Science.gov

Sample records for additional computational time

  1. Additional efficient computation of branched nerve equations: adaptive time step and ideal voltage clamp.

    PubMed

    Borg-Graham, L J

    2000-01-01

    Various improvements are described for the simulation of biophysically and anatomically detailed compartmental models of single neurons and networks of neurons. These include adaptive time-step integration and a reordering of the circuit matrix to allow ideal voltage clamp of arbitrary nodes. We demonstrate how the adaptive time-step method can give equivalent accuracy as a fixed time-step method for typical current clamp simulation protocols, with about a 2.5 reduction in runtime. The ideal voltage clamp method is shown to be more stable than the nonideal case, in particular when used with the adaptive time-step method. Simulation results are presented using the Surf-Hippo Neuron Simulation System, a public domain object-oriented simulator written in Lisp. PMID:10809013

  2. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Computational Process and Material Modeling of Powder Bed additive manufacturing of IN 718. Optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling. Increase understanding of build properties. Increase reliability of builds. Decrease time to adoption of process for critical hardware. Potential to decrease post-build heat treatments. Conduct single-track and coupon builds at various build parameters. Record build parameter information and QM Meltpool data. Refine Applied Optimization powder bed AM process model using data. Report thermal modeling results. Conduct metallography of build samples. Calibrate STK models using metallography findings. Run STK models using AO thermal profiles and report STK modeling results. Validate modeling with additional build. Photodiode Intensity measurements highly linear with power input. Melt Pool Intensity highly correlated to Melt Pool Size. Melt Pool size and intensity increase with power. Applied Optimization will use data to develop powder bed additive manufacturing process model.

  3. Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), additional computer support equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), additional computer support equipment - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  4. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing (OSU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Powder-Bed Additive Manufacturing (AM) through Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) or Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is being used by NASA and the Aerospace industry to "print" parts that traditionally are very complex, high cost, or long schedule lead items. The process spreads a thin layer of metal powder over a build platform, then melts the powder in a series of welds in a desired shape. The next layer of powder is applied, and the process is repeated until layer-by-layer, a very complex part can be built. This reduces cost and schedule by eliminating very complex tooling and processes traditionally used in aerospace component manufacturing. To use the process to print end-use items, NASA seeks to understand SLM material well enough to develop a method of qualifying parts for space flight operation. Traditionally, a new material process takes many years and high investment to generate statistical databases and experiential knowledge, but computational modeling can truncate the schedule and cost -many experiments can be run quickly in a model, which would take years and a high material cost to run empirically. This project seeks to optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling.

  5. Computer simulation for the growing probability of additional offspring with an advantageous reversal allele in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2016-01-01

    This study calculated the growing probability of additional offspring with the advantageous reversal allele in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape using the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model. The growing probability was calculated for various population sizes, N, sequence lengths, L, selective advantages, s, fitness parameters, k and measuring parameters, C. The saturated growing probability in the stochastic region was approximately the effective selective advantage, s*, when C≫1/Ns* and s*≪1. The present study suggests that the growing probability in the stochastic region in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model can be described using the theoretical formula for the growing probability in the Moran two-allele model. The selective advantage ratio, which represents the ratio of the effective selective advantage to the selective advantage, does not depend on the population size, selective advantage, measuring parameter and fitness parameter; instead the selective advantage ratio decreases with the increasing sequence length.

  6. Computed tomography characterisation of additive manufacturing materials.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Richard; Thompson, Darren; Winder, John

    2011-06-01

    Additive manufacturing, covering processes frequently referred to as rapid prototyping and rapid manufacturing, provides new opportunities in the manufacture of highly complex and custom-fitting medical devices and products. Whilst many medical applications of AM have been explored and physical properties of the resulting parts have been studied, the characterisation of AM materials in computed tomography has not been explored. The aim of this study was to determine the CT number of commonly used AM materials. There are many potential applications of the information resulting from this study in the design and manufacture of wearable medical devices, implants, prostheses and medical imaging test phantoms. A selection of 19 AM material samples were CT scanned and the resultant images analysed to ascertain the materials' CT number and appearance in the images. It was found that some AM materials have CT numbers very similar to human tissues, FDM, SLA and SLS produce samples that appear uniform on CT images and that 3D printed materials show a variation in internal structure.

  7. Additional development of the XTRAN3S computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borland, C. J.

    1989-01-01

    Additional developments and enhancements to the XTRAN3S computer program, a code for calculation of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, and associated aeroelastic solutions, for 3-D wings in the transonic flow regime are described. Algorithm improvements for the XTRAN3S program were provided including an implicit finite difference scheme to enhance the allowable time step and vectorization for improved computational efficiency. The code was modified to treat configurations with a fuselage, multiple stores/nacelles/pylons, and winglets. Computer program changes (updates) for error corrections and updates for version control are provided.

  8. 29 CFR 25.6 - Time; additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Time; additional time after service by mail. 25.6 Section 25.6 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES FOR THE NOMINATION OF ARBITRATORS UNDER SECTION 11 OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 10988 § 25.6 Time; additional time after service by mail. (a) In computing any period...

  9. Uncertainty versus computer response time

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, W.D. |

    1994-12-31

    Interactive on-line presentation of risk analysis results with immediate ``what if`` capability is now possible with available microcomputer technology. This can provide an effective means off presenting the risk results, the decision possibilities, and the underlying assumptions to decision makers, stakeholders, and the public. However, the limitation of computer calculational power on microcomputers requires a trade-off between the precision of the analysis and the computing and display response time. Fortunately, the uncertainties in the risk analysis are usually so large that extreme precision is often unwarranted. Therefore, risk analyses used for this purpose must include trade-offs between precision and processing time, and uncertainties introduced must be put into perspective.

  10. 12 CFR 1102.27 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computing time. 1102.27 Section 1102.27 Banks... for Proceedings § 1102.27 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed... time begins to run is not included. The last day so computed is included, unless it is a...

  11. 12 CFR 1102.27 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computing time. 1102.27 Section 1102.27 Banks... for Proceedings § 1102.27 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed... time begins to run is not included. The last day so computed is included, unless it is a...

  12. 12 CFR 1102.27 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Computing time. 1102.27 Section 1102.27 Banks... for Proceedings § 1102.27 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed... time begins to run is not included. The last day so computed is included, unless it is a...

  13. 12 CFR 1102.27 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computing time. 1102.27 Section 1102.27 Banks... for Proceedings § 1102.27 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed... time begins to run is not included. The last day so computed is included, unless it is a...

  14. Computational work and time on finite machines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Measures of the computational work and computational delay required by machines to compute functions are given. Exchange inequalities are developed for random access, tape, and drum machines to show that product inequalities between storage and time, number of drum tracks and time, number of bits in an address and time, etc., must be satisfied to compute finite functions on bounded machines.

  15. 17 CFR 201.160 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Time computation. 201.160... Rules of Practice General Rules § 201.160 Time computation. (a) Computation. In computing any period of time prescribed in or allowed by these Rules of Practice or by order of the Commission, the day of...

  16. 17 CFR 201.160 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Time computation. 201.160... Rules of Practice General Rules § 201.160 Time computation. (a) Computation. In computing any period of time prescribed in or allowed by these Rules of Practice or by order of the Commission, the day of...

  17. 17 CFR 201.160 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Time computation. 201.160... Rules of Practice General Rules § 201.160 Time computation. (a) Computation. In computing any period of time prescribed in or allowed by these Rules of Practice or by order of the Commission, the day of...

  18. 12 CFR 622.21 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computing time. 622.21 Section 622.21 Banks and... Formal Hearings § 622.21 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or... run is not to be included. The last day so computed shall be included, unless it is a Saturday,...

  19. 24 CFR 180.405 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Time computations. 180.405 Section... Hearing § 180.405 Time computations. (a) In computing time under this part, the time period begins the day... Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal Government, in which case the time...

  20. 24 CFR 180.405 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Time computations. 180.405 Section... Hearing § 180.405 Time computations. (a) In computing time under this part, the time period begins the day... Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal Government, in which case the time...

  1. 24 CFR 180.405 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Time computations. 180.405 Section... Hearing § 180.405 Time computations. (a) In computing time under this part, the time period begins the day... Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal Government, in which case the time...

  2. 24 CFR 180.405 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Time computations. 180.405 Section... Hearing § 180.405 Time computations. (a) In computing time under this part, the time period begins the day... Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal Government, in which case the time...

  3. 24 CFR 180.405 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Time computations. 180.405 Section... Hearing § 180.405 Time computations. (a) In computing time under this part, the time period begins the day... Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal Government, in which case the time...

  4. Computed Tomography Inspection and Analysis for Additive Manufacturing Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection was performed on test articles additively manufactured from metallic materials. Metallic AM and machined wrought alloy test articles with programmed flaws were inspected using a 2MeV linear accelerator based CT system. Performance of CT inspection on identically configured wrought and AM components and programmed flaws was assessed using standard image analysis techniques to determine the impact of additive manufacturing on inspectability of objects with complex geometries.

  5. 29 CFR 18.4 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Time computations. 18.4 Section 18.4 Labor Office of the... ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.4 Time computations. (a) Generally. In computing any period of time under these rules or in an order issued hereunder the time begins with the day following the act, event,...

  6. 24 CFR 26.31 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Time computations. 26.31 Section 26... HEARING PROCEDURES Hearings Pursuant to the Administrative Procedure Act § 26.31 Time computations. (a) General. In computing any period of time under subpart B of this part, the time period begins the...

  7. 24 CFR 26.31 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Time computations. 26.31 Section 26... HEARING PROCEDURES Hearings Pursuant to the Administrative Procedure Act § 26.31 Time computations. (a) General. In computing any period of time under subpart B of this part, the time period begins the...

  8. 29 CFR 102.111 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Time computation. 102.111 Section 102.111 Labor Regulations... Papers § 102.111 Time computation. (a) In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by these rules, the day of the act, event, or default after which the designated period of time begins to run...

  9. 24 CFR 1720.165 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Time computation. 1720.165 Section... Proceedings General Provisions § 1720.165 Time computation. Computation of any period of time prescribed or... or default initiating such period of time shall have occurred. When the last day of the period...

  10. 29 CFR 18.4 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Time computations. 18.4 Section 18.4 Labor Office of the... ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.4 Time computations. (a) Generally. In computing any period of time under these rules or in an order issued hereunder the time begins with the day following the act, event,...

  11. 12 CFR 622.21 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computing time. 622.21 Section 622.21 Banks and... Formal Hearings § 622.21 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by this subpart, the date of the act or event from which the designated period of time begins...

  12. 24 CFR 26.31 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Time computations. 26.31 Section 26... HEARING PROCEDURES Hearings Pursuant to the Administrative Procedure Act § 26.31 Time computations. (a) General. In computing any period of time under subpart B of this part, the time period begins the...

  13. 29 CFR 102.111 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Time computation. 102.111 Section 102.111 Labor Regulations... Papers § 102.111 Time computation. (a) In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by these rules, the day of the act, event, or default after which the designated period of time begins to run...

  14. 24 CFR 1720.165 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Time computation. 1720.165 Section... Proceedings General Provisions § 1720.165 Time computation. Computation of any period of time prescribed or... or default initiating such period of time shall have occurred. When the last day of the period...

  15. 28 CFR 76.8 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Time computations. 76.8 Section 76.8... PENALTIES FOR POSSESSION OF CERTAIN CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES § 76.8 Time computations. (a) Generally. In computing any period of time under this part or in an order issued hereunder, the time begins with the...

  16. 28 CFR 76.8 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Time computations. 76.8 Section 76.8... PENALTIES FOR POSSESSION OF CERTAIN CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES § 76.8 Time computations. (a) Generally. In computing any period of time under this part or in an order issued hereunder, the time begins with the...

  17. 28 CFR 76.8 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Time computations. 76.8 Section 76.8... PENALTIES FOR POSSESSION OF CERTAIN CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES § 76.8 Time computations. (a) Generally. In computing any period of time under this part or in an order issued hereunder, the time begins with the...

  18. 24 CFR 1720.165 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Time computation. 1720.165 Section... Proceedings General Provisions § 1720.165 Time computation. Computation of any period of time prescribed or... or default initiating such period of time shall have occurred. When the last day of the period...

  19. 28 CFR 76.8 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Time computations. 76.8 Section 76.8... PENALTIES FOR POSSESSION OF CERTAIN CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES § 76.8 Time computations. (a) Generally. In computing any period of time under this part or in an order issued hereunder, the time begins with the...

  20. 24 CFR 1720.165 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Time computation. 1720.165 Section... Proceedings General Provisions § 1720.165 Time computation. Computation of any period of time prescribed or... or default initiating such period of time shall have occurred. When the last day of the period...

  1. 29 CFR 102.111 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Time computation. 102.111 Section 102.111 Labor Regulations... Papers § 102.111 Time computation. (a) In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by these rules, the day of the act, event, or default after which the designated period of time begins to run...

  2. 12 CFR 622.21 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computing time. 622.21 Section 622.21 Banks and... Formal Hearings § 622.21 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by this subpart, the date of the act or event from which the designated period of time begins...

  3. 12 CFR 622.21 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Computing time. 622.21 Section 622.21 Banks and... Formal Hearings § 622.21 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by this subpart, the date of the act or event from which the designated period of time begins...

  4. 24 CFR 26.31 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Time computations. 26.31 Section 26... HEARING PROCEDURES Hearings Pursuant to the Administrative Procedure Act § 26.31 Time computations. (a) General. In computing any period of time under subpart B of this part, the time period begins the...

  5. 29 CFR 18.4 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Time computations. 18.4 Section 18.4 Labor Office of the... ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.4 Time computations. (a) Generally. In computing any period of time under these rules or in an order issued hereunder the time begins with the day following the act, event,...

  6. 24 CFR 1720.165 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Time computation. 1720.165 Section... Proceedings General Provisions § 1720.165 Time computation. Computation of any period of time prescribed or... or default initiating such period of time shall have occurred. When the last day of the period...

  7. 24 CFR 26.31 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Time computations. 26.31 Section 26... HEARING PROCEDURES Hearings Pursuant to the Administrative Procedure Act § 26.31 Time computations. (a) General. In computing any period of time under subpart B of this part, the time period begins the...

  8. 29 CFR 102.111 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Time computation. 102.111 Section 102.111 Labor Regulations... Papers § 102.111 Time computation. (a) In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by these rules, the day of the act, event, or default after which the designated period of time begins to run...

  9. Additional support for the TDK/MABL computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, G. R.; Dunn, Stuart S.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced version of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) computer program was developed under contract and released to the propulsion community in early 1989. Exposure of the code to this community indicated a need for improvements in certain areas. In particular, the TDK code needed to be adapted to the special requirements imposed by the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) development program. This engine utilizes injection of the gas generator exhaust into the primary nozzle by means of a set of slots. The subsequent mixing of this secondary stream with the primary stream with finite rate chemical reaction can have a major impact on the engine performance and the thermal protection of the nozzle wall. In attempting to calculate this reacting boundary layer problem, the Mass Addition Boundary Layer (MABL) module of TDK was found to be deficient in several respects. For example, when finite rate chemistry was used to determine gas properties, (MABL-K option) the program run times became excessive because extremely small step sizes were required to maintain numerical stability. A robust solution algorithm was required so that the MABL-K option could be viable as a rocket propulsion industry design tool. Solving this problem was a primary goal of the phase 1 work effort.

  10. Synchronizing compute node time bases in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Faraj, Daniel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip

    2015-01-27

    Synchronizing time bases in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes organized for data communications in a tree network, where one compute node is designated as a root, and, for each compute node: calculating data transmission latency from the root to the compute node; configuring a thread as a pulse waiter; initializing a wakeup unit; and performing a local barrier operation; upon each node completing the local barrier operation, entering, by all compute nodes, a global barrier operation; upon all nodes entering the global barrier operation, sending, to all the compute nodes, a pulse signal; and for each compute node upon receiving the pulse signal: waking, by the wakeup unit, the pulse waiter; setting a time base for the compute node equal to the data transmission latency between the root node and the compute node; and exiting the global barrier operation.

  11. Synchronizing compute node time bases in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Faraj, Daniel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip

    2014-12-30

    Synchronizing time bases in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes organized for data communications in a tree network, where one compute node is designated as a root, and, for each compute node: calculating data transmission latency from the root to the compute node; configuring a thread as a pulse waiter; initializing a wakeup unit; and performing a local barrier operation; upon each node completing the local barrier operation, entering, by all compute nodes, a global barrier operation; upon all nodes entering the global barrier operation, sending, to all the compute nodes, a pulse signal; and for each compute node upon receiving the pulse signal: waking, by the wakeup unit, the pulse waiter; setting a time base for the compute node equal to the data transmission latency between the root node and the compute node; and exiting the global barrier operation.

  12. 24 CFR 26.11 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Time computation. 26.11 Section 26... HEARING PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.11 Time computation. (a) Generally. Computation of any period of time prescribed or allowed by this part shall begin with the...

  13. 16 CFR 1115.14 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Time computations. 1115.14 Section 1115.14... PRODUCT HAZARD REPORTS General Interpretation § 1115.14 Time computations. (a) General. Weekends and holidays are excluded from the computation of the time periods in this part. (b) Imputing knowledge....

  14. 24 CFR 14.100 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Time computation. 14.100 Section 14... IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT IN ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS General Provisions § 14.100 Time computation. Time periods stated in this part shall be computed in accordance with the Department's rules...

  15. 28 CFR 68.8 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Time computations. 68.8 Section 68.8... ALIENS, UNFAIR IMMIGRATION-RELATED EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES, AND DOCUMENT FRAUD § 68.8 Time computations. (a) Generally. In computing any period of time under these rules or in an order issued hereunder, the...

  16. 12 CFR 1209.17 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Time computations. 1209.17 Section 1209.17... PROCEDURE Rules of Practice and Procedure § 1209.17 Time computations. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed under this part, the date of the act or event that commences...

  17. 28 CFR 68.8 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Time computations. 68.8 Section 68.8... ALIENS, UNFAIR IMMIGRATION-RELATED EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES, AND DOCUMENT FRAUD § 68.8 Time computations. (a) Generally. In computing any period of time under these rules or in an order issued hereunder, the...

  18. 16 CFR 1115.14 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Time computations. 1115.14 Section 1115.14... PRODUCT HAZARD REPORTS General Interpretation § 1115.14 Time computations. (a) General. Weekends and holidays are excluded from the computation of the time periods in this part. (b) Imputing knowledge....

  19. 12 CFR 1209.17 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Time computations. 1209.17 Section 1209.17... PROCEDURE Rules of Practice and Procedure § 1209.17 Time computations. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed under this part, the date of the act or event that commences...

  20. 24 CFR 14.100 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Time computation. 14.100 Section 14... IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT IN ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS General Provisions § 14.100 Time computation. Time periods stated in this part shall be computed in accordance with the Department's rules...

  1. 24 CFR 26.11 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Time computation. 26.11 Section 26... HEARING PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.11 Time computation. (a) Generally. Computation of any period of time prescribed or allowed by this part shall begin with the...

  2. 28 CFR 68.8 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Time computations. 68.8 Section 68.8... ALIENS, UNFAIR IMMIGRATION-RELATED EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES, AND DOCUMENT FRAUD § 68.8 Time computations. (a) Generally. In computing any period of time under these rules or in an order issued hereunder, the...

  3. 24 CFR 14.100 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Time computation. 14.100 Section 14... IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT IN ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS General Provisions § 14.100 Time computation. Time periods stated in this part shall be computed in accordance with the Department's rules...

  4. 24 CFR 26.11 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Time computation. 26.11 Section 26... HEARING PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.11 Time computation. (a) Generally. Computation of any period of time prescribed or allowed by this part shall begin with the...

  5. 24 CFR 26.11 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Time computation. 26.11 Section 26... HEARING PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.11 Time computation. (a) Generally. Computation of any period of time prescribed or allowed by this part shall begin with the...

  6. 12 CFR 908.27 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computing time. 908.27 Section 908.27 Banks and... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE IN HEARINGS ON THE RECORD General Rules § 908.27 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by this subpart, the date of the act or...

  7. 24 CFR 14.100 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Time computation. 14.100 Section 14... IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT IN ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS General Provisions § 14.100 Time computation. Time periods stated in this part shall be computed in accordance with the Department's rules...

  8. 16 CFR 1115.14 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Time computations. 1115.14 Section 1115.14... PRODUCT HAZARD REPORTS General Interpretation § 1115.14 Time computations. (a) General. Weekends and holidays are excluded from the computation of the time periods in this part. (b) Imputing knowledge....

  9. 28 CFR 68.8 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Time computations. 68.8 Section 68.8... ALIENS, UNFAIR IMMIGRATION-RELATED EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES, AND DOCUMENT FRAUD § 68.8 Time computations. (a) Generally. In computing any period of time under these rules or in an order issued hereunder, the...

  10. 24 CFR 26.11 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Time computation. 26.11 Section 26... HEARING PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.11 Time computation. (a) Generally. Computation of any period of time prescribed or allowed by this part shall begin with the...

  11. 24 CFR 14.100 - Time computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Time computation. 14.100 Section 14... IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT IN ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS General Provisions § 14.100 Time computation. Time periods stated in this part shall be computed in accordance with the Department's rules...

  12. 12 CFR 908.27 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computing time. 908.27 Section 908.27 Banks and... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE IN HEARINGS ON THE RECORD General Rules § 908.27 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by this subpart, the date of the act or...

  13. 12 CFR 1780.11 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computing time. 1780.11 Section 1780.11 Banks... DEVELOPMENT RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules § 1780.11 Computing time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by this subpart, the...

  14. 12 CFR 1780.11 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computing time. 1780.11 Section 1780.11 Banks... time. (a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by this subpart, the date of the act or event that commences the designated period of time is not included. The last day...

  15. 16 CFR 1115.14 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... holidays are excluded from the computation of the time periods in this part. (b) Imputing knowledge. In... spend a reasonable time for investigation and evaluation. (See § 1115.14(d).) (d) Time for...

  16. 16 CFR 1115.14 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... holidays are excluded from the computation of the time periods in this part. (b) Imputing knowledge. In... spend a reasonable time for investigation and evaluation. (See § 1115.14(d).) (d) Time for...

  17. 43 CFR 3430.2-2 - Additional time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional time. 3430.2-2 Section 3430.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT...-2 Additional time. (a) If the applicant has timely submitted some, but not all, of the...

  18. 43 CFR 3430.2-2 - Additional time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional time. 3430.2-2 Section 3430.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT...-2 Additional time. (a) If the applicant has timely submitted some, but not all, of the...

  19. 43 CFR 3430.2-2 - Additional time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional time. 3430.2-2 Section 3430.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT...-2 Additional time. (a) If the applicant has timely submitted some, but not all, of the...

  20. Bifurcated method and apparatus for floating point addition with decreased latency time

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, Paul M.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  1. Reliable timing systems for computer controlled accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Jürgen; Nettleton, Robert

    1986-06-01

    Over the past decade the use of computers has set new standards for control systems of accelerators with ever increasing complexity coupled with stringent reliability criteria. In fact, with very slow cycling machines or storage rings any erratic operation or timing pulse will cause the loss of precious particles and waste hours of time and effort of preparation. Thus, for the CERN linac and LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) timing system reliability becomes a crucial factor in the sense that all components must operate practically without fault for very long periods compared to the effective machine cycle. This has been achieved by careful selection of components and design well below thermal and electrical limits, using error detection and correction where possible, as well as developing "safe" decoding techniques for serial data trains. Further, consistent structuring had to be applied in order to obtain simple and flexible modular configurations with very few components on critical paths and to minimize the exchange of information to synchronize accelerators. In addition, this structuring allows the development of efficient strategies for on-line and off-line fault diagnostics. As a result, the timing system for Linac 2 has, so far, been operating without fault for three years, the one for LEAR more than one year since its final debugging.

  2. Ultrafast amplifier additive timing jitter characterization and control.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Alexis; D'Acremont, Quentin; Santarelli, Giorgio; Dilhaire, Stefan; Courjaud, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    We report on the characterization and long-term compensation of additive timing jitter introduced by a femtosecond ytterbium regenerative amplifier with a 100 kHz repetition rate. A balanced optical cross-correlation technique is used to generate a jitter error signal. This approach is well suited to characterize the additive timing jitter of Yb amplifiers seeded by narrow spectrum Yb oscillators. The balanced optical cross-correlator is in a noncollinear configuration allowing a background free coindence detection. This setup enables the measurement of additive timing jitter from the amplifier, with a noise floor of 300 as integrated from 10 Hz to 10 kHz. The measured additive timing jitter level is about 5 fs, integrated from 0.1 Hz to 10 kHz. The amplifier timing drift characterization and control are performed for more than an hour. PMID:26974074

  3. Additional extensions to the NASCAP computer code, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, M. J.; Cooke, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The ION computer code is designed to calculate charge exchange ion densities, electric potentials, plasma temperatures, and current densities external to a neutralized ion engine in R-Z geometry. The present version assumes the beam ion current and density to be known and specified, and the neutralizing electrons to originate from a hot-wire ring surrounding the beam orifice. The plasma is treated as being resistive, with an electron relaxation time comparable to the plasma frequency. Together with the thermal and electrical boundary conditions described below and other straightforward engine parameters, these assumptions suffice to determine the required quantities. The ION code, written in ASCII FORTRAN for UNIVAC 1100 series computers, is designed to be run interactively, although it can also be run in batch mode. The input is free-format, and the output is mainly graphical, using the machine-independent graphics developed for the NASCAP code. The executive routine calls the code's major subroutines in user-specified order, and the code allows great latitude for restart and parameter change.

  4. Additional extensions to the NASCAP computer code, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, M. J.; Katz, I.; Stannard, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    Extensions and revisions to a computer code that comprehensively analyzes problems of spacecraft charging (NASCAP) are documented. Using a fully three dimensional approach, it can accurately predict spacecraft potentials under a variety of conditions. Among the extensions are a multiple electron/ion gun test tank capability, and the ability to model anisotropic and time dependent space environments. Also documented are a greatly extended MATCHG program and the preliminary version of NASCAP/LEO. The interactive MATCHG code was developed into an extremely powerful tool for the study of material-environment interactions. The NASCAP/LEO, a three dimensional code to study current collection under conditions of high voltages and short Debye lengths, was distributed for preliminary testing.

  5. Characterization of real-time computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, K. G.; Krishna, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    A real-time system consists of a computer controller and controlled processes. Despite the synergistic relationship between these two components, they have been traditionally designed and analyzed independently of and separately from each other; namely, computer controllers by computer scientists/engineers and controlled processes by control scientists. As a remedy for this problem, in this report real-time computers are characterized by performance measures based on computer controller response time that are: (1) congruent to the real-time applications, (2) able to offer an objective comparison of rival computer systems, and (3) experimentally measurable/determinable. These measures, unlike others, provide the real-time computer controller with a natural link to controlled processes. In order to demonstrate their utility and power, these measures are first determined for example controlled processes on the basis of control performance functionals. They are then used for two important real-time multiprocessor design applications - the number-power tradeoff and fault-masking and synchronization.

  6. Disc pack cleaning table saves computer time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, J. T., Sr.

    1970-01-01

    Disc pack holding table is support frame upon which computer disc pack is loaded and protective cover released. This combination permits manual off-line cleaning of disc pack storage units at any time without shutting down the computer, and eliminates on-line disc drive unit to hold pack during cleaning.

  7. General purpose computers in real time

    SciTech Connect

    Biel, J.R.

    1989-09-18

    I see three main trends in the use of general purpose computers in real time. The first is more processing power. The second is the use of higher speed interconnects between computers (allowing more data to be delivered to the processors). The third is the use of larger programs running in the computers. Although there is still work that needs to be done, I believe that all indications are that the online need for general purpose computers should be available for the SCC and LHC machines. 2 figs.

  8. X-ray computed tomography for additive manufacturing: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A.; Maskery, I.; Leach, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this review, the use of x-ray computed tomography (XCT) is examined, identifying the requirement for volumetric dimensional measurements in industrial verification of additively manufactured (AM) parts. The XCT technology and AM processes are summarised, and their historical use is documented. The use of XCT and AM as tools for medical reverse engineering is discussed, and the transition of XCT from a tool used solely for imaging to a vital metrological instrument is documented. The current states of the combined technologies are then examined in detail, separated into porosity measurements and general dimensional measurements. In the conclusions of this review, the limitation of resolution on improvement of porosity measurements and the lack of research regarding the measurement of surface texture are identified as the primary barriers to ongoing adoption of XCT in AM. The limitations of both AM and XCT regarding slow speeds and high costs, when compared to other manufacturing and measurement techniques, are also noted as general barriers to continued adoption of XCT and AM.

  9. Universal quantum computation using the discrete-time quantum walk

    SciTech Connect

    Lovett, Neil B.; Cooper, Sally; Everitt, Matthew; Trevers, Matthew; Kendon, Viv

    2010-04-15

    A proof that continuous-time quantum walks are universal for quantum computation, using unweighted graphs of low degree, has recently been presented by A. M. Childs [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 180501 (2009)]. We present a version based instead on the discrete-time quantum walk. We show that the discrete-time quantum walk is able to implement the same universal gate set and thus both discrete and continuous-time quantum walks are computational primitives. Additionally, we give a set of components on which the discrete-time quantum walk provides perfect state transfer.

  10. 43 CFR 3430.2-2 - Additional time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional time. 3430.2-2 Section 3430.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) NONCOMPETITIVE LEASES Preference Right Leases §...

  11. 12 CFR 622.21 - Computing time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... or Federal holiday, in which event the period shall run until the end of the next day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday. When the period of time prescribed or allowed is 10 days or less, intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays shall not be included in the computation. (b) Service...

  12. 29 CFR 25.6 - Time; additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... period so computed is to be included, unless it is a Saturday, Sunday or a Federal legal holiday, in... Federal legal holiday. When the period of time prescribed, or allowed, is less than 7 days, intermediate Saturdays, Sundays and holidays shall be excluded from the computations. Whenever a party has the right...

  13. 29 CFR 25.6 - Time; additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... period so computed is to be included, unless it is a Saturday, Sunday or a Federal legal holiday, in... Federal legal holiday. When the period of time prescribed, or allowed, is less than 7 days, intermediate Saturdays, Sundays and holidays shall be excluded from the computations. Whenever a party has the right...

  14. TimeSet: A computer program that accesses five atomic time services on two continents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrakis, P. L.

    1993-01-01

    TimeSet is a shareware program for accessing digital time services by telephone. At its initial release, it was capable of capturing time signals only from the U.S. Naval Observatory to set a computer's clock. Later the ability to synchronize with the National Institute of Standards and Technology was added. Now, in Version 7.10, TimeSet is able to access three additional telephone time services in Europe - in Sweden, Austria, and Italy - making a total of five official services addressable by the program. A companion program, TimeGen, allows yet another source of telephone time data strings for callers equipped with TimeSet version 7.10. TimeGen synthesizes UTC time data strings in the Naval Observatory's format from an accurately set and maintained DOS computer clock, and transmits them to callers. This allows an unlimited number of 'freelance' time generating stations to be created. Timesetting from TimeGen is made feasible by the advent of Becker's RighTime, a shareware program that learns the drift characteristics of a computer's clock and continuously applies a correction to keep it accurate, and also brings .01 second resolution to the DOS clock. With clock regulation by RighTime and periodic update calls by the TimeGen station to an official time source via TimeSet, TimeGen offers the same degree of accuracy within the resolution of the computer clock as any official atomic time source.

  15. Perspective: Computer simulations of long time dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Elber, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Atomically detailed computer simulations of complex molecular events attracted the imagination of many researchers in the field as providing comprehensive information on chemical, biological, and physical processes. However, one of the greatest limitations of these simulations is of time scales. The physical time scales accessible to straightforward simulations are too short to address many interesting and important molecular events. In the last decade significant advances were made in different directions (theory, software, and hardware) that significantly expand the capabilities and accuracies of these techniques. This perspective describes and critically examines some of these advances. PMID:26874473

  16. Additive Manufacturing of Anatomical Models from Computed Tomography Scan Data.

    PubMed

    Gür, Y

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to investigate the manufacturability of human anatomical models from Computed Tomography (CT) scan data via a 3D desktop printer which uses fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. First, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) CT scan data were converted to 3D Standard Triangle Language (STL) format by using In Vaselius digital imaging program. Once this STL file is obtained, a 3D physical version of the anatomical model can be fabricated by a desktop 3D FDM printer. As a case study, a patient's skull CT scan data was considered, and a tangible version of the skull was manufactured by a 3D FDM desktop printer. During the 3D printing process, the skull was built using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) co-polymer plastic. The printed model showed that the 3D FDM printing technology is able to fabricate anatomical models with high accuracy. As a result, the skull model can be used for preoperative surgical planning, medical training activities, implant design and simulation to show the potential of the FDM technology in medical field. It will also improve communication between medical stuff and patients. Current result indicates that a 3D desktop printer which uses FDM technology can be used to obtain accurate anatomical models.

  17. Computational calculation of equilibrium constants: addition to carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; González-Pérez, Marina; Pérez-Prior, María Teresa; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2009-10-22

    Hydration reactions are relevant for understanding many organic mechanisms. Since the experimental determination of hydration and hemiacetalization equilibrium constants is fairly complex, computational calculations now offer a useful alternative to experimental measurements. In this work, carbonyl hydration and hemiacetalization constants were calculated from the free energy differences between compounds in solution, using absolute and relative approaches. The following conclusions can be drawn: (i) The use of a relative approach in the calculation of hydration and hemiacetalization constants allows compensation of systematic errors in the solvation energies. (ii) On average, the methodology proposed here can predict hydration constants within +/- 0.5 log K(hyd) units for aldehydes. (iii) Hydration constants can be calculated for ketones and carboxylic acid derivatives within less than +/- 1.0 log K(hyd), on average, at the CBS-Q level of theory. (iv) The proposed methodology can predict hemiacetal formation constants accurately at the MP2 6-31++G(d,p) level using a common reference. If group references are used, the results obtained using the much cheaper DFT-B3LYP 6-31++G(d,p) level are almost as accurate. (v) In general, the best results are obtained if a common reference for all compounds is used. The use of group references improves the results at the lower levels of theory, but at higher levels, this becomes unnecessary. PMID:19761202

  18. Computational Calculation of Equilibrium Constants: Addition to Carbonyl Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; González-Pérez, Marina; Pérez-Prior, María Teresa; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2009-09-01

    Hydration reactions are relevant for understanding many organic mechanisms. Since the experimental determination of hydration and hemiacetalization equilibrium constants is fairly complex, computational calculations now offer a useful alternative to experimental measurements. In this work, carbonyl hydration and hemiacetalization constants were calculated from the free energy differences between compounds in solution, using absolute and relative approaches. The following conclusions can be drawn: (i) The use of a relative approach in the calculation of hydration and hemiacetalization constants allows compensation of systematic errors in the solvation energies. (ii) On average, the methodology proposed here can predict hydration constants within ± 0.5 log Khyd units for aldehydes. (iii) Hydration constants can be calculated for ketones and carboxylic acid derivatives within less than ± 1.0 log Khyd, on average, at the CBS-Q level of theory. (iv) The proposed methodology can predict hemiacetal formation constants accurately at the MP2 6-31++G(d,p) level using a common reference. If group references are used, the results obtained using the much cheaper DFT-B3LYP 6-31++G(d,p) level are almost as accurate. (v) In general, the best results are obtained if a common reference for all compounds is used. The use of group references improves the results at the lower levels of theory, but at higher levels, this becomes unnecessary.

  19. Additive Manufacturing of Anatomical Models from Computed Tomography Scan Data.

    PubMed

    Gür, Y

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to investigate the manufacturability of human anatomical models from Computed Tomography (CT) scan data via a 3D desktop printer which uses fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. First, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) CT scan data were converted to 3D Standard Triangle Language (STL) format by using In Vaselius digital imaging program. Once this STL file is obtained, a 3D physical version of the anatomical model can be fabricated by a desktop 3D FDM printer. As a case study, a patient's skull CT scan data was considered, and a tangible version of the skull was manufactured by a 3D FDM desktop printer. During the 3D printing process, the skull was built using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) co-polymer plastic. The printed model showed that the 3D FDM printing technology is able to fabricate anatomical models with high accuracy. As a result, the skull model can be used for preoperative surgical planning, medical training activities, implant design and simulation to show the potential of the FDM technology in medical field. It will also improve communication between medical stuff and patients. Current result indicates that a 3D desktop printer which uses FDM technology can be used to obtain accurate anatomical models. PMID:26336695

  20. Lightweight distributed computing for intraoperative real-time image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwelack, Stefan; Katic, Darko; Wagner, Simon; Spengler, Patrick; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Röhl, Sebastian; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Speidel, Stefanie

    2012-02-01

    In order to provide real-time intraoperative guidance, computer assisted surgery (CAS) systems often rely on computationally expensive algorithms. The real-time constraint is especially challenging if several components such as intraoperative image processing, soft tissue registration or context aware visualization are combined in a single system. In this paper, we present a lightweight approach to distribute the workload over several workstations based on the OpenIGTLink protocol. We use XML-based message passing for remote procedure calls and native types for transferring data such as images, meshes or point coordinates. Two different, but typical scenarios are considered in order to evaluate the performance of the new system. First, we analyze a real-time soft tissue registration algorithm based on a finite element (FE) model. Here, we use the proposed approach to distribute the computational workload between a primary workstation that handles sensor data processing and visualization and a dedicated workstation that runs the real-time FE algorithm. We show that the additional overhead that is introduced by the technique is small compared to the total execution time. Furthermore, the approach is used to speed up a context aware augmented reality based navigation system for dental implant surgery. In this scenario, the additional delay for running the computationally expensive reasoning server on a separate workstation is less than a millisecond. The results show that the presented approach is a promising strategy to speed up real-time CAS systems.

  1. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  2. Spiking neuron computation with the time machine.

    PubMed

    Garg, Vaibhav; Shekhar, Ravi; Harris, John G

    2012-04-01

    The Time Machine (TM) is a spike-based computation architecture that represents synaptic weights in time. This choice of weight representation allows the use of virtual synapses, providing an excellent tradeoff in terms of flexibility, arbitrary weight connections and hardware usage compared to dedicated synapse architectures. The TM supports an arbitrary number of synapses and is limited only by the number of simultaneously active synapses to each neuron. SpikeSim, a behavioral hardware simulator for the architecture, is described along with example algorithms for edge detection and objection recognition. The TM can implement traditional spike-based processing as well as recently developed time mode operations where step functions serve as the input and output of each neuron block. A custom hybrid digital/analog implementation and a fully digital realization of the TM are discussed. An analog chip with 32 neurons, 1024 synapses and an address event representation (AER) block has been fabricated in 0.5 μm technology. A fully digital field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based implementation of the architecture has 6,144 neurons and 100,352 simultaneously active synapses. Both implementations utilize a digital controller for routing spikes that can process up to 34 million synapses per second. PMID:23852979

  3. Cluster Computing for Embedded/Real-Time Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, D.; Kepner, J.

    1999-01-01

    Embedded and real-time systems, like other computing systems, seek to maximize computing power for a given price, and thus can significantly benefit from the advancing capabilities of cluster computing.

  4. 5 CFR 185.129 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Computation of time. 185.129 Section 185.129 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.129 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of time under this part or in an order issued thereunder, the time...

  5. 45 CFR 2554.22 - How is time computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How is time computed? 2554.22 Section 2554.22... SERVICE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Hearing Provisions § 2554.22 How is time computed? (a) In computing any period of time under this part or in an order issued thereunder, the time...

  6. Software Accelerates Computing Time for Complex Math

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Ames Research Center awarded Newark, Delaware-based EM Photonics Inc. SBIR funding to utilize graphic processing unit (GPU) technology- traditionally used for computer video games-to develop high-computing software called CULA. The software gives users the ability to run complex algorithms on personal computers with greater speed. As a result of the NASA collaboration, the number of employees at the company has increased 10 percent.

  7. Explorations in Space and Time: Computer-Generated Astronomy Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of the computer animation technique to travel through space and time and watch models of astronomical systems in motion. Included is a list of eight computer-generated demonstration films entitled Explorations in Space and Time.'' (CC)

  8. Computer Center: It's Time to Take Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain, James D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes typical instructional applications of computers. Areas considered include: (1) instructional simulations and animations; (2) data analysis; (3) drill and practice; (4) student evaluation; (5) development of computer models and simulations; (6) biometrics or biostatistics; and (7) direct data acquisition and analysis. (JN)

  9. 10 CFR 76.74 - Computation and extension of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Computation and extension of time. 76.74 Section 76.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Certification § 76.74 Computation and extension of time. (a) In computing any period of time, the day of the...

  10. 10 CFR 76.74 - Computation and extension of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computation and extension of time. 76.74 Section 76.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Certification § 76.74 Computation and extension of time. (a) In computing any period of time, the day of the...

  11. 10 CFR 76.74 - Computation and extension of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computation and extension of time. 76.74 Section 76.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Certification § 76.74 Computation and extension of time. (a) In computing any period of time, the day of the...

  12. 10 CFR 76.74 - Computation and extension of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation and extension of time. 76.74 Section 76.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Certification § 76.74 Computation and extension of time. (a) In computing any period of time, the day of the...

  13. 10 CFR 76.74 - Computation and extension of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computation and extension of time. 76.74 Section 76.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Certification § 76.74 Computation and extension of time. (a) In computing any period of time, the day of the...

  14. 5 CFR 185.129 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computation of time. 185.129 Section 185.129 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.129 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of time under this part or...

  15. 6 CFR 13.27 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computation of time. 13.27 Section 13.27 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.27 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of time under this part or in an order...

  16. 6 CFR 13.27 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computation of time. 13.27 Section 13.27 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.27 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of time under this part or in an order...

  17. 24 CFR 3282.9 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME PROCEDURAL AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General § 3282.9 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of time prescribed by the regulations in this part, refer to § 26.16(a) of... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computation of time. 3282.9...

  18. 24 CFR 3282.9 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME PROCEDURAL AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General § 3282.9 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of time prescribed by the regulations in this part, refer to § 26.16(a) of... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computation of time. 3282.9...

  19. 5 CFR 185.129 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 185.129 Section 185.129 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.129 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of time under this part or...

  20. 41 CFR 60-30.3 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Computation of time. 60-30.3 Section 60-30.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public... ORDER 11246 General Provisions § 60-30.3 Computation of time. In computing any period of time...

  1. 41 CFR 60-30.3 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Computation of time. 60-30.3 Section 60-30.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public... ORDER 11246 General Provisions § 60-30.3 Computation of time. In computing any period of time...

  2. 5 CFR 410.310 - Computing time in training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computing time in training. 410.310... Establishing and Implementing Training Programs § 410.310 Computing time in training. For the purpose of computing time in training for continued service agreements under section 4108 of title 5, United...

  3. 50 CFR 221.3 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are time periods computed? 221.3 Section 221.3 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Provisions § 221.3 How are time periods computed? (a) General. Time periods are computed as follows: (1)...

  4. 14 CFR 302.507 - Computing time for filing complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computing time for filing complaints. 302... Proceedings With Respect to Rates, Fares and Charges for Foreign Air Transportation § 302.507 Computing time for filing complaints. In computing the time for filing formal complaints pursuant to § 302.506,...

  5. 5 CFR 410.310 - Computing time in training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computing time in training. 410.310... Establishing and Implementing Training Programs § 410.310 Computing time in training. For the purpose of computing time in training for continued service agreements under section 4108 of title 5, United...

  6. 43 CFR 45.3 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are time periods computed? 45.3... IN FERC HYDROPOWER LICENSES General Provisions § 45.3 How are time periods computed? (a) General. Time periods are computed as follows: (1) The day of the act or event from which the period begins...

  7. Timing of Getter Material Addition in Cementitious Wasteforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawter, A.; Qafoku, N. P.; Asmussen, M.; Neeway, J.; Smith, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    A cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, is being evaluated as a possible supplemental immobilization technology for the Hanford sites's low activity waste (LAW), which contains radioactive 99Tc and 129I, as part of the tank waste cleanup mission. Cast Stone is made of a dry blend 47% blast furnace slag, 45% fly ash, and 8% ordinary Portland cement, mixed with a low-activity waste (LAW). To improve the retention of Tc and/or I in Cast Stone, materials with a high affinity for Tc and/or I, termed "getters," can be added to provide a stable domain for the radionuclides of concern. Previous testing conducted with a variety of getters has identified Tin(II)-Apatite and Silver Exchanged Zeolite as promising candidates for Tc and I, respectively. Investigation into the sequence in which getters are added to Cast Stone was performed following two methods: 1) adding getters to the Cast Stone dry blend, and then mixing with liquid waste, and 2) adding getters to the liquid waste first, followed by addition of the Cast Stone dry blend. Cast Stone monolith samples were prepared with each method and leach tests, following EPA method 1315, were conducted in either distilled water or simulated vadose zone porewater for a period of up to 63 days. The leachate was analyzed for Tc, I, Na, NO3-, NO2- and Cr with ICP-MS, ICP-OES and ion chromatography and the results indicated that the Cast Stone with getter addition in the dry blend mix (method 1) has lower rates of Tc and I leaching. The mechanisms of radionuclide release from the Cast Stone were also investigated with a variety of solid phase characterization techniques of the monoliths before and after leaching, such as XRD, SEM/EDS, TEM/SAED and other spectroscopic techniques.

  8. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Kamath, C.; Khairallah, S. A.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this paper, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  9. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    SciTech Connect

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Kamath, C.; Khairallah, S. A.; Rubencik, A. M.

    2015-12-29

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this study, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  10. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    DOE PAGES

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Kamath, C.; Khairallah, S. A.; Rubencik, A. M.

    2015-12-29

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In thismore » study, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.« less

  11. Additive Manufacturing and High-Performance Computing: a Disruptive Latent Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    This presentation will discuss the relationship between recent advances in Additive Manufacturing (AM) technology, High-Performance Computing (HPC) simulation and design capabilities, and related advances in Uncertainty Quantification (UQ), and then examines their impacts upon national and international security. The presentation surveys how AM accelerates the fabrication process, while HPC combined with UQ provides a fast track for the engineering design cycle. The combination of AM and HPC/UQ almost eliminates the engineering design and prototype iterative cycle, thereby dramatically reducing cost of production and time-to-market. These methods thereby present significant benefits for US national interests, both civilian and military, in an age of austerity. Finally, considering cyber security issues and the advent of the ``cloud,'' these disruptive, currently latent technologies may well enable proliferation and so challenge both nuclear and non-nuclear aspects of international security.

  12. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    SciTech Connect

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Khairallah, S. A.; Kamath, C.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    2015-12-15

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this paper, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  13. Real-time Tsunami Inundation Prediction Using High Performance Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Y.; Imamura, F.; Sugawara, D.

    2014-12-01

    Recently off-shore tsunami observation stations based on cabled ocean bottom pressure gauges are actively being deployed especially in Japan. These cabled systems are designed to provide real-time tsunami data before tsunamis reach coastlines for disaster mitigation purposes. To receive real benefits of these observations, real-time analysis techniques to make an effective use of these data are necessary. A representative study was made by Tsushima et al. (2009) that proposed a method to provide instant tsunami source prediction based on achieving tsunami waveform data. As time passes, the prediction is improved by using updated waveform data. After a tsunami source is predicted, tsunami waveforms are synthesized from pre-computed tsunami Green functions of linear long wave equations. Tsushima et al. (2014) updated the method by combining the tsunami waveform inversion with an instant inversion of coseismic crustal deformation and improved the prediction accuracy and speed in the early stages. For disaster mitigation purposes, real-time predictions of tsunami inundation are also important. In this study, we discuss the possibility of real-time tsunami inundation predictions, which require faster-than-real-time tsunami inundation simulation in addition to instant tsunami source analysis. Although the computational amount is large to solve non-linear shallow water equations for inundation predictions, it has become executable through the recent developments of high performance computing technologies. We conducted parallel computations of tsunami inundation and achieved 6.0 TFLOPS by using 19,000 CPU cores. We employed a leap-frog finite difference method with nested staggered grids of which resolution range from 405 m to 5 m. The resolution ratio of each nested domain was 1/3. Total number of grid points were 13 million, and the time step was 0.1 seconds. Tsunami sources of 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake were tested. The inundation prediction up to 2 hours after the

  14. 14 CFR 1264.126 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Computation of time. 1264.126 Section 1264.126 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL PENALTIES ACT OF 1986 § 1264.126 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of...

  15. 10 CFR 205.5 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 205.5 Section 205.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS General Provisions § 205.5 Computation of time. (a) Days. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, in computing any period of...

  16. 14 CFR 1264.126 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 1264.126 Section 1264.126 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL PENALTIES ACT OF 1986 § 1264.126 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of...

  17. 14 CFR 1264.126 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computation of time. 1264.126 Section 1264.126 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL PENALTIES ACT OF 1986 § 1264.126 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of...

  18. 28 CFR 32.2 - Computation of time; filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE BENEFIT CLAIMS General Provisions § 32.2 Computation of time; filing. (a) In computing... designated period of time begins to run shall not be included. The last day of the period so computed shall... Office to be closed or inaccessible, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day that...

  19. 21 CFR 810.3 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Computation of time. 810.3 Section 810.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY General Provisions § 810.3 Computation of time. In computing any period...

  20. 21 CFR 810.3 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computation of time. 810.3 Section 810.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY General Provisions § 810.3 Computation of time. In computing any period...

  1. 21 CFR 810.3 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computation of time. 810.3 Section 810.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY General Provisions § 810.3 Computation of time. In computing any period...

  2. 21 CFR 810.3 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computation of time. 810.3 Section 810.3 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE RECALL AUTHORITY General Provisions § 810.3 Computation of time. In computing any period...

  3. 45 CFR 681.24 - How is time computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How is time computed? 681.24 Section 681.24 Public... REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Hearing Procedures § 681.24 How is time computed? (a) In computing any period of..., event, or default, and includes the last day of the period, unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or...

  4. 45 CFR 681.24 - How is time computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How is time computed? 681.24 Section 681.24 Public... REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Hearing Procedures § 681.24 How is time computed? (a) In computing any period of..., event, or default, and includes the last day of the period, unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or...

  5. 45 CFR 681.24 - How is time computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How is time computed? 681.24 Section 681.24 Public... REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Hearing Procedures § 681.24 How is time computed? (a) In computing any period of..., event, or default, and includes the last day of the period, unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or...

  6. 45 CFR 681.24 - How is time computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How is time computed? 681.24 Section 681.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Hearing Procedures § 681.24 How is time computed? (a) In computing any period...

  7. 10 CFR 110.90 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 110.90 Section 110.90 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Public Participation Procedures Concerning License Applications § 110.90 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of...

  8. 14 CFR 13.44 - Computation of time and extension of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computation of time and extension of time. 13.44 Section 13.44 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....44 Computation of time and extension of time. (a) In computing any period of time prescribed...

  9. 14 CFR 13.44 - Computation of time and extension of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computation of time and extension of time. 13.44 Section 13.44 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....44 Computation of time and extension of time. (a) In computing any period of time prescribed...

  10. RighTime: A real time clock correcting program for MS-DOS-based computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, G. Thomas

    1993-01-01

    A computer program is described which effectively eliminates the misgivings of the DOS system clock in PC/AT-class computers. RighTime is a small, sophisticated memory-resident program that automatically corrects both the DOS system clock and the hardware 'CMOS' real time clock (RTC) in real time. RighTime learns what corrections are required without operator interaction beyond the occasional accurate time set. Both warm (power on) and cool (power off) errors are corrected, usually yielding better than one part per million accuracy in the typical desktop computer with no additional hardware, and RighTime increases the system clock resolution from approximately 0.0549 second to 0.01 second. Program tools are also available which allow visualization of RighTime's actions, verification of its performance, display of its history log, and which provide data for graphing of the system clock behavior. The program has found application in a wide variety of industries, including astronomy, satellite tracking, communications, broadcasting, transportation, public utilities, manufacturing, medicine, and the military.

  11. Time-scheduled delivery of computer health animations: "Installing" healthy habits of computer use.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sy-Chyi; Chern, Jin-Yuan

    2013-06-01

    The development of modern technology brings convenience to our lives but removes physical activity from our daily routines, thereby putting our lives at risk. Extended computer use may contribute to symptoms such as visual impairment and musculoskeletal disorders. To help reduce the risk of physical inactivity and promote healthier computer use, this study developed a time-scheduled delivery of health-related animations for users sitting in front of computers for prolonged periods. In addition, we examined the effects that the program had on the computer-related health behavior intentions and actions of participants. Two waves of questionnaires were implemented for data collection before and after intervention. The results showed that the animation program indeed had a positive effect on participants' healthy computer use actions in terms of breathtaking, body massages, and body stretches. It also helped to bridge the intention-action gap of the health behaviors. The development and evaluation were documented, and users' experiences/suggestions were discussed at the end. PMID:23715211

  12. Time-scheduled delivery of computer health animations: "Installing" healthy habits of computer use.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sy-Chyi; Chern, Jin-Yuan

    2013-06-01

    The development of modern technology brings convenience to our lives but removes physical activity from our daily routines, thereby putting our lives at risk. Extended computer use may contribute to symptoms such as visual impairment and musculoskeletal disorders. To help reduce the risk of physical inactivity and promote healthier computer use, this study developed a time-scheduled delivery of health-related animations for users sitting in front of computers for prolonged periods. In addition, we examined the effects that the program had on the computer-related health behavior intentions and actions of participants. Two waves of questionnaires were implemented for data collection before and after intervention. The results showed that the animation program indeed had a positive effect on participants' healthy computer use actions in terms of breathtaking, body massages, and body stretches. It also helped to bridge the intention-action gap of the health behaviors. The development and evaluation were documented, and users' experiences/suggestions were discussed at the end.

  13. 7 CFR 1.603 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false How are time periods computed? 1.603 Section 1.603 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses General Provisions § 1.603 How are time periods computed? (a) General. Time periods are...

  14. 7 CFR 1.603 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How are time periods computed? 1.603 Section 1.603 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses General Provisions § 1.603 How are time periods computed? (a) General. Time periods are...

  15. 7 CFR 1.603 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false How are time periods computed? 1.603 Section 1.603 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses General Provisions § 1.603 How are time periods computed? (a) General. Time periods are...

  16. 7 CFR 1.603 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How are time periods computed? 1.603 Section 1.603 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses General Provisions § 1.603 How are time periods computed? (a) General. Time periods are...

  17. 7 CFR 1.603 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How are time periods computed? 1.603 Section 1.603 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses General Provisions § 1.603 How are time periods computed? (a) General. Time periods are...

  18. 39 CFR 952.31 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of time. 952.31 Section 952.31 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.31 Computation of time. A designated period of time under these...

  19. Evolution of the International Atomic Time TAI computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granveaud, M.

    1979-01-01

    The computation of the International Atomic Time (TAI), a worldwide time reference, is briefly examined. The types of atomic clocks, computation procedures, and time intercomparison between clocks utilizing navigation satellites are addressed. Changes in the system would essentially depend on the improvement of the atomic clocks.

  20. 29 CFR 18.4 - Time computations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... other than complaints is deemed effected at the time of mailing. (3) Whenever a party has the right or... mail, five (5) days shall be added to the prescribed period. (d) Filing or service by facsimile. Filing... facsimile machine. For purposes of filings by facsimile the time printed on the transmission by...

  1. Real-Time, Sensor-Based Computing in the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badmus, O. O.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Demonstrates the importance of Real-Time, Sensor-Based (RTSB) computing and how it can be easily and effectively integrated into university student laboratories. Describes the experimental processes, the process instrumentation and process-computer interface, the computer and communications systems, and typical software. Provides much technical…

  2. Accessing Computers in Education, One Byte at a Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Anthony V.

    This paper discusses computers and their potential role in education. The term "byte" is first explained, to emphasize the idea that the use of computers should be implemented one "byte" or step at a time. The reasons for this approach are then outlined. Potential applications in computer usage in educational administration are suggested, computer…

  3. Really computing nonperturbative real time correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; McLerran, Larry; Smilga, Andrei

    1995-10-01

    It has been argued by Grigoriev and Rubakov that one can simulate real time processes involving baryon number nonconservation at high temperature using real time evolution of classical equations, and summing over initial conditions with a classical thermal weight. It is known that such a naive algorithm is plagued by ultraviolet divergences. In quantum theory the divergences are regularized, but the corresponding graphs involve the contributions from the hard momentum region and also the new scale ~gT comes into play. We propose a modified algorithm which involves solving the classical equations of motion for the effective hard thermal loop Hamiltonian with an ultraviolet cutoff μ>>gT and integrating over initial conditions with a proper thermal weight. Such an algorithm should provide a determination of the infrared behavior of the real time correlation function T determining the baryon violation rate. Hopefully, the results obtained in this modified algorithm will be cutoff independent.

  4. Influence of computer work under time pressure on cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping; Hu, Sijung; Yu, Hongliu

    2015-03-01

    Computer users are often under stress when required to complete computer work within a required time. Work stress has repeatedly been associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The present study examined the effects of time pressure workload during computer tasks on cardiac activity in 20 healthy subjects. Heart rate, time domain and frequency domain indices of heart rate variability (HRV) and Poincaré plot parameters were compared among five computer tasks and two rest periods. Faster heart rate and decreased standard deviation of R-R interval were noted in response to computer tasks under time pressure. The Poincaré plot parameters showed significant differences between different levels of time pressure workload during computer tasks, and between computer tasks and the rest periods. In contrast, no significant differences were identified for the frequency domain indices of HRV. The results suggest that the quantitative Poincaré plot analysis used in this study was able to reveal the intrinsic nonlinear nature of the autonomically regulated cardiac rhythm. Specifically, heightened vagal tone occurred during the relaxation computer tasks without time pressure. In contrast, the stressful computer tasks with added time pressure stimulated cardiac sympathetic activity.

  5. Long time behavior of unsteady flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses a specific issue of time accuracy in the calculation of external aerodynamic problems. The class of problems discussed consists of inviscid compressible subsonic flows. These problems are governed by a convective equation. A key issue that is not understood is the long time behavior of the solution. This is important if one desires transient calculations of problems governed by the Euler equations or its derivatives such as the small disturbance equations or the potential formulations for the gust problem. Difficulties arise for two dimensional problems where the time rate decay solutions of the wave equation is slow. In concert with the above mentioned problem, exterior flows require proper modeling of the boundary conditions. In particular, this requires the truncation of infinite regions into finite regions with the aid of artificial boundaries. These boundary conditions must be consistent with the physics of the unbounded problem as well as consistent in time and space. Our treatment of the problem is discussed in detail and examples are given to verify the results.

  6. Real time mass flow computer for Arc Jet Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal, J.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments at the Arc Jet Tunnel at Ames Research Center have typical run times of 5-10 sec during which the test model is subjected to an environment simulating reentry into Jupiter. Previous real-time determination of mass flow required off-line manual computations from taped or strip chart data. The present paper describes a computer which provides personnel with real-time computations of mass flow. Using an 8-bit microprocessor and standard TTL interface circuitry, the unit interrogates temperature and pressure instruments with other parameters to compute mass flow.

  7. CHARMM additive and polarizable force fields for biophysics and computer-aided drug design

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Mechanics (MM) is the method of choice for computational studies of biomolecular systems owing to its modest computational cost, which makes it possible to routinely perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on chemical systems of biophysical and biomedical relevance. Scope of Review As one of the main factors limiting the accuracy of MD results is the empirical force field used, the present paper offers a review of recent developments in the CHARMM additive force field, one of the most popular bimolecular force fields. Additionally, we present a detailed discussion of the CHARMM Drude polarizable force field, anticipating a growth in the importance and utilization of polarizable force fields in the near future. Throughout the discussion emphasis is placed on the force fields’ parametrization philosophy and methodology. Major Conclusions Recent improvements in the CHARMM additive force field are mostly related to newly found weaknesses in the previous generation of additive force fields. Beyond the additive approximation is the newly available CHARMM Drude polarizable force field, which allows for MD simulations of up to 1 microsecond on proteins, DNA, lipids and carbohydrates. General Significance Addressing the limitations ensures the reliability of the new CHARMM36 additive force field for the types of calculations that are presently coming into routine computational reach while the availability of the Drude polarizable force fields offers a model that is an inherently more accurate model of the underlying physical forces driving macromolecular structures and dynamics. PMID:25149274

  8. A Simple Computer Interface To Time Relatively Slow Physical Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocaya, R. O.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple computer interface that can be used to make reliable time measurements, such as when timing the swings of a pendulum. Presents a sample experiment involving a form of pendulum known as the compound pendulum. (Author/YDS)

  9. 14 CFR 302.8 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computation of time. 302.8 Section 302.8 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS Rules of General Applicability § 302.8 Computation of time....

  10. 14 CFR 13.212 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 13.212 Section 13.212 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Rules of Practice in FAA Civil Penalty Actions § 13.212 Computation of time. (a) This section applies to...

  11. 14 CFR 406.119 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computation of time. 406.119 Section 406.119 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... in FAA Space Transportation Adjudications § 406.119 Computation of time. (a) This section applies...

  12. 14 CFR 302.8 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 302.8 Section 302.8 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS Rules of General Applicability § 302.8 Computation of time....

  13. 14 CFR 16.17 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computation of time. 16.17 Section 16.17 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES RULES OF..., Proceedings Initiated by the FAA, and Appeals § 16.17 Computation of time. This section applies to any...

  14. 14 CFR 17.7 - Filing and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing and computation of time. 17.7 Section 17.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES PROCEDURES FOR PROTESTS AND CONTRACTS DISPUTES General § 17.7 Filing and computation of time. (a) Filing of a protest or contract dispute...

  15. 14 CFR 406.119 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 406.119 Section 406.119 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... in FAA Space Transportation Adjudications § 406.119 Computation of time. (a) This section applies...

  16. 7 CFR 614.14 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 614.14 Section 614.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS NRCS APPEAL PROCEDURES § 614.14 Computation of time. (a) The word...

  17. 28 CFR 5.4 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Computation of time. 5.4 Section 5.4 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT OF FOREIGN AGENTS REGISTRATION ACT OF 1938, AS AMENDED § 5.4 Computation of time. Sundays and holidays shall be counted in...

  18. 14 CFR 16.17 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computation of time. 16.17 Section 16.17 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES RULES OF..., Proceedings Initiated by the FAA, and Appeals § 16.17 Computation of time. This section applies to any...

  19. 32 CFR 1602.9 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Computation of time. 1602.9 Section 1602.9 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.9 Computation of time. Unless otherwise specified the period of days allowed a registrant or...

  20. 32 CFR 1602.9 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Computation of time. 1602.9 Section 1602.9 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.9 Computation of time. Unless otherwise specified the period of days allowed a registrant or...

  1. 32 CFR 1602.9 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Computation of time. 1602.9 Section 1602.9 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.9 Computation of time. Unless otherwise specified the period of days allowed a registrant or...

  2. 32 CFR 1602.9 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of time. 1602.9 Section 1602.9 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.9 Computation of time. Unless otherwise specified the period of days allowed a registrant or...

  3. 32 CFR 1602.9 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Computation of time. 1602.9 Section 1602.9 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.9 Computation of time. Unless otherwise specified the period of days allowed a registrant or...

  4. 39 CFR 963.6 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of time. 963.6 Section 963.6 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO VIOLATIONS OF THE PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.6 Computation of time. A designated...

  5. 43 CFR 45.3 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How are time periods computed? 45.3 Section 45.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONDITIONS AND PRESCRIPTIONS IN FERC HYDROPOWER LICENSES General Provisions § 45.3 How are time periods computed? (a)...

  6. 43 CFR 45.3 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true How are time periods computed? 45.3 Section 45.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONDITIONS AND PRESCRIPTIONS IN FERC HYDROPOWER LICENSES General Provisions § 45.3 How are time periods computed? (a) General....

  7. 43 CFR 45.3 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How are time periods computed? 45.3 Section 45.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONDITIONS AND PRESCRIPTIONS IN FERC HYDROPOWER LICENSES General Provisions § 45.3 How are time periods computed? (a)...

  8. 43 CFR 45.3 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How are time periods computed? 45.3 Section 45.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONDITIONS AND PRESCRIPTIONS IN FERC HYDROPOWER LICENSES General Provisions § 45.3 How are time periods computed? (a)...

  9. 5 CFR 838.131 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Court Orders Generally Procedures Applicable to All Court Orders § 838.131 Computation of time. (a) The rules applicable for computation of time under... proper addresses for submitting court orders affecting CSRS and FERS benefits. (2) A former spouse...

  10. 5 CFR 838.131 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Court Orders Generally Procedures Applicable to All Court Orders § 838.131 Computation of time. (a) The rules applicable for computation of time under... proper addresses for submitting court orders affecting CSRS and FERS benefits. (2) A former spouse...

  11. 5 CFR 838.131 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Court Orders Generally Procedures Applicable to All Court Orders § 838.131 Computation of time. (a) The rules applicable for computation of time under... proper addresses for submitting court orders affecting CSRS and FERS benefits. (2) A former spouse...

  12. 5 CFR 838.131 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Court Orders Generally Procedures Applicable to All Court Orders § 838.131 Computation of time. (a) The rules applicable for computation of time under... proper addresses for submitting court orders affecting CSRS and FERS benefits. (2) A former spouse...

  13. 5 CFR 838.131 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Court Orders Generally Procedures Applicable to All Court Orders § 838.131 Computation of time. (a) The rules applicable for computation of time under... proper addresses for submitting court orders affecting CSRS and FERS benefits. (2) A former spouse...

  14. 15 CFR 930.124 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computation of time. 930.124 Section... MANAGEMENT FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Appeal to the Secretary for Review Related to the Objectives of the Act and National Security Interests § 930.124 Computation of time....

  15. 7 CFR 1.326 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computation of time. 1.326 Section 1.326 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Procedures Related to Administrative Hearings Under the Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.326 Computation of time. (a) In...

  16. 7 CFR 1.326 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computation of time. 1.326 Section 1.326 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Procedures Related to Administrative Hearings Under the Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.326 Computation of time. (a) In...

  17. 7 CFR 1.326 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Computation of time. 1.326 Section 1.326 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Procedures Related to Administrative Hearings Under the Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.326 Computation of time. (a) In...

  18. 7 CFR 1.326 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 1.326 Section 1.326 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Procedures Related to Administrative Hearings Under the Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.326 Computation of time. (a) In...

  19. 7 CFR 1.326 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computation of time. 1.326 Section 1.326 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Procedures Related to Administrative Hearings Under the Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.326 Computation of time. (a) In...

  20. 45 CFR 2554.22 - How is time computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How is time computed? 2554.22 Section 2554.22... SERVICE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Hearing Provisions § 2554.22 How is time computed? (a... is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal government, in which event...

  1. 45 CFR 2554.22 - How is time computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How is time computed? 2554.22 Section 2554.22... SERVICE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Hearing Provisions § 2554.22 How is time computed? (a... is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal government, in which event...

  2. 45 CFR 2554.22 - How is time computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How is time computed? 2554.22 Section 2554.22... SERVICE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Hearing Provisions § 2554.22 How is time computed? (a... is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal government, in which event...

  3. 42 CFR 93.509 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest ORI Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions Hearing Process § 93.509 Computation of time. (a) In computing any period of time under this part for filing...

  4. 12 CFR 308.526 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 308.526 Section 308.526 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Program Fraud Civil Remedies and Procedures § 308.526 Computation of time. (a)...

  5. 12 CFR 308.526 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Computation of time. 308.526 Section 308.526 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Program Fraud Civil Remedies and Procedures § 308.526 Computation of time. (a)...

  6. 12 CFR 308.526 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computation of time. 308.526 Section 308.526 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Program Fraud Civil Remedies and Procedures § 308.526 Computation of time. (a)...

  7. 12 CFR 308.526 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computation of time. 308.526 Section 308.526 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Program Fraud Civil Remedies and Procedures § 308.526 Computation of time. (a)...

  8. 12 CFR 308.526 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computation of time. 308.526 Section 308.526 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Program Fraud Civil Remedies and Procedures § 308.526 Computation of time. (a)...

  9. Utilizing a Collaborative Cross Number Puzzle Game to Develop the Computing Ability of Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yen-Hua; Looi, Chee-Kit; Lin, Chiu-Pin; Shao, Yin-Juan; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2012-01-01

    While addition and subtraction is a key mathematical skill for young children, a typical activity for them in classrooms involves doing repetitive arithmetic calculation exercises. In this study, we explore a collaborative way for students to learn these skills in a technology-enabled way with wireless computers. Two classes, comprising a total of…

  10. Time-Domain Computation Of Electromagnetic Fields In MMICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Faiza S.; Rascoe, Daniel L.

    1995-01-01

    Maxwell's equations solved on three-dimensional, conformed orthogonal grids by finite-difference techniques. Method of computing frequency-dependent electrical parameters of monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) involves time-domain computation of propagation of electromagnetic field in response to excitation by single pulse at input terminal, followed by computation of Fourier transforms to obtain frequency-domain response from time-domain response. Parameters computed include electric and magnetic fields, voltages, currents, impedances, scattering parameters, and effective dielectric constants. Powerful and efficient means for analyzing performance of even complicated MMIC.

  11. 14 CFR 13.44 - Computation of time and extension of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time and extension of time. 13.44 Section 13.44 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Rules of Practice for FAA Hearings § 13.44 Computation of time and extension of time....

  12. A tool for modeling concurrent real-time computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, D. D.; Huang, Shie-Rei; Bhatt, Rahul; Sridharan, N. S.

    1990-01-01

    Real-time computation is a significant area of research in general, and in AI in particular. The complexity of practical real-time problems demands use of knowledge-based problem solving techniques while satisfying real-time performance constraints. Since the demands of a complex real-time problem cannot be predicted (owing to the dynamic nature of the environment) powerful dynamic resource control techniques are needed to monitor and control the performance. A real-time computation model for a real-time tool, an implementation of the QP-Net simulator on a Symbolics machine, and an implementation on a Butterfly multiprocessor machine are briefly described.

  13. 14 CFR 302.507 - Computing time for filing complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computing time for filing complaints. 302.507 Section 302.507 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Proceedings With Respect to Rates, Fares and Charges for Foreign Air Transportation § 302.507 Computing...

  14. 14 CFR 17.7 - Filing and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Filing and computation of time. 17.7 Section 17.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES PROCEDURES FOR PROTESTS AND CONTRACTS DISPUTES General § 17.7 Filing and computation of...

  15. 38 CFR 42.27 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS IMPLEMENTING THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 42.27 Computation of time. (a) In computing... following the act, event, or default, and includes the last day of the period, unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal government, in which event it includes the next...

  16. 40 CFR 222.13 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... period so computed is to be included unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or a legal holiday in which the... next day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays shall be excluded from the computation when the period of time prescribed or allowed is seven...

  17. 40 CFR 222.13 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... period so computed is to be included unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or a legal holiday in which the... next day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays shall be excluded from the computation when the period of time prescribed or allowed is seven...

  18. 40 CFR 222.13 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... period so computed is to be included unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or a legal holiday in which the... next day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays shall be excluded from the computation when the period of time prescribed or allowed is seven...

  19. 41 CFR 105-70.027 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computation of time. 105-70.027 Section 105-70.027 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... Administration 70-IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 105-70.027 Computation of...

  20. 41 CFR 105-70.027 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computation of time. 105-70.027 Section 105-70.027 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... Administration 70-IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT OF 1986 § 105-70.027 Computation of...

  1. 10 CFR 590.105 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Computation of time. 590.105 Section 590.105 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS General Provisions § 590.105 Computation of...

  2. 10 CFR 590.105 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 590.105 Section 590.105 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS General Provisions § 590.105 Computation of...

  3. 10 CFR 590.105 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computation of time. 590.105 Section 590.105 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS General Provisions § 590.105 Computation of...

  4. 10 CFR 590.105 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computation of time. 590.105 Section 590.105 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS General Provisions § 590.105 Computation of...

  5. 10 CFR 590.105 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computation of time. 590.105 Section 590.105 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS General Provisions § 590.105 Computation of...

  6. 29 CFR 1603.106 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EXEMPT STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION UNDER SECTION 304 OF THE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Administrative Process § 1603.106 Computation of time....

  7. 29 CFR 1921.22 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT Miscellaneous § 1921.22 Computation of time. Sundays and holidays shall be... expires on a Sunday or legal holiday, such period shall be extended to include the next following...

  8. 29 CFR 1921.22 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT Miscellaneous § 1921.22 Computation of time. Sundays and holidays shall be... expires on a Sunday or legal holiday, such period shall be extended to include the next following...

  9. 16 CFR 1502.2 - Computation of time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... officer, or by the Commission, Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays are included in computing time. However, if the last day for taking such action falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday,...

  10. 16 CFR 1502.2 - Computation of time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... officer, or by the Commission, Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays are included in computing time. However, if the last day for taking such action falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday,...

  11. 39 CFR 958.21 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PENALTIES, CLEAN-UP COSTS AND DAMAGES FOR VIOLATION OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL REGULATIONS § 958.21 Computation... this part, the time begins with the day following the act, event, or default, and includes the last...

  12. 39 CFR 958.21 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PENALTIES, CLEAN-UP COSTS AND DAMAGES FOR VIOLATION OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL REGULATIONS § 958.21 Computation... this part, the time begins with the day following the act, event, or default, and includes the last...

  13. 32 CFR 150.7 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MILITARY JUSTICE COURTS OF CRIMINAL APPEALS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE § 150.7 Computation of time. In... Chief Judge, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is neither a...

  14. 15 CFR 930.124 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Appeal to the Secretary for Review Related to the Objectives of the Act and National Security Interests § 930.124 Computation of time....

  15. 29 CFR 1603.106 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EXEMPT STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION UNDER SECTION 304 OF THE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Administrative Process § 1603.106 Computation of time....

  16. 20 CFR 655.1030 - Service and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Filed by Employers Utilizing F-1 Students in Off-Campus Work § 655.1030 Service and computation of time... the attorneys for the Administrator. One copy shall be served on the Associate Solicitor, Division...

  17. 14 CFR 13.212 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computation of time. 13.212 Section 13.212 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES... time. (a) This section applies to any period of time prescribed or allowed by this subpart, by...

  18. 40 CFR 97.607 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.607 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the TR SO2... event occurs. (b) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the TR SO2 Group 1...

  19. 40 CFR 97.607 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.607 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the TR SO2... event occurs. (b) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the TR SO2 Group 1...

  20. 14 CFR 13.212 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Computation of time. 13.212 Section 13.212 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES... time. (a) This section applies to any period of time prescribed or allowed by this subpart, by...

  1. 32 CFR 1656.18 - Computation of creditable time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 1656.18 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.18 Computation of creditable time. (a) Creditable time starts when the ASW begins... placement and job interviews performed under orders issued by Selective Service. Creditable time may...

  2. 32 CFR 1656.18 - Computation of creditable time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 1656.18 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.18 Computation of creditable time. (a) Creditable time starts when the ASW begins... placement and job interviews performed under orders issued by Selective Service. Creditable time may...

  3. 32 CFR 1656.18 - Computation of creditable time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 1656.18 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.18 Computation of creditable time. (a) Creditable time starts when the ASW begins... placement and job interviews performed under orders issued by Selective Service. Creditable time may...

  4. 32 CFR 1656.18 - Computation of creditable time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 1656.18 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.18 Computation of creditable time. (a) Creditable time starts when the ASW begins... placement and job interviews performed under orders issued by Selective Service. Creditable time may...

  5. 32 CFR 1656.18 - Computation of creditable time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 1656.18 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.18 Computation of creditable time. (a) Creditable time starts when the ASW begins... placement and job interviews performed under orders issued by Selective Service. Creditable time may...

  6. 40 CFR 97.607 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.607 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the TR SO2... event occurs. (b) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the TR SO2 Group 1...

  7. 40 CFR 97.407 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.407 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the TR NOX... event occurs. (b) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the TR NOX Annual...

  8. 40 CFR 97.407 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.407 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the TR NOX... event occurs. (b) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the TR NOX Annual...

  9. 40 CFR 97.407 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.407 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the TR NOX... event occurs. (b) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the TR NOX Annual...

  10. 40 CFR 96.307 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... occurs. (c) Unless otherwise stated, if the final day of any time period, under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season... Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.307 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program, to begin on...

  11. 40 CFR 96.307 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... occurs. (c) Unless otherwise stated, if the final day of any time period, under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season... Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.307 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program, to begin on...

  12. 40 CFR 96.307 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... occurs. (c) Unless otherwise stated, if the final day of any time period, under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season... Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.307 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program, to begin on...

  13. 40 CFR 96.307 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... occurs. (c) Unless otherwise stated, if the final day of any time period, under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season... Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.307 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program, to begin on...

  14. 40 CFR 96.307 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... occurs. (c) Unless otherwise stated, if the final day of any time period, under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season... Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.307 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program, to begin on...

  15. Just-in-time Design and Additive Manufacture of Patient-specific Medical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shidid, Darpan; Leary, Martin; Choong, Peter; Brandt, Milan

    Recent advances in medical imaging and manufacturing science have enabled the design and production of complex, patient-specific orthopaedic implants. Additive Manufacture (AM) generates three-dimensional structures layer by layer, and is not subject to the constraints associated with traditional manufacturing methods. AM provides significant opportunities for the design of novel geometries and complex lattice structures with enhanced functional performance. However, the design and manufacture of patient-specific AM implant structures requires unique expertise in handling various optimization platforms. Furthermore, the design process for complex structures is computationally intensive. The primary aim of this research is to enable the just-in-time customisation of AM prosthesis; whereby AM implant design and manufacture be completed within the time constraints of a single surgical procedure, while minimising prosthesis mass and optimising the lattice structure to match the stiffness of the surrounding bone tissue. In this research, a design approach using raw CT scan data is applied to the AM manufacture of femoral prosthesis. Using the proposed just-in-time concept, the mass of the prosthesis was rapidly designed and manufactured while satisfying the associated structural requirements. Compressive testing of lattice structures manufactured using proposed method shows that the load carrying capacity of the resected composite bone can be recovered by up to 85% and the compressive stiffness of the AM prosthesis is statistically indistinguishable from the stiffness of the initial bone.

  16. GPU and APU computations of Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Christian; Rossinelli, Diego; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-03-01

    We present GPU and APU accelerated computations of Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) fields. The calculation of FTLEs is a computationally intensive process, as in order to obtain the sharp ridges associated with the Lagrangian Coherent Structures an extensive resampling of the flow field is required. The computational performance of this resampling is limited by the memory bandwidth of the underlying computer architecture. The present technique harnesses data-parallel execution of many-core architectures and relies on fast and accurate evaluations of moment conserving functions for the mesh to particle interpolations. We demonstrate how the computation of FTLEs can be efficiently performed on a GPU and on an APU through OpenCL and we report over one order of magnitude improvements over multi-threaded executions in FTLE computations of bluff body flows.

  17. CPU timing routines for a CONVEX C220 computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynum, Mary Ann

    1989-01-01

    The timing routines available on the CONVEX C220 computer system in the Structural Mechanics Division (SMD) at NASA Langley Research Center are examined. The function of the timing routines, the use of the timing routines in sequential, parallel, and vector code, and the interpretation of the results from the timing routines with respect to the CONVEX model of computing are described. The timing routines available on the SMD CONVEX fall into two groups. The first group includes standard timing routines generally available with UNIX 4.3 BSD operating systems, while the second group includes routines unique to the SMD CONVEX. The standard timing routines described in this report are /bin/csh time,/bin/time, etime, and ctime. The routines unique to the SMD CONVEX are getinfo, second, cputime, toc, and a parallel profiling package made up of palprof, palinit, and palsum.

  18. Continuous-time symmetric Hopfield nets are computationally universal.

    PubMed

    Síma, Jirí; Orponen, Pekka

    2003-03-01

    We establish a fundamental result in the theory of computation by continuous-time dynamical systems by showing that systems corresponding to so-called continuous-time symmetric Hopfield nets are capable of general computation. As is well known, such networks have very constrained Lyapunov-function controlled dynamics. Nevertheless, we show that they are universal and efficient computational devices, in the sense that any convergent synchronous fully parallel computation by a recurrent network of n discrete-time binary neurons, with in general asymmetric coupling weights, can be simulated by a symmetric continuous-time Hopfield net containing only 18n + 7 units employing the saturated-linear activation function. Moreover, if the asymmetric network has maximum integer weight size w(max) and converges in discrete time t*, then the corresponding Hopfield net can be designed to operate in continuous time Theta(t*/epsilon) for any epsilon > 0 such that w(max)2(12n) computation models, our result implies that any polynomially space-bounded Turing machine can be simulated by a family of polynomial-size continuous-time symmetric Hopfield nets.

  19. Continuous-time symmetric Hopfield nets are computationally universal.

    PubMed

    Síma, Jirí; Orponen, Pekka

    2003-03-01

    We establish a fundamental result in the theory of computation by continuous-time dynamical systems by showing that systems corresponding to so-called continuous-time symmetric Hopfield nets are capable of general computation. As is well known, such networks have very constrained Lyapunov-function controlled dynamics. Nevertheless, we show that they are universal and efficient computational devices, in the sense that any convergent synchronous fully parallel computation by a recurrent network of n discrete-time binary neurons, with in general asymmetric coupling weights, can be simulated by a symmetric continuous-time Hopfield net containing only 18n + 7 units employing the saturated-linear activation function. Moreover, if the asymmetric network has maximum integer weight size w(max) and converges in discrete time t*, then the corresponding Hopfield net can be designed to operate in continuous time Theta(t*/epsilon) for any epsilon > 0 such that w(max)2(12n) computation models, our result implies that any polynomially space-bounded Turing machine can be simulated by a family of polynomial-size continuous-time symmetric Hopfield nets. PMID:12620163

  20. 3D Vectorial Time Domain Computational Integrated Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Bond, T C; Koning, J M; Stowell, M L

    2007-02-16

    The design of integrated photonic structures poses considerable challenges. 3D-Time-Domain design tools are fundamental in enabling technologies such as all-optical logic, photonic bandgap sensors, THz imaging, and fast radiation diagnostics. Such technologies are essential to LLNL and WFO sponsors for a broad range of applications: encryption for communications and surveillance sensors (NSA, NAI and IDIV/PAT); high density optical interconnects for high-performance computing (ASCI); high-bandwidth instrumentation for NIF diagnostics; micro-sensor development for weapon miniaturization within the Stockpile Stewardship and DNT programs; and applications within HSO for CBNP detection devices. While there exist a number of photonics simulation tools on the market, they primarily model devices of interest to the communications industry. We saw the need to extend our previous software to match the Laboratory's unique emerging needs. These include modeling novel material effects (such as those of radiation induced carrier concentrations on refractive index) and device configurations (RadTracker bulk optics with radiation induced details, Optical Logic edge emitting lasers with lateral optical inputs). In addition we foresaw significant advantages to expanding our own internal simulation codes: parallel supercomputing could be incorporated from the start, and the simulation source code would be accessible for modification and extension. This work addressed Engineering's Simulation Technology Focus Area, specifically photonics. Problems addressed from the Engineering roadmap of the time included modeling the Auston switch (an important THz source/receiver), modeling Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs, which had been envisioned as part of fast radiation sensors), and multi-scale modeling of optical systems (for a variety of applications). We proposed to develop novel techniques to numerically solve the 3D multi-scale propagation problem for both the microchip

  1. 10 CFR 13.27 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computation of time. 13.27 Section 13.27 Energy NUCLEAR... time is added to the prescribed period except in the following circumstances: (1) If a notice or document is served upon a participant, by first-class mail only, three (3) calendar days will be added...

  2. 40 CFR 72.11 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Program General Provisions § 72.11 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the Acid Rain Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or... scheduled, under the Acid Rain Program, to begin before the occurrence of an act or event shall be...

  3. 40 CFR 72.11 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Program General Provisions § 72.11 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the Acid Rain Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or... scheduled, under the Acid Rain Program, to begin before the occurrence of an act or event shall be...

  4. 40 CFR 72.11 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Program General Provisions § 72.11 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the Acid Rain Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or... scheduled, under the Acid Rain Program, to begin before the occurrence of an act or event shall be...

  5. 40 CFR 72.11 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Program General Provisions § 72.11 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the Acid Rain Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or... scheduled, under the Acid Rain Program, to begin before the occurrence of an act or event shall be...

  6. 40 CFR 72.11 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Program General Provisions § 72.11 Computation of time. (a) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the Acid Rain Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or... scheduled, under the Acid Rain Program, to begin before the occurrence of an act or event shall be...

  7. 20 CFR 802.221 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computation of time. 802.221 Section 802.221 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Prereview... provide otherwise, the day from which the designated period of time begins to run shall not be...

  8. 20 CFR 802.221 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computation of time. 802.221 Section 802.221 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Prereview... provide otherwise, the day from which the designated period of time begins to run shall not be...

  9. 20 CFR 802.221 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computation of time. 802.221 Section 802.221 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Prereview... provide otherwise, the day from which the designated period of time begins to run shall not be...

  10. 20 CFR 802.221 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computation of time. 802.221 Section 802.221 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Prereview... provide otherwise, the day from which the designated period of time begins to run shall not be...

  11. Addition of flexible body option to the TOLA computer program, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, J. W.; Benda, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    This report describes a flexible body option that was developed and added to the Takeoff and Landing Analysis (TOLA) computer program. The addition of the flexible body option to TOLA allows it to be used to study essentially any conventional type airplane in the ground operating environment. It provides the capability to predict the total motion of selected points on the analytical methods incorporated in the program and operating instructions for the option are described. A program listing is included along with several example problems to aid in interpretation of the operating instructions and to illustrate program usage.

  12. The computational power of time dilation in special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamonte, Jacob

    2014-03-01

    The Lorentzian length of a timelike curve connecting both endpoints of a classical computation is a function of the path taken through Minkowski spacetime. The associated runtime difference is due to time-dilation: the phenomenon whereby an observer finds that another's physically identical ideal clock has ticked at a different rate than their own clock. Using ideas appearing in the framework of computational complexity theory, time-dilation is quantified as an algorithmic resource by relating relativistic energy to an nth order polynomial time reduction at the completion of an observer's journey. These results enable a comparison between the optimal quadratic Grover speedup from quantum computing and an n=2 speedup using classical computers and relativistic effects. The goal is not to propose a practical model of computation, but to probe the ultimate limits physics places on computation. Parts of this talk are based on [J.Phys.Conf.Ser. 229:012020 (2010), arXiv:0907.1579]. Support is acknowledged from the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) and the Compagnia di San Paolo Foundation.

  13. The design of a scalable, fixed-time computer benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, J.; Rover, D.; Elbert, S.; Carter, M.

    1990-10-01

    By using the principle of fixed time benchmarking, it is possible to compare a very wide range of computers, from a small personal computer to the most powerful parallel supercomputer, an a single scale. Fixed-time benchmarks promise far greater longevity than those based on a particular problem size, and are more appropriate for grand challenge'' capability comparison. We present the design of a benchmark, SLALOM{trademark}, that scales automatically to the computing power available, and corrects several deficiencies in various existing benchmarks: it is highly scalable, it solves a real problem, it includes input and output times, and it can be run on parallel machines of all kinds, using any convenient language. The benchmark provides a reasonable estimate of the size of problem solvable on scientific computers. Results are presented that span six orders of magnitude for contemporary computers of various architectures. The benchmarks also can be used to demonstrate a new source of superlinear speedup in parallel computers. 15 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. How to Make Additional Time Matter: Integrating Individualized Tutorials into an Extended Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on the effect of extending the school day is decidedly mixed because of the stark differences in how schools use additional time. In this paper, I focus narrowly on the effect of additional time used for individualized tutorials. In 2005, MATCH Charter Public High School integrated two hours of tutorials throughout an extended day. The…

  15. Computational methods to obtain time optimal jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, R. J.; Leake, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Dynamic Programming and the Fletcher-Reeves Conjugate Gradient Method are two existing methods which can be applied to solve a general class of unconstrained fixed time, free right end optimal control problems. New techniques are developed to adapt these methods to solve a time optimal control problem with state variable and control constraints. Specifically, they are applied to compute a time optimal control for a jet engine control problem.

  16. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines.

    PubMed

    Gansäuer, Andreas; Seddiqzai, Meriam; Dahmen, Tobias; Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol(-1) and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG (‡) and ΔG R) are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically.

  17. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines.

    PubMed

    Gansäuer, Andreas; Seddiqzai, Meriam; Dahmen, Tobias; Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol(-1) and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG (‡) and ΔG R) are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically. PMID:24062821

  18. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines

    PubMed Central

    Seddiqzai, Meriam; Dahmen, Tobias; Sure, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Summary The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol−1 and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG ‡ and ΔG R) are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically. PMID:24062821

  19. A new computational structure for real-time dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Izaguirre, A. ); Hashimoto, Minoru )

    1992-08-01

    The authors present an efficient structure for the computation of robot dynamics in real time. The fundamental characteristic of this structure is the division of the computation into a high-priority synchronous task and low-priority background tasks, possibly sharing the resources of a conventional computing unit based on commercial microprocessors. The background tasks compute the inertial and gravitational coefficients as well as the forces due to the velocities of the joints. In each control sample period, the high-priority synchronous task computes the product of the inertial coefficients by the accelerations of the joints and performs the summation of the torques due to the velocities and gravitational forces. Kircanski et al. (1986) have shown that the bandwidth of the variation of joint angles and of their velocities is an order of magnitude less than the variation of joint accelerations. This result agrees with the experiments the authors have carried out using a PUMA 260 robot. Two main strategies contribute to reduce the computational burden associated with the evaluation of the dynamic equations. The first involves the use of efficient algorithms for the evaluation of the equations. The second is aimed at reducing the number of dynamic parameters by identifying beforehand the linear dependencies among these parameters, as well as carrying out a significance analysis of the parameters' contribution to the final joint torques. The actual code used to evaluate this dynamic model is entirely computer generated from experimental data, requiring no other manual intervention than performing a campaign of measurements.

  20. Restructuring the introductory physics lab with the addition of computer-based laboratories.

    PubMed

    Pierri-Galvao, Monica

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays, data acquisition software and sensors are being widely used in introductory physics laboratories. This allows the student to spend more time exploring the data that is collected by the computer hence focusing more on the physical concept. Very often, a faculty is faced with the challenge of updating or introducing a microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) at his or her institution. This article will provide a list of experiments and equipment needed to convert about half of the traditional labs on a 1-year introductory physics lab into MBLs.

  1. Imprecise results: Utilizing partial computations in real-time systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Kwei-Jay; Natarajan, Swaminathan; Liu, Jane W.-S.

    1987-01-01

    In real-time systems, a computation may not have time to complete its execution because of deadline requirements. In such cases, no result except the approximate results produced by the computations up to that point will be available. It is desirable to utilize these imprecise results if possible. Two approaches are proposed to enable computations to return imprecise results when executions cannot be completed normally. The milestone approach records results periodically, and if a deadline is reached, returns the last recorded result. The sieve approach demarcates sections of code which can be skipped if the time available is insufficient. By using these approaches, the system is able to produce imprecise results when deadlines are reached. The design of the Concord project is described which supports imprecise computations using these techniques. Also presented is a general model of imprecise computations using these techniques, as well as one which takes into account the influence of the environment, showing where the latter approach fits into this model.

  2. Literal and figurative interpretations are computed in equal time.

    PubMed

    McElree, B; Nordlie, J

    1999-09-01

    The time courses for constructing literal and figurative interpretations of simple propositions were measured with the response signal, speed-accuracy tradeoff procedure. No differences were found in comprehension speed for literal and figurative strings in a task that required judging whether a string of words was meaningful. Likewise, no differences were found in processing speed for nonsense and figurative strings in a task that required judging whether a string of words was literally true. Figurative strings were less likely to be judged meaningful than were literal strings and less likely to be rejected as literally true than were nonsense strings. The absence of time-course differences is inconsistent with approaches to figurative processing that contend that a figurative interpretation is computed after an anomalous literal interpretation. The time-course profiles suggest that literal and figurative interpretations are computed in equal time but that the meaning of the latter is less constrained than that of the former. PMID:12198788

  3. The computational foundations of time dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, James

    2014-03-01

    The mathematical foundations of TDDFT are established through the formal existence of a fictitious non-interacting system (known as the Kohn-Sham system), which can reproduce the one-electron reduced probability density of the actual system. We build upon these works and show that on the interior of the domain of existence, the Kohn-Sham system can be efficiently obtained given the time-dependent density. Since a quantum computer can efficiently produce such time-dependent densities, we present a polynomial time quantum algorithm to generate the time-dependent Kohn-Sham potential with controllable error bounds. Further, we find that systems do not immediately become non-representable but rather become ill-representable as one approaches this boundary. A representability parameter is defined in our work which quantifies the distance to the boundary of representability and the computational difficulty of finding the Kohn-Sham system.

  4. Time-partitioning simulation models for calculation on parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, Edward J.; Blech, Richard A.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1987-01-01

    A technique allowing time-staggered solution of partial differential equations is presented in this report. Using this technique, called time-partitioning, simulation execution speedup is proportional to the number of processors used because all processors operate simultaneously, with each updating of the solution grid at a different time point. The technique is limited by neither the number of processors available nor by the dimension of the solution grid. Time-partitioning was used to obtain the flow pattern through a cascade of airfoils, modeled by the Euler partial differential equations. An execution speedup factor of 1.77 was achieved using a two processor Cray X-MP/24 computer.

  5. 10 CFR 2.306 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Computation of time. 2.306 Section 2.306 Energy NUCLEAR... added to the prescribed period except in the following circumstances: (1) If a notice or document is served upon a participant, by first-class mail only, three (3) calendar days will be added to...

  6. 14 CFR 16.17 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 16.17 Section 16.17 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES RULES OF PRACTICE FOR FEDERALLY-ASSISTED AIRPORT ENFORCEMENT PROCEEDINGS General Rules Applicable to Complaints, Proceedings Initiated by the FAA,...

  7. 28 CFR 51.9 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.9 Computation of time. (a) The... voting. (b) Except as specified in §§ 51.37, 51.39, and 51.42 the 60-day period shall commence...

  8. 40 CFR 222.13 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 222.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING ACTION ON OCEAN DUMPING PERMIT APPLICATIONS UNDER SECTION 102 OF THE ACT § 222.13 Computation of time. In... Environmental Protection Agency is not open for business, in which event the period runs until the end of...

  9. 40 CFR 222.13 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 222.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING ACTION ON OCEAN DUMPING PERMIT APPLICATIONS UNDER SECTION 102 OF THE ACT § 222.13 Computation of time. In... Environmental Protection Agency is not open for business, in which event the period runs until the end of...

  10. 20 CFR 726.308 - Service and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED BLACK LUNG BENEFITS; REQUIREMENTS FOR COAL MINE OPERATOR'S INSURANCE Civil Money Penalties § 726.308 Service and computation of time. (a) Service of... the Solicitor, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20210, and...

  11. 20 CFR 726.308 - Service and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED BLACK LUNG BENEFITS; REQUIREMENTS FOR COAL MINE OPERATOR'S INSURANCE Civil Money Penalties § 726.308 Service and computation of time. (a) Service of... the Solicitor, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20210, and...

  12. 40 CFR 300.7 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Computation of time. 300.7 Section 300.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION...

  13. 40 CFR 300.7 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Computation of time. 300.7 Section 300.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION...

  14. 40 CFR 300.7 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Computation of time. 300.7 Section 300.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION...

  15. 40 CFR 300.7 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of time. 300.7 Section 300.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION...

  16. 40 CFR 300.7 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Computation of time. 300.7 Section 300.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION...

  17. The Time-Sharing Computer In Introductory Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, William D.; MacDonald, Geraldine E.

    Time-sharing computer-assisted instructional (CAI) programs employing the APL language are being used in support of introductory earth science laboratory exercises at the State University of New York at Binghamton. Three examples are sufficient to illustrate the variety of applications to which these programs are put. The BRACH program is used in…

  18. 39 CFR 3001.15 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday for the Commission, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is neither a Saturday, Sunday, or holiday. A part-day holiday shall be considered as other days and not as a holiday. In computing a period of time which is 5 days...

  19. 39 CFR 3001.15 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday for the Commission, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is neither a Saturday, Sunday, or holiday. A part-day holiday shall be considered as other days and not as a holiday. In computing a period of time which is 5 days...

  20. 46 CFR 4.21-1 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... computed by excluding the first day and including the last unless the last day is Sunday or a legal holiday... legal holiday: Provided, however, That where the time fixed by the regulations in this subchapter or an order of the Board is five days or less all intervening Sundays or legal holidays, other than...

  1. 49 CFR 386.8 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... it is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal Federal holiday in which case the time period will run to the end of the next day that is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal Federal holiday. All Saturdays, Sundays, and legal Federal holidays except those falling on the last day of the period will be computed. (b) Date...

  2. 39 CFR 3001.15 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or federal holiday, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is neither a Saturday, Sunday, nor a federal holiday. In computing a period of time which is 5 days or fewer, all Saturdays, Sundays, and federal holidays are to be excluded....

  3. 39 CFR 3001.15 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... holiday, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is neither a Saturday, Sunday, nor a federal holiday. In computing a period of time which is 5 days or fewer, all Saturdays, Sundays, and federal holidays are to be excluded. Effective Date Note: At 79 FR 33406, June 10, 2014, §...

  4. 46 CFR 4.21-1 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... computed by excluding the first day and including the last unless the last day is Sunday or a legal holiday... legal holiday: Provided, however, That where the time fixed by the regulations in this subchapter or an order of the Board is five days or less all intervening Sundays or legal holidays, other than...

  5. Voice reaction times with recognition for Commodore computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.; Putney, R. Thompson

    1990-01-01

    Hardware and software modifications are presented that allow for collection and recognition by a Commodore computer of spoken responses. Responses are timed with millisecond accuracy and automatically analyzed and scored. Accuracy data for this device from several experiments are presented. Potential applications and suggestions for improving recognition accuracy are also discussed.

  6. 50 CFR 221.3 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How are time periods computed? 221.3 Section 221.3 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS PRESCRIPTIONS IN FERC HYDROPOWER LICENSES...

  7. 50 CFR 221.3 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How are time periods computed? 221.3 Section 221.3 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS PRESCRIPTIONS IN FERC HYDROPOWER LICENSES...

  8. 50 CFR 221.3 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How are time periods computed? 221.3 Section 221.3 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS PRESCRIPTIONS IN FERC HYDROPOWER LICENSES...

  9. 50 CFR 221.3 - How are time periods computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How are time periods computed? 221.3 Section 221.3 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS PRESCRIPTIONS IN FERC HYDROPOWER LICENSES...

  10. 29 CFR 801.59 - Service and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Service and computation of time. 801.59 Section 801.59 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Administrative Proceedings Rules of...

  11. 29 CFR 801.59 - Service and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Service and computation of time. 801.59 Section 801.59 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Administrative Proceedings Rules of...

  12. 29 CFR 801.59 - Service and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Service and computation of time. 801.59 Section 801.59 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Administrative Proceedings Rules of...

  13. 29 CFR 801.59 - Service and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Service and computation of time. 801.59 Section 801.59 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Administrative Proceedings Rules of...

  14. 29 CFR 801.59 - Service and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Service and computation of time. 801.59 Section 801.59 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Administrative Proceedings Rules of...

  15. 11 CFR 111.2 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... New Year's Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day... allowed by this part, the day of the act, event, or default from which the designated period of time begins to run shall not be included. The last day of the period so computed shall be included, unless...

  16. 11 CFR 111.2 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... New Year's Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day... allowed by this part, the day of the act, event, or default from which the designated period of time begins to run shall not be included. The last day of the period so computed shall be included, unless...

  17. 11 CFR 111.2 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... New Year's Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day... allowed by this part, the day of the act, event, or default from which the designated period of time begins to run shall not be included. The last day of the period so computed shall be included, unless...

  18. 11 CFR 111.2 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day... this part, the day of the act, event, or default from which the designated period of time begins to run shall not be included. The last day of the period so computed shall be included, unless it is a...

  19. 41 CFR 105-70.027 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Computation of time. 105-70.027 Section 105-70.027 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Regional Offices-General Services Administration 70-IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM...

  20. 5 CFR 847.108 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time. 847.108 Section 847.108 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) ELECTIONS OF RETIREMENT COVERAGE BY CURRENT AND FORMER EMPLOYEES OF NONAPPROPRIATED...

  1. Time Advice and Learning Questions in Computer Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Gunter Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Students (N = 101) used an introductory text and a computer simulation to learn fundamental concepts about statistical analyses (e.g., analysis of variance, regression analysis and General Linear Model). Each learner was randomly assigned to one cell of a 2 (with or without time advice) x 3 (with learning questions and corrective feedback, with…

  2. 29 CFR 4000.43 - How do I compute a time period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I compute a time period? 4000.43 Section 4000.43..., ISSUANCE, COMPUTATION OF TIME, AND RECORD RETENTION Computation of Time § 4000.43 How do I compute a time period? (a) In general. If you are computing a time period to which this part applies, whether you...

  3. Quantum computing without wavefunctions: time-dependent density functional theory for universal quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Tempel, David G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms.

  4. Quantum Computing Without Wavefunctions: Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Universal Quantum Computation

    PubMed Central

    Tempel, David G.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms. PMID:22553483

  5. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xiaohan; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) at the single-neuron level, and short-term facilitation (STF) and depression (STD) at the synapse level. These dynamical features typically cover a broad range of time scales and exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what is the computational benefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics. In this study, we propose that the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictory computations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractor neural network (CANN) as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing time constants in its dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity, adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, and hence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar time constants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network is able to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed light on the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realize diverse cognitive functions. PMID:27679569

  6. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xiaohan; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) at the single-neuron level, and short-term facilitation (STF) and depression (STD) at the synapse level. These dynamical features typically cover a broad range of time scales and exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what is the computational benefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics. In this study, we propose that the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictory computations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractor neural network (CANN) as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing time constants in its dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity, adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, and hence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar time constants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network is able to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed light on the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realize diverse cognitive functions.

  7. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xiaohan; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) at the single-neuron level, and short-term facilitation (STF) and depression (STD) at the synapse level. These dynamical features typically cover a broad range of time scales and exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what is the computational benefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics. In this study, we propose that the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictory computations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractor neural network (CANN) as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing time constants in its dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity, adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, and hence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar time constants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network is able to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed light on the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realize diverse cognitive functions. PMID:27679569

  8. Computing complex visual features with retinal spike times.

    PubMed

    Gütig, Robert; Gollisch, Tim; Sompolinsky, Haim; Meister, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Neurons in sensory systems can represent information not only by their firing rate, but also by the precise timing of individual spikes. For example, certain retinal ganglion cells, first identified in the salamander, encode the spatial structure of a new image by their first-spike latencies. Here we explore how this temporal code can be used by downstream neural circuits for computing complex features of the image that are not available from the signals of individual ganglion cells. To this end, we feed the experimentally observed spike trains from a population of retinal ganglion cells to an integrate-and-fire model of post-synaptic integration. The synaptic weights of this integration are tuned according to the recently introduced tempotron learning rule. We find that this model neuron can perform complex visual detection tasks in a single synaptic stage that would require multiple stages for neurons operating instead on neural spike counts. Furthermore, the model computes rapidly, using only a single spike per afferent, and can signal its decision in turn by just a single spike. Extending these analyses to large ensembles of simulated retinal signals, we show that the model can detect the orientation of a visual pattern independent of its phase, an operation thought to be one of the primitives in early visual processing. We analyze how these computations work and compare the performance of this model to other schemes for reading out spike-timing information. These results demonstrate that the retina formats spatial information into temporal spike sequences in a way that favors computation in the time domain. Moreover, complex image analysis can be achieved already by a simple integrate-and-fire model neuron, emphasizing the power and plausibility of rapid neural computing with spike times.

  9. Computing classically exact diffusion constants using short-time trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A. F.

    1989-07-10

    The classical diffusion constant of a point defect in an infinite lattice of binding sites is shown to be expressible as transition-state-theory rates multiplied by dynamical correction factors computed from short-time classical trajectories initiated at the site boundaries. The expression, which results from time differentiating the lattice-discretized mean-square displacement, is valid at any temperature for which the site lattice is well defined. It thus avoids both the time-scale limitations of direct molecular dynamics and the rare-event requirements of standard dynamical-correction methods.

  10. Time-Domain Impedance Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Auriault, Laurent

    1996-01-01

    It is an accepted practice in aeroacoustics to characterize the properties of an acoustically treated surface by a quantity known as impedance. Impedance is a complex quantity. As such, it is designed primarily for frequency-domain analysis. Time-domain boundary conditions that are the equivalent of the frequency-domain impedance boundary condition are proposed. Both single frequency and model broadband time-domain impedance boundary conditions are provided. It is shown that the proposed boundary conditions, together with the linearized Euler equations, form well-posed initial boundary value problems. Unlike ill-posed problems, they are free from spurious instabilities that would render time-marching computational solutions impossible.

  11. Efficient quantum algorithm for computing n-time correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Pedernales, J S; Di Candia, R; Egusquiza, I L; Casanova, J; Solano, E

    2014-07-11

    We propose a method for computing n-time correlation functions of arbitrary spinorial, fermionic, and bosonic operators, consisting of an efficient quantum algorithm that encodes these correlations in an initially added ancillary qubit for probe and control tasks. For spinorial and fermionic systems, the reconstruction of arbitrary n-time correlation functions requires the measurement of two ancilla observables, while for bosonic variables time derivatives of the same observables are needed. Finally, we provide examples applicable to different quantum platforms in the frame of the linear response theory.

  12. Efficient method for computing the maximum-likelihood quantum state from measurements with additive Gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Smolin, John A; Gambetta, Jay M; Smith, Graeme

    2012-02-17

    We provide an efficient method for computing the maximum-likelihood mixed quantum state (with density matrix ρ) given a set of measurement outcomes in a complete orthonormal operator basis subject to Gaussian noise. Our method works by first changing basis yielding a candidate density matrix μ which may have nonphysical (negative) eigenvalues, and then finding the nearest physical state under the 2-norm. Our algorithm takes at worst O(d(4)) for the basis change plus O(d(3)) for finding ρ where d is the dimension of the quantum state. In the special case where the measurement basis is strings of Pauli operators, the basis change takes only O(d(3)) as well. The workhorse of the algorithm is a new linear-time method for finding the closest probability distribution (in Euclidean distance) to a set of real numbers summing to one.

  13. Soft Real-Time PID Control on a VME Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karayan, Vahag; Sander, Stanley; Cageao, Richard

    2007-01-01

    microPID (uPID) is a computer program for real-time proportional + integral + derivative (PID) control of a translation stage in a Fourier-transform ultraviolet spectrometer. microPID implements a PID control loop over a position profile at sampling rate of 8 kHz (sampling period 125microseconds). The software runs in a strippeddown Linux operating system on a VersaModule Eurocard (VME) computer operating in real-time priority queue using an embedded controller, a 16-bit digital-to-analog converter (D/A) board, and a laser-positioning board (LPB). microPID consists of three main parts: (1) VME device-driver routines, (2) software that administers a custom protocol for serial communication with a control computer, and (3) a loop section that obtains the current position from an LPB-driver routine, calculates the ideal position from the profile, and calculates a new voltage command by use of an embedded PID routine all within each sampling period. The voltage command is sent to the D/A board to control the stage. microPID uses special kernel headers to obtain microsecond timing resolution. Inasmuch as microPID implements a single-threaded process and all other processes are disabled, the Linux operating system acts as a soft real-time system.

  14. The effect of silane addition timing on mixing processability and properties of silica reinforced rubber compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hee-Hoon; Jin, Hyun-Ho; Ha, Sung-Ho; Jang, Suk-Hee; Kang, Yong-Gu; Han, Min-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    A series of experiments were performed to determine an optimum balance between processability and performance of a highly loaded silica compound. The experiments evaluated 4 different silane injection times. All mixing related to silane addition was conducted with a scaled up "Tandem" mixer line. With exception to silane addition timing, almost all operating conditions were controlled between experimental features. It was found that when the silane addition was introduced earlier in the mixing cycle both the reaction was more complete and the bound rubber content was higher. But processability indicators such as sheet forming and Mooney plasticity were negatively impacted. On the other hand, as silane injection was delayed to later in the mixing process the filler dispersion and good sheet forming was improved. However both the bound rubber content and Silane reaction completion were decreased. With the changes in silane addition time, the processability and properties of a silica compound can be controlled.

  15. Influence of time addition of superplasticizers on the rheological properties of fresh cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Aiad, Ismail

    2003-08-01

    It is well known that the fluidity and the fluidity loss of fresh cement pastes are affected by the kind and the time of addition of organic admixtures. The influence of the time addition of two chemical admixtures, namely, melamine formaldehyde sulfonate (MFS) and naphthalene formaldehyde sulfonate (NFS), on the rheological properties of ordinary Portland and sulfate-resisting cement pastes through the first 120 min of hydration was investigated. The admixture addition was delayed by 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 min. Shear stress and apparent viscosity of the cement pastes were determined at different shear rates (3-146 s{sup -1}) and hydration times of 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. The concentration of Ca{sup 2+} and the combined water content of the cement pastes were determined after 120 min. Yield stress and plastic viscosity values were also determined by using the Bingham model. The results show that an increase in the addition time of the admixture reduces the shear stress, the yield stress, and the plastic viscosity of the cement pastes at the early ages (15 min) as well as at later early ages (120 min). The optimum delaying time of admixture addition is found to be 10-15 min. This time does not depend on the cement and superplasticizer type.

  16. Additional technician tasks and turnaround time in the clinical Stat laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Maria; López-Garrigós, Maite; Flores, Emilio; Leiva-Salinas, Maria; Lillo, Rosa; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many additional tasks in the Stat laboratory (SL) increase the workload. It is necessary to control them because they can affect the service provided by the laboratory. Our aim is to calculate these tasks, study their evolution over a 10 year period, and compare turnaround times (TAT) in summer period to the rest of the year. Materials and methods Additional tasks were classified as “additional test request” and “additional sample”. We collected those incidences from the laboratory information system (LIS), and calculated their evolution over time. We also calculated the monthly TAT for troponin for Emergency department (ED) patients, as the difference between the verification and LIS registration time. A median time of 30 minutes was our indicator target. TAT results and tests workload in summer were compared to the rest of the year. Results Over a 10-year period, the technologists in the SL performed 51,385 additional tasks, a median of 475 per month. The workload was significantly higher during the summer (45,496 tests) than the rest of the year (44,555 tests) (P = 0.019). The troponin TAT did not show this variation between summer and the rest of the year, complying always with our 30 minutes indicator target. Conclusion The technicians accomplished a significant number of additional tasks, and the workload kept increasing over the period of 10 years. That did not affect the TAT results. PMID:27346970

  17. Spike-Timing-Based Computation in Sound Localization

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Dan F. M.; Brette, Romain

    2010-01-01

    Spike timing is precise in the auditory system and it has been argued that it conveys information about auditory stimuli, in particular about the location of a sound source. However, beyond simple time differences, the way in which neurons might extract this information is unclear and the potential computational advantages are unknown. The computational difficulty of this task for an animal is to locate the source of an unexpected sound from two monaural signals that are highly dependent on the unknown source signal. In neuron models consisting of spectro-temporal filtering and spiking nonlinearity, we found that the binaural structure induced by spatialized sounds is mapped to synchrony patterns that depend on source location rather than on source signal. Location-specific synchrony patterns would then result in the activation of location-specific assemblies of postsynaptic neurons. We designed a spiking neuron model which exploited this principle to locate a variety of sound sources in a virtual acoustic environment using measured human head-related transfer functions. The model was able to accurately estimate the location of previously unknown sounds in both azimuth and elevation (including front/back discrimination) in a known acoustic environment. We found that multiple representations of different acoustic environments could coexist as sets of overlapping neural assemblies which could be associated with spatial locations by Hebbian learning. The model demonstrates the computational relevance of relative spike timing to extract spatial information about sources independently of the source signal. PMID:21085681

  18. 14 CFR 221.190 - Time for filing and computation of time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Time for filing and computation of time periods. 221.190 Section 221.190 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Electronically Filed Tariffs § 221.190...

  19. 14 CFR 221.190 - Time for filing and computation of time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Time for filing and computation of time periods. 221.190 Section 221.190 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Electronically Filed Tariffs § 221.190...

  20. 7 CFR 1.174 - Filing; service; extensions of time; and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing; service; extensions of time; and computation of time. 1.174 Section 1.174 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Rules of Practice Governing Cease and Desist Proceedings Under Section 2 of the...

  1. 45 CFR 150.429 - Computation of time and extensions of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Computation of time and extensions of time. 150.429 Section 150.429 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS CMS ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS Administrative...

  2. A heterogeneous hierarchical architecture for real-time computing

    SciTech Connect

    Skroch, D.A.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The need for high-speed data acquisition and control algorithms has prompted continued research in the area of multiprocessor systems and related programming techniques. The result presented here is a unique hardware and software architecture for high-speed real-time computer systems. The implementation of a prototype of this architecture has required the integration of architecture, operating systems and programming languages into a cohesive unit. This report describes a Heterogeneous Hierarchial Architecture for Real-Time (H{sup 2} ART) and system software for program loading and interprocessor communication.

  3. Stochastic nonlinear time series forecasting using time-delay reservoir computers: performance and universality.

    PubMed

    Grigoryeva, Lyudmila; Henriques, Julie; Larger, Laurent; Ortega, Juan-Pablo

    2014-07-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced machine learning paradigm that has already shown excellent performances in the processing of empirical data. We study a particular kind of reservoir computers called time-delay reservoirs that are constructed out of the sampling of the solution of a time-delay differential equation and show their good performance in the forecasting of the conditional covariances associated to multivariate discrete-time nonlinear stochastic processes of VEC-GARCH type as well as in the prediction of factual daily market realized volatilities computed with intraday quotes, using as training input daily log-return series of moderate size. We tackle some problems associated to the lack of task-universality for individually operating reservoirs and propose a solution based on the use of parallel arrays of time-delay reservoirs. PMID:24732236

  4. Stochastic nonlinear time series forecasting using time-delay reservoir computers: performance and universality.

    PubMed

    Grigoryeva, Lyudmila; Henriques, Julie; Larger, Laurent; Ortega, Juan-Pablo

    2014-07-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced machine learning paradigm that has already shown excellent performances in the processing of empirical data. We study a particular kind of reservoir computers called time-delay reservoirs that are constructed out of the sampling of the solution of a time-delay differential equation and show their good performance in the forecasting of the conditional covariances associated to multivariate discrete-time nonlinear stochastic processes of VEC-GARCH type as well as in the prediction of factual daily market realized volatilities computed with intraday quotes, using as training input daily log-return series of moderate size. We tackle some problems associated to the lack of task-universality for individually operating reservoirs and propose a solution based on the use of parallel arrays of time-delay reservoirs.

  5. Using additive manufacturing in accuracy evaluation of reconstructions from computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Smith, Erin J; Anstey, Joseph A; Venne, Gabriel; Ellis, Randy E

    2013-05-01

    Bone models derived from patient imaging and fabricated using additive manufacturing technology have many potential uses including surgical planning, training, and research. This study evaluated the accuracy of bone surface reconstruction of two diarthrodial joints, the hip and shoulder, from computed tomography. Image segmentation of the tomographic series was used to develop a three-dimensional virtual model, which was fabricated using fused deposition modelling. Laser scanning was used to compare cadaver bones, printed models, and intermediate segmentations. The overall bone reconstruction process had a reproducibility of 0.3 ± 0.4 mm. Production of the model had an accuracy of 0.1 ± 0.1 mm, while the segmentation had an accuracy of 0.3 ± 0.4 mm, indicating that segmentation accuracy was the key factor in reconstruction. Generally, the shape of the articular surfaces was reproduced accurately, with poorer accuracy near the periphery of the articular surfaces, particularly in regions with periosteum covering and where osteophytes were apparent.

  6. STICK: Spike Time Interval Computational Kernel, a Framework for General Purpose Computation Using Neurons, Precise Timing, Delays, and Synchrony.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, Xavier; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-11-01

    There has been significant research over the past two decades in developing new platforms for spiking neural computation. Current neural computers are primarily developed to mimic biology. They use neural networks, which can be trained to perform specific tasks to mainly solve pattern recognition problems. These machines can do more than simulate biology; they allow us to rethink our current paradigm of computation. The ultimate goal is to develop brain-inspired general purpose computation architectures that can breach the current bottleneck introduced by the von Neumann architecture. This work proposes a new framework for such a machine. We show that the use of neuron-like units with precise timing representation, synaptic diversity, and temporal delays allows us to set a complete, scalable compact computation framework. The framework provides both linear and nonlinear operations, allowing us to represent and solve any function. We show usability in solving real use cases from simple differential equations to sets of nonlinear differential equations leading to chaotic attractors. PMID:26378879

  7. In this issue: Time to replace doctors' judgement with computers.

    PubMed

    de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Informaticians continue to rise to the challenge, set by the English Health Minister, of trying to replace doctors' judgement with computers. This issue describes successes and where there are barriers. However, whilst there is progress this tends to be incremental and there are grand challenges to be overcome before computers can replace clinician. These grand challenges include: (1) improving usability so it is possible to more readily incorporate technology into clinical workflow; (2) rigorous new analytic methods that make use of the mass of available data, 'Big data', to create real-world evidence; (3) faster ways of meeting regulatory and legal requirements including ensuring privacy; (4) provision of reimbursement models to fund innovative technology that can substitute for clinical time and (5) recognition that innovations that improve quality also often increase cost. Informatics more is likely to support and augment clinical decision making rather than replace clinicians. PMID:26577428

  8. Accuracy vs. computational time: translating aortic simulations to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alistair G; Shi, Yubing; Marzo, Alberto; Staicu, Cristina; Valverde, Isra; Beerbaum, Philipp; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney

    2012-02-01

    State of the art simulations of aortic haemodynamics feature full fluid-structure interaction (FSI) and coupled 0D boundary conditions. Such analyses require not only significant computational resource but also weeks to months of run time, which compromises the effectiveness of their translation to a clinical workflow. This article employs three computational fluid methodologies, of varying levels of complexity with coupled 0D boundary conditions, to simulate the haemodynamics within a patient-specific aorta. The most comprehensive model is a full FSI simulation. The simplest is a rigid walled incompressible fluid simulation while an alternative middle-ground approach employs a compressible fluid, tuned to elicit a response analogous to the compliance of the aortic wall. The results demonstrate that, in the context of certain clinical questions, the simpler analysis methods may capture the important characteristics of the flow field.

  9. Computational Modeling of Semiconductor Dynamics at Femtosecond Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Govind P.; Goorjian, Peter M.

    1998-01-01

    The Interchange No. NCC2-5149 deals with the emerging technology of photonic (or optoelectronic) integrated circuits (PICs or OEICs). In PICs, optical and electronic components are grown together on the same chip. To build such devices and subsystems, one needs to model the entire chip. PICs are useful for building components for integrated optical transmitters, integrated optical receivers, optical data storage systems, optical interconnects, and optical computers. For example, the current commercial rate for optical data transmission is 2.5 gigabits per second, whereas the use of shorter pulses to improve optical transmission rates would yield an increase of 400 to 1000 times. The improved optical data transmitters would be used in telecommunications networks and computer local-area networks. Also, these components can be applied to activities in space, such as satellite to satellite communications, when the data transmissions are made at optical frequencies. The research project consisted of developing accurate computer modeling of electromagnetic wave propagation in semiconductors. Such modeling is necessary for the successful development of PICs. More specifically, these computer codes would enable the modeling of such devices, including their subsystems, such as semiconductor lasers and semiconductor amplifiers in which there is femtosecond pulse propagation. Presently, there are no computer codes that could provide this modeling. Current codes do not solve the full vector, nonlinear, Maxwell's equations, which are required for these short pulses and also current codes do not solve the semiconductor Bloch equations, which are required to accurately describe the material's interaction with femtosecond pulses. The research performed under NCC2-5149 solves the combined Maxwell's and Bloch's equations.

  10. Real-time computing without stable states: a new framework for neural computation based on perturbations.

    PubMed

    Maass, Wolfgang; Natschläger, Thomas; Markram, Henry

    2002-11-01

    A key challenge for neural modeling is to explain how a continuous stream of multimodal input from a rapidly changing environment can be processed by stereotypical recurrent circuits of integrate-and-fire neurons in real time. We propose a new computational model for real-time computing on time-varying input that provides an alternative to paradigms based on Turing machines or attractor neural networks. It does not require a task-dependent construction of neural circuits. Instead, it is based on principles of high-dimensional dynamical systems in combination with statistical learning theory and can be implemented on generic evolved or found recurrent circuitry. It is shown that the inherent transient dynamics of the high-dimensional dynamical system formed by a sufficiently large and heterogeneous neural circuit may serve as universal analog fading memory. Readout neurons can learn to extract in real time from the current state of such recurrent neural circuit information about current and past inputs that may be needed for diverse tasks. Stable internal states are not required for giving a stable output, since transient internal states can be transformed by readout neurons into stable target outputs due to the high dimensionality of the dynamical system. Our approach is based on a rigorous computational model, the liquid state machine, that, unlike Turing machines, does not require sequential transitions between well-defined discrete internal states. It is supported, as the Turing machine is, by rigorous mathematical results that predict universal computational power under idealized conditions, but for the biologically more realistic scenario of real-time processing of time-varying inputs. Our approach provides new perspectives for the interpretation of neural coding, the design of experiments and data analysis in neurophysiology, and the solution of problems in robotics and neurotechnology.

  11. Spurious fields in time domain computations of scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangro, Urve; Nicolaides, Roy

    1995-01-01

    In this paper two-dimensional electromagnetic scattering problems with a time-periodic incident field are considered. The scatterer is a perfect conductor, and an artificial boundary condition is used. The large time behavior of solutions, depending on (divergence-free) initial conditions, is characterized. It turns out that in addition to the expected time-periodic solution the limiting solution may also contain a spurious stationary field. The source of the stationary field is explained and equations describing it are obtained. Several avoidance strategies are discussed, and numerical comparisons of these techniques are given.

  12. From computation to black holes and space-time foam.

    PubMed

    Ng, Y J

    2001-04-01

    We show that quantum mechanics and general relativity limit the speed nu of a simple computer (such as a black hole) and its memory space I to I(nu2) less, similar(t(-2))P, where t(P) is the Planck time. We also show that the lifetime of a simple clock and its precision are similarly limited. These bounds and the holographic bound originate from the same physics that governs the quantum fluctuations of space-time. We further show that these physical bounds are realized for black holes, yielding the correct Hawking black hole lifetime, and that space-time undergoes much larger quantum fluctuations than conventional wisdom claims-almost within range of detection with modern gravitational-wave interferometers.

  13. Run-time statistical estimation of task execution times for heterogeneous distributed computing

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, M.A.; Oezguener, F.; Follen, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, an efficient, run-time, statistical scheme for estimating the execution time of a task is presented, in order to facilitate run-time matching and scheduling in a distributed heterogeneous computing environment. This scheme is based upon a nonparametric regression technique, where the execution time estimate for a task is computed from past observations. Furthermore, this technique is able to compensate for different parameters upon which the execution time depends, and does not require any knowledge of the architecture of the target machine. It is also able to make accurate predictions when erroneous data is present in the set of observations, and has been experimentally shown to produce estimates with very low error even with few past values from which to calculate a new estimate.

  14. Prediction intervals for a noisy nonlinear time series based on a bootstrapping reservoir computing network ensemble.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chunyang; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Wei; Leung, Henry

    2013-07-01

    Prediction intervals that provide estimated values as well as the corresponding reliability are applied to nonlinear time series forecast. However, constructing reliable prediction intervals for noisy time series is still a challenge. In this paper, a bootstrapping reservoir computing network ensemble (BRCNE) is proposed and a simultaneous training method based on Bayesian linear regression is developed. In addition, the structural parameters of the BRCNE, that is, the number of reservoir computing networks and the reservoir dimension, are determined off-line by the 0.632 bootstrap cross-validation. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, two kinds of time series data, including the multisuperimposed oscillator problem with additive noises and a practical gas flow in steel industry are employed here. The experimental results indicate that the proposed approach has a satisfactory performance on prediction intervals for practical applications.

  15. Additive and Interactive Effects on Response Time Distributions in Visual Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yap, Melvin J.; Balota, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Across 3 different word recognition tasks, distributional analyses were used to examine the joint effects of stimulus quality and word frequency on underlying response time distributions. Consistent with the extant literature, stimulus quality and word frequency produced additive effects in lexical decision, not only in the means but also in the…

  16. 16 CFR 803.21 - Additional information shall be supplied within reasonable time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional information shall be supplied within reasonable time. 803.21 Section 803.21 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF...

  17. 16 CFR 803.21 - Additional information shall be supplied within reasonable time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional information shall be supplied within reasonable time. 803.21 Section 803.21 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF...

  18. Ultimate capacity of linear time-invariant bosonic channels with additive Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Bardhan, Bhaskar; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Fiber-optic communications are moving to coherent detection in order to increase their spectral efficiency, i.e., their channel capacity per unit bandwidth. At power levels below the threshold for significant nonlinear effects, the channel model for such operation a linear time-invariant filter followed by additive Gaussian noise is one whose channel capacity is well known from Shannon's noisy channel coding theorem. The fiber channel, however, is really a bosonic channel, meaning that its ultimate classical information capacity must be determined from quantum-mechanical analysis, viz. from the Holevo-Schumacher-Westmoreland (HSW) theorem. Based on recent results establishing the HSW capacity of a linear (lossy or amplifying) channel with additive Gaussian noise, we provide a general continuous-time result, namely the HSW capacity of a linear time-invariant (LTI) bosonic channel with additive Gaussian noise arising from a thermal environment. In particular, we treat quasi-monochromatic communication under an average power constraint through a channel comprised of a stable LTI filter that may be attenuating at all frequencies or amplifying at some frequencies and attenuating at others. Phase-insensitive additive Gaussian noise-associated with the continuous-time Langevin noise operator needed to preserve free-field commutator brackets is included at the filter output. We compare the resulting spectral efficiencies with corresponding results for heterodyne and homodyne detection over the same channel to assess the increased spectral efficiency that might be realized with optimum quantum reception.

  19. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember. 121.483 Section 121.483 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  20. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember. 121.483 Section 121.483 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  1. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember. 121.483 Section 121.483 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  2. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember. 121.483 Section 121.483 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  3. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember. 121.483 Section 121.483 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  4. NNSA?s Computing Strategy, Acquisition Plan, and Basis for Computing Time Allocation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikkel, D J

    2009-07-21

    This report is in response to the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 (H.R. 1105; Public Law 111-8) in its funding of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. This bill called for a report on ASC's plans for computing and platform acquisition strategy in support of stockpile stewardship. Computer simulation is essential to the stewardship of the nation's nuclear stockpile. Annual certification of the country's stockpile systems, Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs), and execution of Life Extension Programs (LEPs) are dependent on simulations employing the advanced ASC tools developed over the past decade plus; indeed, without these tools, certification would not be possible without a return to nuclear testing. ASC is an integrated program involving investments in computer hardware (platforms and computing centers), software environments, integrated design codes and physical models for these codes, and validation methodologies. The significant progress ASC has made in the past derives from its focus on mission and from its strategy of balancing support across the key investment areas necessary for success. All these investment areas must be sustained for ASC to adequately support current stockpile stewardship mission needs and to meet ever more difficult challenges as the weapons continue to age or undergo refurbishment. The appropriations bill called for this report to address three specific issues, which are responded to briefly here but are expanded upon in the subsequent document: (1) Identify how computing capability at each of the labs will specifically contribute to stockpile stewardship goals, and on what basis computing time will be allocated to achieve the goal of a balanced program among the labs. (2) Explain the NNSA's acquisition strategy for capacity and capability of machines at each of the labs and how it will fit within the existing budget constraints. (3) Identify the technical

  5. Energy and time determine scaling in biological and computer designs.

    PubMed

    Moses, Melanie; Bezerra, George; Edwards, Benjamin; Brown, James; Forrest, Stephanie

    2016-08-19

    Metabolic rate in animals and power consumption in computers are analogous quantities that scale similarly with size. We analyse vascular systems of mammals and on-chip networks of microprocessors, where natural selection and human engineering, respectively, have produced systems that minimize both energy dissipation and delivery times. Using a simple network model that simultaneously minimizes energy and time, our analysis explains empirically observed trends in the scaling of metabolic rate in mammals and power consumption and performance in microprocessors across several orders of magnitude in size. Just as the evolutionary transitions from unicellular to multicellular animals in biology are associated with shifts in metabolic scaling, our model suggests that the scaling of power and performance will change as computer designs transition to decentralized multi-core and distributed cyber-physical systems. More generally, a single energy-time minimization principle may govern the design of many complex systems that process energy, materials and information.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. PMID:27431524

  6. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method.

  7. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method. PMID:27176428

  8. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method.

  9. Avoiding Split Attention in Computer-Based Testing: Is Neglecting Additional Information Facilitative?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Janssen, Noortje; Kirschner, Paul A.; Erkens, Gijsbert

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether design guidelines for computer-based learning can be applied to computer-based testing (CBT). Twenty-two students completed a CBT exam with half of the questions presented in a split-screen format that was analogous to the original paper-and-pencil version and half in an integrated format. Results show that students…

  10. Passivity and Passification of Memristor-Based Recurrent Neural Networks With Additive Time-Varying Delays.

    PubMed

    Rakkiyappan, Rajan; Chandrasekar, Arunachalam; Cao, Jinde

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new design scheme for the passivity and passification of a class of memristor-based recurrent neural networks (MRNNs) with additive time-varying delays. The predictable assumptions on the boundedness and Lipschitz continuity of activation functions are formulated. The systems considered here are based on a different time-delay model suggested recently, which includes additive time-varying delay components in the state. The connection between the time-varying delay and its upper bound is considered when estimating the upper bound of the derivative of Lyapunov functional. It is recognized that the passivity condition can be expressed in a linear matrix inequality (LMI) format and by using characteristic function method. For state feedback passification, it is verified that it is apathetic to use immediate or delayed state feedback. By constructing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and employing Jensen's inequality and reciprocal convex combination technique together with a tighter estimation of the upper bound of the cross-product terms derived from the derivatives of the Lyapunov functional, less conventional delay-dependent passivity criteria are established in terms of LMIs. Moreover, second-order reciprocally convex approach is employed for deriving the upper bound for terms with inverses of squared convex parameters. The model based on the memristor with additive time-varying delays widens the application scope for the design of neural networks. Finally, pertinent examples are given to show the advantages of the derived passivity criteria and the significant improvement of the theoretical approaches.

  11. 29 CFR 4000.43 - How do I compute a time period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I compute a time period? 4000.43 Section 4000.43..., ISSUANCE, COMPUTATION OF TIME, AND RECORD RETENTION Computation of Time § 4000.43 How do I compute a time... backwards. Suppose you are required to file an advance notice of reportable event for a transaction that...

  12. 29 CFR 4000.43 - How do I compute a time period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I compute a time period? 4000.43 Section 4000.43..., ISSUANCE, COMPUTATION OF TIME, AND RECORD RETENTION Computation of Time § 4000.43 How do I compute a time... backwards. Suppose you are required to file an advance notice of reportable event for a transaction that...

  13. A computer program for the estimation of time of death.

    PubMed

    Lynnerup, N

    1993-07-01

    In the 1960s Marshall and Hoare presented a "Standard Cooling Curve" based on their mathematical analyses on the postmortem cooling of bodies. Although fairly accurate under standard conditions, the "curve" or formula is based on the assumption that the ambience temperature is constant and that the temperature at death is known. Also, Marshall and Hoare's formula expresses the temperature as a function of time, and not vice versa, the latter being the problem most often encountered by forensic scientists. A simple BASIC program that enables solving of Marshall and Hoare's equation for the postmortem cooling of bodies is presented. It is proposed that by having a computer program that solves the equation, giving the length of the cooling period in response to a certain rectal temperature, and which allows easy comparison of multiple solutions, the uncertainties related to ambience temperature and temperature at death can be quantified, substantiating estimations of time of death.

  14. Computer Program Recognizes Patterns in Time-Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hand, Charles

    2003-01-01

    A computer program recognizes selected patterns in time-series data like digitized samples of seismic or electrophysiological signals. The program implements an artificial neural network (ANN) and a set of N clocks for the purpose of determining whether N or more instances of a certain waveform, W, occur within a given time interval, T. The ANN must be trained to recognize W in the incoming stream of data. The first time the ANN recognizes W, it sets clock 1 to count down from T to zero; the second time it recognizes W, it sets clock 2 to count down from T to zero, and so forth through the Nth instance. On the N + 1st instance, the cycle is repeated, starting with clock 1. If any clock has not reached zero when it is reset, then N instances of W have been detected within time T, and the program so indicates. The program can readily be encoded in a field-programmable gate array or an application-specific integrated circuit that could be used, for example, to detect electroencephalographic or electrocardiographic waveforms indicative of epileptic seizures or heart attacks, respectively.

  15. The Arrow of Time through the Lens of Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palem, Krishna V.

    The concepts of temporal logic were introduced by Amir Pnueli [1] into the realm of computer science in general and programs in particular, to great effect. Given a program specification, a crucial element of reasoning through temporal logic is our ability to assert that one program event occurs before or after the other, with an order intuitively rooted in our notion of "time". In the realm of temporal logic, such assertions are abstracted as pure mathematical facts. An alternative is to consider the physical realization by executing the specified program through, for example, a microprocessor-based system. In such a case, a mechanism is used to ensure that the desired temporal relationships from the program specification are obeyed, and quite often this mechanism takes the form of a clock. In physical instantiations however clocks and similar mechanisms have an associated energy cost. They are guided by the laws of physics in general and thermodynamics in particular, with which the arrow of time and the associated irreversibility are intimately intertwined. Viewed through this lens, a key question arises of whether the need for ensuring that the temporal norms needed for program correctness accrue an inevitable energy cost. In this paper, I sketch some of the intricacies underlying this question. I will hint at the subtle interactions between models of computing, time as it is represented in them, and the associated thermodynamic cost. In his early work, Amir relied as much on the philosophy of reasoning about time [2-4] as on the technical intricacies of mathematical logic. In recognition of the richness of his intellectual endeavor, I have developed this exposition in a philosophical style mimicking that of the ancient greek philosopher Zeno [5,6].

  16. Linking process, structure, property, and performance for metal-based additive manufacturing: computational approaches with experimental support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Xiong, Wei; Yan, Wentao; Lin, Stephen; Cheng, Puikei; Kafka, Orion L.; Wagner, Gregory J.; Cao, Jian; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) methods for rapid prototyping of 3D materials (3D printing) have become increasingly popular with a particular recent emphasis on those methods used for metallic materials. These processes typically involve an accumulation of cyclic phase changes. The widespread interest in these methods is largely stimulated by their unique ability to create components of considerable complexity. However, modeling such processes is exceedingly difficult due to the highly localized and drastic material evolution that often occurs over the course of the manufacture time of each component. Final product characterization and validation are currently driven primarily by experimental means as a result of the lack of robust modeling procedures. In the present work, the authors discuss primary detrimental hurdles that have plagued effective modeling of AM methods for metallic materials while also providing logical speculation into preferable research directions for overcoming these hurdles. The primary focus of this work encompasses the specific areas of high-performance computing, multiscale modeling, materials characterization, process modeling, experimentation, and validation for final product performance of additively manufactured metallic components.

  17. Addition of flexible body option to the TOLA computer program. Part 2: User and programmer documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, J. W.; Benda, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    User and programmer oriented documentation for the flexible body option of the Takeoff and Landing Analysis (TOLA) computer program are provided. The user information provides sufficient knowledge of the development and use of the option to enable the engineering user to successfully operate the modified program and understand the results. The programmer's information describes the option structure and logic enabling a programmer to make major revisions to this part of the TOLA computer program.

  18. Accessible high performance computing solutions for near real-time image processing for time critical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielski, Conrad; Lemoine, Guido; Syryczynski, Jacek

    2009-09-01

    High Performance Computing (HPC) hardware solutions such as grid computing and General Processing on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPGPU) are now accessible to users with general computing needs. Grid computing infrastructures in the form of computing clusters or blades are becoming common place and GPGPU solutions that leverage the processing power of the video card are quickly being integrated into personal workstations. Our interest in these HPC technologies stems from the need to produce near real-time maps from a combination of pre- and post-event satellite imagery in support of post-disaster management. Faster processing provides a twofold gain in this situation: 1. critical information can be provided faster and 2. more elaborate automated processing can be performed prior to providing the critical information. In our particular case, we test the use of the PANTEX index which is based on analysis of image textural measures extracted using anisotropic, rotation-invariant GLCM statistics. The use of this index, applied in a moving window, has been shown to successfully identify built-up areas in remotely sensed imagery. Built-up index image masks are important input to the structuring of damage assessment interpretation because they help optimise the workload. The performance of computing the PANTEX workflow is compared on two different HPC hardware architectures: (1) a blade server with 4 blades, each having dual quad-core CPUs and (2) a CUDA enabled GPU workstation. The reference platform is a dual CPU-quad core workstation and the PANTEX workflow total computing time is measured. Furthermore, as part of a qualitative evaluation, the differences in setting up and configuring various hardware solutions and the related software coding effort is presented.

  19. Time of flight measurement of speed of sound in air with a computer sound card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljalal, Abdulaziz

    2014-11-01

    A computer sound card and freely available audio editing software are used to measure accurately the speed of sound in air using the time-of-flight method. In addition to speed of sound measurement, inversion behaviour upon reflection from an open and closed end of a pipe is demonstrated. Also, it is demonstrated that the reflection at an open end of a pipe occurs slightly outside the pipe. The equipment needed is readily available to any student with access to a microphone, loudspeaker and computer.

  20. Experimental model and analytic solution for real-time observation of vehicle's additional steer angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Liang; Pan, Deng; Cao, Chengmao; Song, Jian

    2014-03-01

    The current research of real-time observation for vehicle roll steer angle and compliance steer angle(both of them comprehensively referred as the additional steer angle in this paper) mainly employs the linear vehicle dynamic model, in which only the lateral acceleration of vehicle body is considered. The observation accuracy resorting to this method cannot meet the requirements of vehicle real-time stability control, especially under extreme driving conditions. The paper explores the solution resorting to experimental method. Firstly, a multi-body dynamic model of a passenger car is built based on the ADAMS/Car software, whose dynamic accuracy is verified by the same vehicle's roadway test data of steady static circular test. Based on this simulation platform, several influencing factors of additional steer angle under different driving conditions are quantitatively analyzed. Then ɛ-SVR algorithm is employed to build the additional steer angle prediction model, whose input vectors mainly include the sensor information of standard electronic stability control system(ESC). The method of typical slalom tests and FMVSS 126 tests are adopted to make simulation, train model and test model's generalization performance. The test result shows that the influence of lateral acceleration on additional steer angle is maximal (the magnitude up to 1°), followed by the longitudinal acceleration-deceleration and the road wave amplitude (the magnitude up to 0.3°). Moreover, both the prediction accuracy and the calculation real-time of the model can meet the control requirements of ESC. This research expands the accurate observation methods of the additional steer angle under extreme driving conditions.

  1. New Stabilization for Dynamical System with Two Additive Time-Varying Delays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Chen, Xiaozhou

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a new delay-dependent stabilization criterion for systems with two additive time-varying delays. The novel functional is constructed, a tighter upper bound of the derivative of the Lyapunov functional is obtained. These results have advantages over some existing ones because the combination of the delay decomposition technique and the reciprocally convex approach. Two examples are provided to demonstrate the less conservatism and effectiveness of the results in this paper. PMID:24701159

  2. Space-Time VMS Computation of Wind-Turbine Rotor and Tower Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Spenser W.

    This thesis is on the space{time variational multiscale (ST-VMS) computation of wind-turbine rotor and tower aerodynamics. The rotor geometry is that of the NREL 5MW offshore baseline wind turbine. We compute with a given wind speed and a specified rotor speed. The computation is challenging because of the large Reynolds numbers and rotating turbulent ows, and computing the correct torque requires an accurate and meticulous numerical approach. The presence of the tower increases the computational challenge because of the fast, rotational relative motion between the rotor and tower. The ST-VMS method is the residual-based VMS version of the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized ST (DSD/SST) method, and is also called "DSD/SST-VMST" method (i.e., the version with the VMS turbulence model). In calculating the stabilization parameters embedded in the method, we are using a new element length definition for the diffusion-dominated limit. The DSD/SST method, which was introduced as a general-purpose moving-mesh method for computation of ows with moving interfaces, requires a mesh update method. Mesh update typically consists of moving the mesh for as long as possible and remeshing as needed. In the computations reported here, NURBS basis functions are used for the temporal representation of the rotor motion, enabling us to represent the circular paths associated with that motion exactly and specify a constant angular velocity corresponding to the invariant speeds along those paths. In addition, temporal NURBS basis functions are used in representation of the motion and deformation of the volume meshes computed and also in remeshing. We name this "ST/NURBS Mesh Update Method (STNMUM)." The STNMUM increases computational efficiency in terms of computer time and storage, and computational exibility in terms of being able to change the time-step size of the computation. We use layers of thin elements near the blade surfaces, which undergo rigid-body motion with the rotor. We

  3. Space-time VMS computation of wind-turbine rotor and tower aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; McIntyre, Spenser; Kostov, Nikolay; Kolesar, Ryan; Habluetzel, Casey

    2014-01-01

    We present the space-time variational multiscale (ST-VMS) computation of wind-turbine rotor and tower aerodynamics. The rotor geometry is that of the NREL 5MW offshore baseline wind turbine. We compute with a given wind speed and a specified rotor speed. The computation is challenging because of the large Reynolds numbers and rotating turbulent flows, and computing the correct torque requires an accurate and meticulous numerical approach. The presence of the tower increases the computational challenge because of the fast, rotational relative motion between the rotor and tower. The ST-VMS method is the residual-based VMS version of the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized ST (DSD/SST) method, and is also called "DSD/SST-VMST" method (i.e., the version with the VMS turbulence model). In calculating the stabilization parameters embedded in the method, we are using a new element length definition for the diffusion-dominated limit. The DSD/SST method, which was introduced as a general-purpose moving-mesh method for computation of flows with moving interfaces, requires a mesh update method. Mesh update typically consists of moving the mesh for as long as possible and remeshing as needed. In the computations reported here, NURBS basis functions are used for the temporal representation of the rotor motion, enabling us to represent the circular paths associated with that motion exactly and specify a constant angular velocity corresponding to the invariant speeds along those paths. In addition, temporal NURBS basis functions are used in representation of the motion and deformation of the volume meshes computed and also in remeshing. We name this "ST/NURBS Mesh Update Method (STNMUM)." The STNMUM increases computational efficiency in terms of computer time and storage, and computational flexibility in terms of being able to change the time-step size of the computation. We use layers of thin elements near the blade surfaces, which undergo rigid-body motion with the rotor. We

  4. An atomic orbital based real-time time-dependent density functional theory for computing electronic circular dichroism band spectra.

    PubMed

    Goings, Joshua J; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-06-21

    One of the challenges of interpreting electronic circular dichroism (ECD) band spectra is that different states may have different rotatory strength signs, determined by their absolute configuration. If the states are closely spaced and opposite in sign, observed transitions may be washed out by nearby states, unlike absorption spectra where transitions are always positive additive. To accurately compute ECD bands, it is necessary to compute a large number of excited states, which may be prohibitively costly if one uses the linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. Here we implement a real-time, atomic-orbital based TDDFT method for computing the entire ECD spectrum simultaneously. The method is advantageous for large systems with a high density of states. In contrast to previous implementations based on real-space grids, the method is variational, independent of nuclear orientation, and does not rely on pseudopotential approximations, making it suitable for computation of chiroptical properties well into the X-ray regime.

  5. An atomic orbital based real-time time-dependent density functional theory for computing electronic circular dichroism band spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goings, Joshua J.; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-06-01

    One of the challenges of interpreting electronic circular dichroism (ECD) band spectra is that different states may have different rotatory strength signs, determined by their absolute configuration. If the states are closely spaced and opposite in sign, observed transitions may be washed out by nearby states, unlike absorption spectra where transitions are always positive additive. To accurately compute ECD bands, it is necessary to compute a large number of excited states, which may be prohibitively costly if one uses the linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. Here we implement a real-time, atomic-orbital based TDDFT method for computing the entire ECD spectrum simultaneously. The method is advantageous for large systems with a high density of states. In contrast to previous implementations based on real-space grids, the method is variational, independent of nuclear orientation, and does not rely on pseudopotential approximations, making it suitable for computation of chiroptical properties well into the X-ray regime.

  6. Predicting the Survival Time for Bladder Cancer Using an Additive Hazards Model in Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    TAPAK, Leili; MAHJUB, Hossein; SADEGHIFAR, Majid; SAIDIJAM, Massoud; POOROLAJAL, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: One substantial part of microarray studies is to predict patients’ survival based on their gene expression profile. Variable selection techniques are powerful tools to handle high dimensionality in analysis of microarray data. However, these techniques have not been investigated in competing risks setting. This study aimed to investigate the performance of four sparse variable selection methods in estimating the survival time. Methods: The data included 1381 gene expression measurements and clinical information from 301 patients with bladder cancer operated in the years 1987 to 2000 in hospitals in Denmark, Sweden, Spain, France, and England. Four methods of the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, smoothly clipped absolute deviation, the smooth integration of counting and absolute deviation and elastic net were utilized for simultaneous variable selection and estimation under an additive hazards model. The criteria of area under ROC curve, Brier score and c-index were used to compare the methods. Results: The median follow-up time for all patients was 47 months. The elastic net approach was indicated to outperform other methods. The elastic net had the lowest integrated Brier score (0.137±0.07) and the greatest median of the over-time AUC and C-index (0.803±0.06 and 0.779±0.13, respectively). Five out of 19 selected genes by the elastic net were significant (P<0.05) under an additive hazards model. It was indicated that the expression of RTN4, SON, IGF1R and CDC20 decrease the survival time, while the expression of SMARCAD1 increase it. Conclusion: The elastic net had higher capability than the other methods for the prediction of survival time in patients with bladder cancer in the presence of competing risks base on additive hazards model. PMID:27114989

  7. Multiscale Methods, Parallel Computation, and Neural Networks for Real-Time Computer Vision.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiti, Roberto

    1990-01-01

    This thesis presents new algorithms for low and intermediate level computer vision. The guiding ideas in the presented approach are those of hierarchical and adaptive processing, concurrent computation, and supervised learning. Processing of the visual data at different resolutions is used not only to reduce the amount of computation necessary to reach the fixed point, but also to produce a more accurate estimation of the desired parameters. The presented adaptive multiple scale technique is applied to the problem of motion field estimation. Different parts of the image are analyzed at a resolution that is chosen in order to minimize the error in the coefficients of the differential equations to be solved. Tests with video-acquired images show that velocity estimation is more accurate over a wide range of motion with respect to the homogeneous scheme. In some cases introduction of explicit discontinuities coupled to the continuous variables can be used to avoid propagation of visual information from areas corresponding to objects with different physical and/or kinematic properties. The human visual system uses concurrent computation in order to process the vast amount of visual data in "real -time." Although with different technological constraints, parallel computation can be used efficiently for computer vision. All the presented algorithms have been implemented on medium grain distributed memory multicomputers with a speed-up approximately proportional to the number of processors used. A simple two-dimensional domain decomposition assigns regions of the multiresolution pyramid to the different processors. The inter-processor communication needed during the solution process is proportional to the linear dimension of the assigned domain, so that efficiency is close to 100% if a large region is assigned to each processor. Finally, learning algorithms are shown to be a viable technique to engineer computer vision systems for different applications starting from

  8. Toward real-time Monte Carlo simulation using a commercial cloud computing infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Henry; Ma, Yunzhi; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2011-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are the gold standard for modeling photon and electron transport in a heterogeneous medium; however, their computational cost prohibits their routine use in the clinic. Cloud computing, wherein computing resources are allocated on-demand from a third party, is a new approach for high performance computing and is implemented to perform ultra-fast MC calculation in radiation therapy. We deployed the EGS5 MC package in a commercial cloud environment. Launched from a single local computer with Internet access, a Python script allocates a remote virtual cluster. A handshaking protocol designates master and worker nodes. The EGS5 binaries and the simulation data are initially loaded onto the master node. The simulation is then distributed among independent worker nodes via the message passing interface, and the results aggregated on the local computer for display and data analysis. The described approach is evaluated for pencil beams and broad beams of high-energy electrons and photons. The output of cloud-based MC simulation is identical to that produced by single-threaded implementation. For 1 million electrons, a simulation that takes 2.58 h on a local computer can be executed in 3.3 min on the cloud with 100 nodes, a 47× speed-up. Simulation time scales inversely with the number of parallel nodes. The parallelization overhead is also negligible for large simulations. Cloud computing represents one of the most important recent advances in supercomputing technology and provides a promising platform for substantially improved MC simulation. In addition to the significant speed up, cloud computing builds a layer of abstraction for high performance parallel computing, which may change the way dose calculations are performed and radiation treatment plans are completed.

  9. Toward real-time Monte Carlo simulation using a commercial cloud computing infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Henry; Ma, Yunzhi; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2011-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are the gold standard for modeling photon and electron transport in a heterogeneous medium; however, their computational cost prohibits their routine use in the clinic. Cloud computing, wherein computing resources are allocated on-demand from a third party, is a new approach for high performance computing and is implemented to perform ultra-fast MC calculation in radiation therapy. We deployed the EGS5 MC package in a commercial cloud environment. Launched from a single local computer with Internet access, a Python script allocates a remote virtual cluster. A handshaking protocol designates master and worker nodes. The EGS5 binaries and the simulation data are initially loaded onto the master node. The simulation is then distributed among independent worker nodes via the message passing interface, and the results aggregated on the local computer for display and data analysis. The described approach is evaluated for pencil beams and broad beams of high-energy electrons and photons. The output of cloud-based MC simulation is identical to that produced by single-threaded implementation. For 1 million electrons, a simulation that takes 2.58 h on a local computer can be executed in 3.3 min on the cloud with 100 nodes, a 47× speed-up. Simulation time scales inversely with the number of parallel nodes. The parallelization overhead is also negligible for large simulations. Cloud computing represents one of the most important recent advances in supercomputing technology and provides a promising platform for substantially improved MC simulation. In addition to the significant speed up, cloud computing builds a layer of abstraction for high performance parallel computing, which may change the way dose calculations are performed and radiation treatment plans are completed. This work was presented in part at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), Philadelphia, PA.

  10. Groundwater travel time computation for two-layer islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketabchi, Hamed; Mahmoodzadeh, Davood; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad

    2016-06-01

    A closed-form analytical computation of groundwater travel time (GWTT) for two-layer oceanic small island aquifers is developed assuming steady-state and sharp-interface conditions. The two-layer geology impacts on the GWTT are investigated using the developed analytical solution to achieve a greater transparency of such conceptualizations. The results demonstrate that the inclusion of geologic layering leads to large changes in the GWTT. Sensitivity analyses, using specified dimensionless parameters, are employed to assess the influences of hydraulic conductivity, recharge rate, upper layer thickness, and seawater/freshwater density difference parameters, which influence the GWTT. These evaluations reveal that the GWTT is mainly influenced by the recharge rate and the upper layer thickness compared to the other influential parameters when the typical parameter ranges are considered.

  11. The operant reserve: a computer simulation in (accelerated) real time.

    PubMed

    Catania, A Charles

    2005-05-31

    In Skinner's Reflex Reserve theory, reinforced responses added to a reserve depleted by responding. It could not handle the finding that partial reinforcement generated more responding than continuous reinforcement, but it would have worked if its growth had depended not just on the last response but also on earlier responses preceding a reinforcer, each weighted by delay. In that case, partial reinforcement generates steady states in which reserve decrements produced by responding balance increments produced when reinforcers follow responding. A computer simulation arranged schedules for responses produced with probabilities proportional to reserve size. Each response subtracted a fixed amount from the reserve and added an amount weighted by the reciprocal of the time to the next reinforcer. Simulated cumulative records and quantitative data for extinction, random-ratio, random-interval, and other schedules were consistent with those of real performances, including some effects of history. The model also simulated rapid performance transitions with changed contingencies that did not depend on molar variables or on differential reinforcement of inter-response times. The simulation can be extended to inhomogeneous contingencies by way of continua of reserves arrayed along response and time dimensions, and to concurrent performances and stimulus control by way of different reserves created for different response classes. PMID:15845312

  12. The operant reserve: a computer simulation in (accelerated) real time.

    PubMed

    Catania, A Charles

    2005-05-31

    In Skinner's Reflex Reserve theory, reinforced responses added to a reserve depleted by responding. It could not handle the finding that partial reinforcement generated more responding than continuous reinforcement, but it would have worked if its growth had depended not just on the last response but also on earlier responses preceding a reinforcer, each weighted by delay. In that case, partial reinforcement generates steady states in which reserve decrements produced by responding balance increments produced when reinforcers follow responding. A computer simulation arranged schedules for responses produced with probabilities proportional to reserve size. Each response subtracted a fixed amount from the reserve and added an amount weighted by the reciprocal of the time to the next reinforcer. Simulated cumulative records and quantitative data for extinction, random-ratio, random-interval, and other schedules were consistent with those of real performances, including some effects of history. The model also simulated rapid performance transitions with changed contingencies that did not depend on molar variables or on differential reinforcement of inter-response times. The simulation can be extended to inhomogeneous contingencies by way of continua of reserves arrayed along response and time dimensions, and to concurrent performances and stimulus control by way of different reserves created for different response classes.

  13. Can Computer-Assisted Discovery Learning Foster First Graders' Fluency with the Most Basic Addition Combinations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroody, Arthur J.; Eiland, Michael D.; Purpura, David J.; Reid, Erin E.

    2013-01-01

    In a 9-month training experiment, 64 first graders with a risk factor were randomly assigned to computer-assisted structured discovery of the add-1 rule (e.g., the sum of 7 + 1 is the number after "seven" when we count), unstructured discovery learning of this regularity, or an active-control group. Planned contrasts revealed that the add-1…

  14. Computational system identification of continuous-time nonlinear systems using approximate Bayesian computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnanathan, Kirubhakaran; Anderson, Sean R.; Billings, Stephen A.; Kadirkamanathan, Visakan

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we derive a system identification framework for continuous-time nonlinear systems, for the first time using a simulation-focused computational Bayesian approach. Simulation approaches to nonlinear system identification have been shown to outperform regression methods under certain conditions, such as non-persistently exciting inputs and fast-sampling. We use the approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) algorithm to perform simulation-based inference of model parameters. The framework has the following main advantages: (1) parameter distributions are intrinsically generated, giving the user a clear description of uncertainty, (2) the simulation approach avoids the difficult problem of estimating signal derivatives as is common with other continuous-time methods, and (3) as noted above, the simulation approach improves identification under conditions of non-persistently exciting inputs and fast-sampling. Term selection is performed by judging parameter significance using parameter distributions that are intrinsically generated as part of the ABC procedure. The results from a numerical example demonstrate that the method performs well in noisy scenarios, especially in comparison to competing techniques that rely on signal derivative estimation.

  15. An analysis of thermal response factors and how to reduce their computational time requirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    Te RESFAC2 version of the Thermal Response Factor Program (RESFAC) is the result of numerous modifications and additions to the original RESFAC. These modifications and additions have significantly reduced the program's computational time requirement. As a result of this work, the program is more efficient and its code is both readable and understandable. This report describes what a thermal response factor is; analyzes the original matrix algebra calculations and root finding techniques; presents a new root finding technique and streamlined matrix algebra; supplies ten validation cases and their results.

  16. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Student Achievement in Addition and Subtraction at First Grade Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivey, Patsy M.

    This study was conducted to determine whether the traditional classroom approach to instruction involving the addition and subtraction of number facts (digits 0-6) is more or less effective than the traditional classroom approach plus a commercially-prepared computer game. A pretest-posttest control group design was used with two groups of first…

  17. Identification of Students' Intuitive Mental Computational Strategies for 1, 2 and 3 Digits Addition and Subtraction: Pedagogical and Curricular Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghazali, Munirah; Alias, Rohana; Ariffin, Noor Asrul Anuar; Ayub, Ayminsyadora

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to examine mental computation strategies used by Year 1, Year 2, and Year 3 students to solve addition and subtraction problems. The participants in this study were twenty five 7 to 9 year-old students identified as excellent, good and satisfactory in their mathematics performance from a school in Penang, Malaysia.…

  18. A method for calculating minimum biodiversity offset multipliers accounting for time discounting, additionality and permanence

    PubMed Central

    Laitila, Jussi; Moilanen, Atte; Pouzols, Federico M

    2014-01-01

    Biodiversity offsetting, which means compensation for ecological and environmental damage caused by development activity, has recently been gaining strong political support around the world. One common criticism levelled at offsets is that they exchange certain and almost immediate losses for uncertain future gains. In the case of restoration offsets, gains may be realized after a time delay of decades, and with considerable uncertainty. Here we focus on offset multipliers, which are ratios between damaged and compensated amounts (areas) of biodiversity. Multipliers have the attraction of being an easily understandable way of deciding the amount of offsetting needed. On the other hand, exact values of multipliers are very difficult to compute in practice if at all possible. We introduce a mathematical method for deriving minimum levels for offset multipliers under the assumption that offsetting gains must compensate for the losses (no net loss offsetting). We calculate absolute minimum multipliers that arise from time discounting and delayed emergence of offsetting gains for a one-dimensional measure of biodiversity. Despite the highly simplified model, we show that even the absolute minimum multipliers may easily be quite large, in the order of dozens, and theoretically arbitrarily large, contradicting the relatively low multipliers found in literature and in practice. While our results inform policy makers about realistic minimal offsetting requirements, they also challenge many current policies and show the importance of rigorous models for computing (minimum) offset multipliers. The strength of the presented method is that it requires minimal underlying information. We include a supplementary spreadsheet tool for calculating multipliers to facilitate application. PMID:25821578

  19. Winter-time CO2 addition in high rate algal mesocosms for enhanced microalgal performance.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Montemezzani, Valerio; Mehrabadi, Abbas; Craggs, Rupert J

    2016-02-01

    Carbon limitation in domestic wastewater high rate algal ponds is thought to constrain microalgal photo-physiology and productivity and CO2 augmentation is often used to overcome this limitation in summer. However, the implications of carbon limitation during winter are poorly understood. This paper investigates the effects of 0.5%, 2%, 5% and 10% CO2 addition on the winter-time performance of wastewater microalgae in high rate algal mesocosms. Performance was measured in terms of light absorption, photosynthetic efficiency, biomass production and nutrient removal rates, along with community composition. Varying percentage CO2 addition and associated change in culture pH resulted in 3 distinct microalgal communities. Light absorption by the microalgae increased by up to 144% with CO2 addition, while a reduction in the package effect meant that there was less internal self-shading thereby increasing the efficiency of light absorption. Carbon augmentation increased the maximum rate of photosynthesis by up to 172%, which led to increased microalgal biovolume by up to 181% and an increase in total organic biomass for all treatments except 10% CO2. While 10% CO2 improved light absorption and photosynthesis this did not translate to enhanced microalgal productivity. Increased microalgal productivity with CO2 addition did not result in increased dissolved nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) removal. This experiment demonstrated that winter-time carbon augmentation up to 5% CO2 improved microalgal light absorption and utilisation, which ultimately increased microalgal biomass and is likely to enhance total annual microalgal areal productivity in HRAPs.

  20. Further results on delay-range-dependent stability with additive time-varying delay systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin-Lin

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, new conditions for the delay-range-dependent stability analysis of time-varying delay systems are proposed in a Lyapunov-Krasovskii framework. Time delay is considered to be time-varying and has lower and upper bounds. A new method is first presented for a system with two time delays, integral inequality approach (IIA) used to express relationships among terms of Leibniz-Newton formula. Constructing a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional includes information belonging to a given range; new delay-range-dependent criterion is established in term of linear matrix inequality (LMI). The advantage of that criterion lies in its simplicity and less conservative. This paper also presents a new result of stability analysis for continuous systems with two additive time-variant components representing a general class of delay with strong application background in network-based control systems. Resulting criteria are then expressed in terms of convex optimization with LMI constraints, allowing for use of efficient solvers. Finally, three numerical examples show these methods reducing conservatism and improving maximal allowable delay.

  1. Program Predicts Time Courses of Human/Computer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Alonso; Howes, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    CPM X is a computer program that predicts sequences of, and amounts of time taken by, routine actions performed by a skilled person performing a task. Unlike programs that simulate the interaction of the person with the task environment, CPM X predicts the time course of events as consequences of encoded constraints on human behavior. The constraints determine which cognitive and environmental processes can occur simultaneously and which have sequential dependencies. The input to CPM X comprises (1) a description of a task and strategy in a hierarchical description language and (2) a description of architectural constraints in the form of rules governing interactions of fundamental cognitive, perceptual, and motor operations. The output of CPM X is a Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT) chart that presents a schedule of predicted cognitive, motor, and perceptual operators interacting with a task environment. The CPM X program allows direct, a priori prediction of skilled user performance on complex human-machine systems, providing a way to assess critical interfaces before they are deployed in mission contexts.

  2. Reducing the computational footprint for real-time BCPNN learning

    PubMed Central

    Vogginger, Bernhard; Schüffny, René; Lansner, Anders; Cederström, Love; Partzsch, Johannes; Höppner, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of synaptic plasticity in neural simulation or neuromorphic hardware is usually very resource-intensive, often requiring a compromise between efficiency and flexibility. A versatile, but computationally-expensive plasticity mechanism is provided by the Bayesian Confidence Propagation Neural Network (BCPNN) paradigm. Building upon Bayesian statistics, and having clear links to biological plasticity processes, the BCPNN learning rule has been applied in many fields, ranging from data classification, associative memory, reward-based learning, probabilistic inference to cortical attractor memory networks. In the spike-based version of this learning rule the pre-, postsynaptic and coincident activity is traced in three low-pass-filtering stages, requiring a total of eight state variables, whose dynamics are typically simulated with the fixed step size Euler method. We derive analytic solutions allowing an efficient event-driven implementation of this learning rule. Further speedup is achieved by first rewriting the model which reduces the number of basic arithmetic operations per update to one half, and second by using look-up tables for the frequently calculated exponential decay. Ultimately, in a typical use case, the simulation using our approach is more than one order of magnitude faster than with the fixed step size Euler method. Aiming for a small memory footprint per BCPNN synapse, we also evaluate the use of fixed-point numbers for the state variables, and assess the number of bits required to achieve same or better accuracy than with the conventional explicit Euler method. All of this will allow a real-time simulation of a reduced cortex model based on BCPNN in high performance computing. More important, with the analytic solution at hand and due to the reduced memory bandwidth, the learning rule can be efficiently implemented in dedicated or existing digital neuromorphic hardware. PMID:25657618

  3. Analysis of Time to Event Outcomes in Randomized Controlled Trials by Generalized Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Unruh, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Randomized Controlled Trials almost invariably utilize the hazard ratio calculated with a Cox proportional hazard model as a treatment efficacy measure. Despite the widespread adoption of HRs, these provide a limited understanding of the treatment effect and may even provide a biased estimate when the assumption of proportional hazards in the Cox model is not verified by the trial data. Additional treatment effect measures on the survival probability or the time scale may be used to supplement HRs but a framework for the simultaneous generation of these measures is lacking. Methods By splitting follow-up time at the nodes of a Gauss Lobatto numerical quadrature rule, techniques for Poisson Generalized Additive Models (PGAM) can be adopted for flexible hazard modeling. Straightforward simulation post-estimation transforms PGAM estimates for the log hazard into estimates of the survival function. These in turn were used to calculate relative and absolute risks or even differences in restricted mean survival time between treatment arms. We illustrate our approach with extensive simulations and in two trials: IPASS (in which the proportionality of hazards was violated) and HEMO a long duration study conducted under evolving standards of care on a heterogeneous patient population. Findings PGAM can generate estimates of the survival function and the hazard ratio that are essentially identical to those obtained by Kaplan Meier curve analysis and the Cox model. PGAMs can simultaneously provide multiple measures of treatment efficacy after a single data pass. Furthermore, supported unadjusted (overall treatment effect) but also subgroup and adjusted analyses, while incorporating multiple time scales and accounting for non-proportional hazards in survival data. Conclusions By augmenting the HR conventionally reported, PGAMs have the potential to support the inferential goals of multiple stakeholders involved in the evaluation and appraisal of clinical trial

  4. Subsonic flutter analysis addition to NASTRAN. [for use with CDC 6000 series digital computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Harder, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A subsonic flutter analysis capability has been developed for NASTRAN, and a developmental version of the program has been installed on the CDC 6000 series digital computers at the Langley Research Center. The flutter analysis is of the modal type, uses doublet lattice unsteady aerodynamic forces, and solves the flutter equations by using the k-method. Surface and one-dimensional spline functions are used to transform from the aerodynamic degrees of freedom to the structural degrees of freedom. Some preliminary applications of the method to a beamlike wing, a platelike wing, and a platelike wing with a folded tip are compared with existing experimental and analytical results.

  5. 29 CFR 459.1 - Computation of time for filing papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Computation of time for filing papers. 459.1 Section 459.1... OF CONDUCT MISCELLANEOUS § 459.1 Computation of time for filing papers. In computing any period of... computations. When these regulations require the filing of any paper, such document must be received by...

  6. Neutron Computed Tomography Using Real-Time Neutron Radiography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulcoski, Mark Francis

    Conventional neutron radiography of an object records a two-dimensional distribution of the neutron beam intensity after it has passed through an object. The neutron radiograph, whether static film or real-time, may be considered a "shadow graph" of the object. In a shadow graph, internal structures in an object may mask one another making it difficult or impossible to precisely define the internals of the object. This problem can be solved by tomographic imaging. A real-time neutron radiography facility was constructed including the capability of neutron tomography. The neutron beam was measured for total neutron flux ((1.0 (+OR-) 0.2) x 10('11) n/(m('2)-sec)), gold cadmium ratio (52 (+OR-) 3) and effective neutron temperature (83(DEGREES)C (+OR -) 8(DEGREES)C). The angular divergence or nonparallelism of the neutron beam was measured to be \\2.3(DEGREES) (+OR -) 0.1(DEGREES) thereby providing a means of quantifying the collimator effectiveness. The resolution capabilities of both static film and real-time neutron radiographs were quantified using a Fourier transform algorithm to calculate the modulation transfer function of both types of radiographs. The contrast sensitivity of both types of radiographs was measured as 3.1% for film and 4.0% for real-time radiographs. Two tomography algorithms, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the convolution method, were programmed on an Intellect 100 Image Processing System. The SIRT algorithm was found to be too large and slow on the Intellect 100 to produce useful tomographs. The convolution method produced results near the theoretical resolution limits for a given number of projections. A tomographic resolution of at least 1.3 mm was demonstrated using 200 projections. Computer running time for the convolution method was found to be (TURN)30 seconds for each projection used. A series of experiments were conducted using the convolution method investigating the effect of high and low pass

  7. Time-Domain Terahertz Computed Axial Tomography NDE System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimdars, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA has identified the need for advanced non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to characterize aging and durability in aircraft materials to improve the safety of the nation's airline fleet. 3D THz tomography can play a major role in detection and characterization of flaws and degradation in aircraft materials, including Kevlar-based composites and Kevlar and Zylon fabric covers for soft-shell fan containment where aging and durability issues are critical. A prototype computed tomography (CT) time-domain (TD) THz imaging system has been used to generate 3D images of several test objects including a TUFI tile (a thermal protection system tile used on the Space Shuttle and possibly the Orion or similar capsules). This TUFI tile had simulated impact damage that was located and the depth of damage determined. The CT motion control gan try was designed and constructed, and then integrated with a T-Ray 4000 control unit and motion controller to create a complete CT TD-THz imaging system prototype. A data collection software script was developed that takes multiple z-axis slices in sequence and saves the data for batch processing. The data collection software was integrated with the ability to batch process the slice data with the CT TD-THz image reconstruction software. The time required to take a single CT slice was decreased from six minutes to approximately one minute by replacing the 320 ps, 100-Hz waveform acquisition system with an 80 ps, 1,000-Hz waveform acquisition system. The TD-THZ computed tomography system was built from pre-existing commercial off-the-shelf subsystems. A CT motion control gantry was constructed from COTS components that can handle larger samples. The motion control gantry allows inspection of sample sizes of up to approximately one cubic foot (.0.03 cubic meters). The system reduced to practice a CT-TDTHz system incorporating a COTS 80- ps/l-kHz waveform scanner. The incorporation of this scanner in the system allows acquisition of 3D

  8. Addition of higher order plate and shell elements into NASTRAN computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.; Goglia, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Two higher order plate elements, the linear strain triangular membrane element and the quintic bending element, along with a shallow shell element, suitable for inclusion into the NASTRAN (NASA Structural Analysis) program are described. Additions to the NASTRAN Theoretical Manual, Users' Manual, Programmers' Manual and the NASTRAN Demonstration Problem Manual, for inclusion of these elements into the NASTRAN program are also presented.

  9. Identifiability of Additive, Time-Varying Actuator and Sensor Faults by State Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Jason M.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has provided a set of necessary and sucient conditions for identifiability of additive step faults (e.g., lock-in-place actuator faults, constant bias in the sensors) using state augmentation. This paper extends these results to an important class of faults which may affect linear, time-invariant systems. In particular, the faults under consideration are those which vary with time and affect the system dynamics additively. Such faults may manifest themselves in aircraft as, for example, control surface oscillations, control surface runaway, and sensor drift. The set of necessary and sucient conditions presented in this paper are general, and apply when a class of time-varying faults affects arbitrary combinations of actuators and sensors. The results in the main theorems are illustrated by two case studies, which provide some insight into how the conditions may be used to check the theoretical identifiability of fault configurations of interest for a given system. It is shown that while state augmentation can be used to identify certain fault configurations, other fault configurations are theoretically impossible to identify using state augmentation, giving practitioners valuable insight into such situations. That is, the limitations of state augmentation for a given system and configuration of faults are made explicit. Another limitation of model-based methods is that there can be large numbers of fault configurations, thus making identification of all possible configurations impractical. However, the theoretical identifiability of known, credible fault configurations can be tested using the theorems presented in this paper, which can then assist the efforts of fault identification practitioners.

  10. Computers for real time flight simulation: A market survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, G. A.; Karplus, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    An extensive computer market survey was made to determine those available systems suitable for current and future flight simulation studies at Ames Research Center. The primary requirement is for the computation of relatively high frequency content (5 Hz) math models representing powered lift flight vehicles. The Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) was used as a benchmark vehicle for computation comparison studies. The general nature of helicopter simulations and a description of the benchmark model are presented, and some of the sources of simulation difficulties are examined. A description of various applicable computer architectures is presented, along with detailed discussions of leading candidate systems and comparisons between them.

  11. Large Advanced Space Systems (LASS) computer-aided design program additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    The LSS preliminary and conceptual design requires extensive iteractive analysis because of the effects of structural, thermal, and control intercoupling. A computer aided design program that will permit integrating and interfacing of required large space system (LSS) analyses is discussed. The primary objective of this program is the implementation of modeling techniques and analysis algorithms that permit interactive design and tradeoff studies of LSS concepts. Eight software modules were added to the program. The existing rigid body controls module was modified to include solar pressure effects. The new model generator modules and appendage synthesizer module are integrated (interfaced) to permit interactive definition and generation of LSS concepts. The mass properties module permits interactive specification of discrete masses and their locations. The other modules permit interactive analysis of orbital transfer requirements, antenna primary beam n, and attitude control requirements.

  12. Addition of visual noise boosts evoked potential-based brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Sicong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Li, Lili

    2014-05-14

    Although noise has a proven beneficial role in brain functions, there have not been any attempts on the dedication of stochastic resonance effect in neural engineering applications, especially in researches of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In our study, a steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP)-based BCI with periodic visual stimulation plus moderate spatiotemporal noise can achieve better offline and online performance due to enhancement of periodic components in brain responses, which was accompanied by suppression of high harmonics. Offline results behaved with a bell-shaped resonance-like functionality and 7-36% online performance improvements can be achieved when identical visual noise was adopted for different stimulation frequencies. Using neural encoding modeling, these phenomena can be explained as noise-induced input-output synchronization in human sensory systems which commonly possess a low-pass property. Our work demonstrated that noise could boost BCIs in addressing human needs.

  13. Theory and computer simulation for the equation of state of additive hard-disk fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, C.; Solana, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    A procedure previously developed by the authors to obtain the equation of state for a mixture of additive hard spheres on the basis of a pure fluid equation of state is applied here to a binary mixture of additive hard disks in two dimensions. The equation of state depends on two parameters which are determined from the second and third virial coefficients for the mixture, which are known exactly. Results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations which are also reported. The agreement between theory and simulation is very good. For the fourth and fifth virial coefficients of the mixture, the equation of state gives results which are also in close agreement with exact numerical values reported in the literature.

  14. 17 CFR 10.5 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... computed is to be included unless it is a Saturday, a Sunday, or a legal holiday; in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is not a Saturday, a Sunday or a legal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays shall be excluded from the computation only when the period of...

  15. 17 CFR 10.5 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... computed is to be included unless it is a Saturday, a Sunday, or a legal holiday; in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is not a Saturday, a Sunday or a legal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays shall be excluded from the computation only when the period of...

  16. 17 CFR 10.5 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... computed is to be included unless it is a Saturday, a Sunday, or a legal holiday; in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is not a Saturday, a Sunday or a legal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays shall be excluded from the computation only when the period of...

  17. RNA polymerase pausing regulates translation initiation by providing additional time for TRAP-RNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Yakhnin, Alexander V; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul

    2006-11-17

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) pause sites have been identified in several prokaryotic genes. Although the presumed biological function of RNAP pausing is to allow synchronization of RNAP position with regulatory factor binding and/or RNA folding, a direct causal link between pausing and changes in gene expression has been difficult to establish. RNAP pauses at two sites in the Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon leader. Pausing at U107 and U144 participates in transcription attenuation and trpE translation control mechanisms, respectively. Substitution of U144 caused a substantial pausing defect in vitro and in vivo. These mutations led to increased trp operon expression that was suppressed by overproduction of TRAP, indicating that pausing at U144 provides additional time for TRAP to bind to the nascent transcript and promote formation of an RNA structure that blocks translation of trpE. These results establish that pausing is capable of playing a role in regulating translation in bacteria. PMID:17114058

  18. Enantioselective conjugate addition of nitro compounds to α,β-unsaturated ketones: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Rubén; Andrés, José M; Álvarez, Rosana; Muruzábal, María D; de Lera, Ángel R; Pedrosa, Rafael

    2011-05-16

    A series of chiral thioureas derived from easily available diamines, prepared from α-amino acids, have been tested as catalysts in the enantioselective Michael additions of nitroalkanes to α,β-unsaturated ketones. The best results are obtained with the bifunctional catalyst prepared from L-valine. This thiourea promotes the reaction with high enantioselectivities and chemical yields for aryl/vinyl ketones, but the enantiomeric ratio for alkyl/vinyl derivatives is very modest. The addition of substituted nitromethanes led to the corresponding adducts with excellent enantioselectivity but very poor diastereoselectivity. Evidence for the isomerization of the addition products has been obtained from the reaction of chalcone with [D(3)]nitromethane, which shows that the final addition products epimerize under the reaction conditions. The epimerization explains the low diastereoselectivity observed in the formation of adducts with two adjacent tertiary stereocenters. Density functional studies of the transition structures corresponding to two alternative activation modes of the nitroalkanes and α,β-unsaturated ketones by the bifunctional organocatalyst have been carried out at the B3LYP/3-21G* level. The computations are consistent with a reaction model involving the Michael addition of the thiourea-activated nitronate to the ketone activated by the protonated amine of the organocatalyst. The enantioselectivities predicted by the computations are consistent with the experimental values obtained for aryl- and alkyl-substituted α,β-unsaturated ketones.

  19. Time-dependent computational studies of flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oran, Elaine S.; Kailasanath, K.

    1989-01-01

    The research performed at the Center for Reactive Flow and Dynamical Systems in the Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, at the Naval Research Laboratory, in support of the NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Program is described. The primary focus was on investigating fundamental questions concerning the propagation and extinction of premixed flames in Earth gravity and in microgravity environments. The approach was to use detailed time-dependent, multispecies, numerical models as tools to simulate flames in different gravity environments. The models include a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism consisting of elementary reactions among the eight reactive species involved in hydrogen combustion, coupled to algorithms for convection, thermal conduction, viscosity, molecular and thermal diffusion, and external forces. The external force, gravity, can be put in any direction relative to flame propagation and can have a range of values. A combination of one-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations was used to investigate the effects of curvature and dilution on ignition and propagation of flames, to help resolve fundamental questions on the existence of flammability limits when there are no external losses or buoyancy forces in the system, to understand the mechanism leading to cellular instability, and to study the effects of gravity on the transition to cellular structure. A flame in a microgravity environment can be extinguished without external losses, and the mechanism leading to cellular structure is not preferential diffusion but a thermo-diffusive instability. The simulations have also lead to a better understanding of the interactions between buoyancy forces and the processes leading to thermo-diffusive instability.

  20. Computational Modeling of Semiconductor Dynamics at Femtosecond Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Govind P.; Goorjian, Peter M.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of the Joint-Research Interchange NCC2-5149 was to develop computer codes for accurate simulation of femtosecond pulse propagation in semiconductor lasers and semiconductor amplifiers [I]. The code should take into account all relevant processes such as the interband and intraband carrier relaxation mechanisms and the many-body effects arising from the Coulomb interaction among charge carriers [2]. This objective was fully accomplished. We made use of a previously developed algorithm developed at NASA Ames [3]-[5]. The new algorithm was tested on several problems of practical importance. One such problem was related to the amplification of femtosecond optical pulses in semiconductors. These results were presented in several international conferences over a period of three years. With the help of a postdoctoral fellow, we also investigated the origin of instabilities that can lead to the formation of femtosecond pulses in different kinds of lasers. We analyzed the occurrence of absolute instabilities in lasers that contain a dispersive host material with third-order nonlinearities. Starting from the Maxwell-Bloch equations, we derived general multimode equations to distinguish between convective and absolute instabilities. We find that both self-phase modulation and intensity-dependent absorption can dramatically affect the absolute stability of such lasers. In particular, the self-pulsing threshold (the so-called second laser threshold) can occur at few times the first laser threshold even in good-cavity lasers for which no self-pulsing occurs in the absence of intensity-dependent absorption. These results were presented in an international conference and published in the form of two papers.

  1. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; et al

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  2. Balance times of multidimensional quasi-additive potentials for a measure-preserving semiflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiongping

    2013-12-01

    Let \\theta\\colon X\\times{T}\\rightarrow X;\\ (x,t)\\mapsto{x{\\boldsymbol\\cdot} t} , where {T}={Z}_+ or {R}_+ , be a measure-preserving semiflow on a probability space (X,\\mathscr{F},\\mu) and given a d-dimensional measurable potential p\\colon X\\times{T}\\rightarrow{R}^d which is δ-quasi-additive with respect to θ, where δ ⩾ 0 namely, for μ-a.e. x ∈ X and for all s,t\\in{T} , \\begin{equation*}|p(x,t+s)-(p(x,t)+p(x{\\boldsymbol\\cdot} t,s))|\\le\\delta. \\end{equation*} We prove that if there exists a measurable {R}^d -valued function p*(x) such that \\begin{equation*}\\lim_{t\\to\\infty}\\frac{1}{t}p(x,t)=p^*(x)\\tqs for~\\mu-a.e.\\, x\\in X, \\end{equation*} then for μ-a.e. x ∈ X and any ε > 0, there holds the following tight control by p*(x): \\begin{equation*}{\\bf mes}\\left\\{t\\in{T}\\colon|p(x,t)-p^*(x)t|\\le\\varepsilon+ \\delta\\right\\}=\\infty, \\end{equation*} where mes{·} stands for the Lebesgue measure in the real line {R} or the counting measure in {Z} . This can be applied to the study of ergodic forced monotonic circle maps and of the normal numbers.

  3. Regulation of Soil Microbial Carbon-use Efficiency by Soil Moisture, Substrate Addition, and Incubation Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, J.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial carbon-use efficiency (CUE) is a key variable in biogeochemical cycling that regulates soil C sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and retention of inorganic nutrients. Microbial CUE is the fraction of C converted to biomass rather than respired as CO2. Biogeochemical models have been shown to be highly sensitive to variation in CUE; however, we currently have a poor understanding of how CUE responds to environmental variables such as soil moisture and nutrient limitations. We examined the effect of soil moisture and C supply on CUE in soil from a western hemlock / sitka spruce forest in Oregon, USA, using a novel technique which supplies 13C and 15N substrates through the gas phase so that water addition is not necessary. Soil samples (28 g oven-dry equiv. wt) at two water potentials (-0.03 and -3.55 MPa) were exposed to 13C-acetic acid vapor for either 6 or 30 sec to provide two different concentrations of acetate to soil microbial communities. The soils were also injected with small amounts of 15NH3 gas to allow quantification of microbial N assimilation rates and to provide an alternate method of calculating CUE. Rates of 13CO2 respiration were measured continuously during a 48-h incubation using cavity ring-down spectroscopy. Soil samples were extracted at seven time intervals (0, 0.5, 1.5, 4.5, 12, 24, and 48 h) in 0.5 M K2SO4 and analyzed for DO13C, microbial 13C, DO15N, inorganic 15N, and microbial 15N to calculate how gross rates of C and N assimilation and microbial CUE change with incubation time. As expected, microbial C and N assimilation rates and CUE increased with soil moisture and the quantity of acetate added; however, C:N assimilated was higher at lower soil moisture, suggesting that either C-storage compounds were being created, or that fungal communities were responsible for a greater proportion of the assimilation in drier soils. Assimilation rates and CUE also changed with incubation time, demonstrating that estimates of CUE

  4. 29 CFR 22.27 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal government, in which event it includes the next business... legal holidays observed by the Federal government shall be excluded from the computation. (c) Where...

  5. 29 CFR 22.27 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal government, in which event it includes the next business... legal holidays observed by the Federal government shall be excluded from the computation. (c) Where...

  6. 20 CFR 355.27 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal government, in which event it includes the next business... legal holidays observed by the Federal government shall be excluded from the computation. (c) Where...

  7. 29 CFR 22.27 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal government, in which event it includes the next business... legal holidays observed by the Federal government shall be excluded from the computation. (c) Where...

  8. 21 CFR 17.30 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... day of the period, unless either such day is a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday, in which event..., intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays shall be excluded from the computation. (c) When...

  9. 21 CFR 17.30 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... day of the period, unless either such day is a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday, in which event..., intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays shall be excluded from the computation. (c) When...

  10. 21 CFR 17.30 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... day of the period, unless either such day is a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday, in which event..., intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays shall be excluded from the computation. (c) When...

  11. 49 CFR 821.10 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... so computed is to be included unless it is a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday for the Board, in... holiday. In all cases, Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays for the Board shall be included in...

  12. 17 CFR 171.4 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... day of the period so computed is to be included unless it is a Saturday, a Sunday, or a legal holiday... Sunday, or a legal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays shall be included in...

  13. 17 CFR 171.4 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... day of the period so computed is to be included unless it is a Saturday, a Sunday, or a legal holiday... Sunday, or a legal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays shall be included in...

  14. 29 CFR 22.27 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal government, in which event it includes the next business... legal holidays observed by the Federal government shall be excluded from the computation. (c) Where...

  15. 45 CFR 79.27 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the period, unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday observed by the Federal government, in... holidays observed by the Federal government shall be excluded from the computation. (c) Where a...

  16. Simple and Time-saving Computer Programs for Chairside Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birn, Herluf; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A study to test the hypothesis that computer assisted instruction used at low cognitive levels is as effective and motivating as conventional teaching, while requiring fewer teacher resources is described. (Author/MLW)

  17. Time independent universal computing with spin chains: quantum plinko machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, K. F.; Gokler, C.; Lloyd, S.; Shor, P. W.

    2016-07-01

    We present a scheme for universal quantum computing using XY Heisenberg spin chains. Information is encoded into packets propagating down these chains, and they interact with each other to perform universal quantum computation. A circuit using g gate blocks on m qubits can be encoded into chains of length O({g}3+δ {m}3+δ ) for all δ \\gt 0 with vanishingly small error.

  18. Time-dependent Computational Studies of Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kailasanath, K.; Patnaik, Gopal; Oran, Elaine S.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the research performed at the Center for Reactive Flow and Dynamical Systems in the Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, at the Naval Research Laboratory, in support of NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Program. The primary focus of this research is on investigating fundamental questions concerning the propagation and extinction of premixed flames in earth gravity and in microgravity environments. Our approach is to use detailed time-dependent, multispecies, numerical models as tools to simulate flames in different gravity environments. The models include a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism consisting of elementary reactions among the eight reactive species involved in hydrogen combustion, coupled to algorithms for convection, thermal conduction, viscosity, molecular and thermal diffusion, and external forces. The external force, gravity, can be put in any direction relative to flame propagation and can have a range of values. Recently more advanced wall boundary conditions such as isothermal and no-slip have been added to the model. This enables the simulation of flames propagating in more practical systems than before. We have used the numerical simulations to investigate the effects of heat losses and buoyancy forces on the structure and stability of flames, to help resolve fundamental questions on the existence of flammability limits when there are no external losses or buoyancy forces in the system, to understand the interaction between the various processes leading to flame instabilities and extinguishment, and to study the dynamics of cell formation and splitting. Our studies have been able to bring out the differences between upward- and downward-propagating flames and predict the zero-gravity behavior of these flames. The simulations have also highlighted the dominant role of wall heat losses in the case of downward-propagating flames. The simulations have been able to qualitatively predict the

  19. Time- and isomer-resolved measurements of sequential addition of acetylene to the propargyl radical

    DOE PAGES

    Savee, John D.; Selby, Talitha M.; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.

    2015-10-06

    Soot formation in combustion is a complex process in which polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are believed to play a critical role. Recent works concluded that three consecutive additions of acetylene (C2H2) to propargyl (C3H3) create a facile route to the PAH indene (C9H8). However, the isomeric forms of C5H5 and C7H7 intermediates in this reaction sequence are not known. We directly investigate these intermediates using time- and isomer-resolved experiments. Both the resonance stabilized vinylpropargyl (vp-C5H5) and 2,4-cyclopentadienyl (c-C5H5) radical isomers of C5H5 are produced, with substantially different intensities at 800 K vs 1000 K. In agreement with literature master equationmore » calculations, we find that c-C5H5 + C2H2 produces only the tropyl isomer of C7H7 (tp-C7H7) below 1000 K, and that tp-C7H7 + C2H2 terminates the reaction sequence yielding C9H8 (indene) + H. Lastly, this work demonstrates a pathway for PAH formation that does not proceed through benzene.« less

  20. Time- and Isomer-Resolved Measurements of Sequential Addition of Acetylene to the Propargyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Savee, John D; Selby, Talitha M; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig A; Osborn, David L

    2015-10-15

    Soot formation in combustion is a complex process in which polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are believed to play a critical role. Recent works concluded that three consecutive additions of acetylene (C2H2) to propargyl (C3H3) create a facile route to the PAH indene (C9H8). However, the isomeric forms of C5H5 and C7H7 intermediates in this reaction sequence are not known. We directly investigate these intermediates using time- and isomer-resolved experiments. Both the resonance stabilized vinylpropargyl (vp-C5H5) and 2,4-cyclopentadienyl (c-C5H5) radical isomers of C5H5 are produced, with substantially different intensities at 800 K vs 1000 K. In agreement with literature master equation calculations, we find that c-C5H5 + C2H2 produces only the tropyl isomer of C7H7 (tp-C7H7) below 1000 K, and that tp-C7H7 + C2H2 terminates the reaction sequence yielding C9H8 (indene) + H. This work demonstrates a pathway for PAH formation that does not proceed through benzene. PMID:26722791

  1. Computations on the primary photoreaction of Br2 with CO2: stepwise vs concerted addition of Br atoms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kewei; Korter, Timothy M; Braiman, Mark S

    2015-04-01

    It was proposed previously that Br2-sensitized photolysis of liquid CO2 proceeds through a metastable primary photoproduct, CO2Br2. Possible mechanisms for such a photoreaction are explored here computationally. First, it is shown that the CO2Br radical is not stable in any geometry. This rules out a free-radical mechanism, for example, photochemical splitting of Br2 followed by stepwise addition of Br atoms to CO2-which in turn accounts for the lack of previously observed Br2+CO2 photochemistry in gas phases. A possible alternative mechanism in liquid phase is formation of a weakly bound CO2:Br2 complex, followed by concerted photoaddition of Br2. This hypothesis is suggested by the previously published spectroscopic detection of a binary CO2:Br2 complex in the supersonically cooled gas phase. We compute a global binding-energy minimum of -6.2 kJ mol(-1) for such complexes, in a linear geometry. Two additional local minima were computed for perpendicular (C2v) and nearly parallel asymmetric planar geometries, both with binding energies near -5.4 kJ mol(-1). In these two latter geometries, C-Br and O-Br bond distances are simultaneously in the range of 3.5-3.8 Å, that is, perhaps suitable for a concerted photoaddition under the temperature and pressure conditions where Br2 + CO2 photochemistry has been observed.

  2. 5 CFR 2429.21 - Computation of time for filing papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of time for filing papers... REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 2429.21 Computation of time for filing papers. (a) In computing any period... § 2429.23(a) of this part, when this subchapter requires the filing of any paper with the Authority,...

  3. Computing Real-time Streamflow Using Emerging Technologies: Non-contact Radars and the Probability Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, J. W.; Bjerklie, D. M.; Jones, J. W.; Minear, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring streamflow, developing, and maintaining rating curves at new streamgaging stations is both time-consuming and problematic. Hydro 21 was an initiative by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide vision and leadership to identify and evaluate new technologies and methods that had the potential to change the way in which streamgaging is conducted. Since 2014, additional trials have been conducted to evaluate some of the methods promoted by the Hydro 21 Committee. Emerging technologies such as continuous-wave radars and computationally-efficient methods such as the Probability Concept require significantly less field time, promote real-time velocity and streamflow measurements, and apply to unsteady flow conditions such as looped ratings and unsteady-flood flows. Portable and fixed-mount radars have advanced beyond the development phase, are cost effective, and readily available in the marketplace. The Probability Concept is based on an alternative velocity-distribution equation developed by C.-L. Chiu, who pioneered the concept. By measuring the surface-water velocity and correcting for environmental influences such as wind drift, radars offer a reliable alternative for measuring and computing real-time streamflow for a variety of hydraulic conditions. If successful, these tools may allow us to establish ratings more efficiently, assess unsteady flow conditions, and report real-time streamflow at new streamgaging stations.

  4. A Computer in the Classroom: The Time Is Right.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraines, David P.; Smith, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The goal was to make the "super blackboard" and "super calculator" capabilities of the computer routinely available to instructors in undergraduate mathematics courses. A good approximation to that goal is described in terms of hardware, display, physical setup, instructors, and software. Alternate solutions and other considerations are included.…

  5. 11 CFR 111.2 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... is a Saturday, a Sunday, or a legal holiday. As used in this section, the term legal holiday includes..., Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and any other day appointed as a holiday for employees of the United States by..., Sundays, and legal holidays shall be excluded in the computation. (c) Special rule for service by...

  6. 30 CFR 700.15 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday on which the regulatory authority is not open for business, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (c) Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays are excluded from the computation when...

  7. 30 CFR 700.15 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday on which the regulatory authority is not open for business, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (c) Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays are excluded from the computation when...

  8. 30 CFR 700.15 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday on which the regulatory authority is not open for business, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (c) Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays are excluded from the computation when...

  9. 30 CFR 700.15 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday on which the regulatory authority is not open for business, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (c) Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays are excluded from the computation when...

  10. 40 CFR 96.207 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR SO2... period scheduled, under the CAIR SO2 Trading Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or event shall... the CAIR SO2 Trading Program, to begin before the occurrence of an act or event shall be computed...

  11. 40 CFR 96.207 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR SO2... period scheduled, under the CAIR SO2 Trading Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or event shall... the CAIR SO2 Trading Program, to begin before the occurrence of an act or event shall be computed...

  12. 40 CFR 96.207 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR SO2... period scheduled, under the CAIR SO2 Trading Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or event shall... the CAIR SO2 Trading Program, to begin before the occurrence of an act or event shall be computed...

  13. Computation of finite-time Lyapunov exponents from time-resolved particle image velocimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raben, Samuel G.; Ross, Shane D.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents two new methods for computing finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) from noisy spatiotemporally resolved experimentally measured image data of the type used for particle image velocimetry (PIV) or particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). These new approaches are based on the simple insight that the particle images recorded during PIV experiments represent Lagrangian flow tracers whose trajectories lend themselves to the direct computation of flow maps, and related quantities such as flow map gradients and FTLEs. We show that using this idea we can improve the reliability and accuracy of FTLE calculation through the use of either direct pathline flow map (PFM) calculation, where individual particle pathlines over a fixed period of time are used to determine the flow map, or particle tracking flow map compilation (FMC), where instantaneous tracking results are used to estimate small snapshots of the flow map which are then compiled to describe the complete flow map. Comparisons of the traditional velocity field integration (VFI) method for computing FTLE fields with these new methods show that FMC produces significantly more accurate estimates of the FTLE field for both synthetic data and experimental data especially in cases where the particle number density is low. This is because the VFI estimates particle motion while PTV directly measures particle motion and therefore generates a more accurate flow map. Overall, our results suggest that VFI is not always a reliable approach when applied to noisy experimental PIV data. For cases where particle loss between frames is minimal, the PFM can also produce better results, but the final field is susceptible to error due to the unstructured nature of the raw flow maps. When comparing the ability to match the true separatrix of a flow, FMC is shown to be a far superior method. The separatrix from FMC has an 80 % overlap with the true solution as compared to approximately 25 % for the PFM and only 1 % for

  14. Origins of stereoselectivity in the Diels-Alder addition of chiral hydroxyalkyl vinyl ketones to cyclopentadiene: a quantitative computational study.

    PubMed

    Bakalova, Snezhana M; Kaneti, Jose

    2008-12-18

    Modest basis set level MP2/6-31G(d,p) calculations on the Diels-Alder addition of S-1-alkyl-1-hydroxy-but-3-en-2-ones (1-hydroxy-1-alkyl methyl vinyl ketones) to cyclopentadiene correctly reproduce the trends in known experimental endo/exo and diastereoface selectivity. B3LYP theoretical results at the same or significantly higher basis set level, on the other hand, do not satisfactorily model observed endo/exo selectivities and are thus unsuitable for quantitative studies. The same is valid also with regard to subtle effects originating from, for example, conformational distributions of reactants. The latter shortcomings are not alleviated by the fact that observed diastereoface selectivities are well-reproduced by DFT calculations. Quantitative computational studies of large cycloaddition systems would require higher basis sets and better account for electron correlation than MP2, such as, for example, CCSD. Presently, however, with 30 or more non-hydrogen atoms, these computations are hardly feasible. We present quantitatively correct stereochemical predictions using a hybrid layered ONIOM computational approach, including the chiral carbon atom and the intramolecular hydrogen bond into a higher level, MP2/6-311G(d,p) or CCSD/6-311G(d,p), layer. Significant computational economy is achieved by taking account of surrounding bulky (alkyl) residues at 6-31G(d) in a low HF theoretical level layer. We conclude that theoretical calculations based on explicit correlated MO treatment of the reaction site are sufficiently reliable for the prediction of both endo/exo and diastereoface selectivity of Diels-Alder addition reactions. This is in line with the understanding of endo/exo selectivity originating from dynamic electron correlation effects of interacting pi fragments and diastereofacial selectivity originating from steric interactions of fragments outside of the Diels-Alder reaction site. PMID:18637663

  15. Time- and isomer-resolved measurements of sequential addition of acetylene to the propargyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Savee, John D.; Selby, Talitha M.; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.

    2015-10-06

    Soot formation in combustion is a complex process in which polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are believed to play a critical role. Recent works concluded that three consecutive additions of acetylene (C2H2) to propargyl (C3H3) create a facile route to the PAH indene (C9H8). However, the isomeric forms of C5H5 and C7H7 intermediates in this reaction sequence are not known. We directly investigate these intermediates using time- and isomer-resolved experiments. Both the resonance stabilized vinylpropargyl (vp-C5H5) and 2,4-cyclopentadienyl (c-C5H5) radical isomers of C5H5 are produced, with substantially different intensities at 800 K vs 1000 K. In agreement with literature master equation calculations, we find that c-C5H5 + C2H2 produces only the tropyl isomer of C7H7 (tp-C7H7) below 1000 K, and that tp-C7H7 + C2H2 terminates the reaction sequence yielding C9H8 (indene) + H. Lastly, this work demonstrates a pathway for PAH formation that does not proceed through benzene.

  16. 15 CFR 971.805 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Miscellaneous § 971... part or 15 CFR part 970, but when a time period expires on any of these days, that time period will...

  17. 15 CFR 971.805 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Miscellaneous § 971... part or 15 CFR part 970, but when a time period expires on any of these days, that time period will...

  18. 15 CFR 971.805 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Miscellaneous § 971... part or 15 CFR part 970, but when a time period expires on any of these days, that time period will...

  19. 15 CFR 971.805 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Miscellaneous § 971... part or 15 CFR part 970, but when a time period expires on any of these days, that time period will...

  20. 15 CFR 971.805 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS Miscellaneous § 971... part or 15 CFR part 970, but when a time period expires on any of these days, that time period will...

  1. Computationally Efficient Partial Crosstalk Cancellation in Fast Time-Varying DSL Crosstalk Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forouzan, Amir R.; Garth, Lee M.

    2007-12-01

    Line selection (LS), tone selection (TS), and joint tone-line selection (JTLS) partial crosstalk cancellers have been proposed to reduce the online computational complexity of far-end crosstalk (FEXT) cancellers in digital subscriber lines (DSL). However, when the crosstalk profile changes rapidly over time, there is an additional requirement that the partial crosstalk cancellers, particularly the LS and JTLS schemes, should also provide a low preprocessing complexity. This is in contrast to the case for perfect crosstalk cancellers. In this paper, we propose two novel channel matrix inversion methods, the approximate inverse (AI) and reduced inverse (RI) schemes, which reduce the recurrent complexity of the LS and JTLS schemes. Moreover, we propose two new classes of JTLS algorithms, the subsort and Lagrange JTLS algorithms, with significantly lower computational complexity than the recently proposed optimal greedy JTLS scheme. The computational complexity analysis of our algorithms shows that they provide much lower recurrent complexities than the greedy JTLS algorithm, allowing them to work efficiently in very fast time-varying crosstalk environments. Moreover, the analytical and simulation results demonstrate that our techniques are close to the optimal solution from the crosstalk cancellation point of view. The results also reveal that partial crosstalk cancellation is more beneficial in upstream DSL, particularly for short loops.

  2. Fault recovery for real-time, multi-tasking computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Richard (Inventor); Kelly, Gerald B. (Inventor); Rogers, Randy (Inventor); Stange, Kent A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    System and methods for providing a recoverable real time multi-tasking computer system are disclosed. In one embodiment, a system comprises a real time computing environment, wherein the real time computing environment is adapted to execute one or more applications and wherein each application is time and space partitioned. The system further comprises a fault detection system adapted to detect one or more faults affecting the real time computing environment and a fault recovery system, wherein upon the detection of a fault the fault recovery system is adapted to restore a backup set of state variables.

  3. Lateralization of High-Frequency Clicks Based on Interaural Time: Additivity of Information across Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth Marie

    Lateralization performance based on interaural differences of time (IDTs) was measured for trains of Gaussian clicks which varied in spectral content. In the first experiment, thresholds ((DELTA)IDTs) were measured as a function of the number of clicks in the train (n = 1 to 32), the interclick interval (ICI = 2.5 or 5 ms), and the spectral content (1 vs. 2 or 4 carriers). Subjects' performance was compared to perfect statistical summation which predicts slopes of -.50 when log-(DELTA)IDT vs. long -n is plotted. The results showed that increasing the spectral content of the clicks decreased the intercepts of the log -log functions (decreased thresholds) while having little effect on their slopes. Shortening the ICIs caused the slopes of the functions to decrease in absolute value. To estimate the bandwidth of frequency-interaction in lateralization, d's were measured for clicks with constant IDTs (n = 1) with a fixed carrier (FF = 4000, 5200, 6000 or 7200 Hz), both alone and combined with a second click whose carrier (F) varied from 3500 to 8500 Hz. Performance in combined conditions was compared to independent summation of the information carried by the two frequency-bands. Performance improved as the separation between F and FF increased until the level predicted by independence was reached. The final experiment investigated the interaction of frequency content with IDT. d's were measured as a function of the IDT in clicks with carriers of 5200, 6000 or 7200 Hz, both alone and combined with a 4000-Hz click with a fixed IDT. Performance in combined conditions was again compared to independent additivity. The improvement with frequency was explained by an increase in the number of samples of the IDT reaching the binaural centers due to spread of excitation along the basilar membrane. Less than independent summation was explained by correlation between overlapping bands which reduced the amount of information exciting independent channels. The data also suggest that

  4. Computer Modeling of Real-Time Dynamic Lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maida, James C.; Pace, J.; Novak, J.; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Station tasks involve procedures that are very complex and highly dependent on the availability of visual information. In many situations, cameras are used as tools to help overcome the visual and physical restrictions associated with space flight. However, these cameras are effected by the dynamic lighting conditions of space. Training for these is conditions is necessary. The current project builds on the findings of an earlier NRA funded project, which revealed improved performance by humans when trained with computer graphics and lighting effects such as shadows and glare.

  5. 40 CFR 97.507 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NOX Ozone Season Trading Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or event shall begin on the day... day of any time period, under the TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program, is not a business day, the time...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season...

  6. 40 CFR 97.507 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NOX Ozone Season Trading Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or event shall begin on the day... day of any time period, under the TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program, is not a business day, the time...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season...

  7. 40 CFR 97.507 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NOX Ozone Season Trading Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or event shall begin on the day... day of any time period, under the TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program, is not a business day, the time...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season...

  8. On-board computational efficiency in real time UAV embedded terrain reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Agadakos, Ioannis; Athanasiou, Vasilis; Papaefstathiou, Ioannis; Mertikas, Stylianos; Kyritsis, Sarantis; Tripolitsiotis, Achilles; Zervos, Panagiotis

    2014-05-01

    In the last few years, there is a surge of applications for object recognition, interpretation and mapping using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). Specifications in constructing those UAVs are highly diverse with contradictory characteristics including cost-efficiency, carrying weight, flight time, mapping precision, real time processing capabilities, etc. In this work, a hexacopter UAV is employed for near real time terrain mapping. The main challenge addressed is to retain a low cost flying platform with real time processing capabilities. The UAV weight limitation affecting the overall flight time, makes the selection of the on-board processing components particularly critical. On the other hand, surface reconstruction, as a computational demanding task, calls for a highly demanding processing unit on board. To merge these two contradicting aspects along with customized development, a System on a Chip (SoC) integrated circuit is proposed as a low-power, low-cost processor, which natively supports camera sensors and positioning and navigation systems. Modern SoCs, such as Omap3530 or Zynq, are classified as heterogeneous devices and provide a versatile platform, allowing access to both general purpose processors, such as the ARM11, as well as specialized processors, such as a digital signal processor and floating field-programmable gate array. A UAV equipped with the proposed embedded processors, allows on-board terrain reconstruction using stereo vision in near real time. Furthermore, according to the frame rate required, additional image processing may concurrently take place, such as image rectification andobject detection. Lastly, the onboard positioning and navigation (e.g., GNSS) chip may further improve the quality of the generated map. The resulting terrain maps are compared to ground truth geodetic measurements in order to access the accuracy limitations of the overall process. It is shown that with our proposed novel system,there is much potential in

  9. Axisymmetric Time-Dependent Computations of Expansion Tube Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this work is to add insight about the flow within expansion tubes by using computational fluid dynamics. This is accomplished by comparing the results of axisymmetric numerical simulations with finite-rate chemistry to data from the HYPULSE expansion tube facility which was previously the NASA Langley expansion tube. The numerical simulations begin at the opening of the primary diaphragm and compute the flow throughout the whole facility and, thus, are able to follow and assess the effect of many of the flow features created during operation of the facility. One particular issue that will be investigated is the effect of boundary layer formation in the acceleration tube on the test gas volume and test gas conditions. Both laminar and turbulent boundary layers will be implemented. The effect of momentary shock reflection off the secondary diaphragm will also be investigated. There is concern that such a reflection will stagnate the test gas and create high levels of dissociated molecules. This is particularly important in propulsion experiments where a freestream composition different from flight conditions may influence ignition and burning data. Several different models of diaphragm rupture will be implemented in order to help understand the importance of this issue.

  10. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required. 121.523 Section 121.523 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of...

  11. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required. 121.523 Section 121.523 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of...

  12. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember. 121.485 Section 121.485 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more...

  13. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required. 121.523 Section 121.523 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of...

  14. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required. 121.523 Section 121.523 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of...

  15. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required. 121.523 Section 121.523 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of...

  16. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember. 121.485 Section 121.485 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more...

  17. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember. 121.485 Section 121.485 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more...

  18. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember. 121.485 Section 121.485 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more...

  19. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember. 121.485 Section 121.485 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more...

  20. Computational complexity of time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, J. D.; Yung, M.-H.; Tempel, D. G.; Boixo, S.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.

    2014-08-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is rapidly emerging as a premier method for solving dynamical many-body problems in physics and chemistry. The mathematical foundations of TDDFT are established through the formal existence of a fictitious non-interacting system (known as the Kohn-Sham system), which can reproduce the one-electron reduced probability density of the actual system. We build upon these works and show that on the interior of the domain of existence, the Kohn-Sham system can be efficiently obtained given the time-dependent density. We introduce a V-representability parameter which diverges at the boundary of the existence domain and serves to quantify the numerical difficulty of constructing the Kohn-Sham potential. For bounded values of V-representability, we present a polynomial time quantum algorithm to generate the time-dependent Kohn-Sham potential with controllable error bounds.

  1. 40 CFR 96.107 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR NOX... weekend or a State or Federal holiday, the time period shall be extended to the next business day....

  2. 40 CFR 307.13 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND... time described or allowed in this part, except as otherwise provided, the day of the event from...

  3. A strategy for reducing turnaround time in design optimization using a distributed computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Katherine C.; Padula, Sharon L.; Rogers, James L.

    1988-01-01

    There is a need to explore methods for reducing lengthly computer turnaround or clock time associated with engineering design problems. Different strategies can be employed to reduce this turnaround time. One strategy is to run validated analysis software on a network of existing smaller computers so that portions of the computation can be done in parallel. This paper focuses on the implementation of this method using two types of problems. The first type is a traditional structural design optimization problem, which is characterized by a simple data flow and a complicated analysis. The second type of problem uses an existing computer program designed to study multilevel optimization techniques. This problem is characterized by complicated data flow and a simple analysis. The paper shows that distributed computing can be a viable means for reducing computational turnaround time for engineering design problems that lend themselves to decomposition. Parallel computing can be accomplished with a minimal cost in terms of hardware and software.

  4. Computational procedure for finite difference solution of one-dimensional heat conduction problems reduces computer time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iida, H. T.

    1966-01-01

    Computational procedure reduces the numerical effort whenever the method of finite differences is used to solve ablation problems for which the surface recession is large relative to the initial slab thickness. The number of numerical operations required for a given maximum space mesh size is reduced.

  5. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-han; Wang, Chun-mei; Tang, Hua-xin; Zuo, Cheng-ji; Xu, Hong-ming

    2009-06-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition timing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its application, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NOx while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NOx is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  6. Computationally efficient image restoration and super-resolution algorithns for real-time implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundareshan, Malur K.

    2002-07-01

    Computational complexity is a major impediment to the real- time implementation of image restoration and super- resolution algorithms. Although powerful restoration algorithms have been developed within the last few years utilizing sophisticated mathematical machinery (based on statistical optimization and convex set theory), these algorithms are typically iterative in nature and require enough number of iterations to be executed to achieve desired resolution gains in order to meaningfully perform detection and recognition tasks in practice. Additionally, recent technological breakthroughs have facilitated novel sensor designs (focal plane arrays, for instance) that make it possible to capture mega-pixel imagery data at video frame rates. A major challenge in the processing of these large format images is to complete the execution of the image processing steps within the frame capture times and to keep up with the output rate of the sensor so that all data captured by the sensor can be efficiently utilized. Consequently, development of novel methods that facilitate real-time implementation of image restoration and super- resolution algorithms is of significant practical interest and will be the primary focus of this paper. The key to designing computationally efficient processing schemes lies in strategically introducing appropriate pre-processing and post-processing steps together with the super-resolution iterations in order to tailor optimized overall processing sequences for imagery data of specific formats. Three distinct methods for tailoring a pre-processing filter and integrating it with the super-resolution processing steps will be outlined in this paper. These methods consist of a Region-of-Interest (ROI) extraction scheme, a background- detail separation procedure, and a scene-derived information extraction step for implementing a set-theoretic restoration of the image that is less demanding in computation compared to the super-resolution iterations. A

  7. A machine for neural computation of acoustical patterns with application to real time speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, P.; Lazzaro, J.

    1986-08-01

    400 analog electronic neurons have been assembled and connected for the analysis and recognition of acoustical patterns, including speech. Input to the net comes from a set of 18 band pass filters (Qmax 300 dB/octave; 180 to 6000 Hz, log scale). The net is organized into two parts, the first performs in real time the decomposition of the input patterns into their primitives of energy, space (frequency) and time relations. The other part decodes the set of primitives. 216 neurons are dedicated to pattern decomposition. The output of the individual filters is rectified and fed to two sets of 18 neurons in an opponent center-surround organization of synaptic connections (``on center'' and (``off center''). These units compute maxima and minima of energy at different frequencies. The next two sets of neutrons compute the temporal boundaries (``on'') and ``off'') and the following two the movement of the energy maxima (formants) up or down the frequency axis. There are in addition ``hyperacuity'' units which expand the frequency resolution to 36, other units tuned to a particular range of duration of the ``on center'' units and others tuned exclusively to very low energy sounds. In order to recognize speech sounds at the phoneme or diphone level, the set of primitives belonging to the phoneme is decoded such that only one neuron or a non-overlapping group of neurons fire when the sound pattern is present at the input. For display and translation into phonetic symbols the output from these neurons is fed into an EPROM decoder and computer which displays in real time a phonetic representation of the speech input.

  8. 29 CFR 2200.4 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Federal holiday, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday. When the period of time prescribed or allowed is less than 11 days, the period shall commence on the first day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday,...

  9. 43 CFR 4.803 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... day of the period, unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal legal holiday, or other nonbusiness day... holiday, or other nonbusiness day. When the period of time prescribed or allowed is 7 days or less, intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, Federal legal holidays and other nonbusiness days shall be excluded in...

  10. 49 CFR 1503.411 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, a legal holiday, or a day on which the enforcement docket is officially closed. If the last day of the time period is a Saturday, Sunday, legal holiday, or a day on which the... Saturday, Sunday, legal holiday, or a day on which the enforcement docket is officially closed....

  11. 49 CFR 1503.411 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, a legal holiday, or a day on which the enforcement docket is officially closed. If the last day of the time period is a Saturday, Sunday, legal holiday, or a day on which the... Saturday, Sunday, legal holiday, or a day on which the enforcement docket is officially closed....

  12. 49 CFR 1503.411 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, a legal holiday, or a day on which the enforcement docket is officially closed. If the last day of the time period is a Saturday, Sunday, legal holiday, or a day on which the... Saturday, Sunday, legal holiday, or a day on which the enforcement docket is officially closed....

  13. 29 CFR 2200.4 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Federal holiday, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday. When the period of time prescribed or allowed is less than 11 days, the period shall commence on the first day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday,...

  14. 29 CFR 2200.4 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal holiday, in which event the period runs until the end of the next day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday. When the period of time prescribed or allowed is less than 11 days, the period shall commence on the first day which is not a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday,...

  15. 40 CFR 97.207 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR SO2 Trading Program General... CAIR SO2 Trading Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or event shall begin on the day the act or event occurs. (b) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the CAIR SO2...

  16. 40 CFR 97.207 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR SO2 Trading Program General... CAIR SO2 Trading Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or event shall begin on the day the act or event occurs. (b) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the CAIR SO2...

  17. 40 CFR 97.207 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR SO2 Trading Program General... CAIR SO2 Trading Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or event shall begin on the day the act or event occurs. (b) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the CAIR SO2...

  18. 40 CFR 97.207 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR SO2 Trading Program General... CAIR SO2 Trading Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or event shall begin on the day the act or event occurs. (b) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the CAIR SO2...

  19. 40 CFR 97.207 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS CAIR SO2 Trading Program General... CAIR SO2 Trading Program, to begin on the occurrence of an act or event shall begin on the day the act or event occurs. (b) Unless otherwise stated, any time period scheduled, under the CAIR SO2...

  20. 40 CFR 96.7 - Computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Budget Trading... day of any time period, under the NOX Budget Trading Program, falls on a weekend or a State or...