by an investment company registered under the Investment...

  7. Profitability and risk assessment of T&D capital expansion plans

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, J.; Clauhs, B.; Price, S.

    1995-12-01

    Financial risk and profitability of T&D plans are becoming more important in the emerging competitive utility environment. The incentive structure is changing, and utilities will have to focus on profitability rather than on relying on the guaranteed rate of return. As changes begin to occur, the traditional T&D planning processes will also change, and more adaptive, less risky capital investments such as mobile and modular transformers will be used with increasing frequency. Financial risk of T&D investments can be reduced by implementing incremental investment plans instead of traditional large investments. Since load growth is uncertain, modular investments have additional value due to increased flexibility. This additional value comes from the ability to match the capacity of the system more closely to different load growth outcomes.

  8. 10 CFR 503.35 - Inability to obtain adequate capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of non-investor-owned public utilities, without jeopardizing the utility's ability to recover its capital investment, through tariffs, without unreasonably adverse economic effect on its service...

  9. Capital cost estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The capital cost estimate for the nuclear process heat source (NPHS) plant was made by: (1) using costs from the current commercial HTGR for electricity production as a base for items that are essentially the same and (2) development of new estimates for modified or new equipment that is specifically for the process heat application. Results are given in tabular form and cover the total investment required for each process temperature studied.

  10. Allergy Capitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Allergy Capitals Anaphylaxis in America Extreme Allergies and Climate Change Access to Pseudoephedrine Consensus Study on Food Allergies ... Allergy Capitals Anaphylaxis in America Extreme Allergies and Climate Change Access to Pseudoephedrine Consensus Study on Food Allergies ...

  11. Intellectual Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2001-01-01

    According to Thomas Stewart's book, intellectual capital comprises three broad categories: human, structural, and customer. Structural, or organizational capital, is knowledge that does not leave at night (with workers, or human capital). Developing a "best practices" database using Lotus Notes software would preserve and access schools'…

  12. 76 FR 80217 - Rural Business Investment Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Companies (RBICs) make venture capital investments in rural areas with the objectives of fostering economic... the knowledge, experience, and capability in Community Development Finance or Relevant Venture Capital... (RBIP) (69 FR 32200), a program to promote economic development and the creation of wealth and...

  13. 77 FR 3847 - Major Capital Investment Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... review DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR... available for public review and comment. The regulations act as a framework for the project evaluation... guidance is available in the Federal Register at 74 FR 37763. A summary of the evaluation and...

  14. 78 FR 1991 - Major Capital Investment Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) published on June 3, 2010 (75 FR 31383), which posed a series of questions... FR 3848), that proposed changes to the regulatory text. FTA also published on January 25, 2012, a... estimate ridership rather than standard local travel forecasting models; to use a series of...

  15. 75 FR 31383 - Major Capital Investment Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... that facilitate sustainable development. The text of E.O. 13514 is available at http://edocket.access... in areas that facilitate sustainable development? 7. To what extent, if any, can technology... comment on how it should evaluate environmental benefits and economic development effects....

  16. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  17. How to Ensure Your Capital Gains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyland, Larry

    1991-01-01

    Every decision made by successful school executives results in either a deposit or a withdrawal from their political capital. Paying attention to one's level of political support is essential for survival. To build capital, administrators must invest time in building good working relationships, concentrate on content, and emphasize accountability.…

  18. 12 CFR 615.5140 - Eligible investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Table. These investments must be denominated in United States dollars. ER28MY99.004 ER28MY99.005 (b... the United States, the host country must maintain the highest sovereign rating for political and...) Obligor limits. (1) You may not invest more than 20 percent of your total capital in eligible...

  19. Fueling innovation in medical devices (and beyond): venture capital in health care.

    PubMed

    Ackerly, D Clay; Valverde, Ana M; Diener, Lawrence W; Dossary, Kristin L; Schulman, Kevin A

    2009-01-01

    Innovation in health care requires new ideas and the capital to develop and commercialize those ideas into products or services. The necessary capital is often "venture capital," but the link between public policy and the venture capital industry has not been well examined. In this paper we explore the link between venture capital and innovation in health care, and we present new descriptive data from a survey of health care venture capital fund managers. Respondents generally viewed policy levers (for example, reimbursement and regulations) as important risks to venture capital investments, potentially affecting their ability to raise capital for early-stage investment funds.

  20. Applying temporal network analysis to the venture capital market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Feng, Ling; Zhu, Rongqian; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2015-10-01

    Using complex network theory to study the investment relationships of venture capital firms has produced a number of significant results. However, previous studies have often neglected the temporal properties of those relationships, which in real-world scenarios play a pivotal role. Here we examine the time-evolving dynamics of venture capital investment in China by constructing temporal networks to represent (i) investment relationships between venture capital firms and portfolio companies and (ii) the syndication ties between venture capital investors. The evolution of the networks exhibits rich variations in centrality, connectivity and local topology. We demonstrate that a temporal network approach provides a dynamic and comprehensive analysis of real-world networks.

  1. Investment appraisal of technology innovations on dairy farm electricity consumption.

    PubMed

    Upton, J; Murphy, M; De Boer, I J M; Groot Koerkamp, P W G; Berentsen, P B M; Shalloo, L

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct an investment appraisal for milk-cooling, water-heating, and milk-harvesting technologies on a range of farm sizes in 2 different electricity-pricing environments. This was achieved by using a model for electricity consumption on dairy farms. The model simulated the effect of 6 technology investment scenarios on the electricity consumption and electricity costs of the 3 largest electricity-consuming systems within the dairy farm (i.e., milk-cooling, water-heating, and milking machine systems). The technology investment scenarios were direct expansion milk-cooling, ice bank milk-cooling, milk precooling, solar water-heating, and variable speed drive vacuum pump-milking systems. A dairy farm profitability calculator was combined with the electricity consumption model to assess the effect of each investment scenario on the total discounted net income over a 10-yr period subsequent to the investment taking place. Included in the calculation were the initial investments, which were depreciated to zero over the 10-yr period. The return on additional investment for 5 investment scenarios compared with a base scenario was computed as the investment appraisal metric. The results of this study showed that the highest return on investment figures were realized by using a direct expansion milk-cooling system with precooling of milk to 15°C with water before milk entry to the storage tank, heating water with an electrical water-heating system, and using standard vacuum pump control on the milking system. Return on investment figures did not exceed the suggested hurdle rate of 10% for any of the ice bank scenarios, making the ice bank system reliant on a grant aid framework to reduce the initial capital investment and improve the return on investment. The solar water-heating and variable speed drive vacuum pump scenarios failed to produce positive return on investment figures on any of the 3 farm sizes considered on either the day and night

  2. Investment appraisal of technology innovations on dairy farm electricity consumption.

    PubMed

    Upton, J; Murphy, M; De Boer, I J M; Groot Koerkamp, P W G; Berentsen, P B M; Shalloo, L

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct an investment appraisal for milk-cooling, water-heating, and milk-harvesting technologies on a range of farm sizes in 2 different electricity-pricing environments. This was achieved by using a model for electricity consumption on dairy farms. The model simulated the effect of 6 technology investment scenarios on the electricity consumption and electricity costs of the 3 largest electricity-consuming systems within the dairy farm (i.e., milk-cooling, water-heating, and milking machine systems). The technology investment scenarios were direct expansion milk-cooling, ice bank milk-cooling, milk precooling, solar water-heating, and variable speed drive vacuum pump-milking systems. A dairy farm profitability calculator was combined with the electricity consumption model to assess the effect of each investment scenario on the total discounted net income over a 10-yr period subsequent to the investment taking place. Included in the calculation were the initial investments, which were depreciated to zero over the 10-yr period. The return on additional investment for 5 investment scenarios compared with a base scenario was computed as the investment appraisal metric. The results of this study showed that the highest return on investment figures were realized by using a direct expansion milk-cooling system with precooling of milk to 15°C with water before milk entry to the storage tank, heating water with an electrical water-heating system, and using standard vacuum pump control on the milking system. Return on investment figures did not exceed the suggested hurdle rate of 10% for any of the ice bank scenarios, making the ice bank system reliant on a grant aid framework to reduce the initial capital investment and improve the return on investment. The solar water-heating and variable speed drive vacuum pump scenarios failed to produce positive return on investment figures on any of the 3 farm sizes considered on either the day and night

  3. 49 CFR 1152.34 - Return on investment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... which the nominal return element shall apply shall be the sum of: (i) The allowable working capital... the subsidizer under 49 CFR 1152.32(m)(2), the investment base shall exclude the increment to the net... statement showing its current nominal cost of capital. The railroad's nominal cost of capital shall be...

  4. Modeling regulated water utility investment incentives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padula, S.; Harou, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    This work attempts to model the infrastructure investment choices of privatized water utilities subject to rate of return and price cap regulation. The goal is to understand how regulation influences water companies' investment decisions such as their desire to engage in transfers with neighbouring companies. We formulate a profit maximization capacity expansion model that finds the schedule of new supply, demand management and transfer schemes that maintain the annual supply-demand balance and maximize a companies' profit under the 2010-15 price control process in England. Regulatory incentives for costs savings are also represented in the model. These include: the CIS scheme for the capital expenditure (capex) and incentive allowance schemes for the operating expenditure (opex) . The profit-maximizing investment program (what to build, when and what size) is compared with the least cost program (social optimum). We apply this formulation to several water companies in South East England to model performance and sensitivity to water network particulars. Results show that if companies' are able to outperform the regulatory assumption on the cost of capital, a capital bias can be generated, due to the fact that the capital expenditure, contrarily to opex, can be remunerated through the companies' regulatory capital value (RCV). The occurrence of the 'capital bias' or its entity depends on the extent to which a company can finance its investments at a rate below the allowed cost of capital. The bias can be reduced by the regulatory penalties for underperformances on the capital expenditure (CIS scheme); Sensitivity analysis can be applied by varying the CIS penalty to see how and to which extent this impacts the capital bias effect. We show how regulatory changes could potentially be devised to partially remove the 'capital bias' effect. Solutions potentially include allowing for incentives on total expenditure rather than separately for capex and opex and allowing

  5. 76 FR 32882 - New Markets Tax Credit Non-Real Estate Investments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... venture capital investments in non-real estate businesses? If not, how can the proposed rules be modified... businesses will bring increased amounts of capital to underserved businesses in low-income communities. The... mean: (A) any capital or equity investment in, or loan to, any qualified active low-income...

  6. Maximum Capital Project Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Matt

    2002-01-01

    Describes the stages of capital project planning and development: (1) individual capital project submission; (2) capital project proposal assessment; (3) executive committee; and (4) capital project execution. (EV)

  7. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital...

  8. Increasing Returns to Education and the Impact on Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeves, Gareth D.

    2014-01-01

    The returns to education have been increasing. It is suggested that high-skilled workers' social capital investment has been adversely affected by the increasing incentives to devote human capital to career development. Lower social capital is linked to reduced economic growth and innovation and higher transaction costs and is detrimental to…

  9. Social Capital as Exchange: Its Contribution to Morale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Chau-kiu; Chan, Raymond Kwok-hong

    2010-01-01

    A way to clarify the measurement of social capital is the differentiation of its bases on opportunity and exchange. Social capital based on opportunity incorporates organizational participation, network strength, trust, helping and continuing relationships, whereas social capital based on exchange consists of the investment and reciprocation of…

  10. 78 FR 45592 - DeltaPoint Capital IV, LP;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION DeltaPoint Capital IV, LP; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P., 45 East Avenue... Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR 107.730). DeltaPoint Capital IV,...

  11. Human capital, schooling and health.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T Paul

    2003-06-01

    A consensus has been forged in the last decade that recent periods of sustained growth in total factor productivity and reduced poverty are closely associated with improvements in a population's child nutrition, adult health, and schooling, particularly in low-income countries. Estimates of the productive returns from these three forms of human capital investment are nonetheless qualified by a number of limitations in our data and analytical methods. This paper reviews the problems that occupy researchers in this field and summarizes accumulating evidence of empirical regularities. Social experiments must be designed to assess how randomized policy interventions motivate families and individuals to invest in human capital, and then measure the changed wage opportunities of those who have been induced to make these investments. Statistical estimation of wage functions that seek to represent the relationship between wage rates and a variety of human capital stocks may yield biased estimates of private rates of return from these investments for a variety of reasons. The paper summarizes several of these problems and illustrates how data and statistical methods can be used to deal with some of them. The measures of labor productivity and the proxies specified for schooling and adult health are first discussed, and then the functional relationships between human capital and wages are described. Three types of estimation problem are discussed: (1) bias due to omitted variables, such as ability or frailty; (2) bias due to the measurement of an aggregation of multiple sources of human capital, e.g. genetic and socially reproducible variation, which may contribute to different gains in worker productivity; and (3) errors in measurement of the human capital stocks. Empirical examples and illustrative estimates are surveyed.

  12. 78 FR 28900 - FS Investment Corporation, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... current income and long-term capital appreciation. A majority of the members of the board of directors... Square Capital Partners owns a majority interest in FSEP Investment Adviser and FSIC II Investment Adviser and a minority interest in FSIC Investment Adviser. ] Applicants represent that there is and...

  13. 12 CFR 652.35 - Eligible non-program investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in United States dollars. ER14JY05.000 ER14JY05.001 (b) Rating of foreign countries. Whenever the obligor or issuer of an eligible investment is located outside the United States, the host country must...) You may not invest more than 25 percent of your regulatory capital in eligible investments issued...

  14. 77 FR 65234 - Notice of Intention To Cancel Registrations of Certain Investment Advisers Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... CAPITAL PARTNERS, LLC 801-71579 GRAVITY CAPITAL PARTNERS, LLC 801-67236 GRAYBEARD CAPITAL, LLC 801-69383...-71591 PROSAPIA CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, LLC 801-62787 QUANTEL ASSOCIATES, INC. 801-63842 QUANTUM FAMILY OFFICE GROUP, LLC 801-68872 QUANTUM WEALTH MANAGEMENT LLC 801-70459 RANDY MEYER INVESTMENT...

  15. Investing in children's health: what are the economic benefits?

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Paolo C.; Bustreo, Flavia; Preker, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    This paper argues that investing in children's health is a sound economic decision for governments to take, even if the moral justifications for such programmes are not considered. The paper also outlines dimensions that are often neglected when public investment decisions are taken. The conclusion that can be drawn from the literature studying the relationship between children's health and the economy is that children's health is a potentially valuable economic investment. The literature shows that making greater investments in children's health results in better educated and more productive adults, sets in motion favourable demographic changes, and shows that safeguarding health during childhood is more important than at any other age because poor health during children's early years is likely to permanently impair them over the course of their life. In addition, the literature confirms that more attention should be paid to poor health as a mechanism for the intergenerational transmission of poverty. Children born into poor families have poorer health as children, receive lower investments in human capital, and have poorer health as adults. As a result, they will earn lower wages as adults, which will affect the next generation of children who will thus be born into poorer families. PMID:16283055

  16. 12 CFR 615.5136 - Emergencies impeding normal access of Farm Credit banks to capital markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Investment Management § 615.5136 Emergencies impeding normal access of Farm Credit banks to capital markets... defense crisis could impede the normal access of Farm Credit banks to the capital markets. Whenever...

  17. 12 CFR 615.5136 - Emergencies impeding normal access of Farm Credit banks to capital markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Investment Management § 615.5136 Emergencies impeding normal access of Farm Credit banks to capital markets... defense crisis could impede the normal access of Farm Credit banks to the capital markets. Whenever...

  18. Reaping benefits from intellectual capital.

    PubMed

    Weston, Marla J; Estrada, Nicolette A; Carrington, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The wealth and value of organizations are increasingly based on intellectual capital. Although acquiring talented individuals and investing in employee learning adds value to the organization, reaping the benefits of intellectual capital involves translating the wisdom of employees into reusable and sustained actions. This requires a culture that creates employee commitment, encourages learning, fosters sharing, and involves employees in decision making. An infrastructure to recognize and embed promising and best practices through social networks, evidence-based practice, customization of innovations, and use of information technology results in increased productivity, stronger financial performance, better patient outcomes, and greater employee and customer satisfaction. PMID:17198112

  19. Reaping benefits from intellectual capital.

    PubMed

    Weston, Marla J; Estrada, Nicolette A; Carrington, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The wealth and value of organizations are increasingly based on intellectual capital. Although acquiring talented individuals and investing in employee learning adds value to the organization, reaping the benefits of intellectual capital involves translating the wisdom of employees into reusable and sustained actions. This requires a culture that creates employee commitment, encourages learning, fosters sharing, and involves employees in decision making. An infrastructure to recognize and embed promising and best practices through social networks, evidence-based practice, customization of innovations, and use of information technology results in increased productivity, stronger financial performance, better patient outcomes, and greater employee and customer satisfaction.

  20. Virtuous capital: what foundations can learn from venture capitalists.

    PubMed

    Letts, C W; Ryan, W; Grossman, A

    1997-01-01

    U.S. foundations and nonprofits work diligently on behalf of society's most needy and yet report that progress is slow and social problems persist. How can they learn to be more effective with their limited resources? Foundations should consider expanding their mission from investing only in program innovation to investing in the organizational needs of nonprofit organizations as well. Their overemphasis on program design has meant deteriorating organizational capacity at many nonprofits. If foundations are to help nonprofits be assured of making payroll, paying the rent, or buying a much-needed computer, they must develop hands-on partnering skills. Venture capital firms offer a helpful benchmark. In addition to putting up capital, they closely monitor the companies in which they have invested, provide management support and stay involved long enough to see the company become strong. If foundation officers familiarize themselves with such practices, they can begin to build organizational capacity in the nonprofit sector. Foundations can hire organizational experts to assist grantees; they can lengthen grant terms to allow nonprofits to build up organization strengths; and they can create new classes of grants that allow for organizational effectiveness. Nonprofits in turn should articulate their organizational needs when applying for grants; they should apply to foundations known for longer-term grants; and they should create plans that justify long-term support from foundations.

  1. Banking services aid tax-exempt investments.

    PubMed

    Forbes, R W; Leonard, P A

    1987-04-01

    Many not-for-profit hospitals are facing a severe capital shortage. Their traditional sources of funding--government grants, philanthropy, and appropriations--have dramatically declined. Increasingly, these hospitals are turning to the tax-exempt bond market for their capital. It is important for the financial manager to understand the elements and the process of tax-exempt financing. One crucial element is the investment banker who handles the project's financing. This article focuses on the financing services investment banking firms provide to hospitals and explains how much these services will cost. PMID:10280840

  2. Risk and uncertainty in health investment.

    PubMed

    Asano, Takao; Shibata, Akihisa

    2011-02-01

    Extending the Grossman (J Polit Econ 80:223-255, 1972) model of health capital into a stochastic one, we analyze how the presence of Knightian uncertainty about the efficacy of health care affects the optimal health investment behavior of individuals. Using Gilboa and Schmeidler's (J Math Econ 18:141-153, 1989) model of max/min expected utility (MMEU) with multiple priors, we show that an agent retains the initial level of health capital if the price of health care lies within a certain range. We also show that the no-investment range expands as the degree of Knightian uncertainty rises.

  3. The social architecture of capitalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Ian

    2005-02-01

    A dynamic model of the social relations between workers and capitalists is introduced. The model self-organises into a dynamic equilibrium with statistical properties that are in close qualitative and in many cases quantitative agreement with a broad range of known empirical distributions of developed capitalism, including the power-law firm size distribution, the Laplace firm and GDP growth distribution, the lognormal firm demises distribution, the exponential recession duration distribution, the lognormal-Pareto income distribution, and the gamma-like firm rate-of-profit distribution. Normally these distributions are studied in isolation, but this model unifies and connects them within a single causal framework. The model also generates business cycle phenomena, including fluctuating wage and profit shares in national income about values consistent with empirical studies. The generation of an approximately lognormal-Pareto income distribution and an exponential-Pareto wealth distribution demonstrates that the power-law regime of the income distribution can be explained by an additive process on a power-law network that models the social relation between employers and employees organised in firms, rather than a multiplicative process that models returns to investment in financial markets. A testable consequence of the model is the conjecture that the rate-of-profit distribution is consistent with a parameter-mix of a ratio of normal variates with means and variances that depend on a firm size parameter that is distributed according to a power-law.

  4. Capital Gains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    "Social capital" describes the strength of community as measured by the connections and levels of trust among its members. These connections are both formal and informal and the benefits include better health and better academic achievement. In this article, the author proposes two types of experiments to determine whether the relationship between…

  5. Capital Campaigns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalessandro, David; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Eight articles focus on capital campaigns including setting goals (D. Dalessandro), the lead gift (D. A. Campbell), motivating trustees (J. J. Ianolli, Jr.), alumni associations (W. B. Adams), role of public relations officers (R. L. Williams), special events( H.R. Gilbert), the campaign document (R. King), and case statements (D. R. Treadwell,…

  6. Caring relationships: an investment in health?

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, P A

    2000-01-01

    Although the US has created the most expensive, technologically advanced medical system in the world, health outcomes are not commensurate with investment. The author argues that providers and policy makers have neglected the effect of human relationships on health, citing research showing that better relationships lead to better health. The author concludes with recommendations for improving public health by supporting society's investments in social capital. Images p145-a p149-a PMID:10968746

  7. Institutional Venture Capital for the Space Industry: Providing Risk Capital for Space Companies that Provide Investor Returns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Roscoe M., III

    2002-01-01

    provided by an institution. Those institutions tend to be Banks, Pension Funds, Insurance Funds, Corporations, and other incorporated entities that are obligated to earn a return on their invested capital. These institutions invest in a venture capital firm for the sole purpose of getting their money back with a healthy profit - within a set period of time. The venture capital firm is responsible for investing in and managing companies whose risk and return are higher than other less risky classes of investment. The venture capital firm's primary skill is its ability to manage the high risk of its venture investments while maintaining the high return potential of its venture investments. to businesses for the purpose of providing the above-mentioned Institutions a substantial return on their invested capital. Institutional Venture Capital for the Space Industry cannot be provided to projects or companies whose philosophy or intention is not to increase shareholder equity value within a set time period. efficiently when tied up in companies that intend to spend billions of dollars before the first dollar of revenue is generated. If 2 billion dollars of venture capital is invested in the equity of a Space Company for a minority equity position, then that Space Company must build that minority shareholder's equity value to a minimum investment return of 4 to 8 billion dollars. There are not many start-up companies that are able to reach public market equity valuations in the tens of billions of dollars within reasonable time horizons. Foundations, Manufacturers, and Strategic Investors can invest in projects that cannot realistically provide a substantial return on their equity to their investors within a reasonable period (5-7 years) of time. Venture Capitalists have to make money. Venture capitalists have made money on Satellite Television, Satellite Radio, Fixed Satellite Services, and other businesses. Venture capitalists have not made money on stand

  8. Abundance in Capital: Global Risk Sharing and Insurance in a Changing Financial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Gero; Schaper, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Insurance has played a viable role in the hedging of homeowners and commercial risks around the world. Countries that have significant penetration in insurance have in addition performed better after large regional or over-regional catastrophic losses. Insurance has hence increased the resilience of western societies. This is opposed to emerging or developing markets with low insurance penetration which have suffered significant drawbacks in their development after large catastrophic events. Examples include the recent Typhoon(s) in the Philippines and the 2010 Haiti earthquake. This presentation will provide insights into the opportunities, views and risk management features a global reinsurance company must assume in order to hedge and mitigate risk across the world. During the past year, an unprecedented amount of new capital has been entering the insurance market, looking for profitable investments outside the much wider capital market. Catastrophe insurance is seen as a valuable alternative to investing in assets that that have shown low returns and high correlation in the recent financial meltdown. The new capital is mostly deployed - or competing with already deployed capital - in the US where insurance penetration is already high. This is opposed to more than half of the world including all developing and most emerging countries which have low insurance penetration and often lack infrastructure hindering new capital to be deployed effectively. What is needed to overcome this obvious deficiency in capital supply and demand? One reason why it is difficult to deploy capital in developing countries is the lack of available exposure information and catastrophe models. This presentation sheds light on the potential science needs of our market and gives an overview of what is being done at Montpelier, a global reinsurance company, to understand catastrophe risk around the globe.

  9. Private equity investment in health care services.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Catherine J; Rudsenske, Todd; Vaughan, James S

    2008-01-01

    Sophisticated private equity investors in health services provide venture capital for early-stage companies, growth capital for mid-stage companies, and equity capital for buyouts of mid-stage and mature companies. They pursue opportunities in provider sectors that are large and have a stable reimbursement environment, such as acute care services; sectors with room to execute consolidation strategies, such as labs; alternative-site sectors, such as "storefront" medicine; and clinical services, such as behavioral health, that are subject to profitably increasing quality and lowering costs. The innovations created through private equity investments could challenge established health services organizations.

  10. Fertility, Human Capital, and Economic Growth over the Demographic Transition

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Do low fertility and population aging lead to economic decline if couples have fewer children, but invest more in each child? By addressing this question, this article extends previous work in which the authors show that population aging leads to an increased demand for wealth that can, under some conditions, lead to increased capital per worker and higher per capita consumption. This article is based on an overlapping generations (OLG) model which highlights the quantity–quality tradeoff and the links between human capital investment and economic growth. It incorporates new national level estimates of human capital investment produced by the National Transfer Accounts project. Simulation analysis is employed to show that, even in the absence of the capital dilution effect, low fertility leads to higher per capita consumption through human capital accumulation, given plausible model parameters. PMID:20495605

  11. Life expectancy and human capital: evidence from the international epidemiological transition.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Casper Worm

    2013-12-01

    Exploiting preintervention variation in mortality from various infectious diseases, together with the time variation arising from medical breakthroughs in the late 1940s and the 1950s, this study examines how a large positive shock to life expectancy influenced the formation of human capital within countries during the second half of the 20th century. The results establish that the rise in life expectancy was behind a significant part of the increase in human capital over this period. According to the baseline estimate, for one additional year of life expectancy, years of schooling increase by 0.17 year. Moreover, the evidence suggests that declines in pneumonia mortality are the underlying cause of this finding, indicating that improved childhood health increases human capital investments. PMID:24157844

  12. Life expectancy and human capital: evidence from the international epidemiological transition.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Casper Worm

    2013-12-01

    Exploiting preintervention variation in mortality from various infectious diseases, together with the time variation arising from medical breakthroughs in the late 1940s and the 1950s, this study examines how a large positive shock to life expectancy influenced the formation of human capital within countries during the second half of the 20th century. The results establish that the rise in life expectancy was behind a significant part of the increase in human capital over this period. According to the baseline estimate, for one additional year of life expectancy, years of schooling increase by 0.17 year. Moreover, the evidence suggests that declines in pneumonia mortality are the underlying cause of this finding, indicating that improved childhood health increases human capital investments.

  13. H. R. 5593: A Bill to maintain the viability of the domestic oil industry by enhancing capital investment and ensuring future oil and gas exploration, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, September 12, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill would maintain the viability of the domestic oil industry by enhancing capital investment and ensuring future oil and gas exploration by amending certain sections of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. The bill describes the following provisions under the title, Percentage depletion and intangible drilling costs: increase in percentage depletion; percentage depletion permitted after transfer of proven property; percentage depletion allowed for stripper well production of integrated producers; net income limitation not to apply to oil or gas wells; and definitions of intangible drilling costs. Under Title II, Domestic energy improvement tax credits, the following tax credits are described: marginal production; exploring for oil or gas; vehicles fueled by clean-burning fuels, property converting vehicles to be so fueled, and facilities for the retail delivery of such fuels; conversion to natural gas equipment; clean fuel alternatives research; and tertiary recovery methods research.

  14. Reducing the cost of health care capital.

    PubMed

    Silberman, R

    1984-08-01

    Although one may ask four financial experts their opinion on the future of the hospital capital market and receive five answers, the blatant need for financial strategic planning is evident. Clearly, the hospital or system with sound financial management will be better positioned to gain and/or maintain an edge in the competitive environment of the health care sector. The trends of the future include hospitals attempting to: Maximize the efficiency of invested capital. Use the expertise of Board members. Use alternative capital sources. Maximize rate of return on investments. Increase productivity. Adjust to changes in reimbursements. Restructure to use optimal financing for capital needs, i.e., using short-term to build up debt capacity if long-term financing is needed in the future. Take advantage of arbitrage (obtain capital and reinvest it until the funds are needed). Delay actual underwriting until funds are to be used. Better management of accounts receivable and accounts payable to avoid short-term financing for cash flow shortfalls. Use for-profit subsidiaries to obtain venture capital by issuing stock. Use product line management. Use leasing to obtain balance sheet advantages. These trends indicate a need for hospital executives to possess a thorough understanding of the capital formation process. In essence, the bottom line is that the short-term viability and long-term survival of a health care organization will greatly depend on the financial expertise of its decision-makers.

  15. 77 FR 59544 - New Markets Tax Credit Non-Real Estate Investments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... commentators explained that this would encourage venture capital investments ] in a non-real estate qualified...) occurring early in the 7-year credit period, which often happen with venture capital investments, would not...-11) was published in the Federal Register (76 FR 32882). The IRS received comments responding to...

  16. 76 FR 36584 - Highmark Funds and Highmark Capital Management, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... COMMISSION Highmark Funds and Highmark Capital Management, Inc. June 16, 2011. AGENCY: Securities and...: Applicants request an order to permit open-end management investment companies relying on rule 12d1-2 under...Mark Capital Management, Inc. (``HCM,'' and together with the Trust, ``Applicants''). Filing Dates:...

  17. 13 CFR 107.210 - Minimum capital requirements for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Licensees. 107.210 Section 107.210 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.210 Minimum capital requirements for Licensees. (a) Companies licensed on or after October 1, 1996. A company licensed on or...

  18. Measuring Social Capital and Its Differentials by Family Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravanera, Zenaida R.; Rajulton, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Social capital has often been invoked to explain differences in children's well-being by family structure. That is, developmental outcome for children in lone or step parent family is not at par with that of children from intact family because parental investments on children may be lower not only in financial and human capital but also in social…

  19. The Treatment of Capital Costs in Educational Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezeau, Lawrence

    1975-01-01

    Failure to account for the cost and depreciation of capital leads to suboptimal investments in education, specifically to excessively capital intensive instructional technologies. This type of error, which is particularly serious when planning for developing countries, can be easily avoided. (Author)

  20. 77 FR 4885 - Rural Business Investment Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ..., the Agency published an Interim Rule for the Rural Business Investment Program (RBIP) (69 FR 32200... to meet the capital requirements. On December 23, 2011 (76 FR 80217), the Agency published an amended... / Wednesday, February 1, 2012 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural...

  1. Comparative dynamics in a health investment model.

    PubMed

    Eisenring, C

    1999-10-01

    The method of comparative dynamics fully exploits the inter-temporal structure of optimal control models. I derive comparative dynamic results in a simplified demand for health model. The effect of a change in the depreciation rate on the optimal paths for health capital and investment in health is studied by use of a phase diagram.

  2. Years and Intensity of Schooling Investment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibowitz, Arleen

    1976-01-01

    Calculates human capital earnings functions over 20 years for 822 men (the Terman sample) and argues that the percentage of gross earnings invested in education may fall below 100 percent well before school ends. (Available from the Secretary's Office, American Economic Association, 1313 21st Ave., South, Nashville, Tennessee 37212) (Author/JG)

  3. 75 FR 30875 - Hercules Technology Growth Capital, Inc.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... 23(c)(3) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the ``Act'') for an exemption from section 23(c) of the Act. SUMMARY: Summary of the Application: Hercules Technology Growth Capital, Inc. (``Company'' or... Capital, Inc., Investment Company Act Release Nos. 27815 (May 2, 2007) (notice) and 27838 (May 23,...

  4. Human Capital Development and Poverty Alleviation in Nigeria: A Symbiotic Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asaju, Kayode

    2012-01-01

    Human Capital development through education is a long time investment made by the state to enhance the well being of her citizenry. By investing in education, well educated individuals bring to bear their talents, knowledge, skills and experiences as they function in the various sectors of the economy. Human Capital development is therefore a…

  5. Return on Investment for Workplace Training: The Canadian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percival, Jennifer C.; Cozzarin, Brian P.; Formaneck, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    One of the central problems in managing technological change and maintaining a competitive advantage in business is improving the skills of the workforce through investment in human capital and a variety of training practices. This paper explores the evidence on the impact of training investment on productivity in 14 Canadian industries from 1999…

  6. 12 CFR 5.37 - Investment in bank premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... as defined in 12 CFR part 6 and will continue to be well capitalized after the investment or loan is... PROCEDURES FOR CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Expansion of Activities § 5.37 Investment in bank premises. (a) Authority... future expansion; or (5) Parking facilities that are used by customers or employees of the bank,...

  7. 12 CFR 5.37 - Investment in bank premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... as defined in 12 CFR part 6 and will continue to be well capitalized after the investment or loan is... PROCEDURES FOR CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Expansion of Activities § 5.37 Investment in bank premises. (a) Authority... future expansion; or (5) Parking facilities that are used by customers or employees of the bank,...

  8. 12 CFR 5.37 - Investment in bank premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... as defined in 12 CFR part 6 and will continue to be well capitalized after the investment or loan is... PROCEDURES FOR CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Expansion of Activities § 5.37 Investment in bank premises. (a) Authority... future expansion; or (5) Parking facilities that are used by customers or employees of the bank,...

  9. 12 CFR 5.37 - Investment in bank premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... as defined in 12 CFR part 6 and will continue to be well capitalized after the investment or loan is... PROCEDURES FOR CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Expansion of Activities § 5.37 Investment in bank premises. (a) Authority... future expansion; or (5) Parking facilities that are used by customers or employees of the bank,...

  10. 12 CFR 5.37 - Investment in bank premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... as defined in 12 CFR part 6 and will continue to be well capitalized after the investment or loan is... PROCEDURES FOR CORPORATE ACTIVITIES Expansion of Activities § 5.37 Investment in bank premises. (a) Authority... future expansion; or (5) Parking facilities that are used by customers or employees of the bank,...

  11. Federal Public Investment Spending and Economic Development in Appalachia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mencken, F. Carson; Tolbert, Charles M., II

    2005-01-01

    This analysis examines the relationship between federal public investment spending and economic development in the special case of Appalachia. We propose that the effects of federal public investment spending on economic development operate indirectly through private capital accumulation. We use a spatial lag regression model to test our ideas for…

  12. 17 CFR 240.17i-7 - Calculations of allowable capital and risk allowances or alternative capital assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... capital by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve (12 CFR 225, Appendix A); (iii) Other intangible... of the Federal Reserve in calculating Tier 1 capital (as defined in 12 CFR 225, Appendix A). (2... notice of intention, the investment bank holding company may request to include, for a period of...

  13. Does Human Capital Matter? A Meta-Analysis of the Relationship between Human Capital and Firm Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, T. Russell; Todd, Samuel Y.; Combs, James G.; Woehr, David J.; Ketchen, David J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Theory at both the micro and macro level predicts that investments in superior human capital generate better firm-level performance. However, human capital takes time and money to develop or acquire, which potentially offsets its positive benefits. Indeed, extant tests appear equivocal regarding its impact. To clarify what is known, we…

  14. 12 CFR 956.2 - Authorized investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Authorized investments. 956.2 Section 956.2 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK ASSETS AND OFF-BALANCE SHEET ITEMS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK INVESTMENTS § 956.2 Authorized investments. In addition to...

  15. 12 CFR 956.2 - Authorized investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authorized investments. 956.2 Section 956.2 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK ASSETS AND OFF-BALANCE SHEET ITEMS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK INVESTMENTS § 956.2 Authorized investments. In addition to...

  16. 12 CFR 1777.23 - Capital restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... An Enterprise shall file a capital restoration plan in writing with OFHEO within ten days of... a capital restoration plan approved by OFHEO under this part is not required to submit an additional capital restoration plan based on a subsequent notice of capital classification, unless OFHEO notifies...

  17. 12 CFR 1777.23 - Capital restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... An Enterprise shall file a capital restoration plan in writing with OFHEO within ten days of... a capital restoration plan approved by OFHEO under this part is not required to submit an additional capital restoration plan based on a subsequent notice of capital classification, unless OFHEO notifies...

  18. [Sensitivity analysis in health investment projects].

    PubMed

    Arroyave-Loaiza, G; Isaza-Nieto, P; Jarillo-Soto, E C

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the concepts and methodologies frequently used in sensitivity analyses in the evaluation of investment programs. In addition, a concrete example is presented: a hospital investment in which four indicators were used to design different scenarios and their impact on investment costs. This paper emphasizes the importance of this type of analysis in the field of management of health services, and more specifically in the formulation of investment programs.

  19. 76 FR 76907 - Small Business Investment Companies-Early Stage SBICs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... provide early stage venture capital financing to small businesses. The standard debenture is generally... operating history may qualify under this definition. The venture capital industry employs various... investment fund draws its initial capital from investors). Because of the cyclical nature of venture...

  20. 13 CFR 108.1940 - Procedures for designation of additional Low-Income Geographic Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 108.1940 Procedures... equivalent county division) has a pattern of unmet needs for investment capital. (3) As adequately...

  1. 77 FR 45385 - Capital Research and Management Company, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... COMMISSION Capital Research and Management Company, et al.; Notice of Application July 25, 2012. AGENCY..., and Washington Mutual Investors Fund (the ``Investment Companies'') and Capital Research and...., Washington, DC 20549-1090. Applicants, Capital Research and Management Company, 333 South Hope Street,...

  2. Knowledge and Intellectual Capital. Symposium 13. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Three presentations are provided from Symposium 13, Knowledge and Intellectual Capital, of the Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) 2000 Conference proceedings. "Human Capital Measurement" (Joanne Provo) begins with a literature review that provides a context for understanding how investments in human capital add value to the firm,…

  3. 77 FR 74230 - PNC Capital Advisors, LLC, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... COMMISSION PNC Capital Advisors, LLC, et al.; Notice of Application December 6, 2012. AGENCY: Securities and... the Act to invest in certain financial instruments. Applicants: PNC Capital Advisors, LLC (``PNC Capital Advisors''), PNC Funds and PNC Advantage Funds (together, the ``Trusts''), and PNC...

  4. Enhancing Natural Capital across the Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, G.; Tallis, H.; Goldstein, J.; Nelson, E.; Polasky, S.

    2008-12-01

    Over the past decade, efforts to value and protect ecosystem services have been promoted by many as the best hope for making conservation mainstream - attractive and commonplace worldwide. Yet, in promising a return (of services) on investments in natural capital, the scientific community needs to deliver knowledge and tools to quantify and forecast this return. To help address this challenge, we have developed a suite of models for integrated valuation of ecosystem services and tradeoffs (InVEST). Based on future scenarios of resource use, climate, and human population, InVEST projects the future provision of services in biophysical and economic terms. The outputs of InVEST provide decision-makers with maps and other spatially explicit information about costs, benefits, tradeoffs, and synergies of alternative investments in natural capital and ecosystem service provision. InVEST is now being used in major resource decisions in Bolivia, Brazil, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Tanzania, and the United States (California, Hawai'i, Oregon, and Washington). To meet increasing demand for this tool and related approaches, the science of ecosystem service provision must be advanced rapidly.

  5. The Role of Capital Productivity in British Airways' Financial Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, Peter

    1999-01-01

    British Airways (BA) was privatised in 1987, but its financial recovery occurred a number of years earlier. This recovery was sustained throughout the early 1990s economic recession, a period when few major airlines were operating profitably. This paper examines the role of productivity developments at British Airways from the early 1980s through 1996. The emphasis is on capital productivity and investment, but changes in capital intensity and labour productivity are also evaluated. Various measures are considered for both capital and labour productivity: outputs are measured in available tonne-kms (ATKS) and revenue tonne-kms (RTKs), with the former preferred over the latter two measures, after adjustment for work performed by BA for others. Capital inputs are measured in equivalent lease costs adjusted to constant prices with a different treatment of flight and ground equipment or assets. Labour inputs are derived from total payroll costs deflated by a UK wage price index. The airline made considerable capital investments over the period and at the same time went through two major processes of labour restructuring. This resulted in a gradual increase in capital intensity, relative high labour productivity growth, but poor capital productivity performance. However, capital investment played an important role in the airline's sustained labour and total factor productivity over the whole period.

  6. The Role of Capital Productivity in British Airways' Financial Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, Peter

    1999-01-01

    British Airways (BA) was privatized in 1987, but its financial recovery occurred a number of years earlier, This recovery was sustained throughout the early 1990s economic recession, a period when few major airlines were operating profitably. This paper examines the role of productivity developments at British Airways from the early 1980s through 1996. The emphasis is on capital productivity and investment, but changes in capital intensity and labour productivity are also evaluated. Various measures are considered for both capital and labour productivity: outputs are measured in available tonne-kms (ATKs) and revenue tonne-kms (RTKs), with the former preferred over the latter two measures, after adjustment for work performed by BA for others. Capital inputs are measured in equivalent lease costs adjusted to constant prices with a different treatment of flight and ground equipment or assets. Labour inputs are derived from total payroll costs deflated by a UK wage price index. The airline made considerable capital investments over the period and at the same time went through two major processes of labour restructuring. This resulted in a gradual increase in capital intensity, relative high labour productivity growth, but poor capital productivity performance, However, capital investment played an important role in the airline's sustained labour and total factor productivity over the whole period.

  7. 77 FR 35082 - Arrow Investment Advisers, LLC and Arrow Investments Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... the delivery cycles present in foreign markets in which those Funds invest. Applicants have been...''); (b) secondary market transactions in Shares to occur at negotiated market prices; (c) certain series... seek to preserve and grow capital, independent of market direction. 2. Arrow, a Delaware...

  8. Achieving Investment Autonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Jeffrey B.

    1988-01-01

    Public investors can lower commissions through investment autonomy, that is, implementing the investment decision process without outside input. Details some techniques for fine-tuning the investment process. (MLF)

  9. Social capital in engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Shane

    A theoretical argument is presented to suggest that engineering curriculum be designed to develop social capital. Additionally, the value of social capital in the retention of students in the College of Engineering, and the development, role, and value of social capital in an electrical engineering laboratory is evaluated. Data collected includes participant observations, informal and formal student interviews, and a researcher-designed survey. Social capital consists of interaction among individuals (networks), social rules that encourage interactions such as trust and reciprocity (norms), and the value of these networks and norms to the individual and the group. A large body of evidence suggests that social capital is valuable in terms of retention and multiple measures of academic achievement. The importance of social capital in retention was verified by students that have left engineering and those that remain, in terms of interactions with peers, teaching assistants, and engineering faculty; and a lack of sense of community in freshman engineering courses. Students that have left engineering differed in their perceptions of social capital from those that remain in their frustrations with teaching methods that encourage little discussion or opportunities to ask questions about assumptions or approaches. The open-ended nature of laboratory assignments, extensive required troubleshooting, and lack of specific directions from the teaching assistants were found to encourage the development of social capital in the laboratory setting. Degree centrality, a network measure of social capital as the number of ties an individual has within a social network, was found to be positively correlated with laboratory grade. Student perceptions of the importance of interactions with other students on success in the laboratory setting has a negative model effect on academic achievement in the laboratory. In contrast, student perceptions of the quality of interactions with

  10. 12 CFR 933.5 - Disclosure to members concerning capital plan and capital stock conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the general effect thereof upon the rights of existing members; and (4) A description of any other... dividends, product volumes, investment volumes, new business lines and risk profile. (3) A description of... description of any restrictions or limitations under a Bank's capital plan on a member's rights to buy,...

  11. 31 CFR 203.20 - Investment account requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Investment account requirements. 203... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM Investment Program and Collateral Security Requirements for TT&L Depositaries § 203.20 Investment account requirements. (a) Additions. Treasury will invest funds in obligations...

  12. 31 CFR 203.20 - Investment account requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Investment account requirements. 203... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM Investment Program and Collateral Security Requirements for TT&L Depositaries § 203.20 Investment account requirements. (a) Additions. Treasury will invest funds in obligations...

  13. 31 CFR 203.20 - Investment account requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Investment account requirements. 203... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM Investment Program and Collateral Security Requirements for TT&L Depositaries § 203.20 Investment account requirements. (a) Additions. Treasury will invest funds in obligations...

  14. 78 FR 13212 - Investment and Deposit Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... provide FCUs with an additional investment portfolio risk management tool that can be useful in an... valuable portfolio management tool when there are inflationary risks in the economy. \\4\\ 77 FR 59144 (Sept... adopting this final rule to provide FCUs with an additional investment portfolio risk management tool...

  15. The growing challenge of hospital investment.

    PubMed

    Sibbel, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    Healthcare providers around the world are faced with challenges like limited financial scope, demographic changes, technical and medical progress, a rising transparency level and increasing patient claims which all lead to high pressure on healthcare markets. Reduced federal support intensifies this situation. But, financial capability and an adequate investment strategy are key success factors for hospitals in the future. Therefore, hospitals have to evaluate new ways of capital allocation. This article analyses five different opportunities for inpatient care facilities to meet their investment requirements and to underline their market position as a service enterprise.

  16. Measuring the value of groundwater and other forms of natural capital.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Abbott, Joshua K; Bayham, Jude; Boone, Whitney; Haacker, Erin M K; Pfeiffer, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Valuing natural capital is fundamental to measuring sustainability. The United Nations Environment Programme, World Bank, and other agencies have called for inclusion of the value of natural capital in sustainability metrics, such as inclusive wealth. Much has been written about the importance of natural capital, but consistent, rigorous valuation approaches compatible with the pricing of traditional forms of capital have remained elusive. We present a guiding quantitative framework enabling natural capital valuation that is fully consistent with capital theory, accounts for biophysical and economic feedbacks, and can guide interdisciplinary efforts to measure sustainability. We illustrate this framework with an application to groundwater in the Kansas High Plains Aquifer, a rapidly depleting asset supporting significant food production. We develop a 10-y time series (1996-2005) of natural capital asset prices that accounts for technological, institutional, and physical changes. Kansas lost approximately $110 million per year (2005 US dollars) of capital value through groundwater withdrawal and changes in aquifer management during the decade spanning 1996-2005. This annual loss in wealth is approximately equal to the state's 2005 budget surplus, and is substantially more than investments in schools over this period. Furthermore, real investment in agricultural capital also declined over this period. Although Kansas' depletion of water wealth is substantial, it may be tractably managed through careful groundwater management and compensating investments in other natural and traditional assets. Measurement of natural capital value is required to inform management and ongoing investments in natural assets.

  17. Measuring the value of groundwater and other forms of natural capital.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Abbott, Joshua K; Bayham, Jude; Boone, Whitney; Haacker, Erin M K; Pfeiffer, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Valuing natural capital is fundamental to measuring sustainability. The United Nations Environment Programme, World Bank, and other agencies have called for inclusion of the value of natural capital in sustainability metrics, such as inclusive wealth. Much has been written about the importance of natural capital, but consistent, rigorous valuation approaches compatible with the pricing of traditional forms of capital have remained elusive. We present a guiding quantitative framework enabling natural capital valuation that is fully consistent with capital theory, accounts for biophysical and economic feedbacks, and can guide interdisciplinary efforts to measure sustainability. We illustrate this framework with an application to groundwater in the Kansas High Plains Aquifer, a rapidly depleting asset supporting significant food production. We develop a 10-y time series (1996-2005) of natural capital asset prices that accounts for technological, institutional, and physical changes. Kansas lost approximately $110 million per year (2005 US dollars) of capital value through groundwater withdrawal and changes in aquifer management during the decade spanning 1996-2005. This annual loss in wealth is approximately equal to the state's 2005 budget surplus, and is substantially more than investments in schools over this period. Furthermore, real investment in agricultural capital also declined over this period. Although Kansas' depletion of water wealth is substantial, it may be tractably managed through careful groundwater management and compensating investments in other natural and traditional assets. Measurement of natural capital value is required to inform management and ongoing investments in natural assets. PMID:26858431

  18. Measuring the value of groundwater and other forms of natural capital

    PubMed Central

    Fenichel, Eli P.; Abbott, Joshua K.; Bayham, Jude; Boone, Whitney; Haacker, Erin M. K.; Pfeiffer, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Valuing natural capital is fundamental to measuring sustainability. The United Nations Environment Programme, World Bank, and other agencies have called for inclusion of the value of natural capital in sustainability metrics, such as inclusive wealth. Much has been written about the importance of natural capital, but consistent, rigorous valuation approaches compatible with the pricing of traditional forms of capital have remained elusive. We present a guiding quantitative framework enabling natural capital valuation that is fully consistent with capital theory, accounts for biophysical and economic feedbacks, and can guide interdisciplinary efforts to measure sustainability. We illustrate this framework with an application to groundwater in the Kansas High Plains Aquifer, a rapidly depleting asset supporting significant food production. We develop a 10-y time series (1996−2005) of natural capital asset prices that accounts for technological, institutional, and physical changes. Kansas lost approximately $110 million per year (2005 US dollars) of capital value through groundwater withdrawal and changes in aquifer management during the decade spanning 1996–2005. This annual loss in wealth is approximately equal to the state’s 2005 budget surplus, and is substantially more than investments in schools over this period. Furthermore, real investment in agricultural capital also declined over this period. Although Kansas’ depletion of water wealth is substantial, it may be tractably managed through careful groundwater management and compensating investments in other natural and traditional assets. Measurement of natural capital value is required to inform management and ongoing investments in natural assets. PMID:26858431

  19. The Investment Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Is marketing an expense or an investment? Most accountants will claim that marketing is an expense, and clearly that seems true when cutting the checks to fund these efforts. When it is done properly, marketing is the best investment. A key principle to Smart Marketing is the Investment Paradigm. The Investment Paradigm is understanding that every…

  20. Investing for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodall, Leonard E.

    1992-01-01

    Four steps to retirement planning, intended to demystify retirement investment, are offered for college faculty: (1) establish diversification goals; (2) urge their institutions to offer more investment options; (3) coordinate retirement investments with other investments; and (4) take steps to guarantee against inflation. Typical age-related…

  1. Providing capital for physician group practices: new opportunities for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Coddington, D C; Moore, K D; Clarke, R L

    1999-12-01

    As physician group practices grow and consolidate, they have an increasing interest in developing close capital partnerships to ensure access to capital. Yet as many healthcare organizations have sought to divest poorly performing acquired physician practices, physicians have seen their pool of potential capital partners shrink. Under these conditions, hospitals have a new opportunity to present themselves to physician group practices as attractive capital partners. To understand the nature of this opportunity, one needs to know why group practices seek capital, how groups approach their investment strategies, and what criteria they use to compare prospective capital partners. To build stronger relationships with physicians, hospitals should focus on turning around their poorly performing acquired physician practices and pursue strategies such as collaborating with physician practice management companies and developing new models for partnering with physicians (e.g., special purchase agreements and more advanced management services organizations). PMID:11066695

  2. 75 FR 7339 - Secondary Capital Accounts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... capital (``SC'') from non-natural person members and nonmembers. 61 FR 50696 (Sept. 27, 1996). The Board intended that SC accounts provide LICUs with additional means to accumulate capital. 61 FR 3788 (Feb. 2... implemented a number of measures designed to ensure the safety and soundness of LICUs that accepted SC. 61...

  3. Queer Cultural Capital: Implications for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennell, Summer Melody

    2016-01-01

    This article takes the concept of cultural capital from Yosso's (2005) work and transforms the model for queer communities. While Yosso identified five forms of cultural capital in communities of color (familial, aspirational, navigational, resistant, and linguistic), the author identifies an additional form: transgressive. Queer cultural capital…

  4. What constitutes a health-enabling neighborhood? A grounded theory situational analysis addressing the significance of social capital and gender.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Malin; Emmelin, Maria

    2013-11-01

    Variations in health between neighborhoods are well known and the conceptualization of social capital has contributed to an understanding of how contextual factors influence these differences. Studies show positive health-effects from living in high social capital areas, at least for some population sub-groups. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand what constitutes a 'health-enabling' neighborhood. It follows up results from a social capital survey in northern Sweden indicating that the health effects of living in a high social capital neighborhood is gendered in favor of women. A grounded theory situational analysis of eight focus group discussions--four with men and four with women--illustrated similar and different positions on how neighborhood characteristics influence health. A neighborhood, where people say hi to each other ("hi-factor") and where support between neighbors exist, were factors perceived as positive for health by all, as was a good location, neighborhood greenness and proximity to essential arenas. Women perceived freedom from demands, feeling safe and city life as additional health enabling factors. For men freedom to do what you want, a sense of belonging, and countryside life were important. To have burdensome neighbors, physical disturbances and a densely living environment were perceived as negative for health in both groups while demands for a well styled home and feeling unsafe were perceived as negative for health among women. Neighborhood social capital, together with other elements in the living environment, has fundamental influence on people's perceived health. Our findings do not confirm that social capital is more important for women than for men but that distinctive form of social capital differ in impact. Investing in physical interventions, such as planning for meeting places, constructing attractive green areas, and making neighborhoods walking-friendly, may increase human interactions that is instrumental for

  5. What constitutes a health-enabling neighborhood? A grounded theory situational analysis addressing the significance of social capital and gender.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Malin; Emmelin, Maria

    2013-11-01

    Variations in health between neighborhoods are well known and the conceptualization of social capital has contributed to an understanding of how contextual factors influence these differences. Studies show positive health-effects from living in high social capital areas, at least for some population sub-groups. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand what constitutes a 'health-enabling' neighborhood. It follows up results from a social capital survey in northern Sweden indicating that the health effects of living in a high social capital neighborhood is gendered in favor of women. A grounded theory situational analysis of eight focus group discussions--four with men and four with women--illustrated similar and different positions on how neighborhood characteristics influence health. A neighborhood, where people say hi to each other ("hi-factor") and where support between neighbors exist, were factors perceived as positive for health by all, as was a good location, neighborhood greenness and proximity to essential arenas. Women perceived freedom from demands, feeling safe and city life as additional health enabling factors. For men freedom to do what you want, a sense of belonging, and countryside life were important. To have burdensome neighbors, physical disturbances and a densely living environment were perceived as negative for health in both groups while demands for a well styled home and feeling unsafe were perceived as negative for health among women. Neighborhood social capital, together with other elements in the living environment, has fundamental influence on people's perceived health. Our findings do not confirm that social capital is more important for women than for men but that distinctive form of social capital differ in impact. Investing in physical interventions, such as planning for meeting places, constructing attractive green areas, and making neighborhoods walking-friendly, may increase human interactions that is instrumental for

  6. 75 FR 77190 - Exemptions for Advisers to Venture Capital Funds, Private Fund Advisers With Less Than $150...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... not provide, an exemption.\\39\\ As a general matter, venture capital funds are long-term investors in... venture capital is a ``long-term investment'' and the ``payoff comes after the company is acquired or goes... agreements * * * prohibit [the venture capital fund] from any type of long term borrowing. * * * Leverage...

  7. Commercial launch systems: A risky investment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupnick, Edwin; Skratt, John

    1996-03-01

    A myriad of evolutionary paths connect the current state of government-dominated space launch operations to true commercial access to space. Every potential path requires the investment of private capital sufficient to fund the commercial venture with a perceived risk/return ratio acceptable to the investors. What is the private sector willing to invest? Does government participation reduce financial risk? How viable is a commercial launch system without government participation and support? We examine the interplay between various forms of government participation in commercial launch system development, alternative launch system designs, life cycle cost estimates, and typical industry risk aversion levels. The boundaries of this n-dimensional envelope are examined with an ECON-developed business financial model which provides for the parametric assessment and interaction of SSTO design variables (including various operational scenarios with financial variables including debt/equity assumptions, and commercial enterprise burden rates on various functions. We overlay this structure with observations from previous ECON research which characterize financial risk aversion levels for selected industrial sectors in terms of acceptable initial lump-sum investments, cumulative investments, probability of failure, payback periods, and ROI. The financial model allows the construction of parametric tradeoffs based on ranges of variables which can be said to actually encompass the ``true'' cost of operations and determine what level of ``true'' costs can be tolerated by private capitalization.

  8. Effects of the provisions of the corporate and personal income tax codes on solar investment decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedmak, M. R.

    The effects of the provisions of the existing corporate and personal income tax codes on solar investment decisions are analyzed. It is shown that the provisions of a tax code do not discriminate against investment in solar technologies if the present value of depreciation and interest expense tax deductions over the relevant decision period is equal to the present value of actual capital expenses. However, on the basis of a quantitative analyses, it is concluded that the existing corporate income tax code does discriminate against solar investments for the majority of corporations, although the 25 percent tax credit available to businesses for solar investments is sufficient to alleviate the distortion in most cases. In contrast, the provisions of the existing personal income tax code favor solar investments over investments in less capital intensive energy generating units, as the interest paid on loads used to finance solar investments made by individuals is tax deductible, while conventional fuel expenses are not deductible.

  9. How a Venture Capitalist Approaches an Investment Decision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbert, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    In this talk, I will provide a high-level overview of the venture capital history, structure, process and approaches to investing in early-stage companies. I will discuss what VCs look for, and share some dos and don'ts for entrepreneurs looking for venture funding. I will close with a description of the Tatarstand CleanTech Fund, and some examples of deals we invested in and passed over and why.

  10. An Examination of Capital Outlay Funding Mechanisms in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carl; Maiden, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to explore fiscal interrelationships that underlay capital outlay funding, including the differences between rural and non-rural school districts. The study additionally focused on the relationships between various capital outlay funding components (capital outlay expenditures per pupil, net assessed valuation per pupil,…

  11. 12 CFR 165.5 - Capital restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....5 Capital restoration plans. (a) Schedule for filing plan—(1) In general. A Federal savings association shall file a written capital restoration plan with the OCC within 45 days of the date that the... restoration plan solely by virtue of the reclassification. (2) Additional capital restoration...

  12. 12 CFR 565.5 - Capital restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 565.5 Capital restoration plans. (a) Schedule for filing plan—(1) In general. A savings association shall file a written capital restoration plan with the appropriate Regional Office within 45 days of the... a capital restoration plan solely by virtue of the reclassification. (2) Additional...

  13. 12 CFR 165.5 - Capital restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....5 Capital restoration plans. (a) Schedule for filing plan—(1) In general. A Federal savings association shall file a written capital restoration plan with the OCC within 45 days of the date that the... restoration plan solely by virtue of the reclassification. (2) Additional capital restoration...

  14. 12 CFR 565.5 - Capital restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 565.5 Capital restoration plans. (a) Schedule for filing plan—(1) In general. A savings association shall file a written capital restoration plan with the appropriate Regional Office within 45 days of the... a capital restoration plan solely by virtue of the reclassification. (2) Additional...

  15. 77 FR 59144 - Investment and Deposit Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... that TIPS are an appropriate investment for FCUs and can be a valuable portfolio management tool when... portfolio risk management tool that can be useful in an inflationary economic environment. DATES: Comments... can benefit from including them in their overall investment portfolio. In addition to analyzing...

  16. Capitation and the Medicare program: History, issues, and evidence

    PubMed Central

    Langwell, Kathryn M.; Hadley, James P.

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews the history of capitation in the Medicare program and examines issues and research findings related to Medicare capitation. Specific capitation issues and related research findings reviewed include: the feasibility and extent of health maintenance organization participation in Medicare; plan marketing; beneficiary choice behavior; quality of care; and the use and cost of services. In addition, areas requiring further study are noted, and the potential for extensions of capitation under Medicare are explored. PMID:10311935

  17. 12 CFR 702.105 - Weighted-average life of investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., as defined in 17 CFR 270.2a-7, and collective investment funds operated in accordance with short-term investment fund rules set forth in 12 CFR 9.18(b)(4)(ii)(B)(1)-(3), the weighted-average life is defined as...-in capital and membership capital in corporate credit unions, as defined in 12 CFR 704.2,...

  18. Measuring human capital cost through benchmarking in health care environment.

    PubMed

    Kocakülâh, Mehmet C; Harris, Donna

    2002-01-01

    Each organization should seek to maximize its human capital investments, which ultimately lead to increased profits and asset efficiency. Service companies utilize less capital equipment and more human productivity, customer service, and/or delivery of service as the product. With the measurement of human capital, one can understand what is happening, exercise some degree of control, and make positive changes. Senior management lives or dies by the numbers and if Human Resources (HR) really wants to be a strategic business partner, HR must be judged by the same standards as everyone else in the health care organization. PMID:12462657

  19. Measuring human capital cost through benchmarking in health care environment.

    PubMed

    Kocakülâh, Mehmet C; Harris, Donna

    2002-01-01

    Each organization should seek to maximize its human capital investments, which ultimately lead to increased profits and asset efficiency. Service companies utilize less capital equipment and more human productivity, customer service, and/or delivery of service as the product. With the measurement of human capital, one can understand what is happening, exercise some degree of control, and make positive changes. Senior management lives or dies by the numbers and if Human Resources (HR) really wants to be a strategic business partner, HR must be judged by the same standards as everyone else in the health care organization.

  20. 12 CFR 324.11 - Capital conservation buffer and countercyclical capital buffer amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Additional limitations on distributions may apply to an FDIC-supervised institution under 12 CFR 303.241 and... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Capital conservation buffer and countercyclical capital buffer amount. 324.11 Section 324.11 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE...

  1. 12 CFR 217.11 - Capital conservation buffer and countercyclical capital buffer amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... distributions. Additional limitations on distributions may apply to a Board-regulated institution under 12 CFR 225.4, 12 CFR 225.8, and 12 CFR 263.202. (b) Countercyclical capital buffer amount. (1) General. An... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Capital conservation buffer and...

  2. Carbon investment funds

    SciTech Connect

    2007-01-15

    The report is a study of the development of funds to invest in the purchase of carbon credits. It takes a look at the growing market for carbon credits, the rise of carbon investment funds, and the current state of carbon investing. Topics covered in the report include: Overview of climate change, greenhouse gases, and the Kyoto Protocols. Analysis of the alternatives for reducing carbon emissions including nitrous oxide reduction, coal mine methane capture and carbon capture and storage; Discussion of the different types of carbon credits; Discussion of the basics of carbon trading; Evaluation of the current status of carbon investing; and Profiles of 37 major carbon investment funds worldwide.

  3. Social capital in an outdoor recreation context.

    PubMed

    Mann, Marilynne; Leahy, Jessica

    2010-02-01

    This study examined social capital development in three all-terrain vehicles (ATV) clubs in Maine using an adapted version of Lin's (2001) social capital theory model. The structural components of social capital identified included collective assets and individual assets in the form of normative behavior and trust relationships. Also identified were counter-norms for individual ATV riders identified as having divergent norms from club members. The second component of social capital is access to and mobilization of network contacts and resources. Access networks in the context of the ATV clubs studied were identified as community and landowner relations while mobilization of resources was existent in club membership attempts toward self-governance and efforts of the statewide "umbrella" organization. Instrumental outcomes benefit society and expressive outcomes benefit the individual. Both types of returns are present in the data suggesting that ATV clubs are creating social capital. This is important information to clubs who desire to market themselves, improve their reputations, and enhance their volunteer association. It is of further interest to state governments who fund clubs through trail grants as proof that a return on investment is being realized. Theoretical and applied implications for these and other types of recreation-based volunteer associations (e.g., clubs, friends groups, advocacy groups) are presented.

  4. Social Capital in an Outdoor Recreation Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Marilynne; Leahy, Jessica

    2010-02-01

    This study examined social capital development in three all-terrain vehicles (ATV) clubs in Maine using an adapted version of Lin’s (2001) social capital theory model. The structural components of social capital identified included collective assets and individual assets in the form of normative behavior and trust relationships. Also identified were counter-norms for individual ATV riders identified as having divergent norms from club members. The second component of social capital is access to and mobilization of network contacts and resources. Access networks in the context of the ATV clubs studied were identified as community and landowner relations while mobilization of resources was existent in club membership attempts toward self-governance and efforts of the statewide “umbrella” organization. Instrumental outcomes benefit society and expressive outcomes benefit the individual. Both types of returns are present in the data suggesting that ATV clubs are creating social capital. This is important information to clubs who desire to market themselves, improve their reputations, and enhance their volunteer association. It is of further interest to state governments who fund clubs through trail grants as proof that a return on investment is being realized. Theoretical and applied implications for these and other types of recreation-based volunteer associations (e.g., clubs, friends groups, advocacy groups) are presented.

  5. Social capital in an outdoor recreation context.

    PubMed

    Mann, Marilynne; Leahy, Jessica

    2010-02-01

    This study examined social capital development in three all-terrain vehicles (ATV) clubs in Maine using an adapted version of Lin's (2001) social capital theory model. The structural components of social capital identified included collective assets and individual assets in the form of normative behavior and trust relationships. Also identified were counter-norms for individual ATV riders identified as having divergent norms from club members. The second component of social capital is access to and mobilization of network contacts and resources. Access networks in the context of the ATV clubs studied were identified as community and landowner relations while mobilization of resources was existent in club membership attempts toward self-governance and efforts of the statewide "umbrella" organization. Instrumental outcomes benefit society and expressive outcomes benefit the individual. Both types of returns are present in the data suggesting that ATV clubs are creating social capital. This is important information to clubs who desire to market themselves, improve their reputations, and enhance their volunteer association. It is of further interest to state governments who fund clubs through trail grants as proof that a return on investment is being realized. Theoretical and applied implications for these and other types of recreation-based volunteer associations (e.g., clubs, friends groups, advocacy groups) are presented. PMID:20016986

  6. Advocating investments in information technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nirenberg, L.M. )

    1992-01-01

    Information and communication systems can improve the timeliness and quality of decisions. These benefits are strategically important to the utility industry in an era of increasing competition. Because these systems often do not reduce labor cost, however, they can be difficult to evaluate. This report presents a new process for reaching consensus of the value of capital investment in information and communication systems. The results of this project is A Strategic Advocacy Process (ASAP), a methodology that can be used to evaluate investments in information technology. ASAP uses belief graphs to produce a living business case showing facts, assumptions, goals, and metrics for measuring progress toward those goals; shows how to use option pricing theory to quantify the value of managerial flexibility; ASAP uses an organizational impact assessment tool to identify the potential impact of new information systems and how to realize the benefits of managerial flexibility. The ASAP methodology addresses the critical problem of correctly valuing information and communication systems. The methodology offers a way to account for the intangible'' value of these systems by recognizing the managerial flexibility these systems can provide in addressing risks and uncovering new business opportunities. Metrics for measuring progress toward new goals can be defined, and plans for achieving the goals can be made. As a result, agreement can be reached on the uses, value, and priority of projects based on a metric other than on labor replacement savings.

  7. International Investment in Human Capital: Overseas Education for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Craufurd D., Ed.

    This document contains 10 essays based on papers presented at a 1991 conference on the changed role of overseas education in development. The book discusses the impact of the end of the Cold War and a rapidly changing economic environment on the rationale for international student and faculty mobility. The practice in developing nations of…

  8. Creating American Jobs Through Foreign Capital Investment Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Leahy, Patrick J. [D-VT

    2011-03-17

    12/07/2011 Committee on the Judiciary. Hearings held. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.3245, which became Public Law 112-176 on 9/28/2012. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Capital Investment and Market Segmentation: Making Movies for Mormon Audiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Newell D.; Larsen, Val

    2014-01-01

    Is there a commercially viable market in the United States for movies made for Mormons? David "Dutch" Richards, a graduate of Brigham Young University's School of Film, thinks there is. He believes that in the Western United States, especially in Utah and the Intermountain West, there are enough Mormons who would pay to watch a film…

  10. Creating American Jobs Through Foreign Capital Investment Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Larsen, Rick [D-WA-2

    2011-09-20

    09/23/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration Policy and Enforcement. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.3245, which became Public Law 112-176 on 9/28/2012. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Venture Capital in Ohio Schools: Building Commitment and Capacity for School Renewal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    This publication describes Venture Capital grants, which are awarded to Ohio schools for school-improvement efforts. Originating in the business sector, the concept of Venture Capital represented corporate earning or individual savings invested in a new or fresh enterprise. The grants are designed to be long-term, evolving efforts focused on a…

  12. 77 FR 6156 - Rand Capital Corporation, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... venture capital investments in small, early-stage and developing enterprises. Rand's principal objective... COMMISSION Rand Capital Corporation, et al.; Notice of Application February 1, 2012. AGENCY: Securities and... Act'') granting an exemption from section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. Applicants: Rand...

  13. The Capabilities Approach: Rethinking Agency, Freedom, and Capital in Early Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzzelli, Cary A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the human capital approach to human development and how it has been used for evaluating early education programs. It critiques the human capital approach by considering how its focus on measurable returns on economic investments limits an understanding of the full and complex contribution of early education to…

  14. Testing the Human Capital Development Model: The Case of Apprenticeships in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akpinar, Taner; Gün, Servet

    2016-01-01

    Human capital theory was developed to study how individual agents make rational choices or how they invest in human capital to maximize their welfare. One of the leading founders of this perspective, Becker, argues that schooling, on-the-job training, medical care, migration and searching for information about prices and incomes are different…

  15. 12 CFR 615.5171 - Transfer of capital from banks to associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfer of capital from banks to associations... Other Investments § 615.5171 Transfer of capital from banks to associations. (a) Definitions for this... credit bank (collectively, bank) to an affiliated association, including but not limited to: (i)...

  16. 17 CFR 275.203(l)-1 - Venture capital fund defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... 275.203(l)-1 Section 275.203(l)-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 § 275.203(l)-1 Venture capital fund defined. (a) Venture capital fund defined. For purposes of section 203(l) of the Act (15...

  17. 17 CFR 275.203(l)-1 - Venture capital fund defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... 275.203(l)-1 Section 275.203(l)-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 § 275.203(l)-1 Venture capital fund defined. (a) Venture capital fund defined. For purposes of section 203(l) of the Act (15...

  18. 17 CFR 275.203(l)-1 - Venture capital fund defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 275.203(l)-1 Section 275.203(l)-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940 § 275.203(l)-1 Venture capital fund defined. (a) Venture capital fund defined. For purposes of section 203(l) of the Act (15...

  19. The Impact of Education Investment on Sri Lankan Economic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganegodage, K. Renuka; Rambaldi, Alicia N.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate the contribution of investment on education to Sri Lanka's economic growth during the period 1959-2008. Physical capital, economic policy changes and the ethnic war are also evaluated due to their substantial importance. This study uses a framework encompassing both the neoclassical and endogenous growth model. The impact of education…

  20. Shared Savings Financing for College and University Energy Efficiency Investments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business Officer, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Shared savings arrangements for campus energy efficient investments are discussed. Shared savings is a term for an agreement in which a private company offers to implement an energy efficiency program, including capital improvements, in exchange for a portion of the energy cost savings. Attention is directed to: types of shared savings…

  1. Choosing a Strategy for Return-on-Investment Justification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foshay, Wellesley R.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the concept of human capital, including how it is linked to strategic analysis and how it relates to four alternative models for return-on-investment (ROI). Discusses how to choose the best model for ROI justification of training or other human performance technology (HPT) interventions. (AEF)

  2. Scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration: evidence from China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Linna; Lei, Yalin

    2013-01-01

    With the continued growth in demand for mineral resources and China's efforts in increasing investment in geological prospecting, fiscal investment in geological exploration becomes a research hotspot. This paper examines the yearly relationship among fiscal investment in geological exploration of the current term, that of the last term and prices of mining rights over the period 1999-2009. Hines and Catephores' investment acceleration model is applied to describe the scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration which are value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights and fiscal investment in the last term. The results indicate that when value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights or fiscal investment in the last term moves at 1 unit, fiscal investment in the current term will move 0.381, 1.094 or 0.907 units respectively. In order to determine the scale of fiscal investment in geological exploration for the current year, the Chinese government should take fiscal investment in geological exploration for the last year and the capital stock of the previous investments into account. In practice, combination of government fiscal investment in geological exploration with its performance evaluation can create a virtuous circle of capital management mechanism. PMID:24204652

  3. Scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration: evidence from China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Linna; Lei, Yalin

    2013-01-01

    With the continued growth in demand for mineral resources and China's efforts in increasing investment in geological prospecting, fiscal investment in geological exploration becomes a research hotspot. This paper examines the yearly relationship among fiscal investment in geological exploration of the current term, that of the last term and prices of mining rights over the period 1999-2009. Hines and Catephores' investment acceleration model is applied to describe the scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration which are value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights and fiscal investment in the last term. The results indicate that when value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights or fiscal investment in the last term moves at 1 unit, fiscal investment in the current term will move 0.381, 1.094 or 0.907 units respectively. In order to determine the scale of fiscal investment in geological exploration for the current year, the Chinese government should take fiscal investment in geological exploration for the last year and the capital stock of the previous investments into account. In practice, combination of government fiscal investment in geological exploration with its performance evaluation can create a virtuous circle of capital management mechanism.

  4. Scale Determinants of Fiscal Investment in Geological Exploration: Evidence from China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Linna; Lei, Yalin

    2013-01-01

    With the continued growth in demand for mineral resources and China's efforts in increasing investment in geological prospecting, fiscal investment in geological exploration becomes a research hotspot. This paper examines the yearly relationship among fiscal investment in geological exploration of the current term, that of the last term and prices of mining rights over the period 1999–2009. Hines and Catephores' investment acceleration model is applied to describe the scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration which are value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights and fiscal investment in the last term. The results indicate that when value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights or fiscal investment in the last term moves at 1 unit, fiscal investment in the current term will move 0.381, 1.094 or 0.907 units respectively. In order to determine the scale of fiscal investment in geological exploration for the current year, the Chinese government should take fiscal investment in geological exploration for the last year and the capital stock of the previous investments into account. In practice, combination of government fiscal investment in geological exploration with its performance evaluation can create a virtuous circle of capital management mechanism. PMID:24204652

  5. 26 CFR 1.852-2 - Method of taxation of regulated investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Method of taxation of regulated investment... Trusts § 1.852-2 Method of taxation of regulated investment companies. (a) Imposition of normal tax and... for partially tax-exempt interest provided by section 242. (b) Taxation of capital gains—(1)...

  6. The Policy Determinants of Investment in Tertiary Education. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 576

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Joaquim Oliveira; Boarini, Romina; Strauss, Hubert; de la Maisonneuve, Christine; Saadi, Clarice

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses how policies and institutions affect private returns to invest in tertiary human capital, the ability of individuals to finance this investment and the institutional characteristics of tertiary education systems. Focusing on core tertiary education services, the paper presents new measures of private returns to tertiary…

  7. 12 CFR 702.105 - Weighted-average life of investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., as defined in 17 CFR 270.2a-7, and collective investment funds operated in accordance with short-term investment fund rules set forth in 12 CFR 9.18(b)(4)(ii)(B)(1)-(3), the weighted-average life is defined as... and nonperpetual capital in corporate credit unions, as defined in 12 CFR 704.2, the...

  8. 12 CFR 702.105 - Weighted-average life of investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., as defined in 17 CFR 270.2a-7, and collective investment funds operated in accordance with short-term investment fund rules set forth in 12 CFR 9.18(b)(4)(ii)(B)(1)-(3), the weighted-average life is defined as... and nonperpetual capital in corporate credit unions, as defined in 12 CFR 704.2, the...

  9. 26 CFR 1.1243-1 - Loss of small business investment company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Loss of small business investment company. 1.1243-1 Section 1.1243-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Special Rules for Determining Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1243-1 Loss of small business investment company....

  10. 76 FR 58059 - Investment Managers Series Trust, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... COMMISSION Investment Managers Series Trust, et al.; Notice of Application September 13, 2011. AGENCY...: Investment Managers Series Trust (the ``Trust'') and Palmer Square Capital Management LLC (``Palmer Square... comprised of 35 series, including the Palmer Square Absolute Return Fund (``PS Fund'').\\1\\ Palmer ]...

  11. Hours Invested in Professional Development during Late Career as a Function of Career Motivation and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greller, Martin M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The study was undertaken to determine and understand the career investment behavior of workers in late career (ages 50-70). Design/methodology/approach: The common wisdom, supported by economic theory, is that human capital investments in late career workers are of negligible value. Yet, recent evidence suggests that older workers do…

  12. 26 CFR 1.1298-0T - Passive foreign investment company-table of contents (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Passive foreign investment company-table of... Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1298-0T Passive foreign investment company—table of contents (temporary). This section lists the table of contents for § 1.1298-1T. § 1.1298-1TSection 1298(f) annual...

  13. 13 CFR 108.510 - SBA approval of NMVC Company's Investment Adviser/Manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Investment Adviser/Manager. 108.510 Section 108.510 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Managing the Operations of a NMVC Company Management and Compensation § 108.510 SBA approval of NMVC Company's Investment Adviser/Manager. You may...

  14. 26 CFR 1.1291-0T - Passive foreign investment company-table of contents (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Passive foreign investment company-table of contents (temporary). 1.1291-0T Section 1.1291-0T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1291-0T Passive foreign investment company—table of contents...

  15. 76 FR 80868 - Increasing Access to Rural Community Investment Opportunities for Investors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of the Secretary Increasing Access to Rural Community Investment... established USDA's authority to make loans and grants to rural communities. Currently, USDA manages a loan... different investment structures that provide increased access to capital for rural communities....

  16. 12 CFR 702.105 - Weighted-average life of investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., as defined in 17 CFR 270.2a-7, and collective investment funds operated in accordance with short-term investment fund rules set forth in 12 CFR 9.18(b)(4)(ii)(B)(1)-(3), the weighted-average life is defined as... and nonperpetual capital in corporate credit unions, as defined in 12 CFR 704.2, the...

  17. Educating Lone Wolves: Pedagogical Implications of Human Capital Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptiste, Ian

    2001-01-01

    Educational practices based on human capital theory are unlikely to alleviate social inequities because the theory views people as isolated materialists driven by desire for goods and security. It assumes an educational meritocracy in which socioeconomic status is limited only by educational investment, and more educated people are presumed to be…

  18. The Role of Capital in Improving Productivity and Creating Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnoy, Martin

    Causes of the significant decrease in productivity growth and dramatic increase in unemployment in the United States since the mid-1960's are examined in order to test the underlying assumption of current economic policies that increasing capital savings and investments will create fuller and more productive employment. Data on trends in…

  19. Coalition in New York studies improving access to capital.

    PubMed

    Pallarito, K

    1992-11-16

    A coalition convened by the Greater New York Hospital Association is studying ways to improve access to capital, an area of healthcare reform the group says has been largely overlooked. The group, including representatives from hospitals, investment banking, accounting firms and the state, will issue a report outlining its recommendations. The findings also will be presented to the White House. PMID:10122217

  20. Human Capital, HRD and VET: The Case of India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomé, Eduardo; Goyal, Apoorva

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to analyze the role of human capital (HC), human resource development (HRD) and vocational educational and training (VET) in the emerging Indian economy. How may we define the HC, HRD and VET in India? To what extent and how as HRD investments in India contributed to India's recent economic development? What were the…

  1. ADN to BSN: lessons from human capital theory.

    PubMed

    Graf, Christina M

    2006-01-01

    Currently, approximately 16% of associate degree nursing (ADN) graduates acquire baccalaureate or higher degrees. Human capital analysis demonstrated negative to minimal average returns on investment (ROI) in BSN education. Increasing the ROI may influence ADNs to pursue baccalaureate education and can be an effective strategy for meeting the projected need for BSN-prepared nurses.

  2. 48 CFR 215.404-71-4 - Facilities capital employed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Forms CASB-CMF and cost of money factors (48 CFR 9904.414 and FAR 31.205-10); and (2) DD Form 1861...) The economic value of the facilities capital, such as physical age, undepreciated value, idleness, and... improved product quality or accelerated deliveries; or (B) Investments in new equipment for research...

  3. 7 CFR 4290.210 - Minimum capital requirements for RBICs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum capital requirements for RBICs. 4290.210 Section 4290.210 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT...

  4. The Concept of Education as an Investment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goffman, Irving J.; And Others

    The economic benefits and investment functions of education and its relationship to other human resource investments are reported. In addition, a report on the revenue yields of various taxes related to economic conditions is included. The concept of human investment is discussed from the standpoint of its similarities with physical capital…

  5. 12 CFR 1267.2 - Authorized investments and transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Authorized investments and transactions. 1267... HOME LOAN BANK INVESTMENTS § 1267.2 Authorized investments and transactions. (a) In addition to assets....S.C. 1454 or 1455); (5) Stock, obligations, or other securities of any small business...

  6. 12 CFR 1267.2 - Authorized investments and transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Authorized investments and transactions. 1267.2... BANK INVESTMENTS § 1267.2 Authorized investments and transactions. (a) In addition to assets enumerated....S.C. 1454 or 1455); (5) Stock, obligations, or other securities of any small business...

  7. 12 CFR 1267.2 - Authorized investments and transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Authorized investments and transactions. 1267.2... BANK INVESTMENTS § 1267.2 Authorized investments and transactions. (a) In addition to assets enumerated....S.C. 1454 or 1455); (5) Stock, obligations, or other securities of any small business...

  8. The study on stage financing model of IT project investment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si-hua; Xu, Sheng-hua; Lee, Changhoon; Xiong, Neal N; He, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Stage financing is the basic operation of venture capital investment. In investment, usually venture capitalists use different strategies to obtain the maximum returns. Due to its advantages to reduce the information asymmetry and agency cost, stage financing is widely used by venture capitalists. Although considerable attentions are devoted to stage financing, very little is known about the risk aversion strategies of IT projects. This paper mainly addresses the problem of risk aversion of venture capital investment in IT projects. Based on the analysis of characteristics of venture capital investment of IT projects, this paper introduces a real option pricing model to measure the value brought by the stage financing strategy and design a risk aversion model for IT projects. Because real option pricing method regards investment activity as contingent decision, it helps to make judgment on the management flexibility of IT projects and then make a more reasonable evaluation about the IT programs. Lastly by being applied to a real case, it further illustrates the effectiveness and feasibility of the model.

  9. The Study on Stage Financing Model of IT Project Investment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sheng-hua; Xiong, Neal N.

    2014-01-01

    Stage financing is the basic operation of venture capital investment. In investment, usually venture capitalists use different strategies to obtain the maximum returns. Due to its advantages to reduce the information asymmetry and agency cost, stage financing is widely used by venture capitalists. Although considerable attentions are devoted to stage financing, very little is known about the risk aversion strategies of IT projects. This paper mainly addresses the problem of risk aversion of venture capital investment in IT projects. Based on the analysis of characteristics of venture capital investment of IT projects, this paper introduces a real option pricing model to measure the value brought by the stage financing strategy and design a risk aversion model for IT projects. Because real option pricing method regards investment activity as contingent decision, it helps to make judgment on the management flexibility of IT projects and then make a more reasonable evaluation about the IT programs. Lastly by being applied to a real case, it further illustrates the effectiveness and feasibility of the model. PMID:25147845

  10. 77 FR 40389 - Gladstone Capital Corporation, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... current income and capital gains by investing in debt and equity securities of private businesses. Lending... Lending Corporation (``Lending,'' and collectively with GLAD and GAIN, the ``Funds''), Gladstone Partners... and GAIN are closed-end management investment companies that have elected to be regulated as...

  11. Survival of the Supported: Social Capital Networks and the Finish Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfred, Mary V.; Nanton, Carmela R.

    2009-01-01

    Social capital connotes concepts such as assets, wealth, resources, and investments. Applying economic-value terminology to relationships highlights the considerable potential benefits and liabilities (social and economical) that have resulted from women's penchant for investment in social networks, whether they are in society, the workplace, the…

  12. Return to nursing home investment: Issues for public policy

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Carliss Y.; Bishop, Christine E.

    1984-01-01

    Because Government policy does much to determine the return available to nursing home investment, the profitability of the nursing home industry has been a subject of controversy since Government agencies began paying a large portion of the Nation's nursing home bill. Controversy appears at several levels. First is the rather narrow concern, often conceived in accounting terms, of the appropriate reimbursement of capital-related expense under Medicaid and Medicare. Second is the concern about how return to capital affects the flow of investment into nursing homes, leading either to inadequate access to care or to over-capacity. Third is the concern about how-sources of return to nursing home investment affect the pattern of nursing home ownership and the amount of equity held by owners since the pattern of ownership and amount of equity have been linked to quality of care. PMID:10310945

  13. 78 FR 13742 - BB&T Capital Partners Mezzanine Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION BB&T Capital Partners Mezzanine Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that BB&T Capital Partners... Regulations (13 CFR 107.730). BB&T Capital Partners Mezzanine Fund II, L.P. proposes to provide debt...

  14. 76 FR 55720 - BB&T Capital Partners Mezzanine Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION BB&T Capital Partners Mezzanine Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that BB&T Capital Partners... Regulations (13 CFR 107.730). BB&T Capital Partners Mezzanine Fund II proposes to provide debt...

  15. A Social Capital Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzàlez-Aranguena, Enrique; Khmelnitskaya, Anna; Manuel, Conrado; del Pozo, Mónica

    2011-09-01

    We define an index of social capital using game-theoretical concepts. We assume that interests of individuals are presented by means of a cooperative game which take into account possible different players abilities whereas the network of relations is modeled by a graph. The social capital of each actor is then measured as the difference between his Myerson value and his Shapley value.

  16. Linguistic Capital Pays Dividends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linse, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Some 37 million U.S. residents speak Spanish at home and more than 55% of them say they also speak English. That creates what is called linguistic capital. Although linguistic capital is difficult to quantify, it is enormously valuable and is determined by an individual's language competency, and is too frequently wasted instead of being…

  17. Implementing a Capital Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daigneau, William A.

    2003-01-01

    Addresses four questions regarding implementation of a long-term capital plan to manage a college's facilities portfolio: When should the projects be implemented? How should the capital improvements be implemented? What will it actually cost in terms of project costs as well as operating costs? Who will implement the plan? (EV)

  18. Socially responsible investing. Is it successful?

    PubMed

    Camey, B F

    1994-11-01

    Socially responsible investing (SRI) has been defined as "the integration of social or ethical criteria into the investment decision-making process." Based on the values they hold, investors distinguish socially responsible investments from those which are not by implementing social screens: nonfinancial criteria applied in the decision-making process. Socially responsible investors typically follow one of three approaches to ethical investing: avoidance of businesses whose activities they do not support, a positive approach where they seek investments that will enhance the quality of life, and an activist approach where they attempt to influence the company's activities. In addition to individuals, many institutional investors are heavily involved with SRI. Activist investors can judge their investments' performance by the success of their shareholder activities. Investors might also look at the societal effects of their investments. If investors are seeking to change the corporation or society, SRI has proven to be successful. Empirical studies have shown mixed results with respect to the financial performance of SRI, but the findings tend to show that SRI has minimal impact, either positively or negatively, on investment returns. Nevertheless, many factors indicate that SRI may be here to stay. PMID:10137947

  19. 76 FR 42768 - Capital Distribution

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Capital Distribution AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... concerning the following information collection. Title of Proposal: Capital Distribution. OMB Number: 1550..., the information provides the OTS with a mechanism for monitoring capital distributions since...

  20. Social capital and health – implications for health promotion

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Malin

    2011-01-01

    This article is a review of the PhD Thesis of Malin Eriksson, entitled ‘Social capital, health and community action – implications for health promotion.’ The article presents a theoretical overview of social capital and its relation to health, reviews empirical findings of the links between social capital and (self-rated) health, and discusses the usefulness of social capital in health promotion interventions at individual and community levels. Social capital, conceptualized as an individual characteristic, can contribute to the field of health promotion by adding new knowledge on how social network interventions may best be designed to meet the needs of the target group. The distinction of different forms of social capital, i.e. bonding, bridging, and linking, can be useful in mapping the kinds of networks that are available and health-enhancing (or damaging) and for whom. Further, social capital can advance social network interventions by acknowledging the risk for unequal distribution of investments and returns from social network involvement. Social capital, conceptualized as characterizing whole communities, provides a useful framework for what constitutes health-supporting environments and guidance on how to achieve them. Mapping and mobilization of social capital in local communities may be one way of achieving community action for health promotion. Social capital is context-bound by necessity. Thus, from a global perspective, it cannot be used as a ‘cookbook’ on how to achieve supportive environments and community action smoothly. However, social capital can provide new ideas on the processes that influence human interactions, cooperation, and community action for health promotion in various contexts. PMID:21311607

  1. Stranded investment and non-utility generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, D.E. . Center for Energy Studies); Maloney, M.T. )

    1999-06-01

    Stranded cost recovery continues to be a focal point of electricity deregulation. Restructuring has ground to a halt in many places largely due to the contentiousness of the issue, and even where there has been action states have granted substantial stranded cost recovery to utilities, vitiating much of the price reductions that competition is forecast to bring. While a surprisingly large amount of non-utility generation capacity already has been shut down due to obsolescence, this has not choked off capital investment. The example suggests that stranded-cost recovery is neither warranted nor necessary.

  2. Regenerative nanomedicines: an emerging investment prospective?

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Cells respond to their structural surrounding and within nanostructures exhibit unique proliferative and differentiation properties. The application of nanotechnologies to the field of regenerative medicine offers the potential to direct cell fate, target the delivery of cells and reduce immune rejection (via encapsulation), thereby supporting the development of regenerative medicines. The overall objective of any therapy is the delivery of the product not just into the clinic but also to patients on a routine basis. Such a goal typically requires a commercial vehicle and substantial levels of investment in scientific, clinical, regulatory and business expertise, resources, time and funding. Therefore, this paper focuses on some of the challenges facing this emerging industry, including investment by the venture capital community. PMID:20826478

  3. Investment in Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    Operating a financial investment company in an unstable economy is not easy. But the right training at Vanguard ensures satisfied customers. The company made an investment of its own in learning and development that paid off big in 2009. The learning offerings, both innovative and efficient, keep its workers updated on strategies that bring…

  4. Investing in Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Governors Association, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Investing in Innovation" provides a snapshot of trends in the states and identifies a wide range of strategies now employed. California's big investments, such as $3 billion for stem cell research, have already grabbed national headlines. But states like Arizona, Indiana and North Dakota, which haven't historically been big research and…

  5. Investing in Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Directions for Higher Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Discusses why it is essential to look at costs related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) faculty not simply as a critical expense, but as part of an intentional investment strategy meant to produce an important and significant value-added benefit. Offers advice on planning, financing, and assessing this investment. (EV)

  6. 12 CFR 559.5 - How much may a savings association invest in service corporations or lower-tier entities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...(c)(4)(B) of the HOLA, you may invest up to 3% of your assets in the capital stock, obligations, and... under other provisions of section 5(c) of the HOLA and part 560 of this chapter, and available...

  7. Capitated contracting of integrated health provider organizations.

    PubMed

    Bazzoli, G J; Dynan, L; Burns, L R

    This paper examines global capitation of integrated health provider organizations that link physicians and hospitals, such as physician-hospital organizations and management service organizations. These organizations have proliferated in recent years, but their contracting activity has not been studied. We develop a conceptual model to understand the capitated contracting bargaining process. Exploratory multivariate analysis suggests that global capitation of these organizations is more common in markets with high health maintenance organization (HMO) market share, greater numbers of HMOs, and fewer physician group practices. Additionally, health provider organizations with more complex case mix, nonprofit status, more affiliated physicians, health system affiliations, and diversity in physician organizational arrangements are more likely to have global capitation. Finally, state regulation of provider contracting with self-insured employers appears to have spillover effects on health plan risk contracting with health providers. PMID:10711318

  8. Capitated contracting of integrated health provider organizations.

    PubMed

    Bazzoli, G J; Dynan, L; Burns, L R

    This paper examines global capitation of integrated health provider organizations that link physicians and hospitals, such as physician-hospital organizations and management service organizations. These organizations have proliferated in recent years, but their contracting activity has not been studied. We develop a conceptual model to understand the capitated contracting bargaining process. Exploratory multivariate analysis suggests that global capitation of these organizations is more common in markets with high health maintenance organization (HMO) market share, greater numbers of HMOs, and fewer physician group practices. Additionally, health provider organizations with more complex case mix, nonprofit status, more affiliated physicians, health system affiliations, and diversity in physician organizational arrangements are more likely to have global capitation. Finally, state regulation of provider contracting with self-insured employers appears to have spillover effects on health plan risk contracting with health providers.

  9. 77 FR 27499 - Destra Capital Investments LLC and Destra Unit Investment Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... basis (``DSC''). For each Series, the Depositor would set a maximum sales charge per Unit, a portion of... an investor purchases the Units).\\2\\ The DSC would be collected subsequently in installment payments... Unitholder redeems or sells Units, the Depositor intends to deduct any unpaid DSC from the redemption or...

  10. Gambling on change. Five big systems buy into a venture capital fund to try to reap profits from the transformation of healthcare.

    PubMed

    Evans, Melanie

    2011-01-31

    Five healthcare systems have financed a venture-capital fund with hopes for a financial and operational return. Executives say the investment is a way to influence technological developments and evaluate products and software. James Bosscher, chief investment officer at Trinity Health, left, said Heritage fund investments will target health information technology.

  11. 78 FR 62931 - Emergence Capital Partners SBIC, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Emergence Capital Partners SBIC... Conflicts of Interest of the Small Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR...

  12. 75 FR 22435 - Pharos Capital Partners II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Pharos Capital Partners II, L.P., 1 Burton..., has sought an exemption under Section 312 of the Act and Section 107.730, which Constitute...

  13. 76 FR 21936 - Emergence Capital Partners SBIC, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Emergence Capital Partners SBIC... Conflicts of Interest, of the Small Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR...

  14. 76 FR 68803 - Escalate Capital Partners SBIC I, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Escalate Capital Partners, SBIC... Constitute Conflicts of Interest of the Small Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13...

  15. 76 FR 74115 - Emergence Capital Partners SBIC, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-30

    ... Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Emergence Capital Partners SBIC... Conflicts of Interest of the Small Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR...

  16. 75 FR 45178 - Escalate Capital Partners SBIC I, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Escalate Capital Partners SBIC I... Conflicts of Interest of the Small Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR...

  17. 78 FR 77770 - Aldine Capital Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Aldine Capital Fund II, L.P., 30 West... exemption under Section 312 of the Act and Section 107.730, Financings which Constitute Conflicts...

  18. Chaotic Footloose Capital.

    PubMed

    Commendatore, Pasquale; Currie, Martin; Kubin, Ingrid

    2007-04-01

    This paper examines the long-term behavior of a discrete-time Footloose Capital model, where capitalists, who are themselves immobile between regions, move their physical capital between regions in response to economic incentives. The spatial location of industry can exhibit cycles of any periodicity or behave chaotically. Long-term behavior is highly sensitive to transport costs and to the responsiveness of capitalists to profit differentials. The concentration of industry in one region can result from high transport costs or from rapid responses by capitalists. In terms of possible dynamical behaviors, the discrete-time model is much richer than the standard continuous-time Footloose Capital model.

  19. Investing in threatened species conservation: does corruption outweigh purchasing power?

    PubMed

    Garnett, Stephen T; Joseph, Liana N; Watson, James E M; Zander, Kerstin K

    2011-01-01

    In many sectors, freedom in capital flow has allowed optimization of investment returns through choosing sites that provide the best value for money. These returns, however, can be compromised in countries where corruption is prevalent. We assessed where the best value for money might be obtained for investment in threatened species that occur at a single site, when taking into account corruption. We found that the influence of corruption on potential investment decisions was outweighed by the likely value for money in terms of pricing parity. Nevertheless global conservation is likely to get best returns in terms of threatened species security by investing in "honest" countries than in corrupt ones, particularly those with a high cost of living.

  20. The effectiveness of AMT investment in UK metal component manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, David; Nugent, Edward

    1991-11-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the effectiveness of capital investment, particularly investment in Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT). AMT encompasses not only production, but also design and administration areas. The intention was to make recommendations for the future direction of investment in the industry. The structure of the industry which comprises 54 companies is outlined. In order to obtain sufficiently detailed and accurate data, each company was visited. Discussions were held with managers covering the areas of production, engineering, finance, design, sales and marketing, quality and other strategic issues affecting investment decision making. The study conclusions and recommendations are presented. An overview of the industry and the survey sample are given. Company performance, practice relationships which link practice, and performance are discussed.

  1. Investing in Threatened Species Conservation: Does Corruption Outweigh Purchasing Power?

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, Stephen T.; Joseph, Liana N.; Watson, James E. M.; Zander, Kerstin K.

    2011-01-01

    In many sectors, freedom in capital flow has allowed optimization of investment returns through choosing sites that provide the best value for money. These returns, however, can be compromised in countries where corruption is prevalent. We assessed where the best value for money might be obtained for investment in threatened species that occur at a single site, when taking into account corruption. We found that the influence of corruption on potential investment decisions was outweighed by the likely value for money in terms of pricing parity. Nevertheless global conservation is likely to get best returns in terms of threatened species security by investing in “honest” countries than in corrupt ones, particularly those with a high cost of living. PMID:21818383

  2. Measuring the Economic Impacts of Federal Investments in Research

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, S; Merrill, S

    2011-08-31

    greenhouse gas emissions at the global level. In principle, these benefits can be measured as a return on research investments, with appropriate consideration of time lags to research outcomes and attribution to private as well as public expenditure. With appropriate metrics, the same could be true for benefits to public health, environmental quality, and food productivity and security. Federal funding of research leads to the development of human capital that is deployed in a variety of occupations with economic and social impacts. Research also produces information that is used in formal (e.g., regulatory and judicial) and informal (e.g., firm and consumer) decision making processes. In addition to reviewing the range of work (by academics, consultants, and research agencies themselves) that has been done in measuring research outcomes and providing a forum to discuss their methods, this report also considers the different methodologies used across fields of research (e.g., agriculture and energy research) to identifies which are applicable to a range of federal S&T funding.

  3. 77 FR 39675 - Applications for Licensing as a Non-Leveraged Rural Business Investment Company Under the Rural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... wealth and job opportunities in rural areas and among individuals living in those areas through venture capital investments by for-profit RBICs. The purpose of this Notice is to license qualified RBICs as non... or collectively, hold 10 percent or more of the applicant's total capital. IV. Application...

  4. Investment, regulation, and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Stuart J; McDonald, Jillian; Falck-Zepeda, Jose

    2014-01-01

    As with any technological innovation, time refines the technology, improving upon the original version of the innovative product. The initial GM crops had single traits for either herbicide tolerance or insect resistance. Current varieties have both of these traits stacked together and in many cases other abiotic and biotic traits have also been stacked. This innovation requires investment. While this is relatively straight forward, certain conditions need to exist such that investments can be facilitated. The principle requirement for investment is that regulatory frameworks render consistent and timely decisions. If the certainty of regulatory outcomes weakens, the potential for changes in investment patterns increases.   This article provides a summary background to the leading plant breeding technologies that are either currently being used to develop new crop varieties or are in the pipeline to be applied to plant breeding within the next few years. Challenges for existing regulatory systems are highlighted. Utilizing an option value approach from investment literature, an assessment of uncertainty regarding the regulatory approval for these varying techniques is undertaken. This research highlights which technology development options have the greatest degree of uncertainty and hence, which ones might be expected to see an investment decline. PMID:24499745

  5. 77 FR 6606 - DoubleLine Capital LP and DoubleLine Funds Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... COMMISSION DoubleLine Capital LP and DoubleLine Funds Trust; Notice of Application February 2, 2012. AGENCY... relying on rule 12d1-2 under the Act to invest in certain financial instruments. APPLICANTS: DoubleLine Capital LP (``DoubleLine'') and DoubleLine Funds Trust (``Trust''). FILING DATE: The application was...

  6. 77 FR 42353 - Escalate Capital Partners SBIC I, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Escalate Capital Partners SBIC I, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Escalate Capital Partners SBIC I, L.P., 300 West 6th Street, Suite...

  7. 75 FR 32230 - Emergence Capital Partners SBIC, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Emergence Capital Partners SBIC, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Emergence Capital Partners SBIC, L.P., 160 Bovet Road, Suite 300, San...

  8. 75 FR 32230 - Solutions Capital I, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Solutions Capital I, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Solutions Capital I, L.P., 1100 Wilson Blvd., Suite 3000, Arlington, VA 22209, a...

  9. Investing in river health.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J

    2002-01-01

    Rivers provide society with numerous returns. These relate to both the passive and extractive uses of the resources embodied in river environments. Some returns are manifest in the form of financial gains whilst others are non-monetary. For instance, rivers are a source of monetary income for those who harvest their fish. The water flowing in rivers is extracted for drinking and to water crops and livestock that in turn yield monetary profits. However, rivers are also the source of non-monetary values arising from biological diversity. People who use them for recreation (picnicking, swimming, boating) also receive non-monetary returns. The use of rivers to yield these returns has had negative consequences. With extraction for financial return has come diminished water quantity and quality. The result has been a diminished capacity of rivers to yield (non-extractive) environmental returns and to continue to provide extractive values. A river is like any other asset. With use, the value of an asset depreciates because its productivity declines. In order to maintain the productive capacity of their assets, managers put aside from their profits depreciation reserves that can be invested in the repair or replacement of those assets. Society now faces a situation in which its river assets have depreciated in terms of their capacity to provide monetary and non-monetary returns. An investment in river "repair" is required. But, investment means that society gives up something now in order to achieve some benefit in the future. Society thus has to grapple wih the choice between investing in river health and other investments--such as in hospitals, schools, defence etc. - as well as between investing in river health and current consumption--such as on clothes, food, cars etc. A commonly used aid for investment decision making in the public sector is benefit cost analysis. However, its usefulness in tackling the river investment problem is restricted because it requires all

  10. Investing in river health.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J

    2002-01-01

    Rivers provide society with numerous returns. These relate to both the passive and extractive uses of the resources embodied in river environments. Some returns are manifest in the form of financial gains whilst others are non-monetary. For instance, rivers are a source of monetary income for those who harvest their fish. The water flowing in rivers is extracted for drinking and to water crops and livestock that in turn yield monetary profits. However, rivers are also the source of non-monetary values arising from biological diversity. People who use them for recreation (picnicking, swimming, boating) also receive non-monetary returns. The use of rivers to yield these returns has had negative consequences. With extraction for financial return has come diminished water quantity and quality. The result has been a diminished capacity of rivers to yield (non-extractive) environmental returns and to continue to provide extractive values. A river is like any other asset. With use, the value of an asset depreciates because its productivity declines. In order to maintain the productive capacity of their assets, managers put aside from their profits depreciation reserves that can be invested in the repair or replacement of those assets. Society now faces a situation in which its river assets have depreciated in terms of their capacity to provide monetary and non-monetary returns. An investment in river "repair" is required. But, investment means that society gives up something now in order to achieve some benefit in the future. Society thus has to grapple wih the choice between investing in river health and other investments--such as in hospitals, schools, defence etc. - as well as between investing in river health and current consumption--such as on clothes, food, cars etc. A commonly used aid for investment decision making in the public sector is benefit cost analysis. However, its usefulness in tackling the river investment problem is restricted because it requires all

  11. Venture capital on a shoestring: Bioventures’ pioneering life sciences fund in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Since 2000, R&D financing for global health has increased significantly, with innovative proposals for further increases. However, although venture capital (VC) funding has fostered life sciences businesses across the developed world, its application in the developing world and particularly in Africa is relatively new. Is VC feasible in the African context, to foster the development and application of local health innovation? As the most industrially advanced African nation, South Africa serves as a test case for life sciences venture funding. This paper analyzes Bioventures, the first VC company focused on life sciences investment in sub-Saharan Africa. The case study method was used to analyze the formation, operation, and investment support of Bioventures, and to suggest lessons for future health venture funds in Africa that aim to develop health-oriented innovations. Discussion The modest financial success of Bioventures in challenging circumstances has demonstrated a proof of concept that life sciences VC can work in the region. Beyond providing funds, support given to investees included board participation, contacts, and strategic services. Bioventures had to be proactive in finding and supporting good health R&D. Due to the fund’s small size, overhead and management expenses were tightly constrained. Bioventures was at times unable to make follow-on investments, being forced instead to give up equity to raise additional capital, and to sell health investments earlier than might have been optimal. With the benefit of hindsight, the CFO of Bioventures felt that partnering with a larger fund might benefit similar future funds. Being better linked to market intelligence and other entrepreneurial investors was also seen as an unmet need. Summary BioVentures has learned lessons about how the traditional VC model might evolve to tackle health challenges facing Africa, including how to raise funds and educate investors; how to select, value, and support

  12. The Future of Capitation

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, John D; Bierman, Arlene S; Fein, Oliver; Rask, Kimberly; Rich, Eugene C; Selker, Harry P

    2001-01-01

    Capitation-based reimbursement significantly influences the practice of medicine. As physicians, we need to assure that payment models do not jeopardize the care we provide when we accept higher levels of personal financial risk. In this paper, we review the literature relevant to capitation, consider the interaction of financial incentives with physician and medical risk, and conclude that primary care physicians need to work to assure that capitated systems incorporate checks and balances which protect both patients and providers. We offer the following proposals for individuals and groups considering capitated contracts: (1) reimbursement for primary care physicians should recognize both individual patient encounters and the administrative work of patient care management; (2) reimbursement for subspecialists should recognize both access to subspecialty knowledge and expertise as well as patient care encounters, but in some situations, subspecialists may provide the majority of care to individual patients and will be reimbursed as primary care providers; (3) groups of physicians should accept financial risk for patient care only if they have the tools and resources to manage the care; (4) physicians sharing risk for patient care should meet regularly to discuss care and resource management; and (5) physicians must disclose the financial relationships they have with health plans and medical care organizations, and engage patients and communities in discussions about resource allocation. As a payment model, capitation offers opportunities for primary care physicians to influence the future of health care by improving the management of resources at a local level. PMID:11318926

  13. 12 CFR 325.104 - Capital restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... filing plan—(1) In general. A bank shall file a written capital restoration plan with the appropriate... supervisory actions as if the bank were undercapitalized is not required to submit a capital restoration plan... restoration plan approved under section 38 and this subpart is not required to submit an additional...

  14. 12 CFR 325.104 - Capital restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... filing plan—(1) In general. A bank shall file a written capital restoration plan with the appropriate... supervisory actions as if the bank were undercapitalized is not required to submit a capital restoration plan... restoration plan approved under section 38 and this subpart is not required to submit an additional...

  15. You have more capital than you think.

    PubMed

    Merton, Robert C

    2005-11-01

    Senior executives typically delegate the responsibility for managing a firm's derivatives portfolio to in-house financial experts and the company's financial advisers. That's a strategic blunder, argues this Nobel laureate, because the inventiveness of modern financial markets makes it possible for companies to double or even triple their capacity to invest in their strategic assets and competencies. Risks fall into two categories: either a company adds value by assuming them on behalf of its shareholders or it does not. By hedging or insuring against non-value-adding risks with derivative securities and contracts, thereby removing them from what the author calls the risk balance sheet, managers can release equity capital for assuming more value-adding risk. This is not just a theoretical possibility. One innovation-the interest rate swap, introduced about 20 years ago-has already enabled the banking industry to dramatically increase its capacity for adding value to each dollar of invested equity capital. With the range of derivative instruments growing, there is no reason why other companies could not similarly remove strategic risks, potentially creating billions of dollars in shareholder value. The possibilities are especially important for private companies that have no access to public equity markets and therefore cannot easily increase their equity capital by issuing more shares. The author describes how derivative contracts of various kinds are already being employed strategically to mitigate or eliminate various risks. He also shows how companies can use the risk balance sheet to identify risks they should not bear directly and to determine how much equity capacity they can release for assuming more value-adding risk. PMID:16299963

  16. 12 CFR 1777.20 - Capital classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... notice of proposed capital classification, holds core capital equaling or exceeding the minimum capital... classification, holds core capital equaling or exceeding the minimum capital level. (3) Significantly... the date specified in the notice of proposed capital classification, holds core capital less than...

  17. Effect of the FDA on health care investments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, David J.

    1994-12-01

    The cost of securing FDA approval has long been an important consideration in funding projects involving new medical technologies, but the more stringent regulatory behavior of the FDA in the past few years has led to a discernable decrease in the funding of start-up medical device companies. An abundance of anecdotal evidence, supported with surveys of venture capital firms, investment groups and medical device corporations, indicates a serious shortage of funds available for the development of certain medical technologies.

  18. Investment Evaluation of RFID TechnologyApplications: An Evolution Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimakopoulou, Andriana; Pramatari, Katerina; Karagiannaki, Angeliki; Papadopoulos, George; Paraskevopoulos, Antonis

    Prior empirical research on the evaluation of RFID technologytreats and assesses individual RFID applications independently and in isolation from each other. However, literature on investment evaluation of information technologies has recognised and utilised the significance of evaluating "interdependent" information systems (IS) projects with synergies. Moreover, previous studies when appraising the business value of an RFID investment ignore its opportunity to offer and evolve into additional follow-on investments in the future. Nevertheless, the importance of this notion has been acknowledged by the pertinent literature for the evaluation of other information technologies. This chapter proposes an approach for the investment evaluation of RFID applications considering them rather as a bundle of interdependent and sequential investments than as stand-alone ones. The results from a case study demonstrate how the proposed approach can be employed for the evaluation of RFID projects and offering an additional insight into evaluating investments in RFID applications.

  19. Investing in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Strapped for cash, a Massachusetts high school creates its own venture capital fund to incentivize teachers to create programs that improve student learning. The result has been higher test scores and higher job satisfaction. One important program is credited with helping close the achievement gap at the school, while others have helped ambitious…

  20. Invest in Family*

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilesh; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The family is an integral part of one's life. It is very essential that every individual employed or unemployed invests time therein. The family is a source of support and growth for an individual, and the lack of family support or loneliness may be a causative factor in the genesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. In India, family plays a paramount role when it comes to mental health of the individual. Tips on how one should invest time in one's family along with the role of a family in one's personal and social structure are discussed. PMID:25838732

  1. Raising venture capital in the biopharma industry.

    PubMed

    Leytes, Lev J

    2002-11-15

    Raising venture capital (VC) is both an art and a science. Future entrepreneurs should carefully consider the various issues of VC financing that have a strong impact on the success of their business. In addition to attracting the best venture capital firms, these issues include such subtle but important points as the timing of financing (especially of the first round), external support sources, desirable qualities of a VC firm, amount to be raised, establishing a productive interface between the founders and the venture capitalists, and most importantly the effects of well-executed VC funding on hiring senior executives and scientific leaders.

  2. Solar Access to Public Capital (SAPC) Mock Securitization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, Michael; Lowder, Travis; Rottman, Mary; Borod, Ronald; Gabig, Nathan; Henne, Stephen; Caplin, Conrad; Notte, Quentin

    2015-12-21

    In late 2012, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated the Solar Access to Public Capital (SAPC) working group. Backed by a three-year funding facility from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL set out to organize the solar, legal, banking, capital markets, engineering, and other relevant stakeholder communities in order to open lower-cost debt investment for solar asset deployment. SAPC engaged its members to standardize contracts, develop best practices, and comprehend how the rating agencies perceive solar project portfolios as an investment asset class. Rating agencies opine on the future creditworthiness of debt obligations. Issuers often seek investment-grade ratings from the rating agencies in order to satisfy the desires of their investors. Therefore, for the solar industry to access larger pools of capital at a favorable cost, it is critical to increase market participants' understanding of solar risk parameters. The process provided valuable information to address rating agency perceptions of risk that, without such information, could require costly credit enhancement or higher yields to attract institutional investors. Two different securities were developed--one for a hypothetical residential solar portfolio and one for a hypothetical commercial solar portfolio. Five rating agencies (Standard and Poor's, Moody's, KBRA, Fitch, and DBRS) participated and provided extensive feedback, some through conversations that extended several months. The findings represented in this report are a composite summary of that feedback and do not indicate any specific feedback from any single rating agency.

  3. Creating Schools without Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolke, Mark

    2001-01-01

    A shortage of capital and appropriate education facilities prompted the Edmonton (Alberta) Public Schools to explore creative solutions such as leasing retrofitted facilities to house new academic programs. Landlords generally like school districts, considering them reliable, long-term tenants for hard-to-rent larger buildings. (MLH)

  4. Understanding your capital options.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher T

    2012-05-01

    When planning capital expenditures, hospitals and health systems should understand the following financing considerations: Traditional fixed-rate tax-exempt bonds; Variable-rate financing alternatives; Basel III Accord requirements; Direct tax-exempt bank loans; Total return swaps Taxable financings; Interest-rate swaps and collateral requirements

  5. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  6. Reggio Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stejzygier, Aneta

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the social capital as the essential element of success of the Reggio Emilia preschools known for their unique approach to the early childhood education. The collaborative effort is introduced through examples of the currently ongoing "Reggio Narrates" project of Reggio preschools, the "Dialogue with the Places" and "The…

  7. Planning for Capital Reinvestment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biedenweg, Frederick; Weisburg-Swanson, Lynda; Gardner, Catherine

    1998-01-01

    Describes and evaluates four alternatives for planning and budgeting for capital reinvestment for college and university facilities: physical plant auditing; a depreciation-based approach; percentage of current replacement value; and facility subsystem modeling, or life-cycle modeling. Each has advantages and limitations in budgeting for and…

  8. Towards Transnational Academic Capitalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauppinen, Ilkka

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to current debates on the relationship between globalisation and higher education. The main argument of the paper is that we are currently witnessing transnationalisation of academic capitalism. This argument is illustrated by examining the collaboration between transnational corporations and research universities, and how…

  9. The opportunity cost of capital: development of new pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Chit, Ayman; Chit, Ahmad; Papadimitropoulos, Manny; Krahn, Murray; Parker, Jayson; Grootendorst, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The opportunity cost of the capital invested in pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) to bring a new drug to market makes up as much as half the total cost. However, the literature on the cost of pharmaceutical R&D is mixed on how, exactly, one should calculate this "hidden" cost. Some authors attempt to adopt models from the field of finance, whereas other prominent authors dismiss this practice as biased, arguing that it artificially inflates the R&D cost to justify higher prices for pharmaceuticals. In this article, we examine the arguments made by both sides of the debate and then explain the cost of capital concept and describe in detail how this value is calculated. Given the significant contribution of the cost of capital to the overall cost of new drug R&D, a clear understanding of the concept is critical for policy makers, investors, and those involved directly in the R&D.

  10. Combination of real options and game-theoretic approach in investment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasteh, Abdollah

    2016-02-01

    Investments in technology create a large amount of capital investments by major companies. Assessing such investment projects is identified as critical to the efficient assignment of resources. Viewing investment projects as real options, this paper expands a method for assessing technology investment decisions in the linkage existence of uncertainty and competition. It combines the game-theoretic models of strategic market interactions with a real options approach. Several key characteristics underlie the model. First, our study shows how investment strategies rely on competitive interactions. Under the force of competition, firms hurry to exercise their options early. The resulting "hurry equilibrium" destroys the option value of waiting and involves violent investment behavior. Second, we get best investment policies and critical investment entrances. This suggests that integrating will be unavoidable in some information product markets. The model creates some new intuitions into the forces that shape market behavior as noticed in the information technology industry. It can be used to specify best investment policies for technology innovations and adoptions, multistage R&D, and investment projects in information technology.

  11. Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.

    PubMed

    Frazier, H C

    1990-01-01

    There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s.

  12. Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.

    PubMed

    Frazier, H C

    1990-01-01

    There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s. PMID:2122167

  13. Investing in Youth: Lithuania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The series Investing in Youth builds on the expertise of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on youth employment, social support and skills. It covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The present report on Lithuania is the fourth of a new…

  14. Investing in Youth: Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The series Investing in Youth builds on the expertise of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on youth employment, social support and skills. It covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. This report provides a detailed diagnosis of the youth…

  15. Energy Investment: Beyond Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosti, Donald T.; Amarant, John

    2005-01-01

    People vary considerably in their work performance as well as their overall approach to work. At one extreme are the outstanding performers, who approach work with enthusiasm and energy, and, at the other extreme, are those who seem to do only what is necessary to get by. Organizatins often invest a good deal of energy in trying to improve the…

  16. Beyond the Investment Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The current policy interest in early childhood education and care is driven by an investment narrative, a story of quality and high returns emerging from a dominant neoliberal political economy. This short note expresses deep reservations about this narrative, and hints at another narrative that foregrounds democracy, experimentation and…

  17. Strategic Investments Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, Doug

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the organizational hierarchy for strategic management and strategic investments at NASA. The presentation also relates these topics to the budgets it submits to Congress, strategies for space exploration research and development, and systems analysis.

  18. Investing in Youth: Latvia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The series Investing in Youth builds on the expertise of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on youth employment, social support and skills. It covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. This report provides a detailed diagnosis of the youth…

  19. Development of a Scale to Measure Academic Capital in High-Risk College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, Christa; Sriram, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a psychometric instrument that measures academic capital in college students. Academic capital is a set of social processes that aid students in acquiring the knowledge and support necessary to access and navigate higher education. This study establishes the validity and reliability of the Academic Capital Scale. In addition to…

  20. Capital versus talent. The battle that's reshaping business.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roger L; Moldoveanu, Mihnea C

    2003-07-01

    For much of the twentieth century, labor and capital fought bitterly for control of the industrialized economy. The titans of industry ultimately won a resounding victory over the unions, but the story doesn't end there. In today's economy, value is largely the product of knowledge and information. Companies cannot generate profits without the ideas, skills, and leadership capabilities of knowledge workers. It's these factors--not technologies, not factories, and certainly not capital--that give the most successful companies their unique advantages. As knowledge workers come to realize this, and see that the demand for their talent outstrips the supply, they are steadily wresting more and more of the profits from shareholders. This time the battle is between the sources of capital and the producers of value, and how it will end is far from clear. The roots of the current conflict lie in the twentieth-century shift from industrial to managerial capitalism and the creation of a new class of professional talent, the authors explain. Since the arrival of the information-based economy in the past decade, tensions have escalated. The dramatic rise of CEO pay--and the public fire it has drawn--is a telling symptom. With this new battle, we're also witnessing a fundamental change in the political alignment of capital. The Left is now siding with "the common shareholder" against the well-compensated top tier of the labor pool. Shareholders seeing an unprecedented proportion of the return on their investments siphoned off to employees may well ask, is there no end to it? Increasingly, it's human capital that is the basis of value, and financial capital has become far more generic than shareholders would like to believe. The growing tensions between shareholders and managers cannot be ignored, and capitalism is at a crossroads--again. PMID:12858709

  1. Capital versus talent. The battle that's reshaping business.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roger L; Moldoveanu, Mihnea C

    2003-07-01

    For much of the twentieth century, labor and capital fought bitterly for control of the industrialized economy. The titans of industry ultimately won a resounding victory over the unions, but the story doesn't end there. In today's economy, value is largely the product of knowledge and information. Companies cannot generate profits without the ideas, skills, and leadership capabilities of knowledge workers. It's these factors--not technologies, not factories, and certainly not capital--that give the most successful companies their unique advantages. As knowledge workers come to realize this, and see that the demand for their talent outstrips the supply, they are steadily wresting more and more of the profits from shareholders. This time the battle is between the sources of capital and the producers of value, and how it will end is far from clear. The roots of the current conflict lie in the twentieth-century shift from industrial to managerial capitalism and the creation of a new class of professional talent, the authors explain. Since the arrival of the information-based economy in the past decade, tensions have escalated. The dramatic rise of CEO pay--and the public fire it has drawn--is a telling symptom. With this new battle, we're also witnessing a fundamental change in the political alignment of capital. The Left is now siding with "the common shareholder" against the well-compensated top tier of the labor pool. Shareholders seeing an unprecedented proportion of the return on their investments siphoned off to employees may well ask, is there no end to it? Increasingly, it's human capital that is the basis of value, and financial capital has become far more generic than shareholders would like to believe. The growing tensions between shareholders and managers cannot be ignored, and capitalism is at a crossroads--again.

  2. Intellectual Capital: Comparison and Contrast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Susan R.

    2001-01-01

    Suggests that one of the most important keys for improving individual and organizational performance is in developing and strengthening intellectual capital (IC) and explores the similarities and differences between the concepts of intellectual capital, human capital, and knowledge management. Presents four IC characteristics and addresses the…

  3. The Investment Case for Education and Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wils, Annababette; Bonnet, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Education is in crisis worldwide. Millions of children, especially the most marginalized, are excluded from school. Many millions more attend school, but they do not learn basic reading and math skills. In addition, international funding for education is on the decline. "The Investment Case for Education and Equity" explains the global…

  4. Improved Estimates of Capital Formation in the National Health Expenditure Accounts

    PubMed Central

    Sensenig, Arthur L.; Donahoe, Gerald F.

    2006-01-01

    The National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA) were revised with the release of the 2004 estimates. The largest revision was the incorporation of a more comprehensive measure of investment in medical sector capital. The revision raised total health expenditures' share of gross domestic product (GDP) from 15.4 to 15.8 percent in 2003. The improved measure encompasses investment in moveable equipment and software, as well as expenditures for the construction of structures used by the medical sector. PMID:17290665

  5. 31 CFR Appendix C to Part 356 - Investment Considerations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Investment Considerations C Appendix C..., App. C Appendix C to Part 356—Investment Considerations I. Inflation-Protected Securities A. Principal... may be enhanced over time as we issue additional amounts or more entities participate in the market....

  6. Designing a successful investment program.

    PubMed

    Karpinski, J P

    1997-02-01

    Healthcare organizations have various asset pool funds that can be invested to increase nonoperating revenues. In order to maximize the long-term success of investment efforts, healthcare organizations need to develop comprehensive investment management programs. Such programs identify the assets that can be invested, establish the level of risk each asset type can be exposed to, and match long-term and short-term investment opportunities to the appropriate asset pool. Programs can be managed internally or outsourced to investment management firms with objectives and procedures that are compatible with those of the healthcare organizations' investment policies and guidelines. These policies and guidelines must address asset allocation. Oversight committees must be established to monitor investment performance and reallocate assets, as needed, to take advantage of market movements.

  7. Designing a successful investment program.

    PubMed

    Karpinski, J P

    1997-02-01

    Healthcare organizations have various asset pool funds that can be invested to increase nonoperating revenues. In order to maximize the long-term success of investment efforts, healthcare organizations need to develop comprehensive investment management programs. Such programs identify the assets that can be invested, establish the level of risk each asset type can be exposed to, and match long-term and short-term investment opportunities to the appropriate asset pool. Programs can be managed internally or outsourced to investment management firms with objectives and procedures that are compatible with those of the healthcare organizations' investment policies and guidelines. These policies and guidelines must address asset allocation. Oversight committees must be established to monitor investment performance and reallocate assets, as needed, to take advantage of market movements. PMID:10164878

  8. Investment Vehicles for School Funds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    School administrators are advised to invest school funds for maximum return, coupled with safety and flexibility. The advantages and disadvantages of a variety of investment instruments are explained. (MLF)

  9. Impact of Real-world Factors Influencing Investment Decisions on the Costs and Distribution of Climate Change Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, J.; Iyer, G.; McJeon, H. C.; Leon, C.; Hultman, N.

    2015-12-01

    Strategies to mitigate dangerous anthropogenic climate change require a dramatic transformation of the energy system to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, that in turn requires large-scale investments. Investment decisions depend not only on investment capital availability but also on investment risks. A number of factors such as national policy environments, quality of public and private institutions, sector, firm and technology specific characteristics can affect investors' assessments of risks, leading to a wide variation in the business climate for investment. Such heterogeneity in investment risks can have important implications, as investors usually respond to risks by requiring higher returns for riskier projects; delaying or forgoing the investments; or preferring to invest in existing, familiar projects. We study the impact of variation in investment risks on regional patterns of emissions mitigation, the cost of emissions mitigation and patterns of technology deployment. We modify an integrated assessment model, widely used in global climate policy analyses (the Global Change Assessment Model) and incorporate decisions on investments based on risks along two dimensions. Along the first dimension, we vary perceived risks associated with particular technologies. To do so, we assign a higher cost of capital for investment in low-carbon technologies as these involve intrinsically higher levels of regulatory and market risk. The second dimension uses a proxy to vary investment risks across regions, based on an institutional quality metric published by the World Economic Forum. Explicit representation of investment risks has two major effects. First, it raises the cost of emissions mitigation relative to a world with uniform investment risks. Second, it shifts the pattern of emissions mitigation, with industrialized countries mitigating more, and developing countries mitigating less. Our results suggest that institutional reforms aimed at lowering investment

  10. Public funding and private investment for R&D: a survey in China’s pharmaceutical industry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, China has experienced tremendous growth in its pharmaceutical industry. Both the Chinese government and private investors are motivated to invest into pharmaceutical research and development (R&D). However, studies regarding the different behaviors of public and private investment in pharmaceutical R&D are scarce. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the current situation of public funding and private investment into Chinese pharmaceutical R&D. Methods The primary data used in the research were obtained from the China High-tech Industry Statistics Yearbook (2002–2012) and China Statistical Yearbook of Science and Technology (2002–2012). We analyzed public funding and private investment in five aspects: total investment in the industry, funding sources of the whole industry, differences between provinces, difference in subsectors, and private equity/venture capital investment. Results The vast majority of R&D investment was from private sources. There is a significantly positive correlation between public funding and private investment in different provinces of China. However, public funding was likely to be invested into less developed provinces with abundant natural herbal resources. Compared with the chemical medicine subsector, traditional Chinese medicine and biopharmaceutical subsectors obtained more public funding. Further, the effect of the government was focused on private equity and venture capital investment although private fund is the mainstream of this type of investment. Conclusions Public funding and private investment play different but complementary roles in pharmaceutical R&D in China. While being less than private investment, public funding shows its significance in R&D investment. With rapid growth of the industry, the pharmaceutical R&D investment in China is expected to increase steadily from both public and private sources. PMID:24925505

  11. Cost modeling as a technology assessment tool for radiology department capital equipment acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Marion, J L; Vanden Brink, J A

    1996-06-01

    Changes reshaping the healthcare delivery system impact capital equipment acquisition decisions within radiology departments. During an era of rapid technological advancement, acquisition decisions often favor new imaging technology with an emphasis on volume and revenue increases. With a slowdown or plateau in new imaging technology and significant changes in the healthcare delivery structure, greater emphasis is now being given to productivity and quality improvement investments. Such investments are aimed at reducing labor and material operating costs through capital investment in electronic alternatives, such as the digital viewing and storage of diagnostic images in lieu of film. This shift in emphasis presents a dilemma for radiology departments because it is often more difficult to show a quality and productivity improvement justification. One approach is to use a formal ¿technology assessment¿ (TA) process wherein a manager considers changes in processes, labor, equipment, space, and consumables, and then assesses that impact on cost, utilization, quality of care, and other factors. A cost model is a useful tool in this process. A review of a number of real world experiences demonstrates the benefits of more timely and informed capital equipment investment decisions. While the direct savings may not entirely offset such investments, TA analysis also evaluates in tangible benefits that may not be quantifiable in economic terms. Both tangible cost savings and intangible benefits need to be weighed against the net investment in a new technology.

  12. Policy approaches to renewable energy investment in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, A.; Komendantova, N.; Battaglini, A.; Lilliestam, J.; Williges, K.

    2009-04-01

    suited to achieving such growth quickly and smoothly? What bottlenecks—in terms of supply chains, human capital, finance, and transmission capacity—need to be anticipated and addressed if the rate of capacity growth is to be sustained over several decades? What model of governance would create a safe investment climate in consistence with new EU legislation (i.e. EU Renewable Energy Directive) as well as expected post-Kyoto targets and mechanisms? The material that we present here is based on a series of workshops held between November 2008 and January 2009, in which a wide range of stakeholders expressed their views about the fundamental needs for policy intervention. Supplementing the results from these workshops have been additional expert interviews, and basic financial modeling. One of the interesting results from this research is the need for a multi-pronged approach. First, there is a need for a support scheme, potentially compatible with in all cases supplementing the EU REN Directive, that would create a stable market for North African electricity in Europe. Second, there is a need for policies that facilitate the formation of public private partnerships in North Africa, as the specific investment vehicle, as a way to manage some of the uncertainties associated with large-scale investments in the region. Third, attention has to be paid to the development of supply chains within the Mediterranean region, as a way of ensuring the compatibility of such investments with sustainable development.

  13. Topological properties and community detection of venture capital network: Evidence from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yonghong; Zhang, Qi; Li, Sai-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Financial networks have been extensively studied as examples of real world complex networks. Based on the data from Chinese GEM and SME board, we establish a venture capital (VC) network to study the statistical properties, topological properties and community structure of the Chinese venture capital network. The result shows that there are no dominant venture capital firms in China which act as hubs in the VC network, and multi-company syndication is not popular in China, meaning that the relationships among venture capital companies are weak. The network is robust under either random or intentional attack, and possesses small world property. We also find from its community structure that, venture capital companies are more concentrated in developed districts but the links within the same district are scarce as compared to the links between different developed districts, indicating that venture capital companies are more willing to syndicate with companies in other developed districts. Furthermore, venture capital companies which invest in the same industry have closer relations within their communities than those which do not invest in the same industry.

  14. Venezuelan ``apertura`` invites private exploration capital

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevali, J.

    1995-10-09

    The Congress of the Republic of Venezuela on July 4, 1995, approved the conditions for an Exploration Association Contract. This action opened Venezuela to exploration for light and medium crudes by private companies in association with a special-purpose affiliate of Petroleos de Venezuela (Pdvsa). The objective of the apertura, or opening, is to attract private capital to Venezuela`s petroleum sector and thereby accelerate exploration and development of light and medium crude oil. An important parallel objective is for this incremental investment into the country to stimulate the domestic economy and encourage development and growth across all sectors. The paper discusses the geology of the four primary sedimentary basins in Venezuela, source rocks and maturity, and the costs and terms of Venezuela`s contract.

  15. Values beyond value? Is anything beyond the logic of capital?

    PubMed

    Skeggs, Bev

    2014-03-01

    We are living in a time when it is frequently assumed that the logic of capital has subsumed every single aspect of our lives, intervening in the organization of our intimate relations as well as the control of our time, including investments in the future (e.g. via debt). The theories that document the incursion of this logic (often through the terms of neoliberalism and/or governmentality) assume that this logic is internalized, works and organizes everything including our subjectivity. These theories performatively reproduce the very conditions they describe, shrinking the domain of values and making it subject to capital's logic. All values are reduced to value. Yet values and value are always dialogic, dependent and co-constituting. In this paper I chart the history by which value eclipses values and how this shrinks our sociological imagination. By outlining the historical processes that institutionalized different organizations of the population through political economy and the social contract, producing ideas of proper personhood premised on propriety, I detail how forms of raced, gendered and classed personhood was formed. The gaps between the proper and improper generate significant contradictions that offer both opportunities to and limits on capitals' lines of flight. It is the lacks, the residues, and the excess that cannot be captured by capital's mechanisms of valuation that will be explored in order to think beyond the logic of capital and show how values will always haunt value. PMID:24571532

  16. Values beyond value? Is anything beyond the logic of capital?

    PubMed

    Skeggs, Bev

    2014-03-01

    We are living in a time when it is frequently assumed that the logic of capital has subsumed every single aspect of our lives, intervening in the organization of our intimate relations as well as the control of our time, including investments in the future (e.g. via debt). The theories that document the incursion of this logic (often through the terms of neoliberalism and/or governmentality) assume that this logic is internalized, works and organizes everything including our subjectivity. These theories performatively reproduce the very conditions they describe, shrinking the domain of values and making it subject to capital's logic. All values are reduced to value. Yet values and value are always dialogic, dependent and co-constituting. In this paper I chart the history by which value eclipses values and how this shrinks our sociological imagination. By outlining the historical processes that institutionalized different organizations of the population through political economy and the social contract, producing ideas of proper personhood premised on propriety, I detail how forms of raced, gendered and classed personhood was formed. The gaps between the proper and improper generate significant contradictions that offer both opportunities to and limits on capitals' lines of flight. It is the lacks, the residues, and the excess that cannot be captured by capital's mechanisms of valuation that will be explored in order to think beyond the logic of capital and show how values will always haunt value.

  17. Capital in the twenty-first century: a critique.

    PubMed

    Soskice, David

    2014-12-01

    I set out and explain Piketty's model of the dynamics of capitalism based on two equations and the r > g inequality (his central contradiction of capitalism). I then take issue with Piketty's analysis of the rebuilding of inequality from the 1970s to the present on three grounds: First, his model is based on the (neo-classical) assumption that companies are essentially passive actors who invest the amount savers choose to accumulate at equilibrium output - leading to the counterintuitive result that companies respond to the secular fall in growth (and hence their product markets) from the 1970s on by increasing their investment relative to output; this does indeed imply increased inequality on Piketty's β measure, the ratio of capital to output. I suggest a more realistic model in which businesses determine investment growth based on their expectations of output growth, with monetary policy bringing savings into line with business-determined investment; the implication of this model is that β does not change at all. And in fact as other recent empirical work which I reference has noted, β has not changed significantly over these recent decades. Hence Piketty's central analysis of the growth of contemporary inequality requires rethinking. Second, despite many references to the need for political economic analysis, Piketty's analysis of the growth of inequality in the period from the 1970s to the present is almost devoid of it, his explanatory framework being purely mathematical. I sketch what a political economic framework might look like during a period when politics was central to inequality. Third, inequality in fact rose on a variety of dimensions apart from β (including poverty which Piketty virtually makes no reference to in this period), but it is unclear what might explain why inequality rose in these other dimensions. PMID:25516344

  18. Capital in the twenty-first century: a critique.

    PubMed

    Soskice, David

    2014-12-01

    I set out and explain Piketty's model of the dynamics of capitalism based on two equations and the r > g inequality (his central contradiction of capitalism). I then take issue with Piketty's analysis of the rebuilding of inequality from the 1970s to the present on three grounds: First, his model is based on the (neo-classical) assumption that companies are essentially passive actors who invest the amount savers choose to accumulate at equilibrium output - leading to the counterintuitive result that companies respond to the secular fall in growth (and hence their product markets) from the 1970s on by increasing their investment relative to output; this does indeed imply increased inequality on Piketty's β measure, the ratio of capital to output. I suggest a more realistic model in which businesses determine investment growth based on their expectations of output growth, with monetary policy bringing savings into line with business-determined investment; the implication of this model is that β does not change at all. And in fact as other recent empirical work which I reference has noted, β has not changed significantly over these recent decades. Hence Piketty's central analysis of the growth of contemporary inequality requires rethinking. Second, despite many references to the need for political economic analysis, Piketty's analysis of the growth of inequality in the period from the 1970s to the present is almost devoid of it, his explanatory framework being purely mathematical. I sketch what a political economic framework might look like during a period when politics was central to inequality. Third, inequality in fact rose on a variety of dimensions apart from β (including poverty which Piketty virtually makes no reference to in this period), but it is unclear what might explain why inequality rose in these other dimensions.

  19. 78 FR 73915 - Solutions Capital I, L.P., License No. 03/03-0247; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Solutions Capital... Constitute Conflicts of Interest of the Small Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR... Capital I, L.P. Therefore this transaction is considered a financing constituting a conflict of...

  20. 78 FR 69516 - DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P.; License No. 02/02-0662; Notice Seeking Exemption Under the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... ADMINISTRATION DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P.; License No. 02/02-0662; Notice Seeking Exemption Under the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P., 45... interest of the Small Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR 107.730)....

  1. 78 FR 2313 - CapitalSpring SBIC, L.P., License No. 09/79-0454, Notice Seeking Exemption Under the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CapitalSpring SBIC, L.P., License No. 09/79-0454, Notice Seeking Exemption Under the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that CapitalSpring SBIC, L.P., 950 3rd Avenue, 24th Floor, New York, NY 10022,...

  2. Inner structure of capital control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano

    2004-07-01

    We study the topological structure of the network of shareholding relationships in the Italian stock market (MIB) and in two US stock markets (NYSE and NASDAQ). The portfolio diversification and the wealth invested on the market by economical agents have been shown in our previous work to have all a power law behavior. However, a further investigation shows that the inner structure of the capital control network are not at all the same across markets. The shareholding network is a weighted graph, therefore we introduce two quantities analogous to in-degree and out-degree for weighted graphs which measure, respectively: the number of effective shareholders of a stock and the number of companies effectively controlled by a single holder. Combining the information carried by the distributions of these two quantities we are able to extract the backbone of each market and we find that while the MIB splits into several separated groups of interest, the US markets is characterized by very large holders sharing control on overlapping subsets of stocks. This method seems promising for the analysis of the topology of capital control networks in general and not only in the stock market.

  3. Stakeholders' Perception on the Investment in Higher Education in South-West Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babalola, J. B.; Olaiya, Foluke M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the perceptions of stakeholders on investment in higher education and economic development in south-west Nigeria. The study was based on the argument that despite the fact that Nigeria celebrates her wealth of human capital and boasts of her educated labour force, there is still widespread ignorance and poverty with no…

  4. Measuring Social Returns to Higher Education Investments in Hong Kong: Production Function Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voon, Jan P.

    2001-01-01

    Uses a growth model involving an aggregate production function to measure social benefits from human capital improvements due to investments in Hong Kong higher education. Returns calculated using the production-function approach are significantly higher than those derived from the wage-increment method. Returns declined during the past 10 years.…

  5. 26 CFR 1.1242-1 - Losses on small business investment company stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Losses on small business investment company stock. 1.1242-1 Section 1.1242-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Special Rules for Determining Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1242-1 Losses on small business...

  6. 13 CFR 108.610 - Required certifications for Loans and Investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Required certifications for Loans and Investments. 108.610 Section 108.610 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Recordkeeping, Reporting, and Examination...

  7. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 1720 - Policy Guidance; Non-Mortgage Liquidity Investments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...: (1) providing stability to mortgage markets; (2) responding to the changing capital markets; (3... financially sound and liquid. As the Enterprises' financial safety and soundness regulator, OFHEO conducts its...-mortgage liquidity investment activities should include procedures for the following: portfolio...

  8. 77 FR 12641 - Surrender of License of Small Business Investment Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... United States Small Business Administration under the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, under... Company License No. 01/71-0390 issued to Venture Capital Fund of New England IV, L.P., and said license is hereby declared null and void. United States Small Business Administration. Sean J. Greene,...

  9. Increased use of Renewable Energy in Africa through a Program of Energy Enterprise Development and Investment

    SciTech Connect

    Christine Eibs Singer

    2005-03-11

    To provide training in enterprise development and technical applications, local partner capacity building, individualized enterprise development services and seed capital investment to catalyze the creation of sustainable renewable energy enterprises that deliver clean energy services to households and businesses in South Africa, Ethiopia and Tanzania.

  10. 78 FR 51078 - Reporting Requirements for Positive Train Control Expenses and Investments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... from, other capital investments and expenses. PTC is an automated system designed to prevent train-to... operating statistics for each railroad. Currently, PTC expenditures are incorporated into the R-1 under the..., http://www.stb.dot.gov/stb/industry/econ_reports.html . PTC is a system designed to prevent...

  11. 77 FR 25775 - Small Business Investment Companies-Early Stage SBICs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... also review the information at www.sba.gov/inv/earlystage which includes a list of frequently asked... Regulatory Capital, up to a maximum of $50 million. Early Stage SBICs must invest at least 50% of their... governing these SBICs may be found at www.sba.gov/inv/earlystage . DATES: In order to expedite licensing...

  12. 78 FR 39820 - Notice Seeking Exemption Under the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ...). Salem Halifax Capital Partners, L.P. is seeking post- financing approval from SBA for a debt and equity... Investment Act of 1958, as amended (``the Act''), in connection with the financing of a small concern, has sought an exemption under Section 312 of the Act and Section 107.730, Financings which...

  13. 12 CFR 225.172 - What are the holding periods permitted for merchant banking investments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... applicable under the Board's capital adequacy rules or guidelines (see 12 CFR 225 appendix A) to merchant... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the holding periods permitted for merchant banking investments? 225.172 Section 225.172 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM...

  14. 12 CFR 225.172 - What are the holding periods permitted for merchant banking investments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... applicable under the Board's capital adequacy rules or guidelines (see 12 CFR 225 appendix A) to merchant... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What are the holding periods permitted for merchant banking investments? 225.172 Section 225.172 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM...

  15. 12 CFR 225.172 - What are the holding periods permitted for merchant banking investments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... applicable under the Board's capital adequacy rules or guidelines (see 12 CFR 225 appendix A) to merchant... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What are the holding periods permitted for merchant banking investments? 225.172 Section 225.172 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM...

  16. 12 CFR 225.172 - What are the holding periods permitted for merchant banking investments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... applicable under the Board's capital adequacy rules or guidelines (see 12 CFR 225 appendix A) to merchant... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What are the holding periods permitted for merchant banking investments? 225.172 Section 225.172 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM...

  17. 26 CFR 1.857-6 - Method of taxation of shareholders of real estate investment trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Method of taxation of shareholders of real...-6 Method of taxation of shareholders of real estate investment trusts. (a) Ordinary income. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section (relating to capital gains), a...

  18. Economic evaluation of distribution system smart grid investments

    SciTech Connect

    Onen, Ahmet; Cheng, Danling; Broadwater, Robert P.; Scirbona, Charlie; Cocks, George; Hamilton, Stephanie; Wang, Xiaoyu; Roark, Jeffrey

    2014-12-31

    This paper investigates economic benefits of smart grid automation investments. A system consisting of 7 substations and 14 feeders is used in the evaluation. Here benefits that can be quantified in terms of dollar savings are considered, termed “hard dollar” benefits. Smart Grid investment evaluations to be considered include investments in improved efficiency, more cost effective use of existing system capacity with automated switches, and coordinated control of capacitor banks and voltage regulators. These Smart Grid evaluations are sequentially ordered, resulting in a series of incremental hard dollar benefits. Hard dollar benefits come from improved efficiency, delaying large capital equipment investments, shortened storm restoration times, and reduced customer energy use. Analyses used in the evaluation involve hourly power flow analysis over multiple years and Monte Carlo simulations of switching operations during storms using a reconfiguration for restoration algorithm. The economic analysis uses the time varying value of the Locational Marginal Price. Algorithms used include reconfiguration for restoration involving either manual or automated switches and coordinated control involving two modes of control. Field validations of phase balancing and capacitor design results are presented. The evaluation shows that investments in automation can improve performance while at the same time lowering costs.

  19. Economic evaluation of distribution system smart grid investments

    DOE PAGES

    Onen, Ahmet; Cheng, Danling; Broadwater, Robert P.; Scirbona, Charlie; Cocks, George; Hamilton, Stephanie; Wang, Xiaoyu; Roark, Jeffrey

    2014-12-31

    This paper investigates economic benefits of smart grid automation investments. A system consisting of 7 substations and 14 feeders is used in the evaluation. Here benefits that can be quantified in terms of dollar savings are considered, termed “hard dollar” benefits. Smart Grid investment evaluations to be considered include investments in improved efficiency, more cost effective use of existing system capacity with automated switches, and coordinated control of capacitor banks and voltage regulators. These Smart Grid evaluations are sequentially ordered, resulting in a series of incremental hard dollar benefits. Hard dollar benefits come from improved efficiency, delaying large capital equipmentmore » investments, shortened storm restoration times, and reduced customer energy use. Analyses used in the evaluation involve hourly power flow analysis over multiple years and Monte Carlo simulations of switching operations during storms using a reconfiguration for restoration algorithm. The economic analysis uses the time varying value of the Locational Marginal Price. Algorithms used include reconfiguration for restoration involving either manual or automated switches and coordinated control involving two modes of control. Field validations of phase balancing and capacitor design results are presented. The evaluation shows that investments in automation can improve performance while at the same time lowering costs.« less

  20. Productivity and the services of capital and labor

    SciTech Connect

    Baily, M.N.

    1981-01-01

    This paper argues that the slowdown in labor productivity growth that has occurred since 1968 and particularly since 1973 has probably been caused by a decline in the services of capital and labor relative to the measured quantities of these inputs. There is enough suggestive evidence of a decrease in effective labor input relative to measured labor hours to attribute about one-seventh of the productivity growth decline to this source. These effects have been concentrated outside the main manufacturing and industrial sectors. The most important cause of the growth slowdown in recent years seems to be a decline in the services of capital, caused by obsolescence and by the diversion of some part of capital spending to saving energy or product conversion. According to the model in this paper, conventional estimates based on the measured capital stock overstated the rate of total factor productivity growth through the mid-1960s, and the steady-state productivity growth rate of the US economy is lower than has been thought. Thus some part of the recent productivity slow-down is simply a return to the long-run steady-state path. An implication of this paper is that investment may do more to improve productivity growth than a coventional analysis predicts. There is an important qualification to this conclusion. We will gain little by adding substantially to the growth rate of gross output if we add little to output net of economic depreciation. The payoff to investment will be exceptionally large provided that new capital can avoid the problem of obsolescence that slowed productivity during the past decade. 64 references, 6 tables.

  1. Schooling, Skills, and the Returns to Government Investment in Education: An Exploration Using Data from Ghana. Living Standards Measurement Study, Working Paper No. 76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glewwe, Paul

    Investments in schooling are often regarded as essential for economic development, implying that such investments have high rates of return in developing countries. This paper examines the accuracy and usefulness of estimates of rates of return to formal schooling based on the standard human capital model of G. Becker and J. Mincer. Focus is on…

  2. 12 CFR 703.14 - Permissible investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.14 Permissible investments. (a) Variable rate investment. A Federal credit union may invest in a variable rate investment, as long as the index is tied to domestic interest... obligation/real estate mortgage investment conduit. A Federal credit union may invest in a fixed or...

  3. 12 CFR 703.14 - Permissible investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.14 Permissible investments. (a) Variable rate investment. A Federal credit union may invest in a variable rate investment, as long as the index is tied to domestic interest... obligation/real estate mortgage investment conduit. A Federal credit union may invest in a fixed or...

  4. Ecological Footprints and Appropriated Carrying Capacity: Measuring the Natural Capital Requirements of the Human Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ress, William E.; Wackernagel, Mathis

    1996-01-01

    Contrasts conventional economic rationality with economic principles. Develops an empirical approach based on a reinterpretation of carrying capacity that can account for technological advances and trade. Discusses the necessity of diverting much of the present consumption to investment in the maintenance of natural capital stocks. (AIM)

  5. A dynamic IS-LM business cycle model with two time delays in capital accumulation equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lujun; Li, Yaqiong

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze a augmented IS-LM business cycle model with the capital accumulation equation that two time delays are considered in investment processes according to Kalecki's idea. Applying stability switch criteria and Hopf bifurcation theory, we prove that time delays cause the equilibrium to lose or gain stability and Hopf bifurcation occurs.

  6. The Involvement of Migrant Mothers in Their Children's Education: Cultural Capital and Transnational Class Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamal Al-deen, Taghreed; Windle, Joel

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the kinds of capital, practices and investments that are implicated in the participation of migrant mothers in the educational careers of their children, drawing on a Bourdieusian framework. We present findings of a study of Muslim Iraqi mothers with school-aged children in Australia, based on 47 interviews with 25…

  7. 13 CFR 107.585 - Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital. 107.585 Section 107.585 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Voluntary Decrease in...

  8. University Capital, Community Engagement, and Continuing Education: Blending Professional Development and Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Edward T.

    2010-01-01

    Extending the dialogue on community engagement, this article examines the potential of a new programming area for university continuing education (UCE) that blends professional development and social change: the investment of university capital in community projects. Increasing interest in applying social and environmental, as well as financial,…

  9. 7 CFR 4290.1840 - Computation of RBIC's Capital Impairment Percentage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... from the table in 13 CFR 107.1840(d)(4). (5) Reduce the gain computed in paragraph (d)(4) of this... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of RBIC's Capital Impairment Percentage... INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM RBIC's Noncompliance With Terms of Leverage Computation of Rbic's...

  10. Congratulations or Condolences? The Role of Human Capital in the Cultivation of a University Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, John; Singell, Larry D., Jr.; Stater, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Administrative skill is essential to organizational effectiveness. Yet, few studies examine how human capital investments over a career affect selection into administration. We use panel data for economists to estimate the probability of choosing administration over a pure academic track. The results show that, while research-specific human…

  11. Firm-Specific Marketing Capital and Job Satisfaction of Marketers: Evidence from Vietnam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Tho D.; Nguyen, Trang T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the resource-based view of the firm, this study aims to examine antecedents and outcomes of firm-specific marketing capital pool invested by marketers in a transition market, Vietnam. Design/methodology/approach: A sample of 528 marketers in Ho Chi Minh City was surveyed to test the theoretical model. Structural equation…

  12. Human Capital or Human Connections? The Cultural Meanings of Education in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Background/Context: In the field of educational research, conventional wisdom holds that primary-level schooling, specifically literacy acquisition, promotes economic mobility for individuals and economic development for the nation. This belief is rooted in human capital theory, the causal argument claiming that state investment in schooling or…

  13. 12 CFR 955.6 - Risk-based capital requirement for acquired member assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ASSETS AND OFF-BALANCE SHEET ITEMS ACQUIRED MEMBER ASSETS § 955.6 Risk-based capital requirement for... applicable to on-balance sheet equivalent value of AMA Third Highest Investment Grade 0.90 Fourth Highest... NRSRO in an amount equal to or greater than the outstanding balance of the assets or pools of...

  14. 75 FR 61788 - Triangle Capital Corporation, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... the Act.\\2\\ Triangle operates as a specialty finance company that provides customized financing... same investment objectives and strategies as Triangle. Triangle owns a 99.9% limited partnership... to the SBA's substantial regulation of permissible leverage in their capital structure. 4. The...

  15. Returns to Human and Research Capital, United States Agriculture, 1949-1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishelson, Gideon

    This study estimated rates of return to public investments in human and research capital (formal schooling and extension and vocational agricultural education) in the United States agricultural industry. (Southern states were excluded because of demographic and educational factors that would have biased the variables.) Output per farm was defined…

  16. "I Want to Do Things with Languages": A Male Karenni Refugee's Reconstructing Multilingual Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Chatwara Suwannamai

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses how a male Karenni refugee in the United States has constructed multilingual capital along the way of his multiple movements across national borders. As a member of an ethnic minority group in three different countries (Burma, Thailand, and the United States), he has invested in learning multiple languages throughout the…

  17. 76 FR 58850 - Highland Capital Management, L.P., et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Highland Capital Management, L.P., et al.; Notice of Application September 15, 2011. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission''). ACTION: Notice of an application under section 6(c) of the Investment Company Act of 1940...

  18. 75 FR 60840 - Highland Capital Management, L.P. and Highland Funds I; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Highland Capital Management, L.P. and Highland Funds I; Notice of Application September 27, 2010. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission''). ACTION: Notice of an application under section 6(c) of the Investment Company Act...

  19. Investment issues in nuclear plant license renewal

    SciTech Connect

    Eynon, R.T.

    1999-09-01

    A method that determines the operating lives for existing nuclear power plants is discussed. These assumptions are the basis for projections of electricity supply through 2020 reported in the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) Annual Energy Outlook 1999. To determine if plants will seek license renewal, one must first determine if they will be operating to the end of their current licenses. This determination is based on an economic test that assumes an investment of $150/kW will be required after 30 yr of operation for plants with older designs. This expenditure is intended to be equivalent to the cost that would be associated with any of several needs such as a one0time investment to replace aging equipment (steam generators), a series of investments to fix age-related degradation, increases in operating costs, or costs associated with decreased performance. This investment is compared with the cost of building and operating the lowest-cost new plant over the same 10-yr period. If a plant fails this test, it is assumed to be retired after 30 yr of service. All other plants are then considered candidates for license renewal. The method used to determine if it is economic to apply for license renewal and operate plants for an additional 20 yr is to assume that plants face an investment of $250 million after 40 yr of operation to refurbish aging components. This investment is compared with the lowest-cost new plant alternative evaluated over the same 20 yr that the nuclear plant would operate. If the nuclear plant is the lowest cost option, it is projected to continue to operate. EIA projects that it would be economic to extend the operating licenses for 3.7 GW of capacity (6 units).

  20. 13 CFR 303.9 - Requirements for short-term Planning Investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Planning Investments. 303.9 Section 303.9 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PLANNING INVESTMENTS AND COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES § 303.9 Requirements for short-term Planning Investments. (a) In addition to providing support for...

  1. 13 CFR 303.9 - Requirements for short-term Planning Investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Planning Investments. 303.9 Section 303.9 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PLANNING INVESTMENTS AND COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES § 303.9 Requirements for short-term Planning Investments. (a) In addition to providing support for...

  2. 13 CFR 303.9 - Requirements for short-term Planning Investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Planning Investments. 303.9 Section 303.9 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PLANNING INVESTMENTS AND COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES § 303.9 Requirements for short-term Planning Investments. (a) In addition to providing support for...

  3. 13 CFR 303.9 - Requirements for short-term Planning Investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Planning Investments. 303.9 Section 303.9 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PLANNING INVESTMENTS AND COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES § 303.9 Requirements for short-term Planning Investments. (a) In addition to providing support for...

  4. 13 CFR 303.9 - Requirements for short-term Planning Investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Planning Investments. 303.9 Section 303.9 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PLANNING INVESTMENTS AND COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES § 303.9 Requirements for short-term Planning Investments. (a) In addition to providing support for...

  5. 26 CFR 1.1411-10 - Controlled foreign corporations and passive foreign investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Tax § 1.1411-10 Controlled foreign corporations and passive foreign investment companies. (a) In... indirectly owns an interest in a passive foreign investment company (PFIC). In addition, this section... in QEF, a foreign corporation that is a passive foreign investment company (within the meaning...

  6. Ripple effects of reform on capital financing.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Kelly

    2014-05-01

    Healthcare leaders should inventory and quantify the capital initiatives deemed critical for success under changing business models. Key considerations in planning such initiatives are opportunity costs and potential impact on productivity. Senior leaders also should create rolling five-year estimates of expenditures in addition to a one-year budget. Approaches to paying for such initiatives include borrowing from cash reserves, partnering to share cash and other resources, and developing new revenue sources derived from the initiatives themselves.

  7. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  8. Health Inequalities through the Lens of Health Capital Theory: Issues, Solutions, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Galama, Titus J; van Kippersluis, Hans

    2013-06-01

    We explore what health-capital theory has to offer in terms of informing and directing research into health inequality. We argue that economic theory can help in identifying mechanisms through which specific socioeconomic indicators and health interact. Our reading of the literature, and our own work, leads us to conclude that non-degenerate versions of the Grossman model (1972a;b) and its extensions can explain many salient stylized facts on health inequalities. Yet, further development is required in at least two directions. First, a childhood phase needs to be incorporated, in recognition of the importance of childhood endowments and investments in the determination of later-life socioeconomic and health outcomes. Second, a unified theory of joint investment in skill (or human) capital and in health capital could provide a basis for a theory of the relationship between education and health. PMID:24570580

  9. Health Inequalities through the Lens of Health Capital Theory: Issues, Solutions, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Galama, Titus J.; van Kippersluis, Hans

    2013-01-01

    We explore what health-capital theory has to offer in terms of informing and directing research into health inequality. We argue that economic theory can help in identifying mechanisms through which specific socioeconomic indicators and health interact. Our reading of the literature, and our own work, leads us to conclude that non-degenerate versions of the Grossman model (1972a;b) and its extensions can explain many salient stylized facts on health inequalities. Yet, further development is required in at least two directions. First, a childhood phase needs to be incorporated, in recognition of the importance of childhood endowments and investments in the determination of later-life socioeconomic and health outcomes. Second, a unified theory of joint investment in skill (or human) capital and in health capital could provide a basis for a theory of the relationship between education and health. PMID:24570580

  10. 12 CFR 615.5200 - Capital planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Capital Adequacy § 615.5200 Capital planning. (a) The Board...'s capital adequacy plan. Rather, the standards are intended to serve as minimum levels of capital... capital adequacy plan as a part of the financial plan required by § 618.8440 of this chapter. The...

  11. 12 CFR 652.61 - Capital planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... equity capital instrument, a payment of common or preferred stock dividends, a payment that may be... projections extend. Tier 1 Capital means the components meeting the criteria of Common Equity Tier 1 Capital..., including the core capital and regulatory capital ratios required by sections 8.32 and 8.33 of the Act,...

  12. Eased Canadian foreign investment sought

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-16

    This paper reports that foreign investors soon may have an expanded opportunity to invest in Canada's oil industry. Industry and business groups and members of the Alberta caucus of the governing federal Conservative Party are calling for easing or removal of current restrictions on foreign investment in the energy sector. There is strong opposition from the political left to block any dilution of current limits on foreign investment in Canada.

  13. Personality Trait Development and Social Investment in Work

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Nathan W.; Roberts, Brent W.; Lodi-Smith, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    A longitudinal study of employed individuals was used to test the relationship between social investment at work—the act of cognitively and emotionally committing to one’s job—and longitudinal and cross-sectional personality trait development. Participants provided ratings of personality traits and social investment at work at two time-points, separated by approximately three years. Data were analyzed using latent change models. Cross-sectional results showed that extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness and emotional stability were related to social investment at work. Additionally, a positive association was found between longitudinal change in social investment in work and change in personality traits—especially conscientiousness. Finally, the correlated changes in social investment and personality traits were invariant across age groups, suggesting that personality traits remain malleable across the lifespan. PMID:22822278

  14. How Fidelity invests in service professionals.

    PubMed

    McColgan, E A

    1997-01-01

    If you're in the business of service delivery, investment in the training and development of your staff is one of the keys to your company's success. But what's the best way to design and implement your investment? In 1994, Fidelity Institutional Retirement Services Company (FIRSCo) needed to ensure that its rapidly expanding staff maintained the company's high levels of customer satisfaction. The solution, according to Ellyn McColgan, formerly an executive vice president of FIRSCo and now the president of Fidelity Investments Tax-Exempt Services Company, was to reach out to its service associates with a powerful new model for training and development called Service Delivery University. SDU is a virtual university with a content-based core curriculum and five colleges that focus on business concepts and skills. It is driven by three principles. First, all training must be directly aligned with the company's strategic and financial objectives and focused on customer needs. Second, service delivery is a profession and should be taught as such. And finally, professional development should be the primary responsibility of line managers rather than the human resources department. McColgan explains how FIRSCo overcame resistance to this sweeping change in employee education. (Time was one obstacle: each associate receives 80 hours of training per year.) In addition, the author discusses the fine art of measuring the success of a program like SDU. She finds that the company's investment has paid dividends to the staff, to the organization as a whole, and to FIRSCo's customers.

  15. NASA's Hypersonic Investment Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Hutt, John; McClinton, Charles

    2002-01-01

    NASA has established long term goals for access to space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goal for third-generation launch systems represents significant reduction in cost and improved safety over the current first generation system. The Advanced Space Transportation Office (ASTP) at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Hypersonic Investment Area (HIA), third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframe, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), avionics, power, operations and system analysis. These technologies are being matured through research and both ground and flight-testing. This paper provides an overview of the HIA program plans and recent accomplishments.

  16. Transformative Pedagogy for Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores ways in which pedagogy for an elaborated form of transformative learning can be a useful catalyst for the development of social capital in community and workplace groups and networks. I begin with an example and then explore ideas of learning challenges embedded in building and maintaining social capital. I consider the…

  17. San Diego's Capital Planning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytton, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article describes San Diego's capital planning process. As part of its capital planning process, the San Diego Unified School District has developed a systematic analysis of functional quality at each of its school sites. The advantage of this approach is that it seeks to develop and apply quantifiable metrics and standards for the more…

  18. Capital Formation in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances, Carol; Coldren, Sharon L.

    The need for new capital in higher education and major areas where the interests of the business and higher education communities are aligned are considered. Higher education is a major employer and makes a large contribution to the gross national product. Human capital has become the accepted term for referring to the contribution of education,…

  19. Taking Capital Requirements into Account.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Hans; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive capital charge policy is recommended as an integral part of college budgeting and reporting. It includes three components: a capital renewal and replacement charge, a new equipment and library and laboratory acquisitions budget, and a debt repayment schedule using internal borrowing. (MSE)

  20. Rethinking Higher Education Capital Finance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, George A.

    1988-01-01

    Capital finance in institutions of higher education is analyzed in light of changes in the Tax Reform Act of 1986 affecting the ability of institutions to finance capital projects and the likelihood of changes in the government's view of tax-exempt financing. The options for colleges and universities are analyzed in the following areas: (1)…

  1. Human Capital and Economic Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mincer, Jacob

    1984-01-01

    The framework of an aggregate production function shows that growth of human capital is both a condition and a consequence of economic growth. The concurrent growth and diffusion of human capital, involving production of new knowledge, appears necessary to ensure sustained economic development worldwide. (TE)

  2. Schools, Social Capital and Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Julie; Catts, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the significance of social capital in relation to education, exploring its relevance to teachers and other professionals as well as among young people. It draws on aspects of five case studies undertaken by the Schools and Social Capital Network, within the Applied Educational Research Scheme in Scotland. These case studies…

  3. 76 FR 74631 - Capital Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... assets. \\1\\ 76 FR 35351 (June 17, 2011). \\2\\ The amendments to Regulation Y are codified at 12 CFR 225.8... (Pillar 2) Related to the Implementation of the Basel II Advanced Capital Framework, 73 FR 44620 (July 31... Owners' Loan Act. See 76 FR 22662, 22665 (April 22, 2011). The Board may extend the capital plan...

  4. 12 CFR 6.4 - Capital measures and capital category definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... risk-based capital ratio; (2) The Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio; (3) The leverage ratio. (b) Capital...) Well capitalized if the bank: (i) Has a total risk-based capital ratio of 10.0 percent or greater; and (ii) Has a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 6.0 percent or greater; and (iii) Has a leverage...

  5. 12 CFR 6.4 - Capital measures and capital category definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... risk-based capital ratio; (2) The Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio; (3) The leverage ratio. (b) Capital...) Well capitalized if the bank: (i) Has a total risk-based capital ratio of 10.0 percent or greater; and (ii) Has a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 6.0 percent or greater; and (iii) Has a leverage...

  6. 12 CFR 565.4 - Capital measures and capital category definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for any rating category (other than in a rating category specifically addressing capital adequacy... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Capital measures and capital category... PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION § 565.4 Capital measures and capital category definitions. (a) Capital...

  7. 12 CFR 6.4 - Capital measures and capital category definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Capital measures and capital category definitions. 6.4 Section 6.4 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Capital Categories § 6.4 Capital measures and capital category definitions. (a) Capital measures. For purposes of section 38...

  8. Advancing social and economic development by investing in women's and children's health: a new Global Investment Framework.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, Karin; Axelson, Henrik; Sheehan, Peter; Anderson, Ian; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Temmerman, Marleen; Mason, Elizabeth; Friedman, Howard S; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Lawn, Joy E; Sweeny, Kim; Tulloch, Jim; Hansen, Peter; Chopra, Mickey; Gupta, Anuradha; Vogel, Joshua P; Ostergren, Mikael; Rasmussen, Bruce; Levin, Carol; Boyle, Colin; Kuruvilla, Shyama; Koblinsky, Marjorie; Walker, Neff; de Francisco, Andres; Novcic, Nebojsa; Presern, Carole; Jamison, Dean; Bustreo, Flavia

    2014-04-12

    A new Global Investment Framework for Women's and Children's Health demonstrates how investment in women's and children's health will secure high health, social, and economic returns. We costed health systems strengthening and six investment packages for: maternal and newborn health, child health, immunisation, family planning, HIV/AIDS, and malaria. Nutrition is a cross-cutting theme. We then used simulation modelling to estimate the health and socioeconomic returns of these investments. Increasing health expenditure by just $5 per person per year up to 2035 in 74 high-burden countries could yield up to nine times that value in economic and social benefits. These returns include greater gross domestic product (GDP) growth through improved productivity, and prevention of the needless deaths of 147 million children, 32 million stillbirths, and 5 million women by 2035. These gains could be achieved by an additional investment of $30 billion per year, equivalent to a 2% increase above current spending.

  9. Advancing social and economic development by investing in women's and children's health: a new Global Investment Framework.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, Karin; Axelson, Henrik; Sheehan, Peter; Anderson, Ian; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Temmerman, Marleen; Mason, Elizabeth; Friedman, Howard S; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Lawn, Joy E; Sweeny, Kim; Tulloch, Jim; Hansen, Peter; Chopra, Mickey; Gupta, Anuradha; Vogel, Joshua P; Ostergren, Mikael; Rasmussen, Bruce; Levin, Carol; Boyle, Colin; Kuruvilla, Shyama; Koblinsky, Marjorie; Walker, Neff; de Francisco, Andres; Novcic, Nebojsa; Presern, Carole; Jamison, Dean; Bustreo, Flavia

    2014-04-12

    A new Global Investment Framework for Women's and Children's Health demonstrates how investment in women's and children's health will secure high health, social, and economic returns. We costed health systems strengthening and six investment packages for: maternal and newborn health, child health, immunisation, family planning, HIV/AIDS, and malaria. Nutrition is a cross-cutting theme. We then used simulation modelling to estimate the health and socioeconomic returns of these investments. Increasing health expenditure by just $5 per person per year up to 2035 in 74 high-burden countries could yield up to nine times that value in economic and social benefits. These returns include greater gross domestic product (GDP) growth through improved productivity, and prevention of the needless deaths of 147 million children, 32 million stillbirths, and 5 million women by 2035. These gains could be achieved by an additional investment of $30 billion per year, equivalent to a 2% increase above current spending. PMID:24263249

  10. A contemporary perspective on capitated reimbursement for imaging services.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, H W

    1995-01-01

    Capitation ensures predictability of healthcare costs, requires acceptance of a premium in return for providing all required medical services and defines the actual dollar amount paid to a physician or hospital on a per member per month basis for a service or group of services. Capitation is expected to dramatically affect the marketplace in the near future, as private enterprise demands lower, more stable healthcare costs. Capitation requires detailed quantitative and financial data, including: eligibility and benefits determination, encounter processing, referral management, claims processing, case management, physician compensation, insurance management functions, outcomes reporting, performance management and cost accounting. It is important to understand actuarial risk and capitation marketing when considering a capitation contract. Also, capitated payment methodologies may vary to include modified fee-for-service, incentive pay, risk pool redistributions, merit, or a combination. Risk is directly related to the ability to predict utilization and unit cost of imaging services provided to a specific insured population. In capitated environments, radiologists will have even less control over referrals than they have today and will serve many more "covered lives"; long-term relationships with referring physicians will continue to evaporate; and services will be provided under exclusive, multi-year contracts. In addition to intensified use of technology for image transfer, telecommunications and sophisticated data processing and tracking systems, imaging departments must continue to provide the greatest amount of appropriate diagnostic information in a timely fashion at the lowest feasible cost and risk to the patient. PMID:10141102

  11. Some problems about population investment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z

    1983-01-01

    In this article, the concept--population investment--relates to population and economy for investment expenditures and economic gains. 3 economic approaches express this concept. 1) Population investment, which maintains the standard of living, may be considered separate from economic investment, which raises the per capita income. The original population and the increased population comprise total population. Increased population, composed of newborns, is nonproductive, lowering per capita output. Rapid population growth increases population investment and decreases economic investment so that the national economy does not improve. 2) Population investment regards people as producers in a narrow as well as broad sense. Each potential worker incurs labor reproduction expenses since he must be reared and educated before he becomes a producing laborer. Family and society labor reproduction expenditures depend upon costs for 1) prenatal care and delivery, 2) living expenses, 3) medical fees, 4) educational fees, and 5) related state expenditures, such as maternity wages and infant mortality costs. A 1979 study, using 191 cities, estimated costs of 6907 yuan in cities, 4830 yuan in towns, and 1630 yuan in rural areas to raise a child from conception through age 16. Researchers conclude that 1) raising the new labor force is more expensive in towns and cities than in rural areas, 2) families supply over 70% and the state less than 30%, of costs, and 3) living expenses make up over 60% of costs, with education taking 11.3% (rural) to 26.8% (urban). 3) Education fees (intelligence investment) form the third population investment function. Changes in labor quality as they effect national income illustrate the effects of intelligence investment. The authors theorize that intelligence investment is a fourth factor, with 1) increased work force size, 2) increased gross output, and 3) reduced material consumption in increasing the national income.

  12. Transit management and replacement capital planning. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The 15 papers in this report deal with the following areas: planning priorities for replacement of transit assets; establishing a transit capital replacement account - the San Diego experience; use of life-cycle cost analysis in transit capital overhaul/replace decisions - an application to the PATH railcar fleet; methodology for projecting rail transit rehabilitation and replacement-capital financing needs; long-range transit fleet planning: defining and costing a replacement-only scenario for Seattle; strategic planning as a basis for capital-investment programming: case study of the regional transportation authority in Chicago; trolley bus and motor-coach operational cost comparisons utilizing section 15 data; strategic model for operator work-force planning in the transit industry; monitoring performance of new bus routes; optimization strategies for transit systems in urban corridors; data processing software for an automatic data-acquisition system in mass transit; determinants of superior performance in public transit: research opportunities using Section 15 data; life-cycle cost analysis of electronic registering fareboxes: a case study; cluster-sampling techniques for estimating transit patronage; recent changes in BART patronage: some findings on fare elasticities.

  13. Considerations when analyzing investment in space transportation business ventures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S. Greenberg, Joel

    2000-07-01

    Private sector investment in space transportation, as in most business situations, requires the development of realistic and believable business plans that demonstrate that if an investment is made that there is a reasonable chance that the indicated financial performance will attract the necessary financing. The business plan must also indicate the assumptions upon which the plan rests, and as has become almost second nature to the space transportation industry, the necessary role of the government in risk reduction and/or capital formation [i.e., government actions that are necessary to make the business venture financially attractive]. This paper discusses and describes several factors that must be considered, by both government and industry, when developing a business plan for obtaining financing for space transportation business ventures.

  14. Leading IDSs heed the call to invest in IT.

    PubMed

    Coddington, Dean C; Moore, Keith D

    2002-02-01

    Case studies of 11 leading integrated delivery systems (IDSs) found all of these organizations are committed to investing in the development of sophisticated IT systems. The case-study IDSs' primary concerns regarding IT investments were related to achieving adequate financial and patient care returns, accessing capital, finding qualified IT staff, finding reliable IT vendors, achieving physician acceptance, and sharing software and IT solutions with other IDSs. Among the competitive advantages these IDSs have gained from advanced IT capabilities are improved patient satisfaction due to superior service outcomes and the IDS's ability to access clinical information from any point within its delivery system, reduced prescription errors and adverse drug reactions, enhanced quality-improvement efforts, reduced costs associated with telephone calls and paper processing, and enhanced ability to recruit clinical personnel. PMID:11842500

  15. Moves Management for physician fundraising in a capital campaign.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Larry K

    2005-01-01

    Hospitals are turning to philanthropy as a significant source of funding for capital programs, and physicians are a key resource. Through their own giving and their community-wide influence, physicians provide a high return on capital campaign investment. By adapting Moves Management, the premier method for prospecting and cultivation, development officers can achieve a high rate of participation by the hospital's physicians and, through them, attain increased community giving. Moves Management is defined as a process that involves managing a series of steps (moves) with identified prospects (the 10 percent who can give 90 percent). The number and type of steps depend upon the individual involved, such that each prospect is moved from attention to interest to desire to action and then back to interest until he or she has given everything he/she will or can to the organization.

  16. Social capital and the collective management of resources.

    PubMed

    Pretty, Jules

    2003-12-12

    The proposition that natural resources need protection from the destructive actions of people is widely accepted. Yet communities have shown in the past and increasingly today that they can collaborate for long-term resource management. The term social capital captures the idea that social bonds and norms are critical for sustainability. Where social capital is high in formalized groups, people have the confidence to invest in collective activities, knowing that others will do so too. Some 0.4 to 0.5 million groups have been established since the early 1990s for watershed, forest, irrigation, pest, wildlife, fishery, and microfinance management. These offer a route to sustainable management and governance of common resources. PMID:14671287

  17. Impact of State hospital rate setting on capital formation

    PubMed Central

    Cromwell, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    For this article, a new national data base of Medicare cost reports on more than 2,000 hospitals is used to measure the impact of State prospective rate setting on capital formation. Several investment measures are analyzed, both in nominal and real terms, using a combination of descriptive and multivariate techniques. Results indicate that, over the last decade, State hospital rate-setting programs have had little demonstrable effect on capital formation and they have not caused any significant aging of plant assets. Programs in both New York and Massachusetts were found to be associated with a slowing in the rate of bed growth, however, resulting in significant long-term cost savings. PMID:10312117

  18. Capital death in the world market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakian, Adam; Podobnik, Boris; Piskor, Manuela; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-03-01

    We study the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita together with the market capitalization (MCAP) per capita as two indicators of the effect of globalization. We find that g, the GDP per capita, as a function of m, the MCAP per capita, follows a power law with average exponent close to 1/3. In addition, the Zipf ranking approach confirms that the m for countries with initially lower values of m tends to grow more rapidly than for countries with initially larger values of m. If the trends over the past 20 years continue to hold in the future, then the Zipf ranking approach leads to the prediction that in about 50 years, all countries participating in globalization will have comparable values of their MCAP per capita. We call this economic state "capital death," in analogy to the physics state of "heat death" predicted by thermodynamic arguments.

  19. Government Policy, Saving and Investment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Robert

    1983-01-01

    Several arguments that government policy--income redistribution and support of the poor, higher marginal income taxes, and social security--has depressed saving are found wanting. Also hard to sustain is the argument that investment demand has been depressed by tax policy. Current government policy will not improve saving and investment. (RM)

  20. In Defense of Parental Investment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    Defends attachment theory and its relation to parental investment. Misunderstandings of the rationale for Parental Investment in the Child Questionnaire (PIC) and the measurement of attitudes in Sharon Hays's article are discussed. Parental and cultural issues are discussed with particular attention to data on fathers and applicability across…