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Sample records for additional cellular factors

  1. Use of a Generalized Additive Model to Investigate Key Abiotic Factors Affecting Microcystin Cellular Quotas in Heavy Bloom Areas of Lake Taihu

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Min; Xie, Ping; Chen, Jun; Qin, Boqiang; Zhang, Dawen; Niu, Yuan; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Qing; Wu, Laiyan

    2012-01-01

    Lake Taihu is the third largest freshwater lake in China and is suffering from serious cyanobacterial blooms with the associated drinking water contamination by microcystin (MC) for millions of citizens. So far, most studies on MCs have been limited to two small bays, while systematic research on the whole lake is lacking. To explain the variations in MC concentrations during cyanobacterial bloom, a large-scale survey at 30 sites across the lake was conducted monthly in 2008. The health risks of MC exposure were high, especially in the northern area. Both Microcystis abundance and MC cellular quotas presented positive correlations with MC concentration in the bloom seasons, suggesting that the toxic risks during Microcystis proliferations were affected by variations in both Microcystis density and MC production per Microcystis cell. Use of a powerful predictive modeling tool named generalized additive model (GAM) helped visualize significant effects of abiotic factors related to carbon fixation and proliferation of Microcystis (conductivity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), water temperature and pH) on MC cellular quotas from recruitment period of Microcystis to the bloom seasons, suggesting the possible use of these factors, in addition to Microcystis abundance, as warning signs to predict toxic events in the future. The interesting relationship between macrophytes and MC cellular quotas of Microcystis (i.e., high MC cellular quotas in the presence of macrophytes) needs further investigation. PMID:22384128

  2. Use of a generalized additive model to investigate key abiotic factors affecting microcystin cellular quotas in heavy bloom areas of Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Tao, Min; Xie, Ping; Chen, Jun; Qin, Boqiang; Zhang, Dawen; Niu, Yuan; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Qing; Wu, Laiyan

    2012-01-01

    Lake Taihu is the third largest freshwater lake in China and is suffering from serious cyanobacterial blooms with the associated drinking water contamination by microcystin (MC) for millions of citizens. So far, most studies on MCs have been limited to two small bays, while systematic research on the whole lake is lacking. To explain the variations in MC concentrations during cyanobacterial bloom, a large-scale survey at 30 sites across the lake was conducted monthly in 2008. The health risks of MC exposure were high, especially in the northern area. Both Microcystis abundance and MC cellular quotas presented positive correlations with MC concentration in the bloom seasons, suggesting that the toxic risks during Microcystis proliferations were affected by variations in both Microcystis density and MC production per Microcystis cell. Use of a powerful predictive modeling tool named generalized additive model (GAM) helped visualize significant effects of abiotic factors related to carbon fixation and proliferation of Microcystis (conductivity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), water temperature and pH) on MC cellular quotas from recruitment period of Microcystis to the bloom seasons, suggesting the possible use of these factors, in addition to Microcystis abundance, as warning signs to predict toxic events in the future. The interesting relationship between macrophytes and MC cellular quotas of Microcystis (i.e., high MC cellular quotas in the presence of macrophytes) needs further investigation. PMID:22384128

  3. Additive Cellular Automata and Volume Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Thomas B.

    2000-09-01

    A class of dynamical systems associated to rings of S-integers in rational function fields is described. General results about these systems give a rather complete description of the well-known dynamics in one-dimensional additive cellular automata with prime alphabet, including simple formulæ for the topological entropy and the number of periodic configurations. For these systems the periodic points are uniformly distributed along some subsequence with respect to the maximal measure, and in particular are dense. Periodic points may be constructed arbitrarily close to a given configuration, and rationality of the dynamical zeta function is characterized. Throughout the emphasis is to place this particular family of cellular automata into the wider context of S-integer dynamical systems, and to show how the arithmetic of rational function fields determines their behaviour. Using a covering space the dynamics of additive cellular automata are related to a form of hyperbolicity in completions of rational function fields. This expresses the topological entropy of the automata directly in terms of volume growth in the covering space.

  4. Cellular factors implicated in filovirus entry.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Suchita; Hope, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Although filoviral infections are still occurring in different parts of the world, there are no effective preventive or treatment strategies currently available against them. Not only do filoviruses cause a deadly infection, but they also have the potential of being used as biological weapons. This makes it imperative to comprehensively study these viruses in order to devise effective strategies to prevent the occurrence of these infections. Entry is the foremost step in the filoviral replication cycle and different studies have reported the involvement of a myriad of cellular factors including plasma membrane components, cytoskeletal proteins, endosomal components, and cytosolic factors in this process. Signaling molecules such as the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases comprising of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer have also been implicated as putative entry factors. Additionally, filoviruses are suggested to bind to a common receptor and recent studies have proposed T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) as potential receptor candidates. This paper summarizes the existing literature on filoviral entry with a special focus on cellular factors involved in this process and also highlights some fundamental questions. Future research aimed at answering these questions could be very useful in designing novel antiviral therapeutics. PMID:23365575

  5. Bioinspired Cellular Structures: Additive Manufacturing and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfl, J.; Pettermann, H. E.; Liska, R.

    Biological materials (e.g., wood, trabecular bone, marine skeletons) rely heavily on the use of cellular architecture, which provides several advantages. (1) The resulting structures can bear the variety of "real life" load spectra using a minimum of a given bulk material, featuring engineering lightweight design principles. (2) The inside of the structures is accessible to body fluids which deliver the required nutrients. (3) Furthermore, cellular architectures can grow organically by adding or removing individual struts or by changing the shape of the constituting elements. All these facts make the use of cellular architectures a reasonable choice for nature. Using additive manufacturing technologies (AMT), it is now possible to fabricate such structures for applications in engineering and biomedicine. In this chapter, we present methods that allow the 3D computational analysis of the mechanical properties of cellular structures with open porosity. Various different cellular architectures including disorder are studied. In order to quantify the influence of architecture, the apparent density is always kept constant. Furthermore, it is shown that how new advanced photopolymers can be used to tailor the mechanical and functional properties of the fabricated structures.

  6. Cellular Restriction Factors of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Jörg; Münk, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviruses are known for their narrow cell- and species-tropisms, which are determined by cellular proteins whose absence or presence either support viral replication (dependency factors, cofactors) or inhibit viral replication (restriction factors). Similar to Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the cat lentivirus Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is sensitive to recently discovered cellular restriction factors from non-host species that are able to stop viruses from replicating. Of particular importance are the cellular proteins APOBEC3, TRIM5α and tetherin/BST-2. In general, lentiviruses counteract or escape their species’ own variant of the restriction factor, but are targeted by the orthologous proteins of distantly related species. Most of the knowledge regarding lentiviral restriction factors has been obtained in the HIV-1 system; however, much less is known about their effects on other lentiviruses. We describe here the molecular mechanisms that explain how FIV maintains its replication in feline cells, but is largely prevented from cross-species infections by cellular restriction factors. PMID:22069525

  7. Additive Manufacturing of Metal Cellular Structures: Design and Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Harrysson, Ola; Cormier, Denis; West, Harvey; Gong, Haijun; Stucker, Brent

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid development of additive manufacturing (AM), high-quality fabrication of lightweight design-efficient structures no longer poses an insurmountable challenge. On the other hand, much of the current research and development with AM technologies still focuses on material and process development. With the design for additive manufacturing in mind, this article explores the design issue for lightweight cellular structures that could be efficiently realized via AM processes. A unit-cell-based modeling approach that combines experimentation and limited-scale simulation was demonstrated, and it was suggested that this approach could potentially lead to computationally efficient design optimizations with the lightweight structures in future applications.

  8. Cellular factors modulating the mechanism of tau protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Sarah N; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Baker, Jeremy; Martinez-Licha, Carlos R; Darling, April; Dickey, Chad A

    2015-05-01

    Pathological accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in the form of neurofibrillary tangles, is a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent neurodegenerative condition worldwide. In addition to Alzheimer's disease, a number of neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies, are characterized by the accumulation of aggregated tau in a variety of brain regions. While tau normally plays an important role in stabilizing the microtubule network of the cytoskeleton, its dissociation from microtubules and eventual aggregation into pathological deposits is an area of intense focus for therapeutic development. Here we discuss the known cellular factors that affect tau aggregation, from post-translational modifications to molecular chaperones. PMID:25666877

  9. Cellular factors modulating the mechanism of tau protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Sarah N.; Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Baker, Jeremy; Martinez-Licha, Carlos R.; Darling, April

    2015-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in the form of neurofibrillary tangles, is a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, the most prevalent neurodegenerative condition worldwide. In addition to Alzheimer’s disease, a number of neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies, are characterized by the accumulation of aggregated tau in a variety of brain regions. While tau normally plays an important role in stabilizing the microtubule network of the cytoskeleton, its dissociation from microtubules and eventual aggregation into pathological deposits is an area of intense focus for therapeutic development. Here we discuss the known cellular factors that affect tau aggregation, from post-translational modifications to molecular chaperones. PMID:25666877

  10. Translation Factors Specify Cellular Metabolic State.

    PubMed

    Mata, Juan

    2016-08-16

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Shah et al. present evidence that a subcomplex of the eIF3 translation initiation factor regulates translation of mRNAs encoding components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and glycolytic enzymes, thus linking translational control with energy metabolism. PMID:27533178

  11. Material and mechanical factors: new strategy in cellular neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Hillary; Kwon, Il Keun; Lim, Jung Yul

    2014-01-01

    Since damaged neural circuits are not generally self-recovered, developing methods to stimulate neurogenesis is critically required. Most studies have examined the effects of soluble pharmacological factors on the cellular neurogenesis. On the other hand, it is now recognized that the other extracellular factors, including material and mechanical cues, also have a strong potential to induce cellular neurogenesis. This article will review recent data on the material (chemical patterning, micro/nano-topography, carbon nanotube, graphene) and mechanical (static cue from substrate stiffness, dynamic cue from stretch and flow shear) stimulations of cellular neurogenesis. These approaches may provide new neural regenerative medicine protocols. Scaffolding material templates capable of triggering cellular neurogenesis can be explored in the presence of neurogenesis-stimulatory mechanical environments, and also with conventional soluble factors, to enhance axonal growth and neural network formation in neural tissue engineering. PMID:25422642

  12. 47 CFR 1.20007 - Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications carriers. 1.20007 Section 1.20007 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act § 1.20007 Additional...

  13. Cellular uptake of titanium and vanadium from addition of salts or fretting corrosion in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, A.M.; Merritt, K.; Brown, S.A. . Dept. of Biomedical Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    The use of titanium and titanium-6% aluminum-4% vanadium alloy for dental and orthopedic implants has increased in the last decade. The implants are presumed to be compatible because oseointegration, bony apposition, and cell attachment are known. However, the cellular association of titanium and vanadium have remained unknown. This study examined the uptake of salts or fretting corrosion products. Titanium was not observed to be toxic to the cells. Vanadium was toxic at levels greater than 10[mu]g/mL. The percentage of cellular association of titanium was shown to be about 10 times that of vanadium. The percentage of cellular association of either element was greater from fretting corrosion than from the addition of salts. The presence of vanadium did not affect the cellular uptake of titanium. The presence of titanium decreased the cell association of vanadium.

  14. Identification of cellular factors binding to acetylated HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Allouch, Awatef; Cereseto, Anna

    2011-11-01

    The viral protein integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into the host cellular genome. We have recently demonstrated that IN is acetylated by a cellular histone acetyltransferase, p300, which modifies three lysines located in the C-terminus of the viral factor (Cereseto et al. in EMBO J 24:3070-3081, 2005). This modification enhances IN catalytic activity, as demonstrated by in vitro assays. Consistently, mutations introduced in the targeted lysines greatly decrease the efficiency of HIV-1 integration. Acetylation was proven to regulate protein functions by modulating protein-protein interactions. HIV-1 to efficiently complete its replication steps, including the integration reaction, requires interacting with numerous cellular factors. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether acetylation might modulate the interaction between IN and the cellular factors. To this aim we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening that differs from the screenings so far performed (Rain et al. in Methods 47:291-297, 2009; Studamire and Goff in Retrovirology 5:48, 2008) for using as bait IN constitutively acetylated. From this analysis we have identified thirteen cellular factors involved in transcription, chromatin remodeling, nuclear transport, RNA binding, protein synthesis regulation and microtubule organization. To validate these interactions, binding assays were performed showing that acetylation increases the affinity of IN with specific factors. Nevertheless, few two-hybrid hits bind with the same affinity the acetylated and the unmodified IN. These results further underlie the relevance of IN post-translational modification by acetylation in HIV-1 replication cycle. PMID:20016921

  15. The inactive-active phase transition in the noisy additive (exclusive-or) probabilistic cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the inactive-active phase transition in an array of additive (exclusive-or) cellular automata (CA) under noise. The model is closely related with the Domany-Kinzel (DK) probabilistic cellular automaton (PCA), for which there are rigorous as well as numerical estimates on the transition probabilities. Here, we characterize the critical behavior of the noisy additive cellular automaton by mean field analysis and finite-size scaling and show that its phase transition belongs to the directed percolation universality class of critical behavior. As a by-product of our analysis, we argue that the critical behavior of the noisy elementary CA 90 and 102 (in Wolfram’s enumeration scheme) must be the same. We also perform an empirical investigation of the mean field equations to assess their quality and find that away from the critical point (but not necessarily very far away) the mean field approximations provide a reasonably good description of the dynamics of the PCA.

  16. Humoral and cellular factors of maternal immunity in swine.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Henri; Berri, Mustapha; Gerdts, Volker; Meurens, François

    2009-03-01

    Immunoglobulins cannot cross the placenta in pregnant sows. Neonatal pigs are therefore agammaglobulinemic at birth and, although immunocompetent, they cannot mount rapid immune responses at systemic and mucosal sites. Their survival depends directly on the acquisition of maternal immunity via colostrum and milk. Protection by maternal immunity is mediated by a number of factors, including specific systemic humoral immunity, involving mostly maternal IgG transferred from blood to colostrum and typically absorbed within the first 36 h of life. Passive mucosal immunity involves local humoral immunity, including the production of secretory IgA (sIgA), which is transferred principally via milk until weaning. The mammary gland (MG) produces sIgA, which is, then secreted into the milk via the poly-Ig receptor (pIgR) of epithelial cells. These antibodies are produced in response to intestinal and respiratory antigens, including pathogens and commensal organisms. Protection is also mediated by cellular immunity, which is transferred via maternal cells present in mammary secretions. The mechanisms underlying the various immunological links between MG and the mucosal surfaces involve hormonally regulated addressins and chemokines specific to these compartments. The enhancement of colostrogenic immunity depends on the stimulation of systemic immunity, whereas the enhancement of lactogenic immunity depends on appropriate stimulation at induction sites, an increase in cell trafficking from the gut and upper respiratory tract to the MG and, possibly, enhanced immunoglobulin production at the effector site and secretion in milk. In addition, mammary secretions provide factors other than immunoglobulins that protect the neonate and regulate the development of mucosal immunity--a key element of postnatal adaptation to environmental antigens. PMID:18761034

  17. 47 CFR 1.20007 - Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications carriers. 1.20007 Section 1.20007 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection...

  18. 47 CFR 1.20007 - Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications carriers. 1.20007 Section 1.20007 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Communications Assistance for...

  19. 47 CFR 1.20007 - Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications carriers. 1.20007 Section 1.20007 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection...

  20. 47 CFR 1.20007 - Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional assistance capability requirements for wireline, cellular, and PCS telecommunications carriers. 1.20007 Section 1.20007 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection...

  1. Cellular monitoring systems for the assessment of space environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Arenz, A.; Meier, M. M.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    Harmful environmental factors - namely ionizing radiation - will continue to influence future manned space missions. The Cellular Biodiagnostic group at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops cellular monitoring systems, which include bacterial and mammalian cell systems capable of recognizing DNA damage as a consequence of the presence of genotoxic conditions. Such bioassay or biosensor systems will complement the physical detector systems used in space, insofar as they yield intrinsically biologically weighted measures of cellular responses. Furthermore, synergistic mutagenic and cancerogenic impacts of the radiation environment together with other potentially genotoxic constituents of the space habitat can be quantified using such systems, whose signals are especially relevant for the molecular damage to the DNA or the chromosomes. The experiment Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CERASP) has been selected by NASA to be performed on the International Space Station. It will supply basic information on the cellular response to radiation applied in microgravity. One of the biological end-points under investigation will be survival reflected by radiation-dependent reduction of constitutive expression of the enhanced variant of green fluorescent protein (EGFP), originally isolated from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria. A second end-point will be gene activation by space flight conditions in mammalian cells, based on fluorescent promoter reporter systems using the destabilized EGFP variant (d2EGFP). The promoter element to be investigated will reflect the activity of the NF-kB stress response pathway as an anti-apoptotic radiation response. DNA damage will be measured by fluorescent analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU). The systems have worked properly for terrestrial applications during the first experiments. Experiments using accelerated particles produced at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL have given insights into cellular mechanisms

  2. Cellular Reprogramming Using Defined Factors and MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Takanori; Kuboki, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    Development of human bodies, organs, and tissues contains numerous steps of cellular differentiation including an initial zygote, embryonic stem (ES) cells, three germ layers, and multiple expertized lineages of cells. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been recently developed using defined reprogramming factors such as Nanog, Klf5, Oct3/4 (Pou5f1), Sox2, and Myc. This outstanding innovation is largely changing life science and medicine. Methods of direct reprogramming of cells into myocytes, neurons, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts have been further developed using modified combination of factors such as N-myc, L-myc, Sox9, and microRNAs in defined cell/tissue culture conditions. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are also emerging multipotent stem cells with particular microRNA expression signatures. It was shown that miRNA-720 had a role in cellular reprogramming through targeting the pluripotency factor Nanog and induction of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). This review reports histories, topics, and idea of cellular reprogramming. PMID:27382371

  3. Cellular Factors Targeting APCs to Modulate Adaptive T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Do, Jeongsu; Min, Booki

    2014-01-01

    The fate of adaptive T cell immunity is determined by multiple cellular and molecular factors, among which the cytokine milieu plays the most important role in this process. Depending on the cytokines present during the initial T cell activation, T cells become effector cells that produce different effector molecules and execute adaptive immune functions. Studies thus far have primarily focused on defining how these factors control T cell differentiation by targeting T cells themselves. However, other non-T cells, particularly APCs, also express receptors for the factors and are capable of responding to them. In this review, we will discuss how APCs, by responding to those cytokines, influence T cell differentiation and adaptive immunity. PMID:25126585

  4. Cellular monitoring systems for the assessment of space environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Arenz, Andrea; Meier, Matthias M.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    Detrimental environmental factors - namely ionizing radiation - will continue to affect future manned space missions. The Cellular Biodiagnostics group at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops cellular monitoring systems, which include bacterial and mammalian cell systems capable of responding to DNA damage as a consequence of the presence of genotoxic conditions. Such bioassays will complement the physical detector systems used in space, insofar as they yield intrinsically biologically weighted measures of cellular responses. Furthermore, synergistic toxic impacts of the radiation environment together with other potentially genotoxic constituents of the space habitat can be quantified using such systems. The biological end-point under investigation in this work is the gene activation by radiation in mammalian cells, based on fluorescent promoter reporter systems using the destabilized enhanced green fluorescent protein variant (d2EGFP). The promoter element to be investigated reflects the activity of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. The NF-κB family of proteins plays a major role in the inflammatory and immune response, cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis and tumorigenesis. After exposure to X-rays, an increase in NF-κB activation was seen only with high doses. Experiments using accelerated argon ions (95 MeV/u, LET ˜230 keV/μm) produced at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL have shown activation of the NF-κB pathway with doses greater than 1 × 10 6 particles cm -2 (P cm -2), reaching its maximal activation at 2 × 10 7 P cm -2. These results suggest that the exceptional radiation field in space may activate the NF-κB pathway in human cells.

  5. Cellular Actions of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, R. J.; Katz, L. E. L.; Grimberg, Adda; Cohen, P.; Weinzimer, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs), and the IGFBP proteases are involved in the regulation of somatic growth and cellular proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. IGFs are potent mitogenic agents whose actions are determined by the availability of free IGFs to interact with the IGF receptors. IGFBPs comprise a family of proteins that bind IGFs with high affinity and specificity and thereby regulate IGF-dependent actions. IGFBPs have recently emerged as IGF-independent regulators of cell growth. Various IGFBP association proteins as well as cleavage of IGFBPs by specific proteases modulate levels of free IGFs and IGFBPs. The ubiquity and complexity of the IGF axis promise exciting discoveries and applications for the future. PMID:10226802

  6. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor’s p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles’ LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90–300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  7. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Christine E; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor's p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles' LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90-300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  8. Serum factors in older individuals change cellular clock properties

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Lucia; Schmitt, Karen; Meier, Fides; Izakovic, Jan; Roemer, Konstanze; Viola, Antoine; Cajochen, Christian; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Brown, Steven A.; Eckert, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Human aging is accompanied by dramatic changes in daily sleep–wake behavior: Activity shifts to an earlier phase, and the consolidation of sleep and wake is disturbed. Although this daily circadian rhythm is brain-controlled, its mechanism is encoded by cell-autonomous circadian clocks functioning in nearly every cell of the body. In fact, human clock properties measured in peripheral cells such as fibroblasts closely mimic those measured physiologically and behaviorally in the same subjects. To understand better the molecular mechanisms by which human aging affects circadian clocks, we characterized the clock properties of fibroblasts cultivated from dermal biopsies of young and older subjects. Fibroblast period length, amplitude, and phase were identical in the two groups even though behavior was not, thereby suggesting that basic clock properties of peripheral cells do not change during aging. Interestingly, measurement of the same cells in the presence of human serum from older donors shortened period length and advanced the phase of cellular circadian rhythms compared with treatment with serum from young subjects, indicating that a circulating factor might alter human chronotype. Further experiments demonstrated that this effect is caused by a thermolabile factor present in serum of older individuals. Thus, even though the molecular machinery of peripheral circadian clocks does not change with age, some age-related circadian dysfunction observed in vivo might be of hormonal origin and therefore might be pharmacologically remediable. PMID:21482780

  9. Effect of crystals and fibrous network polymer additives on cellular morphology of microcellular foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Ryoma; Utano, Tatsumi; Yasuhara, Shunya; Ishihara, Shota; Ohshima, Masahiro

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the core-back foam injection molding was used for preparing microcelluar polypropylene (PP) foam with either a 1,3:2,4 bis-O-(4-methylbenzylidene)-D-sorbitol gelling agent (Gel-all MD) or a fibros network polymer additive (Metablen 3000). Both agent and addiive could effectively control the celluar morphology in foams but somehow different ways. In course of cooling the polymer with Gel-all MD in the mold caity, the agent enhanced the crystal nucleation and resulted in the large number of small crystals. The crystals acted as effective bubble nucleation agent in foaming process. Thus, the agent reduced the cell size and increased the cell density, drastically. Furthermore, the small crystals provided an inhomogenuity to the expanding cell wall and produced the high open cell content with nano-scale fibril structure. Gell-all as well as Metablene 3000 formed a gel-like fibrous network in melt. The network increased the elongational viscosity and tended to prevent the cell wall from breaking up. The foaming temperature window was widened by the presence of the network. Especially, the temperature window where the macro-fibrous structure was formed was expanded to the higher temperature. The effects of crystal nucleating agent and PTFE on crystals' size and number, viscoelsticity, rheological propreties of PP and cellular morphology were compared and thorougly investigated.

  10. Post-Transcriptional Control of LINE-1 Retrotransposition by Cellular Host Factors in Somatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Javier G.; Cristofari, Gaël

    2016-01-01

    Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposons form the only autonomously active family of transposable elements in humans. They are expressed and mobile in the germline, in embryonic stem cells and in the early embryo, but are silenced in most somatic tissues. Consistently, they play an important role in individual genome variations through insertional mutagenesis and sequence transduction, which occasionally lead to novel genetic diseases. In addition, they are reactivated in nearly half of the human epithelial cancers, contributing to tumor genome dynamics. The L1 element codes for two proteins, ORF1p and ORF2p, which are essential for its mobility. ORF1p is an RNA-binding protein with nucleic acid chaperone activity and ORF2p possesses endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activities. These proteins and the L1 RNA assemble into a ribonucleoprotein particle (L1 RNP), considered as the core of the retrotransposition machinery. The L1 RNP mediates the synthesis of new L1 copies upon cleavage of the target DNA and reverse transcription of the L1 RNA at the target site. The L1 element takes benefit of cellular host factors to complete its life cycle, however several cellular pathways also limit the cellular accumulation of L1 RNPs and their deleterious activities. Here, we review the known cellular host factors and pathways that regulate positively or negatively L1 retrotransposition at post-transcriptional level, in particular by interacting with the L1 machinery or L1 replication intermediates; and how they contribute to control L1 activity in somatic cells. PMID:27014690

  11. Krüppel-like factor 4 negatively regulates cellular antiviral immune response

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei-Wei; Lian, Huan; Zhong, Bo; Shu, Hong-Bing; Li, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection triggers activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and IRF3, which collaborate to induce the expression of type I interferons (IFNs) and elicit innate antiviral response. In this report, we identified Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) as a negative regulator of virus-triggered signaling. Overexpression of KLF4 inhibited virus-induced activation of ISRE and IFN-β promoter in various types of cells, while knockdown of KLF4 potentiated viral infection-triggered induction of IFNB1 and downstream genes and attenuated viral replication. In addition, KLF4 was found to be localized in the cytosol and nucleus, and viral infection promoted the translocation of KLF4 from cytosol to nucleus. Upon virus infection, KLF4 was bound to the promoter of IFNB gene and inhibited the recruitment of IRF3 to the IFNB promoter. Our study thus suggests that KLF4 negatively regulates cellular antiviral response. PMID:25531393

  12. Cellular origin(s) of chronic lymphocytic leukemia: cautionary notes and additional considerations and possibilities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Several cell types have been suggested as giving rise to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and these suggestions have reflected the sophistication of technology available at the time. Although there is no consensus as to the normal cellular counterpart(s) in the disease, an antigen-experienced B lymphocyte appears required based on surface membrane phenotypes and gene expression profiles. However, what is still unclear is whether a single or multiple normal precursors were stimulated to evolve into CLL and at what stage(s) this occurred. A unifying, parsimonious theory is that CLL clones with either mutated or unmutated IGHVs derive from marginal zone B cells. However, evidence for remarkably similar B-cell receptor amino acid sequence and striking differences in polyantigen and autoantigen-binding activity, found in some but not all CLL clones, challenge a single-cell derivation for CLL. In this Perspective, we summarize data regarding normal counterparts of CLL cells and suggest that a multistep process of leukemogenesis is important to consider when assigning a cellular origin for this disease. Finally, although available data do not definitively identify the cell(s) of origin, we offer possibilities for single- and multiple-cell origin models as straw men that can be improved on and hopefully lead to final answers to this puzzle. PMID:21148333

  13. Improvement of modal scaling factors using mass additive technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Allemang, Randall J.; Wei, Max L.; Brown, David L.

    1987-01-01

    A general investigation into the improvement of modal scaling factors of an experimental modal model using additive technique is discussed. Data base required by the proposed method consists of an experimental modal model (a set of complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors) of the original structure and a corresponding set of complex eigenvalues of the mass-added structure. Three analytical methods,i.e., first order and second order perturbation methods, and local eigenvalue modification technique, are proposed to predict the improved modal scaling factors. Difficulties encountered in scaling closely spaced modes are discussed. Methods to compute the necessary rotational modal vectors at the mass additive points are also proposed to increase the accuracy of the analytical prediction.

  14. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 in experimental autoimmune neuritis. Cellular localization and time course.

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, R.; Funa, K.; Schweitzer, T.; Jung, S.; Bourde, O.; Toyka, K. V.; Hartung, H. P.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is a monophasic inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system that resolves spontaneously by molecular mechanisms as yet unknown. We have investigated whether the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) might be endogenously expressed in the peripheral nervous system of Lewis rats with actively induced and adoptive transfer EAN. TGF-beta 1 mRNA was upregulated to high levels in sensory and motor roots, spinal ganglia, and sciatic nerve as revealed by quantitative Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization histochemistry, with peak levels just preceding the first signs of clinical recovery. TGF-beta 1 mRNA was localized to scattered round cells and dense cellular infiltrates, but only rarely to Schwann cell profiles. Double labeling studies revealed macrophages and subpopulations of T cells as the major cellular source of TGF-beta 1 mRNA. TGF-beta 1 protein was visualized immunocytochemically and localized to infiltrating mononuclear cells with peak expression around the same time as mRNA, in addition to some constitutive expression in axons and Schwann cells. Our studies suggest that the spontaneous recovery observed in Lewis rat EAN might be mediated by the endogenous elaboration of TGF-beta 1 within the peripheral nerve, and that macrophages might control their own cytotoxicity by expressing TGF-beta 1. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8546208

  15. Cellular transcription factors enhance herpes simplex virus type 1 oriS-dependent DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huynh, A T; Schaffer, P A

    1998-05-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) origin of DNA replication, oriS, contains three binding sites for the viral origin binding protein (OBP) flanked by transcriptional regulatory elements of the immediate-early genes encoding ICP4 and ICP22/47. To assess the role of flanking sequences in oriS function, plasmids containing oriS and either wild-type or mutant flanking sequences were tested in transient DNA replication assays. Although the ICP4 and ICP22/47 regulatory regions were shown to enhance oriS function, most individual elements in these regions, including the VP16-responsive TAATGARAT elements, were found to be dispensable for oriS function. In contrast, two oriS core-adjacent regulatory (Oscar) elements, OscarL and OscarR, at the base of the oriS palindrome were shown to enhance oriS function significantly and additively. Specifically, mutational disruption of either element reduced oriS-dependent DNA replication by 60 to 70%, and disruption of both elements reduced replication by 90%. The properties of protein-DNA complexes formed in gel mobility shift assays using uninfected and HSV-1-infected Vero cell nuclear extracts demonstrated that both OscarL and OscarR are binding sites for cellular proteins. Whereas OscarR does not correspond to the consensus binding site of any known transcription factor, OscarL contains a consensus binding site for the transcription factor Sp1. Gel mobility shift and supershift experiments using antibodies directed against members of the Sp1 family of transcription factors demonstrated the presence of Sp1 and Sp3, but not Sp2 or Sp4, in the protein-DNA complexes formed at OscarL. The abilities of OscarL and OscarR to bind their respective cellular proteins correlated directly with the efficiency of oriS-dependent DNA replication. Cooperative interactions between the Oscar-binding factors and proteins binding to adjacent OBP binding sites were not observed. Notably, Oscar element mutations that impaired oriS-dependent DNA

  16. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

  17. Cellular Factors Involved in HTLV-1 Entry and Pathogenicit

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Hiroo

    2012-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1 – associated myelopathy and tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-1 has a preferential tropism for CD4 T cells in healthy carriers and ATL patients, while both CD4 and CD8 T cells serve as viral reservoirs in HAM/TSP patients. HTLV-1 has also been detected other cell types, including monocytes, endothelial cells, and dendritic cells. In contrast to the limited cell tropism of HTLV-1 in vivo, the HTLV receptor appears to be expressed in almost all human or animal cell lines. It remains to be examined whether this cell tropism is determined by host factors or by HTLV-1 heterogeneity. Unlike most retroviruses, cell-free virions of HTLV-1 are very poorly infectious. The lack of completely HTLV-1-resistant cells and the low infectivity of HTLV-1 have hampered research on the HTLV entry receptor. Entry of HTLV-1 into target cells is thought to involve interactions between the env (Env) glycoproteins, a surface glycoprotein (surface unit), and a transmembrane glycoprotein. Recent studies have shown that glucose transporter GLUT1, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) are the three proteins important for the entry of HTLV-1. Studies using adherent cell lines have shown that GLUT1 can function as a receptor for HTLV. HSPGs are required for efficient entry of HTLV-1 into primary CD4 T cells. NRP-1 is expressed in most established cell lines. Further studies have shown that these three molecules work together to promote HTLV-1 binding to cells and fusion of viral and cell membranes. The virus could first contact with HSPGs and then form complexes with NRP-1, followed by association with GLUT1. It remains to be determined whether these three molecules can explain HTLV-1 cell tropism. It also remains to be more definitively proven that these molecules are sufficient to permit HTLV-1 entry into completely HTLV-1-resistant cells. PMID

  18. Modeling of time dependent localized flow shear stress and its impact on cellular growth within additive manufactured titanium implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ziyu; Yuan, Lang; Lee, Peter D; Jones, Eric; Jones, Julian R

    2014-01-01

    Bone augmentation implants are porous to allow cellular growth, bone formation and fixation. However, the design of the pores is currently based on simple empirical rules, such as minimum pore and interconnects sizes. We present a three-dimensional (3D) transient model of cellular growth based on the Navier–Stokes equations that simulates the body fluid flow and stimulation of bone precursor cellular growth, attachment, and proliferation as a function of local flow shear stress. The model's effectiveness is demonstrated for two additive manufactured (AM) titanium scaffold architectures. The results demonstrate that there is a complex interaction of flow rate and strut architecture, resulting in partially randomized structures having a preferential impact on stimulating cell migration in 3D porous structures for higher flow rates. This novel result demonstrates the potential new insights that can be gained via the modeling tool developed, and how the model can be used to perform what-if simulations to design AM structures to specific functional requirements. PMID:24664988

  19. Endothelial cellular senescence is inhibited by liver X receptor activation with an additional mechanism for its atheroprotection in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Toshio; Kotani, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Tomoe; Taguchi, Kumiko; Iida, Mayu; Ina, Koichiro; Maeda, Morihiko; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Hattori, Yuichi; Ignarro, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Senescence of vascular endothelial cells leads to endothelial dysfunction and contributes to the progression of atherosclerosis. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors whose activation protects against atherosclerosis by transcriptional regulation of genes important in promoting cholesterol efflux and inhibiting inflammation. Here we found that LXR activation with specific ligands reduced the increase in senescence-associated (SA) β-gal activity, a senescence marker, and reversed the decrease in telomerase activity, a replicative senescence marker, in human endothelial cells under high glucose. This effect of LXR activation was associated with reduced reactive oxygen species and increased endothelial NO synthase activity. A series of experiments that used siRNAs indicated that LXRβ mediates the prevention of endothelial cellular senescence, and that sterol regulatory element binding protein-1, which was up-regulated as a direct LXRβ target gene, may act as a brake of endothelial cellular senescence. Although oral administration of the LXR ligand led to severe fatty liver in diabetic rats, concomitant therapy with metformin avoided the development of hepatic steatosis. However, the preventive effect of the LXR ligand on SA β-gal–stained cells in diabetic aortic endothelium was preserved even if metformin was coadministered. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that an additional mechanism, such as the regulation of endothelial cellular senescence, is related to the antiatherogenic properties of LXRs, and concomitant treatment with metformin may provide a clinically useful therapeutic strategy to alleviate an LXR activation-mediated adverse effects on liver triglyceride metabolism. PMID:24398515

  20. Next-generation biomedical implants using additive manufacturing of complex, cellular and functional mesh arrays.

    PubMed

    Murr, L E; Gaytan, S M; Medina, F; Lopez, H; Martinez, E; Machado, B I; Hernandez, D H; Martinez, L; Lopez, M I; Wicker, R B; Bracke, J

    2010-04-28

    In this paper, we examine prospects for the manufacture of patient-specific biomedical implants replacing hard tissues (bone), particularly knee and hip stems and large bone (femoral) intramedullary rods, using additive manufacturing (AM) by electron beam melting (EBM). Of particular interest is the fabrication of complex functional (biocompatible) mesh arrays. Mesh elements or unit cells can be divided into different regions in order to use different cell designs in different areas of the component to produce various or continually varying (functionally graded) mesh densities. Numerous design elements have been used to fabricate prototypes by AM using EBM of Ti-6Al-4V powders, where the densities have been compared with the elastic (Young) moduli determined by resonant frequency and damping analysis. Density optimization at the bone-implant interface can allow for bone ingrowth and cementless implant components. Computerized tomography (CT) scans of metal (aluminium alloy) foam have also allowed for the building of Ti-6Al-4V foams by embedding the digital-layered scans in computer-aided design or software models for EBM. Variations in mesh complexity and especially strut (or truss) dimensions alter the cooling and solidification rate, which alters the alpha-phase (hexagonal close-packed) microstructure by creating mixtures of alpha/alpha' (martensite) observed by optical and electron metallography. Microindentation hardness measurements are characteristic of these microstructures and microstructure mixtures (alpha/alpha') and sizes. PMID:20308113

  1. Synergistic and additive effects of cimetidine and levamisole on cellular immune responses to hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Niu, X; Yang, Y; Wang, J

    2013-02-01

    We and others have previously shown that both cimetidine (CIM) and levamisole (LMS) enhance humoral and cellular responses to DNA vaccines via different mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the synergistic and additive effects of CIM and LMS on the potency of antigen-specific immunities generated by a DNA vaccine encoding the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, pVax-S2). Compared with CIM or LMS alone, the combination of CIM and LMS elicited a robust HBsAg-specific cellular response that was characterized by higher IgG2a, but did not further increase HBsAg-specific antibody IgG and IgG1 production. Consistent with these results, the combination of CIM and LMS produced the highest level of IL-2 and IFN-γ in antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, whereas the combination of CIM and LMS did not further increase IL-4 production. Significantly, a robust HBsAg-specific cytotoxic response was also observed in the animals immunized with pVax-S2 in the presence of the combination of CIM and LMS. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that the combination of CIM and LMS promoted dendritic cell (DC) activation and blocked anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and TGF-β production in CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells. These findings suggest that CIM and LMS have the synergistic and additive ability to enhance cellular response to hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine, which may be mediated by DC activation and inhibition of anti-inflammatory cytokine expression. Thus, the combination of cimetidine and levamisole may be useful as an effective adjuvant in DNA vaccinations for chronic hepatitis B virus infection. PMID:23298196

  2. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2: Its Contribution to Acute Cellular Rejection and Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and one of the two receptors that orchestrate the complex biological functions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF, also designed TNF-α). Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that TNFR2 plays an important role in renal disorders associated with acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma but its exact role in these settings is still not completely understood. This papers reviews the factors that may mediate TNFR2 induction in acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma and its contribution to these conditions and discusses its therapeutic implications. A greater understanding of the function of TNFR2 may lead to the development of new anti-TNF drugs. PMID:24350291

  4. AP-42 ADDITIONS AND REVISIONS - TRANSPORTABILITY FACTORS FOR FUGITIVE DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The product is a table of factors, one for each county in the US, reflecting the portion of fugitive dust removed very close to the source via impaction on vegetation and similar mechanisms. Factors were based on land cover in area (county or grid cell) A praft final product was...

  5. Global analysis of bacterial transcription factors to predict cellular target processes.

    PubMed

    Doerks, Tobias; Andrade, Miguel A; Lathe, Warren; von Mering, Christian; Bork, Peer

    2004-03-01

    Whole-genome sequences are now available for >100 bacterial species, giving unprecedented power to comparative genomics approaches. We have applied genome-context methods to predict target processes that are regulated by transcription factors (TFs). Of 128 orthologous groups of proteins annotated as TFs, to date, 36 are functionally uncharacterized; in our analysis we predict a probable cellular target process or biochemical pathway for half of these functionally uncharacterized TFs. PMID:15049306

  6. Human Cortical Neural Stem Cells Expressing Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Lisa M; Sims, Erika; Lunn, J Simon; Kashlan, Osama N; Chen, Kevin S; Bruno, Elizabeth S; Pacut, Crystal M; Hazel, Tom; Johe, Karl; Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia. Current treatment fails to modify underlying disease pathologies and very little progress has been made to develop effective drug treatments. Cellular therapies impact disease by multiple mechanisms, providing increased efficacy compared with traditional single-target approaches. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we have shown that transplanted spinal neural stem cells (NSCs) integrate into the spinal cord, form synapses with the host, improve inflammation, and reduce disease-associated pathologies. Our current goal is to develop a similar "best in class" cellular therapy for AD. Here, we characterize a novel human cortex-derived NSC line modified to express insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), HK532-IGF-I. Because IGF-I promotes neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in vivo, this enhanced NSC line offers additional environmental enrichment, enhanced neuroprotection, and a multifaceted approach to treating complex AD pathologies. We show that autocrine IGF-I production does not impact the cell secretome or normal cellular functions, including proliferation, migration, or maintenance of progenitor status. However, HK532-IGF-I cells preferentially differentiate into gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurons, a subtype dysregulated in AD; produce increased vascular endothelial growth factor levels; and display an increased neuroprotective capacity in vitro. We also demonstrate that HK532-IGF-I cells survive peri-hippocampal transplantation in a murine AD model and exhibit long-term persistence in targeted brain areas. In conclusion, we believe that harnessing the benefits of cellular and IGF-I therapies together will provide the optimal therapeutic benefit to patients, and our findings support further preclinical development of HK532-IGF-I cells into a disease-modifying intervention for AD. PMID:26744412

  7. Transforming growth factor-beta1 mediates cellular response to DNA damage in situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Arteaga, Carlos; Warters, Ray; Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is rapidly activated after ionizing radiation, but its specific role in cellular responses to DNA damage is not known. Here we use Tgfbeta1 knockout mice to show that radiation-induced apoptotic response is TGF-beta1 dependent in the mammary epithelium, and that both apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in response to DNA damage decrease as a function of TGF-beta1 gene dose in embryonic epithelial tissues. Because apoptosis in these tissues has been shown previously to be p53 dependent, we then examined p53 protein activation. TGF-beta1 depletion, by either gene knockout or by using TGF-beta neutralizing antibodies, resulted in decreased p53 Ser-18 phosphorylation in irradiated mammary gland. These data indicate that TGF-beta1 is essential for rapid p53-mediated cellular responses that mediate cell fate decisions in situ.

  8. E2F transcription factor 1 regulates cellular and organismal senescence by inhibiting Forkhead box O transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Peng, Shengyi; Tao, Li; Ruan, Haihe; Yang, Yanglu; Li, Tie-Mei; Adams, Ursula; Meng, Songshu; Bi, Xiaolin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2014-12-01

    E2F1 and FOXO3 are two transcription factors that have been shown to participate in cellular senescence. Previous report reveals that E2F1 enhanced cellular senescence in human fibroblast cells, while FOXO transcription factors play against senescence by regulation reactive oxygen species scavenging proteins. However, their functional interplay has been unclear. Here we use E2F1 knock-out murine Embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), knockdown RNAi constructs, and ectopic expression of E2F1 to show that it functions by negatively regulating FOXO3. E2F1 attenuates FOXO3-mediated expression of MnSOD and Catalase without affecting FOXO3 protein stability, subcellular localization, or phosphorylation by Akt. We mapped the interaction between E2F1 and FOXO3 to a region including the DNA binding domain of E2F1 and the C-terminal transcription-activation domain of FOXO3. We propose that E2F1 inhibits FOXO3-dependent transcription by directly binding FOXO3 in the nucleus and preventing activation of its target genes. Moreover, knockdown of the Caenorhabditis elegans E2F1 ortholog efl-1 significantly extends lifespan in a manner that requires the activity of the C. elegans FOXO gene daf-16. We conclude that there is an evolutionarily conserved signaling connection between E2F1 and FOXO3, which regulates cellular senescence and aging by regulating the activity of FOXO3. We speculate that drugs and/or therapies that inhibit this physical interaction might be good candidates for reducing cellular senescence and increasing longevity. PMID:25344604

  9. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhaohua; Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse; Lin, Ren-Jang; Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  10. Cellular Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Is an Important Dengue Virus Restriction Factor

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Federico; Damonte, Elsa B.; García, Cybele C.

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic antiviral defense is based on cellular restriction factors that are constitutively expressed and, thus, active even before a pathogen enters the cell. The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) are discrete nuclear foci that contain several cellular proteins involved in intrinsic antiviral responses against a number of viruses. Accumulating reports have shown the importance of PML as a DNA virus restriction factor and how these pathogens evade this antiviral activity. However, very little information is available regarding the antiviral role of PML against RNA viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is an RNA emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen affecting millions of individuals each year by causing severe and potentially fatal syndromes. Since no licensed antiviral drug against DENV infection is currently available, it is of great importance to understand the factors mediating intrinsic immunity that may lead to the development of new pharmacological agents that can boost their potency and thereby lead to treatments for this viral disease. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antiviral role of PML in DENV-2 A549 infected cells. PMID:25962098

  11. Epstein-Barr virus induces cellular transcription factors to allow active expression of EBER genes by RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Felton-Edkins, Zoë A; Kondrashov, Alexander; Karali, Dimitra; Fairley, Jennifer A; Dawson, Christopher W; Arrand, John R; Young, Lawrence S; White, Robert J

    2006-11-10

    The EBER genes of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are transcribed by RNA polymerase (pol) III to produce untranslated RNAs that are implicated in oncogenesis. These EBER transcripts are the most highly expressed viral gene products in EBV-transformed cells. We have identified changes to the cellular transcription machinery that may contribute to the high levels of EBER RNA. These include phosphorylation of ATF2, which interacts with EBER promoters. A second is induction of TFIIIC, a pol III-specific factor that activates EBER genes; all five subunits of TFIIIC are overexpressed in EBV-positive cells. In addition, EBV induces BDP1, a subunit of the pol III-specific factor TFIIIB. Although BDP1 is the only TFIIIB subunit induced by EBV, its induction is sufficient to stimulate EBER expression in vivo, implying a limiting function. The elevated levels of BDP1 and TFIIIC in EBV-positive cells stimulate production of tRNA, 7SL, and 5S rRNA. Abnormally high expression of these cellular pol III products may contribute to the ability of EBV to enhance growth potential. PMID:16956891

  12. Viral and Cellular Factors Involved in Phloem Transport of Plant Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hipper, Clémence; Brault, Véronique; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Revers, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Phloem transport of plant viruses is an essential step in the setting-up of a complete infection of a host plant. After an initial replication step in the first cells, viruses spread from cell-to-cell through mesophyll cells, until they reach the vasculature where they rapidly move to distant sites in order to establish the infection of the whole plant. This last step is referred to as systemic transport, or long-distance movement, and involves virus crossings through several cellular barriers: bundle sheath, vascular parenchyma, and companion cells for virus loading into sieve elements (SE). Viruses are then passively transported within the source-to-sink flow of photoassimilates and are unloaded from SE into sink tissues. However, the molecular mechanisms governing virus long-distance movement are far from being understood. While most viruses seem to move systemically as virus particles, some viruses are transported in SE as viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNP). The nature of the cellular and viral factors constituting these RNPs is still poorly known. The topic of this review will mainly focus on the host and viral factors that facilitate or restrict virus long-distance movement. PMID:23745125

  13. Embryonic MicroRNA-369 Controls Metabolic Splicing Factors and Urges Cellular Reprograming

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Dewi, Dyah Laksmi; Ozaki, Miyuki; Noguchi, Yuko; Mimori, Koshi; Gotoh, Noriko; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Shima, Hiroshi; Doki, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Noncoding microRNAs inhibit translation and lower the transcript stability of coding mRNA, however miR-369 s, in aberrant silencing genomic regions, stabilizes target proteins under cellular stress. We found that in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells led to chromatin methylation of histone H3K4 at the miR-369 region on chromosome 12qF in mice, which is expressed in embryonic cells and is critical for pluripotency. Proteomic analyses revealed that miR-369 stabilized translation of pyruvate kinase (Pkm2) splicing factors such as HNRNPA2B1. Overexpression of miR-369 stimulated Pkm2 splicing and enhanced induction of cellular reprogramming by induced pluripotent stem cell factors, whereas miR-369 knockdown resulted in suppression. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the Argonaute complex contained the fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 and HNRNPA2B1 in a miR-369-depedent manner. Our findings demonstrate a unique role of the embryonic miR-369-HNRNPA2B1 axis in controlling metabolic enzyme function, and suggest a novel pathway linking epigenetic, transcriptional, and metabolic control in cell reprogramming. PMID:26176628

  14. Detyrosinated Glu-tubulin is a substrate for cellular Factor XIIIA transglutaminase in differentiating osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Cui, Cui; Hitomi, Kiyotaka; Kaartinen, Mari T

    2014-06-01

    Microtubule components α- and β-tubulin undergo a number of posttranslational modifications that modulate their dynamics and cellular functions. These modifications include polyamination and covalent crosslinking by transglutaminase enzymes. We have demonstrated previously that the less dynamic and more stable tubulin form-detyrosinated Glu-tubulin-is found in high molecular weight, oligomeric complexes in bone-forming osteoblasts during differentiation and along with deposition of collagenous extracellular matrix. In this study, we report that oligomeric Glu-tubulin has high nocodazole tolerance, indicating further increased stability. We show that α-tubulin, which gives rise to Glu-tubulin, is a transglutaminase substrate in in vitro assays and that it is crosslinked into oligomers (dimers, trimers and tetramers) by transglutaminase 2 and Factor XIIIA; β-tubulin was not crosslinked by transglutaminase activity. The oligomeric Glu-tubulin was specifically localized to the plasma membrane of osteoblasts as analyzed by subcellular fractionation, cell surface biotinylation experiments and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Glu- and α-tubulin co-localized with cellular Factor XIIIA as analyzed by conventional and TIRF microscopy. The Factor XIIIA-specific substrate peptide bF11 co-localized with α-tubulin and acted as a competitive inhibitor to oligomerization of Glu-tubulin, attenuating its formation in cells. This was associated with significantly decreased type I collagen deposition and decreased secretory activity as measured by synaptotagmin VII levels on the osteoblast plasma membrane. Our results suggest that Glu-tubulin may exist as covalently stabilized form which may be linked to the secretion and elaboration of collagenous extracellular matrix. PMID:24643364

  15. Quantifying colocalization of a conditionally active transcription factor FOXP3 in three-dimensional cellular space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Allan, Sarah E.; Levings, Megan K.

    2009-02-01

    Biological macromolecular interactions between proteins, transcription factors, DNA and other types of biomolecules, are fundamentally important to several cellular and biological processes. 3D Multi-channel confocal microscopy and colocalization analysis of fluorescent signals have proven to be invaluable tools for detecting such molecular interactions. The aim of this work was to quantify colocalization of the FOXP3 transcription factor in 3D cellular space generated from the confocal 3D image sets. 293T cells transfected with a conditionally active form of FOXP3 were stained for nuclei with Hoechst, for FOXP3 with anti-FOXP3 conjugated to PE, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen used as protein translocation and activation agent. Since the protein signal was weak and nonspecific intensity contributions were strong, it was difficult to perform colocalization analysis and estimate colocalization quantities. We performed 3D restoration by deconvolution method on the confocal images using experimentally measured point spread functions (PSFs) and subsequently a color shift correction. The deconvolution method eliminated nonspecific intensity contributions originating from PSF imposed by optical microscopy diffraction resolution limits and noise since these factors significantly affected colocalization analysis and quantification. Visual inspection of the deconvolved 3D image suggested that the FOXP3 molecules are predominantly colocalized within the nuclei although the fluorescent signals from FOXP3 molecules were also present in the cytoplasm. A close inspection of the scatter plot (colocalization map) and correlation quantities such as the Pearsons and colocalization coefficients showed that the fluorescent signals from the FOXP3 molecules and DNA are strongly correlated. In conclusion, our colocalization quantification approach confirms the preferential association of the FOXP3 molecules with the DNA despite the presence of fluorescent signals from the former one both in the

  16. Drosophila translational elongation factor-1gamma is modified in response to DOA kinase activity and is essential for cellular viability.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yujie; Schlierf, Michael; Gaspar, Ana Cuervo; Dreux, Catherine; Kpebe, Arlette; Chaney, Linda; Mathieu, Aurelie; Hitte, Christophe; Grémy, Olivier; Sarot, Emeline; Horn, Mark; Zhao, Yunlong; Kinzy, Terri Goss; Rabinow, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila translational elongation factor-1gamma (EF1gamma) interacts in the yeast two-hybrid system with DOA, the LAMMER protein kinase of Drosophila. Analysis of mutant EF1gamma alleles reveals that the locus encodes a structurally conserved protein essential for both organismal and cellular survival. Although no genetic interactions were detected in combinations with mutations in EF1alpha, an EF1gamma allele enhanced mutant phenotypes of Doa alleles. A predicted LAMMER kinase phosphorylation site conserved near the C terminus of all EF1gamma orthologs is a phosphorylation site in vitro for both Drosophila DOA and tobacco PK12 LAMMER kinases. EF1gamma protein derived from Doa mutant flies migrates with altered mobility on SDS gels, consistent with it being an in vivo substrate of DOA kinase. However, the aberrant mobility appears to be due to a secondary protein modification, since the mobility of EF1gamma protein obtained from wild-type Drosophila is unaltered following treatment with several nonspecific phosphatases. Expression of a construct expressing a serine-to-alanine substitution in the LAMMER kinase phosphorylation site into the fly germline rescued null EF1gamma alleles but at reduced efficiency compared to a wild-type construct. Our data suggest that EF1gamma functions in vital cellular processes in addition to translational elongation and is a LAMMER kinase substrate in vivo. PMID:19841092

  17. Cellular Oxygen Sensing: Crystal Structure of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase (PHD2)

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough,M.; Li, V.; Flashman, E.; Chowdhury, R.; Mohr, C.; Lienard, B.; Zondlo, J.; Oldham, N.; Clifton, I.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular and physiological responses to changes in dioxygen levels in metazoans are mediated via the posttranslational oxidation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF). Hydroxylation of conserved prolyl residues in the HIF-{alpha} subunit, catalyzed by HIF prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), signals for its proteasomal degradation. The requirement of the PHDs for dioxygen links changes in dioxygen levels with the transcriptional regulation of the gene array that enables the cellular response to chronic hypoxia; the PHDs thus act as an oxygen-sensing component of the HIF system, and their inhibition mimics the hypoxic response. We describe crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human PHD2, an important prolyl-4-hydroxylase in the human hypoxic response in normal cells, in complex with Fe(II) and an inhibitor to 1.7 Angstroms resolution. PHD2 crystallizes as a homotrimer and contains a double-stranded {beta}-helix core fold common to the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependant dioxygenase family, the residues of which are well conserved in the three human PHD enzymes (PHD 1-3). The structure provides insights into the hypoxic response, helps to rationalize a clinically observed mutation leading to familial erythrocytosis, and will aid in the design of PHD selective inhibitors for the treatment of anemia and ischemic disease.

  18. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional requirements for two-factor... Additional requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  19. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  20. Functional interaction between the human cytomegalovirus 86-kilodalton IE2 protein and the cellular transcription factor CREB.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, D; Gebert, S; Arlt, H; Stamminger, T

    1995-01-01

    The 86-kDa IE2 protein (IE86) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been described as a promiscuous transactivator of viral, as well as cellular, gene expression. Investigation of the mechanism used by IE86 to activate gene expression from the early UL112/113 promoter of HCMV revealed the existence of three binding sites for IE86 located between nucleotides -290 and -120 relative to the transcriptional start site (H. Arlt, D. Lang, S. Gebert, and T. Stamminger, J. Virol. 68:4117-4125, 1994). As shown previously, deletion of these target sites resulted in a reduction of IE86-mediated transactivation by approximately 70%. The remaining promoter, however, could still be stimulated about 40-fold, indicating the presence of an additional responsive element within these sequences. Here, we provide evidence that a binding site for the cellular transcription factor CREB can also act as a target for IE86 transactivation. By DNase I protection analysis, a binding sequence for CREB could be detected between nucleotides -78 and -56 within the respective promoter region. After in vitro mutagenesis of this CREB-binding site within the context of the entire UL112/113 promoter, a marked reduction in transactivation levels was evident. Moreover, when individual CREB-binding sites were positioned upstream of a minimal, TATA box-containing UL112/113 promoter, they were able to confer strong IE86 responsiveness, whereas a mutated sequence did not exert any effect. In far Western blot and pull-down experiments, a direct interaction of IE86 with the cellular transcription factor CREB could be observed. The in vivo relevance of this in vitro interaction was confirmed by using various GAL4 fusion proteins in the presence or absence of IE86 which revealed a strong activation only in the presence of both a GAL4-CREB fusion and IE86. This shows that at least one specific member of the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors is involved in mediating transactivation by the HCMV IE86 protein

  1. Downregulation of Cellular Protective Factors of Rumen Epithelium in Goats Fed High Energy Diet

    PubMed Central

    Hollmann, Manfred; Miller, Ingrid; Hummel, Karin; Sabitzer, Sonja; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2013-01-01

    Energy-rich diets can challenge metabolic and protective functions of the rumen epithelial cells, but the underlying factors are unclear. This study sought to evaluate proteomic changes of the rumen epithelium in goats fed a low, medium, or high energy diet. Expression of protein changes were compared by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by protein identification with matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of about 2,000 spots commonly detected in all gels, 64 spots were significantly regulated, which were traced back to 24 unique proteins. Interestingly, the expression profiles of several chaperone proteins with important cellular protective functions such as heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein, peroxiredoxin-6, serpin H1, protein disulfide-isomerase, and selenium-binding protein were collectively downregulated in response to high dietary energy supply. Similar regulation patterns were obtained for some other proteins involved in transport or metabolic functions. In contrast, metabolic enzymes like retinal dehydrogenase 1 and ATP synthase subunit beta, mitochondrial precursor were upregulated in response to high energy diet. Lower expressions of chaperone proteins in the rumen epithelial cells in response to high energy supply may suggest that these cells were less protected against the potentially harmful rumen toxic compounds, which might have consequences for rumen and systemic health. Our findings also suggest that energy-rich diets and the resulting acidotic insult may render rumen epithelial cells more vulnerable to cellular damage by attenuating their cell defense system, hence facilitating the impairment of rumen barrier function, typically observed in energy-rich fed ruminants. PMID:24349094

  2. Graphene Enhances Cellular Proliferation through Activating the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Sun, Cheng; Liao, Chunyang; Cui, Lin; Li, Haishan; Qu, Guangbo; Yu, Wenlian; Song, Naining; Cui, Yuan; Wang, Zheng; Xie, Wenping; Chen, Huiming; Zhou, Qunfang

    2016-07-27

    Graphene has promising applications in food packaging, water purification, and detective sensors for contamination monitoring. However, the biological effects of graphene are not fully understood. It is necessary to clarify the potential risks of graphene exposure to humans through diverse routes, such as foods. In the present study, graphene, as the model nanomaterial, was used to test its potential effects on the cell proliferation based on multiple representative cell lines, including HepG2, A549, MCF-7, and HeLa cells. Graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, particle size analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The cellular responses to graphene exposure were evaluated using flow cytometry, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, and alamarBlue assays. Rat cerebral astrocyte cultures, as the non-cancer cells, were used to assess the potential cytotoxicity of graphene as well. The results showed that graphene stimulation enhanced cell proliferation in all tested cell cultures and the highest elevation in cell growth was up to 60%. A western blot assay showed that the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) was upregulated upon graphene treatment. The phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and the downstream proteins, ShC and extracellular regulating kinase (ERK), were remarkably induced, indicating that the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK signaling pathway was triggered. The activation of PI3 kinase p85 and AKT showed that the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was also involved in graphene-induced cell proliferation, causing the increase of cell ratios in the G2/M phase. No influences on cell apoptosis were observed in graphene-treated cells when compared to the negative controls, proving the low cytotoxicity of this emerging nanomaterial. The findings in this study revealed the potential cellular biological effect of graphene, which may give useful hints on its biosafety

  3. Cellular and biochemical mechanisms, risk factors and management of preterm birth: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Vitale, S G; Marilli, I; Rapisarda, A M; Rossetti, D; Belluomo, G; Iapichino, V; Stancanelli, F; Cianci, A

    2014-12-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is usually defined as a delivery before 37 completed weeks or 259 days of gestation. World Health Organization estimates a worldwide incidence of PTB of 9.6%. Infants born preterm are at higher risks than infants born at term for mortality, and acute and chronic morbidity. Major causes of PTB are the following: spontaneous preterm labor with intact membranes (50%), labor induction or caesarean delivery for maternal or fetal indications (30%), and preterm premature rupture of membranes or PPROM (20%). The aim of this review is to analyze this medical condition, focusing on cellular and biochemical mechanisms, maternal risk factors and role of inflammation and infections in preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) and PTB. Moreover we will discuss about the proper therapeutic strategies for its management. Although different methods have been introduced to predict the advent of preterm labour in asymptomatic women, possibilities for real primary prevention are rare. An early estimation of potential risk factors is pivotal in the secondary prevention of PTB. Finally most efforts so far have been tertiary interventions. These measures have reduced perinatal morbidity and mortality. Advances in primary and secondary care will be needed to prevent prematurity-related illness in infants and children. PMID:25373016

  4. Repression of the human papillomavirus type 18 enhancer by the cellular transcription factor Oct-1.

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe-Seyler, F; Butz, K; zur Hausen, H

    1991-01-01

    The role of cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of the cancer-associated human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) is yet poorly understood. The presence of an Oct-1-binding site within the HPV18 upstream regulatory region led us to investigate the influence of Oct-1 on viral transcription. Cotransfection of Oct-1 expression plasmids together with luciferase reporter constructs containing HPV18 regulatory sequences indicated that Oct-1 can transcriptionally repress the HPV18 upstream regulatory region. In contrast, heterologous control regions were not affected by Oct-1. HPV18 cis elements that can be repressed by Oct-1 mapped to a 135-bp subregion of the viral constitutive enhancer. Analysis of an Oct-1 mutant defective in DNA binding suggested that HPV18 down-modulation does not require direct binding of Oct-1 to DNA. These results make Oct-1 a candidate factor involved in the intracellular surveillance of HPV18 transcription and support the notion of a host cell mechanism that can specifically repress HPV E6-E7 transforming gene expression. Images PMID:1654457

  5. Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Is a Cellular Factor Required for Hepatitis C Virus Propagation▿

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun-Sook; Tran, Huong T. L.; Park, Soo-Je; Yim, Seung-Ae; Hwang, Soon B.

    2011-01-01

    The life cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular factors. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) library screening, we identified peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (Pin1) as a host factor involved in HCV propagation. Here we demonstrated that silencing of Pin1 expression resulted in decreases in HCV replication in both HCV replicon cells and cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells, whereas overexpression of Pin1 increased HCV replication. Pin1 interacted with both the NS5A and NS5B proteins. However, Pin1 expression was increased only by the NS5B protein. Both the protein binding and isomerase activities of Pin1 were required for HCV replication. Juglone, a natural inhibitor of Pin1, inhibited HCV propagation by inhibiting the interplay between the Pin1 and HCV NS5A/NS5B proteins. These data indicate that Pin1 modulates HCV propagation and may contribute to HCV-induced liver pathogenesis. PMID:21680504

  6. 34 CFR 477.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE PROGRAM ANALYSIS ASSISTANCE AND POLICY STUDIES PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make an Award? § 477.22 What additional factors does the... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary...

  7. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  8. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  9. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  10. Metabolism of platelet activating factor at the whole organ and cellular level

    SciTech Connect

    Haroldsen, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-3-glycerophosphocholine) has been characterized as a phospholipid possessing a myriad of effects from the cellular to whole organism levels. Analytical methods and procedures were developed in order to measure and identify PAF precursors and metabolites. Two quantitative physicochemical methods based on isotope dilution mass spectrometry (MS) were developed to measure lyso-PAF and applied to the calcium ionophore stimulated human neutrophil. Levels of lyso-PAF were found to be significantly increased, 2-3 fold, upon cell activation with a stimulus that concomitantly elicits the production of PAF. Investigation into the metabolism of PAF by the isolated perfused rat lung by intratracheal instillation revealed (/sup 3/H)-PAF to be extensively metabolized over a 15 minute time course. Greater than 96% of the administered dose was retained by the lung and was distributed as: lyso-PAF (3.3%), phosphatidylcholine (GPC, 82.3%), phosphatidylethanolamine (2.5%), and neutral lipid (2.5%), the remainder was intact PAF.

  11. Cellular Signaling by Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs) and Their Receptors (FGFRs) in Male Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Leanne M.; O’Bryan, Moira K.; Hinton, Barry T.

    2008-01-01

    The major function of the reproductive system is to ensure the survival of the species by passing on hereditary traits from one generation to the next. This is accomplished through the production of gametes and the generation of hormones that function in the maturation and regulation of the reproductive system. It is well established that normal development and function of the male reproductive system is mediated by endocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), their receptors (FGFRs), and signaling cascades have been implicated in a diverse range of cellular processes including: proliferation, apoptosis, cell survival, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, motility, and differentiation. The maintenance and regulation of correct FGF signaling is evident from human and mouse genetic studies which demonstrate that mutations leading to disruption of FGF signaling cause a variety of developmental disorders including dominant skeletal diseases, infertility, and cancer. Over the course of this review, we will provide evidence for differential expression of FGFs/FGFRs in the testis, male germ cells, the epididymis, the seminal vesicle, and the prostate. We will show that this signaling cascade has an important role in sperm development and maturation. Furthermore, we will demonstrate that FGF/FGFR signaling is essential for normal epididymal function and prostate development. To this end, we will provide evidence for the involvement of the FGF signaling system in the regulation and maintenance of the male reproductive system. PMID:18216218

  12. Intracellular Localization and Cellular Factors Interaction of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 Tax Proteins: Similarities and Functional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Bertazzoni, Umberto; Turci, Marco; Avesani, Francesca; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Bidoia, Carlo; Romanelli, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic viruses type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 (HTLV-2) present very similar genomic structures but HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2. Is this difference due to their transactivating Tax proteins, Tax-1 and Tax-2, which are responsible for viral and cellular gene activation? Do Tax-1 and Tax-2 differ in their cellular localization and in their interaction pattern with cellular factors? In this review, we summarize Tax-1 and Tax-2 structural and phenotypic properties, their interaction with factors involved in signal transduction and their localization-related behavior within the cell. Special attention will be given to the distinctions between Tax-1 and Tax-2 that likely play an important role in their transactivation activity. PMID:21994745

  13. Curcumin and Its Analogue Induce Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Have Additive Effects with Bortezomib in Cellular and Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, L. I.; Fehér, L. Z.; Szebeni, G. J.; Gyuris, M.; Sipos, P.; Alföldi, R.; Ózsvári, B.; Hackler, L.; Balázs, A.; Batár, P.; Kanizsai, I.; Puskás, L. G.

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapy of bortezomib with other chemotherapeutics is an emerging treatment strategy. Since both curcumin and bortezomib inhibit NF-κB, we tested the effects of their combination on leukemia cells. To improve potency, a novel Mannich-type curcumin derivative, C-150, was synthesized. Curcumin and its analogue showed potent antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on the human leukemia cell line, HL60, with different potency but similar additive properties with bortezomib. Additive antiproliferative effects were correlated well with LPS-induced NF-κB inhibition results. Gene expression data on cell cycle and apoptosis related genes, obtained by high-throughput QPCR, showed that curcumin and its analogue act through similar signaling pathways. In correlation with in vitro results similar additive effect could be obsereved in SCID mice inoculated systemically with HL60 cells. C-150 in a liposomal formulation given intravenously in combination with bortezomib was more efficient than either of the drugs alone. As our novel curcumin analogue exerted anticancer effects in leukemic cells at submicromolar concentration in vitro and at 3 mg/kg dose in vivo, which was potentiated by bortezomib, it holds a great promise as a future therapeutic agent in the treatment of leukemia alone or in combination. PMID:26075279

  14. Cellular localization of transforming growth factor-beta expression in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K.; Flanders, K. C.; Phan, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is associated with increased lung transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) gene expression, but cellular localization of the source of this expression has not been unequivocally established. In this study, lung fibrosis was induced in rats by endotracheal bleomycin injection on day 0 and, on selected days afterwards, lungs were harvested for in situ hybridization, immunohistochemical and histochemical analyses for TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein expression, and cell identification. The results show that control lungs express essentially no detectable TGF-beta 1 mRNA or protein in the parenchyma. Before day 3 after bleomycin treatment, scattered bronchiolar epithelial cells, mononuclear cells, and eosinophils expressed elevated levels of TGF-beta 1. Between days 3 and 14, there was a major increase in the number of eosinophils, myofibroblasts, and fibroblasts strongly expressing TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein. TGF-beta 1-producing cells were predominantly localized within areas of injury and active fibrosis. After day 14, the intensity and number of TGF-beta 1-expressing cells significantly declined and were predominantly found in fibroblasts in fibrotic areas. The expression of TGF-beta 1 protein was generally coincident with that for mRNA with the exception of bronchiolar epithelial cells in which strong protein expression was unaccompanied by a commensurate increase in mRNA. The study demonstrates that myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, and eosinophils represent the major sources of increased lung TGF-beta 1 expression in this model of pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7543734

  15. Internalization and cellular pools of never growth factor in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neet, K.E.; Kasaian, M.

    1987-05-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) binds to a cell surface receptor on responsive neuronal cells to initiate cell maintenance and/or differentiation regimes. The purpose of these studies was to define quantitatively the fate of NGF in PC12 cells with respect to various cellular compartments in a single series of biochemical experiments. Different binding methodologies were evaluated in suspension and on plates. 50 pM SVI-NGF was bound to rat PC12 cells in suspension for 30 min at 37, followed by various methods and combinations of methods to remove subsets of bound ligand. Distinction could be made between NGF bound to fast vs. slow cell surface receptors, NGF bound to slow receptors at the cell surface vs. cell interior, and detergent-soluble vs. cytoskeletally-attached NGF. These treatments defined the relative size of five pools, including the fast receptor (65%), two intracellular compartments (12% and 3%) susceptible to nonionic detergent, and a detergent-stable intracellular pool of ligand (16%). At 37 the cold chase stable and the acid stable pools were about the same size because of rapid internalization, but the slow receptor was measurable at 4. Inhibitors were used to define the route of NGF through the cell from the plasma membrane to degradation. Chloroquine caused accumulation of NGF only in pools that were not associated with the cytoskeleton, implicating this compartment in supplying ligand to the lysosome. Results with cytochalasin B and colchicine and suggested both microfilament and microtubule pathways in NGF degradation. A model for the movement of NGF through the cell was developed based on these observations.

  16. Cellular Internalization of Fibroblast Growth Factor-12 Exerts Radioprotective Effects on Intestinal Radiation Damage Independently of FGFR Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Umeda, Sachiko; Yasuda, Takeshi; Fujita, Mayumi; Asada, Masahiro; Meineke, Viktor; Imamura, Toru; Imai, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Several fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) were shown to inhibit radiation-induced tissue damage through FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling; however, this signaling was also found to be involved in the pathogenesis of several malignant tumors. In contrast, FGF12 cannot activate any FGFRs. Instead, FGF12 can be internalized readily into cells using 2 cell-penetrating peptide domains (CPP-M, CPP-C). Therefore, this study focused on clarifying the role of FGF12 internalization in protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: Each FGF or peptide was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 hours before or after total body irradiation with γ rays at 9 to 12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Administration of FGF12 after radiation exposure was as effective as pretreatment in significantly promoting intestinal regeneration, proliferation of crypt cells, and epithelial differentiation. Two domains, comprising amino acid residues 80 to 109 and 140 to 169 of FGF12B, were identified as being responsible for the radioprotective activity, so that deletion of both domains from FGF12B resulted in a reduction in activity. Interestingly, these regions included the CPP-M and CPP-C domains, respectively; however, CPP-C by itself did not show an antiapoptotic effect. In addition, FGF1, prototypic FGF, possesses a domain corresponding to CPP-M, whereas it lacks CPP-C, so the fusion of FGF1 with CPP-C (FGF1/CPP-C) enhanced cellular internalization and increased radioprotective activity. However, FGF1/CPP-C reduced in vitro mitogenic activity through FGFRs compared with FGF1, implying that FGFR signaling might not be essential for promoting the radioprotective effect of FGF1/CPP-C. In addition, internalized FGF12 suppressed the activation of p38α after irradiation, resulting in reduced radiation-induced apoptosis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that FGF12 can protect the

  17. Enamel matrix proteins exhibit growth factor activity: A review of evidence at the cellular and molecular levels

    PubMed Central

    WYGANOWSKA-ŚWIĄTKOWSKA, MARZENA; URBANIAK, PAULINA; NOHAWICA, MICHAŁ MAREK; KOTWICKA, MAŁGORZATA; JANKUN, JERZY

    2015-01-01

    Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) is a commercially available protein extract, mainly comprising amelogenins. A number of other polypeptides have been identified in EMD, mostly growth factors, which promote cementogenesis and osteogenesis during the regeneration processes through the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and activity; however, not all of their functions are clear. Enamel extracts have been proposed to have numerous activities such as bone morphogenetic protein- and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-like activity, and activities similar to those of insulin-like growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor. These activities have been observed at the molecular and cellular levels and in numerous animal models. Furthermore, it has been suggested that EMD contains an unidentified biologically active factor that acts in combination with TGF-β1, and several studies have reported functional similarities between growth factors and TGF-β in cellular processes. The effects of enamel extracts on the cell cycle and biology are summarized and discussed in this review. PMID:26161150

  18. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? In addition to applying the selection criteria in, as appropriate §§ 658.31, 658.32, and 658.33, the Secretary, to the extent practicable and... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  19. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? In addition to applying the selection criteria in, as appropriate §§ 658.31, 658.32, and 658.33, the Secretary, to the extent practicable and... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  20. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? In addition to applying the selection criteria in, as appropriate §§ 658.31, 658.32, and 658.33, the Secretary, to the extent practicable and... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  1. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? In addition to applying the selection criteria in, as appropriate §§ 658.31, 658.32, and 658.33, the Secretary, to the extent practicable and... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  2. Cellular factors associated with latency and spontaneous Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in B-lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael L; Xu, Shushen; Lyons-Weiler, James; Rosendorff, Adam; Webber, Steven A; Wasil, Laura R; Metes, Diana; Rowe, David T

    2010-04-25

    EBV-immortalized B-lymphoblastoid cell lines are used as models for cellular transformation and as antigen-presenting cells in immunological assays. LCLs vary in surface markers and other phenotypic properties, but it is not known how this heterogeneity relates to the EBV life cycle. To explore correlations, we examined 62 LCLs for cellular and viral phenotypes. LCLs generated from pediatric and adult donors could similarly be categorized as either low in EBV copy number or fluctuating within a high range. High-copy status accompanied higher lytic viral gene expression and lower latent gene expression. Inhibiting lytic EBV replication did not affect cellular phenotype or lytic switch protein expression, indicating that an LCL's lytic permissivity was a stable property. Among the cellular genes overexpressed in permissive LCLs were unfolded protein response genes and plasma cell markers. Among genes overexpressed in non-permissive LCLs were transcription factors involved in maintaining B cell lineage, in particular EBF1. This study suggests previously undetected mechanisms by which cellular pathways influence the lytic reactivation of EBV. PMID:20153012

  3. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of HIV-1 gene expression: role of cellular factors for Tat and Rev.

    PubMed

    Nekhai, Sergei; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2006-12-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains presents a challenge for the design of new therapy. Targeting host cell factors that regulate HIV-1 replication might be one way to overcome the propensity for HIV-1 to mutate in order to develop resistance to antivirals. This article reviews the interplay between viral proteins Tat and Rev and their cellular cofactors in the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of HIV-1 gene expression. HIV-1 Tat regulates viral transcription by recruiting cellular factors to the HIV promoter. Tat interacts with protein kinase complexes Cdk9/cyclin T1 and Cdk2/cyclin E; acetyltransferases p300/CBP, p300/CBP-associated factor and hGCN5; protein phosphatases and other factors. HIV-1 Rev regulates post-transcriptional processing of viral mRNAs. Rev primarily functions to export unspliced and partially spliced viral RNAs from the nucleus into the cytoplasm. For this activity, Rev cooperates with cellular transport protein CRM1 and RNA helicases DDX1 and DDX3, amongst others. PMID:17661632

  4. Interactome Analysis of the Influenza A Virus Transcription/Replication Machinery Identifies Protein Phosphatase 6 as a Cellular Factor Required for Efficient Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    York, Ashley; Hutchinson, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The negative-sense RNA genome of influenza A virus is transcribed and replicated by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). The viral RdRP is an important host range determinant, indicating that its function is affected by interactions with cellular factors. However, the identities and the roles of most of these factors remain unknown. Here, we employed affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry to identify cellular proteins that interact with the influenza A virus RdRP in infected human cells. We purified RdRPs using a recombinant influenza virus in which the PB2 subunit of the RdRP is fused to a Strep-tag. When this tagged subunit was purified from infected cells, copurifying proteins included the other RdRP subunits (PB1 and PA) and the viral nucleoprotein and neuraminidase, as well as 171 cellular proteins. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry revealed that the most abundant of these host proteins were chaperones, cytoskeletal proteins, importins, proteins involved in ubiquitination, kinases and phosphatases, and mitochondrial and ribosomal proteins. Among the phosphatases, we identified three subunits of the cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), including the catalytic subunit PPP6C and regulatory subunits PPP6R1 and PPP6R3. PP6 was found to interact directly with the PB1 and PB2 subunits of the viral RdRP, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of the catalytic subunit of PP6 in infected cells resulted in the reduction of viral RNA accumulation and the attenuation of virus growth. These results suggest that PP6 interacts with and positively regulates the activity of the influenza virus RdRP. IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses are serious clinical and veterinary pathogens, causing substantial health and economic impacts. In addition to annual seasonal epidemics, occasional global pandemics occur when viral strains adapt to humans from other species. To replicate efficiently and cause disease, influenza

  5. Human Cortical Neural Stem Cells Expressing Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    McGinley, Lisa M.; Sims, Erika; Lunn, J. Simon; Kashlan, Osama N.; Chen, Kevin S.; Bruno, Elizabeth S.; Pacut, Crystal M.; Hazel, Tom; Johe, Karl; Sakowski, Stacey A.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia. Current treatment fails to modify underlying disease pathologies and very little progress has been made to develop effective drug treatments. Cellular therapies impact disease by multiple mechanisms, providing increased efficacy compared with traditional single-target approaches. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we have shown that transplanted spinal neural stem cells (NSCs) integrate into the spinal cord, form synapses with the host, improve inflammation, and reduce disease-associated pathologies. Our current goal is to develop a similar “best in class” cellular therapy for AD. Here, we characterize a novel human cortex-derived NSC line modified to express insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), HK532-IGF-I. Because IGF-I promotes neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in vivo, this enhanced NSC line offers additional environmental enrichment, enhanced neuroprotection, and a multifaceted approach to treating complex AD pathologies. We show that autocrine IGF-I production does not impact the cell secretome or normal cellular functions, including proliferation, migration, or maintenance of progenitor status. However, HK532-IGF-I cells preferentially differentiate into gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurons, a subtype dysregulated in AD; produce increased vascular endothelial growth factor levels; and display an increased neuroprotective capacity in vitro. We also demonstrate that HK532-IGF-I cells survive peri-hippocampal transplantation in a murine AD model and exhibit long-term persistence in targeted brain areas. In conclusion, we believe that harnessing the benefits of cellular and IGF-I therapies together will provide the optimal therapeutic benefit to patients, and our findings support further preclinical development of HK532-IGF-I cells into a disease-modifying intervention for AD. Significance There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and

  6. Are major behavioral and sociodemographic risk factors for mortality additive or multiplicative in their effects?

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neil; Preston, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    All individuals are subject to multiple risk factors for mortality. In this paper, we consider the nature of interactions between certain major sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors associated with all-cause mortality in the United States. We develop the formal logic pertaining to two forms of interaction between risk factors, additive and multiplicative relations. We then consider the general circumstances in which additive or multiplicative relations might be expected. We argue that expectations about interactions among socio-demographic variables, and their relation to behavioral variables, have been stated in terms of additivity. However, the statistical models typically used to estimate the relation between risk factors and mortality assume that risk factors act multiplicatively. We examine empirically the nature of interactions among five major risk factors associated with all-cause mortality: smoking, obesity, race, sex, and educational attainment. Data were drawn from the cross-sectional NHANES III (1988-1994) and NHANES 1999-2010 surveys, linked to death records through December 31, 2011. Our analytic sample comprised 35,604 respondents and 5369 deaths. We find that obesity is additive with each of the remaining four variables. We speculate that its additivity is a reflection of the fact that obese status is generally achieved later in life. For all pairings of socio-demographic variables, risks are multiplicative. For survival chances, it is much more dangerous to be poorly educated if you are black or if you are male. And it is much riskier to be a male if you are black. These traits, established at birth or during childhood, literally result in deadly combinations. We conclude that the identification of interactions among risk factors can cast valuable light on the nature of the process being studied. It also has public health implications by identifying especially vulnerable groups and by properly identifying the proportion of deaths

  7. The Effects of Imatinib Mesylate on Cellular Viability, Platelet Derived Growth Factor and Stem Cell Factor in Mouse Testicular Normal Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, Fatemeh; Hashemnia, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Valizadeh, Nasim; Roshan-Milani, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Background: Growth factors play an essential role in the development of tumor and normal cells like testicular leydig cells. Treatment of cancer with anti-cancer agents like imatinib mesylate may interfere with normal leydig cell activity, growth and fertility through failure in growth factors’ production or their signaling pathways. The purpose of the study was to determine cellular viability and the levels of, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) in normal mouse leydig cells exposed to imatinib, and addressing the effect of imatinib on fertility potential. Methods: The mouse TM3 leydig cells were treated with 0 (control), 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μM imatinib for 2, 4 and 6 days. Each experiment was repeated three times (15 experiments in each day).The cellular viability and growth factors levels were assessed by MTT and ELISA methods, respectively. For statistical analysis, one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s post hoc and Kruskal-Wallis test were performed. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: With increasing drug concentration, cellular viability decreased significantly (p<0.05) and in contrast, PDGF levels increased (p<0.05). Different imatinib concentrations had no significant effect on SCF level. Increasing the duration of treatment from 2 to 6 days had no obvious effect on cellular viability, PDGF and SCF levels. Conclusion: Imatinib may reduce fertility potential especially at higher concentrations in patients treated with this drug by decreasing cellular viability. The effect of imatinib on leydig cells is associated with PDGF stimulation. Of course future studies can be helpful in exploring the long term effects of this drug. PMID:27141462

  8. Microstructural architecture developed in the fabrication of solid and open-cellular copper components by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Diana Alejandra

    The fabrication of Cu components were first built by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) from low-purity, atomized Cu powder containing a high density of Cu2O precipitates leading to a novel example of precipitate-dislocation architecture. These microstructures exhibit cell-like arrays (1-3microm) in the horizontal reference plane perpendicular to the build direction with columnar-like arrays extending from ~12 to >60 microm in length and corresponding spatial dimensions of 1-3 microm. These observations were observed by the use of optical metallography, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness measurements were taken both on the atomized powder and the Cu components. The hardness for these architectures ranged from ~HV 83 to 88, in contrast to the original Cu powder microindentation hardness of HV 72 and the commercial Cu base plate hardness of HV 57. These observations were utilized for the fabrication of open-cellular copper structures by additive manufacturing using EBM and illustrated the ability to fabricate some form of controlled microstructural architecture by EBM parameter alteration or optimizing. The fabrication of these structures ranged in densities from 0.73g/cm3 to 6.67g/cm3. These structures correspond to four different articulated mesh arrays. While these components contained some porosity as a consequence of some unmelted regions, the Cu2O precipitates also contributed to a reduced density. Using X-ray Diffraction showed the approximate volume fraction estimated to be ~2%. The addition of precipitates created in the EBM melt scan formed microstructural arrays which contributed to hardening contributing to the strength of mesh struts and foam ligaments. The measurements of relative stiffness versus relative density plots for Cu compared very closely with Ti-6Al-4V open cellular structures - both mesh and foams. The Cu reticulated mesh structures exhibit a slope of n = 2 in contrast to a slope of n = 2

  9. MicroRNA-mediated regulation of p21 and TASK1 cellular restriction factors enhances HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Farberov, Luba; Herzig, Eytan; Modai, Shira; Isakov, Ofer; Hizi, Amnon; Shomron, Noam

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that play a central role in the regulation of gene expression by binding to target mRNAs. Several studies have revealed alterations in cellular miRNA profiles following HIV-1 infection, mostly for miRNAs involved in inhibiting viral infection. These miRNA expression modifications might also serve to block the innate HIV-1 inhibition mechanism. As a result, it is expected that during HIV-1 infection miRNAs target genes that hinder or prevent the progression of the HIV-1 replication cycle. One of the major sets of genes known to inhibit the progression of HIV-1 infection are cellular restriction factors. In this study, we identified a direct miRNA target gene that modulates viral spread in T-lymphocytes and HeLa-CCR5 cell lines. Following infection, let-7c, miR-34a or miR-124a were upregulated, and they targeted and downregulated p21 and TASK1 (also known as CDKN1A and KCNK3, respectively) cellular proteins. This eventually led to increased virion release and higher copy number of viral genome transcripts in infected cells. Conversely, by downregulating these miRNAs, we could suppress viral replication and spread. Our data suggest that HIV-1 exploits the host miRNA cellular systems in order to block the innate inhibition mechanism, allowing a more efficient infection process. PMID:25717002

  10. Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-04-20

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  11. Expression and cellular localization of the transcription factor NeuroD1 in the developing and adult rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Castro, Analía E; Benitez, Sergio G; Farias Altamirano, Luz E; Savastano, Luis E; Patterson, Sean I; Muñoz, Estela M

    2015-05-01

    Circadian rhythms govern many aspects of mammalian physiology. The daily pattern of melatonin synthesis and secretion is one of the classic examples of circadian oscillations. It is mediated by a class of neuroendocrine cells known as pinealocytes which are not yet fully defined. An established method to evaluate functional and cytological characters is through the expression of lineage-specific transcriptional regulators. NeuroD1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor involved in the specification and maintenance of both endocrine and neuronal phenotypes. We have previously described developmental and adult regulation of NeuroD1 mRNA in the rodent pineal gland. However, the transcript levels were not influenced by the elimination of sympathetic input, suggesting that any rhythmicity of NeuroD1 might be found downstream of transcription. Here, we describe NeuroD1 protein expression and cellular localization in the rat pineal gland during development and the daily cycle. In embryonic and perinatal stages, protein expression follows the mRNA pattern and is predominantly nuclear. Thereafter, NeuroD1 is mostly found in pinealocyte nuclei in the early part of the night and in cytoplasm during the day, a rhythm maintained into adulthood. Additionally, nocturnal nuclear NeuroD1 levels are reduced after sympathetic disruption, an effect mimicked by the in vivo administration of α- and β-adrenoceptor blockers. NeuroD1 phosphorylation at two sites, Ser(274) and Ser(336) , associates with nuclear localization in pinealocytes. These data suggest that NeuroD1 influences pineal phenotype both during development and adulthood, in an autonomic and phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:25752781

  12. Cognitive effects of cellular phones: a possible role of non-radiofrequency radiation factors.

    PubMed

    Hareuveny, Ronen; Eliyahu, Ilan; Luria, Roy; Meiran, Nachshon; Margaliot, Menachem

    2011-10-01

    Some studies found that cognitive functions of human beings may be altered while exposed to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) emitted by cellular phones. In two recent studies, we have found that experiment duration and exposure side (i.e., phone's location--right or left) may have a major influence on the detection of such effects. In this brief follow-up experiment, 29 right-handed male subjects were divided into two groups. Each subject had two standard cellular phones attached to both sides of his head. The subjects performed a spatial working memory task that required either a left-hand or a right-hand response under one of the two exposure conditions: left side of the head or right side. Contrary to our previous studies, in this work external antennas located far away from the subjects were connected to the cellular phones. This setup prevents any emission of RFR from the internal antenna, thus drastically reducing RFR exposure. Despite that, the results remain similar to those obtained in our previous work. These results indicate that some of the effects previously attributed to RFR can be the result of some confounders. PMID:21488064

  13. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? 658.34 Section 658.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE...

  14. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION... Secretary consider in making grant awards? Except for 34 CFR parts 656, 657, and 661, to the extent... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  15. 34 CFR 490.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 490.22 Section 490.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION LIFE SKILLS FOR STATE AND...

  16. 34 CFR 411.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 411.22 Section 411.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH...

  17. 34 CFR 401.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 401.22 Section 401.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INDIAN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM...

  18. 34 CFR 401.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 401.22 Section 401.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INDIAN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM...

  19. 34 CFR 401.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 401.22 Section 401.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INDIAN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM...

  20. 34 CFR 411.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 411.22 Section 411.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH...

  1. 34 CFR 411.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 411.22 Section 411.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH...

  2. 34 CFR 401.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 401.22 Section 401.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INDIAN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM...

  3. 34 CFR 411.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 411.22 Section 411.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH...

  4. 34 CFR 401.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 401.22 Section 401.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INDIAN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM...

  5. 34 CFR 411.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 411.22 Section 411.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH...

  6. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  7. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  8. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  9. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  10. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  11. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 655.32 What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards? Except for 34 CFR parts 656, 657, and 661, to the extent... making grant awards? 655.32 Section 655.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  12. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 655.32 What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards? Except for 34 CFR parts 656, 657, and 661, to the extent... making grant awards? 655.32 Section 655.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  13. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 655.32 What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards? Except for 34 CFR parts 656, 657, and 661, to the extent... making grant awards? 655.32 Section 655.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  14. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards? 655.32 Section 655.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS How Does...

  15. 34 CFR 477.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 477.22 Section 477.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE PROGRAM ANALYSIS ASSISTANCE...

  16. Coordinated Destruction of Cellular Messages in Translation Complexes by the Gammaherpesvirus Host Shutoff Factor and the Mammalian Exonuclease Xrn1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G. Renuka; Wong, Wesley; Jackson, Andrew O.; Glaunsinger, Britt A.

    2011-01-01

    Several viruses encode factors that promote host mRNA degradation to silence gene expression. It is unclear, however, whether cellular mRNA turnover pathways are engaged to assist in this process. In Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus this phenotype is enacted by the host shutoff factor SOX. Here we show that SOX-induced mRNA turnover is a two-step process, in which mRNAs are first cleaved internally by SOX itself then degraded by the cellular exonuclease Xrn1. SOX therefore bypasses the regulatory steps of deadenylation and decapping normally required for Xrn1 activation. SOX is likely recruited to translating mRNAs, as it cosediments with translation initiation complexes and depletes polysomes. Cleaved mRNA intermediates accumulate in the 40S fraction, indicating that recognition occurs at an early stage of translation. This is the first example of a viral protein commandeering cellular mRNA turnover pathways to destroy host mRNAs, and suggests that Xrn1 is poised to deplete messages undergoing translation in mammalian cells. PMID:22046136

  17. MTHFR homozygous mutation and additional risk factors for cerebral infarction in a large Italian family.

    PubMed

    Del Balzo, Francesca; Spalice, Alberto; Perla, Massimo; Properzi, Enrico; Iannetti, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Several cases with cerebral infarctions associated with the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have been reported. Given the large number of asymptomatic individuals with the MTHFR mutation, additional risk factors for cerebral infarction should be considered. This study describes a large family with the MTHFR mutation and a combination of heterozygous factor V Leiden mutations and different additional exogenous and endogenous thrombogenic risk factors. Psychomotor retardation and a left fronto-insular infarct associated with the MTHFR mutation together with diminished factor VII and low level of protein C was documented in the first patient. In the second patient, generalized epilepsy and a malacic area in the right nucleus lenticularis was associated with the MTHFR mutation and a low level of protein C. In the third patient, right hemiparesis and a left fronto-temporal porencephalic cyst were documented, together with the MTHFR mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. An extensive search of additional circumstantial and genetic thrombogenic risk factors should be useful for prophylaxis and prognosis of infants with cerebral infarctions associated with the MTHFR mutation and of their related family members. PMID:19068258

  18. Improved Growth Factor Directed Vascularization into Fibrin Constructs Through Inclusion of Additional Extracellular Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Smith, JD; Melhem, ME; Magge, KT; Waggoner, AS; Campbell, PG

    2009-01-01

    Using the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM) and a novel histological technique we investigated the ability of blood vessels to directly invade fibrin-based scaffolds. In our initial experiments utilizing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165) we found no direct invasion. Instead, the fibrin was completely degraded and replaced with highly vascularized new tissue. Addition of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), or platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) to the fibrin construct also did not result in construct vascularization. Because natural and regenerating tissues exhibit complex extracellular matrices (ECMs), we hypothesized that a more complex scaffold may improve blood vessel invasion. Addition of fibronectin, hyaluronic acid, and collagen type I within 20 mg/mL fibrin constructs resulted in no significant improvement. However, the same additive concentrations within 10 mg/mL fibrin constructs resulted in dramatic improvements, specifically with hyaluronic acid. Overall, we believe these results indicate the importance of structural and functional cues of not only in the initial scaffold but also as the construct is degraded and remodeled. Furthermore, the CAM assay may represent a useful model for understanding ECM interactions as well as for screening and designing tissue engineered scaffolds. PMID:17223139

  19. Low neural exosomal levels of cellular survival factors in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, Edward J; Boxer, Adam; Schwartz, Janice B; Abner, Erin L; Petersen, Ronald C; Miller, Bruce L; Carlson, Olga D; Mustapic, Maja; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors that mediate neuronal defenses against diverse stresses were quantified in plasma neural-derived exosomes of Alzheimer’s disease or frontotemporal dementia patients and matched controls. Exosomal levels of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6, heat-shock factor-1, and repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor all were significantly lower in Alzheimer’s disease patients than controls (P < 0.0001). In frontotemporal dementia, the only significant difference was higher levels of repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor than in controls. Exosomal transcription factors were diminished 2–10 years before clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Low exosomal levels of survival proteins may explain decreased neuronal resistance to Alzheimer’s disease neurotoxic proteins. PMID:26273689

  20. Pre-treatment factors associated with detecting additional brain metastases at stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wardak, Zabi; Augustyn, Alexander; Zhu, Hong; Mickey, Bruce E; Whitworth, Louis A; Madden, Christopher J; Barnett, Samuel L; Abdulrahman, Ramzi E; Nedzi, Lucien A; Timmerman, Robert D; Choe, Kevin S

    2016-06-01

    The number of brain metastases identified on diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key factor in consideration of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). However, additional lesions are often detected on high-resolution SRS-planning MRI. We investigated pre-treatment clinical characteristics that are associated with finding additional metastases at SRS. Patients treated with SRS for brain metastases between the years of 2009-2014 comprised the study cohort. All patients underwent frame-fixed, 1 mm thick MRI on the day of SRS. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed for an association with increase in number of metastases identified on SRS-planning MRI. 289 consecutive SRS cases were analyzed. 725 metastases were identified on pre-treatment MRI and 1062 metastases were identified on SRS-planning MRI. An increase in the number of metastases occurred in 34 % of the cases. On univariate analysis, more than four metastases and the diameter of the largest lesion were significantly associated with an increase in number of metastases on SRS-planning MRI. When stratified by the diameter of the largest lesion into <2, 2-3, or ≥3 cm, additional metastases were identified in 37, 29, and 18 %, respectively. While this increase in the number of metastases is largely due to the difference in imaging technique, the number and size of the metastases were also associated with finding additional lesions. These clinical factors may be considered when determining treatment options for brain metastases. PMID:26966096

  1. Biomimetic hybrid porous scaffolds immobilized with platelet derived growth factor-BB promote cellularization and vascularization in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Murali, Ragothaman; Ponrasu, Thangavel; Cheirmadurai, Kalirajan; Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy

    2016-02-01

    Development of hybrid scaffolds with synergistic combination of growth factor is a promising approach to promote early in vivo wound repair and tissue regeneration. Here, we show the rapid wound healing in Wistar albino rats using biomimetic collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum based hybrid porous scaffolds covalently immobilized with platelet derived growth factor-BB. The immobilized platelet derived growth factor in the hybrid scaffolds not only enhance the total protein, collagen, hexosamine, and uronic acid contents in the granulation tissue but also provide stronger tissues. The wound closure analysis reveal that the complete epithelialization period is 15.4 ± 0.9 days for collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum-platelet derived growth factor hybrid scaffolds, whereas it is significantly higher for control, collagen, collagen- poly(dialdehyde) guar gum and povidine-iodine treated groups. Further, the histological evaluation shows that the immobilized platelet derived growth factor in the hybrid scaffolds induced a more robust cellular and vascular response in the implanted site. Hence, we demonstrate that the collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum hybrid scaffolds loaded with platelet derived growth factor stimulates chemotactic effects in the implanted site to promote rapid tissue regeneration and wound repair without the assistance of antibacterial agents. PMID:26414915

  2. Synergistic and additive killing by antimicrobial factors found in human airway surface liquid.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Tack, B F; McCray, P B; Welsh, M J

    2000-11-01

    Airway surface liquid contains multiple factors thought to provide a first line of defense against bacteria deposited in the airways. Although the antimicrobial action of individual factors has been studied, less is known about how they work in combination. We examined the combined action of six antimicrobial peptides found in airway surface liquid. The paired combinations of lysozyme-lactoferrin, lysozyme-secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and lactoferrin-SLPI were synergistic. The triple combination of lysozyme, lactoferrin, and SLPI showed even greater synergy. Other combinations involving the human beta-defensins, LL-37, and tobramycin (often administered to cystic fibrosis patients by inhalation) were additive. Because the airway surface liquid salt concentration may be elevated in cystic fibrosis patients, we examined the effect of salt on the synergistic combinations. As the ionic strength increased, synergistic interactions were lost. Our data suggest that the antibacterial potency of airway surface liquid may be significantly increased by synergistic and additive interactions between antimicrobial factors. These results also suggest that increased salt concentrations that may exist in cystic fibrosis could inhibit airway defenses by diminishing these synergistic interactions. PMID:11053013

  3. Modulation of Enhancer Looping and Differential Gene Targeting by Epstein-Barr Virus Transcription Factors Directs Cellular Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Michael J.; Wood, C. David; Ojeniyi, Opeoluwa; Cooper, Tim J.; Kanhere, Aditi; Arvey, Aaron; Webb, Helen M.; Palermo, Richard D.; Harth-Hertle, Marie L.; Kempkes, Bettina; Jenner, Richard G.; West, Michelle J.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) epigenetically reprogrammes B-lymphocytes to drive immortalization and facilitate viral persistence. Host-cell transcription is perturbed principally through the actions of EBV EBNA 2, 3A, 3B and 3C, with cellular genes deregulated by specific combinations of these EBNAs through unknown mechanisms. Comparing human genome binding by these viral transcription factors, we discovered that 25% of binding sites were shared by EBNA 2 and the EBNA 3s and were located predominantly in enhancers. Moreover, 80% of potential EBNA 3A, 3B or 3C target genes were also targeted by EBNA 2, implicating extensive interplay between EBNA 2 and 3 proteins in cellular reprogramming. Investigating shared enhancer sites neighbouring two new targets (WEE1 and CTBP2) we discovered that EBNA 3 proteins repress transcription by modulating enhancer-promoter loop formation to establish repressive chromatin hubs or prevent assembly of active hubs. Re-ChIP analysis revealed that EBNA 2 and 3 proteins do not bind simultaneously at shared sites but compete for binding thereby modulating enhancer-promoter interactions. At an EBNA 3-only intergenic enhancer site between ADAM28 and ADAMDEC1 EBNA 3C was also able to independently direct epigenetic repression of both genes through enhancer-promoter looping. Significantly, studying shared or unique EBNA 3 binding sites at WEE1, CTBP2, ITGAL (LFA-1 alpha chain), BCL2L11 (Bim) and the ADAMs, we also discovered that different sets of EBNA 3 proteins bind regulatory elements in a gene and cell-type specific manner. Binding profiles correlated with the effects of individual EBNA 3 proteins on the expression of these genes, providing a molecular basis for the targeting of different sets of cellular genes by the EBNA 3s. Our results therefore highlight the influence of the genomic and cellular context in determining the specificity of gene deregulation by EBV and provide a paradigm for host-cell reprogramming through modulation of

  4. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic Myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Franz J.; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M.; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V. Wee; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the patient's immune response to the virus infection limits the therapy's utility, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using non-specific pharmacological inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumours, and robust monocyte, T and NK cell infiltration 3 days following MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumour-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumour-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of CPA-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multi-faceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with CPA-mediated lymphoablation. PMID:25336188

  5. Differential expression of growth factors at the cellular level in virus-infected brain.

    PubMed

    Prosniak, Mikhail; Zborek, Anna; Scott, Gwen S; Roy, Anirban; Phares, Timothy W; Koprowski, Hilary; Hooper, D Craig

    2003-05-27

    The contribution of host factors to rabies virus (RV) transcription/replication and axonal/transsynaptic spread is largely unknown. We previously identified several host genes that are up-regulated in the mouse brain during RV infection, including neuroleukin, which is involved in neuronal growth and survival, cell motility, and differentiation, and fibroblast growth factor homologous factor 4 (FHF4), which has been implicated in limb and nervous system development. In this study, we used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to assess the expression of mRNAs specific for neuroleukin, the two isoforms of FHF4 (FHF4-1a and -1b) encoded by the FHF4 gene, and N protein of RV in neurons and astrocytes isolated by laser capture microdissection from mouse brains infected with the laboratory-adapted RV strain CVS-N2c or with a street RV of silver-haired bat origin. Differences in the gene expression patterns suggest that the capacity of RV strains to infect nonneuronal cells and differentially modulate host gene expression may be important in virus replication and spread in the CNS. PMID:12736376

  6. Differential expression of growth factors at the cellular level in virus-infected brain

    PubMed Central

    Prosniak, Mikhail; Zborek, Anna; Scott, Gwen S.; Roy, Anirban; Phares, Timothy W.; Koprowski, Hilary; Hooper, D. Craig

    2003-01-01

    The contribution of host factors to rabies virus (RV) transcription/replication and axonal/transsynaptic spread is largely unknown. We previously identified several host genes that are up-regulated in the mouse brain during RV infection, including neuroleukin, which is involved in neuronal growth and survival, cell motility, and differentiation, and fibroblast growth factor homologous factor 4 (FHF4), which has been implicated in limb and nervous system development. In this study, we used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to assess the expression of mRNAs specific for neuroleukin, the two isoforms of FHF4 (FHF4-1a and -1b) encoded by the FHF4 gene, and N protein of RV in neurons and astrocytes isolated by laser capture microdissection from mouse brains infected with the laboratory-adapted RV strain CVS-N2c or with a street RV of silver-haired bat origin. Differences in the gene expression patterns suggest that the capacity of RV strains to infect nonneuronal cells and differentially modulate host gene expression may be important in virus replication and spread in the CNS. PMID:12736376

  7. Direct cellular effects of some mediators, hormones and growth factor-like agents on denervated (isolated) rat gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Bódis, B; Karádi, O; Nagy, L; Dohoczky, C; Kolega, M; Mózsik, G

    1997-01-01

    The brain-gut axis has an important role in the mechanism of gastric cytoprotection in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of protective agents without any central and peripheral innervation. A mixed population of rat gastric mucosal cells was isolated by the method of Nagy et al (Gastroenterology (1994) 77, 433-443). Cells were incubated for 60 min with cytoprotective drugs such as prostacyclin, histamine, pentagastrin and PL-10 substances (synthesized parts of BPC). At the end of this incubation cells were treated by 15% ethanol for 5 min. Cell viability was tested by trypan blue exclusion test and succinic dehydrogenase activity. The following results were obtained: 1) prostacyclin, histamine and pentagastrin had no direct cytoprotective effect on isolated cells; and 2) PL-10 substances significantly protected the cells against ethanol-induced cellular damage. This led to the following conclusions: 1) in the phenomenon of gastric cytoprotection only the growth factor-like agents have a direct cellular effect; and 2) the intact peripheral innervation is basically necessary for the development of mediators and hormone-induced gastric cytoprotection. PMID:9403792

  8. Glutathione and the rate of cellular proliferation determine tumour cell sensitivity to tumour necrosis factor in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, E; Navarro, J; Mompo, J; Asensi, M; Pellicer, J A; Estrela, J M

    1997-01-01

    Low rates of cellular proliferation are associated with low GSH content and enhanced sensitivity of Ehrlich ascites-tumour (EAT) cells to the cytotoxic effects of recombinant human tumour necrosis factor (rhTNF-alpha). Buthionine sulphoximine, a selective inhibitor of GSH synthesis, inhibited tumour growth and increased rhTNF-alpha cytoxicity in vitro. Administration of sublethal doses (10(6)units/kg per day) of rhTNF-alpha to EAT-bearing mice promoted oxidative stress (as measured by increases in intracellular peroxide levels, O2(-); generation and mitochondrial GSSG) and resulted in a slight reduction (19%) in tumour cell number when controls showed the highest rate of cellular proliferation. ATP (1mmol/kg per day)-induced selective GSH depletion, when combined with rhTNF-alpha administration, afforded a 61% inhibition of tumour growth and resulted in a significant extension of host survival. Administration of N-acetylcysteine (1mmol/kg per day) or GSH ester (5mmol/kg per day) abolished the rhTNF-alpha- and ATP-induced effects on tumour growth by maintaining high GSH levels in the cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity of tumour cells to rhTNF-alpha in vivo depends on their GSH content and their rate of proliferation. PMID:9224645

  9. The Nutrient-Responsive Transcription Factor TFE3, Promotes Autophagy, Lysosomal Biogenesis, and Clearance of Cellular Debris

    PubMed Central

    Martina, José A.; Diab, Heba I.; Lishu, Li; Jeong-A, Lim; Patange, Simona; Raben, Nina; Puertollano, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a gene network regulating lysosomal biogenesis and its transcriptional regulator TFEB revealed that cells monitor lysosomal function and respond to degradation requirements and environmental cues. Here, we report the identification of transcription factor E3 (TFE3) as another regulator of lysosomal homeostasis that induced expression of genes encoding proteins involved in autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis in ARPE-19 cells in response to starvation and lysosomal stress. We found that in nutrient-replete cells, TFE3 was recruited to lysosomes through interaction with active Rag GTPases and exhibited mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation. Phosphorylated TFE3 was retained in the cytosol through its interaction with the cytosolic chaperone 14-3-3. Following starvation, TFE3 rapidly translocated to the nucleus and bound to the CLEAR elements present in the promoter region of many lysosomal genes, thereby inducing lysosomal biogenesis. Depletion of endogenous TFE3 entirely abolished the response of ARPE-19 cells to starvation, suggesting that TFE3 plays a critical role in nutrient sensing and regulation of energy metabolism. Furthermore, overexpression of TFE3 triggered lysosomal exocytosis and resulted in efficient cellular clearance in a cellular model of a lysosomal storage disorder, Pompe disease, thus identifying TFE3 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of lysosomal disorders. PMID:24448649

  10. Nuclear transcription factors: a new approach to enhancing cellular responses to ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Sato, Nobuyuki; Moore, Brian; Mack, Judith; Gasbarre, Christopher; Keevey, Samantha; Ortel, Bernhard; Sinha, Alok; Khachemoune, Amor

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using aminolevulinic acid (ALA) relies upon the uptake of ALA into cancer cells, where it is converted into a porphyrin intermediate, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) that is highly photosensitizing. For large or resistant tumors, however, ALA/PDT is often not completely effective due to inadequate PpIX levels. Therefore, new approaches to enhance the intracellular production of PpIX are sought. Here, we describe a general approach to improve intracellular PpIX accumulation via manipulations that increase the expression of an enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO), that is rate-determining for PpIX production. We show that nuclear hormones that promote terminal differentiation, e.g. vitamin D or androgens, can also increase the accumulation of PpIX and the amount of killing of the target cells upon exposure to light. These hormones bind to intracellular hormone receptors that translocate to the nucleus, where they act as transcription factors to increase the expression of target genes. We have found that several other transcription factors associated with terminal differentiation, including members of the CCAAT enhancer binding (C/EBP) family, and a homeobox protein named Hoxb13, are also capable of enhancing PpIX accumulation. These latter transcription factors appear to interact directly with the CPO gene promoter, resulting in enhanced CPO transcriptional activity. Our data in several different cell systems, including epithelial cells of the skin and prostate cancer cells, indicate that enhancement of CPO expression and PpIX accumulation represents a viable new approach toward improving the efficacy of ALA/PDT.

  11. The Grp170 nucleotide exchange factor executes a key role during ERAD of cellular misfolded clients

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takamasa; Tsai, Billy

    2016-01-01

    When a protein misfolds in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), it retrotranslocates to the cytosol and is degraded by the proteasome via a pathway called ER-associated degradation (ERAD). To initiate ERAD, ADP-BiP is often recruited to the misfolded client, rendering it soluble and translocation competent. How the misfolded client is subsequently released from BiP so that it undergoes retrotranslocation, however, remains enigmatic. Here we demonstrate that the ER-resident nucleotide exchange factor (NEF) Grp170 plays an important role during ERAD of the misfolded glycosylated client null Hong Kong (NHK). As a NEF, Grp170 triggers nucleotide exchange of BiP to generate ATP-BiP. ATP-BiP disengages from NHK, enabling it to retrotranslocate to the cytosol. We demonstrate that Grp170 binds to Sel1L, an adapter of the transmembrane Hrd1 E3 ubiquitin ligase postulated to be the retrotranslocon, and links this interaction to Grp170’s function during ERAD. More broadly, Grp170 also promotes degradation of the nonglycosylated transthyretin (TTR) D18G misfolded client. Our findings thus establish a general function of Grp170 during ERAD and suggest that positioning this client-release factor at the retrotranslocation site may afford a mechanism to couple client release from BiP and retrotranslocation. PMID:27030672

  12. Three WRKY transcription factors additively repress abscisic acid and gibberellin signaling in aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gu, Lingkun; Ringler, Patricia; Smith, Stanley; Rushton, Paul J; Shen, Qingxi J

    2015-07-01

    Members of the WRKY transcription factor superfamily are essential for the regulation of many plant pathways. Functional redundancy due to duplications of WRKY transcription factors, however, complicates genetic analysis by allowing single-mutant plants to maintain wild-type phenotypes. Our analyses indicate that three group I WRKY genes, OsWRKY24, -53, and -70, act in a partially redundant manner. All three showed characteristics of typical WRKY transcription factors: each localized to nuclei and yeast one-hybrid assays indicated that they all bind to W-boxes, including those present in their own promoters. Quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicated that the expression levels of the three WRKY genes varied in the different tissues tested. Particle bombardment-mediated transient expression analyses indicated that all three genes repress the GA and ABA signaling in a dosage-dependent manner. Combination of all three WRKY genes showed additive antagonism of ABA and GA signaling. These results suggest that these WRKY proteins function as negative transcriptional regulators of GA and ABA signaling. However, different combinations of these WRKY genes can lead to varied strengths in suppression of their targets. PMID:26025535

  13. Effect of Addition of Chin Strap on PAP Compliance, Nightly Duration of Use, and Other Factors

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Shelley R.; O'Brien, Daniel T.; Zhang, Shiling; Devara, Anupama; Rowley, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: A chinstrap is potentially useful to reduce unintentional air leak by preventing mouth opening during PAP treatment. This study examines whether the addition of a chinstrap to PAP therapy has any effect on adherence, nightly duration of use, air leak, and residual AHI. Methods: This was a retrospective study performed at an AASM-accredited VAMC sleep center. Clinical sleep data of veterans (n = 124) prescribed PAP therapy for sleep apnea was evaluated, and the effect of chinstrap use vs non-use on the above parameters was assessed. Results: Chinstrap users had significantly greater PAP adherence, longer nightly duration of PAP use, lower residual AHI and lower leak compared to chinstrap non-users at first follow up visit. Conclusions: The addition of a chin strap to PAP therapy is a simple and inexpensive method of increasing PAP adherence. Citation: Knowles SR; O'Brien DT; Zhang S; Devara A; Rowley JA. Effect of addition of chin strap on PAP compliance, nightly duration of use, and other factors. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(4):377-383. PMID:24733982

  14. Aiolos transcription factor controls cell death in T cells by regulating Bcl-2 expression and its cellular localization.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, F; Martínez-A, C; Camonis, J; Rebollo, A

    1999-01-01

    We searched for proteins that interact with Ras in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated or IL-2-deprived cells, and found that the transcription factor Aiolos interacts with Ras. The Ras-Aiolos interaction was confirmed in vitro and in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation. Indirect immunofluorescence shows that IL-2 controls the cellular distribution of Aiolos and induces its tyrosine phosphorylation, required for dissociation from Ras. We also identified functional Aiolos-binding sites in the Bcl-2 promoter, which are able to activate the luciferase reporter gene. Mutation of Aiolos-binding sites within the Bcl-2 promoter inhibits transactivation of the reporter gene luciferase, suggesting direct control of Bcl-2 expression by Aiolos. Co-transfection experiments confirm that Aiolos induces Bcl-2 expression and prevents apoptosis in IL-2-deprived cells. We propose a model for the regulation of Bcl-2 expression via Aiolos. PMID:10369681

  15. Cytoplasmic domains determine signal specificity, cellular routing characteristics and influence ligand binding of epidermal growth factor and insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, H; Dull, T J; Honegger, A M; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1989-01-01

    The cell surface receptors for insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) both employ a tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity to fulfil their distinct biological roles. To identify the structural domains responsible for various receptor activities, we have generated chimeric receptor polypeptides consisting of major EGF and insulin receptor structural domains and examined their biochemical properties and cellular signalling activities. The EGF-insulin receptor hybrids are properly synthesized and transported to the cell surface, where they form binding competent structures that are defined by the origin of their extracellular domains. While their ligand binding affinities are altered, we find that these chimeric receptors are fully functional in transmitting signals across the plasma membrane and into the cell. Thus, EGF receptor and insulin receptor cytoplasmic domain signalling capabilities are independent of their new heterotetrameric or monomeric environments respectively. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domains carry the structural determinants that define kinase specificity, mitogenic and transforming potential, and receptor routing. Images PMID:2583088

  16. Cellular Effects of Pyocyanin, a Secreted Virulence Factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hall, Susan; McDermott, Catherine; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; McFarland, Amelia J; Forbes, Amanda; Perkins, Anthony V; Davey, Andrew K; Chess-Williams, Russ; Kiefel, Milton J; Arora, Devinder; Grant, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    Pyocyanin has recently emerged as an important virulence factor produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The redox-active tricyclic zwitterion has been shown to have a number of potential effects on various organ systems in vitro, including the respiratory, cardiovascular, urological, and central nervous systems. It has been shown that a large number of the effects to these systems are via the formation of reactive oxygen species. The limitations of studies are, to date, focused on the localized effect of the release of pyocyanin (PCN). It has been postulated that, given its chemical properties, PCN is able to readily cross biological membranes, however studies have yet to be undertaken to evaluate this effect. This review highlights the possible manifestations of PCN exposure; however, most studies to date are in vitro. Further high quality in vivo studies are needed to fully assess the physiological manifestations of PCN exposure on the various body systems. PMID:27517959

  17. Cellular Effects of Pyocyanin, a Secreted Virulence Factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Susan; McDermott, Catherine; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; McFarland, Amelia J.; Forbes, Amanda; Perkins, Anthony V.; Davey, Andrew K.; Chess-Williams, Russ; Kiefel, Milton J.; Arora, Devinder; Grant, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Pyocyanin has recently emerged as an important virulence factor produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The redox-active tricyclic zwitterion has been shown to have a number of potential effects on various organ systems in vitro, including the respiratory, cardiovascular, urological, and central nervous systems. It has been shown that a large number of the effects to these systems are via the formation of reactive oxygen species. The limitations of studies are, to date, focused on the localized effect of the release of pyocyanin (PCN). It has been postulated that, given its chemical properties, PCN is able to readily cross biological membranes, however studies have yet to be undertaken to evaluate this effect. This review highlights the possible manifestations of PCN exposure; however, most studies to date are in vitro. Further high quality in vivo studies are needed to fully assess the physiological manifestations of PCN exposure on the various body systems. PMID:27517959

  18. ROLE OF CELLULAR BIOENERGETICS IN SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL PROLIFERATION INDUCED BY PLATELET-DERIVED GROWTH FACTOR

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jessica; Hill, Bradford G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Dranka, Brian P.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Abnormal smooth muscle cell proliferation is a hallmark of vascular disease. Although growth factors are known to contribute to cell hyperplasia, the changes in metabolism associated with this response, particularly mitochondrial respiration, remain unclear. Given the increased energy requirements for proliferation, we hypothesized that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) would stimulate glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration and that this elevated bioenergetic capacity is required for smooth muscle cell hyperplasia. To test this hypothesis, cell proliferation, glycolytic flux, and mitochondrial oxygen consumption were measured after treatment of primary rat aortic smooth muscle cells with PDGF. PDGF increased basal and maximal rates of glycolytic flux and mitochondrial oxygen consumption; enhancement of these bioenergetic pathways led to a substantial increase in the mitochondrial reserve capacity. Interventions with the PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 or the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose abrogated PDGF-stimulated proliferation and prevented augmentation of glycolysis and mitochondrial reserve capacity. Similarly, when L-glucose was substituted for D-glucose, PDGF-dependent proliferation was abolished, as were changes in glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. Interestingly, lactate dehydrogenase protein levels and activity were significantly increased after PDGF treatment. Moreover, L-lactate substitution for D-glucose was sufficient for increasing the mitochondrial reserve capacity and cell proliferation after treatment with PDGF; these effects were inhibited by the lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor, oxamate. These data suggest that glycolysis, by providing substrates that enhance the mitochondrial reserve capacity, plays an essential role in PDGF-induced cell proliferation, underscoring the integrated metabolic response required for proliferation of VSMC in the diseased vasculature. PMID:20331438

  19. Sleep Loss as a Factor to Induce Cellular and Molecular Inflammatory Variations

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Castillo-García, Stephanie Ariadne; Hernández, María Eugenia; Domínguez-Salazar, Emilio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Gómez-González, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    A reduction in the amount of time spent sleeping occurs chronically in modern society. Clinical and experimental studies in humans and animal models have shown that immune function is impaired when sleep loss is experienced. Sleep loss exerts a strong regulatory influence on peripheral levels of inflammatory mediators of the immune response. An increasing number of research projects support the existence of reciprocal regulation between sleep and low-intensity inflammatory response. Recent studies show that sleep deficient humans and rodents exhibit a proinflammatory component; therefore, sleep loss is considered as a risk factor for developing cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis). Circulating levels of proinflammatory mediators depend on the intensity and duration of the method employed to induce sleep loss. Recognizing the fact that the concentration of proinflammatory mediators is different between acute and chronic sleep-loss may expand the understanding of the relationship between sleep and the immune response. The aim of this review is to integrate data from recent published reports (2002–2013) on the effects of sleep loss on the immune response. This review may allow readers to have an integrated view of the mechanisms involved in central and peripheral deficits induced by sleep loss. PMID:24367384

  20. Effect of photo-immobilization of epidermal growth factor on the cellular behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Ogiwara, Kazutaka; Nagaoka, Masato; Cho, Chong-Su; Akaike, Toshihiro . E-mail: takaike@bio.titech.ac.jp

    2006-06-23

    We constructed photo-reactive epidermal growth factor (EGF) bearing p-azido phenylalanine at the C-terminal (HEGFP) by genetic engineering to investigate the possibility of immobilized EGF as a novel artificial extracellular matrix (ECM). The constructed recombinant protein was immobilized to glass surface by ultraviolet irradiation. A431 cells adhered both to HEGFP-immobilized and collagen-coated surfaces. Interaction between immobilized HEGFP and EGF receptors in the A431 cells was independent of Mg{sup 2+} although integrin-mediated cell adhesion to natural ECMs is dependent on Mg{sup 2+}. Phosphorylation of EGF receptors in A431 cells was induced by immobilized HEGFP as same as soluble EGF. DNA uptake of hepatocytes decreased by immobilized HEGFP whereas it increased by soluble EGF. Liver-specific functions of hepatocytes were maintained for 3 days by immobilized HEGFP whereas they were not maintained by soluble EGF, indicating that immobilized HEGFP follows different signal transduction pathway from soluble EGF.

  1. Mechanisms of solvent resistance mediated by interplay of cellular factors in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Juan-Luis; Sol Cuenca, Maria; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Segura, Ana; Duque, Estrella; Gómez-García, María R; Udaondo, Zulema; Roca, Amalia

    2015-07-01

    A number of microorganisms have the ability to thrive in the presence of a range of toxic solvents. Tolerance to these chemicals is a multifactorial process, meaning that bacterial cells use a set of physiological and gene expression changes to overcome the damage imparted by these chemicals. This review focuses mainly on issues related to tolerance to aromatic hydrocarbons and butanol in Pseudomonas, although other microorganisms are also discussed. Pseudomonas putida strains contain a circular chromosome of approximately 6 Mbp which encodes about 5300 genes. A combination of physiological and biochemical assays, a genome-wide collection of mutants and several omics approaches have provided useful information to help identify functions involved in solvent tolerance in P. putida. The solvent response involves fine-tuning of lipid fluidity to adjust membrane functions including impermeabilization, activation of a general stress-response system, increased energy generation and induction of specific efflux pumps that extrude solvents to the medium. These responses are modulated at the transcriptional level by local and global regulators as well as by a number of sRNAs whose levels fluctuate with the presence of solvents in the environment. Taken as a whole these regulatory inputs orchestrate the complex network of metabolic responses observed after solvent addition. PMID:25934123

  2. The collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 facilitates hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma progression by regulating multiple cellular factors and signal cascades.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Cao, Yanhua; Bai, Lan; Zhu, Chengliang; Li, Rui; He, Hui; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Kailang; Liu, Fang; Wu, Jianguo

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the major causes of acute and chronic liver diseases, fulminant hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC accounts for more than 85% of primary liver cancers and is the seventh most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. However, the mechanism by which HBV induces HCC is largely unknown. Collagen triple helixes repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1) is a secreted protein and has characteristics of a circulating hormone with potentially broad implications for cell metabolism and physiology. CTHRC1 is associated with human cancers, but its effect on HCC is unknown. Here, we revealed that CTHRC1 expression is highly correlated with HCC progression in HBV-infected patients, and demonstrated that HBV stimulates CTHRC1 expression by activating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), through extracellular signal-regulated kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (ERK/c-JNK) pathway. In addition, CTHRC1 activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through regulating phosphoinosmde-3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI-3K/AKT/mTOR) pathway. More interestingly, CTHRC1 enhances colony formation, migration, and invasion of hepatoma cells by regulating p53 and stimulating matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. In addition, knock-down of CTHRC1 results in the repression of HBV-associated carcinogenesis in nude mice. Thus, we revealed a novel mechanism by which HBV facilitates HCC development through activating the oncoprotein CTHRC1, which in turn enhances HBV-related HCC progression by stimulates colony formation, migration, and invasion of hepatoma cells through regulating multiple cellular factors and signal cascades. PMID:25263696

  3. Factors which Limit the Value of Additional Redundancy in Human Rated Launch Vehicle Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Joel M.; Stott, James E.; Ring, Robert W.; Hatfield, Spencer; Kaltz, Gregory M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has embarked on an ambitious program to return humans to the moon and beyond. As NASA moves forward in the development and design of new launch vehicles for future space exploration, it must fully consider the implications that rule-based requirements of redundancy or fault tolerance have on system reliability/risk. These considerations include common cause failure, increased system complexity, combined serial and parallel configurations, and the impact of design features implemented to control premature activation. These factors and others must be considered in trade studies to support design decisions that balance safety, reliability, performance and system complexity to achieve a relatively simple, operable system that provides the safest and most reliable system within the specified performance requirements. This paper describes conditions under which additional functional redundancy can impede improved system reliability. Examples from current NASA programs including the Ares I Upper Stage will be shown.

  4. Cellular and extracellular factors in early root resorption repair in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Andreas; Kunert, Dominique; Friesen, Therese; Zhang, Dongliang; Lossdörfer, Stefan; Götz, Werner

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of extracellular matrix components, such as collagen type I, fibronectin, and osteopontin (OPN) during cementum repair following experimentally induced tooth movement, and to characterize the cells taking part in the regenerative process. The upper right first molars were moved mesially in 21 three-month-old male Wistar rats using a coil spring with a force of 0.5 N. After 9 days, the appliance was removed and the animals were killed in groups of three immediately after withdrawal of the force and 5, 7, 10, 12, 14, and 17 days later. Three rats served as non-experimental control animals. The maxillae were prepared and processed for histological analysis. Together with the disappearance of the multinucleated odontoclasts from the resorption lacunae, signs of repair were visible 5 days after the release of the orthodontic force. The first signs of cementum repair were seen on day 10. The newly produced cementum was of the acellular extrinsic fibre type (AEFC) and reattachment was achieved with the principal periodontal ligament (PDL) fibres orientated almost perpendicular to the root surface. The initial interface formed between the old and new cementum, as well as the new AEFC, was characterized by a strong immunoreaction with OPN and collagen I antibody, but only a weak immunoreaction with the fibronectin antibody. Only a small number of mononuclear cells, which were involved in the repair process, showed a positive immunoreaction with the osteoblastic lineage markers runt-related transcription factor 2 and osteocalcin. These same cells stained sparsely with muscle segment homeobox homologue 2, but not with the E11 antibody. Thus, most of the cells associated with this reparative activity on the surface of the lacunae were differentiated PDL cells of the fibroblastic phenotype. Cells with a defined osteoblastic phenotype seemed to be of minor importance in this repair process. PMID:18632841

  5. Mosquito Cellular Factors and Functions in Mediating the Infectious entry of Chikungunya Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige Chanditha; Chen, Karen Caiyun; Hussain, Khairunnisa' Mohamed; Chen, Huixin; Low, Swee Ling; Ng, Lee Ching; Lin, Raymond; Ng, Mary Mah-Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus responsible for recent epidemics in the Asia Pacific regions. A customized gene expression microarray of 18,760 transcripts known to target Aedes mosquito genome was used to identify host genes that are differentially regulated during the infectious entry process of CHIKV infection on C6/36 mosquito cells. Several genes such as epsin I (EPN1), epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 15 (EPS15) and Huntingtin interacting protein I (HIP1) were identified to be differentially expressed during CHIKV infection and known to be involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Transmission electron microscopy analyses further revealed the presence of CHIKV particles within invaginations of the plasma membrane, resembling clathrin-coated pits. Characterization of vesicles involved in the endocytic trafficking processes of CHIKV revealed the translocation of the virus particles to the early endosomes and subsequently to the late endosomes and lysosomes. Treatment with receptor-mediated endocytosis inhibitor, monodansylcadaverine and clathrin-associated drug inhibitors, chlorpromazine and dynasore inhibited CHIKV entry, whereas no inhibition was observed with caveolin-related drug inhibitors. Inhibition of CHIKV entry upon treatment with low-endosomal pH inhibitors indicated that low pH is essential for viral entry processes. CHIKV entry by clathrin-mediated endocytosis was validated via overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of Eps15, in which infectious entry was reduced, while siRNA-based knockdown of genes associated with CME, low endosomal pH and RAB trafficking proteins exhibited significant levels of CHIKV inhibition. This study revealed, for the first time, that the infectious entry of CHIKV into mosquito cells is mediated by the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway. PMID:23409203

  6. The SEB-1 Transcription Factor Binds to the STRE Motif in Neurospora crassa and Regulates a Variety of Cellular Processes Including the Stress Response and Reserve Carbohydrate Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Kowbel, David John; Fioramonte, Mariana; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Glass, N Louise; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress conditions, all cells induce mechanisms resulting in an attempt to adapt to stress that involve proteins which, once activated, trigger cell responses by modulating specific signaling pathways. In this work, using a combination of pulldown assays and mass spectrometry analyses, we identified the Neurospora crassa SEB-1 transcription factor that binds to the Stress Response Element (STRE) under heat stress. Orthologs of SEB-1 have been functionally characterized in a few filamentous fungi as being involved in stress responses; however, the molecular mechanisms mediated by this transcription factor may not be conserved. Here, we provide evidences for the involvement of N. crassa SEB-1 in multiple cellular processes, including response to heat, as well as osmotic and oxidative stress. The Δseb-1 strain displayed reduced growth under these conditions, and genes encoding stress-responsive proteins were differentially regulated in the Δseb-1 strain grown under the same conditions. In addition, the SEB-1-GFP protein translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus under heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress conditions. SEB-1 also regulates the metabolism of the reserve carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose under heat stress, suggesting an interconnection between metabolism control and this environmental condition. We demonstrated that SEB-1 binds in vivo to the promoters of genes encoding glycogen metabolism enzymes and regulates their expression. A genome-wide transcriptional profile of the Δseb-1 strain under heat stress was determined by RNA-seq, and a broad range of cellular processes was identified that suggests a role for SEB-1 as a protein interconnecting these mechanisms. PMID:26994287

  7. Comprehensive Identification of Krüppel-Like Factor Family Members Contributing to the Self-Renewal of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Cellular Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyojung; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Azami, Takuya; Khoa, Le Tran Phuc; Yanagisawa, Jun; Takahashi, Satoru; Ema, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotency is maintained in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and is induced from somatic cells by the activation of appropriate transcriptional regulatory networks. Krüppel-like factor gene family members, such as Klf2, Klf4 and Klf5, have important roles in maintaining the undifferentiated state of mouse ES cells as well as in cellular reprogramming, yet it is not known whether other Klf family members exert self-renewal and reprogramming functions when overexpressed. In this study, we examined whether overexpression of any representative Klf family member, such as Klf1-Klf10, would be sufficient for the self-renewal of mouse ES cells. We found that only Klf2, Klf4, and Klf5 produced leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-independent self-renewal, although most KLF proteins, if not all, have the ability to occupy the regulatory regions of Nanog, a critical Klf target gene. We also examined whether overexpression of any of Klf1-Klf10 would be sufficient to convert epiblast stem cells into a naïve pluripotent state and found that Klf5 had such reprogramming ability, in addition to Klf2 and Klf4. We also delineated the functional domains of the Klf2 protein for LIF-independent self-renewal and reprogramming. Interestingly, we found that both the N-terminal transcriptional activation and C-terminal zinc finger domains were indispensable for this activity. Taken together, our comprehensive analysis provides new insight into the contribution of Klf family members to mouse ES self-renewal and cellular reprogramming. PMID:26943822

  8. The SEB-1 Transcription Factor Binds to the STRE Motif in Neurospora crassa and Regulates a Variety of Cellular Processes Including the Stress Response and Reserve Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Kowbel, David John; Fioramonte, Mariana; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Glass, N. Louise; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress conditions, all cells induce mechanisms resulting in an attempt to adapt to stress that involve proteins which, once activated, trigger cell responses by modulating specific signaling pathways. In this work, using a combination of pulldown assays and mass spectrometry analyses, we identified the Neurospora crassa SEB-1 transcription factor that binds to the Stress Response Element (STRE) under heat stress. Orthologs of SEB-1 have been functionally characterized in a few filamentous fungi as being involved in stress responses; however, the molecular mechanisms mediated by this transcription factor may not be conserved. Here, we provide evidences for the involvement of N. crassa SEB-1 in multiple cellular processes, including response to heat, as well as osmotic and oxidative stress. The Δseb-1 strain displayed reduced growth under these conditions, and genes encoding stress-responsive proteins were differentially regulated in the Δseb-1 strain grown under the same conditions. In addition, the SEB-1-GFP protein translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus under heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress conditions. SEB-1 also regulates the metabolism of the reserve carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose under heat stress, suggesting an interconnection between metabolism control and this environmental condition. We demonstrated that SEB-1 binds in vivo to the promoters of genes encoding glycogen metabolism enzymes and regulates their expression. A genome-wide transcriptional profile of the Δseb-1 strain under heat stress was determined by RNA-seq, and a broad range of cellular processes was identified that suggests a role for SEB-1 as a protein interconnecting these mechanisms. PMID:26994287

  9. Cellular transcription factor Oct-1 interacts with the Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 protein to promote disruption of viral latency.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Amanda R; Kwek, Swee Sen; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Wille, Coral K; Kenney, Shannon C

    2011-09-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent-to-lytic switch is an essential part of the viral life cycle, but the cellular factors that promote viral reactivation are not well defined. In this report, we demonstrate that the cellular transcription factor Oct-1 cooperates with the EBV immediate-early protein BRLF1 (R, Rta) to induce lytic viral reactivation. We show that cotransfected Oct-1 enhances the ability of BRLF1 to activate lytic gene expression in 293 cells stably infected with a BRLF1-defective EBV mutant (BRLF1-stop) and that Oct-1 increases BRLF1-mediated activation of lytic EBV promoters in reporter gene assays. We find that Oct-1 interacts directly with BRLF1 in vitro and that a mutant BRLF1 protein (the M140A mutant) attenuated for the ability to interact with Oct-1 in vitro is also resistant to Oct-1-mediated transcriptional enhancement in 293 BRLF1-stop cells. Furthermore, we show that cotransfected Oct-1 augments BRLF1 binding to a variety of lytic EBV promoters in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays (including the BZLF1, BMRF1, and SM promoters) and that BRLF1 tethers Oct-1 to lytic EBV promoters. In addition, we demonstrate that an Oct-1 mutant defective in DNA binding (the S335D mutant) still retains the ability to enhance BRLF1 transcriptional effects. Finally, we show that knockdown of endogenous Oct-1 expression reduces the level of constitutive lytic EBV gene expression in both EBV-positive B-cell and EBV-positive epithelial cell lines. These results suggest that Oct-1 acts as a positive regulator of EBV lytic gene expression and that this effect is at least partially mediated through its interaction with the viral protein BRLF1. PMID:21697476

  10. Enhancement of antibody production by growth factor addition in perfusion and hollow-fiber culture systems.

    PubMed

    Omasa, T; Kobayashi, M; Nishikawa, T; Shioya, S; Suga, K; Uemura, S; Kitani, Y; Imamura, Y

    1995-12-20

    The effects of the high-molecular-weight growth factors, transferrin and bovine serum albumin (BSA), on antibody production were analyzed quantitatively in continuous hollow-fiber cultivation over a period of 60 days. Transferrin enhanced cell growth but had no significant effect on the specific antibody production rate, whereas BSA significantly enhanced antibody production. The antibody production rate was increased 4- and 14-fold respectively by feeding BSA at 2 and 5 g L(-1) into the EC side of the system (the side connected to the cell-containing outer part of the hollow-fiber unit) compared with the production achieved without BSA. Addition of 5 g L(1) BSA into the IC side of the system (the side connected to the inner part of the hollow-fiber unit) resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in the antibody production rate. The effect of BSA was also analyzed using the perfusion culture system with a separation unit. When fresh medium containing either 2 or 5 g L(-1) BSA was fed into the reactor, both the specific growth rate and specific death rate increased, while the specific antibody production rate was increased 2- and 25-fold, respectively, by feeding BSA at these two concentrations compared with no addition. Comparing the two systems, the increase in the antibody production rate achieved with the hollow-fiber system was threefold greater than that in the perfusion culture system with the same concentration of BSA feeding. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18623537

  11. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F.; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Issitt, Theo; Ulyatt, Clare; Walker, John H.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2012-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. Black

  12. Identification of multiple cellular uptake pathways of polystyrene nanoparticles and factors affecting the uptake: relevance for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Firdessa, Rebuma; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A; Moll, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles may address challenges by human diseases through improving diagnosis, vaccination and treatment. The uptake mechanism regulates the type of threat a particle poses on the host cells and how a cell responds to it. Hence, understanding the uptake mechanisms and cellular interactions of nanoparticles at the cellular and subcellular level is a prerequisite for their effective biomedical applications. The present study shows the uptake mechanisms of polystyrene nanoparticles and factors affecting their uptake in bone marrow-derived macrophages, 293T kidney epithelial cells and L929 fibroblasts. Labeling with the endocytic marker FM4-64 and transmission electron microscopy studies show that the nanoparticles were internalized rapidly via endocytosis and accumulated in intracellular vesicles. Soon after their internalizations, nanoparticles trafficked to organelles with acidic pH. Analysis of the ultrastructural morphology of the plasma membrane invaginations or extravasations provides clear evidence for the involvement of several uptake routes in parallel to internalize a given type of nanoparticles by mammalian cells, highlighting the complexity of the nanoparticle-cell interactions. Blocking the specific endocytic pathways by different pharmacological inhibitors shows similar outcomes. The potential to take up nanoparticles varies highly among different cell types in a particle sizes-, time- and energy-dependent manner. Furthermore, infection and the activation status of bone marrow-derived macrophages significantly affect the uptake potential of the cells, indicating the need to understand the diseases' pathogenesis to establish effective and rational drug-delivery systems. This study enhances our understanding of the application of nanotechnology in biomedical sciences. PMID:25224362

  13. The cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factors requires co-ordinated signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gina A.; Fearnley, Gareth W.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    VEGFs (vascular endothelial growth factors) are a family of conserved disulfide-linked soluble secretory glycoproteins found in higher eukaryotes. VEGFs mediate a wide range of responses in different tissues including metabolic homoeostasis, cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis. Such responses are initiated by VEGF binding to soluble and membrane-bound VEGFRs (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases) and co-receptors. VEGF and receptor splice isoform diversity further enhances complexity of membrane protein assembly and function in signal transduction pathways that control multiple cellular responses. Different signal transduction pathways are simultaneously activated by VEGFR–VEGF complexes with membrane trafficking along the endosome–lysosome network further modulating signal output from multiple enzymatic events associated with such pathways. Balancing VEGFR–VEGF signal transduction with trafficking and proteolysis is essential in controlling the intensity and duration of different intracellular signalling events. Dysfunction in VEGF-regulated signal transduction is important in chronic disease states including cancer, atherosclerosis and blindness. This family of growth factors and receptors is an important model system for understanding human disease pathology and developing new therapeutics for treating such ailments. PMID:26285805

  14. Differential effects of carboxy-terminal sequence deletions on platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling activities and interactions with cellular substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Seedorf, K; Millauer, B; Kostka, G; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1992-01-01

    Chimeric receptors composed of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) extracellular domain fused to wild-type and truncated platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R) intracellular sequences were stably expressed in NIH 3T3 cells devoid of endogenous EGF-Rs. This experimental system allowed us to investigate the biological activity of PDGF-R cytoplasmic-domain mutants in PDGF-R-responsive NIH 3T3 cells by activating PDGF-specific signaling pathways with EGF. Deletion of 74 carboxy-terminal amino acids severely impaired the ability of the PDGF-R cytoplasmic domain to associate with cellular substrates in vitro. This deletion also inhibited receptor and substrate phosphorylation, reduced the receptor's mitogenic activity, and completely abolished its oncogenic signaling potential. Surprisingly, removal of only six additional amino acids, including Tyr-989, restored substantial receptor and substrate phosphorylation capacity as well as transforming potential and yielded a receptor with wild-type levels of ligand-induced mitogenic activity. However, the ability of this chimera to bind phospholipase C gamma was severely impaired in comparison with the ability of the wild-type receptor, while the association with other cellular proteins was not affected. Further deletion of 35 residues, including Tyr-977, nearly abolished all PDGF-R cytoplasmic-domain biological signaling activities. None of the three C-terminal truncations completely abolished the mitogenic potential of the receptors or had any influence on ligand binding or receptor down regulation. Together, these data implicate the 80 C-terminal-most residues of the PDGF-R, and possibly Tyr-989, in phospholipase C gamma binding, while receptor sequences upstream from Asp-988 appear to be essential for specific interactions with other cellular polypeptides such as ras GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Thus, the mutants described here allow the separation of distinct PDGF

  15. Stereospecific Inhibitory Effects of CCG-1423 on the Cellular Events Mediated by Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor A

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Bunta; Minami, Saki; Ishida, Hideaki; Yoshioka, Ryuzo; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Morita, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Ken’ichiro

    2015-01-01

    CCG-1423 suppresses several pathological processes including cancer cell migration, tissue fibrosis, and the development of atherosclerotic lesions. These suppressions are caused by inhibition of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A), which is a critical factor for epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). CCG-1423 can therefore be a potent inhibitor for EMT. CCG-1423 and related compounds, CCG-100602 and CCG-203971 possess similar biological activities. Although these compounds are comprised of two stereoisomers, the differences in their biological activities remain to be assessed. To address this issue, we stereoselectively synthesized optically pure isomers of these compounds and validated their biological activities. The S-isomer of CCG-1423 rather than the R-isomer exhibited modestly but significantly higher inhibitory effects on the cellular events triggered by MRTF-A activation including serum response factor-mediated gene expression and cell migration of fibroblasts and B16F10 melanoma cells. Accordingly, the S-isomer of CCG-1423 more potently blocked the serum-induced nuclear import of MRTF-A than the R-isomer. No such difference was observed in cells treated with each of two stereoisomers of CCG-100602 or CCG-203971. We previously reported that the N-terminal basic domain (NB), which functions as a nuclear localization signal of MRTF-A, is a binding site for CCG-1423. Consistent with the biological activities of two stereoisomers of CCG-1423, docking simulation demonstrated that the S-isomer of CCG-1423 was more likely to bind to NB than the R-isomer. This is a first report demonstrating the stereospecific biological activities of CCG-1423. PMID:26295164

  16. Cellular splicing factor RAF-2p48/NPI-5/BAT1/UAP56 interacts with the influenza virus nucleoprotein and enhances viral RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Momose, F; Basler, C F; O'Neill, R E; Iwamatsu, A; Palese, P; Nagata, K

    2001-02-01

    Previous biochemical data identified a host cell fraction, designated RAF-2, which stimulated influenza virus RNA synthesis. A 48-kDa polypeptide (RAF-2p48), a cellular splicing factor belonging to the DEAD-box family of RNA-dependent ATPases previously designated BAT1 (also UAP56), has now been identified as essential for RAF-2 stimulatory activity. Additionally, RAF-2p48 was independently identified as an influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP)-interacting protein, NPI-5, in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a mammalian cDNA library. In vitro, RAF-2p48 interacted with free NP but not with NP bound to RNA, and the RAF-2p48-NP complex was dissociated following addition of free RNA. Furthermore, RAF-2p48 facilitated formation of the NP-RNA complexes that likely serve as templates for the viral RNA polymerase. RAF-2p48 was shown, in both in vitro binding assays and the yeast two-hybrid system, to bind to the amino-terminal region of NP, a domain essential for RNA binding. Together, these observations suggest that RAF-2p48 facilitates NP-RNA interaction, thus leading to enhanced influenza virus RNA synthesis. PMID:11160689

  17. Integrating products of Bessel functions with an additional exponential or rational factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Deun, Joris; Cools, Ronald

    2008-04-01

    We provide two MATLAB programs to compute integrals of the form ex∏i=1kJν_i(ax)dxand 0∞xr+x∏i=1kJν_i(ax)dx with Jν_i(x) the Bessel function of the first kind and (real) order ν. The parameter m is a real number such that ∑ν+m>-1 (to assure integrability near zero), r is real and the numbers c and a are all strictly positive. The program can deliver accurate error estimates. Program summaryProgram title: BESSELINTR, BESSELINTC Catalogue identifier: AEAH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1601 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 161 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab (version ⩾6.5), Octave (version ⩾2.1.69) Computer: All supporting Matlab or Octave Operating system: All supporting Matlab or Octave RAM: For k Bessel functions our program needs approximately ( 500+140k) double precision variables Classification: 4.11 Nature of problem: The problem consists in integrating an arbitrary product of Bessel functions with an additional rational or exponential factor over a semi-infinite interval. Difficulties arise from the irregular oscillatory behaviour and the possible slow decay of the integrand, which prevents truncation at a finite point. Solution method: The interval of integration is split into a finite and infinite part. The integral over the finite part is computed using Gauss-Legendre quadrature. The integrand on the infinite part is approximated using asymptotic expansions and this approximation is integrated exactly with the aid of the upper incomplete gamma function. In the case where a rational factor is present, this factor is first expanded in a Taylor series around infinity. Restrictions: Some (and eventually all

  18. Transcriptional control of fungal cell cycle and cellular events by Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor in an insect pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Qing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the cell cycle by forkhead (Fkh) transcription factors is likely associated with fungal adaptation to host and environment. Here we show that Fkh2, an ortholog of yeast Fkh1/2, orchestrates cell cycle and many cellular events of Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of Fkh2 in B. bassiana resulted in dramatic down-regulation of the cyclin-B gene cluster and hence altered cell cycle (longer G2/M and S, but shorter G0/G1, phases) in unicellular blastospores. Consequently, ΔFkh2 produced twice as many, but smaller, blastospores than wild-type under submerged conditions, and formed denser septa and shorter/broader cells in aberrantly branched hyphae. In these hyphae, clustered genes required for septation and conidiation were remarkedly up-regulated, followed by higher yield and slower germination of aerial conidia. Moreover, ΔFkh2 displayed attenuated virulence and decreased tolerance to chemical and environmental stresses, accompanied with altered transcripts and activities of phenotype-influencing proteins or enzymes. All the changes in ΔFkh2 were restored by Fkh2 complementation. All together, Fkh2-dependent transcriptional control is vital for the adaptation of B. bassiana to diverse habitats of host insects and hence contributes to its biological control potential against arthropod pests. PMID:25955538

  19. Transcriptional control of fungal cell cycle and cellular events by Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor in an insect pathogen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Qing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the cell cycle by forkhead (Fkh) transcription factors is likely associated with fungal adaptation to host and environment. Here we show that Fkh2, an ortholog of yeast Fkh1/2, orchestrates cell cycle and many cellular events of Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of Fkh2 in B. bassiana resulted in dramatic down-regulation of the cyclin-B gene cluster and hence altered cell cycle (longer G2/M and S, but shorter G0/G1, phases) in unicellular blastospores. Consequently, ΔFkh2 produced twice as many, but smaller, blastospores than wild-type under submerged conditions, and formed denser septa and shorter/broader cells in aberrantly branched hyphae. In these hyphae, clustered genes required for septation and conidiation were remarkedly up-regulated, followed by higher yield and slower germination of aerial conidia. Moreover, ΔFkh2 displayed attenuated virulence and decreased tolerance to chemical and environmental stresses, accompanied with altered transcripts and activities of phenotype-influencing proteins or enzymes. All the changes in ΔFkh2 were restored by Fkh2 complementation. All together, Fkh2-dependent transcriptional control is vital for the adaptation of B. bassiana to diverse habitats of host insects and hence contributes to its biological control potential against arthropod pests. PMID:25955538

  20. Activation and Cellular Localization of the Cyclosporine A-sensitive Transcription Factor NF-AT in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Karen L.; Friday, Bret B.; Thaloor, Deepa; Murphy, T.J.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    1998-01-01

    The widely used immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CSA) blocks nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, NF-AT (nuclear factor of activated T cells), preventing its activity. mRNA for several NF-AT isoforms has been shown to exist in cells outside of the immune system, suggesting a possible mechanism for side effects associated with CSA treatment. In this study, we demonstrate that CSA inhibits biochemical and morphological differentiation of skeletal muscle cells while having a minimal effect on proliferation. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with CSA inhibits muscle regeneration after induced trauma in mice. These results suggest a role for NF-AT–mediated transcription outside of the immune system. In subsequent experiments, we examined the activation and cellular localization of NF-AT in skeletal muscle cells in vitro. Known pharmacological inducers of NF-AT in lymphoid cells also stimulate transcription from an NF-AT–responsive reporter gene in muscle cells. Three isoforms of NF-AT (NF-ATp, c, and 4/x/c3) are present in the cytoplasm of muscle cells at all stages of myogenesis tested. However, each isoform undergoes calcium-induced nuclear translocation from the cytoplasm at specific stages of muscle differentiation, suggesting specificity among NF-AT isoforms in gene regulation. Strikingly, one isoform (NF-ATc) can preferentially translocate to a subset of nuclei within a single multinucleated myotube. These results demonstrate that skeletal muscle cells express functionally active NF-AT proteins and that the nuclear translocation of individual NF-AT isoforms, which is essential for the ability to coordinate gene expression, is influenced markedly by the differentiation state of the muscle cell. PMID:9763451

  1. Role of Viral RNA and Co-opted Cellular ESCRT-I and ESCRT-III Factors in Formation of Tombusvirus Spherules Harboring the Tombusvirus Replicase

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Pogany, Judit; Barajas, Daniel; Pathak, Kunj; Risco, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plus-stranded RNA viruses induce membrane deformations in infected cells in order to build viral replication complexes (VRCs). Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) co-opts cellular ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) proteins to induce the formation of vesicle (spherule)-like structures in the peroxisomal membrane with tight openings toward the cytosol. In this study, using a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) vps23Δ bro1Δ double-deletion mutant, we showed that the Vps23p ESCRT-I protein (Tsg101 in mammals) and Bro1p (ALIX) ESCRT-associated protein, both of which bind to the viral p33 replication protein, play partially complementary roles in TBSV replication in cells and in cell extracts. Dual expression of dominant-negative versions of Arabidopsis homologs of Vps23p and Bro1p inhibited tombusvirus replication to greater extent than individual expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. We also demonstrated the critical role of Snf7p (CHMP4), Vps20p, and Vps24p ESCRT-III proteins in tombusvirus replication in yeast and in vitro. Electron microscopic imaging of vps23Δ yeast revealed the lack of tombusvirus-induced spherule-like structures, while crescent-like structures are formed in ESCRT-III deletion yeasts replicating TBSV RNA. In addition, we also showed that the length of the viral RNA affects the sizes of spherules formed in N. benthamiana cells. The 4.8-kb genomic RNA is needed for the formation of spherules 66 nm in diameter, while spherules formed during the replication of the ∼600-nucleotide (nt)-long defective interfering RNA in the presence of p33 and p92 replication proteins are 42 nm. We propose that the viral RNA serves as a “measuring string” during VRC assembly and spherule formation. IMPORTANCE Plant positive-strand RNA viruses, similarly to animal positive-strand RNA viruses, replicate in membrane-bound viral replicase complexes in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Identification of cellular and viral factors

  2. Relative Importance and Additive Effects of Maternal and Infant Risk Factors on Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; James, Kristina; Escobar, Gabriel; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Li, Sherian Xu; Carroll, Kecia N.; Walsh, Eileen; Mitchel, Edward; Das, Suman; Kumar, Rajesh; Yu, Chang; Dupont, William D.; Hartert, Tina V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental exposures that occur in utero and during early life may contribute to the development of childhood asthma through alteration of the human microbiome. The objectives of this study were to estimate the cumulative effect and relative importance of environmental exposures on the risk of childhood asthma. Methods We conducted a population-based birth cohort study of mother-child dyads who were born between 1995 and 2003 and were continuously enrolled in the PRIMA (Prevention of RSV: Impact on Morbidity and Asthma) cohort. The individual and cumulative impact of maternal urinary tract infections (UTI) during pregnancy, maternal colonization with group B streptococcus (GBS), mode of delivery, infant antibiotic use, and older siblings at home, on the risk of childhood asthma were estimated using logistic regression. Dose-response effect on childhood asthma risk was assessed for continuous risk factors: number of maternal UTIs during pregnancy, courses of infant antibiotics, and number of older siblings at home. We further assessed and compared the relative importance of these exposures on the asthma risk. In a subgroup of children for whom maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy information was available, the effect of maternal antibiotic use on the risk of childhood asthma was estimated. Results Among 136,098 singleton birth infants, 13.29% developed asthma. In both univariate and adjusted analyses, maternal UTI during pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18, 1.25; adjusted OR [AOR] 1.04, 95%CI 1.02, 1.07 for every additional UTI) and infant antibiotic use (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.20, 1.22; AOR 1.16, 95%CI 1.15, 1.17 for every additional course) were associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma, while having older siblings at home (OR 0.92, 95%CI 0.91, 0.93; AOR 0.85, 95%CI 0.84, 0.87 for each additional sibling) was associated with a decreased risk of childhood asthma, in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with vaginal

  3. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the electronic... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  4. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the electronic... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  5. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the electronic... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  6. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the electronic... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  7. Regulation of Ras Exchange Factors and Cellular Localization of Ras Activation by Lipid Messengers in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jesse E.; Rubio, Ignacio; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2013-01-01

    The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs) catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and Son of Sevenless (SOS)-family GEFs. Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood. One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of RasGEFs functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells. PMID:24027568

  8. CELLULAR BIOAVAILABILITY OF NATURAL HORMONES AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS AS A FUNCTION OF SERUM AND CYTOSOLIC BINDING FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental contaminants have been reported to function as hormone mimics in various wildlife species. To investigate a potential mechanism for the interaction of contaminants with the endocrine system, we evaluated the cellular bioavailability of numerous chemicals. Hormone bi...

  9. Oligomeric Amyloid-β Toxicity Can Be Inhibited by Blocking Its Cellular Binding in Cortical Neuronal Cultures with Addition of the Triphenylmethane Dye Brilliant Blue G.

    PubMed

    Jana, Metta K; Cappai, Roberto; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D

    2016-08-17

    Accumulation of soluble amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers in the brain has been suggested to cause neurodegeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our previous findings showed that the binding of Aβ trimer and tetramer to neurons is significantly correlated with Aβ-induced neuronal cell death. We propose blocking of neuronal binding of these neurotoxic Aβ oligomers as a therapeutic strategy for preventing this disease. To test this, a nontoxic triphenylmethane dye, Brilliant Blue G (BBG), which has been reported to modulate Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity, was investigated using mouse primary cortical neuronal cultures treated with photoinduced cross-linked toxic Aβ40 oligomers as well as soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides. We found that the BBG-induced decrease in Aβ binding resulted in a significant decrease in its neurotoxicity. These findings support our hypothesis that disruption of cellular Aβ binding is a promising therapeutic strategy for combating AD. PMID:27258855

  10. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  11. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  12. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  13. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  14. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  15. Are cellular polarisation and mitotic frequency prognostic factors for local recurrence in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast?

    PubMed

    Idvall, I; Anderson, H; Ringberg, A; Fernö, M

    2003-08-01

    There is still no generally accepted histopathological classification system for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Nuclear grade, with or without other histopathological parameters (i.e. comedo-type necrosis and cellular polarisation), has been demonstrated to yield prognostic information. A detailed method for the evaluation of the mitotic frequency in DCIS, based on an approach by Contesso, was used in this study. We also investigated if cellular polarisation and mitotic frequency were important for the ipsilateral local recurrence-free interval (IL-RFI) in 121 DCIS patients who had been operated upon with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) without radiotherapy. Both cellular polarisation and the mitotic frequency were associated with histopathological and cellular biological factors (in previous evaluations), and were of borderline significance for IL-RFI in the univariate analyses. However, when nuclear grade was included in the multivariate analyses (with or without the growth pattern), neither cellular polarisation nor the mitotic frequency were of any independent prognostic value. PMID:12888365

  16. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, T.; Schaltz, E.; Ahn, S.

    2015-05-01

    Power transfer capability of wireless power transfer systems is highly dependent on the magnetic design of the primary and secondary inductors and is measured quantitatively by the coupling factor. The inductors are designed by placing the coil over a ferrite base to increase the coupling factor and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance, and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending on the placement of ferrite. Also, the addition of ferrite increases the self-inductance of the coils, and there is a probability for an overall decrease in the coupling factor. Correct placement of ferrite, on the other hand, can increase the coupling factor relatively higher than the base ferrite as it is closer to the other inductor. Ferrite being a heavy compound of iron increases the inductor weight significantly and needs to be added judiciously. Four zones have been identified in the paper, which shows different sensitivity to addition of ferrite in terms of the two inductances and coupling factor. Simulation and measurement results are presented for different air gaps between the coils and at different gap distances between the ferrite base and added ferrite. This paper is beneficial in improving the coupling factor while adding minimum weight to wireless power transfer system.

  17. Calcifying nanoparticles (nanobacteria): an additional potential factor for urolithiasis in space flight crews.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey A; Ciftcioglu, Neva; Schmid, Josef F; Barr, Yael R; Griffith, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced microgravity appears to be a risk factor for the development of urinary calculi, resulting in urolithiasis during and after spaceflight. Calcifying nanoparticles, or nanobacteria, multiply more rapidly in simulated microgravity and create external shells of calcium phosphate. The question arises whether calcifying nanoparticles are nidi for calculi and contribute to the development of clinically significant urolithiasis in those who are predisposed to the development of urinary calculi because of intrinsic or extrinsic factors. This case report describes a calculus recovered after flight from an astronaut that, on morphologic and immunochemical analysis (including specific monoclonal antibody staining), demonstrated characteristics of calcifying nanoparticles. PMID:18718644

  18. Statistical Mechanics of Surjective Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kari, Jarkko; Taati, Siamak

    2015-09-01

    Reversible cellular automata are seen as microscopic physical models, and their states of macroscopic equilibrium are described using invariant probability measures. We establish a connection between the invariance of Gibbs measures and the conservation of additive quantities in surjective cellular automata. Namely, we show that the simplex of shift-invariant Gibbs measures associated to a Hamiltonian is invariant under a surjective cellular automaton if and only if the cellular automaton conserves the Hamiltonian. A special case is the (well-known) invariance of the uniform Bernoulli measure under surjective cellular automata, which corresponds to the conservation of the trivial Hamiltonian. As an application, we obtain results indicating the lack of (non-trivial) Gibbs or Markov invariant measures for "sufficiently chaotic" cellular automata. We discuss the relevance of the randomization property of algebraic cellular automata to the problem of approach to macroscopic equilibrium, and pose several open questions. As an aside, a shift-invariant pre-image of a Gibbs measure under a pre-injective factor map between shifts of finite type turns out to be always a Gibbs measure. We provide a sufficient condition under which the image of a Gibbs measure under a pre-injective factor map is not a Gibbs measure. We point out a potential application of pre-injective factor maps as a tool in the study of phase transitions in statistical mechanical models.

  19. Factor analysis models for structuring covariance matrices of additive genetic effects: a Bayesian implementation

    PubMed Central

    de los Campos, Gustavo; Gianola, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Multivariate linear models are increasingly important in quantitative genetics. In high dimensional specifications, factor analysis (FA) may provide an avenue for structuring (co)variance matrices, thus reducing the number of parameters needed for describing (co)dispersion. We describe how FA can be used to model genetic effects in the context of a multivariate linear mixed model. An orthogonal common factor structure is used to model genetic effects under Gaussian assumption, so that the marginal likelihood is multivariate normal with a structured genetic (co)variance matrix. Under standard prior assumptions, all fully conditional distributions have closed form, and samples from the joint posterior distribution can be obtained via Gibbs sampling. The model and the algorithm developed for its Bayesian implementation were used to describe five repeated records of milk yield in dairy cattle, and a one common FA model was compared with a standard multiple trait model. The Bayesian Information Criterion favored the FA model. PMID:17897592

  20. Additive relationship between serum fibroblast growth factor 21 level and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Expression and activity of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21 hormone-like protein are associated with development of several metabolic disorders. This study was designed to investigate whether serum FGF21 level was also associated with the metabolic syndrome-related cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, and its clinical features in a Chinese cohort. Methods Two-hundred-and-fifty-three subjects visiting the Cardiology Department (Sixth People's Hospital affiliated to Shanghai JiaoTong University) were examined by coronary arteriography (to diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD)) and hepatic ultrasonography (to diagnose non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)). Serum FGF21 level was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and analyzed for correlation to subject and clinical characteristics. The independent factors of CAD were determined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Subjects with NAFLD showed significantly higher serum FGF21 than those without NAFLD (388.0 pg/mL (253.0-655.4) vs. 273.3 pg/mL (164.9-383.7), P < 0.01). Subjects with CAD showed significantly higher serum FGF21, regardless of NAFLD diagnosis (P < 0.05). Serum FGF21 level significantly elevated with the increasing number of metabolic disorders (P for trend < 0.01). After adjustment of age, sex, and BMI, FGF21 was positively correlated with total cholesterol (P < 0.05) and triglyceride (P < 0.01). FGF21 was identified as an independent factor of CAD (odds ratio = 2.984, 95% confidence interval: 1.014-8.786, P < 0.05). Conclusions Increased level of serum FGF21 is associated with NAFLD, metabolic disorders and CAD. PMID:23981342

  1. Role of Cellular Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factors in NF-κB Activation and Lymphocyte Transformation by Herpesvirus Saimiri STP

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heuiran; Choi, Joong-Kook; Li, Mengtao; Kaye, Ken; Kieff, Elliott; Jung, Jae U.

    1999-01-01

    The STP oncoproteins of the herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) subgroup A strain 11 and subgroup C strain 488 are now found to be stably associated with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) 1, 2, or 3. Mutational analyses identified residues of PXQXT/S in STP-A11 as critical for TRAF association. In addition, a somewhat divergent region of STP-C488 is critical for TRAF association. Mutational analysis also revealed that STP-C488 induced NF-κB activation that was correlated with its ability to associate with TRAFs. The HVS STP-C488 P10→R mutant was deficient in human T-lymphocyte transformation to interleukin-2-independent growth but showed wild-type phenotype for marmoset T-lymphocyte transformation in vitro and in vivo. The STP-C488 P10→R mutant was also defective in Rat-1 fibroblast transformation, and fibroblast cell transformation was blocked by a TRAF2 dominant-negative mutant. These data implicate TRAFs in STP-C488-mediated transformation of human lymphocytes and rodent fibroblasts. Other factors are implicated in immortalization of common marmoset T lymphocytes and may also be critical in the transformation of human lymphocytes and rodent fibroblasts. PMID:10196286

  2. Molecular cloning and expression of an additional epidermal growth factor receptor-related gene.

    PubMed Central

    Plowman, G D; Whitney, G S; Neubauer, M G; Green, J M; McDonald, V L; Todaro, G J; Shoyab, M

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), and amphiregulin are structurally and functionally related growth regulatory proteins. These secreted polypeptides all bind to the 170-kDa cell-surface EGF receptor, activating its intrinsic kinase activity. However, amphiregulin exhibits different activities than EGF and TGF-alpha in a number of biological assays. Amphiregulin only partially competes with EGF for binding EGF receptor, and amphiregulin does not induce anchorage-independent growth of normal rat kidney cells (NRK) in the presence of TGF-beta. Amphiregulin also appears to abrogate the stimulatory effect of TGF-alpha on the growth of several aggressive epithelial carcinomas that overexpress EGF receptor. These findings suggest that amphiregulin may interact with a separate receptor in certain cell types. Here we report the cloning of another member of the human EGF receptor (HER) family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which we have named "HER3/ERRB3." The cDNA was isolated from a human carcinoma cell line, and its 6-kilobase transcript was identified in various human tissues. We have generated peptide-specific antisera that recognizes the 160-kDa HER3 protein when transiently expressed in COS cells. These reagents will allow us to determine whether HER3 binds amphiregulin or other growth regulatory proteins and what role HER3 protein plays in the regulation of cell growth. Images PMID:2164210

  3. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program? 359.32 Section 359.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND...

  4. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program? 359.32 Section 359.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND...

  5. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program? 359.32 Section 359.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND...

  6. Additional thyroid dose factor from transportation sources in Russia after the Chernobyl disaster.

    PubMed Central

    Parshkov, E M; Chebotareva, I V; Sokolov, V A; Dallas, C E

    1997-01-01

    Beginning approximately 4 years after the Chernobyl nuclear accident a steady increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer was observed in children and adolescents of the Bryansk Oblast, which received the highest level of radionuclide contaminants in Russia. We examined the spatial relationship between the residence location of patients with identified thyroid cancer (0-18 years old at the time of the accident) and a number of geographic parameters to better account for the etiology of thyroid cancer spatial distribution. Geographic parameters analyzed included spatial distribution of 137Cs and 131I in soil, population demographics, measurements and reconstructions. of absorbed thyroid 131I doses in the population, and maps of major transportation arteries. An interesting finding is the lack of a consistent correlation between the spatial distribution of radionuclides in the soil and thyroid cancer incidence. Instead, most of the thyroid cancer cases were diagnosed in settlements situated on major railways and roads. Correlating population with thyroid cancer cases and transportation arteries reveals a much higher cancer rate on or near major roads and railways than at a distance from them, again independent of radionuclide soil concentration. There are other important factors, of course, that must be considered in future evaluations of this phenomenon. These include the influence of iodine endemic zones, genetic predisposition to thyroid cancer, and duration of residence time in contaminated areas. The feasibility of radionuclide transport on railways and roads is discussed, together with the vectors for transfer of the contaminants to the human population. Developing a model to reconstruct the radiation dose to the thyroid over time in this geographic region is proposed in light of the impact of transportation arteries. Specific studies are outlined to provide the data necessary to develop this model as well as to better characterize the feasibility and

  7. Cellular distribution of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and B (VEGFB) and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in focal cortical dysplasia type IIB

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Karin; Troost, Dirk; Spliet, Wim G. M.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Gorter, Jan A.

    2008-01-01

    Members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family are key signaling proteins in the induction and regulation of angiogenesis, both during development and in pathological conditions. However, signaling mediated through VEGF family proteins and their receptors has recently been shown to have direct effects on neurons and glial cells. In the present study, we immunocytochemically investigated the expression and cellular distribution of VEGFA, VEGFB, and their associated receptors (VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2) in focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) type IIB from patients with medically intractable epilepsy. Histologically normal temporal cortex and perilesional regions displayed neuronal immunoreactivity (IR) for VEGFA, VEGFB, and VEGF receptors (VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2), mainly in pyramidal neurons. Weak IR was observed in blood vessels and there was no notable glial IR within the grey and white matter. In all FCD specimens, VEGFA, VEGFB, and both VEGF receptors were highly expressed in dysplastic neurons. IR in astroglial and balloon cells was observed for VEGFA and its receptors. VEGFR-1 displayed strong endothelial staining in FCD. Double-labeling also showed expression of VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFR-1 in cells of the microglia/macrophage lineage. The neuronal expression of both VEGFA and VEGFB, together with their specific receptors in FCD, suggests autocrine/paracrine effects on dysplastic neurons. These autocrine/paracrine effects could play a role in the development of FCD, preventing the death of abnormal neuronal cells. In addition, the expression of VEGFA and its receptors in glial cells within the dysplastic cortex indicates that VEGF-mediated signaling could contribute to astroglial activation and associated inflammatory reactions. PMID:18317782

  8. Aitchbone hanging and ageing period are additive factors influencing pork eating quality.

    PubMed

    Channon, H A; Taverner, M R; D'Souza, D N; Warner, R D

    2014-01-01

    The effects of abattoir, carcase weight (60 or 80 kg HCW), hanging method (Achilles or aitchbone) and ageing period (2 or 7 day post-slaughter) on eating quality attributes of pork were investigated in this 3×2×2×2 factorial study. A total of 144 Large White×Landrace female pigs were slaughtered at one of three abattoirs and sides hung from either the Achilles tendon or the aitchbone. After 24 h chilling, loin (M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum) and topside (M. semimembranosus) muscles were individually vacuum packaged and aged for 2 or 7 days post-slaughter. Consumers (n=852) evaluated eating quality. Neither abattoir nor carcase weight influenced tenderness, flavour or overall liking of pork. Improvements in tenderness, flavour and overall liking were found due to aitchbone hanging (P<0.001) and ageing (P<0.001) for 7 days compared with Achilles-hung carcases and pork aged for 2 days, respectively. This study demonstrated that aitchbone hanging and 7 day ageing can improve eating quality, but these effects were additive as the interaction term was not significant. PMID:24013699

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factors in T lymphocyte differentiation and function. A Review in the Theme: Cellular Responses to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jin-Hui; Barbi, Joseph; Pan, Fan

    2015-11-01

    Low oxygen concentrations or hypoxia is a trait common to inflamed tissues. Therefore it is not surprising that pathways of hypoxic stress response, largely governed by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF), are highly relevant to the proper function of immune cells. HIF expression and stabilization in immune cells can be triggered not only by hypoxia, but also by a variety of stimuli and pathological stresses associated with leukocyte activation and inflammation. In addition to its role as a sensor of oxygen scarcity, HIF is also a major regulator of immune cell metabolic function. Rapid progress is being made in elucidating the roles played by HIF in diverse aspects of both innate and adaptive immunity. Here we discuss a number of breakthroughs that have shed light on how HIF expression and activity impact the differentiation and function of diverse T cell populations. The insights gained from these findings may serve as the foundation for future therapies aimed at fine-tuning the immune response. PMID:26354751

  10. Electrical inhibition of lens epithelial cell proliferation: an additional factor in secondary cataract?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Entong; Reid, Brian; Lois, Noemi; Forrester, John V.; McCaig, Colin D.; Zhao, Min

    2005-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of blindness but is at least curable by surgery. Unfortunately, many patients gradually develop the complication of posterior capsule opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract. This arises from stimulated cell growth within the lens capsule and can greatly impair vision. It is not fully understood why residual lens epithelial cell growth occurs after surgery. We propose and show that cataract surgery might remove an important inhibitory factor for lens cell growth, namely electric fields. The lens generates a unique pattern of electric currents constantly flowing out from the equator and entering the anterior and posterior poles. We show here that cutting and removing part of the anterior capsule as in cataract surgery significantly decreases the equatorial outward electric currents. Application of electric fields in culture inhibits proliferation of human lens epithelial cells. This inhibitory effect is likely to be mediated through a cell cycle control mechanism that decreases entry of cells into S phase from G1 phase by decreasing the G1-specific cell cycle protein cyclin E and increasing the cyclin-Cdk complex inhibitor p27kip1. Capsulorrhexis in vivo, which reduced endogenous lens electric fields, significantly increased LEC growth. This, together with our previous findings that electric fields have significant effects on the direction of lens cell migration, points to a controlling mechanism for the aberrant cell growth in posterior capsule opacification. A novel approach to control growth of lens epithelial cells using electric fields combined with other controlling mechanisms may be more effective in the prevention and treatment of this common complication of cataract surgery. PMID:15764648

  11. No Effect of the Transforming Growth Factor {beta}1 Promoter Polymorphism C-509T on TGFB1 Gene Expression, Protein Secretion, or Cellular Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Reuther, Sebastian; Metzke, Elisabeth; Bonin, Michael; Petersen, Cordula; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Raabe, Annette

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To study whether the promoter polymorphism (C-509T) affects transforming growth factor {beta}1 gene (TGFB1) expression, protein secretion, and/or cellular radiosensitivity for both human lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed with lymphocytes taken either from 124 breast cancer patients or 59 pairs of normal monozygotic twins. We used 15 normal human primary fibroblast strains as controls. The C-509T genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism or TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay. The cellular radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was measured by G0/1 assay and that of fibroblasts by colony assay. The amount of extracellular TGFB1 protein was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and TGFB1 expression was assessed via microarray analysis or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The C-509T genotype was found not to be associated with cellular radiosensitivity, neither for lymphocytes (breast cancer patients, P=.811; healthy donors, P=.181) nor for fibroblasts (P=.589). Both TGFB1 expression and TGFB1 protein secretion showed considerable variation, which, however, did not depend on the C-509T genotype (protein secretion: P=.879; gene expression: lymphocytes, P=.134, fibroblasts, P=.605). There was also no general correlation between TGFB1 expression and cellular radiosensitivity (lymphocytes, P=.632; fibroblasts, P=.573). Conclusion: Our data indicate that any association between the SNP C-509T of TGFB1 and risk of normal tissue toxicity cannot be ascribed to a functional consequence of this SNP, either on the level of gene expression, protein secretion, or cellular radiosensitivity.

  12. Decoding Cellular Dynamics in Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling Using a New Pathway-Based Integration Approach for Proteomics and Transcriptomics Data

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Astrid; Beißbarth, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Identification of dynamic signaling mechanisms on different cellular layers is now facilitated as the increased usage of various high-throughput techniques goes along with decreasing costs for individual experiments. A lot of these signaling mechanisms are known to be coordinated by their dynamics, turning time-course data sets into valuable information sources for inference of regulatory mechanisms. However, the combined analysis of parallel time-course measurements from different high-throughput platforms still constitutes a major challenge requiring sophisticated bioinformatic tools in order to ease biological interpretation. We developed a new pathway-based integration approach for the analysis of coupled omics time-series data, which we implemented in the R package pwOmics. Unlike many other approaches, our approach acknowledges the role of the different cellular layers of measurement and infers consensus profiles and time profile clusters for further biological interpretation. We investigated a time-course data set on epidermal growth factor stimulation of human mammary epithelial cells generated on the two layers of RNA and proteins. The data was analyzed using our new approach with a focus on feedback signaling and pathway crosstalk. We could confirm known regulatory patterns relevant in the physiological cellular response to epidermal growth factor stimulation as well as identify interesting new interactions in this signaling context, such as the regulatory influence of the connective tissue growth factor on transferrin receptor or the influence of growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible alpha on the connective tissue growth factor. Thus, we show that integrated cross-platform analysis provides a deeper understanding of regulatory signaling mechanisms. Combined with time-course information it enables the characterization of dynamic signaling processes and leads to the identification of important regulatory interactions which might be dysregulated in disease

  13. Identification of Major Factors Influencing ELISpot-Based Monitoring of Cellular Responses to Antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven G.; Joosten, Simone A.; Verscheure, Virginie; Pathan, Ansar A.; McShane, Helen; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Mascart, Françoise

    2009-01-01

    A number of different interferon-γ ELISpot protocols are in use in laboratories studying antigen-specific immune responses. It is therefore unclear how results from different assays compare, and what factors most significantly influence assay outcome. One such difference is that some laboratories use a short in vitro stimulation period of cells before they are transferred to the ELISpot plate; this is commonly done in the case of frozen cells, in order to enhance assay sensitivity. Other differences that may be significant include antibody coating of plates, the use of media with or without serum, the serum source and the number of cells added to the wells. The aim of this paper was to identify which components of the different ELISpot protocols influenced assay sensitivity and inter-laboratory variation. Four laboratories provided protocols for quantifying numbers of interferon-γ spot forming cells in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis derived antigens. The differences in the protocols were compared directly. We found that several sources of variation in assay protocols can be eliminated, for example by avoiding serum supplementation and using AIM-V serum free medium. In addition, the number of cells added to ELISpot wells should also be standardised. Importantly, delays in peripheral blood mononuclear cell processing before stimulation had a marked effect on the number of detectable spot forming cells; processing delay thus should be minimised as well as standardised. Finally, a pre-stimulation culture period improved the sensitivity of the assay, however this effect may be both antigen and donor dependent. In conclusion, small differences in ELISpot protocols in routine use can affect the results obtained and care should be given to conditions selected for use in a given study. A pre-stimulation step may improve the sensitivity of the assay, particularly when cells have been previously frozen. PMID:19956718

  14. Tissue-specific factors additively increase the probability of the all-or-none formation of a hypersensitive site.

    PubMed Central

    Boyes, J; Felsenfeld, G

    1996-01-01

    DNase I-hypersensitive sites lack a canonical nucleosome and have binding sites for various transcription factors. To understand how the hypersensitivity is generated and maintained, we studied the chicken erythroid-specific beta(A)/epsilon globin gene enhancer, a region where both tissue-specific and ubiquitous transcription factors can bind. Constructions containing mutations of this enhancer were stably introduced into a chicken erythroid cell line. We found that the hypersensitivity was determined primarily by the erythroid factors and that their binding additively increased the accessibility. The fraction of accessible sites in clonal cell lines was quantitated using restriction endonucleases; these data implied that the formation of each hypersensitive site was an all-or-none phenomenon. Use of DNase I and micrococcal nuclease probes further indicated that the size of the hypersensitive site was influenced by the binding of transcription factors which then determined the length of the nucleosome-free gap. Our data are consistent with a model in which hypersensitive sites are generated stochastically: mutations that reduce the number of bound factors reduce the probability that these factors will prevail over a nucleosome; thus, the fraction of sites in the population that are accessible is also diminished. Images PMID:8665857

  15. A Novel Interaction between FLICE-Associated Huge Protein (FLASH) and E2A Regulates Cell Proliferation and Cellular Senescence via Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-Alpha-p21WAF1/CIP1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Takahiro; Murakami, Taichi; Ono, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Akiko; Tominaga, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Toshikazu; Nagai, Kojiro; Doi, Toshio; Abe, Hideharu

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the cell proliferation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases. Cellular senescence limits proliferation of cancer cells, preventing tumorigenesis and restricting tissue damage. However, the role of cellular senescence in proliferative nephritis has not been determined. The proliferative peak in experimental rat nephritis coincided with a peak in E2A expression in the glomeruli. Meanwhile, E12 (an E2A-encoded transcription factor) did not promote proliferation of Mesangial cells (MCs) by itself. We identified caspase-8-binding protein FLICE-associated huge protein (FLASH) as a novel E2A-binding partner by using a yeast two-hybrid screening. Knockdown of FLASH suppressed proliferation of MCs. This inhibitory effect was partially reversed by the knockdown of E2A. In addition, the knockdown of FLASH induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 (p21) expression, but did not affect p53 expression. Furthermore, overexpression of E12 and E47 induced p21, but not p53 in MCs, in the absence of FLASH. We also demonstrated that E2A and p21 expression at the peak of proliferation was followed by significant induction of FLASH in mesangial areas in rat proliferative glomerulonephritis. Moreover, we revealed that FLASH negatively regulates cellular senescence via the interaction with E12. We also demonstrated that FLASH is involved in the TNF-α-induced p21 expressions. These results suggest that the functional interaction of E2A and FLASH play an important role in cell proliferation and cellular senescence via regulation of p21 expression in experimental glomerulonephritis. PMID:26208142

  16. Off the shelf cellular therapeutics: Factors to consider during cryopreservation and storage of human cells for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Woods, Erik J; Thirumala, Sreedhar; Badhe-Buchanan, Sandhya S; Clarke, Dominic; Mathew, Aby J

    2016-06-01

    The field of cellular therapeutics has immense potential, affording an exciting array of applications in unmet medical needs. One of several key issues is an emphasis on getting these therapies from bench to bedside without compromising safety and efficacy. The successful commercialization of cellular therapeutics will require many to extend the shelf-life of these therapies beyond shipping "fresh" at ambient or chilled temperatures for "just in time" infusion. Cryopreservation is an attractive option and offers potential advantages, such as storing and retaining patient samples in case of a relapse, banking large quantities of allogeneic cells for broader distribution and use and retaining testing samples for leukocyte antigen typing and matching. However, cryopreservation is only useful if cells can be reanimated to physiological life with negligible loss of viability and functionality. Also critical is the logistics of storing, processing and transporting cells in clinically appropriate packaging systems and storage devices consistent with quality and regulatory standards. Rationalized approaches to develop commercial-scale cell therapies require an efficient cryopreservation system that provides the ability to inventory standardized products with maximized shelf life for later on-demand distribution and use, as well as a method that is scientifically sound and optimized for the cell of interest. The objective of this review is to bridge this gap between the basic science of cryobiology and its application in this context by identifying several key aspects of cryopreservation science in a format that may be easily integrated into mainstream cell therapy manufacture. PMID:27173747

  17. Induction of Specific Cellular and Humoral Responses against Renal Cell Carcinoma after Combination Therapy with Cryoablation and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Archana; Littrup, Peter; Paul, Elyse N.; Adam, Barbara; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    Cryotherapy offers a minimally invasive treatment option for the management of both irresectable and localized prostate, liver, pulmonary and renal tumors. The anti-neoplastic effects of cryotherapy are mediated by direct tumor lysis and by indirect effects such as intracellular dehydration, pH changes, and microvascular damage resulting in ischemic necrosis. In this study, we investigated whether percutaneous cryoablation of lung metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in combination with aerosolized granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can induce systemic cellular and humoral immune responses in 6 RCC patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were sequentially studied up to 63 days post cryoimmunotherapy (CI). PBMC from pre and post CI were phenotyped for lymphocyte subsets and tested for cytotoxicity and IFNγ Elispots directed at RCC cells. Humoral responses were measured by in vitro antibody synthesis assay directed at RCC cells. The immune monitoring data showed that CI induced tumor specific CTL, specific in vitro anti-tumor antibody responses, and enhanced Th1 cytokine production in 4 out of 6 patients. More importantly, the magnitude of cellular and humoral anti-tumor response appears to be associated with clinical responses. These pilot data show that CI can induce robust and brisk cellular and humoral immune responses in metastatic RCC patients, but requires further evaluation in optimized protocols. PMID:21577139

  18. Structural studies on the RNA-recognition motif of NELF E, a cellular negative transcription elongation factor involved in the regulation of HIV transcription

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Jampani N.; Neumann, Liane; Wenzel, Sabine; Schweimer, Kristian; Rösch, Paul; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.

    2006-01-01

    The elongation of transcription of HIV RNA at the TAR (transactivation-response element) is highly regulated by positive and negative factors. The cellular negative transcription elongation factor NELF (negative elongation factor) was suggested to be involved in transcriptional regulation of HIV-1 (HIV type 1) by binding to the stem of the viral TAR RNA which is synthesized by cellular RNA polymerase II at the viral long terminal repeat. NELF is a heterotetrameric protein consisting of NELF A, B, C or the splice variant D, and E. In the present study, we determined the solution structure of the RRM (RNA-recognition motif) of the RNA-binding subunit NELF E and studied its interaction with the viral TAR RNA. Our results show that the separately expressed recombinant NELF E RRM has α-helical and β-strand elements adopting a βαββαβ fold and is able to bind to TAR RNA. Fluorescence equilibrium titrations with fluorescently labelled double- and single-stranded oligoribonucleotides representing the TAR RNA stem imply that NELF E RRM binds to the single-stranded TAR RNAs with Kd values in the low-micromolar range. PMID:16898873

  19. ERp57 as a novel cellular factor controlling prion protein biosynthesis: Therapeutic potential of protein disulfide isomerases.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Martin; Rozas, Pablo; Hetz, Claudio; Medinas, Danilo B

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis is observed in Prion-related disorders (PrDs). The protein disulfide isomerase ERp57 is a stress-responsive ER chaperone up-regulated in the brain of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients. However, the actual role of ERp57 in prion protein (PrP) biogenesis and the ER stress response remained poorly defined. We have recently addressed this question using gain- and loss-of-function approaches in vitro and animal models, observing that ERp57 regulates steady-state levels of PrP. Our results revealed that ERp57 modulates the biosynthesis and maturation of PrP but, surprisingly, does not contribute to the global cellular reaction against ER stress in neurons. Here we discuss the relevance of ERp57 as a possible therapeutic target in PrDs and other protein misfolding disorders. PMID:26864548

  20. Cellular Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming technology was first established more than 50 years ago. It can rejuvenate somatic cells by erasing the epigenetic memories and reconstructing a new pluripotent order. The recent discovery reviewed here that induced pluripotency can be achieved by a small set of transcription factors has opened up unprecedented opportunities in the pharmaceutical industry, the clinic, and laboratories. This technology allows us to access pathological studies by using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. In addition, iPS cells are also expected to be a rising star for regenerative medicine, as sources of transplantation therapy. PMID:24492711

  1. Time course of increased cellular proliferation in collateral arteries after administration of vascular endothelial growth factor in a rabbit model of lower limb vascular insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, S.; Rossow, S. T.; Kearney, M.; Zheng, L. P.; Bauters, C.; Bunting, S.; Ferrara, N.; Symes, J. F.; Isner, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Proliferation of vascular cells has been previously shown to contribute to spontaneous development of coronary collaterals. Recent studies from several laboratories have established that collateral artery growth in both the heart and limb can be enhanced by administration of angiogenic growth factors, or therapeutic angiogenesis. In this study, we sought (1) to define the extent and time course of endothelial cell (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation accompanying spontaneous collateral development during limb ischemia and (2) to determine the extent to which proliferative activity of ECs and SMCs is augmented during therapeutic angiogenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a heparin-binding EC-specific mitogen. Ten days after induction of limb ischemia by surgically excising the femoral artery of rabbits, either VEGF (500 to 1000 micrograms) or saline was administered as a bolus into the iliac artery of the ischemic limb. Cellular proliferation was evaluated by bromodeoxyuridine labeling for 24 hours at day 0 (immediately before VEGF administration) and at days 3, 5, and 7 after VEGF, EC proliferation in the midzone collaterals of VEGF-treated animals increased 2.8-fold at day 5 (P < 0.05 versus control), and returned to baseline levels by day 7. SMC proliferation in midzone collaterals also increased 2.7-fold in response to VEGF (P < 0.05). No significant increase in EC or SMC proliferation was observed in either the stem or re-entry collaterals of VEGF-treated animals compared with untreated ischemic control animals. Reduction of hemodynamic deficit in the ischemic limb measured by lower limb blood pressure was documented at day 7 after VEGF (P < 0.01 versus untreated, ischemic control). These data thus (1) establish the contribution of cellular proliferation to collateral vessel development in limb ischemia and (2) support the concept that augmented cellular proliferation contributes to the enhanced formation of collateral vessels after

  2. Factors influencing the transfection efficiency and cellular uptake mechanisms of Pluronic P123-modified polypropyleneimine/pDNA polyplexes in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jijin; Hao, Junguo; Fang, Xiaoling; Sha, Xianyi

    2016-04-01

    Generally, the major obstacles for efficient gene delivery are cellular internalization and endosomal escape of nucleic acid such as plasmid DNA (pDNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA). We previously developed Pluronic P123 modified polypropyleneimine (PPI)/pDNA (P123-PPI/pDNA) polyplexes as a gene delivery system. The results showed that P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes revealed higher transfection efficiency than PPI/pDNA polyplexes in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells. As a continued effort, the present investigation on the factors influencing the transfection efficiency, cellular uptake mechanisms, and intracellular fate of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes is reported. The presence of P123 was the main factor influencing the transfection efficiency of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes in MCF-7/ADR cells, but other parameters, such as N/P ratio, FBS concentration, incubation time and temperature were important as well. The endocytic inhibitors against clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), caveolae-mediated endocytosis (CvME), and macropinocytosis were involved in the internalization to investigate their effects on the cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes in vitro. The data showed that the internalization of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes was obtained from both CME and CvME. Colocalization experiments with TRITC-transferrin (CME indicator), Alexa Fluor 555-CTB (CvME indicator), monoclonal anti-α-tubulin (microtubule indicator), and LysoTracker Green (Endosome/lysosome indicator) were carried out to confirm the internalization routes. The results showed that both CME and CvME played vital roles in the effective transfection of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes. Endosome/lysosome system and skeleton, including actin filament and microtubule, were necessary for the transportation after internalization. PMID:26741268

  3. Matrix Metalloproteinase 3 Promotes Cellular Anti-Dengue Virus Response via Interaction with Transcription Factor NFκB in Cell Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xiangyang; Pan, Wen; Feng, Tingting; Shi, Xiaohong; Dai, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), the causative agent of human Dengue hemorrhagic fever, is a mosquito-borne virus of immense global health importance. Characterization of cellular factors promoting or inhibiting DENV infection is important for understanding the mechanism of DENV infection. In this report, MMP3 (stromelysin-1), a secretory endopeptidase that degrades extracellular matrices, has been shown promoting cellular antiviral response against DENV infection. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western Blot showed that the expression of MMP3 was upregulated in DENV-infected RAW264.7 cells. The intracellular viral loads were significantly higher in MMP3 silenced cells compared with controls. The expression level of selective anti-viral cytokines were decreased in MMP3 siRNA treated cells, and the transcription factor activity of NFκB was significantly impaired upon MMP3 silencing during DENV infection. Further, we found that MMP3 moved to cell nucleus upon DENV infection and colocalized with NFκB P65 in nucleus. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis suggested that MMP3 directly interacted with NFκB in nucleus during DENV infection and the C-terminal hemopexin-like domain of MMP3 was required for the interaction. This study suggested a novel role of MMP3 in nucleus during viral infection and provided new evidence for MMPs in immunomodulation. PMID:24416274

  4. The effects of genotype and infant weight on adult plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, and LDL cholesterol are additive.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, J A; Bolla, M; Osmond, C; Fall, C; Barker, D J; Humphries, S E

    1997-01-01

    High circulating levels of cholesterol, particularly low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and the clotting factors fibrinogen and factor VII, are associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction. Variations in the plasma levels of these factors are determined in part by polymorphisms in the genes concerned and also by weight at 1 year (infant weight). We have looked at the possibility of interactions between these genetic factors and infant weight in a sample of 290 men and 192 women from Hertfordshire using the beta-fibrinogen G/A-455, factor VII R353Q, and ApoE polymorphisms. The rare allele frequencies of the three polymorphisms were 0.19 for beta-fibrinogen, 0.10 for factor VII, and 0.07 and 0.13 for the 2 and 4 alleles of ApoE, and these frequencies were not different in subjects of different infant weight. In this sample, the polymorphisms showed the expected effects on plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, and LDL cholesterol. The A-455 allele was associated with higher fibrinogen levels but the effect was only statistically significant in women (p = 0.003). The R353 allele was associated with higher factor VII activity in both men and women (p < 0.0001 for both). The ApoE2 allele was associated with lower levels of LDL cholesterol (p = 0.03 in men, p = 0.006 in women), while the ApoE4 allele was associated with higher levels (p < 0.001 in men, not significant in women). In this sample of men and women the effect of low infant weight was only associated with significant effects on fibrinogen and LDL cholesterol in the group of men (p = 0.005 and p = 0.008 respectively). Compared with the E3E3 subjects, the LDL lowering effect of the E2 allele and the raising effect of the E4 allele was greater in those with low infant weight compared with those with high infant weight (low v high infant weight for E2: 12.7% v 9.4%; for E4 12.7% v 8.5%). Although in this sample the interactive effect did not reach statistical significance, the additive effect

  5. Fat-specific protein 27 modulates nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 and the cellular response to stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27), a member of the cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor a-like effector (Cide) family, is highly expressed in adipose tissues and is a lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein that induces the accumulation of LDs. Using a yeast two-hybrid system to examine potentia...

  6. Cross-resistance to UV radiation of a cisplatin-resistant human cell line: Overexpression of cellular factors that recognize UV-modified DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, C.C.; Huang, S.L.; Huang, H.M.; Lin-Chao, S. )

    1991-04-01

    A human cell line selected for cisplatin resistance (CPR) was irradiated with UV light and showed cross-resistance to UV light. Applying a modified chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay, we observed that CPR cells acquired enhanced host cell reactivation of a transfected plasmid carrying UV damage. Gel mobility shift analysis indicated that two nuclear factors that recognize UV-modified DNA were overexpressed in CPR cells. In addition, factors that bind UV-modified DNA were independent from the factors that bind cisplatin-modified DNA. The significance of the identified binding factors, possibly DNA repair enzymes, is discussed.

  7. Inhibition of cellular proliferation and modulation of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins by retinoids in a bovine mammary epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Woodward, T L; Turner, J D; Hung, H T; Zhao, X

    1996-06-01

    Retinoids are potent inhibitors of growth and tumor progression in many mammary carcinoma cell lines, though regulation of growth in nontumorigenic mammary epithelial cells by retinoids is less clear. Here, we have characterized the inhibition of MAC-T (a nontransformed bovine mammary epithelial cell line) cellular proliferation by retinoids and their role in regulating insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs). Retinoic acid (RA) (100 nM) was a potent inhibitor of MAC-T cell proliferation. Retinol was 10-100 times less effective. Neither retinoid could completely arrest growth at noncytotoxic concentrations. Retinoic acid inhibited cellular proliferation by 1 h (P < .05), but inhibition was fivefold greater by 24 h (P < .01). This second stage of growth inhibition (after 12 h) was dependent upon protein synthesis. However, RA-induced inhibition of cellular proliferation did not persist, with thymidine incorporation increasing toward control levels by 4 days in culture. Retinoic acid was less effective in inhibiting thymidine incorporation when cells were stimulated with insulin, des(1-3) IGF-I, or Long(R3) IGF-I when compared to cells stimulated with native IGF-I or serum. Inhibition of proliferation by RA was associated with increased levels of IGFBP-2 in conditioned media and in plasma membrane preparations. Treatment with insulin or des(1-3) IGF-I resulted in the appearance of IGFBP-3 in conditioned media and on the cell surface. However, RA significantly reduced IGFBP-3 levels in conditioned media and eliminated IGFBP-3 associated with the plasma membrane. Thus, RA is a potent but transient inhibitor of bovine mammary epithelial cell proliferation, and this growth inhibition is correlated with increased IGFBP-2 accumulation and inhibition of IGF-I stimulated IGFBP-3 protein secretion. PMID:8655603

  8. Motif affinity and mass spectrometry proteomic approach for the discovery of cellular AMPK targets: identification of mitochondrial fission factor as a new AMPK substrate.

    PubMed

    Ducommun, Serge; Deak, Maria; Sumpton, David; Ford, Rebecca J; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Kussmann, Martin; Viollet, Benoit; Steinberg, Gregory R; Foretz, Marc; Dayon, Loïc; Morrice, Nicholas A; Sakamoto, Kei

    2015-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key cellular energy sensor and regulator of metabolic homeostasis. Although it is best known for its effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, AMPK is implicated in diverse cellular processes, including mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy, and cell growth and proliferation. To further our understanding of energy homeostasis through AMPK-dependent processes, the design and application of approaches to identify and characterise novel AMPK substrates are invaluable. Here, we report an affinity proteomicstrategy for the discovery and validation of AMPK targets using an antibody to isolate proteins containing the phospho-AMPK substrate recognition motif from hepatocytes that had been treated with pharmacological AMPK activators. We identified 57 proteins that were uniquely enriched in the activator-treated hepatocytes, but were absent in hepatocytes lacking AMPK. We focused on two candidates, cingulin and mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), and further characterised/validated them as AMPK-dependent targets by immunoblotting with phosphorylation site-specific antibodies. A small-molecule AMPK activator caused transient phosphorylation of endogenous cingulin at S137 in intestinal Caco2 cells. Multiple splice-variants of MFF appear to express in hepatocytes and we identified a common AMPK-dependent phospho-site (S129) in all the 3 predominant variants spanning the mass range and a short variant-specific site (S146). Collectively, our proteomic-based approach using a phospho-AMPK substrate antibody in combination with genetic models and selective AMPK activators will provide a powerful and reliable platform for identifying novel AMPK-dependent cellular targets. PMID:25683918

  9. Inhibition of cellular proliferation by the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 is associated with suppression of insulin-like growth factor I receptor gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, H; Shen-Orr, Z; Rauscher, F J; Morris, J F; Roberts, C T; LeRoith, D

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-I-R) gene promoter by the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 in intact cells. The levels of endogenous IGF-I-R mRNA and the activity of IGF-I-R gene promoter fragments in luciferase reporter constructs were found to be significantly higher in G401 cells (a Wilms' tumor-derived cell line lacking detectable WT1 mRNA) than in 293 cells (a human embryonic kidney cell line which expresses significant levels of WT1 mRNA). To study whether WT1 could suppress the expression of the endogenous IGF-I-R gene, WT1-negative G401 cells were stably transfected with a WT1 expression vector. Expression of WT1 mRNA in G401 cells resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of cellular proliferation, which was associated with a reduction in the levels of IGF-I-R mRNA, promoter activity, and ligand binding and with a reduction in IGF-I-stimulated cellular proliferation, thymidine incorporation, and anchorage-independent growth. These data suggest that a major aspect of the action of the WT1 tumor suppressor is the repression of IGF-I-R gene expression. PMID:7791758

  10. Cellular Factor XIIIA Transglutaminase Localizes in Caveolae and Regulates Caveolin-1 Phosphorylation, Homo-oligomerization and c-Src Signaling in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Kaartinen, Mari T

    2015-11-01

    Transglutaminases (TGs) are a family of widely distributed enzymes that catalyze protein crosslinking by forming a covalent isopeptide bond between the substrate proteins. We have shown that MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts express Factor XIII-A (FXIII-A), and that the extracellular crosslinking activity of FXIII-A is involved in regulating matrix secretion and deposition. In this study, we have investigated the localization and potential role of intracellular FXIII-A. Conventional immunofluorescence microscopy and TIRF microscopy analyses showed that FXIII-A co-localizes with caveolin-1 in specialized membrane structures, caveolae, in differentiating osteoblasts. The caveolae-disrupting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished FXIII-A staining and co-localization with caveolin-1 from the osteoblast plasma membrane. The presence of FXIII-A in caveolae was confirmed by preparing caveolae-enriched cellular fractions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation followed by western blotting. Despite this association of FXIII-A with caveolae, there was no detectable transglutaminase activity in caveolae, as measured by monodansylcadaverine incorporation. TG inhibitor NC9--which can alter TG enzyme conformation--localized to caveolae and displaced FXIII-A from these structures when added to the osteoblast cultures. The decreased FXIII-A levels in caveolae after NC9 treatment increased c-Src activation, which resulted in caveolin-1 phosphorylation, homo-oligomerization and Akt phosphorylation, suggesting cellular FXIII-A has a role in regulating c-Src signaling in osteoblasts. PMID:26231113

  11. Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and not activator protein-1 in cellular response to nickel compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; Davidson, Gerard; Li, Jingxia; Yan, Yan; Chen, Fei; Costa, Max; Chen, Lung Chi; Huang, Chuanshu

    2002-01-01

    The predominant exposure route for nickel compounds is by inhalation, and several studies have indicated the correlation between nickel exposure and respiratory cancers. The tumor-promoting effects of nickel compounds are thought to be associated with their transactivation of transcription factors. We have investigated the possible activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor KB (NF-kappaB) in mouse C141 epidermal cells and fibroblasts 3T3 and B82, and human bronchoepithelial BEAS-2B cells in response to nickel compound exposure. Our results show that NF-kappaB activity is induced by nickel exposure in 3T3 and BEAS-2B cells. Conversely, similar nickel treatment of these cells did not induce AP-1 activity, suggesting that nickel tumorigenesis occurs through NF-kappaB and not AP-1. We also investigated the role of NF-kappaB in the induction of Cap43 by nickel compounds using dominant negative mutant Ikappabeta kinase b-KM BEAS-2B transfectants. PMID:12426142

  12. Lentiviral hepatitis B pseudotype entry requires sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and additional hepatocyte-specific factors.

    PubMed

    Meredith, L W; Hu, K; Cheng, X; Howard, C R; Baumert, T F; Balfe, P; van de Graaf, K F; Protzer, U; McKeating, J A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the world's major unconquered infections, resulting in progressive liver disease, and current treatments rarely cure infection. A limitation to discovering new therapies is our limited knowledge of HBV entry and dissemination pathways that hinders the development of in vitro culture systems. To address this gap in our understanding we optimized the genesis of infectious lentiviral pseudoparticles (HBVpps). The recent discovery that the bile salt transporter sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) acts as a receptor for HBV enabled us to assess the receptor dependency of HBVpp infection. HBVpps preferentially infect hepatoma cells expressing NTCP, whereas other non-liver cells engineered to express NTCP do not support infection, suggesting that additional hepatocyte-specific factors are required for HBVpp internalization. These results highlight the value of the HBVpp system to dissect the pathways of HBV entry and dissemination. PMID:26474824

  13. Insulin receptor isoform A and insulin-like growth factor II as additional treatment targets in human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Avnet, Sofia; Sciacca, Laura; Salerno, Manuela; Gancitano, Giovanni; Cassarino, Maria Francesca; Longhi, Alessandra; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Carboni, Joan M; Gottardis, Marco; Giunti, Armando; Pollak, Michael; Vigneri, Riccardo; Baldini, Nicola

    2009-03-15

    Despite the frequent presence of an insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGFIR)-mediated autocrine loop in osteosarcoma (OS), interfering with this target was only moderately effective in preclinical studies. Here, we considered other members of the IGF system that might be involved in the molecular pathology of OS. We found that, among 45 patients with OS, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 serum levels were significantly lower, and IGF-II serum levels significantly higher, than healthy controls. Increased IGF-II values were associated with a decreased disease-free survival. After tumor removal, both IGF-I and IGF-II levels returned to normal values. In 23 of 45 patients, we obtained tissue specimens and found that all expressed high mRNA level of IGF-II and >IGF-I. Also, isoform A of the insulin receptor (IR-A) was expressed at high level in addition to IGFIR and IR-A/IGFIR hybrids receptors (HR(A)). These receptors were also expressed in OS cell lines, and simultaneous impairment of IGFIR, IR, and Hybrid-Rs by monoclonal antibodies, siRNA, or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor BMS-536924, which blocks both IGFIR and IR, was more effective than selective anti-IGFIR strategies. Also, anti-IGF-II-siRNA treatment in low-serum conditions significantly inhibited MG-63 OS cells that have an autocrine circuit for IGF-II. In summary, IGF-II rather than IGF-I is the predominant growth factor produced by OS cells, and three different receptors (IR-A, HR(A), and IGFIR) act complementarily for an IGF-II-mediated constitutive autocrine loop, in addition to the previously shown IGFIR/IGF-I circuit. Cotargeting IGFIR and IR-A is more effective than targeting IGF-IR alone in inhibiting OS growth. PMID:19258511

  14. Expression of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus HTDV/HERV-K Is Enhanced by Cellular Transcription Factor YY1

    PubMed Central

    Knössl, Michael; Löwer, Roswitha; Löwer, Johannes

    1999-01-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus HTDV/HERV-K, which resides in moderate copy numbers in the human genome, is expressed in a cell-type-specific manner, predominantly in teratocarcinoma cells. We have analyzed the regulatory potential of the 5′ enhancer of the HERV-K long terminal repeat. Protein extracts of HERV-K-expressing teratocarcinoma cell lines (GH and Tera2) and nonexpressing HeLa and HepG2 cells form different protein complexes on the enhancer sequence as detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Using competition EMSAs, DNase I footprinting, and supershift experiments, we localized the binding site of these complexes to a 20-bp sequence within the enhancer and showed that the transcription factor YY1 is one component of the HERV-K enhancer complex. Replacement of the YY1 binding site with unrelated sequences reduced expression of the luciferase gene as a reporter in transient-transfection assays. PMID:9882329

  15. Timed interactions between viral and cellular replication factors during the initiation of SV40 in vitro DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Poonam; Nasheuer, Heinz-Peter; Hartmann, Hella; Grosse, Frank; Fanning, Ellen; Weisshart, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    The initiation of SV40 (simian virus 40) DNA replication requires the co-operative interactions between the viral Tag (large T-antigen), RPA (replication protein A) and Pol (DNA polymerase α-primase) on the template DNA. Binding interfaces mapped on these enzymes and expressed as peptides competed with the mutual interactions of the native proteins. Prevention of the genuine interactions was accomplished only prior to the primer synthesis step and blocked the assembly of a productive initiation complex. Once the complex was engaged in the synthesis of an RNA primer and its extension, the interfering effects of the peptides ceased, suggesting a stable association of the replication factors during the initiation phase. Specific antibodies were still able to disrupt preformed interactions and inhibited primer synthesis and extension activities, underlining the crucial role of specific protein–protein contacts during the entire initiation process. PMID:17666013

  16. Characterization of a Novel Human Herpesvirus 8-Encoded Protein, vIRF-3, That Shows Homology to Viral and Cellular Interferon Regulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lubyova, Barbora; Pitha, Paula M.

    2000-01-01

    The genome of the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) contains a cluster of open reading frames (ORFs) encoding proteins with homology to the cellular transcription factors of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family. Two of these homologues, vIRF-1 and vIRF-2, were previously identified and functionally analyzed. In this study, we have characterized a novel gene, designated vIRF-3, encoded within the previously predicted ORF K10.5 and our newly identified ORF K10.6. Northern blotting of RNA extracted from BCBL-1 cells with a vIRF-3-specific probe and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed a single transcript of 2.2 kb with a splice present in the coding region. The vIRF-3 mRNA levels in BCBL-1 cells were increased upon 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment, with kinetics of expression similar to those of the early immediate genes. The vIRF-3 ORF encodes a 73-kDa protein with homology to cellular IRF-4 and HHV-8-encoded vIRF-2 and K11. In transient transfection assays with the IFNACAT reporter, vIRF-3 functioned as a dominant-negative mutant of both IRF-3 and IRF-7 and inhibited virus-mediated transcriptional activity of the IFNA promoter. Similarly, the overexpression of vIRF-3 in mouse L929 cells resulted in inhibition of virus-mediated synthesis of biologically active interferons. These results suggest that by targeting IRF-3 and IRF-7, which play a critical role in the activation of alpha/beta interferon (IFN) genes, HHV-8 has evolved a mechanism by which it directly subverts the functions of IRFs and down-regulates the induction of the IFN genes that are important components of the innate immunity. PMID:10933732

  17. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  18. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  19. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  20. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  1. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor mediated cellular and subcellular targeted delivery of Iron oxide core-Titanium dioxide shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ye

    TiO2 nanomaterials can carry a multitude of therapeutic and diagnostic agents and the semiconductor properties of TiO2 allow for the production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species following photoactivation. However, the delivery of these nanomaterials to specific cancer cells and specific subcellular organelles within these cells can have a substantial impact on the efficacy and safety of TiO2 nanoparticle therapeutics. Targeting cell surface receptors that are overexpressed by cancer cells is one strategy to improve the specificity of nanoparticle delivery. Therefore we decided to target the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) because ligand- binding induces rapid receptor endocytosis and ligand-bound EGFR can translocate to the nucleus of cancer cells. To create NPs that can bind EGFR, we identified a peptide derived from the B-loop of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) that has been shown to bind and activate EGFR and conjugated it to the surface of Fe3O4 core-TiO2 shell NPs to produce B-loop NCs. We then devised a pulldown assay to show that B-loop NCs, but not bare NPs or NCs carrying a scrambled B-loop peptide, can bind and extract EGFR from HeLa cell protein extracts. Interestingly, B-loop NCs can also pulldown importin-beta, a protein that can transport EGFR to the nucleus. Furthermore, we used flow cytometry and fluorescently labeled NPs to show that B-loop peptides can significantly improve the internalization of NPs by EGFR-expressing HeLa cells. We determined that B-loop NCs can bind EGFR on the membrane of HeLa cells and that these NCs can be transported to the nucleus, by using a combination of confocal microscopy and X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy (XFM) to indirectly and directly track the subcellular distribution of NCs. Finally, we demonstrate how the Bionanoprobe, a novel high-resolution XFM apparatus that can scan whole-mounted, frozen-hydrated cells at multiple angles can be used to verify the subcellular distribution of B-loop NCs.

  3. Architected Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  4. Constraint factor graph cut–based active contour method for automated cellular image segmentation in RNAi screening

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, C.; LI, H.; ZHOU, X.; WONG, S. T. C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Image-based, high throughput genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) experiments are increasingly carried out to facilitate the understanding of gene functions in intricate biological processes. Automated screening of such experiments generates a large number of images with great variations in image quality, which makes manual analysis unreasonably time-consuming. Therefore, effective techniques for automatic image analysis are urgently needed, in which segmentation is one of the most important steps. This paper proposes a fully automatic method for cells segmentation in genome-wide RNAi screening images. The method consists of two steps: nuclei and cytoplasm segmentation. Nuclei are extracted and labelled to initialize cytoplasm segmentation. Since the quality of RNAi image is rather poor, a novel scale-adaptive steerable filter is designed to enhance the image in order to extract long and thin protrusions on the spiky cells. Then, constraint factor GCBAC method and morphological algorithms are combined to be an integrated method to segment tight clustered cells. Compared with the results obtained by using seeded watershed and the ground truth, that is, manual labelling results by experts in RNAi screening data, our method achieves higher accuracy. Compared with active contour methods, our method consumes much less time. The positive results indicate that the proposed method can be applied in automatic image analysis of multi-channel image screening data. PMID:18445146

  5. Disassembly activity of actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) is associated with distinct cellular processes in apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Silvia; Zimmermann, Dennis; Olshina, Maya A.; Wilkinson, Mark; Fisher, Fabio; Tan, Yan Hong; Stewart, Rebecca J.; Tonkin, Christopher J.; Wong, Wilson; Kovar, David R.; Baum, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin family have been shown to be crucial for the motility and survival of apicomplexan parasites. However, the mechanisms by which ADF proteins fulfill their function remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the comparative activities of ADF proteins from Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, using a conditional T. gondii ADF-knockout line complemented with ADF variants from either species. We show that P. falciparum ADF1 can fully restore native TgADF activity, demonstrating functional conservation between parasites. Strikingly, mutation of a key basic residue (Lys-72), previously implicated in disassembly in PfADF1, had no detectable phenotypic effect on parasite growth, motility, or development. In contrast, organelle segregation was severely impaired when complementing with a TgADF mutant lacking the corresponding residue (Lys-68). Biochemical analyses of each ADF protein confirmed the reduced ability of lysine mutants to mediate actin depolymerization via filament disassembly although not severing, in contrast to previous reports. These data suggest that actin filament disassembly is essential for apicomplexan parasite development but not for motility, as well as pointing to genus-specific coevolution between ADF proteins and their native actin. PMID:26157165

  6. Disassembly activity of actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) is associated with distinct cellular processes in apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Haase, Silvia; Zimmermann, Dennis; Olshina, Maya A; Wilkinson, Mark; Fisher, Fabio; Tan, Yan Hong; Stewart, Rebecca J; Tonkin, Christopher J; Wong, Wilson; Kovar, David R; Baum, Jake

    2015-09-01

    Proteins of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin family have been shown to be crucial for the motility and survival of apicomplexan parasites. However, the mechanisms by which ADF proteins fulfill their function remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the comparative activities of ADF proteins from Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, using a conditional T. gondii ADF-knockout line complemented with ADF variants from either species. We show that P. falciparum ADF1 can fully restore native TgADF activity, demonstrating functional conservation between parasites. Strikingly, mutation of a key basic residue (Lys-72), previously implicated in disassembly in PfADF1, had no detectable phenotypic effect on parasite growth, motility, or development. In contrast, organelle segregation was severely impaired when complementing with a TgADF mutant lacking the corresponding residue (Lys-68). Biochemical analyses of each ADF protein confirmed the reduced ability of lysine mutants to mediate actin depolymerization via filament disassembly although not severing, in contrast to previous reports. These data suggest that actin filament disassembly is essential for apicomplexan parasite development but not for motility, as well as pointing to genus-specific coevolution between ADF proteins and their native actin. PMID:26157165

  7. Cellular mechanisms regulating activity-dependent release of native brain-derived neurotrophic factor from hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Katz, David M

    2002-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in activity-dependent modifications of neuronal connectivity and synaptic strength, including establishment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). To shed light on mechanisms underlying BDNF-dependent synaptic plasticity, the present study was undertaken to characterize release of native BDNF from newborn rat hippocampal neurons in response to physiologically relevant patterns of electrical field stimulation in culture, including tonic stimulation at 5 Hz, bursting stimulation at 25 and 100 Hz, and theta-burst stimulation (TBS). Release was measured using the ELISA in situ technique, developed in our laboratory to quantify secretion of native BDNF without the need to first overexpress the protein to nonphysiological levels. Each stimulation protocol resulted in a significant increase in BDNF release that was tetrodotoxin sensitive and occurred in the absence of glutamate receptor activation. However, 100 Hz tetanus and TBS, stimulus patterns that are most effective in inducing hippocampal LTP, were significantly more effective in releasing native BDNF than lower-frequency stimulation. For all stimulation protocols tested, removal of extracellular calcium, or blockade of N-type calcium channels, prevented BDNF release. Similarly, depletion of intracellular calcium stores with thapsigargin and treatment with dantrolene, an inhibitor of calcium release from caffeine-ryanodine-sensitive stores, markedly inhibited activity-dependent BDNF release. Our results indicate that BDNF release can encode temporal features of hippocampal neuronal activity. The dual requirement for calcium influx through N-type calcium channels and calcium mobilization from intracellular stores strongly implicates a role for calcium-induced calcium release in activity-dependent BDNF secretion. PMID:12451139

  8. Regulation of gene expression by NFAT transcription factors in hibernating ground squirrels is dependent on the cellular environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-09-01

    Calcineurin is a calmodulin-stimulated phosphatase that regulates the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) c1-4 through dephosphorylation. We believe that this mechanism plays various roles in the remodeling and maintenance of Ictidomys tridecemlineatus skeletal muscle. During hibernation, bouts of torpor and arousal take place, and squirrels do not lose muscle mass despite being inactive. Protein expression of Ca(2+) signaling proteins were studied using immunoblotting. A DNA-protein interaction ELISA technique was created to test the binding of NFATs in the nucleus to DNA probes containing the NFAT response element under environmental conditions reflective of those during hibernation. Calcineurin protein levels increased by 3.08-fold during torpor (compared to euthermic control), whereas calpain1 levels also rose by 3.66-fold during torpor. Calmodulin levels were elevated upon entering torpor. NFATc4 binding to DNA showed a 1.4-fold increase during torpor, and we found that this binding was further enhanced when 600 nM of Ca(2+) was supplemented. We also found that decreasing the temperature of ELISAs resulted in progressive decreases in the binding of NFATs c1, c3, and c4 to DNA. In summary, calmodulin and calpain1 appear to activate calcineurin and NFATc4 during torpor. NFAT binding to target promoters is affected by intranuclear [Ca(2+)] and environmental temperatures. Therefore, Ca(2+) signaling and temperature changes play key roles in regulation of the NFAT-calcineurin pathway in skeletal muscle of hibernating 13-lined ground squirrels over the torpor-arousal cycle, and they may contribute to the avoidance of disuse-induced muscle atrophy that occurs naturally in these animals. PMID:27344571

  9. Type 1 Diabetes in the Spanish Population: additional factors to Class II HLA-DR3 and -DR4

    PubMed Central

    Urcelay, Elena; Santiago, José L; de la Calle, Hermenegildo; Martínez, Alfonso; Méndez, Julián; Ibarra, José M; Maluenda, Carlos; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; de la Concha, Emilio G

    2005-01-01

    Background The Major Histocompatibility Complex is the main genetic contributor to susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D); genome-wide scans have consistently mapped increased predisposition to this region. The highest disease risk has been associated with HLA-DR3 and HLA-DR4. In particular, the DR3-positive ancestral haplotype 18.2 was reported as highly diabetogenic. We aimed to corroborate whether this haplotype increases the susceptibility conferred by the DQ2-DR3 alleles in a Mediterranean population. We also searched for additional susceptibility factors to the classic DQ2-DR3 and DQ8-DR4. Results Genetic MHC markers were analysed in a case-control study with 302 T1D patients and 529 ethnically matched controls. DR3-TNFa1b5 carrier rate was significantly higher in DR3-positive heterozygous T1D patients than in DR3-positive heterozygous controls (p = 0.0019; odds ratio OR [95% confidence interval CI] = 2.26 [1.3–3.93]). This data was confirmed analysing the allelic frequency, which includes the information corresponding to the DR3-homozygous individuals (p = 0.001; OR = 2.09) and by using the Arlequin software to check the DR3-positive haplotypes (p = 0.004;OR = 1.93). The present results provide strong evidence of a second susceptibility region in the ancestral haplotype 18.2 in the Spanish population. Moreover, we searched for T1D susceptibility factors in addition to the MHC classical ones, within the DR2-DQ6/DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 negative population. Several genetic markers in both MHC class II (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501 [p = 0.007;OR = 2.81], DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202 [p = 0.03; OR = 2.35]) and III (TNFa2b1 [p = 0.01 OR = 2.74], BAT-2*2 [p = 0.004; OR = 3.19]) were found. These different alleles associated with T1D were not independent and we observed linkage disequilibrium among them leading us to describe two new risk haplotypes (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501-TNFa2b1 and DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202- BAT-2*2). Finally, we studied a T1D susceptibility/protection marker located in

  10. Randomised Controlled Feasibility Trial of an Evidence-Informed Behavioural Intervention for Obese Adults with Additional Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sniehotta, Falko F.; Dombrowski, Stephan U.; Avenell, Alison; Johnston, Marie; McDonald, Suzanne; Murchie, Peter; Ramsay, Craig R.; Robertson, Kim; Araujo-Soares, Vera

    2011-01-01

    Background Interventions for dietary and physical activity changes in obese adults may be less effective for participants with additional obesity-related risk factors and co-morbidities than for otherwise healthy individuals. This study aimed to test the feasibility and acceptability of the recruitment, allocation, measurement, retention and intervention procedures of a randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve physical activity and dietary practices amongst obese adults with additional obesity related risk factors. Method Pilot single centre open-labelled outcome assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial of obese (Body Mass Index (BMI)≥30 kg/m2) adults (age≥18 y) with obesity related co-morbidities such as type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance or hypertension. Participants were randomly allocated to a manual-based group intervention or a leaflet control condition in accordance to a 2∶1 allocation ratio. Primary outcome was acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures, secondary outcomes included measures of body composition, physical activity, food intake and psychological process measures. Results Out of 806 potentially eligible individuals identified through list searches in two primary care general medical practices N = 81 participants (63% female; mean-age = 56.56(11.44); mean-BMI = 36.73(6.06)) with 2.35(1.47) co-morbidities were randomised. Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) was the only significant predictor of providing consent to take part in the study (higher chances of consent for invitees with lower levels of deprivation). Participant flowcharts, qualitative and quantitative feedback suggested good acceptance and feasibility of intervention procedures but 34.6% of randomised participants were lost to follow-up due to overly high measurement burden and sub-optimal retention procedures. Participants in the intervention group showed positive trends for most psychological, behavioural and body

  11. Sodium Benzoate, a Metabolite of Cinnamon and a Food Additive, Upregulates Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor in Astrocytes and Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Modi, Khushbu K; Jana, Malabendu; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-11-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a promyelinating trophic factor that plays an important role in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, mechanisms by which CNTF expression could be increased in the brain are poorly understood. Recently we have discovered anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities of sodium benzoate (NaB), a metabolite of cinnamon and a widely-used food additive. Here, we delineate that NaB is also capable of increasing the mRNA and protein expression of CNTF in primary mouse astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and primary human astrocytes. Accordingly, oral administration of NaB and cinnamon led to the upregulation of astroglial and oligodendroglial CNTF in vivo in mouse brain. Induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal model of MS, reduced the level of CNTF in the brain, which was restored by oral administration of cinnamon. While investigating underlying mechanisms, we observed that NaB induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated NaB-induced expression of CNTF. The activation of cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein by NaB, the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the CNTF promoter by NaB and the abrogation of NaB-induced expression of CNTF in astrocytes by siRNA knockdown of CREB suggest that NaB increases the expression of CNTF via the activation of CREB. These results highlight a novel myelinogenic property of NaB and cinnamon, which may be of benefit for MS and other demyelinating disorders. PMID:26399250

  12. Cellular Uptake and Cytotoxic Effect of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted and Plitidepsin Loaded Co-Polymeric Polymersomes on Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe; Thevenot, Julie; Oliveira, Hugo; Pérez-Andrés, Encarnación; Berra, Edurne; Masa, Marc; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Lecommandoux, Sébastien; Heredia, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulating chemotherapy drugs in targeted nanodelivery systems is one of the most promising approaches to tackle cancer disease, avoiding side effects of common treatment. In the last decade, several nanocarriers with different nature have been tested, but polypeptide-based copolymers have attracted considerable attention for their biocompatibility, controlled and slow biodegradability as well as their low toxicity. In this work, we synthesized, characterized and evaluated poly(trimethylene carbonate)-bock-poly(L-glutamic acid) derived polymersomes, targeted to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), loaded with plitidepsin and ultimately tested in HT29 and LS174T colorectal cancer cell lines for specificity and efficacy. Furthermore, morphology, physico-chemical properties and plitidepsin loading were carefully investigated. A thorough in vitro cytotoxicity analysis of the unloaded polymersomes was carried out for biocompatibility check, studying viability, cell membrane asymmetry and reactive oxygen species levels. Those cytotoxicity assays showed good biocompatibility for plitidepsin-unloaded polymersomes. Cellular uptake and cytotoxic effect of EGFR targeted and plitidepsin loaded polymersome indicated that colorectal cancer cell lines were.more sensitive to anti-EGFR-drug-loaded than untargeted drug-loaded polymersomes. Also, in both cell lines, the use of untargeted polymersomes greatly reduced plitidepsin cytotoxicity as well as the cellular uptake, indicating that the use of this targeted nanocarrier is a promising approach to tackle colorectal cancer disease and avoid the undesired effects of the usual treatment. Furthermore, in vivo assays support the in vitro conclusions that EGFR targeted polymersomes could be a good drug delivery system. This work provides a proof of concept for the use of encapsulated targeted drugs as future therapeutic treatments for cancer. PMID:26554161

  13. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP1) can regulate E2F1 transcription factor-mediated control of cyclin transcription.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Jessy; Berthelet, Jean; Marivin, Arthur; Gemble, Simon; Edmond, Valérie; Plenchette, Stéphanie; Lagrange, Brice; Hammann, Arlette; Dupoux, Alban; Delva, Laurent; Eymin, Béatrice; Solary, Eric; Dubrez, Laurence

    2011-07-29

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) is a potent regulator of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cytoplasm. However, in some primary cells and tumor cell lines, cIAP1 is expressed in the nucleus, and its nuclear function remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the N-terminal part of cIAP1 directly interacts with the DNA binding domain of the E2F1 transcription factor. cIAP1 dramatically increases the transcriptional activity of E2F1 on synthetic and CCNE promoters. This function is not conserved for cIAP2 and XIAP, which are cytoplasmic proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that cIAP1 is recruited on E2F binding sites of the CCNE and CCNA promoters in a cell cycle- and differentiation-dependent manner. cIAP1 silencing inhibits E2F1 DNA binding and E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation of the CCNE gene. In cells that express a nuclear cIAP1 such as HeLa, THP1 cells and primary human mammary epithelial cells, down-regulation of cIAP1 inhibits cyclin E and A expression and cell proliferation. We conclude that one of the functions of cIAP1 when localized in the nucleus is to regulate E2F1 transcriptional activity. PMID:21653699

  14. Molecular cloning of cellular genes encoding retinoblastoma-associated proteins: identification of a gene with properties of the transcription factor E2F.

    PubMed Central

    Shan, B; Zhu, X; Chen, P L; Durfee, T; Yang, Y; Sharp, D; Lee, W H

    1992-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein interacts with a number of cellular proteins to form complexes which are probably crucial for its normal physiological function. To identify these proteins, we isolated nine distinct clones by direct screening of cDNA expression libraries using purified RB protein as a probe. One of these clones, Ap12, is expressed predominantly at the G1-S boundary and in the S phase of the cell cycle. The nucleotide sequence of Ap12 has features characteristic of transcription factors. The C-terminal region binds to unphosphorylated RB in regions similar to those to which T antigen binds and contains a transactivation domain. A region containing a potential leucine zipper flanked by basic residues is able to bind an E2F recognition sequence specifically. Expression of Ap12 in mammalian cells significantly enhances E2F-dependent transcriptional activity. These results suggest that Ap12 encodes a protein with properties known to be characteristic of transcription factor E2F. Images PMID:1448092

  15. Additional diagnostic and clinical value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies compared with rheumatoid factor isotypes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vallbracht, Inka; Helmke, Klaus

    2005-07-01

    In the past decade significant advantages have been made in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and therapeutic strategies have changed a lot. These days, highly effective disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs enable intervention early in the disease process, in order to prevent major joint damage. For years, serological support in the diagnosis of RA has been limited to the presence of rheumatoid factors, although not very specific for RA. During the last years a variety of circulating non-RF antibodies have been discovered and reported to be of potential diagnostic value. CCP2 proved to be a very disease-specific and even sensitive marker for RA. In addition to the diagnostic properties, CCP showed to be a good prognostic marker, CCP helps to predict the erosive or nonerosive progression of the disease, and CCP is already present early in the disease. This diagnostic tool enables the clinician to choose the optimal therapeutic management for each single RA patient. PMID:16081030

  16. Are delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase inhibition and metal concentrations additional factors for the age-related cognitive decline?

    PubMed

    Baierle, Marília; Charão, Mariele F; Göethel, Gabriela; Barth, Anelise; Fracasso, Rafael; Bubols, Guilherme; Sauer, Elisa; Campanharo, Sarah C; Rocha, Rafael C C; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Bordignon, Suelen; Zibetti, Murilo; Trentini, Clarissa M; Avila, Daiana S; Gioda, Adriana; Garcia, Solange C

    2014-01-01

    Aging is often accompanied by cognitive impairments and influenced by oxidative status and chemical imbalances. Thus, this study was conducted to examine whether age-related cognitive deficit is associated with oxidative damage, especially with inhibition of the enzyme delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D), as well as to verify the influence of some metals in the enzyme activity and cognitive performance. Blood ALA-D activity, essential (Fe, Zn, Cu, Se) and non-essential metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, As, Cr, Ni, V) were measured in 50 elderly and 20 healthy young subjects. Cognitive function was assessed by tests from Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) battery and other. The elderly group presented decreased ALA-D activity compared to the young group. The index of ALA-D reactivation was similar to both study groups, but negatively associated with metals. The mean levels of essential metals were within the reference values, while the most toxic metals were above them in both groups. Cognitive function impairments were observed in elderly group and were associated with decreased ALA-D activity, with lower levels of Se and higher levels of toxic metals (Hg and V). Results suggest that the reduced ALA-D activity in elderly can be an additional factor involved in cognitive decline, since its inhibition throughout life could lead to accumulation of the neurotoxic compound ALA. Toxic metals were found to contribute to cognitive decline and also to influence ALA-D reactivation. PMID:25329536

  17. Cellular Mechanisms Controlling Caspase Activation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Amanda B.; Freel, Christopher D.; Kornbluth, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Caspases are the primary drivers of apoptotic cell death, cleaving cellular proteins that are critical for dismantling the dying cell. Initially translated as inactive zymogenic precursors, caspases are activated in response to a variety of cell death stimuli. In addition to factors required for their direct activation (e.g., dimerizing adaptor proteins in the case of initiator caspases that lie at the apex of apoptotic signaling cascades), caspases are regulated by a variety of cellular factors in a myriad of physiological and pathological settings. For example, caspases may be modified posttranslationally (e.g., by phosphorylation or ubiquitylation) or through interaction of modulatory factors with either the zymogenic or active form of a caspase, altering its activation and/or activity. These regulatory events may inhibit or enhance enzymatic activity or may affect activity toward particular cellular substrates. Finally, there is emerging literature to suggest that caspases can participate in a variety of cellular processes unrelated to apoptotic cell death. In these settings, it is particularly important that caspases are maintained under stringent control to avoid inadvertent cell death. It is likely that continued examination of these processes will reveal new mechanisms of caspase regulation with implications well beyond control of apoptotic cell death. PMID:23732469

  18. Cellular signaling protective against noise-induced hearing loss – A role for novel intrinsic cochlear signaling involving corticotropin-releasing factor?

    PubMed

    Vetter, Douglas E

    2015-09-01

    Hearing loss afflicts approximately 15% of the world's population, and crosses all socioeconomic boundaries. While great strides have been made in understanding the genetic components of syndromic and non-syndromic hearing loss, understanding of the mechanisms underlying noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) have come much more slowly. NIHL is not simply a mechanism by which older individuals loose their hearing. Significantly, the incidence of NIHL is increasing, and is now involving ever younger populations. This may predict future increased occurrences of hearing loss. Current research has shown that even short-term exposures to loud sounds generating what was previously considered temporary hearing loss, actually produces an almost immediate and permanent loss of specific populations of auditory nerve fibers. Additionally, recurrent exposures to intense sound may hasten age-related hearing loss. While NIHL is a significant medical concern, to date, few compounds have delivered significant protection, arguing that new targets need to be identified. In this commentary, we will explore cellular signaling processes taking place in the cochlea believed to be involved in protection against hearing loss, and highlight new data suggestive of novel signaling not previously recognized as occurring in the cochlea, that is perhaps protective of hearing. This includes a recently described local hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA)-like signaling system fully contained in the cochlea. This system may represent a local cellular stress-response system based on stress hormone release similar to the systemic HPA axis. Its discovery may hold hope for new drug therapies that can be delivered directly to the cochlea, circumventing systemic side effects. PMID:26074267

  19. Cellular resilience.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Lena; Harris, Georgina; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resilience describes the ability of a cell to cope with environmental changes such as toxicant exposure. If cellular metabolism does not collapse directly after the hit or end in programmed cell death, the ensuing stress responses promote a new homeostasis under stress. The processes of reverting "back to normal" and reversal of apoptosis ("anastasis") have been studied little at the cellular level. Cell types show astonishingly similar vulnerability to most toxicants, except for those that require a very specific target, metabolism or mechanism present only in specific cell types. The majority of chemicals triggers "general cytotoxicity" in any cell at similar concentrations. We hypothesize that cells differ less in their vulnerability to a given toxicant than in their resilience (coping with the "hit"). In many cases, cells do not return to the naive state after a toxic insult. The phenomena of "pre-conditioning", "tolerance" and "hormesis" describe this for low-dose exposures to toxicants that render the cell more resistant to subsequent hits. The defense and resilience programs include epigenetic changes that leave a "memory/scar" - an alteration as a consequence of the stress the cell has experienced. These memories might have long-term consequences, both positive (resistance) and negative, that contribute to chronic and delayed manifestations of hazard and, ultimately, disease. This article calls for more systematic analyses of how cells cope with toxic perturbations in the long-term after stressor withdrawal. A technical prerequisite for these are stable (organotypic) cultures and a characterization of stress response molecular networks. PMID:26536287

  20. Cellular Homeostasis and Aging.

    PubMed

    Hartl, F Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Aging and longevity are controlled by a multiplicity of molecular and cellular signaling events that interface with environmental factors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Modulation of these pathways to extend life span, including insulin-like signaling and the response to dietary restriction, identified the cellular machineries and networks of protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and stress resistance pathways as critical players in the aging process. A decline of proteostasis capacity during aging leads to dysfunction of specific cell types and tissues, rendering the organism susceptible to a range of chronic diseases. This volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry contains a set of two reviews addressing our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying aging in model organisms and humans. PMID:27050288

  1. A new role for the cellular PABP repressor Paip2 as an innate restriction factor capable of limiting productive cytomegalovirus replication.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Caleb; Yu, Dong; Mohr, Ian

    2013-08-15

    The capacity of polyadenylate-binding protein PABPC1 (PABP1) to stimulate translation is regulated by its repressor, Paip2. Paradoxically, while PABP accumulation promotes human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) protein synthesis, we show that this is accompanied by an analogous increase in the abundance of Paip2 and EDD1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that destabilizes Paip2. Coordinate control of PABP1, Paip2, and EDD1 required the virus-encoded UL38 mTORC1 activator and resulted in augmented Paip2 synthesis, stability, and association with PABP1. Paip2 synthesis also increased following serum stimulation of uninfected normal fibroblasts, suggesting that this coregulation may play a role in how uninfected cells respond to stress. Significantly, Paip2 accumulation was dependent on PABP accrual, as preventing PABP1 accumulation suppressed viral replication and inhibited the corresponding Paip2 increase. Furthermore, depleting Paip2 restored the ability of infected cells to assemble the translation initiation factor eIF4F, promoting viral protein synthesis and replication without increasing PABP1. This establishes a new role for the cellular PABP1 inhibitor Paip2 as an innate defense that restricts viral protein synthesis and replication. Moreover, it illustrates how a stress-induced rise in PABP1 triggered by virus infection can counter and surpass a corresponding increase in Paip2 abundance and stability. PMID:23964095

  2. Effect of triptolide on secretion of inflammatory cellular factors TNF-α and IL-8 in peritoneal macrophages of mice activated by lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Bai, Xiang-jun; Hu, Duan; Li, Zhan-fei; Liu, Kai-jun

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research has been carried out to look for safe and effective anti-inflammation drugs from traditional Chinese herbal medicine. As a powerful research technology of life science, molecular biology has entered many areas of traditional Chinese medicine. This study aimed to investigate the effect of triptolide on tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) of peritoneal macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. METHODS: Peritoneal elicited macrophages were separated, purified and activated by LPS in mice, then cultured in vitro with triptolide at different concentrations. The activity of TNF-α and the level of IL-8 of cellular supernatants were determined by MTT colorimetric assay and ELISA, respectively. RESULTS: The activity of TNF-α in macrophages was significantly inhibited (P<0.01) by triptolide (10-1-101μg/ml) during 4-24 hours in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The level of IL-8 in macrophages was significantly inhibited (P<0.01) by triptolide (10-1-101μg/ml) in 12 hours in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Triptolide could inhibit the activity of TNF-α and the level of IL-8 in macrophages activated by LPS. PMID:25214945

  3. Cellular and Tumor Radiosensitivity is Correlated to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Protein Expression Level in Tumors Without EGFR Amplification;Epidermal growth factor receptor; Radiotherapy; Squamous cell carcinoma; Biomarker; Local tumor control

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Saker, Jarob; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Krause, Mechthild; Yaromina, Ala; Meyer-Staeckling, Soenke; Scherkl, Benjamin; Kriegs, Malte; Brandt, Burkhard; Grenman, Reidar; Petersen, Cordula; Baumann, Michael; Dikomey, Ekkehard

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: There is conflicting evidence for whether the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor in human tumors can be used as a marker of radioresponse. Therefore, this association was studied in a systematic manner using squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines grown as cell cultures and xenografts. Methods and Materials: The study was performed with 24 tumor cell lines of different tumor types, including 10 SCC lines, which were also investigated as xenografts on nude mice. Egfr gene dose and the length of CA-repeats in intron 1 were determined by polymerase chain reaction, protein expression in vitro by Western blot and in vivo by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and radiosensitivity in vitro by colony formation. Data were correlated with previously published tumor control dose 50% data after fractionated irradiation of xenografts of the 10 SCC. Results: EGFR protein expression varies considerably, with most tumor cell lines showing moderate and only few showing pronounced upregulation. EGFR upregulation could only be attributed to massive gene amplification in the latter. In the case of little or no amplification, in vitro EGFR expression correlated with both cellular and tumor radioresponse. In vivo EGFR expression did not show this correlation. Conclusions: Local tumor control after the fractionated irradiation of tumors with little or no gene amplification seems to be dependent on in vitro EGFR via its effect on cellular radiosensitivity.

  4. Nuclear factor-kappa B directs carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 receptor expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae-infected epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Muenzner, Petra; Billker, Oliver; Meyer, Thomas F; Naumann, Michael

    2002-03-01

    The human-specific pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae expresses opacity-associated (Opa) protein adhesins that bind to various members of the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family. In this study, we have analyzed the mechanism underlying N. gonorrhoeae-induced CEACAM up-regulation in epithelial cells. Epithelial cells represent the first barrier for the microbial pathogen. We therefore characterized CEACAM expression in primary human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells and found that CEACAM1-3 (L, S) and CEACAM1-4 (L, S) splice variants mediate an increased Opa(52)-dependent gonoccocal binding to HOSE cells. Up-regulation of these CEACAM molecules in HOSE cells is a direct process that takes place within 2 h postinfection and depends on close contact between microbial pathogen and HOSE cells. N. gonorrhoeae-triggered CEACAM1 up-regulation involves activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), which translocates as a p50/p65 heterodimer into the nucleus, and an NF-kappaB-specific inhibitory peptide inhibited CEACAM1-receptor up-regulation in N. gonorrhoeae-infected HOSE cells. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides did not induce NF-kappaB and CEACAM up-regulation, which corresponds to our findings that HOSE cells do not express toll-like receptor 4. The ability of N. gonorrhoeae to up-regulate its epithelial receptor CEACAM1 through NF-kappaB suggests an important mechanism allowing efficient bacterial colonization during the initial infection process. PMID:11751883

  5. A Mechanism to Enhance Cellular Responsivity to Hormone Action: Krüppel-Like Factor 9 Promotes Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β Autoinduction During Postembryonic Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang; Knoedler, Joseph R; Denver, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR)-β (trb) is induced by TH (autoinduced) in Xenopus tadpoles during metamorphosis. We previously showed that Krüppel-like factor 9 (Klf9) is rapidly induced by TH in the tadpole brain, associates in chromatin with the trb upstream region in a developmental stage and TH-dependent manner, and forced expression of Klf9 in the Xenopus laevis cell line XTC-2 accelerates and enhances trb autoinduction. Here we investigated whether Klf9 can promote trb autoinduction in tadpole brain in vivo. Using electroporation-mediated gene transfer, we transfected plasmids into premetamorphic tadpole brain to express wild-type or mutant forms of Klf9. Forced expression of Klf9 increased baseline trb mRNA levels in thyroid-intact but not in goitrogen-treated tadpoles, supporting that Klf9 enhances liganded TR action. As in XTC-2 cells, forced expression of Klf9 enhanced trb autoinduction in tadpole brain in vivo and also increased TH-dependent induction of the TR target genes klf9 and thbzip. Consistent with our previous mutagenesis experiments conducted in XTC-2 cells, the actions of Klf9 in vivo required an intact N-terminal region but not a functional DNA binding domain. Forced expression of TRβ in tadpole brain by electroporation-mediated gene transfer increased baseline and TH-induced TR target gene transcription, supporting a role for trb autoinduction during metamorphosis. Our findings support that Klf9 acts as an accessory transcription factor for TR at the trb locus during tadpole metamorphosis, enhancing trb autoinduction and transcription of other TR target genes, which increases cellular responsivity to further TH action on developmental gene regulation programs. PMID:26886257

  6. Rewiring of Cellular Membrane Homeostasis by Picornaviruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites and utilize host elements to support key viral processes, including penetration of the plasma membrane, initiation of infection, replication, and suppression of the host's antiviral defenses. In this review, we focus on picornaviruses, a family of positive-strand RNA viruses, and discuss the mechanisms by which these viruses hijack the cellular machinery to form and operate membranous replication complexes. Studies aimed at revealing factors required for the establishment of viral replication structures identified several cellular-membrane-remodeling proteins and led to the development of models in which the virus used a preexisting cellular-membrane-shaping pathway “as is” for generating its replication organelles. However, as more data accumulate, this view is being increasingly questioned, and it is becoming clearer that viruses may utilize cellular factors in ways that are distinct from the normal functions of these proteins in uninfected cells. In addition, the proteincentric view is being supplemented by important new studies showing a previously unappreciated deep remodeling of lipid homeostasis, including extreme changes to phospholipid biosynthesis and cholesterol trafficking. The data on viral modifications of lipid biosynthetic pathways are still rudimentary, but it appears once again that the viruses may rewire existing pathways to generate novel functions. Despite remarkable progress, our understanding of how a handful of viral proteins can completely overrun the multilayered, complex mechanisms that control the membrane organization of a eukaryotic cell remains very limited. PMID:24920802

  7. A Nucleator Arms Race: Cellular Control of Actin Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Campellone, Kenneth G.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    For more than a decade the Arp2/3 complex, a handful of nucleation-promoting factors, and formins were the only molecules known to directly nucleate actin filament formation de novo. However, the past several years have brought a surge in the discovery of mammalian proteins with roles in actin nucleation and dynamics. Newly recognized nucleation-promoting factors, such as WASH, WHAMM, and JMY stimulate Arp2/3 complex activity at distinct cellular locations. Formin nucleators with additional biochemical and cellular activities have also been uncovered. Finally, the Spire, Cordon-bleu, and Leiomodin nucleators have revealed new ways of overcoming the kinetic barriers to actin polymerization. PMID:20237478

  8. Auxin and Cellular Elongation.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Silvia Melina; Barbez, Elke; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Estevez, José M

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is a crucial growth regulator in plants. However, a comprehensive understanding of how auxin induces cell expansion is perplexing, because auxin acts in a concentration- and cell type-dependent manner. Consequently, it is desirable to focus on certain cell types to exemplify the underlying growth mechanisms. On the other hand, plant tissues display supracellular growth (beyond the level of single cells); hence, other cell types might compromise the growth of a certain tissue. Tip-growing cells do not display neighbor-induced growth constraints and, therefore, are a valuable source of information for growth-controlling mechanisms. Here, we focus on auxin-induced cellular elongation in root hairs, exposing a mechanistic view of plant growth regulation. We highlight a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and transport, steering root hair development in response to internal and external triggers. Auxin signaling modules and downstream cascades of transcription factors define a developmental program that appears rate limiting for cellular growth. With this knowledge in mind, the root hair cell is a very suitable model system in which to dissect cellular effectors required for cellular expansion. PMID:26787325

  9. Changes in gene expression and cellular localization of insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 in the ovaries during ovary development of the yellowtail, Seriola quinqueradiata.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Kentaro; Gen, Koichiro; Izumida, Daisuke; Kazeto, Yukinori; Hotta, Takuro; Takashi, Toshinori; Aono, Hideaki; Soyano, Kiyoshi

    2016-06-01

    A method of controlling the somatic growth and reproduction of yellowtail fish (Seriola quinqueradiata) is needed in order to establish methods for the efficient aquaculture production of the species. However, little information about the hormonal interactions between somatic growth and reproduction is available for marine teleosts. There is accumulating evidence that insulin-like growth factor (IGF), a major hormone related somatic growth, plays an important role in fish reproduction. As the first step toward understanding the physiological role of IGF in the development of yellowtail ovaries, we characterized the expression and cellular localization of IGF-1 and IGF-2 in the ovary during development. We histologically classified the maturity of two-year-old females with ovaries at various developmental stages into the perinucleolar (Pn), yolk vesicle (Yv), primary yolk (Py), secondary yolk and tertiary yolk (Ty) stages, according to the most advanced type of oocyte present. The IGF-1 gene expression showed constitutively high levels at the different developmental stages, although IGF-1 mRNA levels tended to increase from the Py to the Ty stage with vitellogenesis, reaching maximum levels during the Ty stage. The IGF-2 mRNA levels increased as ovarian development advanced. Using immunohistochemistry methods, immunoreactive IGF-1 was mainly detected in the theca cells of ovarian follicles during late secondary oocyte growth, and in part of the granulosa cells of Ty stage oocytes. IGF-2 immunoreactivity was observed in all granulosa cells in layer in Ty stage oocytes. These results indicate that follicular IGFs may be involved in yellowtail reproduction via autocrine/paracrine mechanisms. PMID:26764214

  10. Oxidative stress enables Epstein-Barr virus-induced B-cell transformation by posttranscriptional regulation of viral and cellular growth-promoting factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Kamranvar, S A; Masucci, M G

    2016-07-21

    Infection of human B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) leads to the establishment of immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) that are widely used as a model of viral oncogenesis. An early consequence of infection is the induction of DNA damage and activation of the DNA damage response, which limits the efficiency of growth transformation. The cause of the DNA damage remains poorly understood. We have addressed this question by comparing the response of B lymphocytes infected with EBV or stimulated with a potent B-cell mitogen. We found that although the two stimuli induce comparable proliferation during the first 10 days of culture, the EBV-infected blasts showed significantly higher levels of DNA damage, which correlated with stronger and sustained accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment with ROS scavengers decreased DNA damage in both mitogen-stimulated and EBV-infected cells. However, while mitogen-induced proliferation was slightly improved, the proliferation of EBV-infected cells and the establishment of LCLs were severely impaired. Quenching of ROS did not affect the kinetics and magnitude of viral gene expression but was associated with selective downregulation of the viral LMP1 and phosphorylated cellular transcription factor STAT3 that have key roles in transformation. Analysis of the mechanism by which high levels of ROS support LMP1 expression revealed selective inhibition of viral microRNAs that target the LMP1 transcript. Our study provides novel insights into the role of EBV-induced oxidative stress in promoting B-cell immortalization and malignant transformation. PMID:26592445

  11. trans activation of the simian virus 40 late promoter by large T antigen requires binding sites for the cellular transcription factor TEF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Casaz, P; Sundseth, R; Hansen, U

    1991-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen stimulates the level of transcription from several RNA polymerase II promoters, including the SV40 late promoter. The mechanism of trans activation appears to be indirect since binding of T antigen to specific DNA sequences is not required. However, specific promoter elements that respond to T antigen have not previously been defined. We identified DNA sequences from the SV40 late promoter whose ability to stimulate transcription is induced by the expression of T antigen. In particular, the Sph I + II motifs of the SV40 enhancer can confer T-antigen inducibility to the normally uninducible herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene promoter when multiple copies of the sequence are inserted 5' of the transcription initiation site and TATA sequence. Binding sites for the cellular transcription factor TEF-1 and octamer binding proteins are contained within the Sph I + II motifs, as well as at other positions in the SV40 promoter. To study the role of individual protein-binding sites in trans activation by T antigen, mutations were constructed in various TEF-1 and octamer protein-binding sites of the SV40 late promoter. These mutations did not significantly affect basal promoter activity. However, mutation of all three TEF-1 sites prevented detectable activation by T antigen. DNase I footprinting of the mutated promoters with purified proteins demonstrated that inducibility by T antigen correlated with binding affinity of TEF-1 for the DNA and not with binding affinity of an octamer binding protein. Images PMID:1658359

  12. Cellular steatosis in ethanol oxidizing-HepG2 cells is partially controlled by the transcription factor, early growth response-1

    PubMed Central

    Thomes, Paul G.; Osna, Natalia A.; Davis, John S.; Donohue, Terrence M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the transcription factor early growth response-1 (Egr-1) regulates ethanol-induced fatty liver. However, the mechanism(s) through which ethanol oxidation controls Egr-1 is unknown. Here, using recombinant hepatoma (HepG2; VL-17A) cells that metabolize ethanol, we show that alcohol dehydrogenase catalysis of ethanol oxidation and subsequent acetaldehyde production controls Egr-1 expression. Further, the induction of Egr-1 enhances expression of other steatosis-related genes, resulting in triglyceride accumulation. Ethanol exposure increased Egr-1 promoter activity, messenger RNA and Egr-1 protein levels in VL-17A cells. Elevated Egr-1 protein was sustained by an ethanol-induced decrease in proteasome activity, thereby stabilizing the Egr-1 protein. Egr-1 induction depended on ethanol oxidation, as it was prevented when ethanol oxidation was blocked. Ethanol exposure induced Egr-1 and triglyceride accumulation only in alcohol dehydrogenase-expressing cells that produced acetaldehyde. Such induction did not occur in parental, non-metabolizing HepG2 cells or in cells that express only cytochrome P450 2E1. However, direct exposure of HepG2 cells to acetaldehyde induced both Egr-1 protein and triglycerides. Egr-1 over-expression elevated triglyceride levels, which were augmented by ethanol exposure. However, these triglyceride levels did not exceed those in ethanol-exposed cells that had normal Egr-1 expression. Conversely, Egr-1 knockdown by siRNA only partially blocked ethanol-induced triglyceride accumulation and was associated not only with lower Egr-1 expression but also attenuation of SREBP1c and TNF-α mRNAs. Double knockdown of both Egr-1 and SREBP-1c abolished ethanol-elicited steatosis. Collectively, our findings provide important new insights into the temporal regulation by ethanol oxidation of Egr-1 and cellular steatosis. PMID:23103837

  13. Molecular and cellular analysis of the pH response transcription factor PacC in the fungal symbiont Epichloë festucae.

    PubMed

    Lukito, Yonathan; Chujo, Tetsuya; Scott, Barry

    2015-12-01

    In order to survive and adapt to the environment, it is imperative for fungi to be able to sense and respond to changes in extracellular pH conditions. In ascomycetes, sensing of extracellular pH is mediated by the Pal pathway resulting in activation of the PacC transcription factor at alkaline pH. The role of PacC in regulating fungal virulence and pathogenicity has been described in several pathogenic fungi but to date not in a symbiotic fungus. Epichloë festucae is a biotrophic fungal endophyte that forms a stable mutualistic interaction with Lolium perenne. In this study, pacC deletion (ΔpacC) and dominant active (pacC(C)) mutants were generated in order to study the cellular roles of PacC in E. festucae. Deletion of pacC resulted in increased sensitivity of the mutant to salt-stress but surprisingly did not affect the ability of the mutant to grow under alkaline pH conditions. Alkaline pH was observed to induce conidiation in wild-type E. festucae but not in the ΔpacC mutant. On the other hand the pacC(C) mutant had increased conidiation at neutral pH alone. Null pacC mutants had no effect on the symbiotic interaction with ryegrass plants whereas the pacC(C) mutant increased the tiller number. Examination of the growth of the pacC(C) mutant in the plant revealed the formation of aberrant convoluted hyphal structures and an increase in hyphal breakage, which are possible reasons for the altered host interaction phenotype. PMID:26529380

  14. Teaching cellular engineering.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Daniel A; Waugh, Richard E

    2006-02-01

    Cellular engineering is one of the fastest growing subdisciplines in the field of Biomedical Engineering. It involves the application of engineering analysis to understand and control cellular behavior, with the ultimate objective of developing novel therapeutic or diagnostic approaches for the clinic or harnessing cellular function for commercial applications. Well-educated students in this area need strong foundational knowledge in engineering science, chemistry, and cell and molecular biology. In undergraduate curricula, the challenge is to include essential engineering skills plus appropriate levels of training in chemistry and biology while satisfying accreditation-mandated breadth in engineering training. At the graduate level, educators must accommodate students with diverse backgrounds and provide them with both a state-of-the-art understanding of the life sciences and the most advanced engineering skills. Engineering curricular content should include mechanics and materials, physical chemistry, transport phenomena, and control theory. Training from faculty with appointments and research programs in the life sciences is generally recommended, and additional life science content should also be integrated within the engineering curriculum. A capstone course in cellular engineering that includes opportunities for students to have hands-on experiences with state-of-the-art laboratory techniques is highly recommended. PMID:16450196

  15. An Additional Potential Factor for Kidney Stone Formation during Space Flights: Calcifying Nanoparticles (Nanobacteria): A Case Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Ciftcioglu, Neva; Schmid, Joseph; Griffith, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced microgravity appears to be a risk factor for the development of urinary calculi due to skeletal calcium liberation and other undefined factors, resulting in stone disease in crewmembers during and after spaceflight. Calcifying nanoparticles, or nanobacteria, reproduce at a more rapid rate in simulated microgravity conditions and create external shells of calcium phosphate in the form of apatite. The questions arises whether calcifying nanoparticles are niduses for calculi and contribute to the development of clinical stone disease in humans, who possess environmental factors predisposing to the development of urinary calculi and potentially impaired immunological defenses during spaceflight. A case of a urinary calculus passed from an astronaut post-flight with morphological characteristics of calcifying nanoparticles and staining positive for a calcifying nanoparticle unique antigen, is presented.

  16. Employing Lead Thiocyanate Additive to Reduce the Hysteresis and Boost the Fill Factor of Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Weijun; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Wang, Changlei; Saparov, Bayrammurad; Duan, Hsin-Sheng; Zhao, Dewei; Xiao, Zewen; Schulz, Philip; Harvey, Steven P; Liao, Weiqiang; Meng, Weiwei; Yu, Yue; Cimaroli, Alexander J; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Zhu, Kai; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Fang, Guojia; Mitzi, David B; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-07-01

    Lead thiocyanate in the perovskite precursor can increase the grain size of a perovskite thin film and reduce the conductivity of the grain boundaries, leading to perovskite solar cells with reduced hysteresis and enhanced fill factor. A planar perovskite solar cell with grain boundary and interface passivation achieves a steady-state efficiency of 18.42%. PMID:27145346

  17. Overexpression of hepatocyte growth factor in SBMA model mice has an additive effect on combination therapy with castration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Huang, Zhe; Jiang, Yue-Mei; Kondo, Naohide; Iida, Madoka; Tohnai, Genki; Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Sobue, Gen

    2015-12-25

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ)-encoding tract within the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The pathologic features of SBMA are motor neuron loss in the spinal cord and brainstem and diffuse nuclear accumulation and nuclear inclusions of mutant AR in residual motor neurons and certain visceral organs. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a polypeptide growth factor which has neuroprotective properties. To investigate whether HGF overexpression can affect disease progression in a mouse model of SBMA, we crossed SBMA transgenic model mice expressing an AR gene with an expanded CAG repeat with mice overexpressing HGF. Here, we report that high expression of HGF induces Akt phosphorylation and modestly ameliorated motor symptoms in an SBMA transgenic mouse model treated with or without castration. These findings suggest that HGF overexpression can provide a potential therapeutic avenue as a combination therapy with disease-modifying therapies in SBMA. PMID:26551462

  18. Smoking and polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolism and DNA repair genes are additive risk factors affecting bladder cancer in Northern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Rouissi, Kamel; Ouerhani, Slah; Hamrita, Bechr; Bougatef, Karim; Marrakchi, Raja; Cherif, Mohamed; Ben Slama, Mohamed Riadh; Bouzouita, Mohamed; Chebil, Mohamed; Ben Ammar Elgaaied, Amel

    2011-12-01

    Cancer epidemiology has undergone marked development since the nineteen-fifties. One of the most spectacular and specific contributions was the demonstration of the massive effect of smoking and genetic polymorphisms on the occurrence of bladder cancer. The tobacco carcinogens are metabolized by various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as the super-families of N-acetyltransferases (NAT) and glutathione S-transferases (GST). DNA repair is essential to an individual's ability to respond to damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Alterations in DNA repair genes may affect cancer risk by influencing individual susceptibility to this environmental exposure. Polymorphisms in NAT2, GST and DNA repair genes alter the ability of these enzymes to metabolize carcinogens or to repair alterations caused by this process. We have conducted a case-control study to assess the role of smoking, slow NAT2 variants, GSTM1 and GSTT1 null, and XPC, XPD, XPG nucleotide excision-repair (NER) genotypes in bladder cancer development in North Tunisia. Taken alone, each gene unless NAT2 did not appear to be a factor affecting bladder cancer susceptibility. For the NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes, the NAT2*5/*7 diplotype was found to have a 7-fold increased risk to develop bladder cancer (OR = 7.14; 95% CI: 1.30-51.41). However, in tobacco consumers, we have shown that Null GSTM1, Wild GSTT1, Slow NAT2, XPC (CC) and XPG (CC) are genetic risk factors for the disease. When combined together in susceptible individuals compared to protected individuals these risk factors give an elevated OR (OR = 61). So, we have shown a strong cumulative effect of tobacco and different combinations of studied genetic risk factors which lead to a great susceptibility to bladder cancer. PMID:21647780

  19. Cellular localization and expression of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF binding proteins within the epiphyseal growth plate of the ovine fetus: possible functional implications.

    PubMed

    de los Rios, P; Hill, D J

    1999-04-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are important in the regulation of normal fetal musculoskeletal growth and development, and their actions have been shown to be modulated by IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). Because the anatomical distribution of IGFBPs is likely to dictate IGF bioavailability, we determined the cellular distribution and expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-1 to IGFBP-6 in epiphyseal growth plates of the fetal sheep, using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization. Little mRNA for IGF-I was detectable within the growth plates, but mRNA for IGF-II was abundant in germinal and proliferative chondrocytes, although absent from some differentiating chondrocytes and hypertrophic cells. Immunohistochemistry for IGF-I and IGF-II showed a presence of both peptides in all chondrocyte zones, including hypertrophic cells. Immunoreactive IGFBP-2 to -5 were localized within the germinal and proliferative zones of chondrocytes, but little immunoreactivity was present within the columns of differentiating cells. IGFBP immunoreactivity again appeared in hypertrophic chondrocytes. IGFBP mRNA in chondrocytes of the epiphyseal growth plate was below the detectable limit of in situ hybridization. However, low levels of mRNAs for IGFBP-2 to -6 were detected by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. A co-localization of IGFBPs with IGF peptides in intact cartilage suggests that they may regulate IGF bioavailability and action locally. To test this hypothesis, monolayer cultures of chondrocytes were established from the proliferative zone of the growth plate, and were found to release immunoreactive IGF-II and to express mRNAs encoding IGFBP-2 to -6. Exogenous IGFBP-3, -4, and -5 had an inhibitory action on IGF-II-dependent DNA synthesis. IGFBP-2 had a biphasic effect, potentiating IGF-II action at low concentrations but inhibiting DNA synthesis at equimolar or greater concentrations relative to IGF-II. Long R3 IGF-I, which has a reduced binding

  20. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  1. Breeding site selection by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in relation to large wood additions and factors that influence reproductive success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Steven M.; Dunham, Jason B.; McEnroe, Jeffery R.; Lightcap, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The fitness of female Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) with respect to breeding behavior can be partitioned into at least four fitness components: survival to reproduction, competition for breeding sites, success of egg incubation, and suitability of the local environment near breeding sites for early rearing of juveniles. We evaluated the relative influences of habitat features linked to these fitness components with respect to selection of breeding sites by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). We also evaluated associations between breeding site selection and additions of large wood, as the latter were introduced into the study system as a means of restoring habitat conditions to benefit coho salmon. We used a model selection approach to organize specific habitat features into groupings reflecting fitness components and influences of large wood. Results of this work suggest that female coho salmon likely select breeding sites based on a wide range of habitat features linked to all four hypothesized fitness components. More specifically, model parameter estimates indicated that breeding site selection was most strongly influenced by proximity to pool-tail crests and deeper water (mean and maximum depths). Linkages between large wood and breeding site selection were less clear. Overall, our findings suggest that breeding site selection by coho salmon is influenced by a suite of fitness components in addition to the egg incubation environment, which has been the emphasis of much work in the past.

  2. Quantum cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porod, Wolfgang; Lent, Craig S.; Bernstein, Gary H.

    1994-06-01

    The Notre Dame group has developed a new paradigm for ultra-dense and ultra-fast information processing in nanoelectronic systems. These Quantum Cellular Automata (QCA's) are the first concrete proposal for a technology based on arrays of coupled quantum dots. The basic building block of these cellular arrays is the Notre Dame Logic Cell, as it has been called in the literature. The phenomenon of Coulomb exclusion, which is a synergistic interplay of quantum confinement and Coulomb interaction, leads to a bistable behavior of each cell which makes possible their use in large-scale cellular arrays. The physical interaction between neighboring cells has been exploited to implement logic functions. New functionality may be achieved in this fashion, and the Notre Dame group invented a versatile majority logic gate. In a series of papers, the feasibility of QCA wires, wire crossing, inverters, and Boolean logic gates was demonstrated. A major finding is that all logic functions may be integrated in a hierarchial fashion which allows the design of complicated QCA structures. The most complicated system which was simulated to date is a one-bit full adder consisting of some 200 cells. In addition to exploring these new concepts, efforts are under way to physically realize such structures both in semiconductor and metal systems. Extensive modeling work of semiconductor quantum dot structures has helped identify optimum design parameters for QCA experimental implementations.

  3. Improvement of low bioavailability of a novel factor Xa inhibitor through formulation of cationic additives in its oral dosage form.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshimine; Kanamaru, Taro; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Shinji; Akashi, Mitsuru; Sakuma, Shinji

    2011-12-15

    A clinical trial of (2S)-2-[4-[[(3S)-1-acetimidoyl-3-pyrrolidinyl]oxy]phenyl]-3-(7-amidino-2-naphtyl) propanoic acid (DX-9065) revealed that its oral bioavailability was only 3% when it was administered as a conventional capsule formulation. The low bioavailability of DX-9065 was likely caused by both its poor membrane permeability and its electrostatic interaction with anionic bile acids. We hypothesized that DX-9065 absorption would be enhanced when the cationic drug was free from the complex through its replacement with other cationic substances. Polystyrene nanospheres coated with cationic poly(vinylamine) and cholestyramine, which is clinically used as a cholesterol-lowering agent, dramatically prevented DX-9065 from interacting with chenodeoxycholic acid in vitro. Successive animal experiments showed that bioavailability of DX-9065 administered with these cationic substances was 2-3 times that of DX-9065 administered solely. A dry syrup formulation with one-half of a minimal cholesterol-lowering equivalent dose of cholestyramine was designed, and the clinical trial was resumed. A 1.3-fold increase in bioavailability of DX-9065 was observed when the dry syrup was administered. We successfully demonstrated that DX-9065 absorption was enhanced when the drug was administered with cationic additives; however, it appeared that the absorption-enhancing function of cholestyramine largely depended on its dose. The dose escalation is probably prerequisite for the significant improvement of DX-9065 absorption in humans. PMID:22001539

  4. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors CRF1 and CRF2 exert both additive and opposing influences on defensive startle behavior.

    PubMed

    Risbrough, Victoria B; Hauger, Richard L; Roberts, Amanda L; Vale, Wylie W; Geyer, Mark A

    2004-07-21

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors (CRF1 and CRF2) are crucial mediators of physiological and behavioral responses to stress. In animals, CRF1 appears to primarily mediate CRF-induced anxiety-like responses, but the role of CRF2 during stress is still unclear. Here we report the effects of CRF1 and CRF2 on the magnitude and plasticity of defensive startle responses in mice. Startle plasticity is measured by inhibition of startle by sensory stimuli, i.e., prepulse inhibition (PPI), and is disrupted in patients with panic or posttraumatic stress disorders in which CRF neurotransmission may be overactive. Pharmacological blockade of CRF1 reversed both CRF-induced increases in startle and CRF-induced deficits in PPI. CRF2 blockade attenuated high-dose but not low-dose CRF-induced increases in startle and reduced PPI. Conversely, activation of CRF2 enhanced PPI. CRF had no effect on startle and increased PPI in CRF1 knock-out mice. These data indicate that CRF receptors act in concert to increase the magnitude of defensive startle yet in opposition to regulate the flexibility of startle. These data support a new model of respective CRF receptor roles in stress-related behavior such that, although both receptors enhance the magnitude of defensive responses, CRF1 receptors contravene, whereas CRF2 receptors enhance, the impact of sensory information on defensive behavior. We hypothesize that excessive CRF1 activation combined with reduced CRF2 signaling may contribute to information processing deficits seen in panic and posttraumatic stress disorder patients and support CRF1-specific pharmacotherapy. PMID:15269266

  5. The severity of retinal pathology in homozygous Crb1rd8/rd8 mice is dependent on additional genetic factors

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Ulrich F.O.; Carvalho, Livia S.; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha kleine; Cowing, Jill A.; Greenaway, Simon; Chu, Colin J.; Herrmann, Philipp; Smith, Alexander J.; Munro, Peter M.G.; Potter, Paul; Bainbridge, James W.B.; Ali, Robin R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phenotype–genotype correlations in retinal degeneration is a major challenge. Mutations in CRB1 lead to a spectrum of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies with variable phenotypes suggesting the influence of modifying factors. To establish the contribution of the genetic background to phenotypic variability associated with the Crb1rd8/rd8 mutation, we compared the retinal pathology of Crb1rd8/rd8/J inbred mice with that of two Crb1rd8/rd8 lines backcrossed with C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. Topical endoscopic fundal imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy fundus images of all three Crb1rd8/rd8 lines showed a significant increase in the number of inferior retinal lesions that was strikingly variable between the lines. Optical coherence tomography, semithin, ultrastructural morphology and assessment of inflammatory and vascular marker by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the lesions were associated with photoreceptor death, Müller and microglia activation and telangiectasia-like vascular remodelling—features that were stable in the inbred, variable in the second, but virtually absent in the third Crb1rd8/rd8 line, even at 12 months of age. This suggests that the Crb1rd8/rd8 mutation is necessary, but not sufficient for the development of these degenerative features. By whole-genome SNP analysis of the genotype–phenotype correlation, a candidate region on chromosome 15 was identified. This may carry one or more genetic modifiers for the manifestation of the retinal pathology associated with mutations in Crb1. This study also provides insight into the nature of the retinal vascular lesions that likely represent a clinical correlate for the formation of retinal telangiectasia or Coats-like vasculopathy in patients with CRB1 mutations that are thought to depend on such genetic modifiers. PMID:25147295

  6. The severity of retinal pathology in homozygous Crb1rd8/rd8 mice is dependent on additional genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Carvalho, Livia S; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha Kleine; Cowing, Jill A; Greenaway, Simon; Chu, Colin J; Herrmann, Philipp; Smith, Alexander J; Munro, Peter M G; Potter, Paul; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phenotype-genotype correlations in retinal degeneration is a major challenge. Mutations in CRB1 lead to a spectrum of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies with variable phenotypes suggesting the influence of modifying factors. To establish the contribution of the genetic background to phenotypic variability associated with the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation, we compared the retinal pathology of Crb1(rd8/rd8)/J inbred mice with that of two Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines backcrossed with C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. Topical endoscopic fundal imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy fundus images of all three Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines showed a significant increase in the number of inferior retinal lesions that was strikingly variable between the lines. Optical coherence tomography, semithin, ultrastructural morphology and assessment of inflammatory and vascular marker by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the lesions were associated with photoreceptor death, Müller and microglia activation and telangiectasia-like vascular remodelling-features that were stable in the inbred, variable in the second, but virtually absent in the third Crb1(rd8/rd8) line, even at 12 months of age. This suggests that the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation is necessary, but not sufficient for the development of these degenerative features. By whole-genome SNP analysis of the genotype-phenotype correlation, a candidate region on chromosome 15 was identified. This may carry one or more genetic modifiers for the manifestation of the retinal pathology associated with mutations in Crb1. This study also provides insight into the nature of the retinal vascular lesions that likely represent a clinical correlate for the formation of retinal telangiectasia or Coats-like vasculopathy in patients with CRB1 mutations that are thought to depend on such genetic modifiers. PMID:25147295

  7. Physiological basis of tolerance to complete submergence in rice involves genetic factors in addition to the SUB1 gene.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhanshu; Mackill, David J; Ismail, Abdelbagi M

    2014-01-01

    1 lines. This suggests the possibility of further improvements in submergence tolerance by incorporating additional traits present in FR13A or other similar landraces. PMID:25281725

  8. Physiological basis of tolerance to complete submergence in rice involves genetic factors in addition to the SUB1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhanshu; Mackill, David J.; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2014-01-01

    1 lines. This suggests the possibility of further improvements in submergence tolerance by incorporating additional traits present in FR13A or other similar landraces. PMID:25281725

  9. Evaluation of cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking as determining factors of gene expression for amino acid-substituted gemini surfactant-based DNA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene transfer using non-viral vectors offers a non-immunogenic and safe method of gene delivery. Cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of the nanoparticles can impact on the transfection efficiency of these vectors. Therefore, understanding the physicochemical properties that may influence the cellular uptake and the intracellular trafficking can aid the design of more efficient non-viral gene delivery systems. Recently, we developed novel amino acid-substituted gemini surfactants that showed higher transfection efficiency than their parent compound. In this study, we evaluated the mechanism of cellular uptake of the plasmid/gemini surfactant/helper lipid nanoparticles and their effect on the transfection efficiency. Results Nanoparticles were incubated with Sf 1 Ep cells in the presence of different endocytic inhibitors and gene expression (interferon-γ) was measured using ELISA. Clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated uptake were found to be equally contributing to cellular internalization of both P/12-7NH-12/L (parent gemini surfactant) and P/12-7NGK-12/L (amino acid-substituted gemini surfactant) nanoparticles. The plasmid and the helper lipid were fluorescently tagged to track the nanoparticles inside the cells, using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the P/12-7NGK-12/L particles were cylindrical while the P/12-7NH-12/L particles were spherical which may influence the cellular uptake behaviour of these particles. Dye exclusion assay and pH-titration of the nanoparticles suggested that high buffering capacity, pH-dependent increase in particle size and balanced DNA binding properties may be contributing to a more efficient endosomal escape of P/12-7NGK-12/L compared to the P/12-7NH-12/L nanoparticles, leading to higher gene expression. Conclusion Amino-acid substitution in the spacer of gemini surfactant did not alter the cellular uptake pathway, showing similar pattern to the

  10. The coordinate cellular response to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) is regulated through vimentin binding to receptor tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTPβ).

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinchun; Xi, Gang; Wai, Christine; Clemmons, David R

    2015-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) functions coordinately with IGF-I to stimulate cellular proliferation and differentiation. IGFBP-2 binds to receptor tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTPβ), and this binding in conjunction with IGF-I receptor stimulation induces RPTPβ polymerization leading to phosphatase and tensin homolog inactivation, AKT stimulation, and enhanced cell proliferation. To determine the mechanism by which RPTPβ polymerization is regulated, we analyzed the protein(s) that associated with RPTPβ in response to IGF-I and IGFBP-2 in vascular smooth muscle cells. Proteomic experiments revealed that IGF-I stimulated the intermediate filament protein vimentin to bind to RPTPβ, and knockdown of vimentin resulted in failure of IGFBP-2 and IGF-I to stimulate RPTPβ polymerization. Knockdown of IGFBP-2 or inhibition of IGF-IR tyrosine kinase disrupted vimentin/RPTPβ association. Vimentin binding to RPTPβ was mediated through vimentin serine phosphorylation. The serine threonine kinase PKCζ was recruited to vimentin in response to IGF-I and inhibition of PKCζ activation blocked these signaling events. A cell-permeable peptide that contained the vimentin phosphorylation site disrupted vimentin/RPTPβ association, and IGF-I stimulated RPTPβ polymerization and AKT activation. Integrin-linked kinase recruited PKCζ to SHPS-1-associated vimentin in response to IGF-I and inhibition of integrin-linked kinase/PKCζ association reduced vimentin serine phosphorylation. PKCζ stimulation of vimentin phosphorylation required high glucose and vimentin/RPTPβ-association occurred only during hyperglycemia. Disruption of vimetin/RPTPβ in diabetic mice inhibited RPTPβ polymerization, vimentin serine phosphorylation, and AKT activation in response to IGF-I, whereas nondiabetic mice showed no difference. The induction of vimentin phosphorylation is important for IGFBP-2-mediated enhancement of IGF-I-stimulated proliferation during hyperglycemia, and it

  11. Assessment of the Electronic Factors Determining the Thermodynamics of "Oxidative Addition" of C-H and N-H Bonds to Ir(I) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, David Y; Choliy, Yuriy; Haibach, Michael C; Hartwig, John F; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Goldman, Alan S

    2016-01-13

    A study of electronic factors governing the thermodynamics of C-H and N-H bond addition to Ir(I) complexes was conducted. DFT calculations were performed on an extensive series of trans-(PH3)2IrXL complexes (L = NH3 and CO; X = various monodentate ligands) to parametrize the relative σ- and π-donating/withdrawing properties of the various ligands, X. Computed energies of oxidative addition of methane to a series of three- and four-coordinate Ir(I) complexes bearing an ancillary ligand, X, were correlated with the resulting (σ(X), π(X)) parameter set. Regression analysis indicates that the thermodynamics of addition of methane to trans-(PH3)2IrX are generally strongly disfavored by increased σ-donation from the ligand X, in contradiction to widely held views on oxidative addition. The trend for oxidative addition of methane to four-coordinate Ir(I) was closely related to that observed for the three-coordinate complexes, albeit slightly more complicated. The computational analysis was found to be consistent with the rates of reductive elimination of benzene from a series of isoelectronic Ir(III) phenyl hydride complexes, measured experimentally in this work and previously reported. Extending the analysis of ancillary ligand energetic effects to the oxidative addition of ammonia to three-coordinate Ir(I) complexes leads to the conclusion that increasing σ-donation by X also disfavors oxidative addition of N-H bonds to trans-(PH3)2IrX. However, coordination of NH3 to the Ir(I) center is disfavored even more strongly by increasing σ-donation by X, which explains why the few documented examples of H-NH2 oxidative addition to transition metals involve complexes with strongly σ-donating ligands situated trans to the site of addition. An orbital-based rationale for the observed results is presented. PMID:26652221

  12. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Cellular Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Kylee J.; Muller, Daria; Golding, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to alcohol significantly alters the developmental trajectory of progenitor cells and fundamentally compromises tissue formation (i.e., histogenesis). Emerging research suggests that ethanol can impair mammalian development by interfering with the execution of molecular programs governing differentiation. For example, ethanol exposure disrupts cellular migration, changes cell–cell interactions, and alters growth factor signaling pathways. Additionally, ethanol can alter epigenetic mechanisms controlling gene expression. Normally, lineage-specific regulatory factors (i.e., transcription factors) establish the transcriptional networks of each new cell type; the cell’s identity then is maintained through epigenetic alterations in the way in which the DNA encoding each gene becomes packaged within the chromatin. Ethanol exposure can induce epigenetic changes that do not induce genetic mutations but nonetheless alter the course of fetal development and result in a large array of patterning defects. Two crucial enzyme complexes—the Polycomb and Trithorax proteins—are central to the epigenetic programs controlling the intricate balance between self-renewal and the execution of cellular differentiation, with diametrically opposed functions. Prenatal ethanol exposure may disrupt the functions of these two enzyme complexes, altering a crucial aspect of mammalian differentiation. Characterizing the involvement of Polycomb and Trithorax group complexes in the etiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders will undoubtedly enhance understanding of the role that epigenetic programming plays in this complex disorder. PMID:24313167

  13. Superoxide radicals increase transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and collagen release from human lung fibroblasts via cellular influx through chloride channels

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Shufan Hartog, Gertjan J.M. den; Bast, Aalt

    2009-05-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. However, it remains unclear which ROS is the major cause. We hypothesize that superoxide elicits specific toxicity to human lung fibroblasts and plays an important role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, superoxide generated from xanthine and xanthine oxidase activated lung fibroblasts by increasing the release of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen. This was associated with increased levels of intracellular superoxide. SOD and tempol, by scavenging respectively extracellular and intracellular superoxide, prevented the activation of fibroblasts induced by exposure to exogenous superoxide, whereas catalase did not. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide did not activate fibroblasts. Apparently, superoxide rather than hydrogen peroxide is involved in the regulation of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen release in lung fibroblasts. The chloride channel blocker, DIDS, inhibited the increase of intracellular superoxide levels induced by exogenous superoxide and consequently prevented the activation of fibroblasts. This suggests that the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels is essential for superoxide-induced activation of fibroblasts. ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs are involved in the intracellular pathway leading to superoxide-induced fibroblasts activation. Superoxide possesses until now undiscovered specific pro-fibrotic properties in human lung fibroblasts. This takes place via the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels rather than via the formation of hydrogen peroxide.

  14. Dynamic Modulation of HIV-1 Integrase Structure and Function by Cellular Lens Epithelium-derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) Protein*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Christopher J.; Kessl, Jacques J.; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Dar, Mohd Jamal; Engelman, Alan; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2008-01-01

    The mandatory integration of the reverse-transcribed HIV-1 genome into host chromatin is catalyzed by the viral protein integrase (IN), and IN activity can be regulated by numerous viral and cellular proteins. Among these, LEDGF has been identified as a cellular cofactor critical for effective HIV-1 integration. The x-ray crystal structure of the catalytic core domain (CCD) of IN in complex with the IN binding domain (IBD) of LEDGF has furthermore revealed essential protein-protein contacts. However, mutagenic studies indicated that interactions between the full-length proteins were more extensive than the contacts observed in the co-crystal structure of the isolated domains. Therefore, we have conducted detailed biochemical characterization of the interactions between full-length IN and LEDGF. Our results reveal a highly dynamic nature of IN subunit-subunit interactions. LEDGF strongly stabilized these interactions and promoted IN tetramerization. Mass spectrometric protein footprinting and molecular modeling experiments uncovered novel intra- and inter-protein-protein contacts in the full-length IN-LEDGF complex that lay outside of the observable IBD-CCD structure. In particular, our studies defined the IN tetramer interface important for enzymatic activities and high affinity LEDGF binding. These findings provide new insight into how LEDGF modulates HIV-1 IN structure and function, and highlight the potential for exploiting the highly dynamic structure of multimeric IN as a novel therapeutic target. PMID:18801737

  15. Identification of cellular target genes of the Epstein-Barr virus transactivator Zta: activation of transforming growth factor beta igh3 (TGF-beta igh3) and TGF-beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Cayrol, C; Flemington, E K

    1995-01-01

    The lytic switch transactivator Zta initiates the ordered cascade of Epstein-Barr virus gene expression that culminates in virus production. Zta is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that transactivates early viral promotes via cis-acting sequences. Activation of some of these genes is mediated through binding to consensus AP-1 promoter elements. This observation suggests that Zta may also regulate the expression of cellular genes. While many targets of Zta have been identified in the Epstein-Barr virus genome, putative host cell targets remain largely unknown. To address this issue, a tetracycline-regulated Zta expression system was generated, and differential hybridization screening was used to isolate Zta-responsive cellular genes. The major target identified by this analysis is a gene encoding a fasciclin-like secreted factor, transforming growth factor beta igh3 (TGF-beta igh3), that was originally identified as a gene that is responsive to the potent immunosuppressor TGF-beta 1. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated that induction of Zta expression results in a 10-fold increase in TGF-beta igh3 mRNA levels. Zta was also found to increase TGF-beta 1 mRNA levels as well as the amount of active TGF-beta 1 secreted into the medium. Interestingly, alpha 1-collagen IV, which has been shown to potentiate the effects of TGF-beta 1, is also a cellular target of Zta. These results suggest that Zta could play a role in modulating the host cell environment through activating the expression of secreted factors. PMID:7769680

  16. Th1 stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani: comparative cellular and protective responses of rTriose phosphate isomerase, rProtein disulfide isomerase and rElongation factor-2 in combination with rHSP70 against visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Anil Kumar; Khare, Prashant; Joshi, Sumit; Kushawaha, Pramod Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the recovery from the disease is always associated with the generation of Th1-type of cellular responses. Based on this, we have previously identified several Th1-stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani -triose phosphate isomerase (TPI), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and elongation factor-2 (EL-2) etc. including heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) which induced Th1-type of cellular responses in both cured Leishmania patients/hamsters. Since, HSPs, being the logical targets for vaccines aimed at augmenting cellular immunity and can be early targets in the immune response against intracellular pathogens; they could be exploited as vaccine/adjuvant to induce long-term immunity more effectively. Therefore, in this study, we checked whether HSP70 can further enhance the immunogenicity and protective responses of the above said Th1-stimulatory proteins. Since, in most of the studies, immunogenicity of HSP70 of L. donovani was assessed in native condition, herein we generated recombinant HSP70 and tested its potential to stimulate immune responses in lymphocytes of cured Leishmania infected hamsters as well as in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cured patients of VL either individually or in combination with above mentioned recombinant proteins. rLdHSP70 alone elicited strong cellular responses along with remarkable up-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines and extremely lower level of IL-4 and IL-10. Among the various combinations, rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI emerged as superior one augmenting improved cellular responses followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2. These combinations were further evaluated for its protective potential wherein rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI again conferred utmost protection (∼80%) followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2 (∼75%) and generated a strong cellular immune response with significant increase in the levels of iNOS transcript as well as IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines which was further supported by the high level of IgG2 antibody

  17. Cellular Stress Responses and Monitored Cellular Activities.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Naito, Yoshifumi; Kato, Hideya; Amaya, Fumimasa

    2016-08-01

    To survive, organisms require mechanisms that enable them to sense changes in the outside environment, introduce necessary responses, and resist unfavorable distortion. Consequently, through evolutionary adaptation, cells have become equipped with the apparatus required to monitor their fundamental intracellular processes and the mechanisms needed to try to offset malfunction without receiving any direct signals from the outside environment. It has been shown recently that eukaryotic cells are equipped with a special mechanism that monitors their fundamental cellular functions and that some pathogenic proteobacteria can override this monitoring mechanism to cause harm. The monitored cellular activities involved in the stressed intracellular response have been researched extensively in Caenorhabditis elegans, where discovery of an association between key mitochondrial activities and innate immune responses was named "cellular associated detoxification and defenses (cSADD)." This cellular surveillance pathway (cSADD) oversees core cellular activities such as mitochondrial respiration and protein transport into mitochondria, detects xenobiotics and invading pathogens, and activates the endocrine pathways controlling behavior, detoxification, and immunity. The cSADD pathway is probably associated with cellular responses to stress in human inflammatory diseases. In the critical care field, the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes (e.g., respiratory distress syndromes and sepsis) involves the disturbance of mitochondrial respiration leading to cell death. Up-to-date knowledge about monitored cellular activities and cSADD, especially focusing on mitochondrial involvement, can probably help fill a knowledge gap regarding the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes in the critical care field. PMID:26954943

  18. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  19. Synthetic biology in cellular immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Wong, Wilson W.

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of genetically engineered T cells with cancer-targeting receptors has shown tremendous promise for eradicating tumors in clinical trials. This form of cellular immunotherapy presents a unique opportunity to incorporate advanced systems and synthetic biology approaches to create cancer therapeutics with novel functions. Here, we first review the development of synthetic receptors, switches, and circuits to control the location, duration, and strength of T cell activity against tumors. In addition, we discuss the cellular engineering and genome editing of host cells (or the chassis) to improve the efficacy of cell-based cancer therapeutics, and to reduce the time and cost of manufacturing. PMID:26088008

  20. Cellular senescence in aging primates.

    PubMed

    Herbig, Utz; Ferreira, Mark; Condel, Laura; Carey, Dee; Sedivy, John M

    2006-03-01

    The aging of organisms is characterized by a gradual functional decline of all organ systems. Mammalian somatic cells in culture display a limited proliferative life span, at the end of which they undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as replicative senescence. Whether cellular senescence contributes to organismal aging has been controversial. We investigated telomere dysfunction, a recently discovered biomarker of cellular senescence, and found that the number of senescent fibroblasts increases exponentially in the skin of aging baboons, reaching >15% of all cells in very old individuals. In addition, the same cells contain activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase and heterochromatinized nuclei, confirming their senescent status. PMID:16456035

  1. Cellular phones: are they detrimental?

    PubMed

    Salama, Osama E; Abou El Naga, Randa M

    2004-01-01

    The issue of possible health effects of cellular phones is very much alive in the public's mind where the rapid increase in the number of the users of cell phones in the last decade has increased the exposure of people to the electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Health consequences of long term use of mobile phones are not known in detail but available data indicates the development of non specific annoying symptoms on acute exposure to mobile phone radiations. In an attempt to determine the prevalence of such cell phones associated health manifestations and the factors affecting their occurrence, a cross sectional study was conducted in five randomly selected faculties of Alexandria University. Where, 300 individuals including teaching staff, students and literate employee were equally allocated and randomly selected among the five faculties. Data about mobile phone's users and their medical history, their pattern of mobile usage and the possible deleterious health manifestations associated with cellular phone use was collected. The results revealed 68% prevalence of mobile phone usage, nearly three quarters of them (72.5%) were complainers of the health manifestations. They suffered from headache (43%), earache (38.3%), sense of fatigue (31.6%), sleep disturbance (29.5%), concentration difficulty (28.5%) and face burning sensation (19.2%). Both univariate and multivariate analysis were consistent in their findings. Symptomatic users were found to have significantly higher frequency of calls/day, longer call duration and longer total duration of mobile phone usage/day than non symptomatic users. For headache both call duration and frequency of calls/day were the significant predicting factors for its occurrence (chi2 = 18.208, p = 0.0001). For earache, in addition to call duration, the longer period of owning the mobile phone were significant predictors (chi2 = 16.996, p = 0.0002). Sense of fatigue was significantly affected by both call duration and age of the user

  2. Integrated cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Jason C.

    The generation of new three-dimensional (3D) matrices that enable integration of biomolecular components and whole cells into device architectures, without adversely altering their morphology or activity, continues to be an expanding and challenging field of research. This research is driven by the promise that encapsulated biomolecules and cells can significantly impact areas as diverse as biocatalysis, controlled delivery of therapeutics, environmental and industrial process monitoring, early warning of warfare agents, bioelectronics, photonics, smart prosthetics, advanced physiological sensors, portable medical diagnostic devices, and tissue/organ replacement. This work focuses on the development of a fundamental understanding of the biochemical and nanomaterial mechanisms that govern the cell directed assembly and integration process. It was shown that this integration process relies on the ability of cells to actively develop a pH gradient in response to evaporation induced osmotic stress, which catalyzes silica condensation within a thin 3D volume surrounding the cells, creating a functional bio/nano interface. The mechanism responsible for introducing functional foreign membrane-bound proteins via proteoliposome addition to the silica-lipid-cell matrix was also determined. Utilizing this new understanding, 3D cellular immobilization capabilities were extended using sol-gel matrices endowed with glycerol, trehalose, and media components. The effects of these additives, and the metabolic phase of encapsulated S. cerivisiase cells, on long-term viability and the rate of inducible gene expression was studied. This enabled the entrapment of cells within a novel microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous colorimetric, fluorescent, and electrochemical detection of a single analyte, significantly improving confidence in the biosensor output. As a complementary approach, multiphoton protein lithography was utilized to engineer 3D protein matrices in which to

  3. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  4. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  5. Outpatient management of postbiopsy pneumothorax with small-caliber chest tubes: factors affecting the need for prolonged drainage and additional interventions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjay; Hicks, Marshall E; Wallace, Michael J; Ahrar, Kamran; Madoff, David C; Murthy, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of outpatient management of postbiopsy pneumothoraces with small-caliber chest tubes and to assess the factors that influence the need for prolonged drainage or additional interventions. We evaluated the medical records of patients who were treated with small-caliber chest tubes attached to Heimlich valves for pneumothoraces resulting from image-guided transthoracic needle biopsy to determine the hospital admission rates, the number of days the catheters were left in place, and the need for further interventions. We also evaluated the patient, lesion, and biopsy technique characteristics to determine their influence on the need for prolonged catheter drainage or additional interventions. Of the 191 patients included in our study, 178 (93.2%) were treated as outpatients. Ten patients (5.2%) were admitted for chest tube-related problems, either for underwater suction (n = 8) or for pain control (n = 2). No further interventions were required in 146 patients (76.4%), with successful removal of the chest tubes the day after the biopsy procedure. Prolonged catheter drainage (mean, 4.3 days) was required in 44 patients (23%). Nineteen patients (9.9%) underwent additional interventions for management of pneumothorax. Presence of emphysema was noted more frequently in patients who required additional interventions or prolonged chest tube drainage than in those who did not (51.1% vs. 24.7%; p = 0.001). We conclude that use of the Heimlich valve allows safe and successful outpatient treatment of most patients requiring chest tube placement for postbiopsy pneumothorax. Additional interventions or prolonged chest tube drainage are needed more frequently in patients with emphysema in the needle path. PMID:18074173

  6. Outpatient Management of Postbiopsy Pneumothorax with Small-Caliber Chest Tubes: Factors Affecting the Need for Prolonged Drainage and Additional Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjay Hicks, Marshall E.; Wallace, Michael J.; Ahrar, Kamran; Madoff, David C.; Murthy, Ravi

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of outpatient management of postbiopsy pneumothoraces with small-caliber chest tubes and to assess the factors that influence the need for prolonged drainage or additional interventions.We evaluated the medical records of patients who were treated with small-caliber chest tubes attached to Heimlich valves for pneumothoraces resulting from image-guided transthoracic needle biopsy to determine the hospital admission rates, the number of days the catheters were left in place, and the need for further interventions. We also evaluated the patient, lesion, and biopsy technique characteristics to determine their influence on the need for prolonged catheter drainage or additional interventions. Of the 191 patients included in our study, 178 (93.2%) were treated as outpatients. Ten patients (5.2%) were admitted for chest tube-related problems, either for underwater suction (n = 8) or for pain control (n = 2). No further interventions were required in 146 patients (76.4%), with successful removal of the chest tubes the day after the biopsy procedure. Prolonged catheter drainage (mean, 4.3 days) was required in 44 patients (23%). Nineteen patients (9.9%) underwent additional interventions for management of pneumothorax. Presence of emphysema was noted more frequently in patients who required additional interventions or prolonged chest tube drainage than in those who did not (51.1% vs. 24.7%; p = 0.001).We conclude that use of the Heimlich valve allows safe and successful outpatient treatment of most patients requiring chest tube placement for postbiopsy pneumothorax. Additional interventions or prolonged chest tube drainage are needed more frequently in patients with emphysema in the needle path.

  7. Cellular-based preemption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Aaron D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cellular-based preemption system that uses existing cellular infrastructure to transmit preemption related data to allow safe passage of emergency vehicles through one or more intersections. A cellular unit in an emergency vehicle is used to generate position reports that are transmitted to the one or more intersections during an emergency response. Based on this position data, the one or more intersections calculate an estimated time of arrival (ETA) of the emergency vehicle, and transmit preemption commands to traffic signals at the intersections based on the calculated ETA. Additional techniques may be used for refining the position reports, ETA calculations, and the like. Such techniques include, without limitation, statistical preemption, map-matching, dead-reckoning, augmented navigation, and/or preemption optimization techniques, all of which are described in further detail in the above-referenced patent applications.

  8. Two distinct upstream regulatory domains containing multicopy cellular transcription factor binding sites provide basal repression and inducible enhancer characteristics to the immediate-early IES (US3) promoter from human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y J; Tseng, W P; Hayward, G S

    1996-08-01

    The US3 gene of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is expressed at immediate-early (IE) times in permissive HF cells, but not in nonpermissive rodent cells, and encodes several proteins that have been reported to have regulatory characteristics, although they are dispensable for growth in cell culture. Both spliced and unspliced forms of US3 IE transcripts are associated with the second of only two known large and complex upstream enhancer domains within the 229-kb HCMV genome, which we refer to as the IES cis-acting control region. Only the 260-bp proximal segment (from -313 to -55) of the 600-bp IES control domain, which contains multicopy NF-kappaB binding sites, proved to be necessary to transfer both high basal expression plus phorbol ester- and okadaic acid-inducible characteristics to heterologous promoters in transient assays in U-937 and K-562 cells. However, the IES control region contains a distinctive 280-bp distal domain, characterized by the presence of seven interspersed repeats of a 10-bp TGTCGCGACA palindromic consensus motif that encompasses a NruI site. This far upstream Nru repeat region (from -596 to -314) imparted up to 20-fold down-regulation effects onto strong basal heterologous promoters as well as onto the IES enhancer plus minimal promoter region in both U-937 and K-562 cells. Functional Nru repressor elements (NREs) could not be generated by multimerizing either the palindromic (P) Nru motifs alone or adjacent degenerate interrupted (I Nru motifs alone. However, multimerized forms of the combined P plus I elements reconstituted the full 20-fold cis-acting down-regulation phenotype of the intact NRE domain. The P and I forms of the Nru elements each bound independently and specifically to related cellular DNA-binding factors to form differently migrating A or B complexes, respectively, whereas the combined P plus I elements bound cooperatively to both the A and B complexes with high affinity. Interestingly, nuclear extracts from U-937, K-562

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species and Cellular Oxygen Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Timothy P; Pan, Yi; Simon, M. Celeste

    2008-01-01

    Many organisms activate adaptive transcriptional programs to help them cope with decreased oxygen levels, or hypoxia, in their environment. These responses are triggered by various oxygen sensing systems in bacteria, yeast and metazoans. In metazoans, the hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) mediate the adaptive transcriptional response to hypoxia by upregulating genes involved in maintaining bioenergetic homeostasis. The HIFs in turn are regulated by HIF-specific prolyl hydroxlase activity, which is sensitive to cellular oxygen levels and other factors such as tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Establishing a role for ROS in cellular oxygen sensing has been challenging since ROS are intrinsically unstable and difficult to measure. However, recent advances in fluorescence energy transfer resonance (FRET)-based methods for measuring ROS are alleviating some of the previous difficulties associated with dyes and luminescent chemicals. In addition, new genetic models have demonstrated that functional mitochondrial electron transport and associated ROS production during hypoxia are required for HIF stabilization in mammalian cells. Current efforts are directed at how ROS mediate prolyl hydroxylase activity and hypoxic HIF stabilization. Progress in understanding this process has been enhanced by the development of the FRET-based ROS probe, an vivo prolyl hydroxylase reporter and various genetic models harboring mutations in components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. PMID:17893032

  10. Detection of cis- and trans-acting Factors in DNA Structure-Induced Genetic Instability Using In silico and Cellular Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Zhao, Junhua; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Sequences that can adopt alternative DNA structures (i.e., non-B DNA) are very abundant in mammalian genomes, and recent studies have revealed many important biological functions of non-B DNA structures in chromatin remodeling, DNA replication, transcription, and genetic instability. Here, we provide results from an in silico web-based search engine coupled with cell-based experiments to characterize the roles of non-B DNA conformations in genetic instability in eukaryotes. The purpose of this article is to illustrate strategies that can be used to identify and interrogate the biological roles of non-B DNA structures, particularly on genetic instability. We have included unpublished data using a short H-DNA-forming sequence from the human c-MYC promoter region as an example, and identified two different mechanisms of H-DNA-induced genetic instability in yeast and mammalian cells: a DNA replication-related model of mutagenesis; and a replication-independent cleavage model. Further, we identified candidate proteins involved in H-DNA-induced genetic instability by using a yeast genetic screen. A combination of in silico and cellular methods, as described here, should provide further insight into the contributions of non-B DNA structures in biological functions, genetic evolution, and disease development. PMID:27532010

  11. Detection of cis- and trans-acting Factors in DNA Structure-Induced Genetic Instability Using In silico and Cellular Approaches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guliang; Zhao, Junhua; Vasquez, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    Sequences that can adopt alternative DNA structures (i.e., non-B DNA) are very abundant in mammalian genomes, and recent studies have revealed many important biological functions of non-B DNA structures in chromatin remodeling, DNA replication, transcription, and genetic instability. Here, we provide results from an in silico web-based search engine coupled with cell-based experiments to characterize the roles of non-B DNA conformations in genetic instability in eukaryotes. The purpose of this article is to illustrate strategies that can be used to identify and interrogate the biological roles of non-B DNA structures, particularly on genetic instability. We have included unpublished data using a short H-DNA-forming sequence from the human c-MYC promoter region as an example, and identified two different mechanisms of H-DNA-induced genetic instability in yeast and mammalian cells: a DNA replication-related model of mutagenesis; and a replication-independent cleavage model. Further, we identified candidate proteins involved in H-DNA-induced genetic instability by using a yeast genetic screen. A combination of in silico and cellular methods, as described here, should provide further insight into the contributions of non-B DNA structures in biological functions, genetic evolution, and disease development. PMID:27532010

  12. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  13. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Yiannakouris, Nikos; Katsoulis, Michail; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Ordovas, Jose M; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Objectives An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for several conventional cardiovascular risk factors (ConvRFs), including smoking, hypertension, type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), body mass index (BMI), physical activity and adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Design A case–control study. Setting The general Greek population of the EPIC study. Participants and outcome measures 477 patients with medically confirmed incident CHD and 1271 controls participated in this study. We estimated the ORs for CHD by dividing participants at higher or lower GRS and, alternatively, at higher or lower ConvRF, and calculated the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) as a measure of deviation from additivity. Results The joint presence of higher GRS and higher risk ConvRF was in all instances associated with an increased risk of CHD, compared with the joint presence of lower GRS and lower risk ConvRF. The OR (95% CI) was 1.7 (1.2 to 2.4) for smoking, 2.7 (1.9 to 3.8) for hypertension, 4.1 (2.8 to 6.1) for T2DM, 1.9 (1.4 to 2.5) for lower physical activity, 2.0 (1.3 to 3.2) for high BMI and 1.5 (1.1 to 2.1) for poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet. In all instances, RERI values were fairly small and not statistically significant, suggesting that the GRS and the ConvRFs do not have effects beyond additivity. Conclusions Genetic predisposition to CHD, operationalised through a multilocus GRS, and ConvRFs have essentially additive effects on CHD risk. PMID:24500614

  14. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  15. Interaction between insulin-like growth factor-I receptor and alphaVbeta3 integrin linked signaling pathways: cellular responses to changes in multiple signaling inputs.

    PubMed

    Clemmons, D R; Maile, L A

    2005-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane proteins that mediate cell attachment to extracellular matrix, migration, division, and inhibition of apoptosis. Because growth factors are also important for these processes, there has been interest in cooperative signaling between growth factor receptors and integrins. IGF-I is an important growth factor for vascular cells. One integrin, alphaVbeta3, that is expressed in smooth muscle cells modulates IGF-I actions. Ligand occupancy of alphaVbeta3 is required for IGF-I to stimulate cell migration and division. Src homology 2 containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) is a tyrosine phosphatase whose recruitment to signaling molecules is stimulated by growth factors including IGF-I. If alphaVbeta3 ligand occupancy is inhibited, there is no recruitment of SHP-2 to alphaVbeta3 and its transfer to downstream signaling molecules is blocked. Ligand occupancy of alphaVbeta3 stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of the beta3-subunit, resulting in recruitment of SHP-2. This transfer is mediated by an insulin receptor substrate-1-related protein termed DOK-1. Subsequently, SHP-2 is transferred to another transmembrane protein, SHPS-1. This transfer requires IGF-I receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of SHPS-1, which contains two YXXL motifs that mediate SHP-2 binding. The transfer of SHP-2 to SHPS-1 is also required for recruitment of Shc to SHPS-1. Ligand occupancy of alphaVbeta3 results in sustained Shc phosphorylation and enhanced Shc recruitment. Shc activation results in induction of MAPK. Inhibition of the Shc/SHPS-1 complex formation results in failure to achieve sustained MAPK activation and an attenuated mitogenic response. Thus, within the vessel wall, a mechanism exists whereby ligand occupancy of the alphaVbeta3 integrin is required for assembly of a multicomponent membrane signaling complex that is necessary for cells to respond optimally to IGF-I. PMID:15528274

  16. Molecular and cellular effects of vitamin B12 in brain, myocardium and liver through its role as co-factor of methionine synthase.

    PubMed

    Guéant, Jean-Louis; Caillerez-Fofou, Maatem; Battaglia-Hsu, Shyuefang; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Freund, Jean-Noel; Dulluc, Isabelle; Adjalla, Charles; Maury, Florence; Merle, Carole; Nicolas, Jean-Pierre; Namour, Fares; Daval, Jean-Luc

    2013-05-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, cbl) is a cofactor of methionine synthase (MTR) in the synthesis of methionine, the precursor of the universal methyl donor S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM), which is involved in epigenomic regulatory mechanisms. We have established a neuronal cell model with stable expression of a transcobalamin-oleosin chimer and subsequent decreased cellular availability of vitamin B12, which produces reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis and accelerated differentiation through PP2A, NGF and TACE pathways. Anti-transcobalamin antibody or impaired transcobalamin receptor expression produce also impaired proliferation in other cells. Consistently, the transcription, protein expression and activity of MTR are increased in proliferating cells of skin and intestinal epitheliums, in rat intestine crypts and in proliferating CaCo2 cells, while MTR activity correlates with DNA methylation in rat intestine villi. Exposure to nitrous oxide in animal models identified impairment of MTR reaction as the most important metabolic cause of neurological manifestations of B12 deficiency. Early vitamin B12 and folate deprivation during gestation and lactation of a 'dam-progeny' rat model developed in our laboratory is associated with long-lasting disabilities of behavior and memory capacities, with persisting hallmarks related to increased apoptosis, impaired neurogenesis and altered plasticity. We found also an epigenomic deregulation of energy metabolism and fatty acids beta-oxidation in myocardium and liver, through imbalanced methylation/acetylation of PGC-1alpha and decreased expression of SIRT1. These nutrigenomic effects display similarities with the molecular mechanisms of fetal programming. Beside deficiency, B12 loading increases the expression of MTR through internal ribosome entry sites (IRES) and down-regulates MDR-1 gene expression. In conclusion, vitamin B12 influences cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in brain. Vitamin B12 and folate combined

  17. 5-Aminosalicylic Acid Azo-Linked to Procainamide Acts as an Anticolitic Mutual Prodrug via Additive Inhibition of Nuclear Factor kappaB.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooseong; Nam, Joon; Lee, Sunyoung; Jeong, Seongkeun; Jung, Yunjin

    2016-06-01

    To improve the anticolitic efficacy of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), a colon-specific mutual prodrug of 5-ASA was designed. 5-ASA was coupled to procainamide (PA), a local anesthetic, via an azo bond to prepare 5-(4-{[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]carbamoyl}phenylazo)salicylic acid (5-ASA-azo-PA). 5-ASA-azo-PA was cleaved to 5-ASA and PA up to about 76% at 10 h in the cecal contents while remaining stable in the small intestinal contents. Oral gavage of 5-ASA-azo-PA and sulfasalazine, a colon-specific prodrug currently used in clinic, to rats showed similar efficiency in delivery of 5-ASA to the large intestine, and PA was not detectable in the blood after 5-ASA-azo-PA administration. Oral gavage of 5-ASA-azo-PA alleviated 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rat colitis. Moreover, combined intracolonic treatment with 5-ASA and PA elicited an additive ameliorative effect. Furthermore, combined treatment with 5-ASA and PA additively inhibited nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) activity in human colon carcinoma cells and inflamed colonic tissues. Finally, 5-ASA-azo-PA administered orally was able to reduce inflammatory mediators, NFκB target gene products, in the inflamed colon. 5-ASA-azo-PA may be a colon-specific mutual prodrug acting against colitis, and the mutual anticolitic effects occurred at least partly through the cooperative inhibition of NFκB activity. PMID:27112518

  18. A Risk Score with Additional Four Independent Factors to Predict the Incidence and Recovery from Metabolic Syndrome: Development and Validation in Large Japanese Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Obokata, Masaru; Negishi, Kazuaki; Ohyama, Yoshiaki; Okada, Haruka; Imai, Kunihiko; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many risk factors for Metabolic syndrome (MetS) have been reported, there is no clinical score that predicts its incidence. The purposes of this study were to create and validate a risk score for predicting both incidence and recovery from MetS in a large cohort. Methods Subjects without MetS at enrollment (n = 13,634) were randomly divided into 2 groups and followed to record incidence of MetS. We also examined recovery from it in rest 2,743 individuals with prevalent MetS. Results During median follow-up of 3.0 years, 878 subjects in the derivation and 757 in validation cohorts developed MetS. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified 12 independent variables from the derivation cohort and initial score for subsequent MetS was created, which showed good discrimination both in the derivation (c-statistics 0.82) and validation cohorts (0.83). The predictability of the initial score for recovery from MetS was tested in the 2,743 MetS population (906 subjects recovered from MetS), where nine variables (including age, sex, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, uric acid and five MetS diagnostic criteria constituents.) remained significant. Then, the final score was created using the nine variables. This score significantly predicted both the recovery from MetS (c-statistics 0.70, p<0.001, 78% sensitivity and 54% specificity) and incident MetS (c-statistics 0.80) with an incremental discriminative ability over the model derived from five factors used in the diagnosis of MetS (continuous net reclassification improvement: 0.35, p < 0.001 and integrated discrimination improvement: 0.01, p<0.001). Conclusions We identified four additional independent risk factors associated with subsequent MetS, developed and validated a risk score to predict both incident and recovery from MetS. PMID:26230621

  19. Aeromonas salmonicida Infection Only Moderately Regulates Expression of Factors Contributing to Toll-Like Receptor Signaling but Massively Activates the Cellular and Humoral Branches of Innate Immunity in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Brietzke, Andreas; Korytář, Tomáš; Jaros, Joanna; Köllner, Bernd; Goldammer, Tom; Seyfert, Hans-Martin; Rebl, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are known to detect a defined spectrum of microbial structures. However, the knowledge about the specificity of teleost Tlr factors for distinct pathogens is limited so far. We measured baseline expression profiles of 18 tlr genes and associated signaling factors in four immune-relevant tissues of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Intraperitoneal injection of a lethal dose of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida induced highly increased levels of cytokine mRNAs during a 72-hour postinfection (hpi) period. In contrast, only the fish-specific tlr22a2 and the downstream factor irak1 featured clearly increased transcript levels, while the mRNA concentrations of many other tlr genes decreased. Flow cytometry quantified cell trafficking after infection indicating a dramatic influx of myeloid cells into the peritoneum and a belated low level immigration of lymphoid cells. T and B lymphocytes were differentiated with RT-qPCR revealing that B lymphocytes emigrated from and T lymphocytes immigrated into head kidney. In conclusion, no specific TLR can be singled out as a dominant receptor for A. salmonicida. The recruitment of cellular factors of innate immunity rather than induced expression of pathogen receptors is hence of key importance for mounting a first immune defense against invading A. salmonicida. PMID:26266270

  20. Release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and histamine. II. The cellular origin of human PAF: monocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and basophils.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G; Aglietta, M; Coda, R; Bussolino, F; Piacibello, W; Tetta, C

    1981-01-01

    The origin of platelet activating factor (PAF) from human leucocytes was investigated. Purified monocytes release PAF passively at pH 10.6, when challenged with Ionophore A 23187 or under phagocytic stimuli. Pure preparations of polymorphonuclear neutrophils liberate PAF passively, when challenged with C5a, neutrophil cationic proteins (CP), their carboxypeptidase B derived products (C5a des Arg, CP des Arg) or under phagocytic stimuli. Basophil rich buffy coat cells release PAF when challenged with C5a, CP, anti-IgE (in low amount) or Synacthen concomitantly with basophil degranulation and histamine release. Electron microscopy studies, carried out on Synacthen-stimulated basophil rich buffy coat, provide morphological evidence for platelet-basophil interaction. In conclusion our data demonstrate that PAF can be released from different leucocyte populations. However, the stimuli able to trigger such release appear to have some specificity for the cell target. Images Figure 5 PMID:6161885

  1. Early cellular signaling responses to axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Thomas J; Wang, Ai Ling; Yuan, Ming; Neufeld, Arthur H

    2009-01-01

    Background We have used optic nerve injury as a model to study early signaling events in neuronal tissue following axonal injury. Optic nerve injury results in the selective death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The time course of cell death takes place over a period of days with the earliest detection of RGC death at about 48 hr post injury. We hypothesized that in the period immediately following axonal injury, there are changes in the soma that signal surrounding glia and neurons and that start programmed cell death. In the current study, we investigated early changes in cellular signaling and gene expression that occur within the first 6 hrs post optic nerve injury. Results We found evidence of cell to cell signaling within 30 min of axonal injury. We detected differences in phosphoproteins and gene expression within the 6 hrs time period. Activation of TNFα and glutamate receptors, two pathways that can initiate cell death, begins in RGCs within 6 hrs following axonal injury. Differential gene expression at 6 hrs post injury included genes involved in cytokine, neurotrophic factor signaling (Socs3) and apoptosis (Bax). Conclusion We interpret our studies to indicate that both neurons and glia in the retina have been signaled within 30 min after optic nerve injury. The signals are probably initiated by the RGC soma. In addition, signals activating cellular death pathways occur within 6 hrs of injury, which likely lead to RGC degeneration. PMID:19284657

  2. Modelling cellular behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  3. Induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 gene expression in murine liver by lipopolysaccharide. Cellular localization and role of endogenous tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Fearns, C.; Loskutoff, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) gene expression primarily in endothelial cells in most organs of the mouse, with maximal induction by 3 hours. Here we show that induction in the liver occurs in a distinctly different pattern. For example, the increase in PAI-1 mRNA in liver was biphasic with an initial peak at 1 to 2 hours and a second peak at 6 to 8 hours. Moreover, in situ hybridization experiments revealed that PAI-1 mRNA was induced in both endothelial cells and hepatocytes. The endothelial cell response was monophasic and maximal between 1 and 4 hours, whereas the hepatocyte response was biphasic, peaking at 2 hours and again at 6 to 8 hours. To determine possible mechanisms involved in the induction of PAI-1 by LPS, we analyzed the tissues for changes in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha LPS caused a rapid induction of TNF-alpha mRNA in Kupffer cells, detectable within 15 minutes. Pretreatment of mice with anti-TNF antiserum before challenge with LPS reduced the subsequent increase in plasma levels of PAI-1 by 50 to 70% and significantly reduced the level of induction of PAI-1 mRNA in the liver at both early and late times. Pretreatment appeared to inhibit induction primarily within hepatocytes. These results suggest that LPS may induce PAI-1 in endothelial cells and hepatocytes by different mechanisms. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:9033272

  4. Additive effect of calreticulin and translation initiation factor eIF4E on secreted protein production in the baculovirus expression system.

    PubMed

    Teng, Chao-Yi; van Oers, Monique M; Wu, Tzong-Yuan

    2013-10-01

    The baculovirus expression vector system is widely used for the production of recombinant proteins. However, the yield of membrane-bound or secreted proteins is relatively low when compared with intracellular or nuclear proteins. In a previous study, we had demonstrated that the co-expression of the human chaperones calreticulin (CALR) or β-synuclein (β-syn) increased the production of a secreted protein considerably. A similar effect was also seen when co-expressing insect translation initiation factor eIF4E. In this study, different combinations of the three genes were tested (CALR alone, β-syn + CALR, or β-syn + CALR + eIF4E) to further improve secretory protein production by assessing the expression level of a recombinant secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEFP). An additional 1.8-fold increment of SEFP production was obtained when cells co-expressed all the three "helper" genes, compared to cells, in which only CALR was co-produced with SEFP. Moreover, the duration of the SEFP production lasted much longer in cells that co-expressed these three "helper" genes, up to 10 dpi was observed. Utilization of this "triple-supporters" containing vector offers significant advantages when producing secreted proteins and is likely to have benefits for the production of viral vaccines and other pharmaceutical products. PMID:23900798

  5. Protein Hit1, a novel box C/D snoRNP assembly factor, controls cellular concentration of the scaffolding protein Rsa1 by direct interaction

    PubMed Central

    Rothé, Benjamin; Saliou, Jean-Michel; Quinternet, Marc; Back, Régis; Tiotiu, Decebal; Jacquemin, Clémence; Loegler, Christine; Schlotter, Florence; Peña, Vlad; Eckert, Kelvin; Moréra, Solange; Dorsselaer, Alain Van; Branlant, Christiane; Massenet, Séverine; Sanglier-Cianférani, Sarah; Manival, Xavier; Charpentier, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis of eukaryotic box C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles (C/D snoRNPs) involves conserved trans-acting factors, which are proposed to facilitate the assembly of the core proteins Snu13p/15.5K, Nop58p/NOP58, Nop56p/NOP56 and Nop1p/Fibrillarin on box C/D small nucleolar RNAs (C/D snoRNAs). In yeast, protein Rsa1 acts as a platform, interacting with both the RNA-binding core protein Snu13 and protein Pih1 of the Hsp82–R2TP chaperone complex. In this work, a proteomic approach coupled with functional and structural studies identifies protein Hit1 as a novel Rsa1p-interacting partner involved in C/D snoRNP assembly. Hit1p contributes to in vivo C/D snoRNA stability and pre-RNA maturation kinetics. It associates with U3 snoRNA precursors and influences its 3′-end processing. Remarkably, Hit1p is required to maintain steady-state levels of Rsa1p. This stabilizing activity is likely to be general across eukaryotic species, as the human protein ZNHIT3(TRIP3) showing sequence homology with Hit1p regulates the abundance of NUFIP1, the Rsa1p functional homolog. The nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of the Rsa1p317–352–Hit1p70–164 complex reveals a novel mode of protein–protein association explaining the strong stability of the Rsa1p–Hit1p complex. Our biochemical data show that C/D snoRNAs and the core protein Nop58 can interact with the purified Snu13p–Rsa1p–Hit1p heterotrimer. PMID:25170085

  6. Cellular Adaptation to VEGF-Targeted Antiangiogenic Therapy Induces Evasive Resistance by Overproduction of Alternative Endothelial Cell Growth Factors in Renal Cell Carcinoma12

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyung Seok; Raven, Peter A.; Frees, Sebastian; Gust, Kilian; Fazli, Ladan; Ettinger, Susan; Hong, Sung Joon; Kollmannsberger, Cristian; Gleave, Martin E.; So, Alan I.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)–targeted antiangiogenic therapy significantly inhibits the growth of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Eventually, therapy resistance develops in even the most responsive cases, but the mechanisms of resistance remain unclear. Herein, we developed two tumor models derived from an RCC cell line by conditioning the parental cells to two different stresses caused by VEGF-targeted therapy (sunitinib exposure and hypoxia) to investigate the mechanism of resistance to such therapy in RCC. Sunitinib-conditioned Caki-1 cells in vitro did not show resistance to sunitinib compared with parental cells, but when tested in vivo, these cells appeared to be highly resistant to sunitinib treatment. Hypoxia-conditioned Caki-1 cells are more resistant to hypoxia and have increased vascularity due to the upregulation of VEGF production; however, they did not develop sunitinib resistance either in vitro or in vivo. Human endothelial cells were more proliferative and showed increased tube formation in conditioned media from sunitinib-conditioned Caki-1 cells compared with parental cells. Gene expression profiling using RNA microarrays revealed that several genes related to tissue development and remodeling, including the development and migration of endothelial cells, were upregulated in sunitinib-conditioned Caki-1 cells compared with parental and hypoxia-conditioned cells. These findings suggest that evasive resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy is acquired by activation of VEGF-independent angiogenesis pathways induced through interactions with VEGF-targeted drugs, but not by hypoxia. These results emphasize that increased inhibition of tumor angiogenesis is required to delay the development of resistance to antiangiogenic therapy and maintain the therapeutic response in RCC. PMID:26678908

  7. Diverse control of metabolism and other cellular processes in Streptomyces coelicolor by the PhoP transcription factor: genome-wide identification of in vivo targets.

    PubMed

    Allenby, Nicholas E E; Laing, Emma; Bucca, Giselda; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Smith, Colin P

    2012-10-01

    Streptomycetes sense and respond to the stress of phosphate starvation via the two-component PhoR-PhoP signal transduction system. To identify the in vivo targets of PhoP we have undertaken a chromatin-immunoprecipitation-on-microarray analysis of wild-type and phoP mutant cultures and, in parallel, have quantified their transcriptomes. Most (ca. 80%) of the previously in vitro characterized PhoP targets were identified in this study among several hundred other putative novel PhoP targets. In addition to activating genes for phosphate scavenging systems PhoP was shown to target two gene clusters for cell wall/extracellular polymer biosynthesis. Furthermore PhoP was found to repress an unprecedented range of pathways upon entering phosphate limitation including nitrogen assimilation, oxidative phosphorylation, nucleotide biosynthesis and glycogen catabolism. Moreover, PhoP was shown to target many key genes involved in antibiotic production and morphological differentiation, including afsS, atrA, bldA, bldC, bldD, bldK, bldM, cdaR, cdgA, cdgB and scbR-scbA. Intriguingly, in the PhoP-dependent cpk polyketide gene cluster, PhoP accumulates substantially at three specific sites within the giant polyketide synthase-encoding genes. This study suggests that, following phosphate limitation, Streptomyces coelicolor PhoP functions as a 'master' regulator, suppressing central metabolism, secondary metabolism and developmental pathways until sufficient phosphate is salvaged to support further growth and, ultimately, morphological development. PMID:22904076

  8. Diverse control of metabolism and other cellular processes in Streptomyces coelicolor by the PhoP transcription factor: genome-wide identification of in vivo targets

    PubMed Central

    Allenby, Nicholas E. E.; Laing, Emma; Bucca, Giselda; Kierzek, Andrzej M.; Smith, Colin P.

    2012-01-01

    Streptomycetes sense and respond to the stress of phosphate starvation via the two-component PhoR–PhoP signal transduction system. To identify the in vivo targets of PhoP we have undertaken a chromatin-immunoprecipitation-on-microarray analysis of wild-type and phoP mutant cultures and, in parallel, have quantified their transcriptomes. Most (ca. 80%) of the previously in vitro characterized PhoP targets were identified in this study among several hundred other putative novel PhoP targets. In addition to activating genes for phosphate scavenging systems PhoP was shown to target two gene clusters for cell wall/extracellular polymer biosynthesis. Furthermore PhoP was found to repress an unprecedented range of pathways upon entering phosphate limitation including nitrogen assimilation, oxidative phosphorylation, nucleotide biosynthesis and glycogen catabolism. Moreover, PhoP was shown to target many key genes involved in antibiotic production and morphological differentiation, including afsS, atrA, bldA, bldC, bldD, bldK, bldM, cdaR, cdgA, cdgB and scbR-scbA. Intriguingly, in the PhoP-dependent cpk polyketide gene cluster, PhoP accumulates substantially at three specific sites within the giant polyketide synthase-encoding genes. This study suggests that, following phosphate limitation, Streptomyces coelicolor PhoP functions as a ‘master’ regulator, suppressing central metabolism, secondary metabolism and developmental pathways until sufficient phosphate is salvaged to support further growth and, ultimately, morphological development. PMID:22904076

  9. Hox Targets and Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Herrero, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Hox genes are a group of genes that specify structures along the anteroposterior axis in bilaterians. Although in many cases they do so by modifying a homologous structure with a different (or no) Hox input, there are also examples of Hox genes constructing new organs with no homology in other regions of the body. Hox genes determine structures though the regulation of targets implementing cellular functions and by coordinating cell behavior. The genetic organization to construct or modify a certain organ involves both a genetic cascade through intermediate transcription factors and a direct regulation of targets carrying out cellular functions. In this review I discuss new data from genome-wide techniques, as well as previous genetic and developmental information, to describe some examples of Hox regulation of different cell functions. I also discuss the organization of genetic cascades leading to the development of new organs, mainly using Drosophila melanogaster as the model to analyze Hox function. PMID:24490109

  10. Cellular solidification of transparent monotectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaulker, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding how liquid phase particles are engulfed or pushed during freezing of a monotectic is addressed. The additional complication is that the solid-liquid interface is nonplanar due to constitutional undercooling. Some evidence of particle pushing where the particles are the liquid phase of the montectic was already observed. Cellular freezing of the succinonitrile-glycerol system also occurred. Only a few compositions were tested at that time. The starting materials were not especially pure so that cellular interface observed was likely due to the presence of unkown impurities, the major portion of which was water. Topics addressed include: the effort of modeling the particle pushing process using the computer, establishing an apparatus for the determination of phase diagrams, and the measurement of the temperature gradients with a specimen which will solidify on the temperature gradient microscope stage.

  11. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  12. Cellular Manufacturing Internet Performance Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Bohley, M.C.; Schwartz, M.E.

    1998-03-04

    The objective of this project was to develop an Internet-based electronic performance support system (EPSS) for cellular manufacturing providing hardware/software specifications, process descriptions, estimated cost savings, manufacturing simulations, training information, and service resources for government and industry users of Cincinnati Milacron machine tools and products. AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) used expertise in the areas of Internet design and multimedia creation to develop a performance support system (PSS) for the Internet with assistance from CM's subject matter experts from engineering, manufacturing, and technical support. Reference information was both created and re-purposed from other existing formats, then made available on the Internet. On-line references on cellular manufacturing operations include: definitions of cells and cellular manufacturing; illustrations on how cellular manufacturing improves part throughput, resource utilization, part quality, and manufacturing flexibility; illustrations on how cellular manufacturing reduces labor and overhead costs; identification of critical factors driving decisions toward cellular manufacturing; a method for identifying process improvement areas using cellular manufacturing; a method for customizing the size of cells for a specific site; a simulation for making a part using cellular manufacturing technology; and a glossary of terms and concepts.

  13. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progression. This review focuses on new findings that enhance understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis, the characteristics of myofibroblasts, their progenitors, and molecular pathways regulating both fibrogenesis and its resolution. PMID:24892703

  14. Social and Demographic Factors Associated with Morbidities in Young Children in Egypt: A Bayesian Geo-Additive Semi-Parametric Multinomial Model

    PubMed Central

    Khatab, Khaled; Adegboye, Oyelola; Mohammed, Taofeeq Ibn

    2016-01-01

    Background Globally, the burden of mortality in children, especially in poor developing countries, is alarming and has precipitated concern and calls for concerted efforts in combating such health problems. Examples of diseases that contribute to this burden of mortality include diarrhoea, cough, fever, and the overlap between these illnesses, causing childhood morbidity and mortality. Methods To gain insight into these health issues, we employed the 2008 Demographic and Health Survey Data of Egypt, which recorded details from 10,872 children under five. This data focused on the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of household members. We applied a Bayesian multinomial model to assess the area-specific spatial effects and risk factors of co-morbidity of fever, diarrhoea and cough for children under the age of five. Results The results showed that children under 20 months of age were more likely to have the three diseases (OR: 6.8; 95% CI: 4.6–10.2) than children between 20 and 40 months (OR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.38–3.3). In multivariate Bayesian geo-additive models, the children of mothers who were over 20 years of age were more likely to have only cough (OR: 1.2; 95% CI: 0.9–1.5) and only fever (OR: 1.2; 95% CI: 0.91–1.51) compared with their counterparts. Spatial results showed that the North-eastern region of Egypt has a higher incidence than most of other regions. Conclusions This study showed geographic patterns of Egyptian governorates in the combined prevalence of morbidity among Egyptian children. It is obvious that the Nile Delta, Upper Egypt, and south-eastern Egypt have high rates of diseases and are more affected. Therefore, more attention is needed in these areas. PMID:27442018

  15. The effectiveness of power-generating complexes constructed on the basis of nuclear power plants combined with additional sources of energy determined taking risk factors into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Khrustalev, V. A.; Portyankin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The effectiveness of combining nuclear power plants equipped with water-cooled water-moderated power-generating reactors (VVER) with other sources of energy within unified power-generating complexes is analyzed. The use of such power-generating complexes makes it possible to achieve the necessary load pickup capability and flexibility in performing the mandatory selective primary and emergency control of load, as well as participation in passing the night minimums of electric load curves while retaining high values of the capacity utilization factor of the entire power-generating complex at higher levels of the steam-turbine part efficiency. Versions involving combined use of nuclear power plants with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units for generating electricity are considered. In view of the fact that hydrogen is an unsafe energy carrier, the use of which introduces additional elements of risk, a procedure for evaluating these risks under different conditions of implementing the fuel-and-hydrogen cycle at nuclear power plants is proposed. Risk accounting technique with the use of statistical data is considered, including the characteristics of hydrogen and gas pipelines, and the process pipelines equipment tightness loss occurrence rate. The expected intensities of fires and explosions at nuclear power plants fitted with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units are calculated. In estimating the damage inflicted by events (fires and explosions) occurred in nuclear power plant turbine buildings, the US statistical data were used. Conservative scenarios of fires and explosions of hydrogen-air mixtures in nuclear power plant turbine buildings are presented. Results from calculations of the introduced annual risk to the attained net annual profit ratio in commensurable versions are given. This ratio can be used in selecting projects characterized by the most technically attainable and socially acceptable safety.

  16. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  17. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  18. CELLULAR MAGNESIUM HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Andrea M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium, the second most abundant cellular cation after potassium, is essential to regulate numerous cellular functions and enzymes, including ion channels, metabolic cycles, and signaling pathways, as attested by more than 1000 entries in the literature. Despite significant recent progress, however, our understanding of how cells regulate Mg2+ homeostasis and transport still remains incomplete. For example, the occurrence of major fluxes of Mg2+ in either direction across the plasma membrane of mammalian cells following metabolic or hormonal stimuli has been extensively documented. Yet, the mechanisms ultimately responsible for magnesium extrusion across the cell membrane have not been cloned. Even less is known about the regulation in cellular organelles. The present review is aimed at providing the reader with a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of the mechanisms enacted by eukaryotic cells to regulate cellular Mg2+ homeostasis and how these mechanisms are altered under specific pathological conditions. PMID:21640700

  19. Knockdown of the cellular protein LRPPRC attenuates HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Cameron J; Matthews, John M; Madson, Christian J; Donnellan, Meghan R; Cerny, Ronald L; Belshan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 exploits numerous host cellular pathways for productive infection. To identify novel factors involved in HIV-1 replication, HIV-1 integrase and matrix protein complexes were captured at 4 hours post infection for proteomic analysis using an affinity purification system. Leucine-rich PPR-motif containing (LRPPRC) protein, a cellular protein involved in mitochondrial function, cell metabolism, and cell-cycle progression was identified as one of the candidate HIV-1 factors. Co-immunoprecipitation RT-PCR experiments confirmed that LRPPRC associated with HIV-1 nucleic acids during the early steps of virus infection. To establish if LRPPRC was critical for HIV-1 infection, three independent LRPPRC knockdown cell lines were constructed (2.7, 3.6, and 4.1). Subcellular fractionation of these cell lines revealed differential knockdown of LRPPRC in subcellular compartments. LRPPRC was knocked down in the insoluble/cytoskeletal fractions of all three cell lines, but the 3.6 and 4.1 cells also showed a reduction in nuclear LRPPRC. Additionally, several cellular factors were downregulated and/or disrupted by loss of LRPPRC. HIV-1 infection was reduced in all three cell lines, but virus production and RNA encapsidation were unaffected, suggesting that LRPPRC was critical for the afferent stage of virus replication. Two of the three cell lines (3.6, 4.1) were refractory for murine leukemia virus infection, a virus dependent on cellular proliferation for productive infection. Consistent with this, these two cell lines exhibited reduced cellular growth with no loss of cellular viability or change in cell cycle phenotype. The early steps of virus infection were also differentially affected among the cell lines. A reduced level of preintegration complex formation was observed in all three cell lines, but viral DNA nuclear import was reduced only in the 3.6 and 4.1 cells. Combined, these data identify LRPPRC as a HIV-1 factor that is involved in HIV-1 replication through more

  20. Cellular reprogramming and hepatocellular carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-Wen; Nie, Yun-Zhong; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2013-12-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers, and is also the leading cause of death worldwide. Studies have shown that cellular reprogramming contributes to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance and the recurrence of cancers. In this article, we summarize and discuss the latest findings in the area of cellular reprogramming in HCC. The aberrant expression of transcription factors OCT4, KLF4, SOX2, c-MYC, NANOG, and LIN28 have been also observed, and the expression of these transcription factors is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in HCC. Studies indicate that cellular reprogramming may play a critical role in the occurrence and recurrence of HCC. Recent reports have shown that DNA methylation, miRNAs, tumor microenvironment, and signaling pathways can induce the expression of stemness transcription factors, which leads to cellular reprogramming in HCC. Furthermore, studies indicate that therapies based on cellular reprogramming could revolutionize HCC treatment. Finally, a novel therapeutic concept is discussed: reprogramming control therapy. A potential reprogramming control therapy method could be developed based on the reprogramming demonstrated in HCC studies and applied at two opposing levels: differentiation and reprogramming. Our increasing understanding and control of cellular programming should facilitate the exploitation of this novel therapeutic concept and its application in clinical HCC treatment, which may represent a promising strategy in the future that is not restricted to liver cancer. PMID:24379607

  1. Differences between disease-associated endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) isoforms in cellular expression, interactions with tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1) and regulation by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, N; Low, W Y; Onipinla, A; Mein, C; Caulfield, M; Munroe, P B; Chernajovsky, Y

    2015-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) processes peptides for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation and promotes cytokine receptor ectodomain shedding. These known functions of ERAP1 may explain its genetic association with several autoimmune inflammatory diseases. In this study, we identified four novel alternatively spliced variants of ERAP1 mRNA, designated as ΔExon-11, ΔExon-13, ΔExon-14 and ΔExon-15. We also observed a rapid and differential modulation of ERAP1 mRNA levels and spliced variants in different cell types pretreated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We have studied three full-length allelic forms of ERAP1 (R127-K528, P127-K528, P127-R528) and one spliced variant (ΔExon-11) and assessed their interactions with tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1) in transfected cells. We observed variation in cellular expression of different ERAP1 isoforms, with R127-K528 being expressed at a much lower level. Furthermore, the cellular expression of full-length P127-K528 and ΔExon-11 spliced variant was enhanced significantly when co-transfected with TNF-R1. Isoforms P127-K528, P127-R528 and ΔExon-11 spliced variant associated with TNF-R1, and this interaction occurred in a region within the first 10 exons of ERAP1. Supernatant-derived vesicles from transfected cells contained the full-length and ectodomain form of soluble TNF-R1, as well as carrying the full-length ERAP1 isoforms. We observed marginal differences between TNF-R1 ectodomain levels when co-expressed with individual ERAP1 isoforms, and treatment of transfected cells with tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-10 exerted variable effects on TNF-R1 ectodomain cleavage. Our data suggest that ERAP1 isoforms may exhibit differential biological properties and inflammatory mediators could play critical roles in modulating ERAP1 expression, leading to altered functional activities of this enzyme. PMID:25545008

  2. CELLULAR PATHOGENESIS OF DIABETIC GASTROENTEROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Ördög, Tamás; Hayashi, Yujiro; Gibbons, Simon J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Gastroenteropathy manifesting in upper gastrointestinal symptoms, delayed gastric emptying, constipation, diarrhea and fecal incontinence occurs frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus and represents a significant health care burden. Current treatments are largely symptomatic and ineffective. Better understanding of the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of these disorders is required for the development of more effective therapies. Recent advances in our understanding of the inherent, high-level complexities of the control systems that execute and regulate gastrointestinal motility, together with the utilization of new experimental models and sophisticated physiological, morphological and molecular techniques have lead to the realization that diabetic gastroenteropathies cannot be ascribed to any singular defect or dysfunction. In fact, these disorders are multifactorial and involve a spectrum of metabolic and dystrophic changes that can potentially affect all key components of motor control including the systemic autonomic and enteric nervous systems, interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscle cells. Candidate pathomechanisms are also varied and include imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidative factors, altered trophic stimuli to mature cells and their progenitors, and, possibly, autoimmune factors. The goal of this paper is to review the cellular changes underlying diabetic gastroenteropathies and their potential causes, with particular focus on functional interactions between various cell types. It is proposed that diabetic gastroenteropathies should be considered a form of gastrointestinal neuromuscular dystrophy rather than a “functional” disorder. Future research should identify ways to block cytotoxic factors, support the regeneration of damaged cells and translate the experimental findings into new treatment modalities. PMID:19829287

  3. Identification of the cellular receptor for anthrax toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Kenneth A.; Mogridge, Jeremy; Mourez, Michael; Collier, R. John; Young, John A. T.

    2001-11-01

    The tripartite toxin secreted by Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, helps the bacterium evade the immune system and can kill the host during a systemic infection. Two components of the toxin enzymatically modify substrates within the cytosol of mammalian cells: oedema factor (OF) is an adenylate cyclase that impairs host defences through a variety of mechanisms including inhibiting phagocytosis; lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent protease that cleaves mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase and causes lysis of macrophages. Protective antigen (PA), the third component, binds to a cellular receptor and mediates delivery of the enzymatic components to the cytosol. Here we describe the cloning of the human PA receptor using a genetic complementation approach. The receptor, termed ATR (anthrax toxin receptor), is a type I membrane protein with an extracellular von Willebrand factor A domain that binds directly to PA. In addition, a soluble version of this domain can protect cells from the action of the toxin.

  4. The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E5 transforming protein specifically binds and activates the beta-type receptor for the platelet-derived growth factor but not other related tyrosine kinase-containing receptors to induce cellular transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D J; Li, W; Wang, L M; Heidaran, M A; Aaronson, S; Shinn, R; Schlegel, R; Pierce, J H

    1994-01-01

    The 44-amino-acid E5 protein of bovine papillomavirus type 1 is a highly hydrophobic protein which appears to transform cells through the activation of growth factor receptors. To investigate the specificity of E5-growth factor receptor interactions required for mitogenic signaling, we utilized a nontumorigenic, murine myeloid cell line (32D) which is strictly dependent on interleukin-3 (IL-3) for sustained proliferation in culture. This IL-3 dependence can be functionally substituted by the expression of a variety of surrogate growth factor receptors and the addition of the corresponding ligand. Several receptor cDNAs for the alpha- and beta-type platelet-derived growth factor receptors [alpha PDGFR and beta PDGFR], the epidermal growth factor receptor, and the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor) were transfected into 32D cells constitutively expressing the E5 protein to test for IL-3-independent growth. Only beta PDGFR was capable of abrogating the IL-3 dependence of 32D cells. The proliferative signal induced by the coexpression of beta PDGFR and E5 was accompanied by stable complex formation between these proteins, constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor, and tumorigenicity in nude mice. The lack of cooperative interaction between E5 and the epidermal growth factor receptor, the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor, and the highly related alpha PDGFR was paralleled by the inability of E5 to bind to these receptors and failure to increase receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, these data indicate that the ability of E5 to induce sustained proliferation and transformation of 32D cells is a direct consequence of specific interaction between the E5 protein and the beta PDGFR signaling complex and the subsequent stimulation of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Images PMID:8207816

  5. Multidrug transporter proteins and cellular factors involved in free and mAb linked calicheamicin-gamma1 (gentuzumab ozogamicin, GO) resistance and in the selection of GO resistant variants of the HL60 AML cell line.

    PubMed

    Cianfriglia, Maurizio; Mallano, Alessandra; Ascione, Alessandro; Dupuis, Maria Luisa

    2010-06-01

    In this study we elucidated the role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multi-drug transporter proteins and cellular factors such as Bcl-2 expression and CD33 down-modulation contributing to free and hP67.6 mAb linked calicheamicin-gamma1 (CalC-gamma1) resistance. We analyzed in a well designed HL60 cell system the relationship between the expression of ABC proteins, Bcl-2 and CD33 modulation with the activity of free and mAb-linked CalC-gamma1. The results herein reported and discussed, strongly suggest that both MDR1-Pgp and MRP1 efflux systems are engaged by CalC-gamma1, but only MDR1-Pgp over-expression efficiently abrogates drug cytotoxicity in MDR cells. Paradoxically, Bcl-2 expression, as observed for other anticancer compounds belonging to the enediyne family of drugs, confers CalC-gamma1 susceptibility rather than resistance in HL60 cells. Further, the isolation of a resistant HL60 subline (HL60AL) that was developed by exposing the parental sensitive cells to sub-effective doses of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) over an extended period of time shows a reduced level of CD33 expression that represents an important escape mechanism of HL60 MDR cells to the cytotoxic effect of GO. PMID:20428776

  6. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    PubMed

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found. PMID:25291810

  7. The Roles of Cellular Nanomechanics in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Katti, Kalpana S.; Katti, Dinesh R.; Mishra, Sanjay R.; Khan, Sheema; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of cells and tissues may be instrumental in increasing our understanding of cellular behavior and cellular manifestations of diseases such as cancer. Nanomechanical properties can offer clinical translation of therapies beyond what are currently employed. Nanomechanical properties, often measured by nanoindentation methods using atomic force microscopy, may identify morphological variations, cellular binding forces, and surface adhesion behaviors that efficiently differentiate normal cells and cancer cells. The aim of this review is to examine current research involving the general use of atomic force microscopy/nanoindentation in measuring cellular nanomechanics; various factors and instrumental conditions that influence the nanomechanical properties of cells; and implementation of nanoindentation methods to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells or tissues. Applying these fundamental nanomechanical properties to current discoveries in clinical treatment may result in greater efficiency in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer, which ultimately can change the lives of patients. PMID:25137233

  8. Cellular uptake of metallated cobalamins.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mai Thanh Quynh; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian Henry; Gammelgaard, Bente; Furger, Evelyne; Alberto, Roger

    2016-03-16

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates was estimated via detection of their metal constituents (Co, Pt, and Re) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Vitamin B12 (cyano-cob(iii)alamin) and aquo-cob(iii)alamin [Cbl-OH2](+), which differ in the β-axial ligands (CN(-) and H2O, respectively), were included as control samples. The results indicated that B12 derivatives delivered cisplatin to both cellular cytosol and nuclei with an efficiency of one third compared to the uptake of free cisplatin cis-[Pt(II)Cl2(NH3)2]. In addition, uptake of charged B12 derivatives including [Cbl-OH2](+), [{Co}-CN-{cis-PtCl(NH3)2}](+), [{Re}-{Co}-CN-{cis-PtCl(NH3)2}](+), and [{Co}-CN-{trans-Pt(Cyt)(NH3)2}](2+) (Cyt = cytarabin) was high compared to neutral B12, which implied the existence of an additional internalization pathway for charged B12 vitamin analogs. The affinities of the charged B12 derivatives to the B12 transporters HC, IF and TC were similar to that of native vitamin B12. PMID:26739575

  9. Distinction of broken cellular wall Ganoderma lucidum spores and G. lucidum spores using FTIR microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xianliang; Liu, Xingcun; Sheng, Daping; Huang, Dake; Li, Weizu; Wang, Xin

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, FTIR microspectroscopy was used to identify broken cellular wall Ganoderma lucidum spores and G. lucidum spores. For IR spectra, broken cellular wall G. lucidum spores and G. lucidum spores were mainly different in the regions of 3000-2800, 1660-1600, 1400-1200 and 1100-1000 cm-1. For curve fitting, the results showed the differences in the protein secondary structures and the polysaccharide structures/content between broken cellular wall G. lucidum spores and G. lucidum spores. Moreover, the value of A1078/A1741 might be a potentially useful factor to distinguish broken cellular wall G. lucidum spores from G. lucidum spores. Additionally, FTIR microspectroscopy could identify broken cellular wall G. lucidum spores and G. lucidum spores accurately when it was combined with hierarchical cluster analysis. The result suggests FTIR microspectroscopy is very simple and efficient for distinction of broken cellular wall G. lucidum spores and G. lucidum spores. The result also indicates FTIR microspectroscopy may be useful for TCM identification.

  10. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  11. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  12. Antecedents of Charter School Success in New York State: Charter School Management Agencies and Additional Factors That Affect English/Language Arts Test Scores in Elementary Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Charter schools frequently receive public as well as federal attention, and there is a growing body of research becoming available examining charter schools. With all this research there is still a need for further studies which deal specifically with antecedents of charter school success. This study examined factors contributing toward the…

  13. Parameters and characteristics governing cellular internalization and trans-barrier trafficking of nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Karmani; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Bijukumar, Divya; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2015-01-01

    Cellular internalization and trans-barrier transport of nanoparticles can be manipulated on the basis of the physicochemical and mechanical characteristics of nanoparticles. Research has shown that these factors significantly influence the uptake of nanoparticles. Dictating these characteristics allows for the control of the rate and extent of cellular uptake, as well as delivering the drug-loaded nanosystem intra-cellularly, which is imperative for drugs that require a specific cellular level to exert their effects. Additionally, physicochemical characteristics of the nanoparticles should be optimal for the nanosystem to bypass the natural restricting phenomena of the body and act therapeutically at the targeted site. The factors at the focal point of emerging smart nanomedicines include nanoparticle size, surface charge, shape, hydrophobicity, surface chemistry, and even protein and ligand conjugates. Hence, this review discusses the mechanism of internalization of nanoparticles and ideal nanoparticle characteristics that allow them to evade the biological barriers in order to achieve optimal cellular uptake in different organ systems. Identifying these parameters assists with the progression of nanomedicine as an outstanding vector of pharmaceuticals. PMID:25834433

  14. Additivity of Factor Effects in Reading Tasks Is Still a Challenge for Computational Models: Reply to Ziegler, Perry, and Zorzi (2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besner, Derek; O'Malley, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    J. C. Ziegler, C. Perry, and M. Zorzi (2009) have claimed that their connectionist dual process model (CDP+) can simulate the data reported by S. O'Malley and D. Besner. Most centrally, they have claimed that the model simulates additive effects of stimulus quality and word frequency on the time to read aloud when words and nonwords are randomly…

  15. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for severa...

  16. Fabrication of cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Garg, Rajeev

    1996-02-01

    Nature uses cellular materials in applications requiring strength while, simultaneously, minimizing raw materials requirements. Minimizing raw materials is efficient both in terms of the energy expended by the organism to synthesize the structure and in terms of the strength- to-weight ratio of the structure. Wood is the most obvious example of cellular bio-materials, and it is the focus of other presentations in this symposium. The lightweight bone structure of birds is another excellent example where weight is a key criterion. The anchoring foot of the common muscle [Mytilus edulis] whereby it attaches itself to objects is a further example of a biological system that uses a foam to fill space and yet conserve on raw materials. In the case of the muscle the foam is water filled and the foot structure distributes stress over a larger area so that the strength of the byssal thread from which it is suspended is matched to the strength of interfacial attachment of the foot to a substrate. In these examples the synthesis and fabrication of the cellular material is directed by intercellular, genetically coded, biochemical reactions. The resulting cell sizes are microns in scale. Cellular materials at the next larger scale are created by organisms at the next higher level of integration. For example an African tree frog lays her eggs in a gas/fluid foam sack she builds on a branch overhanging a pond. The outside of the foam sack hardens in the sun and prevents water evaporation. The foam structure minimizes the amount of fluid that needs to be incorporated into the sack and minimizes its weight. However, as far as the developing eggs are concerned, they are in an aqueous medium, i.e. the continuous fluid phase of the foam. After precisely six days the eggs hatch, and the solidified outer wall re-liquefies and dumps the emerging tadpoles into the pond below. The bee honeycomb is an example of a cellular material with exquisite periodicity at millimeter length scales. The

  17. Cellular integrity is required for inhibition of initiation of cellular DNA synthesis by reovirus type 3.

    PubMed Central

    Roner, M R; Cox, D C

    1985-01-01

    Synchronized HeLa cells, primed for entry into the synthesis phase by amethopterin, were prevented from initiating DNA synthesis 9 h after infection with reovirus type 3. However, nuclei isolated from synchronized cells infected with reovirus for 9 or 16 h demonstrated a restored ability to synthesize DNA. The addition of enucleated cytoplasmic extracts from infected or uninfected cells did not affect this restored capacity for synthesis. The addition of ribonucleotide triphosphates to nuclei isolated from infected cells stimulated additional DNA synthesis, suggesting that these nuclei were competent to initiate new rounds of DNA replication. Permeabilization of infected cells did not restore the ability of these cells to synthesize DNA. Nucleoids isolated from intact or permeabilized cells, infected for 9 or 16 h displayed an increased rate of sedimentation when compared with nucleoids isolated from uninfected cells. Nucleoids isolated from the nuclei of infected cells demonstrated a rate of sedimentation similar to that of nucleoids isolated from the nuclei of uninfected cells. The inhibition of initiation of cellular DNA synthesis by reovirus type 3 appears not to have been due to a permanent alteration of the replication complex, but this inhibition could be reversed by the removal of that complex from factors unique to the structural or metabolic integrity of the infected cell. Images PMID:3968718

  18. Factors determining the stability, size distribution, and cellular accumulation of small, monodisperse chitosan nanoparticles as candidate vectors for anticancer drug delivery: application to the passive encapsulation of [14C]-doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Masarudin, Mas Jaffri; Cutts, Suzanne M; Evison, Benny J; Phillips, Don R; Pigram, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Development of parameters for the fabrication of nanosized vectors is pivotal for its successful administration in therapeutic applications. In this study, homogeneously distributed chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs) with diameters as small as 62 nm and a polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.15 were synthesized and purified using a simple, robust method that was highly reproducible. Nanoparticles were synthesized using modified ionic gelation of the chitosan polymer with sodium tripolyphosphate. Using this method, larger aggregates were mechanically isolated from single particles in the nanoparticle population by selective efficient centrifugation. The presence of disaggregated monodisperse nanoparticles was confirmed using atomic force microscopy. Factors such as anions, pH, and concentration were found to affect the size and stability of nanoparticles directly. The smallest nanoparticle population was ∼62 nm in hydrodynamic size, with a low PDI of 0.15, indicating high particle homogeneity. CNPs were highly stable and retained their monodisperse morphology in serum-supplemented media in cell culture conditions for up to 72 hours, before slowly degrading over 6 days. Cell viability assays demonstrated that cells remained viable following a 72-hour exposure to 1 mg/mL CNPs, suggesting that the nanoparticles are well tolerated and highly suited for biomedical applications. Cellular uptake studies using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled CNPs showed that cancer cells readily accumulate the nanoparticles 30 minutes posttreatment and that nanoparticles persisted within cells for up to 24 hours posttreatment. As a proof of principle for use in anticancer therapeutic applications, a [14C]-radiolabeled form of the anticancer agent doxorubicin was efficiently encapsulated within the CNP, confirming the feasibility of using this system as a drug delivery vector. PMID:26715842

  19. Additive Manufacturing/Diagnostics via the High Frequency Induction Heating of Metal Powders: The Determination of the Power Transfer Factor for Fine Metallic Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Orlando; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Caravias, George; Holcomb, Matthew

    2015-03-11

    Grid Logic Inc. is developing a method for sintering and melting fine metallic powders for additive manufacturing using spatially-compact, high-frequency magnetic fields called Micro-Induction Sintering (MIS). One of the challenges in advancing MIS technology for additive manufacturing is in understanding the power transfer to the particles in a powder bed. This knowledge is important to achieving efficient power transfer, control, and selective particle heating during the MIS process needed for commercialization of the technology. The project s work provided a rigorous physics-based model for induction heating of fine spherical particles as a function of frequency and particle size. This simulation improved upon Grid Logic s earlier models and provides guidance that will make the MIS technology more effective. The project model will be incorporated into Grid Logic s power control circuit of the MIS 3D printer product and its diagnostics technology to optimize the sintering process for part quality and energy efficiency.

  20. Additivity of factor effects in reading tasks is still a challenge for computational models: Reply to Ziegler, Perry, and Zorzi (2009).

    PubMed

    Besner, Derek; O'Malley, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    J. C. Ziegler, C. Perry, and M. Zorzi (2009) have claimed that their connectionist dual process model (CDP+) can simulate the data reported by S. O'Malley and D. Besner. Most centrally, they have claimed that the model simulates additive effects of stimulus quality and word frequency on the time to read aloud when words and nonwords are randomly intermixed. This work represents an important attempt given that computational models of reading processes have to date largely ignored the issue of whether it is possible to simulate additive effects. Despite CDP+'s success at capturing many other phenomena, it is clear that CDP+ fails to capture the full pattern seen with skilled readers in these experiments. PMID:19210105

  1. Cellular growth in biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.D.; Whitaker, S.

    1999-09-20

    In this paper the authors develop a macroscopic evolutionary equation for the growth of the cellular phase starting from a microscopic description of mass transport and a simple structured model for product formation. The methods of continuum mechanics and volume averaging are used to develop the macroscopic representation by carefully considering the fluxes of chemical species that pertain to cell growth. The concept of structured models is extended to include the transport of reacting chemical species at the microscopic scale. The resulting macroscopic growth model is similar in form to previously published models for the transport of a single substrate and electron donor and for the production of cellular mass and exopolymer. The method of volume averaging indicated under what conditions the developed growth model is valid and provides an explicit connection between the relevant microscopic model parameters and their corresponding macroscopic counterparts.

  2. Cellular dysfunction in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Mervyn

    2008-12-01

    Cellular dysfunction is a commonplace sequelum of sepsis and other systemic inflammatory conditions. Impaired energy production (related to mitochondrial inhibition, damage, and reduced protein turnover) appears to be a core mechanism underlying the development of organ dysfunction. The reduction in energy availability appears to trigger a metabolic shutdown that impairs normal functioning of the cell. This may well represent an adaptive mechanism analogous to hibernation that prevents a massive degree of cell death and thus enables eventual recovery in survivors. PMID:18954700

  3. Radiolabeled cellular blood elements

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, M.L.; Ezikowitz, M.D.; Hardeman, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers delivered by guest lectures and participants at the Advanced Study Institute's colloquium on Radiolabeled Cellular Blood Elements at Maratea, Italy on August 29, to September 9, 1982. The book includes chapters on basic cell physiology and critical reviews of data and experience in the preparation and use of radiolabeled cells, as well as reports on very recent developments, from a faculty that included experts on cell physiology in health and disease and on the technology of in vivo labeling.

  4. Predictability in cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Chira, Camelia; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Modelled as finite homogeneous Markov chains, probabilistic cellular automata with local transition probabilities in (0, 1) always posses a stationary distribution. This result alone is not very helpful when it comes to predicting the final configuration; one needs also a formula connecting the probabilities in the stationary distribution to some intrinsic feature of the lattice configuration. Previous results on the asynchronous cellular automata have showed that such feature really exists. It is the number of zero-one borders within the automaton's binary configuration. An exponential formula in the number of zero-one borders has been proved for the 1-D, 2-D and 3-D asynchronous automata with neighborhood three, five and seven, respectively. We perform computer experiments on a synchronous cellular automaton to check whether the empirical distribution obeys also that theoretical formula. The numerical results indicate a perfect fit for neighbourhood three and five, which opens the way for a rigorous proof of the formula in this new, synchronous case. PMID:25271778

  5. Probabilistic cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-09-01

    Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case-connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders-the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata. PMID:24999557

  6. Cellular Learning: Strategy for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrum, John

    1987-01-01

    Cellular learning refers to both arrangement of shop equipment and addition of new course materials for a contemporary manufacturing curriculum. The concept is an accumulation of ideas and strategies for the instruction and training of students. It also provides a method for consolidating old equipment and adding group technology. (CH)

  7. Cellular ageing mechanisms in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sacitharan, P K; Vincent, T L

    2016-08-01

    Age is the strongest independent risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and for many years this was assumed to be due to repetitive microtrauma of the joint surface over time, the so-called 'wear and tear' arthritis. As our understanding of OA pathogenesis has become more refined, it has changed our appreciation of the role of ageing on disease. Cartilage breakdown in disease is not a passive process but one involving induction and activation of specific matrix-degrading enzymes; chondrocytes are exquisitely sensitive to changes in the mechanical, inflammatory and metabolic environment of the joint; cartilage is continuously adapting to these changes by altering its matrix. Ageing influences all of these processes. In this review, we will discuss how ageing affects tissue structure, joint use and the cellular metabolism. We describe what is known about pathways implicated in ageing in other model systems and discuss the potential value of targeting these pathways in OA. PMID:27215642

  8. Unstable vicinal crystal growth from cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasteva, A.; Popova, H.; KrzyŻewski, F.; Załuska-Kotur, M.; Tonchev, V.

    2016-03-01

    In order to study the unstable step motion on vicinal crystal surfaces we devise vicinal Cellular Automata. Each cell from the colony has value equal to its height in the vicinal, initially the steps are regularly distributed. Another array keeps the adatoms, initially distributed randomly over the surface. The growth rule defines that each adatom at right nearest neighbor position to a (multi-) step attaches to it. The update of whole colony is performed at once and then time increases. This execution of the growth rule is followed by compensation of the consumed particles and by diffusional update(s) of the adatom population. Two principal sources of instability are employed - biased diffusion and infinite inverse Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier (iiSE). Since these factors are not opposed by step-step repulsion the formation of multi-steps is observed but in general the step bunches preserve a finite width. We monitor the developing surface patterns and quantify the observations by scaling laws with focus on the eventual transition from diffusion-limited to kinetics-limited phenomenon. The time-scaling exponent of the bunch size N is 1/2 for the case of biased diffusion and 1/3 for the case of iiSE. Additional distinction is possible based on the time-scaling exponents of the sizes of multi-step Nmulti, these are 0.36÷0.4 (for biased diffusion) and 1/4 (iiSE).

  9. Thermomechanical characterisation of cellular rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, H.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution discusses an experimental possibility to characterise a cellular rubber in terms of the influence of multiaxiality, rate dependency under environmental temperature and its behaviour under hydrostatic pressure. In this context, a mixed open and closed cell rubber based on an ethylene propylene diene monomer is investigated exemplarily. The present article intends to give a general idea of the characterisation method and the considerable effects of this special type of material. The main focus lies on the experimental procedure and the used testing devices in combination with the analysis methods such as true three-dimensional digital image correlation. The structural compressibility is taken into account by an approach for a material model using the Theory of Porous Media with additional temperature dependence.

  10. IL-2 Expression in Activated Human Memory FOXP3+ Cells Critically Depends on the Cellular Levels of FOXP3 as Well as of Four Transcription Factors of  T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bendfeldt, Hanna; Benary, Manuela; Scheel, Tobias; Steinbrink, Kerstin; Radbruch, Andreas; Herzel, Hanspeter; Baumgrass, Ria

    2012-01-01

    The human CD4+FOXP3+ T cell population is heterogeneous and consists of various subpopulations which remain poorly defined. Anergy and suppression are two main functional characteristics of FOXP3+Treg cells. We used the anergic behavior of FOXP3+Treg cells for a better discrimination and characterization of such subpopulations. We compared IL-2-expressing with IL-2-non-expressing cells within the memory FOXP3+ T cell population. In contrast to IL-2-non-expressing FOXP3+ cells, IL-2-expressing FOXP3+ cells exhibit intermediate characteristics of Treg and Th cells concerning the Treg cell markers CD25, GITR, and Helios. Besides lower levels of FOXP3, they also have higher levels of the transcription factors NFATc2, c-Fos, NF-κBp65, and c-Jun. An approach combining flow cytometric measurements with statistical interpretation for quantitative transcription factor analysis suggests that the physiological expression levels not only of FOXP3 but also of NFATc2, c-Jun, c-Fos, and NF-κBp65 are limiting for the decision whether IL-2 is expressed or not in activated peripheral human memory FOXP3+ cells. These findings demonstrate that concomitant high levels of NFATc2, c-Jun, c-Fos, and NF-κBp65 lead in addition to potential IL-2 expression in those FOXP3+ cells with low levels of FOXP3. We hypothesize that not only the level of FOXP3 expression but also the amounts of the four transcription factors studied represent determining factors for the anergic phenotype of FOXP3+ Treg cells. PMID:22969764

  11. Statistical properties of a quantum cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio; Inokuchi, Shuichi; Mizoguchi, Yoshihiro; Konno, Norio

    2005-09-01

    We study a quantum cellular automaton (QCA) whose time evolution is defined using the global transition function of a classical cellular automaton (CA). In order to investigate natural transformations from CAs to QCAs, the present QCA includes the CA with Wolfram’s rules 150 and 105 as special cases. We first compute the time evolution of the QCA and examine its statistical properties. As a basic statistical value, the probability of finding an active cell averaged over spatial-temporal space is introduced, and the difference between the CA and QCA is considered. In addition, it is shown that statistical properties in QCAs are related to the classical trajectory in configuration space.

  12. Formin’ cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Sven; Schultz, Jörg; Grosshans, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Diaphanous (Dia) protein family are key regulators of fundamental actin driven cellular processes, which are conserved from yeast to humans. Researchers have uncovered diverse physiological roles in cell morphology, cell motility, cell polarity, and cell division, which are involved in shaping cells into tissues and organs. The identification of numerous binding partners led to substantial progress in our understanding of the differential functions of Dia proteins. Genetic approaches and new microscopy techniques allow important new insights into their localization, activity, and molecular principles of regulation. PMID:24719676

  13. Control of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, Franco; Rechtman, Raúl; El Yacoubi, Samira

    2012-12-01

    We study the problem of master-slave synchronization and control of totalistic cellular automata. The synchronization mechanism is that of setting a fraction of sites of the slave system equal to those of the master one (pinching synchronization). The synchronization observable is the distance between the two configurations. We present three control strategies that exploit local information (the number of nonzero first-order Boolean derivatives) in order to choose the sites to be synchronized. When no local information is used, we speak of simple pinching synchronization. We find the critical properties of control and discuss the best control strategy compared with simple synchronization.

  14. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  15. Cellular lifespan and senescence: a complex balance between multiple cellular pathways.

    PubMed

    Dolivo, David; Hernandez, Sarah; Dominko, Tanja

    2016-07-01

    The study of cellular senescence and proliferative lifespan is becoming increasingly important because of the promises of autologous cell therapy, the need for model systems for tissue disease and the implication of senescent cell phenotypes in organismal disease states such as sarcopenia, diabetes and various cancers, among others. Here, we explain the concepts of proliferative cellular lifespan and cellular senescence, and we present factors that have been shown to mediate cellular lifespan positively or negatively. We review much recent literature and present potential molecular mechanisms by which lifespan mediation occurs, drawing from the fields of telomere biology, metabolism, NAD(+) and sirtuin biology, growth factor signaling and oxygen and antioxidants. We conclude that cellular lifespan and senescence are complex concepts that are governed by multiple independent and interdependent pathways, and that greater understanding of these pathways, their interactions and their convergence upon specific cellular phenotypes may lead to viable therapies for tissue regeneration and treatment of age-related pathologies, which are caused by or exacerbated by senescent cells in vivo. PMID:27417120

  16. Characterization of the betaherpesviral pUL69 protein family reveals binding of the cellular mRNA export factor UAP56 as a prerequisite for stimulation of nuclear mRNA export and for efficient viral replication.

    PubMed

    Zielke, Barbara; Thomas, Marco; Giede-Jeppe, Antje; Müller, Regina; Stamminger, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    UL69 of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes a pleiotropic transactivator protein and has a counterpart in every member of the Herpesviridae family thus far sequenced. However, little is known about the conservation of the functions of the nuclear phosphoprotein pUL69 in the homologous proteins of other betaherpesviruses. Therefore, eukaryotic expression vectors were constructed for pC69 of chimpanzee cytomegalovirus, pRh69 of rhesus cytomegalovirus, pM69 of murine cytomegalovirus, pU42 of human herpesvirus 6, and pU42 of elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus. Indirect immunofluorescence experiments showed that all pUL69 homologs expressed by these vectors were localized to the cell nucleus. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments identified homodimerization as a conserved feature of all homologs, whereas heterodimerization with pUL69 was restricted to its closer relatives. Further analyses demonstrated that pC69 and pRh69 were the only two homologs that functioned, like pUL69, as viral-mRNA export factors. As we had reported recently that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and interaction with the cellular DExD/H-box helicases UAP56 and URH49 were prerequisites for the nuclear-mRNA export activity of pUL69, the homologs were characterized with regard to these properties. Heterokaryon assays demonstrated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling for all homologs, and coimmunoprecipitation and mRNA export assays revealed that the interaction of UAP56 and/or URH49 with pC69 or pRh69 was required for mRNA export activity. Moreover, characterization of HCMV recombinants harboring mutations within the N-terminal sequence of pUL69 revealed a strong replication defect of viruses expressing pUL69 variants that were deficient in UAP56 binding. In summary, homodimerization and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling activity were identified as conserved features of betaherpesviral pUL69 homologs. UAP56 binding was shown to represent a unique characteristic of members of the genus Cytomegalovirus that is required

  17. Solving the Big Data (BD) Problem in Advanced Manufacturing (Subcategory for work done at Georgia Tech. Study Process and Design Factors for Additive Manufacturing Improvement)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Brett W.; Diaz, Kimberly A.; Ochiobi, Chinaza Darlene; Paynabar, Kamran

    2015-09-01

    3D printing originally known as additive manufacturing is a process of making 3 dimensional solid objects from a CAD file. This ground breaking technology is widely used for industrial and biomedical purposes such as building objects, tools, body parts and cosmetics. An important benefit of 3D printing is the cost reduction and manufacturing flexibility; complex parts are built at the fraction of the price. However, layer by layer printing of complex shapes adds error due to the surface roughness. Any such error results in poor quality products with inaccurate dimensions. The main purpose of this research is to measure the amount of printing errors for parts with different geometric shapes and to analyze them for finding optimal printing settings to minimize the error. We use a Design of Experiments framework, and focus on studying parts with cone and ellipsoid shapes. We found that the orientation and the shape of geometric shapes have significant effect on the printing error. From our analysis, we also determined the optimal orientation that gives the least printing error.

  18. Higher TSH can be used as an additional risk factor in prediction of malignancy in euthyroid thyroid nodules evaluated by cytology based on Bethesda system.

    PubMed

    Baser, Husniye; Topaloglu, Oya; Tam, Abbas Ali; Evranos, Berna; Alkan, Afra; Sungu, Nuran; Dumlu, Ersin Gurkan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2016-08-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that thyrotropin (TSH) concentration can be used as a marker for prediction of thyroid malignancy. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between TSH levels and prediction of malignancy in euthyroid patients with different Bethesda categories. The data of 1433 euthyroid patients with 3206 thyroid nodules who underwent thyroidectomy were screened retrospectively. The preoperative cytology results, thyroid function tests, thyroid autoantibodies, and presence of histopathological Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) were recorded. Of the 1433 patients, 585 (40.8 %) had malignant and 848 (59.2 %) had benign histopathology. Malignant group had smaller nodule size, elevated TSH levels, and higher rate of presence of HT compared to benign group (p < 0.001, all). Cytology results of 3206 nodules were as follows: 832 nondiagnostic (ND), 1666 benign, 392 atypia of undetermined significance/follicular lesion of undetermined significance (AUS/FLUS), 68 follicular neoplasm/suspicious for follicular neoplasm (FN/SFN), 133 suspicious for malignancy (SM), and 115 malignant. Both SM and malignant cytology groups had higher TSH levels than other 4 Bethesda categories (p < 0.05, all). Benign cytology group had significantly lower TSH levels compared to other cytology groups (p < 0.05, all). Patients with malignant final histopathology in ND and AUS/FLUS cytology groups had significantly higher TSH levels compared to patients with benign final histopathology (p < 0.05, all). Moreover, TSH levels showed to increase from Bethesda categories II to VI. In addition to cytology, higher TSH levels can be used as a supplementary marker in prediction of malignancy in certain Bethesda categories. PMID:26972701

  19. Thrombospondin-1 interacts with Trypanosoma cruzi surface calreticulin to enhance cellular infection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Candice A; Kleshchenko, Yulia Y; Ikejiani, Adaeze O; Udoko, Aniekanabasi N; Cardenas, Tatiana C; Pratap, Siddharth; Duquette, Mark A; Lima, Maria F; Lawler, Jack; Villalta, Fernando; Nde, Pius N

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which is a neglected tropical disease that produces severe pathology and mortality. The mechanisms by which the parasite invades cells are not well elucidated. We recently reported that T. cruzi up-regulates the expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) to enhance the process of cellular invasion. Here we characterize a novel TSP-1 interaction with T. cruzi that enhances cellular infection. We show that labeled TSP-1 interacts specifically with the surface of T. cruzi trypomastigotes. We used TSP-1 to pull down interacting parasite surface proteins that were identified by mass spectrometry. We also show that full length TSP-1 and the N-terminal domain of TSP-1 (NTSP) interact with T. cruzi surface calreticulin (TcCRT) and other surface proteins. Pre-exposure of recombinant NTSP or TSP-1 to T. cruzi significantly enhances cellular infection of wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) compared to the C-terminal domain of TSP-1, E3T3C1. In addition, blocking TcCRT with antibodies significantly inhibits the enhancement of cellular infection mediated by the TcCRT-TSP-1 interaction. Taken together, our findings indicate that TSP-1 interacts with TcCRT on the surface of T. cruzi through the NTSP domain and that this interaction enhances cellular infection. Thus surface TcCRT is a virulent factor that enhances the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection through TSP-1, which is up-regulated by the parasite. PMID:22808206

  20. Chromatin dynamics during cellular differentiation in the female reproductive lineage of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Baroux, Célia; Autran, Daphné

    2015-07-01

    Sexual reproduction in flowering plants offers a number of remarkable aspects to developmental biologists. First, the spore mother cells - precursors of the plant reproductive lineage - are specified late in development, as opposed to precocious germline isolation during embryogenesis in most animals. Second, unlike in most animals where meiosis directly produces gametes, plant meiosis entails the differentiation of a multicellular, haploid gametophyte, within which gametic as well as non-gametic accessory cells are formed. These observations raise the question of the factors inducing and modus operandi of cell fate transitions that originate in floral tissues and gametophytes, respectively. Cell fate transitions in the reproductive lineage imply cellular reprogramming operating at the physiological, cytological and transcriptome level, but also at the chromatin level. A number of observations point to large-scale chromatin reorganization events associated with cellular differentiation of the female spore mother cells and of the female gametes. These include a reorganization of the heterochromatin compartment, the genome-wide alteration of the histone modification landscape, and the remodeling of nucleosome composition. The dynamic expression of DNA methyltransferases and actors of small RNA pathways also suggest additional, global epigenetic alterations that remain to be characterized. Are these events a cause or a consequence of cellular differentiation, and how do they contribute to cell fate transition? Does chromatin dynamics induce competence for immediate cellular functions (meiosis, fertilization), or does it also contribute long-term effects in cellular identity and developmental competence of the reproductive lineage? This review attempts to review these fascinating questions. PMID:26031902

  1. Thrombospondin-1 Interacts with Trypanosoma cruzi Surface Calreticulin to Enhance Cellular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Candice A.; Kleshchenko, Yulia Y.; Ikejiani, Adaeze O.; Udoko, Aniekanabasi N.; Cardenas, Tatiana C.; Pratap, Siddharth; Duquette, Mark A.; Lima, Maria F.; Lawler, Jack; Villalta, Fernando; Nde, Pius N.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which is a neglected tropical disease that produces severe pathology and mortality. The mechanisms by which the parasite invades cells are not well elucidated. We recently reported that T. cruzi up-regulates the expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) to enhance the process of cellular invasion. Here we characterize a novel TSP-1 interaction with T. cruzi that enhances cellular infection. We show that labeled TSP-1 interacts specifically with the surface of T. cruzi trypomastigotes. We used TSP-1 to pull down interacting parasite surface proteins that were identified by mass spectrometry. We also show that full length TSP-1 and the N-terminal domain of TSP-1 (NTSP) interact with T. cruzi surface calreticulin (TcCRT) and other surface proteins. Pre-exposure of recombinant NTSP or TSP-1 to T. cruzi significantly enhances cellular infection of wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) compared to the C-terminal domain of TSP-1, E3T3C1. In addition, blocking TcCRT with antibodies significantly inhibits the enhancement of cellular infection mediated by the TcCRT-TSP-1 interaction. Taken together, our findings indicate that TSP-1 interacts with TcCRT on the surface of T. cruzi through the NTSP domain and that this interaction enhances cellular infection. Thus surface TcCRT is a virulent factor that enhances the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection through TSP-1, which is up-regulated by the parasite. PMID:22808206

  2. Aging cellular networks: chaperones as major participants.

    PubMed

    Soti, C; Csermely, P

    2007-01-01

    We increasingly rely on the network approach to understand the complexity of cellular functions. Chaperones (heat shock proteins) are key "networkers", which sequester and repair damaged proteins. In order to link the network approach and chaperones with the aging process, we first summarize the properties of aging networks suggesting a "weak link theory of aging". This theory suggests that age-related random damage primarily affects the overwhelming majority of the low affinity, transient interactions (weak links) in cellular networks leading to increased noise, destabilization and diversity. These processes may be further amplified by age-specific network remodelling and by the sequestration of weakly linked cellular proteins to protein aggregates of aging cells. Chaperones are weakly linked hubs (i.e., network elements with a large number of connections) and inter-modular bridge elements of protein-protein interaction, signalling and mitochondrial networks. As aging proceeds, the increased overload of damaged proteins is an especially important element contributing to cellular disintegration and destabilization. Additionally, chaperone overload may contribute to the increase of "noise" in aging cells, which leads to an increased stochastic resonance resulting in a deficient discrimination between signals and noise. Chaperone- and other multi-target therapies, which restore the missing weak links in aging cellular networks, may emerge as important anti-aging interventions. PMID:16814508

  3. Genome-wide expression analysis upon constitutive activation of the HacA bZIP transcription factor in Aspergillus niger reveals a coordinated cellular response to counteract ER stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HacA/Xbp1 is a conserved bZIP transcription factor in eukaryotic cells which regulates gene expression in response to various forms of secretion stress and as part of secretory cell differentiation. In the present study, we replaced the endogenous hacA gene of an Aspergillus niger strain with a gene encoding a constitutively active form of the HacA transcription factor (HacACA). The impact of constitutive HacA activity during exponential growth was explored in bioreactor controlled cultures using transcriptomic analysis to identify affected genes and processes. Results Transcription profiles for the wild-type strain (HacAWT) and the HacACA strain were obtained using Affymetrix GeneChip analysis of three replicate batch cultures of each strain. In addition to the well known HacA targets such as the ER resident foldases and chaperones, GO enrichment analysis revealed up-regulation of genes involved in protein glycosylation, phospholipid biosynthesis, intracellular protein transport, exocytosis and protein complex assembly in the HacACA mutant. Biological processes over-represented in the down-regulated genes include those belonging to central metabolic pathways, translation and transcription. A remarkable transcriptional response in the HacACA strain was the down-regulation of the AmyR transcription factor and its target genes. Conclusions The results indicate that the constitutive activation of the HacA leads to a coordinated regulation of the folding and secretion capacity of the cell, but with consequences on growth and fungal physiology to reduce secretion stress. PMID:22846479

  4. Cellular Contraction and Polarization Drive Collective Cellular Motion.

    PubMed

    Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Utuje, Kazage J C; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-06-21

    Coordinated motions of close-packed multicellular systems typically generate cooperative packs, swirls, and clusters. These cooperative motions are driven by active cellular forces, but the physical nature of these forces and how they generate collective cellular motion remain poorly understood. Here, we study forces and motions in a confined epithelial monolayer and make two experimental observations: 1) the direction of local cellular motion deviates systematically from the direction of the local traction exerted by each cell upon its substrate; and 2) oscillating waves of cellular motion arise spontaneously. Based on these observations, we propose a theory that connects forces and motions using two internal state variables, one of which generates an effective cellular polarization, and the other, through contractile forces, an effective cellular inertia. In agreement with theoretical predictions, drugs that inhibit contractility reduce both the cellular effective elastic modulus and the frequency of oscillations. Together, theory and experiment provide evidence suggesting that collective cellular motion is driven by at least two internal variables that serve to sustain waves and to polarize local cellular traction in a direction that deviates systematically from local cellular velocity. PMID:27332131

  5. Inducing cellular senescence using defined genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Opitz, Oliver G

    2007-01-01

    Cellular senescence is generally defined as an irreversible state of G1 cell cycle arrest in which cells are refractory to growth factor stimulation. Cellular senescence can be induced through several different mechanisms. Primary mammalian cells display a finite life span, suggesting a mechanism that counts cell divisions. Those cells initially proliferate but eventually enter a state of permanent growth arrest, called replicative senescence. Erosion of telomeric DNA has emerged as a key factor in replicative senescence, which is antagonized during cell immortalization. Nevertheless, besides telomere shortening, there are other mechanisms inducing a growth arrest similar to the replicative senescencent phenotype. Oncogenic or mitogenic signals as well as DNA damage can induce such a phenotype of cellular senescence. All forms of cellular senescence share common signaling pathways and morphological features. Thereby, p53 seems to be essential for the senescence response. Many of these senescence inducing mechanisms can be experimentally recapitulated by the introduction of defined genetic elements. Replicative senescence due to telomere shortening can, for example, be induced by a dominant negative version of telomerase, premature senescence by the overexpression of oncogenic ras, or p16. PMID:17634581

  6. Cellular basis of memory for addiction.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    DESPITE THE IMPORTANCE OF NUMEROUS PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, AT ITS CORE, DRUG ADDICTION INVOLVES A BIOLOGICAL PROCESS: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of "cellular or molecular memory." Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of "behavioral memory," perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders. PMID:24459410

  7. Cellular Host Responses to Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Barish, Michael E.; Garcia, Elizabeth; Metz, Marianne Z.; Myers, Sarah M.; Gutova, Margarita; Frank, Richard T.; Miletic, Hrvoje; Kendall, Stephen E.; Glackin, Carlotta A.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Aboody, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive type of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Molecular and genetic analysis has advanced our understanding of glioma biology, however mapping the cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment is crucial for understanding the pathology of this dreaded brain cancer. In this study we identified major cell populations attracted by glioma using orthotopic rodent models of human glioma xenografts. Marker-specific, anatomical and morphological analyses revealed a robust influx of host cells into the main tumor bed and tumor satellites. Methodology/Principal Findings Human glioma cell lines and glioma spheroid orthotopic implants were used in rodents. In both models, the xenografts recruited large numbers of host nestin-expressing cells, which formed a ‘network’ with glioma. The host nestin-expressing cells appeared to originate in the subventricular zone ipsilateral to the tumor, and were clearly distinguishable from pericytes that expressed smooth muscle actin. These distinct cell populations established close physical contact in a ‘pair-wise’ manner and migrated together to the deeper layers of tumor satellites and gave rise to tumor vasculature. The GBM biopsy xenografts displayed two different phenotypes: (a) low-generation tumors (first in vivo passage in rats) were highly invasive and non-angiogenic, and host nestin-positive cells that infiltrated into these tumors displayed astrocytic or elongated bipolar morphology; (b) high-generation xenografts (fifth passage) had pronounced cellularity, were angiogenic with ‘glomerulus-like’ microvascular proliferations that contained host nestin-positive cells. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 were highly expressed in and around glioma xenografts, suggesting their role in glioma progression and invasion. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate a robust migration of nestin-expressing host cells to glioma, which

  8. Engineering Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-03-10

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds, and pharmaceuticals. However, making cells into efficient factories is challenging because cells have evolved robust metabolic networks with hard-wired, tightly regulated lines of communication between molecular pathways that resist efforts to divert resources. Here, we will review the current status and challenges of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation. PMID:26967285

  9. Cellular Morphogenesis In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Troy; Chun, Young; Caicedo-Carvajal, Carlos; Foty, Ramsey

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We describe a model that simulates spherical cells of different types that can migrate and interact either attractively or repulsively. We find that both expected morphologies and previously unreported patterns spontaneously self-assemble. Among the newly discovered patterns are a segmented state of alternating discs, and a “shish-kebab” state, in which one cell type forms a ring around a second type. We show that these unique states result from cellular attraction that increases with distance (e.g., as membranes stretch viscoelastically), and would not be seen in traditional, e.g., molecular, potentials that diminish with distance. Most of the states found computationally have been observed in vitro, and it remains to be established what role these self-assembled states may play in in vivo morphogenesis. PMID:19686642

  10. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  11. FIH Regulates Cellular Metabolism through Hydroxylation of the Deubiquitinase OTUB1

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Carsten C.; Rodriguez, Javier; Pickel, Christina; Burr, Stephen; Fabrizio, Jacqueline-alba; Nolan, Karen A.; Spielmann, Patrick; Cavadas, Miguel A. S.; Crifo, Bianca; Halligan, Doug N.; Nathan, James A.; Peet, Daniel J.; Wenger, Roland H.; Von Kriegsheim, Alex; Cummins, Eoin P.; Taylor, Cormac T.

    2016-01-01

    The asparagine hydroxylase, factor inhibiting HIF (FIH), confers oxygen-dependence upon the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a master regulator of the cellular adaptive response to hypoxia. Studies investigating whether asparagine hydroxylation is a general regulatory oxygen-dependent modification have identified multiple non-HIF targets for FIH. However, the functional consequences of this outside of the HIF pathway remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the deubiquitinase ovarian tumor domain containing ubiquitin aldehyde binding protein 1 (OTUB1) is a substrate for hydroxylation by FIH on N22. Mutation of N22 leads to a profound change in the interaction of OTUB1 with proteins important in cellular metabolism. Furthermore, in cultured cells, overexpression of N22A mutant OTUB1 impairs cellular metabolic processes when compared to wild type. Based on these data, we hypothesize that OTUB1 is a target for functional hydroxylation by FIH. Additionally, we propose that our results provide new insight into the regulation of cellular energy metabolism during hypoxic stress and the potential for targeting hydroxylases for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26752685

  12. Additively Manufactured 3D Porous Ti-6Al-4V Constructs Mimic Trabecular Bone Structure and Regulate Osteoblast Proliferation, Differentiation and Local Factor Production in a Porosity and Surface Roughness Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Alice; Humayun, Aiza; Cohen, David J.; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing by laser sintering is able to produce high resolution metal constructs for orthopaedic and dental implants. In this study, we used a human trabecular bone template to design and manufacture Ti-6Al-4V constructs with varying porosity via laser sintering. Characterization of constructs revealed interconnected porosities ranging from 15–70% with compressive moduli of 2063–2954 MPa. These constructs with macro porosity were further surface-treated to create a desirable multi-scale micro-/nano-roughness, which has been shown to enhance the osseointegration process. Osteoblasts (MG63 cells) exhibited high viability when grown on the constructs. Proliferation (DNA) and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALP), an early differentiation marker, decreased as porosity increased, while osteocalcin (OCN), a late differentiation marker, as well as osteoprotegerin (OPG), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 4 (BMP2, BMP4) increased with increasing porosity. 3D constructs with the highest porosity and surface modification supported the greatest osteoblast differentiation and local factor production. These results indicate that additively manufactured 3D porous constructs mimicking human trabecular bone and produced with additional surface treatment can be customized for increased osteoblast response. Increased factors for osteoblast maturation and differentiation on high porosity constructs suggest the enhanced performance of these surfaces for increasing osseointegration in vivo. PMID:25287305

  13. Lipid Droplets: A Key Cellular Organelle Associated with Cancer Cell Survival under Normoxia and Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    The Warburg effect describes the phenomenon by which cancer cells obtain energy from glycolysis even under normoxic (O₂-sufficient) conditions. Tumor tissues are generally exposed to hypoxia owing to inefficient and aberrant vasculature. Cancer cells have multiple molecular mechanisms to adapt to such stress conditions by reprogramming the cellular metabolism. Hypoxia-inducible factors are major transcription factors induced in cancer cells in response to hypoxia that contribute to the metabolic changes. In addition, cancer cells within hypoxic tumor areas have reduced access to serum components such as nutrients and lipids. However, the effect of such serum factor deprivation on cancer cell biology in the context of tumor hypoxia is not fully understood. Cancer cells are lipid-rich under normoxia and hypoxia, leading to the increased generation of a cellular organelle, the lipid droplet (LD). In recent years, the LD-mediated stress response mechanisms of cancer cells have been revealed. This review focuses on the production and functions of LDs in various types of cancer cells in relation to the associated cellular environment factors including tissue oxygenation status and metabolic mechanisms. This information will contribute to the current understanding of how cancer cells adapt to diverse tumor environments to promote their survival. PMID:27589734

  14. Survey of cellular radiosensitivity parameters.

    PubMed

    Katz, R; Zachariah, R; Cucinotta, F A; Zhang, C

    1994-12-01

    A model of the formation of particle tracks in emulsion has been extended through the use of biological target theory to formulate a theory of the response of biological cells and molecules of biological importance to irradiation with energetic heavy ions. For this purpose the response to gamma rays is represented by the single-hit, multitarget model with parameters m and D0, while additional parameters kappa (or a0) and sigma 0 are required to represent the size of internal cellular targets and the effective cross-sectional area of the cell nucleus, respectively, for heavy-ion bombardments. For one-or-more-hit detectors, only the first three of these parameters are required and m = 1. For cells m is typically 2 or more. The model is developed from the concept that response to secondary electrons follows the same functional form for gamma rays and for the gamma rays surrounding an ion's path. Originally applied to dry enzymes and viruses in 1967, the model of the one-hit detector has been extended to emulsions, to other physical and chemical detectors, to single- and double-strand breaks in DNA in EO buffer and to three E. coli strains. The two-hit response has been observed for "track core" effects in radiation chemistry, for supralinearity in thermoluminescent dosimeters and for desensitized nuclear emulsions, where hit numbers up to 6 have been observed. In its extension to biological cells, additional concepts are required relating to the character of the track, namely the grain-count and track-width regimes, and to the ability of multitarget systems to acquire damage from intertrack delta rays (called gamma kill) as well as from intratrack delta rays (called ion kill). The model has been applied to some 40 sets of radiobiological data obtained from gamma, track-segment heavy-ion and neutron irradiations. Here we elaborate on the meaning of these concepts, tabulate the cellular parameters, and display their systematic behavior and the relationships among them

  15. Light weight cellular structures based on aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, O.; Embury, J.D.; Sinclair, C.; Sang, H.; Silvetti, P.

    1997-02-01

    An interesting form of lightweight material which has emerged in the past 2 decades is metallic foam. This paper deals with the basic concepts of making metallic foams and a detailed study of foams produced from Al-SiC. In addition, some aspects of cellular solids based on honeycomb structures are outlined including the concept of producing both two-phase foams and foams with composite walls.

  16. [Caloric restriction: about its positive metabolic effects and cellular impact].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Bautista, Raúl Julián; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos Alberto; Monroy-Guzmán, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Caloric restriction, as a 30 to 60% decrease of ad libitum balanced caloric intake, without malnutrition, is the non-genetic strategy that has consistently extended the average and maximum lifespan of most living beings, and it has been tested from unicellular organisms like yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Rhesus primates. In addition, various genetic and pharmacological caloric restriction models have shown to protect against cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Primate studies suggest that this intervention delays the onset of age-related diseases; in humans, it has physiological, biochemical and metabolic effects decreasing diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factor. Although currently the mechanism by which caloric restriction has its positive effects at the cellular level is unknown, it has been reported to decrease oxidative stress and increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25125067

  17. Cellular energy metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, M.

    1991-06-01

    Studies have been carried out on adenylate kinase which is an important enzyme in determining the concentrations of the adenine nucleotides. An efficient method has been developed to clone mutant adenylate kinase genes in E. coli. Site-specific mutagenesis of the wild type gene also has been used to obtain forms of adenylate kinase with altered amino acids. The wild type and mutant forms of adenylate kinase have been overexpressed and large quantities were readily isolated. The kinetic and fluorescence properties of the different forms of adenylate kinase were characterized. This has led to a new model for the location of the AMP and ATP bindings sites on the enzyme and a proposal for the mechanism of substrate inhibition. Crystals of the wild type enzyme were obtained that diffract to at least 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. Experiments were also initiated to determine the function of adenylate kinase in vivo. In one set of experiments, E. coli strains with mutations in adenylate kinase showed large changes in cellular nucleotides after reaching the stationary phase in a low phosphate medium. This was caused by selective proteolytic degradation of the mutant adenylate kinase caused by phosphate starvation.

  18. Molecular and Cellular Biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Meyer B.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular and Cellular Biophysics provides advanced undergraduate and graduate students with a foundation in the basic concepts of biophysics. Students who have taken physical chemistry and calculus courses will find this book an accessible and valuable aid in learning how these concepts can be used in biological research. The text provides a rigorous treatment of the fundamental theories in biophysics and illustrates their application with examples. Conformational transitions of proteins are studied first using thermodynamics, and subsequently with kinetics. Allosteric theory is developed as the synthesis of conformational transitions and association reactions. Basic ideas of thermodynamics and kinetics are applied to topics such as protein folding, enzyme catalysis and ion channel permeation. These concepts are then used as the building blocks in a treatment of membrane excitability. Through these examples, students will gain an understanding of the general importance and broad applicability of biophysical principles to biological problems. Offers a unique synthesis of concepts across a wide range of biophysical topics Provides a rigorous theoretical treatment, alongside applications in biological systems Author has been teaching biophysics for nearly 25 years

  19. Electrosurgery with cellular precision.

    PubMed

    Palanker, Daniel V; Vankov, Alexander; Huie, Philip

    2008-02-01

    Electrosurgery, one of the most-often used surgical tools, is a robust but somewhat crude technology that has changed surprisingly little since its invention almost a century ago. Continuous radiofrequency is still used for tissue cutting, with thermal damage extending to hundreds of micrometers. In contrast, lasers developed 70 years later, have been constantly perfected, and the laser-tissue interactions explored in great detail, which has allowed tissue ablation with cellular precision in many laser applications. We discuss mechanisms of tissue damage by electric field, and demonstrate that electrosurgery with properly optimized waveforms and microelectrodes can rival many advanced lasers. Pulsed electric waveforms with burst durations ranging from 10 to 100 micros applied via insulated planar electrodes with 12 microm wide exposed edges produced plasma-mediated dissection of tissues with the collateral damage zone ranging from 2 to 10 microm. Length of the electrodes can vary from micrometers to centimeters and all types of soft tissues-from membranes to cartilage and skin could be dissected in liquid medium and in a dry field. This technology may allow for major improvements in outcomes of the current surgical procedures and development of much more refined surgical techniques. PMID:18270030

  20. Active Cellular Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  1. [Additional administration of dutasteride in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia who did not respond sufficiently to α1-adrenoceptor antagonist : investigation of clinical factors affecting the therapeutic effect of dutasteride].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Mitsunobu; Murai, Tetsuo; Osada, Yutaka; Kawai, Masaki; Kasuga, Jun; Yokomizo, Yumiko; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Nakamura, Mami; Noguchi, Go

    2014-02-01

    We performed additional administration of dutasteride in patients who did not respond sufficiently to α1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) (LUTS/BPH). Among 76 registered patients, efficacy was analyzed in 58 patients. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), subscores for voiding and storage symptoms and quality of life (QOL) on the IPSS, and Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS) were all significantly improved from the third month of administration compared to the time of initiating additional administration of dutasteride. Additional administration of dutasteride also significantly reduced prostate volume, and residual urine with the exception of the sixth month after administration. Age at initiation of administration and voiding symptom subscore on the IPSS were clinical factors affecting the therapeutic effects of dutasteride. The rate of improvement with treatment decreased with increasing age at initiation of dutasteride administration, and increased as voiding symptom subscore on the IPSS increased. Therefore, additional administration of dutasteride appears useful for cases of LUTS/BPH in which a sufficient response is not achieved with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment. Because patients who have severe voiding symptoms or begin dutasteride at an early age may be expected to respond particularly well to dutasteride in terms of clinical efficacy, they were considered to be suitable targets for additional administration. PMID:24755815

  2. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  3. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular...

  4. Intrinsic cellular defenses against human immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Venkatesh, Siddarth; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2012-09-21

    Viral infections are often detrimental to host survival and reproduction. Consequently, hosts have evolved a variety of mechanisms to defend themselves against viruses. A component of this arsenal is a set of proteins, termed restriction factors, which exhibit direct antiviral activity. Among these are several classes of proteins (APOBEC3, TRIM5, Tetherin, and SAMHD1) that inhibit the replication of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses. Here, we outline the features, mechanisms, and evolution of these defense mechanisms. We also speculate on how restriction factors arose, how they might interact with the conventional innate and adaptive immune systems, and how an understanding of these intrinsic cellular defenses might be usefully exploited. PMID:22999946

  5. An automated programmable platform enabling multiplex dynamic stimuli delivery and cellular response monitoring for high-throughput suspension single-cell signaling studies† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4lc01070a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    He, Luye; Kniss, Ariel; San-Miguel, Adriana; Rouse, Tel; Kemp, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling events are orchestrated by dynamic external biochemical cues. By rapidly perturbing cells with dynamic inputs and examining the output from these systems, one could study the structure and dynamic properties of a cellular signaling network. Conventional experimental techniques limit the implementation of these systematic approaches due to the lack of sophistication in manipulating individual cells and the fluid microenvironment around them; existing microfluidic technologies thus far are mainly targeting adherent cells. In this paper we present an automated platform to interrogate suspension cells with dynamic stimuli while simultaneously monitoring cellular responses in a high-throughput manner at single-cell resolution. We demonstrate the use of this platform in an experiment to measure Jurkat T cells in response to distinct dynamic patterns of stimuli; we find cells exhibit highly heterogeneous responses under each stimulation condition. More interestingly, these cells act as low-pass filters, only entrained to the low frequency stimulus signals. We also demonstrate that this platform can be easily programmed to actively generate arbitrary dynamic signals. We envision our platform to be useful in other contexts to study cellular signaling dynamics, which may be difficult using conventional experimental methods. PMID:25609410

  6. Integration of cellular bioenergetics with mitochondrial quality control and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Bradford G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Ballinger, Scott; Dell’Italia, Lou; Zhang, Jianhua; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergetic dysfunction is emerging as a cornerstone for establishing a framework for understanding the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and neurodegeneration. Recent advances in cellular bioenergetics have shown that many cells maintain a substantial bioenergetic reserve capacity, which is a prospective index of “healthy” mitochondrial populations. The bioenergetics of the cell are likely regulated by energy requirements and substrate availability. Additionally, the overall quality of the mitochondrial population and the relative abundance of mitochondria in cells and tissues also impinge on overall bioenergetic capacity and resistance to stress. Because mitochondria are susceptible to damage mediated by reactive oxygen/nitrogen and lipid species, maintaining a “healthy” population of mitochondria through quality control mechanisms appears to be essential for cell survival under conditions of pathological stress. Accumulating evidence suggest that mitophagy is particularly important for preventing amplification of initial oxidative insults, which otherwise would further impair the respiratory chain or promote mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The processes underlying the regulation of mitophagy depend on several factors including the integrity of mtDNA, electron transport chain activity, and the interaction and regulation of the autophagic machinery. The integration and interpretation of cellular bioenergetics in the context of mitochondrial quality control and genetics is the theme of this review. PMID:23092819

  7. Shear loads induce cellular damage in tendon fascicles.

    PubMed

    Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2015-09-18

    Tendon is vital to musculoskeletal function, transferring loads from muscle to bone for joint motion and stability. It is an anisotropic, highly organized, fibrous structure containing primarily type I collagen in addition to tenocytes and other extracellular matrix components contributing to maintenance and function. Tendon is generally loaded via normal stress in a longitudinal direction. However, certain situations, including fiber breakage, enzymatic remodeling, or tendon pathology may introduce various degrees of other loading modalities, such as shear-lag at the fiber level, potentially affecting cellular response and subsequent function. Fascicles from rat tail tendon were dissected and placed in one of three paired groups: intact, single laceration, or double laceration. Each pair had a mechanically tested and control specimen. Single laceration fascicles contained one transverse laceration to mimic a partial tear. Double laceration fascicles had overlapping, longitudinally separated lacerations on opposite sides to cause intra-fascicular shear transfer to be the primary mechanism of loading. Elastic properties of the fascicle, e.g. peak load, steady state load, and stiffness, decreased from intact to single laceration to double laceration groups. Surprisingly, 45% of the intact strength was maintained when shear was the primary internal load transfer mechanism. Cellular viability decreased after mechanical testing in both laceration groups; cell death appeared primarily in a longitudinal plane where high shear load transfer occurred. This cell death extended far from the injury site and may further compromise an already damaged tendon via enzymatic factors and subsequent remodeling associated with cell necrosis. PMID:26162546

  8. Humoral and Cellular Immune Response in Canine Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Miller, J; Popiel, J; Chełmońska-Soyta, A

    2015-07-01

    Hypothyroidism is one of the most common endocrine diseases in dogs and is generally considered to be autoimmune in nature. In human hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is destroyed by both cellular (i.e. autoreactive helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes) and humoral (i.e. autoantibodies specific for thyroglobulin, thyroxine and triiodothyronine) effector mechanisms. Other suggested factors include impaired peripheral immune suppression (i.e. the malfunction of regulatory T cells) or an additional pro-inflammatory effect of T helper 17 lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunological changes in canine hypothyroidism. Twenty-eight clinically healthy dogs, 25 hypothyroid dogs without thyroglobulin antibodies and eight hypothyroid dogs with these autoantibodies were enrolled into the study. There were alterations in serum proteins in hypothyroid dogs compared with healthy controls (i.e. raised concentrations of α-globulins, β2- and γ-globulins) as well as higher concentration of acute phase proteins and circulating immune complexes. Hypothyroid animals had a lower CD4:CD8 ratio in peripheral blood compared with control dogs and diseased dogs also had higher expression of interferon γ (gene and protein expression) and CD28 (gene expression). Similar findings were found in both groups of hypothyroid dogs. Canine hypothyroidism is therefore characterized by systemic inflammation with dominance of a cellular immune response. PMID:25958183

  9. MSAT and cellular hybrid networking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranowsky, Patrick W., II

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation is developing both the Communications Ground Segment and the Series 1000 Mobile Phone for American Mobile Satellite Corporation's (AMSC's) Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the voice services portion of this system depends, to some extent, upon the interoperability of the cellular network and the satellite communication circuit switched communication channels. This paper will describe the set of user-selectable cellular interoperable modes (cellular first/satellite second, etc.) provided by the Mobile Phone and described how they are implemented with the ground segment. Topics including roaming registration and cellular-to-satellite 'seamless' call handoff will be discussed, along with the relevant Interim Standard IS-41 Revision B Cellular Radiotelecommunications Intersystem Operations and IOS-553 Mobile Station - Land Station Compatibility Specification.

  10. AIRTRAQ8 OPTICAL LARYNGOSCOPE FOR TRACHEAL INTUBATION IN A PATIENT WITH AN UNCOMMON GIANT LIPOMA ON THE POSTERIOR ASPECT OF NECK AND ADDITIONAL RISK FACTORS OF ANTICIPATED DIFFICULT AIRWAY: A CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Vassilios; El Kouny, Amr; Al Harbi, Mohammed; Wambi, Freddie; Tawfeeq, Nasser; Tanweer, Aziz; Al Atassi, Abdulallem; Geldhof, Georges

    2015-10-01

    Patients with restricted neck movement present a difficult airway situation because of improper positioning and inadequate extension of the atlanto-occipital joint. The Airtraq optical laryngoscope is a new single use device that permits an indirect view of the glottis without the need to achieve a direct line of sight by conventional use of the 'sniffing position'. We present and discuss a case of uncommon giant lipoma (16 x 12 x 10 cm) in the posterior aspect of the neck in addition with other independent factors of anticipated difficult airway, intubated successfully in the semi-lateral position with the use of Airtraq. PMID:26860029

  11. Wnt7a is a novel inducer of β-catenin-independent tumor-suppressive cellular senescence in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bikkavilli, R K; Avasarala, S; Van Scoyk, M; Arcaroli, J; Brzezinski, C; Zhang, W; Edwards, M G; Rathinam, M K K; Zhou, T; Tauler, J; Borowicz, S; Lussier, Y A; Parr, B A; Cool, C D; Winn, R A

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an initial barrier for carcinogenesis. However, the signaling mechanisms that trigger cellular senescence are incompletely understood, particularly in vivo. Here we identify Wnt7a as a novel upstream inducer of cellular senescence. In two different mouse strains (C57Bl/6J and FVB/NJ), we show that the loss of Wnt7a is a major contributing factor for increased lung tumorigenesis owing to reduced cellular senescence, and not reduced apoptosis, or autophagy. Wnt7a-null mice under de novo conditions and in both the strains display E-cadherin-to-N-cadherin switch, reduced expression of cellular senescence markers and reduced expression of senescence-associated secretory phenotype, indicating a genetic predisposition of these mice to increased carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Interestingly, Wnt7a induced an alternate senescence pathway, which was independent of β-catenin, and distinct from that of classical oncogene-induced senescence mediated by the well-known p16INK4a and p19ARF pathways. Mechanistically, Wnt7a induced cellular senescence via inactivation of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2, an important alternate regulator of cellular senescence. Additionally, we identified Iloprost, a prostacyclin analog, which initiates downstream signaling cascades similar to that of Wnt7a, as a novel inducer of cellular senescence, presenting potential future clinical translational strategies. Thus pro-senescence therapies using either Wnt7a or its mimic, Iloprost, might represent a new class of therapeutic treatments for lung cancer. PMID:25728679

  12. Global functional analyses of cellular responses to pore-forming toxins.

    PubMed

    Kao, Cheng-Yuan; Los, Ferdinand C O; Huffman, Danielle L; Wachi, Shinichiro; Kloft, Nicole; Husmann, Matthias; Karabrahimi, Valbona; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Bellier, Audrey; Ha, Christine; Sagong, Youn; Fan, Hui; Ghosh, Partho; Hsieh, Mindy; Hsu, Chih-Shen; Chen, Li; Aroian, Raffi V

    2011-03-01

    Here we present the first global functional analysis of cellular responses to pore-forming toxins (PFTs). PFTs are uniquely important bacterial virulence factors, comprising the single largest class of bacterial protein toxins and being important for the pathogenesis in humans of many Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. Their mode of action is deceptively simple, poking holes in the plasma membrane of cells. The scattered studies to date of PFT-host cell interactions indicate a handful of genes are involved in cellular defenses to PFTs. How many genes are involved in cellular defenses against PFTs and how cellular defenses are coordinated are unknown. To address these questions, we performed the first genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen for genes that, when knocked down, result in hypersensitivity to a PFT. This screen identifies 106 genes (∼0.5% of genome) in seven functional groups that protect Caenorhabditis elegans from PFT attack. Interactome analyses of these 106 genes suggest that two previously identified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, one (p38) studied in detail and the other (JNK) not, form a core PFT defense network. Additional microarray, real-time PCR, and functional studies reveal that the JNK MAPK pathway, but not the p38 MAPK pathway, is a key central regulator of PFT-induced transcriptional and functional responses. We find C. elegans activator protein 1 (AP-1; c-jun, c-fos) is a downstream target of the JNK-mediated PFT protection pathway, protects C. elegans against both small-pore and large-pore PFTs and protects human cells against a large-pore PFT. This in vivo RNAi genomic study of PFT responses proves that cellular commitment to PFT defenses is enormous, demonstrates the JNK MAPK pathway as a key regulator of transcriptionally-induced PFT defenses, and identifies AP-1 as the first cellular component broadly important for defense against large- and small-pore PFTs. PMID:21408619

  13. Opposite Prognostic Significance of Cellular and Serum Circulating MicroRNA-150 in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stamatopoulos, Basile; Van Damme, Michaël; Crompot, Emerence; Dessars, Barbara; Housni, Hakim El; Mineur, Philippe; Meuleman, Nathalie; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (or miRs) play a crucial role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) physiopathology and prognosis. In addition, circulating microRNAs in body fluids have been proposed as new biomarkers. We investigated the expression of matched cellular and serum circulating microRNA-150 by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) from purified CD19+ cells or from CLL serums obtained at diagnosis in a cohort of 273/252 CLL patients with a median follow-up of 78 months (range 7–380) and correlated it to other biological or clinical parameters. We showed that miR-150 was significantly overexpressed in CLL cells/serums compared with healthy subjects (P < 0.0001). Among CLL patients, a low cellular miR-150 expression level was associated with tumor burden, disease aggressiveness and poor prognostic factors. In contrast, a high level of serum miR-150 was associated with tumor burden markers and some markers of poor prognosis. Similarly, cellular and serum miR-150 also predicted treatment-free survival (TFS) and overall survival (OS) in an opposite manner: patients with low cellular/serum miR-150 levels have median TFS of 40/111 months compared with high-level patients who have a median TFS of 122/60 months (P < 0.0001/P = 0.0066). Similar results were observed for OS. We also found that cellular and serum miR-150 levels vary in an opposite manner during disease progression and that cellular miR-150 could be regulated by its release into the extracellular space. Cellular and serum levels of miR-150 are associated with opposite clinical prognoses and could be used to molecularly monitor disease evolution as a new prognostic factor in CLL. PMID:25584781

  14. Microfluidic Devices for the Measurement of Cellular Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrell, Adrian M.; Mukhitov, Nikita; Yi, Lian; Wang, Xue; Roper, Michael G.

    2016-06-01

    The release of chemical information from cells and tissues holds the key to understanding cellular behavior and dysfunction. The development of methodologies that can measure cellular secretion in a time-dependent fashion is therefore essential. Often these measurements are made difficult by the high-salt conditions of the cellular environment, the presence of numerous other secreted factors, and the small mass samples that are produced when frequent sampling is used to resolve secretory dynamics. In this review, the methods that we have developed for measuring hormone release from islets of Langerhans are dissected to illustrate the practical difficulties of studying cellular secretions. Other methods from the literature are presented that provide alternative approaches to particularly challenging areas of monitoring cellular secretion. The examples presented in this review serve as case studies and should be adaptable to other cell types and systems for unique applications.

  15. Leucocyte cellular adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Yong, K; Khwaja, A

    1990-12-01

    Leucocytes express adhesion promoting receptors which mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These adhesive interactions are crucial to the regulation of haemopoiesis and thymocyte maturation, the direction and control of leucocyte traffic and migration through tissues, and in the development of immune and non-immune inflammatory responses. Several families of adhesion receptors have been identified (Table). The leucocyte integrin family comprises 3 alpha beta heterodimeric membrane glycoproteins which share a common beta subunit, designated CD18. The alpha subunits of each of the 3 members, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1) and p150,95 are designated CD11a, b and c respectively. These adhesion molecules play a critical part in the immune and inflammatory responses of leucocytes. The leucocyte integrin family is, in turn, part of the integrin superfamily, members of which are evolutionally, structurally and functionally related. Another Integrin subfamily found on leucocytes is the VLA group, so-called because the 'very late activation antigens' VLA-1 and VLA-2 were originally found to appear late in T-cell activation. Members of this family function mainly as extracellular matrix adhesion receptors and are found both on haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. They play a part in diverse cellular functions including tissue organisation, lymphocyte recirculation and T-cell immune responses. A third integrin subfamily, the cytoadhesins, are receptors on platelets and endothelial cells which bind extracellular matrix proteins. A second family of adhesion receptors is the immunoglobulin superfamily, members of which include CD2, LFA-3 and ICAM-1, which participate in T-cell adhesive interactions, and the antigen-specific receptors of T and B cells, CD4, CD8 and the MHC Class I and II molecules. A recently recognised family of adhesion receptors is the selectins, characterised by a common lectin domain. Leucocyte

  16. Cellular Functions of Transient Receptor Potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Dadon, Daniela; Minke, Baruch

    2010-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential channels are polymodal cellular sensors involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, mainly by increasing cellular Ca2+. In this review we focus on the roles of these channels in: i) cell death ii) proliferation and differentiation and iii) synaptic vesicle release. Cell death Ca2+ influx participates in apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The Ca2+ permeability and high sensitivity of part of these channels to oxidative/metabolic stress make them important participants in cell death. Several examples are given. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 is activated by H2O2, inducing cell death through an increase in cellular Ca2+ and activation of Poly ADP-Ribose Polymerase. Exposure of cultured cortical neurons to oxygen-glucose deprivation, in vitro, causes cell death via cation influx, mediated by Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7. Metabolic stress constitutively activates the Ca2+ permeable Transient Receptor Potential channels of Drosophila photoreceptor in the dark, potentially leading to retinal degeneration. Similar sensitivity to metabolic stress characterizes several mammalian Transient Receptor Potential Canonical channels. Proliferation and differentiation The rise in cytosolic Ca2+ induces cell growth, differentiation and proliferation via activation of several transcription factors. Activation a variety of store operated and Transient Receptor Potential channels cause a rise in cytosolic Ca2+, making these channels components involved in proliferation and differentiation. Synaptic vesicle release Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 channels reside in synaptic vesicles and regulate neurotransmitter release by a mechanism that is not entirely clear. All the above features of Transient Receptor Potential channels make them crucial components in important, sometimes conflicting, cellular processes that still need to be explored. PMID:20399884

  17. Cellular cardiomyoplasty: what have we learned?

    PubMed

    Kao, Race L; Browder, William; Li, Chuanfu

    2009-01-01

    Restoring blood flow, improving perfusion, reducing clinical symptoms, and augmenting ventricular function are the goals after acute myocardial infarction. Other than cardiac transplantation, no standard clinical procedure is available to restore damaged myocardium. Since we first reported cellular cardiomyoplasty in 1989, successful outcomes have been confirmed by experimental and clinical studies, but definitive long-term efficacy requires large-scale placebo-controlled double-blind randomized trials. On meta-analysis, stem cell-treated groups had significantly improved left ventricular ejection fraction, reduced infarct scar size, and decreased left ventricular end-systolic volume. Fewer myocardial infarctions, deaths, readmissions for heart failure, and repeat revascularizations were additional benefits. Encouraging clinical findings have been reported using satellite or bone marrow stem cells, but understanding of the benefit mechanisms demands additional studies. Adult mammalian ventricular myocardium lacks adequate regeneration capability, and cellular cardiomyoplasty offers a new way to overcome this; the poor retention and engraftment rate and high apoptotic rate of the implanted stem cells limit outcomes. The ideal type and number of cells, optimal timing of cell therapy, and ideal cell delivery method depend on determining the beneficial mechanisms. Cellular cardiomyoplasty has progressed rapidly in the last decade. A critical review may help us to better plan the future direction. PMID:19515892

  18. Mapping of cellular iron using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Eung Seok; Heo, Chaejeong; Kim, Ji Seon; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jong Min

    2013-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive dopaminergic cell loss in the substantianigra (SN) and elevated iron levels demonstrated by autopsy and with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Direct visualization of iron with live imaging techniques has not yet been successful. The aim of this study is to visualize and quantify the distribution of cellular iron using an intrinsic iron hyperspectral fluorescence signal. The 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced cellular model of PD was established in SHSY5Y cells. The cells were exposed to iron by treatment with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC, 100 μM) for up to 6 hours. The hyperspectral fluorescence imaging signal of iron was examined usinga high- resolution dark-field optical microscope system with signal absorption for the visible/ near infrared (VNIR) spectral range. The 6-hour group showed heavy cellular iron deposition compared with the small amount of iron accumulation in the 1-hour group. The cellular iron was dispersed in a small, particulate form, whereas extracellular iron was detected in an aggregated form. In addition, iron particles were found to be concentrated on the cell membrane/edge of shrunken cells. The cellular iron accumulation readily occurred in MPP+-induced cells, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating elevated iron levels in the SN in PD. This direct iron imaging methodology could be applied to analyze the physiological role of iron in PD, and its application might be expanded to various neurological disorders involving other metals, such as copper, manganese or zinc.

  19. Molecular features of cellular reprogramming and development.

    PubMed

    Smith, Zachary D; Sindhu, Camille; Meissner, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Differentiating somatic cells are progressively restricted to specialized functions during ontogeny, but they can be experimentally directed to form other cell types, including those with complete embryonic potential. Early nuclear reprogramming methods, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and cell fusion, posed significant technical hurdles to precise dissection of the regulatory programmes governing cell identity. However, the discovery of reprogramming by ectopic expression of a defined set of transcription factors, known as direct reprogramming, provided a tractable platform to uncover molecular characteristics of cellular specification and differentiation, cell type stability and pluripotency. We discuss the control and maintenance of cellular identity during developmental transitions as they have been studied using direct reprogramming, with an emphasis on transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. PMID:26883001

  20. Cellular and molecular basis of cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Salvador; Andreu, Abraham; Mecklenburg, Nora; Echevarria, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering, and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification, and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function. PMID:23805080

  1. Cellular basis of memory for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Nestler, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of numerous psychosocial factors, at its core, drug addiction involves a biological process: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of “cellular or molecular memory.” Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of “behavioral memory,” perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders. PMID:24459410

  2. Development of an Insert Co-culture System of Two Cellular Types in the Absence of Cell-Cell Contact.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Justine; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-01-01

    The role of secreted soluble factors in the modification of cellular responses is a recurrent theme in the study of all tissues and systems. In an attempt to make straightforward the very complex relationships between the several cellular subtypes that compose multicellular organisms, in vitro techniques have been developed to help researchers acquire a detailed understanding of single cell populations. One of these techniques uses inserts with a permeable membrane allowing secreted soluble factors to diffuse. Thus, a population of cells grown in inserts can be co-cultured in a well or dish containing a different cell type for evaluating cellular changes following paracrine signaling in the absence of cell-cell contact. Such insert co-culture systems offer various advantages over other co-culture techniques, namely bidirectional signaling, conserved cell polarity and population-specific detection of cellular changes. In addition to being utilized in the field of inflammation, cancer, angiogenesis and differentiation, these co-culture systems are of prime importance in the study of the intricate relationships that exist between the different cellular subtypes present in the central nervous system, particularly in the context of neuroinflammation. This article offers general methodological guidelines in order to set up an experiment in order to evaluating cellular changes mediated by secreted soluble factors using an insert co-culture system. Moreover, a specific protocol to measure the neuroinflammatory effects of cytokines secreted by lipopolysaccharide-activated N9 microglia on neuronal PC12 cells will be detailed, offering a concrete understanding of insert co-culture methodology. PMID:27500972

  3. Influence of cell size on cellular uptake of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinlong; Hu, Xiaohong; Li, Jingchao; Russe, Adriana C Mulero; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yang, Yingnan; Chen, Guoping

    2016-06-24

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have shown great potential for biomedical applications because of their unique physical and structural properties. A critical aspect for their clinical applications is cellular uptake that depends on both particle properties and the cell mechanical state. Despite the numerous studies trying to disclose the influencing factors, the role of cell size on cellular uptake remains unclear. In this study, poly(vinyl alcohol) was micropatterned on tissue culture polystyrene surfaces using UV photolithography to control the cell size, and the influence of cell size on the cellular uptake of gold NPs was investigated. Cells with a large size had a high total cellular uptake, but showed a low average uptake per unit area of cells. Cells with a small size showed opposite behaviors. The results were related to both cell/NP contacting area and membrane tension. A large cell size was beneficial for a high total cellular uptake due to the large contact area with the NPs. On the other hand, the large cell size resulted in high membrane tension that required high wrapping energy for engulfing of NPs and thus reduced the uptake. The two oppositely working effects decided the cellular uptake of NPs. The results would shed light on the influence of the cellular microenvironment on cellular uptake behavior. PMID:27095054

  4. Lysosomal storage disorders: The cellular impact of lysosomal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a family of disorders that result from inherited gene mutations that perturb lysosomal homeostasis. LSDs mainly stem from deficiencies in lysosomal enzymes, but also in some non-enzymatic lysosomal proteins, which lead to abnormal storage of macromolecular substrates. Valuable insights into lysosome functions have emerged from research into these diseases. In addition to primary lysosomal dysfunction, cellular pathways associated with other membrane-bound organelles are perturbed in these disorders. Through selective examples, we illustrate why the term “cellular storage disorders” may be a more appropriate description of these diseases and discuss therapies that can alleviate storage and restore normal cellular function. PMID:23185029

  5. Cellular senescence: when bad things happen to good cells.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Judith; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2007-09-01

    Cells continually experience stress and damage from exogenous and endogenous sources, and their responses range from complete recovery to cell death. Proliferating cells can initiate an additional response by adopting a state of permanent cell-cycle arrest that is termed cellular senescence. Understanding the causes and consequences of cellular senescence has provided novel insights into how cells react to stress, especially genotoxic stress, and how this cellular response can affect complex organismal processes such as the development of cancer and ageing. PMID:17667954

  6. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors sh...

  7. Cellular therapy for haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Roddie, P H; Turner, M L

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the recent progress made in the field of cellular therapeutics in haematological malignancy. The review also examined the role that the National Transfusion Services might play in the manufacture of new cellular therapeutic agents, given both their expertise in the safe provision of blood products and their possession of accredited cell manipulation facilities. Cellular therapy is entering an era in which novel cellular products will find increasing clinical use, particularly in the areas of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and immunotherapy. The production of novel cell-based therapies, both in Europe and North America, is now under strict regulatory control and therefore collaboration with the National Transfusion Services in the manufacture of these agents may well be beneficial if the production standards demanded by the regulatory authorities are to be fulfilled. PMID:12437515

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research. PMID:27557541

  9. Deconstructing the third dimension – how 3D culture microenvironments alter cellular cues

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Much of our understanding of the biological mechanisms that underlie cellular functions, such as migration, differentiation and force-sensing has been garnered from studying cells cultured on two-dimensional (2D) glass or plastic surfaces. However, more recently the cell biology field has come to appreciate the dissimilarity between these flat surfaces and the topographically complex, three-dimensional (3D) extracellular environments in which cells routinely operate in vivo. This has spurred substantial efforts towards the development of in vitro 3D biomimetic environments and has encouraged much cross-disciplinary work among biologists, material scientists and tissue engineers. As we move towards more-physiological culture systems for studying fundamental cellular processes, it is crucial to define exactly which factors are operative in 3D microenvironments. Thus, the focus of this Commentary will be on identifying and describing the fundamental features of 3D cell culture systems that influence cell structure, adhesion, mechanotransduction and signaling in response to soluble factors, which – in turn – regulate overall cellular function in ways that depart dramatically from traditional 2D culture formats. Additionally, we will describe experimental scenarios in which 3D culture is particularly relevant, highlight recent advances in materials engineering for studying cell biology, and discuss examples where studying cells in a 3D context provided insights that would not have been observed in traditional 2D systems. PMID:22797912

  10. Simulating Quantitative Cellular Responses Using Asynchronous Threshold Boolean Network Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With increasing knowledge about the potential mechanisms underlying cellular functions, it is becoming feasible to predict the response of biological systems to genetic and environmental perturbations. Due to the lack of homogeneity in living tissues it is difficult to estimate the physiological effect of chemicals, including potential toxicity. Here we investigate a biologically motivated model for estimating tissue level responses by aggregating the behavior of a cell population. We assume that the molecular state of individual cells is independently governed by discrete non-deterministic signaling mechanisms. This results in noisy but highly reproducible aggregate level responses that are consistent with experimental data. Results We developed an asynchronous threshold Boolean network simulation algorithm to model signal transduction in a single cell, and then used an ensemble of these models to estimate the aggregate response across a cell population. Using published data, we derived a putative crosstalk network involving growth factors and cytokines - i.e., Epidermal Growth Factor, Insulin, Insulin like Growth Factor Type 1, and Tumor Necrosis Factor α - to describe early signaling events in cell proliferation signal transduction. Reproducibility of the modeling technique across ensembles of Boolean networks representing cell populations is investigated. Furthermore, we compare our simulation results to experimental observations of hepatocytes reported in the literature. Conclusion A systematic analysis of the results following differential stimulation of this model by growth factors and cytokines suggests that: (a) using Boolean network ensembles with asynchronous updating provides biologically plausible noisy individual cellular responses with reproducible mean behavior for large cell populations, and (b) with sufficient data our model can estimate the response to different concentrations of extracellular ligands. Our results suggest that this

  11. Spinophilin expression determines cellular growth, cancer stemness and 5-flourouracil resistance in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenbacher, Daniela; Deutsch, Alexander; Perakis, Samantha; Ling, Hui; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George Adrian; Rinner, Beate; Gerger, Armin; Pichler, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The putative tumor suppressor gene spinophilin has been involved in cancer progression in several types of cancer. In this study, we explored the prognostic value of spinophilin expression in 162 colon adenocarcinoma patients. In addition, we generated stably expressing spinophilin-directed shRNA CRC cell lines and studied the influence of spinophilin expression on cellular phenotypes and molecular interactions. We independently confirmed that low spinophilin expression levels are associated with poor prognosis in CRC patients (p = 0.038). A reduction of spinophilin levels in p53 wild-type HCT116 and p53-mutated Caco-2 cells led to increased cellular growth rates and anchorage-independent growth (p<0.05). At molecular level, reduced spinophilin levels increased the expression of the transcription factor E2F-1. In addition, we observed an increased formation of tumor spheres, increased number of CD133 positive cells and an increased resistance to 5-flourouracil (p<0.05). Finally, treatment with the de-methylating agent 5-aza-dC increased spinophilin expression in CRC cells (p<0.05), corroborated by a correlation of spinophilin expression and extent of methylated CpG sites in the gene promoter region (p<0.001). In conclusion, gain of aggressive biological properties of CRC cells including cellular growth, cancer stem cell features and 5-flourouracil resistance partly explains the role of spinophilin in CRC. PMID:25261368

  12. Literature Review on Dynamic Cellular Manufacturing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri Houshyar, A.; Leman, Z.; Pakzad Moghadam, H.; Ariffin, M. K. A. M.; Ismail, N.; Iranmanesh, H.

    2014-06-01

    In previous decades, manufacturers faced a lot of challenges because of globalization and high competition in markets. These problems arise from shortening product life cycle, rapid variation in demand of products, and also rapid changes in manufcaturing technologies. Nowadays most manufacturing companies expend considerable attention for improving flexibility and responsiveness in order to overcome these kinds of problems and also meet customer's needs. By considering the trend toward the shorter product life cycle, the manufacturing environment is towards manufacturing a wide variety of parts in small batches [1]. One of the major techniques which are applied for improving manufacturing competitiveness is Cellular Manufacturing System (CMS). CMS is type of manufacturing system which tries to combine flexibility of job shop and also productivity of flow shop. In addition, Dynamic cellular manufacturing system which considers different time periods for the manufacturing system becomes an important topic and attracts a lot of attention to itself. Therefore, this paper made attempt to have a brief review on this issue and focused on all published paper on this subject. Although, this topic gains a lot of attention to itself during these years, none of previous researchers focused on reviewing the literature of that which can be helpful and useful for other researchers who intend to do the research on this topic. Therefore, this paper is the first study which has focused and reviewed the literature of dynamic cellular manufacturing system.

  13. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  14. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  15. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Y J

    2001-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity resulting from detrimental environmental insults has been recognized for a long time. However, extensive studies of the mechanisms involved had not been undertaken until recent years. Advances in molecular biology provide powerful tools and make such studies possible. We are gathering information about cellular events, signaling pathways, and molecular mechanisms of myocardial toxicologic responses to environmental toxicants and pollutants. Severe acute toxic insults cause cardiac cell death instantly. In the early response to mild environmental stimuli, biochemical changes such as alterations in calcium homeostasis occur. These may lead to cardiac arrhythmia, which most often is reversible. Prolonged stimuli activate transcription factors such as activator protein-1 through elevation of intracellular calcium and the subsequent activation of calcineurin. Upregulation by activated transcription factors of hypertrophic genes results in heart hypertrophy, which is a short-term adaptive response to detrimental factors. However, further development of hypertrophy will lead to severe and irreversible cardiomyopathy, and eventually heart failure. From cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure, myocardial cells undergo extensive biochemical and molecular changes. Cardiac hypertrophy causes tissue hypoperfusion, which activates compensatory mechanisms such as production of angiotensin II and norepinephrine. Both further stimulate cardiac hypertrophy and, importantly, activate counterregulatory mechanisms including overexpression of atrial natriuretic peptide and b-type natriuretic peptide, and production of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha. This counterregulation leads to myocardial remodeling as well as cell death through apoptosis and necrosis. Cell death through activation of mitochondrial factors and other pathways constitutes an important cellular mechanism of heart failure. Our current knowledge of cardiotoxicity is limited. Further extensive

  16. Chromatin dynamics during cellular differentiation in the female reproductive lineage of flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    Baroux, Célia; Autran, Daphné

    2015-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in flowering plants offers a number of remarkable aspects to developmental biologists. First, the spore mother cells – precursors of the plant reproductive lineage – are specified late in development, as opposed to precocious germline isolation during embryogenesis in most animals. Second, unlike in most animals where meiosis directly produces gametes, plant meiosis entails the differentiation of a multicellular, haploid gametophyte, within which gametic as well as non-gametic accessory cells are formed. These observations raise the question of the factors inducing and modus operandi of cell fate transitions that originate in floral tissues and gametophytes, respectively. Cell fate transitions in the reproductive lineage imply cellular reprogramming operating at the physiological, cytological and transcriptome level, but also at the chromatin level. A number of observations point to large-scale chromatin reorganization events associated with cellular differentiation of the female spore mother cells and of the female gametes. These include a reorganization of the heterochromatin compartment, the genome-wide alteration of the histone modification landscape, and the remodeling of nucleosome composition. The dynamic expression of DNA methyltransferases and actors of small RNA pathways also suggest additional, global epigenetic alterations that remain to be characterized. Are these events a cause or a consequence of cellular differentiation, and how do they contribute to cell fate transition? Does chromatin dynamics induce competence for immediate cellular functions (meiosis, fertilization), or does it also contribute long-term effects in cellular identity and developmental competence of the reproductive lineage? This review attempts to review these fascinating questions. PMID:26031902

  17. Imaging Self-assembly Dependent Spatial Distribution of Small Molecules in Cellular Environment

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan; Kuang, Yi; Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Chandran, Preethi; Horkay, Ferenc; Xu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of small molecules, as a more common phenomenon than one previously thought, can be either beneficial or detrimental to cells. Despite its profound biological implications, how the self-assembly of small molecules behave in cellular environment is largely unknown and barely explored. This work studies four fluorescent molecules that consist of the same peptidic backbone (e.g., Phe-Phe-Lys) and enzyme trigger (e.g., a phosphotyrosine residue), but bear different fluorophores on the side chain of the lysine residue of the peptidic motif. These molecules, however, exhibit different ability of self-assembly before and after enzymatic transformation (e.g., dephosphorylation). Fluorescent imaging reveals that self-assembly directly affects the distribution of these small molecules in cellular environment. Moreover, cell viability tests suggest that the states and the location of the molecular assemblies in the cellular environment control the phenotypes of the cells. For example, the molecular nanofibers of one of the small molecules apparently stabilize actin filaments and alleviate the insult of an F-actin toxin (e.g., latrunculin A). Combining fluorescent imaging and enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small peptidic molecules, this work not only demonstrates that self-assembly as a key factor for dictating the spatial distribution of small molecules in cellular environment. In addition, it illustrates a useful approach, based on enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small molecules, to modulate spatiotemporal profiles of small molecules in cellular environment, which allows the use of the emergent properties of small molecules to control the fate of cells. PMID:24266765

  18. Imaging self-assembly dependent spatial distribution of small molecules in a cellular environment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Kuang, Yi; Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Chandran, Preethi; Horkay, Ferenc; Xu, Bing

    2013-12-10

    Self-assembly of small molecules, as a more common phenomenon than one previously thought, can be either beneficial or detrimental to cells. Despite its profound biological implications, how the self-assembly of small molecules behave in a cellular environment is largely unknown and barely explored. This work studies four fluorescent molecules that consist of the same peptidic backbone (e.g., Phe-Phe-Lys) and enzyme trigger (e.g., a phosphotyrosine residue), but bear different fluorophores on the side chain of the lysine residue of the peptidic motif. These molecules, however, exhibit a different ability of self-assembly before and after enzymatic transformation (e.g., dephosphorylation). Fluorescent imaging reveals that self-assembly directly affects the distribution of these small molecules in a cellular environment. Moreover, cell viability tests suggest that the states and the locations of the molecular assemblies in the cellular environment control the phenotypes of the cells. For example, the molecular nanofibers of one of the small molecules apparently stabilize actin filaments and alleviate the insult of an F-actin toxin (e.g., latrunculin A). Combining fluorescent imaging and enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small peptidic molecules, this work demonstrates self-assembly as a key factor for dictating the spatial distribution of small molecules in a cellular environment. In addition, it illustrates a useful approach, based on enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small molecules, to modulate spatiotemporal profiles of small molecules in a cellular environment, which allows the use of the emergent properties of small molecules to control the fate of cells. PMID:24266765

  19. FLI1 expression is correlated with breast cancer cellular growth, migration, and invasion and altered gene expression.

    PubMed

    Scheiber, Melissa N; Watson, Patricia M; Rumboldt, Tihana; Stanley, Connor; Wilson, Robert C; Findlay, Victoria J; Anderson, Paul E; Watson, Dennis K

    2014-10-01

    ETS factors have been shown to be dysregulated in breast cancer. ETS factors control the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. FLI1 is an ETS protein aberrantly expressed in retrovirus-induced hematological tumors, but limited attention has been directed towards elucidating the role of FLI1 in epithelial-derived cancers. Using data mining, we show that loss of FLI1 expression is associated with shorter survival and more aggressive phenotypes of breast cancer. Gain and loss of function cellular studies indicate the inhibitory effect of FLI1 expression on cellular growth, migration, and invasion. Using Fli1 mutant mice and both a transgenic murine breast cancer model and an orthotopic injection of syngeneic tumor cells indicates that reduced Fli1 contributes to accelerated tumor growth. Global expression analysis and RNA-Seq data from an invasive human breast cancer cell line with over expression of either FLI1 and another ETS gene, PDEF, shows changes in several cellular pathways associated with cancer, such as the cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways. This study demonstrates a novel role for FLI1 in epithelial cells. In addition, these results reveal that FLI1 down-regulation in breast cancer may promote tumor progression. PMID:25379017

  20. FLI1 Expression is Correlated with Breast Cancer Cellular Growth, Migration, and Invasion and Altered Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Scheiber, Melissa N.; Watson, Patricia M.; Rumboldt, Tihana; Stanley, Connor; Wilson, Robert C.; Findlay, Victoria J.; Anderson, Paul E.; Watson, Dennis K.

    2014-01-01

    ETS factors have been shown to be dysregulated in breast cancer. ETS factors control the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. FLI1 is an ETS protein aberrantly expressed in retrovirus-induced hematological tumors, but limited attention has been directed towards elucidating the role of FLI1 in epithelial-derived cancers. Using data mining, we show that loss of FLI1 expression is associated with shorter survival and more aggressive phenotypes of breast cancer. Gain and loss of function cellular studies indicate the inhibitory effect of FLI1 expression on cellular growth, migration, and invasion. Using Fli1 mutant mice and both a transgenic murine breast cancer model and an orthotopic injection of syngeneic tumor cells indicates that reduced Fli1 contributes to accelerated tumor growth. Global expression analysis and RNA-Seq data from an invasive human breast cancer cell line with over expression of either FLI1 and another ETS gene, PDEF, shows changes in several cellular pathways associated with cancer, such as the cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways. This study demonstrates a novel role for FLI1 in epithelial cells. In addition, these results reveal that FLI1 down-regulation in breast cancer may promote tumor progression. PMID:25379017

  1. Respiratory Viral Infections and Subversion of Cellular Antioxidant Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Komaravelli, Narayana; Casola, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is part of normal cellular aerobic metabolism, due to respiration and oxidation of nutrients in order to generate energy. Low levels of ROS are involved in cellular signaling and are well controlled by the cellular antioxidant defense system. Elevated levels of ROS generation due to pollutants, toxins and radiation exposure, as well as infections, are associated with oxidative stress causing cellular damage. Several respiratory viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and influenza, induce increased ROS formation, both intracellularly and as a result of increased inflammatory cell recruitment at the site of infection. They also reduce antioxidant enzyme (AOE) levels and/or activity, leading to unbalanced oxidative-antioxidant status and subsequent oxidative cell damage. Expression of several AOE is controlled by the activation of the nuclear transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), through binding to the antioxidant responsive element (ARE) present in the AOE gene promoters. While exposure to several pro-oxidant stimuli usually leads to Nrf2 activation and upregulation of AOE expression, respiratory viral infections are associated with inhibition of AOE expression/activity, which in the case of RSV and hMPV is associated with reduced Nrf2 nuclear localization, decreased cellular levels and reduced ARE-dependent gene transcription. Therefore, administration of antioxidant mimetics or Nrf2 inducers represents potential viable therapeutic approaches to viral-induced diseases, such as respiratory infections and other infections associated with decreased cellular antioxidant capacity. PMID:25584194

  2. Aging, Cellular Senescence, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Judith

    2014-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyper-plastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  3. Aging, cellular senescence, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  4. Fracture mechanics of cellular glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwissler, J. G.; Adams, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture mechanics of cellular glasses (for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solr concentrator reflecting panels) are discussed. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials were developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region 1 may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

  5. Unambiguous observation of shape effects on cellular fate of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhiqin; Zhang, Silu; Zhang, Bokai; Zhang, Chunyuan; Fang, Chia-Yi; Rehor, Ivan; Cigler, Petr; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Lin, Ge; Liu, Renbao; Li, Quan

    2014-03-01

    Cellular fate of nanoparticles is vital to application of nanoparticles to cell imaging, bio-sensing, drug delivery, suppression of drug resistance, gene delivery, and cytotoxicity analysis. However, the current studies on cellular fate of nanoparticles have been controversial due to complications of interplay between many possible factors. By well-controlled experiments, we demonstrated unambiguously that the morphology of nanoparticles independently determined their cellular fate. We found that nanoparticles with sharp shapes, regardless of their surface chemistry, size, or composition, could pierce the membranes of endosomes that carried them into the cells and escape to the cytoplasm, which in turn significantly reduced the cellular excretion rate of the nanoparticles. Such features of sharp-shaped nanoparticles are essential for drug delivery, gene delivery, subcellular targeting, and long-term tracking. This work opens up a controllable, purely geometrical and hence safe, degree of freedom for manipulating nanoparticle-cell interaction, with numerous applications in medicine, bio-imaging, and bio-sensing.

  6. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of anthracycline cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Billy; Peng, Xuyang; Pentassuglia, Laura; Lim, Chee Chew; Sawyer, Douglas B

    2007-01-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms that cause cumulative dose-dependent anthracycline-cardiotoxicity remain controversial and incompletely understood. Studies examining the effects of anthracyclines in cardiac myocytes inA vitro have demonstrated several forms of cellular injury. Cell death in response to anthracyclines can be observed by one of several mechanisms including apoptosis and necrosis. Cell death by apoptosis can be inhibited by dexrazoxane, the iron chelator that is known to prevent clinical development of heart failure at high cumulative anthracycline exposure. Together with clinical evidence for myocyte death after anthracycline exposure, in the form of elevations in serum troponin, make myocyte cell death a probable mechanism for anthracycline-induced cardiac injury. Other mechanisms of myocyte injury include the development of cellular \\'sarcopenia\\' characterized by disruption of normal sarcomere structure. Anthracyclines suppress expression of several cardiac transcription factors, and this may play a role in the development of myocyte death as well as sarcopenia. Degradation of the giant myofilament protein titin may represent an important proximal step that leads to accelerated myofilament degradation. Titin is an entropic spring element in the sarcomere that regulates length-dependent calcium sensitivity. Thus titin degradation may lead to impaired diastolic as well as systolic dysfunction, as well as potentiate the effect of suppression of transcription of sarcomere proteins. An interesting interaction has been noted clinically between anthracyclines and newer cancer therapies that target the erbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase. Studies of erbB2 function in viro suggest that signaling through erbB2 by the growth factor neuregulin may regulate cardiac myocyte sarcomere turnover, as well as myocyte-myocyte/myocyte-matrix force coupling. A combination of further in vitro studies, with more careful monitoring of cardiac function after exposure to

  7. Global properties of cellular automata

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, E.

    1986-04-01

    Cellular automata are discrete mathematical systems that generate diverse, often complicated, behavior using simple deterministic rules. Analysis of the local structure of these rules makes possible a description of the global properties of the associated automata. A class of cellular automata that generate infinitely many aperoidic temporal sequences is defined,a s is the set of rules for which inverses exist. Necessary and sufficient conditions are derived characterizing the classes of ''nearest-neighbor'' rules for which arbitrary finite initial conditions (i) evolve to a homogeneous state; (ii) generate at least one constant temporal sequence.

  8. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  9. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  10. Cellular basis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bali, Jitin; Halima, Saoussen Ben; Felmy, Boas; Goodger, Zoe; Zurbriggen, Sebastian; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2010-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease. A characteristic feature of the disease is the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) which either in its soluble oligomeric form or in the plaque-associated form is causally linked to neurodegeneration. Aβ peptide is liberated from the membrane-spanning -amyloid precursor protein by sequential proteolytic processing employing β- and γ-secretases. All these proteins involved in the production of Aβ peptide are membrane associated and hence, membrane trafficking and cellular compartmentalization play important roles. In this review, we summarize the key cellular events that lead to the progression of AD. PMID:21369424

  11. Sound attenuation characteristics of cellular metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, Satya Surya Srinivas

    could be mitigated by the addition of appropriate treatments such as a lightweight grid that modified the incident sound field to be normally directed. Although the performance of the metamaterial-based barrier solutions was better compared to the conventional ones, the performance can be poor at the system eigenfrequencies. The possibility of shifting energy from the deficit bands to other regions where the barriers are more efficient was numerically explored for embodiments of segmented cellular materials having non-linear stiffness characteristics. The acoustical behavior of such materials was probed through representative two-dimensional models of a segmented plate with a contact interface. Super-harmonic response peaks were observed for pure harmonic excitations, the strength of which were found to strongly depend on the degree of non-linearity or bilinear stiffness ratio. The closer an excitation frequency was to the characteristic eigenfrequencies of the structure, the stronger was the super-harmonic response, which supported the idea of transferring energy from problematic frequency bands to higher frequencies. Finally, the possibility of a spatial-shift of energy from longitudinal to lateral direction was explored with the idea of eliminating the design constraints associated with conventional absorbing materials, and with the hope of realizing a compact sound absorber. The embodiment was a two-phase chiral composite made using a Topologically Interlocked Material (TIM) with its unit cell being a tetrahedron consisting of two helicoid dissections. A comparative study was conducted with standard microstructures inspired by the Voigt and Reuss models. The twist mode of the chiral composites was found to be excited by an incident sound field normal to the plane of the TIM assembly. Although this behavior is not unique to a chiral microstructure, many other microstructures do not exhibit this behavior. The excitation of the twist mode by the incident sound field

  12. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  13. Dual-energy precursor and nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 activator treatment additively improve redox glutathione levels and neuron survival in aging and Alzheimer mouse neurons upstream of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debolina; LeVault, Kelsey R; Brewer, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether glutathione (GSH) loss or increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) are more important to neuron loss, aging, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we stressed or boosted GSH levels in neurons isolated from aging 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those from age-matched nontransgenic (non-Tg) neurons. Here, using titrating with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (GCL), we observed that GSH depletion increased neuronal death of 3xTg-AD cultured neurons at increasing rates across the age span, whereas non-Tg neurons were resistant to GSH depletion until old age. Remarkably, the rate of neuron loss with ROS did not increase in old age and was the same for both genotypes, which indicates that cognitive deficits in the AD model were not caused by ROS. Therefore, we targeted for neuroprotection activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2) by 18 alpha glycyrrhetinic acid to stimulate GSH synthesis through GCL. This balanced stimulation of a number of redox enzymes restored the lower levels of Nrf2 and GCL seen in 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those of non-Tg neurons and promoted translocation of Nrf2 to the nucleus. By combining the Nrf2 activator together with the NADH precursor, nicotinamide, we increased neuron survival against amyloid beta stress in an additive manner. These stress tests and neuroprotective treatments suggest that the redox environment is more important for neuron survival than ROS. The dual neuroprotective treatment with nicotinamide and an Nrf2 inducer indicates that these age-related and AD-related changes are reversible. PMID:23954169

  14. Wrinkling in Cellular Structured Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynia, Narges; Li, Yaning; Boyce, Mary C.

    2013-03-01

    Many structured composites found in nature possess undulating and wrinkled interfacial layers that regulate mechanical, chemical, acoustic, adhesive, thermal, electrical and optical functions of the material. This research focused on the formation of wrinkling patterns in cellular structured composites and the effect of the wrinkling pattern on the overall structural response. The cellular composites consisted of stiffer interfacial layers constructing a network submerged in a soft matrix. Analytical and finite element models were developed to capture various aspects of the wrinkling mechanism. The characteristics of the undulation patterns and the instability modes were investigated as functions of model geometry and material composition. Mechanical experiments were designed to further explore the modeling results. The cellular composite samples were fabricated by using different types of elastomers and by varying the geometry and the material properties. The experimental and numerical results were consistent with the analytical predictions. The results in this research improve understanding of the mechanisms governing the undulation pattern formation in cellular composites and can be used to enable on-demand tunability of different functions to provide, among others, active control of wave propagation, mechanical stiffness and deformation, and material swelling and growth.

  15. Cellular Automata and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Ernest

    1994-01-01

    The use of cellular automata to analyze several pre-Socratic hypotheses about the evolution of the physical world is discussed. These hypotheses combine characteristics of both rigorous and metaphoric language. Since the computer demands explicit instructions for each step in the evolution of the automaton, such models can reveal conceptual…

  16. Modulation of cellular responses on engineered polyurethane implants.

    PubMed

    Khandwekar, Anand; Rho, Cho K

    2012-09-01

    An in vivo rat cage implant system was used to study the effect of polyurethane surface chemistries on protein adsorption, macrophage adhesion, foreign-body giant cell formation (FBGCs), cellular apoptosis, and cytokine response. Polyurethanes with zwitterionic, anionic, and cationic chemistries were developed. The changes in the surface topography of the materials were determined using atomic force microscopy and the wettability by dynamic contact angle measurements. The in vitro protein adsorption studies revealed higher protein adsorption on cationic surfaces when compared with the base, while adsorption was significantly reduced on zwitterionic (**p < 0.01) and anionic (*p < 0.05) polyurethanes. Analysis of the exudates surrounding the materials revealed no differences between surfaces in the types or levels of cells present. Conversely, the proportion of adherent cells undergoing apoptosis, as determined by annexin V-FITC staining, increased significantly on anionic followed by zwitterionic surfaces (60 + 5.0 and 38 + 3.7%) when compared with the base. Additionally, zwitterionic and anionic substrates provided decreased rates of macrophage adhesion and fusion into FBGCs, whereas cationic surfaces promoted macrophage adhesion and FBGC formation. Visualization of the F-actin cytoskeleton by Alexa Fluor 488 phalloidin showed a significant delay in the cytoskeletal fusion response on zwitterionic and the anionic surfaces. The real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-10) and pro-wound healing cytokines (IL-4 and TGF-β) revealed differential cytokine responses. Cationic substrates that triggered stimulation of TNF-α and IL-4 were associated with more spread cells and higher FBGCs, whereas zwitterionic and anionic substrates that suppressed these cytokines levels were associated with less spread cells and few FBGCs. These studies have revealed that zwitterionic and anionic

  17. Cellular chaperones and folding enzymes are vital contributors to membrane bound replication and movement complexes during plant RNA virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2012-01-01

    Cellular chaperones and folding enzymes play central roles in the formation of positive-strand and negative-strand RNA virus infection. This article examines the key cellular chaperones and discusses evidence that these factors are diverted from their cellular functions to play alternative roles in virus infection. For most chaperones discussed, their primary role in the cell is to ensure protein quality control. They are system components that drive substrate protein folding, complex assembly or disaggregation. Their activities often depend upon co-chaperones and ATP hydrolysis. During plant virus infection, Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins play central roles in the formation of membrane-bound replication complexes for certain members of the tombusvirus, tobamovirus, potyvirus, dianthovirus, potexvirus, and carmovirus genus. There are several co-chaperones, including Yjd1, RME-8, and Hsp40 that associate with the bromovirus replication complex, pomovirus TGB2, and tospovirus Nsm movement proteins. There are also examples of plant viruses that rely on chaperone systems in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to support cell-to-cell movement. TMV relies on calreticulin to promote virus intercellular transport. Calreticulin also resides in the plasmodesmata and plays a role in calcium sequestration as well as glycoprotein folding. The pomovirus TGB2 interacts with RME-8 in the endosome. The potexvirus TGB3 protein stimulates expression of ER resident chaperones via the bZIP60 transcription factor. Up-regulating factors involved in protein folding may be essential to handling the load of viral proteins translated along the ER. In addition, TGB3 stimulates SKP1 which is a co-factor in proteasomal degradation of cellular proteins. Such chaperones and co-factors are potential targets for antiviral defense. PMID:23230447

  18. Patient-centred care, health behaviours and cardiovascular risk factor levels in people with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes: 5-year follow-up of the ADDITION-Plus trial cohort

    PubMed Central

    Dambha-Miller, Hajira; Cooper, Andrew J M; Simmons, Rebecca K; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Griffin, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between the experience of patient-centred care (PCC), health behaviours and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor levels among people with type 2 diabetes. Design Population-based prospective cohort study. Setting 34 general practices in East Anglia, UK, delivering organised diabetes care. Participants 478 patients recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes aged between 40 and 69 years enrolled in the ADDITION-Plus trial. Main outcome measures Self-reported and objectively measured health behaviours (diet, physical activity, smoking status), CVD risk factor levels (blood pressure, lipid levels, glycated haemoglobin, body mass index, waist circumference) and modelled 10-year CVD risk. Results Better experiences of PCC early in the course of living with diabetes were not associated with meaningful differences in self-reported physical activity levels including total activity energy expenditure (β-coefficient: 0.080 MET h/day (95% CI 0.017 to 0.143; p=0.01)), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (β-coefficient: 5.328 min/day (95% CI 0.796 to 9.859; p=0.01)) and reduced sedentary time (β-coefficient: −1.633 min/day (95% CI −2.897 to −0.368; p=0.01)). PCC was not associated with clinically meaningful differences in levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (β-coefficient: 0.002 mmol/L (95% CI 0.001 to 0.004; p=0.03)), systolic blood pressure (β-coefficient: −0.561 mm Hg (95% CI −0.653 to −0.468; p=0.01)) or diastolic blood pressure (β-coefficient: −0.565 mm Hg (95% CI −0.654 to −0.476; p=0.01)). Over an extended follow-up of 5 years, we observed no clear evidence that PCC was associated with self-reported, clinical or biochemical outcomes, except for waist circumference (β-coefficient: 0.085 cm (95% CI 0.015 to 0.155; p=0.02)). Conclusions We found little evidence that experience of PCC early in the course of diabetes was associated with clinically important changes in health

  19. Pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level is a risk factor for para-aortic lymph node recurrence in addition to squamous cell carcinoma antigen following definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To identify pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels as a risk factor for para-aortic lymph node (PALN) recurrence following concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for cervical cancer. Methods From March 1995 to January 2008, 188 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix were analyzed retrospectively. No patient received PALN irradiation as the initial treatment. CEA and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) were measured before and after radiotherapy. PALN recurrence was detected by computer tomography (CT) scans. We analyzed the actuarial rates of PALN recurrence by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Multivariate analyses were carried out with Cox regression models. We stratified the risk groups based on the hazard ratios (HR). Results Both pretreatment CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL and SCC-Ag levels < 10 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 8.838), SCC-Ag levels ≥ 40 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 12.551), and SCC-Ag levels of 10-40 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 4.2464) were significant factors for PALN recurrence. The corresponding 5-year PALN recurrence rates were 51.5%, 84.8%, and 27.5%, respectively. The 5-year PALN recurrence rate for patients with both low (< 10 ng/mL) SCC and CEA was only 9.6%. CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL or SCC-Ag levels ≥ 10 ng/mL at PALN recurrence were associated with overall survival after an isolated PALN recurrence. Pretreatment CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL were also associated with survival after an isolated PALN recurrence. Conclusions Pretreatment CEA ≥ 10 ng/mL is an additional risk factor of PALN relapse following definitive CCRT for SCC of the uterine cervix in patients with pretreatment SCC-Ag levels < 10 ng/mL. More comprehensive examinations before CCRT and intensive follow-up schedules are suggested for early detection and salvage in patients with SCC-Ag or CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL. PMID:22289572

  20. Lempel-Ziv complexity analysis of one dimensional cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Estevez-Rams, E; Lora-Serrano, R; Nunes, C A J; Aragón-Fernández, B

    2015-12-01

    Lempel-Ziv complexity measure has been used to estimate the entropy density of a string. It is defined as the number of factors in a production factorization of a string. In this contribution, we show that its use can be extended, by using the normalized information distance, to study the spatiotemporal evolution of random initial configurations under cellular automata rules. In particular, the transfer information from time consecutive configurations is studied, as well as the sensitivity to perturbed initial conditions. The behavior of the cellular automata rules can be grouped in different classes, but no single grouping captures the whole nature of the involved rules. The analysis carried out is particularly appropriate for studying the computational processing capabilities of cellular automata rules. PMID:26723145

  1. Lempel-Ziv complexity analysis of one dimensional cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevez-Rams, E.; Lora-Serrano, R.; Nunes, C. A. J.; Aragón-Fernández, B.

    2015-12-01

    Lempel-Ziv complexity measure has been used to estimate the entropy density of a string. It is defined as the number of factors in a production factorization of a string. In this contribution, we show that its use can be extended, by using the normalized information distance, to study the spatiotemporal evolution of random initial configurations under cellular automata rules. In particular, the transfer information from time consecutive configurations is studied, as well as the sensitivity to perturbed initial conditions. The behavior of the cellular automata rules can be grouped in different classes, but no single grouping captures the whole nature of the involved rules. The analysis carried out is particularly appropriate for studying the computational processing capabilities of cellular automata rules.

  2. The Arabidopsis bHLH Transcription Factors MYC3 and MYC4 Are Targets of JAZ Repressors and Act Additively with MYC2 in the Activation of Jasmonate Responses[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Chini, Andrea; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Chico, José-Manuel; Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Geerinck, Jan; Eeckhout, Dominique; Schweizer, Fabian; Godoy, Marta; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Pauwels, Laurens; Witters, Erwin; Puga, María Isabel; Paz-Ares, Javier; Goossens, Alain; Reymond, Philippe; De Jaeger, Geert; Solano, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) trigger an important transcriptional reprogramming of plant cells to modulate both basal development and stress responses. In spite of the importance of transcriptional regulation, only one transcription factor (TF), the Arabidopsis thaliana basic helix-loop-helix MYC2, has been described so far as a direct target of JAZ repressors. By means of yeast two-hybrid screening and tandem affinity purification strategies, we identified two previously unknown targets of JAZ repressors, the TFs MYC3 and MYC4, phylogenetically closely related to MYC2. We show that MYC3 and MYC4 interact in vitro and in vivo with JAZ repressors and also form homo- and heterodimers with MYC2 and among themselves. They both are nuclear proteins that bind DNA with sequence specificity similar to that of MYC2. Loss-of-function mutations in any of these two TFs impair full responsiveness to JA and enhance the JA insensitivity of myc2 mutants. Moreover, the triple mutant myc2 myc3 myc4 is as impaired as coi1-1 in the activation of several, but not all, JA-mediated responses such as the defense against bacterial pathogens and insect herbivory. Our results show that MYC3 and MYC4 are activators of JA-regulated programs that act additively with MYC2 to regulate specifically different subsets of the JA-dependent transcriptional response. PMID:21335373

  3. Overview of molecular, cellular, and genetic neurotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Wallace, David R

    2005-05-01

    It has become increasingly evident that the field of neurotoxicology is not only rapidly growing but also rapidly evolving, especially over the last 20 years. As the number of drugs and environmental and bacterial/viral agents with potential neurotoxic properties has grown, the need for additional testing has increased. Only recently has the technology advanced to a level that neurotoxicologic studies can be performed without operating in a "black box." Examination of the effects of agents that are suspected of being toxic can occur on the molecular (protein-protein), cellular (biomarkers, neuronal function), and genetic (polymorphisms) level. Together, these areas help to elucidate the potential toxic profiles of unknown (and in some cases, known) agents. The area of proteomics is one of the fastest growing areas in science and particularly applicable to neurotoxicology. Lubec et al, provide a review of the potential and limitations of proteomics. Proteomics focuses on a more comprehensive view of cellular proteins and provides considerably more information about the effects of toxins on the CNS. Proteomics can be classified into three different focuses: post-translational modification, protein-expression profiling, and protein-network mapping. Together, these methods represent a more complete and powerful image of protein modifications following potential toxin exposure. Cellular neurotoxicology involves many cellular processes including alterations in cellular energy homeostasis, ion homeostasis, intracellular signaling function, and neurotransmitter release, uptake, and storage. The greatest hurdle in cellular neurotoxicology has been the discovery of appropriate biomarkers that are reliable, reproducible, and easy to obtain. There are biomarkers of exposure effect, and susceptibility. Finding the appropriate biomarker for a particular toxin is a daunting task. The appropriate biomarker for a particular toxin is a daunting task. The advantage to biomarker

  4. Cellular proliferation rate and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2 and IGFBP-3 and estradiol receptor alpha expression in the mammary gland of dairy heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes during development.

    PubMed

    Perri, A F; Dallard, B E; Baravalle, C; Licoff, N; Formía, N; Ortega, H H; Becú-Villalobos, D; Mejia, M E; Lacau-Mengido, I M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary ductal morphogenesis during prepuberty occurs mainly in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and estradiol stimulation. Dairy heifers infected with gastrointestinal nematodes have reduced IGF-1 levels, accompanied by reduced growth rate, delayed puberty onset, and lower parenchyma-stroma relationship in their mammary glands. Immunohistochemical studies were undertaken to determine variations in cell division rate, IGF-1 system components, and estradiol receptors (ESR) during peripubertal development in the mammary glands of antiparasitic-treated and untreated Holstein heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Mammary biopsies were taken at 20, 30, 40, and 70 wk of age. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunolabeling, evident in nuclei, tended to be higher in the parenchyma of the glands from treated heifers than in those from untreated. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) type 2 and type 3 immunolabeling was cytoplasmic and was evident in stroma and parenchyma. The IGFBP2-labeled area was lower in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, a maximal expression of this protein was seen at 40 wk of age, whereas in the untreated group the labeling remained constant. No differences were observed for IGFBP3 between treatment groups or during development. Immunolabeling for α ESR (ESR1) was evident in parenchymal nuclei and was higher in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, ESR1 peaked at 30 wk of age and then decreased. These results demonstrate that the parasite burden in young heifers negatively influence mammary gland development, affecting cell division rate and parameters related to estradiol and IGF-1 signaling in the gland. PMID:24931533

  5. Activation of hERG3 channel stimulates autophagy and promotes cellular senescence in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Neut, Mathew; Haar, Lauren; Rao, Vidhya; Santha, Sreevidya; Lansu, Katherine; Rana, Basabi; Jones, Walter K.; Gentile, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels play a major factor in maintaining cellular homeostasis but very little is known about the role of these proteins in cancer biology. In this work we have discovered that, the Kv11.3 (hERG3) a plasma-membrane potassium channel plays a critical role in the regulation of autophagy in a cancer cell model. We have found that pharmacologic stimulation of the Kv11.3 channel with a small molecule activator, NS1643 induced autophagy via activation of an AMPK-dependent signaling pathway in melanoma cell line. In addition, we have found that NS1643 produced a strong inhibition of cell proliferation by activating a cellular senescence program. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy via siRNA targeting AMPK or treatment with hydroxychloroquine an autophagy inhibitor activates apoptosis in NS1643-treated cells. Thus, we propose that, Kv11.3 is a novel mediator of autophagy, autophagy can be a survival mechanism contributing to cellular senescence, and that use of a combinatorial pharmacologic approach of Kv11.3 activator with inhibitors of autophagy represents a novel therapeutic approach against melanoma. PMID:26942884

  6. [Glycotoxins and cellular dysfunction. A new mechanism for understanding the preventive effects of lifestyle modifications].

    PubMed

    Michalsen, A; Bierhaus, A; Nawroth, P P; Dobos, G J

    2006-08-01

    Recently the AGE-RAGE interaction was identified as a potential mechanism underlying chronic and inflammatory diseases like atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus and kidney disease. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are the derivatives of glucose-protein or glucose-lipid reactions and are mainly generated from the diet (depending on intensity of heating, cooking time and oxygenation). Binding of AGEs or other ligands to the AGE receptor (RAGE) results in cellular activation, i.e. increased expression of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress. Diet-derived AGEs thus induce deleterious effects on tissues and the cardiovascular system. Recent research also found that other lifestyle factors are associated with pronounced inflammatory activation, e.g. psychosocial stress and smoking. In addition, each intake of meals is associated with proinflammatory cellular changes. The AGE-RAGE model and investigations of the underlying cellular mechanisms thus may lead to a better understanding of the health benefits of diets (Mediterranean diet, uncooked vegetarian diets), caloric restriction and intermittent fasting. The clinical impact of low-AGE diets and fasting and the interaction between stress and food intake should be further investigated in controlled trials. PMID:16897151

  7. Multiple cellular proteins interact with LEDGF/p75 through a conserved unstructured consensus motif.

    PubMed

    Tesina, Petr; Čermáková, Kateřina; Hořejší, Magdalena; Procházková, Kateřina; Fábry, Milan; Sharma, Subhalakshmi; Christ, Frauke; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; De Rijck, Jan; Veverka, Václav; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2015-01-01

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is an epigenetic reader and attractive therapeutic target involved in HIV integration and the development of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL1) fusion-driven leukaemia. Besides HIV integrase and the MLL1-menin complex, LEDGF/p75 interacts with various cellular proteins via its integrase binding domain (IBD). Here we present structural characterization of IBD interactions with transcriptional repressor JPO2 and domesticated transposase PogZ, and show that the PogZ interaction is nearly identical to the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with MLL1. The interaction with the IBD is maintained by an intrinsically disordered IBD-binding motif (IBM) common to all known cellular partners of LEDGF/p75. In addition, based on IBM conservation, we identify and validate IWS1 as a novel LEDGF/p75 interaction partner. Our results also reveal how HIV integrase efficiently displaces cellular binding partners from LEDGF/p75. Finally, the similar binding modes of LEDGF/p75 interaction partners represent a new challenge for the development of selective interaction inhibitors. PMID:26245978

  8. StUbEx: Stable tagged ubiquitin exchange system for the global investigation of cellular ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Vyacheslav; Henningsen, Jeanette; Hallenborg, Philip; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Jensen, Søren Skov; Nielsen, Mogens M; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2014-09-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins with the small polypeptide ubiquitin plays a pivotal role in many cellular processes, altering protein lifespan, location, and function and regulating protein-protein interactions. Ubiquitination exerts its diverse functions through complex mechanisms by formation of different polymeric chains and subsequent recognition of the ubiquitin signal by specific protein interaction domains. Despite some recent advances in the analytical tools for the analysis of ubiquitination by mass spectrometry, there is still a need for additional strategies suitable for investigation of cellular ubiquitination at the proteome level. Here, we present a stable tagged ubiquitin exchange (StUbEx) cellular system in which endogenous ubiquitin is replaced with an epitope-tagged version, thereby allowing specific and efficient affinity purification of ubiquitinated proteins for global analyses of protein ubiquitination. Importantly, the overall level of ubiquitin in the cell remains virtually unchanged, thus avoiding ubiquitination artifacts associated with overexpression. The efficiency and reproducibility of the method were assessed through unbiased analysis of epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling by quantitative mass spectrometry, covering over 3400 potential ubiquitinated proteins. The StUbEx system is applicable to virtually any cell line and can be readily adapted to any of the ubiquitin-like post-translational modifications. PMID:25093938

  9. Role of cellular adhesions in tissue dynamics spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Daniel A.; An, Ran; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2014-02-01

    Cellular adhesions play a critical role in cell behavior, and modified expression of cellular adhesion compounds has been linked to various cancers. We tested the role of cellular adhesions in drug response by studying three cellular culture models: three-dimensional tumor spheroids with well-developed cellular adhesions and extracellular matrix (ECM), dense three-dimensional cell pellets with moderate numbers of adhesions, and dilute three-dimensional cell suspensions in agarose having few adhesions. Our technique for measuring the drug response for the spheroids and cell pellets was biodynamic imaging (BDI), and for the suspensions was quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS). We tested several cytoskeletal chemotherapeutic drugs (nocodazole, cytochalasin-D, paclitaxel, and colchicine) on three cancer cell lines chosen from human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29), human pancreatic carcinoma (MIA PaCa-2), and rat osteosarcoma (UMR-106) to exhibit differences in adhesion strength. Comparing tumor spheroid behavior to that of cell suspensions showed shifts in the spectral motion of the cancer tissues that match predictions based on different degrees of cell-cell contacts. The HT-29 cell line, which has the strongest adhesions in the spheroid model, exhibits anomalous behavior in some cases. These results highlight the importance of using three-dimensional tissue models in drug screening with cellular adhesions being a contributory factor in phenotypic differences between the drug responses of tissue and cells.

  10. Hierarchy of cellular decisions in collective behavior: Implications for wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Wickert, Lisa E.; Pomerenke, Shaun; Mitchell, Isaiah; Masters, Kristyn S.; Kreeger, Pamela K.

    2016-01-01

    Collective processes such as wound re-epithelialization result from the integration of individual cellular decisions. To determine which individual cell behaviors represent the most promising targets to engineer re-epithelialization, we examined collective and individual responses of HaCaT keratinocytes seeded upon polyacrylamide gels of three stiffnesses (1, 30, and 100 kPa) and treated with a range of epidermal growth factor (EGF) doses. Wound closure was found to increase with substrate stiffness, but was responsive to EGF treatment only above a stiffness threshold. Individual cell behaviors were used to create a partial least squares regression model to predict the hierarchy of factors driving wound closure. Unexpectedly, cell area and persistence were found to have the strongest correlation to the observed differences in wound closure. Meanwhile, the model predicted a relatively weak correlation between wound closure with proliferation, and the unexpectedly minor input from proliferation was successfully tested with inhibition by aphidicolin. Combined, these results suggest that the poor clinical results for growth factor-based therapies for chronic wounds may result from a disconnect between the individual cellular behaviors targeted in these approaches and the resulting collective response. Additionally, the stiffness-dependency of EGF sensitivity suggests that therapies matched to microenvironmental characteristics will be more efficacious. PMID:26832302

  11. Open cellular structure in marine stratocumulus sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Robert; Comstock, K. K.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Cornish, C.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Fairall, C.

    2008-06-25

    Geostationary and sunsynchronous satellite data and in-situ observations from ship cruises are used to investigate the formation of open cellular structure in marine stratocumulus clouds over the Southeast Pacific (SEP). Open cellular convection either forms spontaneously as pockets of open cells (POCs) within overcast stratocumulus, or is advected into the region from midlatitude regions. POC formation occurs most frequently during the latter part of the night demonstrating that this transition is not caused by solar absorption-driven decoupling. The transition preferentially occurs in clouds with low 11-3.7 microns nighttime brightness temperature difference (BTD) which is found to be well correlated with both in-situ measured accumulation mode aerosol concentration and cloud droplet concentration estimates derived from MODIS. Besides indicating that night time BTD is an excellent proxy for stratocumulus cloud droplet concentration Nd, this also suggests that low aerosol concentrations favor POC formation. Indeed, extremely low accumulation mode aerosol concentrations are found during the passage of open cell events over the ship. Free-tropospheric moisture is not found to be an important factor in POC formation. Significant subseasonal variability occurs in the fractional coverage of open cellular convection over the broader SEP. This coverage is well correlated with a MODIS-derived drizzle proxy (MDP) proportional to the ratio of liquid water path (LWP) to Nd for predominantly overcast regions. Both LWP and Nd variability influences the MDP. Periods of low MDP have significant positive large scale Nd anomalies and are preceded byoffshore winds at 850 hPa, which suggests a potential continental influence upon open cell formation over the SEP. Together, the results suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and drizzle in marine stratocumulus and a role for drizzle in modulating the large scale albedo of these cloud systems.

  12. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wynn, T A

    2008-01-01

    Fibrosis is defined by the overgrowth, hardening, and/or scarring of various tissues and is attributed to excess deposition of extracellular matrix components including collagen. Fibrosis is the end result of chronic inflammatory reactions induced by a variety of stimuli including persistent infections, autoimmune reactions, allergic responses, chemical insults, radiation, and tissue injury. Although current treatments for fibrotic diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, systemic sclerosis, progressive kidney disease, and cardiovascular fibrosis typically target the inflammatory response, there is accumulating evidence that the mechanisms driving fibrogenesis are distinct from those regulating inflammation. In fact, some studies have suggested that ongoing inflammation is needed to reverse established and progressive fibrosis. The key cellular mediator of fibrosis is the myofibroblast, which when activated serves as the primary collagen-producing cell. Myofibroblasts are generated from a variety of sources including resident mesenchymal cells, epithelial and endothelial cells in processes termed epithelial/endothelial-mesenchymal (EMT/EndMT) transition, as well as from circulating fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes that are derived from bone-marrow stem cells. Myofibroblasts are activated by a variety of mechanisms, including paracrine signals derived from lymphocytes and macrophages, autocrine factors secreted by myofibroblasts, and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS) produced by pathogenic organisms that interact with pattern recognition receptors (i.e. TLRs) on fibroblasts. Cytokines (IL-13, IL-21, TGF-beta1), chemokines (MCP-1, MIP-1beta), angiogenic factors (VEGF), growth factors (PDGF), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), acute phase proteins (SAP), caspases, and components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (ANG II) have been identified as important regulators of fibrosis and are being

  13. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, TA

    2009-01-01

    Fibrosis is defined by the overgrowth, hardening, and/or scarring of various tissues and is attributed to excess deposition of extracellular matrix components including collagen. Fibrosis is the end result of chronic inflammatory reactions induced by a variety of stimuli including persistent infections, autoimmune reactions, allergic responses, chemical insults, radiation, and tissue injury. Although current treatments for fibrotic diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, systemic sclerosis, progressive kidney disease, and cardiovascular fibrosis typically target the inflammatory response, there is accumulating evidence that the mechanisms driving fibrogenesis are distinct from those regulating inflammation. In fact, some studies have suggested that ongoing inflammation is needed to reverse established and progressive fibrosis. The key cellular mediator of fibrosis is the myofibroblast, which when activated serves as the primary collagen-producing cell. Myofibroblasts are generated from a variety of sources including resident mesenchymal cells, epithelial and endothelial cells in processes termed epithelial/endothelial-mesenchymal (EMT/EndMT) transition, as well as from circulating fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes that are derived from bone-marrow stem cells. Myofibroblasts are activated by a variety of mechanisms, including paracrine signals derived from lymphocytes and macrophages, autocrine factors secreted by myofibroblasts, and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS) produced by pathogenic organisms that interact with pattern recognition receptors (i.e. TLRs) on fibroblasts. Cytokines (IL-13, IL-21, TGF-β1), chemokines (MCP-1, MIP-1β), angiogenic factors (VEGF), growth factors (PDGF), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), acute phase proteins (SAP), caspases, and components of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (ANG II) have been identified as important regulators of fibrosis and are being

  14. From Cellular Mechanotransduction to Biologically Inspired Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a lecture I presented as the recipient of the 2009 Pritzker Distinguished Lecturer Award at the Biomedical Engineering Society annual meeting in October 2009. Here, I review more than thirty years of research from my laboratory, beginning with studies designed to test the theory that cells use tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture to stabilize their shape and sense mechanical signals, which I believed to be critical for control of cell function and tissue development. Although I was trained as a cell biologist, I found that the tools I had at my disposal were insufficient to experimentally test these theories, and thus I ventured into engineering to find critical solutions. This path has been extremely fruitful as it has led to confirmation of the critical role that physical forces play in developmental control, as well as how cells sense and respond to mechanical signals at the molecular level through a process known as cellular mechanotransduction. Many of the predictions of the cellular tensegrity model relating to cell mechanical behaviors have been shown to be valid, and this vision of cell structure led to discovery of the central role that transmembrane adhesion receptors, such as integrins, and the cytoskeleton play in mechanosensing and mechanochemical conversion. In addition, these fundamental studies have led to significant unexpected technology fallout, including development of micromagnetic actuators for non-invasive control of cellular signaling, microfluidic systems as therapeutic extracorporeal devices for sepsis therapy, and new DNA-based nanobiotechnology approaches that permit construction of artificial tensegrities that mimic properties of living materials for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20140519

  15. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by cellular labile iron.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kyohei; Kawakami, Toru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Tomizawa, Miyu; Fujiwara, Tohru; Ishii, Tomonori; Harigae, Hideo; Ogasawara, Kouetsu

    2016-02-01

    Cellular labile iron, which contains chelatable redox-active Fe(2+), has been implicated in iron-mediated cellular toxicity leading to multiple organ dysfunction. Iron homeostasis is controlled by monocytes/macrophages through their iron recycling and storage capacities. Furthermore, iron sequestration by monocytes/macrophages is regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1, highlighting the importance of these cells in the crosstalk between inflammation and iron homeostasis. However, a role for cellular labile iron in monocyte/macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses has not been defined. Here we describe how cellular labile iron activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes. Stimulation of lipopolysaccharide-primed peripheral blood mononuclear cells with ferric ammonium citrate increases the level of cellular Fe(2+) levels in monocytes and induces production of interleukin-1β in a dose-dependent manner. This ferric ammonium citrate-induced interleukin-1β production is dependent on caspase-1 and is significantly inhibited by an Fe(2+)-specific chelator. Ferric ammonium citrate consistently induced interleukin-1β secretion in THP1 cells, but not in NLRP3-deficient THP1 cells, indicating a requirement for the NLRP3 inflammasome. Additionally, activation of the inflammasome is mediated by potassium efflux, reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction, and lysosomal membrane permeabilization. Thus, these results suggest that monocytes/macrophages not only sequestrate iron during inflammation, but also mediate inflammation in response to cellular labile iron, which provides novel insights into the role of iron in chronic inflammation. PMID:26577567

  16. Biological magnetic cellular spheroids as building blocks for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mattix, Brandon; Olsen, Timothy R.; Gu, Yu; Casco, Megan; Herbst, Austin; Simionescu, Dan T.; Visconti, Richard P.; Kornev, Konstantin G.; Alexis, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), primarily iron oxide nanoparticles, have been incorporated into cellular spheroids to allow for magnetic manipulation into desired shapes, patterns and 3-D tissue constructs using magnetic forces. However, the direct and long-term interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with cells and biological systems can induce adverse effects on cell viability, phenotype and function, and remain a critical concern. Here we report the preparation of biological magnetic cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin, a biological MNP, capable of serving as a biological alternative to iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids as tissue engineered building blocks. Magnetoferritin NPs were incorporated into 3-D cellular spheroids with no adverse effects on cell viability up to 1 week. Additionally, cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin NPs were magnetically patterned and fused into a tissue ring to demonstrate its potential for tissue engineering applications. These results present a biological approach that can serve as an alternative to the commonly used iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids, which often require complex surface modifications of iron oxide NPs to reduce the adverse effects on cells. PMID:24176725

  17. Biological magnetic cellular spheroids as building blocks for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mattix, Brandon; Olsen, Timothy R; Gu, Yu; Casco, Megan; Herbst, Austin; Simionescu, Dan T; Visconti, Richard P; Kornev, Konstantin G; Alexis, Frank

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), primarily iron oxide nanoparticles, have been incorporated into cellular spheroids to allow for magnetic manipulation into desired shapes, patterns and 3-D tissue constructs using magnetic forces. However, the direct and long-term interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with cells and biological systems can induce adverse effects on cell viability, phenotype and function, and remain a critical concern. Here we report the preparation of biological magnetic cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin, a biological MNP, capable of serving as a biological alternative to iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids as tissue engineered building blocks. Magnetoferritin NPs were incorporated into 3-D cellular spheroids with no adverse effects on cell viability up to 1 week. Additionally, cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin NPs were magnetically patterned and fused into a tissue ring to demonstrate its potential for tissue engineering applications. These results present a biological approach that can serve as an alternative to the commonly used iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids, which often require complex surface modifications of iron oxide NPs to reduce the adverse effects on cells. PMID:24176725

  18. Rerouting Resistance: Escaping Restriction Using Alternative Cellular Pathways.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Alian, Akram

    2015-10-01

    Pathogens, essentially utilizing host machinery for replication, can adapt to exploit cellular redundancies to substitute favored host-pathogen interactions when blocked, leading to a new type of stubborn resistance. Resa-Infante et al. reveal one such 'rerouting-resistance' acquired by the influenza virus when a vital host factor was deleted in mice. PMID:26341725

  19. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jumaat Mohd. Yussof; Omar, Effat; Pai, Dinker R.; Sood, Suneet

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs) and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth factors initiate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation. Inflammation is followed by the proliferation of fibroblasts, which lay down the extracellular matrix. Simultaneously, various white cells and other connective tissue cells release both the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of these metalloproteinases (TIMPs). MMPs remove damaged structural proteins such as collagen, while the fibroblasts lay down fresh extracellular matrix proteins. Fluid collected from acute, healing wounds contains growth factors, and stimulates fibroblast proliferation, but fluid collected from chronic, nonhealing wounds does not. Fibroblasts from chronic wounds do not respond to chronic wound fluid, probably because the fibroblasts of these wounds have lost the receptors that respond to cytokines and growth factors. Nonhealing wounds contain high levels of IL1, IL6, and MMPs, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio. Clinical examination of wounds inconsistently predicts which wounds will heal when procedures like secondary closure are planned. Surgeons therefore hope that these chemicals can be used as biomarkers of wounds which have impaired ability to heal. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will help the healing of chronic, nonhealing wounds. PMID:23162220

  20. Thermodynamics of cellular statistical inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Alex; Fisher, Charles; Mehta, Pankaj

    2014-03-01

    Successful organisms must be capable of accurately sensing the surrounding environment in order to locate nutrients and evade toxins or predators. However, single cell organisms face a multitude of limitations on their accuracy of sensing. Berg and Purcell first examined the canonical example of statistical limitations to cellular learning of a diffusing chemical and established a fundamental limit to statistical accuracy. Recent work has shown that the Berg and Purcell learning limit can be exceeded using Maximum Likelihood Estimation. Here, we recast the cellular sensing problem as a statistical inference problem and discuss the relationship between the efficiency of an estimator and its thermodynamic properties. We explicitly model a single non-equilibrium receptor and examine the constraints on statistical inference imposed by noisy biochemical networks. Our work shows that cells must balance sample number, specificity, and energy consumption when performing statistical inference. These tradeoffs place significant constraints on the practical implementation of statistical estimators in a cell.

  1. Optofluidic Detection for Cellular Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Yi-Chung; Huang, Nien-Tsu; Oh, Bo-Ram; Patra, Bishnubrata; Pan, Chi-Chun; Qiu, Teng; Paul, K. Chu; Zhang, Wenjun; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the output of processes and molecular interactions within a single cell is highly critical to the advancement of accurate disease screening and personalized medicine. Optical detection is one of the most broadly adapted measurement methods in biological and clinical assays and serves cellular phenotyping. Recently, microfluidics has obtained increasing attention due to several advantages, such as small sample and reagent volumes, very high throughput, and accurate flow control in the spatial and temporal domains. Optofluidics, which is the attempt to integrate optics with microfluidic, shows great promise to enable on-chip phenotypic measurements with high precision, sensitivity, specificity, and simplicity. This paper reviews the most recent developments of optofluidic technologies for cellular phenotyping optical detection. PMID:22854915

  2. Peroxisome Metabolism and Cellular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Titorenko, Vladimir I.; Terlecky, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    The essential role of peroxisomes in fatty acid oxidation, anaplerotic metabolism, and hydrogen peroxide turnover is well established. Recent findings suggest these and other related biochemical processes governed by the organelle may also play a critical role in regulating cellular aging. The goal of this review is to summarize and integrate into a model, the evidence that peroxisome metabolism actually helps define the replicative and chronological age of a eukaryotic cell. In this model, peroxisomal reactive oxygen species (ROS) are seen as altering organelle biogenesis and function, and eliciting changes in the dynamic communication networks that exist between peroxisomes and other cellular compartments. At low levels, peroxisomal ROS activate an anti-aging program in the cell; at concentrations beyond a specific threshold, a pro-aging course is triggered. PMID:21083858

  3. Xtoys: Cellular automata on xwindows

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1995-08-15

    Xtoys is a collection of xwindow programs for demonstrating simulations of various statistical models. Included are xising, for the two dimensional Ising model, xpotts, for the q-state Potts model, xautomalab, for a fairly general class of totalistic cellular automata, xsand, for the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfield model of self organized criticality, and xfires, a simple forest fire simulation. The programs should compile on any machine supporting xwindows.

  4. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics.

    PubMed

    Eckel, Zak C; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H; Jacobsen, Alan J; Carter, William B; Schaedler, Tobias A

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging. PMID:26721993

  5. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckel, Zak C.; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H.; Jacobsen, Alan J.; Carter, William B.; Schaedler, Tobias A.

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging.

  6. Janus magnetic cellular spheroids for vascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mattix, Brandon M.; Olsen, Timothy R.; Casco, Megan; Reese, Laura; Poole, John T.; Zhang, Jing; Visconti, Richard P.; Simionescu, Agneta; Simionescu, Dan T.; Alexis, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Cell aggregates, or spheroids, have been used as building blocks to fabricate scaffold-free tissues that can closely mimic the native three-dimensional in vivo environment for broad applications including regenerative medicine and high throughput testing of drugs. The incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into spheroids permits the manipulation of spheroids into desired shapes, patterns, and tissues using magnetic forces. Current strategies incorporating MNPs often involve cellular uptake, and should therefore be avoided because it induces adverse effects on cell activity, viability, and phenotype. Here, we report a Janus structure of magnetic cellular spheroids (JMCS) with spatial control of MNPs to form two distinct domains: cells and extracellular MNPs. This separation of cells and MNPs within magnetic cellular spheroids was successfully incorporated into cellular spheroids with various cellular and extracellular compositions and contents. The amount of cells that internalized MNPs was quantified and showed that JMCSs resulted in significantly lower internalization (35%) compared to uptake spheroids (83%, p < 0.05). Furthermore, the addition of MNPs to cellular spheroids using the Janus method has no adverse effects on cellular viability up to seven weeks, with spheroids maintaining at least 82% viability over 7 weeks when compared to control spheroids without MNPs. By safely incorporating MNPs into cellular spheroids, results demonstrated that JMCSs were capable of magnetic manipulation, and that magnetic forces used during magnetic force assembly mediate fusion into controlled patterns and complex tissues. Finally, JMCSs were assembled and fused into a vascular tissue construct 5 mm in diameter using magnetic force assembly. PMID:24183699

  7. Competitive potential of cellular mobile telecommunications

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, H.

    1983-02-03

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has recently issued rules for the commercial operation of a telecommunications technology not previously in commercial use: the cellular mobile radio. The author has carefully considered the potential for competition between cellular systems and for competition between cellular radio and alternative communications technologies under the regulatory scheme which has been adopted by the FCC. He finds that competition between cellular and wire-line services can be viable if cellular cost and demand data are carefully tracked to avoid market congestion and if cellular or other techniques are not allowed to undercut selected local exchange rates.

  8. The development of decision limits for the GH-2000 detection methodology using additional insulin-like growth factor-I and amino-terminal pro-peptide of type III collagen assays.

    PubMed

    Holt, Richard I G; Böhning, Walailuck; Guha, Nishan; Bartlett, Christiaan; Cowan, David A; Giraud, Sylvain; Bassett, E Eryl; Sönksen, Peter H; Böhning, Dankmar

    2015-09-01

    The GH-2000 and GH-2004 projects have developed a method for detecting GH misuse based on measuring insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and the amino-terminal pro-peptide of type III collagen (P-III-NP). The objectives were to analyze more samples from elite athletes to improve the reliability of the decision limit estimates, to evaluate whether the existing decision limits needed revision, and to validate further non-radioisotopic assays for these markers. The study included 998 male and 931 female elite athletes. Blood samples were collected according to World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) guidelines at various sporting events including the 2011 International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Athletics Championships in Daegu, South Korea. IGF-I was measured by the Immunotech A15729 IGF-I IRMA, the Immunodiagnostic Systems iSYS IGF-I assay and a recently developed mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. P-III-NP was measured by the Cisbio RIA-gnost P-III-P, Orion UniQ™ PIIINP RIA and Siemens ADVIA Centaur P-III-NP assays. The GH-2000 score decision limits were developed using existing statistical techniques. Decision limits were determined using a specificity of 99.99% and an allowance for uncertainty because of the finite sample size. The revised Immunotech IGF-I - Orion P-III-NP assay combination decision limit did not change significantly following the addition of the new samples. The new decision limits are applied to currently available non-radioisotopic assays to measure IGF-I and P-III-NP in elite athletes, which should allow wider flexibility to implement the GH-2000 marker test for GH misuse while providing some resilience against manufacturer withdrawal or change of assays. PMID:25645199

  9. Astrobiological complexity with probabilistic cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Vukotić, Branislav; Ćirković, Milan M

    2012-08-01

    The search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence constitutes one of the major endeavors in science, but has yet been quantitatively modeled only rarely and in a cursory and superficial fashion. We argue that probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) represent the best quantitative framework for modeling the astrobiological history of the Milky Way and its Galactic Habitable Zone. The relevant astrobiological parameters are to be modeled as the elements of the input probability matrix for the PCA kernel. With the underlying simplicity of the cellular automata constructs, this approach enables a quick analysis of large and ambiguous space of the input parameters. We perform a simple clustering analysis of typical astrobiological histories with "Copernican" choice of input parameters and discuss the relevant boundary conditions of practical importance for planning and guiding empirical astrobiological and SETI projects. In addition to showing how the present framework is adaptable to more complex situations and updated observational databases from current and near-future space missions, we demonstrate how numerical results could offer a cautious rationale for continuation of practical SETI searches. PMID:22832998

  10. Elements of the cellular metabolic structure

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated the existence of metabolic covalent modifications in different molecular structures, which are able to store biochemical information that is not encoded by DNA. Some of these covalent mark patterns can be transmitted across generations (epigenetic changes). Recently, the emergence of Hopfield-like attractor dynamics has been observed in self-organized enzymatic networks, which have the capacity to store functional catalytic patterns that can be correctly recovered by specific input stimuli. Hopfield-like metabolic dynamics are stable and can be maintained as a long-term biochemical memory. In addition, specific molecular information can be transferred from the functional dynamics of the metabolic networks to the enzymatic activity involved in covalent post-translational modulation, so that determined functional memory can be embedded in multiple stable molecular marks. The metabolic dynamics governed by Hopfield-type attractors (functional processes), as well as the enzymatic covalent modifications of specific molecules (structural dynamic processes) seem to represent the two stages of the dynamical memory of cellular metabolism (metabolic memory). Epigenetic processes appear to be the structural manifestation of this cellular metabolic memory. Here, a new framework for molecular information storage in the cell is presented, which is characterized by two functionally and molecularly interrelated systems: a dynamic, flexible and adaptive system (metabolic memory) and an essentially conservative system (genetic memory). The molecular information of both systems seems to coordinate the physiological development of the whole cell. PMID:25988183

  11. Typhoid fever as cellular microbiological model.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Dahir Ramos; de Andrade Júnior, Dahir Ramos

    2003-01-01

    The knowledge about typhoid fever pathogenesis is growing in the last years, mainly about the cellular and molecular phenomena that are responsible by clinical manifestations of this disease. In this article are discussed several recent discoveries, as follows: a) Bacterial type III protein secretion system; b) The five virulence genes of Salmonella spp. that encoding Sips (Salmonella invasion protein) A, B, C, D and E, which are capable of induce apoptosis in macrophages; c) The function of Toll R2 and Toll R4 receptors present in the macrophage surface (discovered in the Drosophila). The Toll family receptors are critical in the signalizing mediated by LPS in macrophages in association with LBP and CD14; d) The lines of immune defense between intestinal lumen and internal organs; e) The fundamental role of the endothelial cells in the inflammatory deviation from bloodstream into infected tissues by bacteria. In addition to above subjects, the authors comment the correlation between the clinical features of typhoid fever and the cellular and molecular phenomena of this disease, as well as the therapeutic consequences of this knowledge. PMID:14502344

  12. Sialidases as regulators of bioengineered cellular surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Cristina Y; Ryan, Matthew J; d'Alarcao, Marc; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Human sialidases (NEUs) catalyze the removal of N-acetyl neuraminic acids from the glycome of the cell and regulate a diverse repertoire of nominal cellular functions, such as cell signaling and adhesion. A greater understanding of their substrate permissivity is of interest in order to discern their physiological functions in disease states and in the design of specific and effective small molecule inhibitors. Towards this, we have synthesized soluble fluorogenic reporters of mammalian sialidase activity bearing unnatural sialic acids commonly incorporated into the cellular glycocalyx via metabolic glycoengineering. We found cell-surface sialidases in Jurkat capable of cleaving unnatural sialic acids with differential activities toward a variety of R groups on neuraminic acid. In addition, we observed modulated structure–activity relationships when cell-surface sialidases were presented glycans with unnatural bulky, hydrophobic or fluorinated moieties incorporated directly via glycoengineering. Our results confirm the importance of cell-surface sialidases in glycoengineering incorporation data. We demonstrate the flexibility of human NEUs toward derivatized sugars and highlight the importance of native glycan presentation to sialidase binding and activity. These results stand to inform not only metabolic glycoengineering efforts but also inhibitor design. PMID:25795684

  13. Conformational Sampling of Peptides in Cellular Environments☆

    PubMed Central

    Tanizaki, Seiichiro; Clifford, Jacob; Connelly, Brian D.; Feig, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Biological systems provide a complex environment that can be understood in terms of its dielectric properties. High concentrations of macromolecules and cosolvents effectively reduce the dielectric constant of cellular environments, thereby affecting the conformational sampling of biomolecules. To examine this effect in more detail, the conformational preference of alanine dipeptide, poly-alanine, and melittin in different dielectric environments is studied with computer simulations based on recently developed generalized Born methodology. Results from these simulations suggest that extended conformations are favored over α-helical conformations at the dipeptide level at and below dielectric constants of 5–10. Furthermore, lower-dielectric environments begin to significantly stabilize helical structures in poly-alanine at ɛ = 20. In the more complex peptide melittin, different dielectric environments shift the equilibrium between two main conformations: a nearly fully extended helix that is most stable in low dielectrics and a compact, V-shaped conformation consisting of two helices that is preferred in higher dielectric environments. An additional conformation is only found to be significantly populated at intermediate dielectric constants. Good agreement with previous studies of different peptides in specific, less-polar solvent environments, suggest that helix stabilization and shifts in conformational preferences in such environments are primarily due to a reduced dielectric environment rather than specific molecular details. The findings presented here make predictions of how peptide sampling may be altered in dense cellular environments with reduced dielectric response. PMID:17905846

  14. Shaping cellular form and function by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Bamber, Bruce A; Rowland, Aaron M

    2006-01-01

    In addition to its familiar role in non-selective bulk degradation of cellular material, autophagy can also bring about specific changes in the structure and function of cells. Autophagy has been proposed to operate in a substrate-selective mode to carry out this function, although evidence to demonstrate selectivity has been lacking. A recent study of synapse formation in the nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans now provides experimental evidence for substrate-selective autophagy. Synapses form when presynaptic cells contact their postsynaptic partners during development. This contact induces the assembly of synaptically-localized protein complexes in the postsynaptic cell that contain scaffolding proteins and neurotransmitter receptors. When presynaptic contact was blocked, autophagy in the postsynaptic cell was induced. Substrate selectivity was evident in this system: the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A) receptor), an integral-membrane neurotransmitter receptor, trafficked from the cell surface to autophagosomes. By contrast, the acetylcholine receptor, a structurally-similar neurotransmitter receptor, remained on the cell surface. This result provides experimental support for the idea that autophagy can bring about changes in cell structure and behavior by degrading specific cellular proteins, particularly cell surface receptors that are often important for regulating cell growth, differentiation and function. PMID:16874044

  15. Astrobiological Complexity with Probabilistic Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukotić, Branislav; Ćirković, Milan M.

    2012-08-01

    The search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence constitutes one of the major endeavors in science, but has yet been quantitatively modeled only rarely and in a cursory and superficial fashion. We argue that probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) represent the best quantitative framework for modeling the astrobiological history of the Milky Way and its Galactic Habitable Zone. The relevant astrobiological parameters are to be modeled as the elements of the input probability matrix for the PCA kernel. With the underlying simplicity of the cellular automata constructs, this approach enables a quick analysis of large and ambiguous space of the input parameters. We perform a simple clustering analysis of typical astrobiological histories with "Copernican" choice of input parameters and discuss the relevant boundary conditions of practical importance for planning and guiding empirical astrobiological and SETI projects. In addition to showing how the present framework is adaptable to more complex situations and updated observational databases from current and near-future space missions, we demonstrate how numerical results could offer a cautious rationale for continuation of practical SETI searches.

  16. Proteases in cellular slime mold development: evidence for their involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Fong, D; Bonner, J T

    1979-01-01

    Protein degradation appears to be essential for normal differentiation in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Several protease inhibitors block normal differentiation, and in most cases this inhibition can be reversed by addition of amino acids. For example, chloroquine, which inhibits slime mold cathepsin B activity, interferred with development by blocking sorocarp formation, and this inhibition was reversed by the addition of amino acids. Tosyllysyl chloromethyl ketone also blocked development, and this inhibition was reversed by simultaneous additions of amino acids and glutathione. Moreover, the addition of antipain and leupeptin delayed sorocarp formation. These results, together with the finding reported earlier that cathepsin B activity is differentially localized in the prestalk-prespore zones of the migrating slugs, suggest that proteolysis might play a regulatory role in cellular slime mold differentiation. Images PMID:293735

  17. Cellular proliferation, cellular viability, and biocompatibility of HA-ZnO composites.

    PubMed

    Saha, Naresh; Dubey, Ashutosh K; Basu, Bikramjit

    2012-01-01

    One of the important issues in the development of hydroxyapatite (HA)-based biomaterials is the prosthetic infection, which limits wider use of monolithic HA despite superior cellular response. Recently, we reported that ZnO addition to HA can induce bactericidal property. It is therefore important to assess how ZnO addition influences the cytotoxicity property and cell adhesion/proliferation on HA-ZnO composite surfaces in vitro. In the above perspective, the objective of this study is to investigate the cell type and material composition dependent cellular proliferation and viability of pressureless sintered HA-ZnO composites. The combination of cell viability data as well as morphological observations of cultured human osteoblast-like SaOS2 cells and mouse fibroblast L929 cells suggests that HA-ZnO composites containing 10 Wt % or lower ZnO exhibit the ability to support cell adhesion and proliferation. Both SaOS2 and L929 cells exhibit extensive multidirectional network of actin cytoskeleton and cell flattening on the lower ZnO containing (≤10 Wt %) HA-ZnO composites. The in vitro results illustrate how variation in ZnO content can influence significantly the cell vitality, as evaluated using MTT biochemical assay. Also, the critical statistical analysis reveals that ZnO addition needs to be carefully tailored to ensure good in vitro cytocompatibility. The underlying reasons for difference in biological properties are analyzed. It is suggested that surface wettability as well as dissolution of ZnO, both contribute to the observed differences in cellular viability and proliferation. PMID:22102555

  18. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  19. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  20. Compact Biocompatible Quantum Dots Functionalized for Cellular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenhao; Howarth, Mark; Greytak, Andrew B.; Zheng, Yi; Nocera, Daniel G.; Ting, Alice Y.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2009-01-01

    We present a family of water-soluble quantum dots (QDs) that exhibit low nonspecific binding to cells, small hydrodynamic diameter, tunable surface charge, high quantum yield, and good solution stability across a wide pH range. These QDs are amenable to covalent modification via simple carbodiimide coupling chemistry, which is achieved by functionalizing the surface of QDs with a new class of heterobifunctional ligands incorporating dihydrolipoic acid, a short poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) spacer, and an amine or carboxylate terminus. The covalent attachment of molecules is demonstrated by appending a rhodamine dye to form a QD-dye conjugate exhibiting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). High-affinity labeling is demonstrated by covalent attachment of streptavidin, thus enabling the tracking of biotinylated epidermal growth factor (EGF) bound to EGF receptor on live cells. In addition, QDs solubilized with the heterobifunctional ligands retain their metal-affinity driven conjugation chemistry with polyhistidine-tagged proteins. This dual functionality is demonstrated by simultaneous covalent attachment of a rhodamine FRET acceptor and binding of polyhistidine-tagged streptavidin on the same nanocrystal to create a targeted QD, which exhibits dual-wavelength emission. Such emission properties could serve as the basis for ratiometric sensing of the cellular receptor’s local chemical environment. PMID:18177042

  1. Critical Behavior in Cellular Automata Animal Disease Transmission Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, P. D.; Chang, Julius

    Using cellular automata model, we simulate the British Government Policy (BGP) in the 2001 foot and mouth epidemic in Great Britain. When clinical symptoms of the disease appeared in a farm, there is mandatory slaughter (culling) of all livestock in an infected premise (IP). Those farms in the neighboring of an IP (contiguous premise, CP), are also culled, aka nearest neighbor interaction. Farms where the disease may be prevalent from animal, human, vehicle or airborne transmission (dangerous contact, DC), are additionally culled, aka next-to-nearest neighbor interactions and lightning factor. The resulting mathematical model possesses a phase transition, whereupon if the physical disease transmission kernel exceeds a critical value, catastrophic loss of animals ensues. The nonlocal disease transport probability can be as low as 0.01% per day and the disease can still be in the high mortality phase. We show that the fundamental equation for sustainable disease transport is the criticality equation for neutron fission cascade. Finally, we calculate that the percentage of culled animals that are actually healthy is ≈30%.

  2. Discovery of a proteinaceous cellular receptor for a norovirus.

    PubMed

    Orchard, Robert C; Wilen, Craig B; Doench, John G; Baldridge, Megan T; McCune, Broc T; Lee, Ying-Chiang J; Lee, Sanghyun; Pruett-Miller, Shondra M; Nelson, Christopher A; Fremont, Daved H; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-08-26

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are a leading cause of gastroenteritis globally, yet the host factors required for NoV infection are poorly understood. We identified host molecules that are essential for murine NoV (MNoV)-induced cell death, including CD300lf as a proteinaceous receptor. We found that CD300lf is essential for MNoV binding and replication in cell lines and primary cells. Additionally, Cd300lf(-/-) mice are resistant to MNoV infection. Expression of CD300lf in human cells breaks the species barrier that would otherwise restrict MNoV replication. The crystal structure of the CD300lf ectodomain reveals a potential ligand-binding cleft composed of residues that are critical for MNoV infection. Therefore, the presence of a proteinaceous receptor is the primary determinant of MNoV species tropism, whereas other components of cellular machinery required for NoV replication are conserved between humans and mice. PMID:27540007

  3. Cellular autofluorescence imaging for early diagnosis of cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenkeste, Karine; Deniset, Ariane; Lecart, Sandrine; Leveque-Fort, Sandrine; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre; Ferlicot, Sophie; Eschwege, Pascal

    2005-08-01

    Urinary cytology is employed in diagnostic guidelines of bladder cancer in anatomo-pathological laboratories mostly for its ability to diagnose non detectable cancers using cystoscopy, but also because it is a non-invasive and non-constraining technique for a regular follow-up of the more exposed populations. The impossibility to detect such cancers is mainly due to their localization either in the bladder or in the upper urinary tract and the prostate. However, urinary cytology lacks sensitivity, especially for the detection of low grade low stage tumors due to inherent limitation of morphological criteria to distinguish low grade tumor cells from normal urothelial cells. For this purpose, we developed, in addition to urinary cytology, an original screening of these cytological slides by using spectrally-resolved and time-resolved fluorescence as a contrast factor, without changing any parameters in the cytological slide preparation. This method takes advantage of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, continuously tunable in the spectral range 700-950 nm allowing the observation of most endogenous cellular chromophores by biphotonic excitation. A commercial confocal microscope was also used in the measurements allowing an excitation of the samples between 458 nm and 633 nm. We observed that the fluorescence emission is differentially distributed in normal and pathological urothelial cells. Spectral- and time-resolved measurements attested this difference over about one hundred cases which have been tested to confirm the high accuracy of this non-invasive technique.

  4. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Catrina M; Bialas, Nathan J; Dekkers, Martijn P J; Walker, Denise S; Grundy, Laura J; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Leroux, Michel R

    2016-07-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-associated ciliary components. Roles for protofilament ribbon-associated proteins in nonmotile cilia and cellular signaling have not been investigated. We show that PACRG localizes to a small subset of nonmotile cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionary adaptation for mediating specific sensory/signaling functions. We find that it influences a learning behavior known as gustatory plasticity, in which it is functionally coupled to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. We also demonstrate that PACRG promotes longevity in C. elegans by acting upstream of the lifespan-promoting FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and likely upstream of insulin/IGF signaling. Our findings establish previously unrecognized sensory/signaling functions for PACRG and point to a role for this protein in promoting longevity. Furthermore, our work suggests additional ciliary motility-signaling connections, since EFHC1 (EF-hand containing 1), a potential PACRG interaction partner similarly associated with the protofilament ribbon and ciliary motility, also positively regulates lifespan. PMID:27193298

  5. Mast Cells as Cellular Sensors in Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Beghdadi, Walid; Madjene, Lydia Célia; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Gautier, Gregory; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are localized in tissues. Intense research on these cells over the years has demonstrated their role as effector cells in the maintenance of tissue integrity following injury produced by infectious agents, toxins, metabolic states, etc. After stimulation they release a sophisticated array of inflammatory mediators, cytokines, and growth factors to orchestrate an inflammatory response. These mediators can directly initiate tissue responses on resident cells, but they have also been shown to regulate other infiltrating immune cell functions. Research in recent years has revealed that the outcome of mast cell actions is not always detrimental for the host but can also limit disease development. In addition, mast cell functions highly depend on the physiological context in the organism. Depending on the genetic background, strength of the injurious event, the particular microenvironment, mast cells direct responses ranging from pro- to anti-inflammatory. It appears that they have evolved as cellular sensors to discern their environment in order to initiate an appropriate physiological response either aimed to favor inflammation for repair or at the contrary limit the inflammatory process to prevent further damage. Like every sophisticated machinery, its dysregulation leads to pathology. Given the broad distribution of mast cells in tissues this also explains their implication in many inflammatory diseases. PMID:22566827

  6. A Transcriptional Program Mediating Entry into Cellular Quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Helen; Adler, Adam S; Segal, Eran; Chang, Howard Y

    2007-01-01

    The balance of quiescence and cell division is critical for tissue homeostasis and organismal health. Serum stimulation of fibroblasts is well studied as a classic model of entry into the cell division cycle, but the induction of cellular quiescence, such as by serum deprivation (SD), is much less understood. Here we show that SS and SD activate distinct early transcriptional responses genome-wide that converge on a late symmetric transcriptional program. Several serum deprivation early response genes (SDERGs), including the putative tumor suppressor genes SALL2 and MXI1, are required for cessation of DNA synthesis in response to SD and induction of additional SD genes. SDERGs are coordinately repressed in many types of human cancers compared to their normal counterparts, and repression of SDERGs predicts increased risk of cancer progression and death in human breast cancers. These results identify a gene expression program uniquely responsive to loss of growth factor signaling; members of SDERGs may constitute novel growth inhibitors that prevent cancer. PMID:17559306

  7. Lipid Droplets And Cellular Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2013-01-01

    Among organelles, lipid droplets (LDs) uniquely constitute a hydrophobic phase in the aqueous environment of the cytosol. Their hydrophobic core of neutral lipids stores metabolic energy and membrane components, making LDs hubs for lipid metabolism. In addition, LDs are implicated in a number of other cellular functions, ranging from protein storage and degradation to viral replication. These processes are functionally linked to many physiological and pathological conditions, including obesity and related metabolic diseases. Despite their important functions and nearly ubiquitous presence in cells, many aspects of LD biology are unknown. In the past few years, the pace of LD investigation has increased, providing new insights. Here, we review the current knowledge of LD cell biology and its translation to physiology. PMID:22524315

  8. Cellular imaging using temporally flickering nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ilovitsh, Tali; Danan, Yossef; Meir, Rinat; Meiri, Amihai; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing the surface plasmon resonance effect in gold nanoparticles enables their use as contrast agents in a variety of applications for compound cellular imaging. However, most techniques suffer from poor signal to noise ratio (SNR) statistics due to high shot noise that is associated with low photon count in addition to high background noise. We demonstrate an effective way to improve the SNR, in particular when the inspected signal is indistinguishable in the given noisy environment. We excite the temporal flickering of the scattered light from gold nanoparticle that labels a biological sample. By preforming temporal spectral analysis of the received spatial image and by inspecting the proper spectral component corresponding to the modulation frequency, we separate the signal from the wide spread spectral noise (lock-in amplification). PMID:25650019

  9. Cellular immunity and lymphokine production during spaceflights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantinova, I. V.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Lesniak, A. T.; Shaffar, L.; Mandel, A.; Rykova, M. P.; Antropova, E. N.; Ferrua, B.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on changes in cellular immunity and in the production of lymphokine in spacecrews during spaceflights. Measurements were carried out on blood samples collected from 50 cosmonauts before and after spaceflights of different duration, on board Salyut-6, Salyut-7, or Mir. Additional data were obtained from rats flown on board the Cosmos-1667 and Cosmos-1887 biosatellites. The parameters measured included the PHA responsiveness of T lymphocytes, the activity of T-helper cells and of nonspecific T suppressors, the activity of the so-called natural killer lymphocytes, the production of gamma-interferon, and the cell-surface markers. Results showed that the frequency and the extent of changes in the immunologic resistance of subjects depended on the duration of the flight. However, even after the most prolonged (365 days) spaceflight, the changes observed were mostly of a functional character with subsequent rapid return to normal.

  10. Sesquiterpene antitumor agents: inhibitors of cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, K H; Hall, I H; Mar, E C; Starnes, C O; ElGebaly, S A; Waddell, T G; HADGRAFT, R I; Ruffner, C G; Weidner, I

    1977-04-29

    Helenalin and tenulin injected into CF1 male mice bearing Ehrlich ascites tumors inhibit DNA synthesis and DNA polymerase enzymatic activity in the tumor cells. Helenalin inhibited protein synthesis. Both drugs increased the concentration of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, and interfered with glycolytic and mitochondrial energy processes. Cholesterol synthesis was also inhibited, resulting in lower serum cholesterol levels in tumor-bearing animals. Data obtained in vitro indicate that the cyclopentenone-bearing sesquiterpene lactone and related compounds do not alkylate puring bases of nucleic acids but rather undergo a Michael-type addition reaction with the sulfhydryl groups of reduced glutathione and l-cysteine. Thus, the inhibition of cellular enzyme activities and metabolism that has been observed with these drugs might be explained by the occurrence of a Michael-type teaction. PMID:191909

  11. Cellular imaging using temporally flickering nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ilovitsh, Tali; Danan, Yossef; Meir, Rinat; Meiri, Amihai; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing the surface plasmon resonance effect in gold nanoparticles enables their use as contrast agents in a variety of applications for compound cellular imaging. However, most techniques suffer from poor signal to noise ratio (SNR) statistics due to high shot noise that is associated with low photon count in addition to high background noise. We demonstrate an effective way to improve the SNR, in particular when the inspected signal is indistinguishable in the given noisy environment. We excite the temporal flickering of the scattered light from gold nanoparticle that labels a biological sample. By preforming temporal spectral analysis of the received spatial image and by inspecting the proper spectral component corresponding to the modulation frequency, we separate the signal from the wide spread spectral noise (lock-in amplification). PMID:25650019

  12. Gradient Static-Strain Stimulation in a Microfluidic Chip for 3D Cellular Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Hsin-Yi; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Huang, Tsu-Wei; Liao, Ronglih; Chen, Tsung-Ju; Paul, Arghya; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Cell alignment is a critical factor to govern cellular behavior and function for various tissue engineering applications ranging from cardiac to neural regeneration. In addition to physical geometry, strain is a crucial parameter to manipulate cellular alignment for functional tissue formation. In this paper, we introduce a simple approach to generate a range of gradient static strains without external mechanical control for the stimulation of cellular behavior within 3D biomimetic hydrogel microenvironments. A glass-supported microfluidic chip with a convex flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane on the top was employed for loading the cells suspended in a prepolymer solution. Following UV crosslinking through a photomask with a concentric circular pattern, the cell-laden hydrogels were formed in a height gradient from the center (maximum) to the boundary (minimum). When the convex PDMS membrane retracted back to a flat surface, it applied compressive gradient forces on the cell-laden hydrogels. The concentric circular hydrogel patterns confined the direction of hydrogel elongation, and the compressive strain on the hydrogel therefore resulted in elongation stretch in the radial direction to guide cell alignment. NIH3T3 cells were cultured in the chip for 3 days with compressive strains that varied from ~65% (center) to ~15% (boundary) on hydrogels. We found that the hydrogel geometry dominated the cell alignment near the outside boundary, where cells aligned along the circular direction, and the compressive strain dominated the cell alignment near the center, where cells aligned radially. This study developed a new and simple approach to facilitate cellular alignment based on hydrogel geometry and strain stimulation for tissue engineering applications. This platform offers unique advantages and is significantly different than the existing approaches owing to the fact that gradient generation was accomplished in a miniature device without using an external

  13. Pretreatment with enteral cholestyramine prevents suppression of the cellular immune system after partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Van Leeuwen, P A; Boermeester, M A; Houdijk, A P; Meyer, S; Cuesta, M A; Wesdorp, R I; Rodrick, M L; Wilmore, D W

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors tested the hypothesis that the beneficial effects of the endotoxin-binding agent cholestyramine on the postoperative course in rats that had undergone a partial hepatectomy was the result of improvement of cellular immune functions. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Major liver resection is associated with severe postoperative complications and a high incidence of systemic infections. Gut-derived endotoxins previously were shown to be involved in the pathogenic processes after partial hepatectomy in rats. In addition, enteral cholestyramine improved postoperative survival, but how its beneficial effects are mediated is not clear. METHODS: Rats that were force-fed for 7 days with either cholestyramine (150 mg/day) or 0.9% saline (equal volume) were randomized to undergo a partial hepatectomy or a sham operation. After 24 hours, the rats were killed and splenic mononuclear cells were tested in vitro for mitogenic responses and cytokine production. RESULTS: Proliferative responses of splenic B and T lymphocytes and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 by splenocytes were lower in rats after partial hepatectomy than in sham-operated animals. An increased concanavalin A-stimulated production of interleukin-2 also was found after partial hepatectomy compared with sham levels. Pretreatment with enteral cholestyramine preserved cellular proliferative responsiveness of both B and T cells, and restored cytokine production by splenocytes to sham levels. CONCLUSION: Prophylactic treatment with enteral cholestyramine preserved cellular immune functions after partial hepatectomy in the rat, which may explain its beneficial effects on the postoperative course. Furthermore, the authors' results are consistent with the hypothesis that endotoxemia is involved in the pathogenesis of the cellular immune derangements after partial hepatectomy. PMID:7717782

  14. The adenovirus E1A protein overrides the requirement for cellular ras in initiating DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, D W; Dobrowolski, S F; Piotrkowski, A; Harter, M L

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A protein can induce cellular DNA synthesis in growth-arrested cells by interacting with the cellular protein p300 or pRb. In addition, serum- and growth factor-dependent cells require ras activity to initiate DNA synthesis and recently we have shown that Balb/c 3T3 cells can be blocked in either early or late G1 following microinjection of an anti-ras antibody. In this study, the E1A 243 amino acid protein is shown through microinjection not only to shorten the G0 to S phase interval but, what is more important, to override the inhibitory effects exerted by the anti-ras antibody in either early or late G1. Specifically, whether E1A is co-injected with anti-ras into quiescent cells or injected 18 h following a separate injection of anti-ras after serum stimulation, it efficiently induces cellular DNA synthesis in cells that would otherwise be blocked in G0/G1. Moreover, injection of a mutant form of E1A that can no longer associate with p300 is just as efficient as wild-type E1A in stimulating DNA synthesis in cells whose ras activity has been neutralized by anti-ras. The results presented here show that E1A is capable of overriding the requirement of cellular ras activity in promoting the entry of cells into S phase. Moreover, the results suggest the possibility that pRb and/or pRb-related proteins may function in a ras-dependent pathway that enables E1A to achieve this activity. Images PMID:7813447

  15. Quantum dot multiplexing for the profiling of cellular receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Montiel, Felipe T.; Li, Peter; Imoukhuede, P. I.

    2015-11-01

    The profiling of cellular heterogeneity has wide-reaching importance for our understanding of how cells function and react to their environments in healthy and diseased states. Our ability to interpret and model cell behavior has been limited by the difficulties of measuring cell differences, for example, comparing tumor and non-tumor cells, particularly at the individual cell level. This demonstrates a clear need for a generalizable approach to profile fluorophore sites on cells or molecular assemblies on beads. Here, a multiplex immunoassay for simultaneous detection of five different angiogenic markers was developed. We targeted angiogenic receptors in the vascular endothelial growth factor family (VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and VEGFR3) and Neuropilin (NRP) family (NRP1 and NRP2), using multicolor quantum dots (Qdots). Copper-free click based chemistry was used to conjugate the monoclonal antibodies with 525, 565, 605, 655 and 705 nm CdSe/ZnS Qdots. We tested and performed colocalization analysis of our nanoprobes using the Pearson correlation coefficient statistical analysis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were tested. The ability to easily monitor the molecular indicators of angiogenesis that are a precursor to cancer in a fast and cost effective system is an important step towards personalized nanomedicine.The profiling of cellular heterogeneity has wide-reaching importance for our understanding of how cells function and react to their environments in healthy and diseased states. Our ability to interpret and model cell behavior has been limited by the difficulties of measuring cell differences, for example, comparing tumor and non-tumor cells, particularly at the individual cell level. This demonstrates a clear need for a generalizable approach to profile fluorophore sites on cells or molecular assemblies on beads. Here, a multiplex immunoassay for simultaneous detection of five different angiogenic markers was developed. We targeted angiogenic receptors

  16. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  17. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  18. Quantum cellular automata without particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, David A.; Shakeel, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cellular automata (QCA) constitute space and time homogeneous discrete models for quantum field theories (QFTs). Although QFTs are defined without reference to particles, computations are done in terms of Feynman diagrams, which are explicitly interpreted in terms of interacting particles. Similarly, the easiest QCA to construct are quantum lattice gas automata (QLGA). A natural question then is, which QCA are not QLGA? Here we construct a nontrivial example of such a QCA; it provides a simple model in 1 +1 dimensions with no particle interpretation at the scale where the QCA dynamics are homogeneous.

  19. Universal map for cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2012-08-01

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CAs) containing no freely adjustable parameters and valid for any alphabet size and any neighborhood range (including non-symmetrical neighborhoods). The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and to arbitrary order in time. Specific CA maps for the famous Conway's Game of Life and Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs are given. An induction method for CAs, based in the universal map, allows mathematical expressions for the orbits of a wide variety of elementary CAs to be systematically derived.

  20. Therapeutic cloning and cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Ramon M; Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are capable of differentiating into any cell-type present in an adult organism, and constitute a renewable source of tissue for regenerative therapies. The transplant of allogenic stem cells is challenging due to the risk of immune rejection. Nevertheless, somatic cell reprogramming techniques allow the generation of isogenic embryonic stem cells, genetically identical to the patient. In this chapter we will discuss the cellular reprogramming techniques in the context of regenerative therapy and the biological and technical barriers that they will need to overcome before clinical use. PMID:22457116