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Sample records for additional congenital anomalies

  1. Congenital Vascular Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gravereaux, Edwin C.; Nguyen, Louis L.; Cunningham, Leslie D.

    2004-04-01

    Congenital vascular anomalies are rare. The cardiovascular specialist should nevertheless be aware of the more common types of vascular anomalies and understand the implications for patient treatment and the likelihood of associated morbidity. The presentation of congenital arteriovenous malformations can range from asymptomatic or cosmetic lesions, to those causing ischemia, ulceration, hemorrhage, or high-output congestive heart failure. Treatment of large, symptomatic arteriovenous malformations often requires catheter-directed embolization prior to the attempt at complete surgical excision. Later recurrence, due to collateral recruitment, is frequent. Graded compression stockings and leg elevation are the mainstays of treatment for the predominantly venous congenital vascular anomalies. Most congenital central venous disorders are clinically silent. An exception is the retrocaval ureter. Retroaortic left renal vein, circumaortic venous ring, and absent, left-sided or duplicated inferior vena cava are relevant when aortic or inferior vena cava procedures are planned. The treatment of the venous disorders is directed at prevention or management of symptoms. Persistent sciatic artery, popliteal entrapment syndrome, and aberrant right subclavian artery origin are congenital anomalies that are typically symptomatic at presentation. Because they mimic more common diseases, diagnosis is frequently delayed. Delay can result in significant morbidity for the patient. Failure to make the diagnosis of persistent sciatic artery and popliteal entrapment can result in critical limb ischemia and subsequent amputation. Unrecognized aberrant right subclavian artery origin associated with aneurysmal degeneration can rupture and result in death. The treatment options for large-vessel arterial anomalies are surgical, sometimes in combination with endovascular techniques.

  2. Congenital Anomalies of the Limbs

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, G.; Mongeau, M.; Moreault, P.; Dupuis, M.; Hebert, B.; Corriveau, C.

    1964-01-01

    As a preparatory step towards the development of a complete habilitation program for children with congenital limb anomalies associated with maternal ingestion of thalidomide, the medical records of all patients with congenital limb anomalies referred to the Rehabilitation Institute of Montreal in the past decade were studied, and an examination and a thorough reassessment were made of 41 patients (21 males and 20 females). In this paper, Part I, the medical and prosthetic aspects are dealt with and a form of management is described for each type of anomaly. The conclusions are reached that prosthetic fitting and training should be initiated very early in life and that co-operation of the parent is essential to successful habilitation of a child with congenital limb anomalies. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:14154297

  3. Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System.

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, R B; Thunem, N Y; Anderson-Redick, S

    1989-01-01

    The Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System was started in 1966 in response to the thalidomide tragedy earlier in the decade. It was one of four provincial surveillance systems on which the federal government relied for baseline statistics of congenital anomalies. The government now collects data from six provinces and one territory. The Alberta Congenital Anomaly Surveillance System originally depended on three types of notification to the Division of Vital Statistics, Department of Health, Government of Alberta: birth notice and certificates of death and stillbirth; increased sources of ascertainment have greatly improved data quality. We present the data for 1980-86 and compare the prevalence rates of selected anomalies with the rates from three other surveillance systems. Surveillance systems do not guarantee that a new teratogen will be detected, but they are extremely valuable for testing hypotheses regarding causation. At the very least they provide baseline data with which to compare any deviation or trend. For many, if not most, congenital anomalies total prevention is not possible; however, surveillance systems can be used to measure progress in prevention. PMID:2819634

  4. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Lubinsky, M.S.

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  5. Congenital uterine anomalies affecting reproduction.

    PubMed

    Reichman, David E; Laufer, Marc R

    2010-04-01

    The following review seeks to summarise the current data regarding reproductive outcomes associated with congenital uterine anomalies. Such malformations originate from adverse embryologic events ranging from agenesis to lateral and vertical fusion defects. Associated renal anomalies are common both for the symmetric and asymmetric malformations. While fertility is minimally impacted upon by müllerian anomalies in most cases, such malformations have historically been associated with poor obstetric outcomes such as recurrent miscarriage, second trimester loss, preterm delivery, malpresentation and intrauterine foetal demise (IUFD). The following review delineates the existing literature regarding such outcomes and indicates therapies, where applicable, to optimise the care of such patients.

  6. Congenital anomalies in the baboon (Papio spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Benjamin; Owston, Michael A.; Kumar, Shyamesh; Dick, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    Background A comprehensive survey of the prevalence of congenital anomalies in baboons has not been previously reported. We report the congenital anomalies observed over a 26-year period in a large captive baboon colony. Methods A computer search was performed for all baboon congenital anomalies identified at necropsy and recorded on necropsy submissions. Results We identified 198 congenital anomalies in 166 baboons from 9,972 necropsies (1.66% of total necropsies). The nervous, urogenital, musculoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems were most commonly affected. The most common organs affected were the brain, bone, heart, testicle, kidney, penis, aorta, and skeletal muscle. The most frequent congenital anomalies were blindness, seizures, and hydrocephalus. Conclusions The baboon has an overall frequency of congenital anomalies similar to humans and other nonhuman primates. Although the most frequently affected systems are similar, congenital anomalies involving the digestive system appear to be less common in the baboon. PMID:21332757

  7. An uncommon congenital anomaly of the ribs

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Arjun; Zunimol, Mohamed Puthiyaveettil

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic rib is an extremely rare congenital anomaly of the ribs. Here, we present the case of a 10-year-old boy with asthma who, on routine evaluation, was found to have this anomaly. PMID:27051123

  8. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD. PMID:25497206

  9. Multiple congenital ocular anomalies in Icelandic horses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple congenital ocular anomalies (MCOA) syndrome is a hereditary congenital eye defect that was first described in Silver colored Rocky Mountain horses. The mutation causing this disease is located within a defined chromosomal interval, which also contains the gene and mutation that is associated with the Silver coat color (PMEL17, exon 11). Horses that are homozygous for the disease-causing allele have multiple defects (MCOA-phenotype), whilst the heterozygous horses predominantly have cysts of the iris, ciliary body or retina (Cyst-phenotype). It has been argued that these ocular defects are caused by a recent mutation that is restricted to horses that are related to the Rocky Mountain Horse breed. For that reason we have examined another horse breed, the Icelandic horse, which is historically quite divergent from Rocky Mountain horses. Results We examined 24 Icelandic horses and established that the MCOA syndrome is present in this breed. Four of these horses were categorised as having the MCOA-phenotype and were genotyped as being homozygous for the PMEL17 mutation. The most common clinical signs included megaloglobus, iris stromal hypoplasia, abnormal pectinate ligaments, iridociliary cysts occasionally extending into the peripheral retina and cataracts. The cysts and pectinate ligament abnormalities were observed in the temporal quadrant of the eyes. Fourteen horses were heterozygous for the PMEL17 mutation and were characterized as having the Cyst-phenotype with cysts and occasionally curvilinear streaks in the peripheral retina. Three additional horses were genotyped as PMEL17 heterozygotes, but in these horses we were unable to detect cysts or other forms of anomalies. One eye of a severely vision-impaired 18 month-old stallion, homozygous for the PMEL17 mutation was examined by light microscopy. Redundant duplication of non-pigmented ciliary body epithelium, sometimes forming cysts bulging into the posterior chamber and localized areas of

  10. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  11. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  12. Genotype-phenotype correlation of congenital anomalies in multiple congenital anomalies hypotonia seizures syndrome (MCAHS1)/PIGN-related epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Leah; Lemmon, Monica; Beck, Natalie; Johnson, Maria; Mu, Weiyi; Murdock, David; Bodurtha, Joann; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Cohn, Ronald; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Barañano, Kristin; Hamosh, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in PIGN, resulting in multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor deficiency, have been published in four families to date. We report four patients from three unrelated families with epilepsy and hypotonia in whom whole exome sequencing yielded compound heterozygous variants in PIGN. As with previous reports Patients 1 and 2 (full siblings) have severe global developmental delay, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and minor dysmorphic features, including high palate, bitemporal narrowing, depressed nasal bridge, and micrognathia; Patient 3 had early global developmental delay with later progressive spastic quadriparesis, intellectual disability, and intractable generalized epilepsy; Patient 4 had bilateral narrowing as well but differed by the presence of hypertelorism, markedly narrow palpebral fissures, and long philtrum, had small distal phalanges of fingers 2, 3, and 4, absent distal phalanx of finger 5 and similar toe anomalies, underdeveloped nails, unusual brain anomalies, and a more severe early clinical course. These patients expand the known clinical spectrum of the disease. The severity of the presentations in conjunction with the patients' mutations suggest a genotype-phenotype correlation in which congenital anomalies are only seen in patients with biallelic loss-of-function. In addition, PIGN mutations appear to be panethnic and may be an underappreciated cause of epilepsy.

  13. Genotype–Phenotype Correlation of Congenital Anomalies in Multiple Congenital Anomalies Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome (MCAHS1)/ PIGN-Related Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Leah; Lemmon, Monica; Beck, Natalie; Johnson, Maria; Mu, Weiyi; Murdock, David; Bodurtha, Joann; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Cohn, Ronald; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Barañano, Kristin; Hamosh, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in PIGN, resulting in multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor deficiency, have been published in four families to date. We report four patients from three unrelated families with epilepsy and hypotonia in whom whole exome sequencing yielded compound heterozygous variants in PIGN. As with previous reports Patients 1 and 2 (full siblings) have severe global developmental delay, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and minor dysmorphic features, including high palate, bitemporal narrowing, depressed nasal bridge, and micrognathia; Patient 3 had early global developmental delay with later progressive spastic quadriparesis, intellectual disability, and intractable generalized epilepsy; Patient 4 had bilateral narrowing as well but differed by the presence of hypertelorism, markedly narrow palpebral fissures, and long philtrum, had small distal phalanges of fingers 2, 3, and 4, absent distal phalanx of finger 5 and similar toe anomalies, underdeveloped nails, unusual brain anomalies, and a more severe early clinical course. These patients expand the known clinical spectrum of the disease. The severity of the presentations in conjunction with the patients’ mutations suggest a genotype–phenotype correlation in which congenital anomalies are only seen in patients with biallelic loss-of-function. In addition, PIGN mutations appear to be panethnic and may be an underappreciated cause of epilepsy. PMID:26394714

  14. A Description of Congenital Anomalies Among Infants in Entebbe, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Ndibazza, Juliet; Lule, Swaib; Nampijja, Margaret; Mpairwe, Harriet; Oduru, Gloria; Kiggundu, Molly; Akello, Miriam; Muhangi, Lawrence; Elliott, Alison M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on congenital anomalies from developing countries of the sub-Saharan region are scarce. However, it is important to have comprehensive and reliable data on the description and prevalence of congenital anomalies to allow surveillance and the implementation of appropriate public health strategies for prevention and management. In this study, we describe the profile of congenital anomalies seen in a birth cohort in Entebbe, Uganda. METHODS: Congenital anomalies were defined as any structural defect present at birth. Pregnant women were recruited to the cohort between 2003 and 2005. Defects present at birth were recorded by the midwife at delivery and by physicians at the routine six-week postnatal visit and at illness-related visits until 1 year of life. The anomalies were classified by organ system according to the 10th version of the World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). RESULTS: There were 180 infants with a congenital anomaly among 2365 births. The most commonly affected systems were the musculoskeletal (42.7 per 1000 births) and skin (16.1 per 1000 births). The prevalence of major anomalies was 20.3 per 1000 births; 1.7 per 1000 births for cardiac anomalies and 1.3 per 1000 births for neural system anomalies. Forty (22%) of the congenital anomalies were identified at birth, 131 (73%) at the 6-week postnatal visit, and nine (5%) at illness-related visits. CONCLUSION: Congenital anomalies are common in developing countries. Establishment of comprehensive databases for surveillance would be helpful for surveillance of effects of new exposures, for prevention, management, and health care planning. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21770020

  15. Congenital cystic eye with multiple dermal appendages and intracranial congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Michaelides, Michael; Tsantiridis, Christos; Spyridi, Styliani; Arvanity, Mary; Efstratiou, Ioannis

    2010-06-01

    Congenital cystic eye (anophthalmia with cyst) is an extremely rare anomaly discovered at birth with few reported cases in the literature, resulting from partial or complete failure during invagination of the primary optic vesicle during fetal development. Herein we present the radiographic, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a unique case of congenital cystic eye associated with dermal appendages and advanced intracranial congenital anomalies in a 3-month-old boy.

  16. [Congenital uterine anomalies: diagnosis, prognosis and management in 2008].

    PubMed

    Rossier, Marie-Claude; Bays, Virginie; Vial, Yvan; Achtari, Chahin

    2008-10-22

    The müllerian anomalies or congenital uterine anomalies are relatively frequent if we keep in mind that 3-4% of our female patients present with a müllerian anomaly, although many among them are asymptomatic. It is important to evoke this diagnosis for all patients with a history of recurrent miscarriage, late abortion and premature delivery, for the adolescent consulting for primary amenorrhea, dysmenorrhea or dyspareunia as well as for the woman consulting for infertility. We will review pathogenesis, diagnostic methods, standard classification with a description of the different types of congenital uterine anomalies and the recommended management.

  17. Major congenital anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome: a EUROCAT population-based registry study.

    PubMed

    Morris, Joan K; Garne, Ester; Wellesley, Diana; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Beres, Judit; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Budd, Judith; Dias, Carlos Matias; Gatt, Miriam; Klungsoyr, Kari; Khoshnood, Babak; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Mullaney, Carmel; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; O'Mahony, Mary; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Rounding, Cath; Sipek, Antonin; Stoianova, Sylvia; Tucker, David; de Walle, Hermien; Yevtushok, Lyubov; Loane, Maria; Dolk, Helen

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that over 40% of babies with Down syndrome have a major cardiac anomaly and are more likely to have other major congenital anomalies. Since 2000, many countries in Europe have introduced national antenatal screening programs for Down syndrome. This study aimed to determine if the introduction of these screening programs and the subsequent termination of prenatally detected pregnancies were associated with any decline in the prevalence of additional anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome. The study sample consisted of 7,044 live births and fetal deaths with Down syndrome registered in 28 European population-based congenital anomaly registries covering seven million births during 2000-2010. Overall, 43.6% (95% CI: 42.4-44.7%) of births with Down syndrome had a cardiac anomaly and 15.0% (14.2-15.8%) had a non-cardiac anomaly. Female babies with Down syndrome were significantly more likely to have a cardiac anomaly compared to male babies (47.6% compared with 40.4%, P < 0.001) and significantly less likely to have a non-cardiac anomaly (12.9% compared with 16.7%, P < 0.001). The prevalence of cardiac and non-cardiac congenital anomalies in babies with Down syndrome has remained constant, suggesting that population screening for Down syndrome and subsequent terminations has not influenced the prevalence of specific congenital anomalies in these babies.

  18. Marrow hypoplasia associated with congenital neurologic anomalies in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Drachtman, R; Weinblatt, M; Sitarz, A; Gold, A; Kochen, J

    1990-10-01

    Two siblings with congenital neurologic structural anomalies and delayed-onset selective bone marrow hypoplasia in a previously undescribed constellation of symptoms are presented. Differences between these cases and other well known syndromes are discussed. The importance of this association is the implication that children with congenital neurologic abnormalities may be at increased risk for the development of hypoplastic hematopoietic conditions. PMID:2264478

  19. ASSOCIATED NON DIAPHRAGMATIC ANOMALIES AMONG CASES WITH CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Alembik, Y; Dott, B; Roth, M P

    2015-01-01

    Cases with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CDH in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CDH were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 29 years in 386,088 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 139 cases with CDH born during this period (total prevalence of 3.60 per 10,000), 85 (61.2%) had associated major anomalies. There were 25 (18.0%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 12 trisomies 18, and 24 (17.3%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but Fryns syndrome. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including fetal alcohol syndrome, de Lange syndrome, sequences (laterality sequence and ectopia cordis), and complexes (limb body wall complex). Thirty six (25.9%) of the cases had non syndromic multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies of the cardiovascular system (n = 53, 27.5%), the urogenital system (n = 34, 17.6%), the musculoskeletal system (n = 29, 15.0%), and the central nervous system (n = 19, 9.8%) were the most common other congenital anomalies. We observed specific patterns of anomalies associated with CDH which emphasizes the need to evaluate all patients with CDH for possible associated malformations. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was close to two in three infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CDH. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CDH. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CDH can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in more than one out of two cases with CDH.

  20. ASSOCIATED NON DIAPHRAGMATIC ANOMALIES AMONG CASES WITH CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Alembik, Y; Dott, B; Roth, M P

    2015-01-01

    Cases with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CDH in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CDH were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 29 years in 386,088 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 139 cases with CDH born during this period (total prevalence of 3.60 per 10,000), 85 (61.2%) had associated major anomalies. There were 25 (18.0%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 12 trisomies 18, and 24 (17.3%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but Fryns syndrome. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including fetal alcohol syndrome, de Lange syndrome, sequences (laterality sequence and ectopia cordis), and complexes (limb body wall complex). Thirty six (25.9%) of the cases had non syndromic multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies of the cardiovascular system (n = 53, 27.5%), the urogenital system (n = 34, 17.6%), the musculoskeletal system (n = 29, 15.0%), and the central nervous system (n = 19, 9.8%) were the most common other congenital anomalies. We observed specific patterns of anomalies associated with CDH which emphasizes the need to evaluate all patients with CDH for possible associated malformations. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was close to two in three infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CDH. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CDH. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CDH can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in more than one out of two cases with CDH. PMID:26625659

  1. Vertebral and Intraspinal Anomalies in Indian Population with Congenital Scoliosis: A Study of 119 Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    S, Rajasekaran; G, Balamurali; Shetty, Ajoy

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case study by clinical and radiological data analysis. Purpose To analyze different types of vertebral anomalies and the incidence of associated intraspinal anomalies in the Indian population. Overview of Literature This is the largest study of congenital scoliosis and associated intraspinal anomalies in Indian population. Incidence of intraspinal anomaly in this series is 47% which is higher than previous literature. Hemivertebra was the most common anomaly as seen in previous studies. Methods A total of 119 patients with congenital scoliosis who underwent surgery between December 2006 and December 2012 were studied. Data was reviewed with medical records, plain radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Results Thoracolumbar curve was most common, seen in 43.6% of patients. In addition to scoliotic deformity, kyphosis was seen in 26% of patients. Failure of formation, the most common vertebral anomaly, was seen in 51.2% of patients, failure of segmentation was seen in 19.3% of patients, and there were 29.4% patients having both formation and segmentation anomalies. Hemivertebra was the most common vertebral anomaly seen in 66.3% of patients and for whom 63.2% were in thoracic spine. Intraspinal anomalies were associated with 47% of patients with congenital scoliosis. Tethered cord was the most common intraspinal abnormality and was found in 48.2% patients with intraspinal anomalies. The patients with failure of segmentation and mixed deformities were found to have a significantly higher incidence of intraspinal anomalies (65% and 57%, respectively) than those with failure of formation (34%). Out of 31 patients with kyphotic deformity 29% had intraspinal anomalies, and amongst them tethered cord was the most common anomaly seen in 66% patients. Out of 12 patients with neurocutaneous markers, 83% patients had intraspinal anomaly. Conclusions Intraspinal anomalies were seen in 47% of patients with congenital scoliosis in the

  2. Repair of congenital 'disconnected uterus': a new female genital anomaly?

    PubMed

    Kisu, Iori; Tanaka, Kyoko; Banno, Kouji; Okuda, Shigeo; Aoki, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Congenital uterine anomaly is a female genital disorder caused by developmental anomaly of the Müllerian ducts. In this report, we present a case of repair of congenital 'disconnected uterus' between the cervix and the body of the uterus. The case did not correspond to the consensus classifications that have been proposed for congenital uterine anomaly. The patient was a young woman whose chief complaints were not having first menstruation and experiencing monthly severe lower abdominal pain. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the uterine body was separated from the uterine cervix. Uteroplasty was conducted to anastomose the separated uterus. Periodic menstruation started 1 month after surgery and abdominal pain was improved. Performance of uteroplasty in this case was extremely significant and greatly improved the quality of life of the patient.

  3. Congenital anomalies of kidney and hand: a review

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Gopalakrishnan; Jeyachandran, Dhanapriya; Subramaniyan, Bala; Thanigachalam, Dineshkumar; Rajagopalan, Arul

    2013-01-01

    ‘Acro-renal syndrome’ refers to co-occurrence of congenital renal and limb anomalies. The term acro-renal syndrome was coined by Curran et al. in 1972 though Dieker and Opitz were the first to report this phenomenon in three male patients in 1969. The common limb defects include oligodactyly, ectrodactyly, syndactyly or brachydactyly anomalies of the carpal and tarsal bones and the common renal anomalies observed are unilateral renal agenesis (URA), bilateral renal hypoplasia, ureteric hypoplasia, hydroureteronephrosis and duplication abnormalities. The acro-renal syndrome as originally described is rare, reported only in ∼20 patients in the international literature. We report a 23-year-old male patient with renal anomalies in the form of absent right kidney, left-sided vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and skeletal anomalies viz short radius, absent first metacarpal ray in left hand and left undescended testis, consistent with Dieker's type acro-renal syndrome. Apart from the classical acro-renal syndrome, several anomalies of acro-renal patterns and the abnormal gene loci involved are described in the literature. This article is a comprehensive review of the development of kidneys, types of acro-renal syndromes, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), syndromes associated with combined limb and renal anomalies, and anomalies associated with URA. PMID:26019842

  4. Using scan statistics for congenital anomalies surveillance: the EUROCAT methodology.

    PubMed

    Teljeur, Conor; Kelly, Alan; Loane, Maria; Densem, James; Dolk, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Scan statistics have been used extensively to identify temporal clusters of health events. We describe the temporal cluster detection methodology adopted by the EUROCAT (European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies) monitoring system. Since 2001, EUROCAT has implemented variable window width scan statistic for detecting unusual temporal aggregations of congenital anomaly cases. The scan windows are based on numbers of cases rather than being defined by time. The methodology is imbedded in the EUROCAT Central Database for annual application to centrally held registry data. The methodology was incrementally adapted to improve the utility and to address statistical issues. Simulation exercises were used to determine the power of the methodology to identify periods of raised risk (of 1-18 months). In order to operationalize the scan methodology, a number of adaptations were needed, including: estimating date of conception as unit of time; deciding the maximum length (in time) and recency of clusters of interest; reporting of multiple and overlapping significant clusters; replacing the Monte Carlo simulation with a lookup table to reduce computation time; and placing a threshold on underlying population change and estimating the false positive rate by simulation. Exploration of power found that raised risk periods lasting 1 month are unlikely to be detected except when the relative risk and case counts are high. The variable window width scan statistic is a useful tool for the surveillance of congenital anomalies. Numerous adaptations have improved the utility of the original methodology in the context of temporal cluster detection in congenital anomalies. PMID:26026722

  5. Using scan statistics for congenital anomalies surveillance: the EUROCAT methodology.

    PubMed

    Teljeur, Conor; Kelly, Alan; Loane, Maria; Densem, James; Dolk, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Scan statistics have been used extensively to identify temporal clusters of health events. We describe the temporal cluster detection methodology adopted by the EUROCAT (European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies) monitoring system. Since 2001, EUROCAT has implemented variable window width scan statistic for detecting unusual temporal aggregations of congenital anomaly cases. The scan windows are based on numbers of cases rather than being defined by time. The methodology is imbedded in the EUROCAT Central Database for annual application to centrally held registry data. The methodology was incrementally adapted to improve the utility and to address statistical issues. Simulation exercises were used to determine the power of the methodology to identify periods of raised risk (of 1-18 months). In order to operationalize the scan methodology, a number of adaptations were needed, including: estimating date of conception as unit of time; deciding the maximum length (in time) and recency of clusters of interest; reporting of multiple and overlapping significant clusters; replacing the Monte Carlo simulation with a lookup table to reduce computation time; and placing a threshold on underlying population change and estimating the false positive rate by simulation. Exploration of power found that raised risk periods lasting 1 month are unlikely to be detected except when the relative risk and case counts are high. The variable window width scan statistic is a useful tool for the surveillance of congenital anomalies. Numerous adaptations have improved the utility of the original methodology in the context of temporal cluster detection in congenital anomalies.

  6. Disparities in Infant Mortality Due to Congenital Anomalies on Guam.

    PubMed

    Noel, Jonathan K; Namazi, Sara; Haddock, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    In the 1970's and 1980's, there were large inter-village disparities in infant mortality due to congenital anomalies on Guam. A village-level analysis was conducted to determine if these disparities can be explained by behavioral (ie, median age of village females, village fertility ratio), structural (ie, population density, persons per household, single mother households per village, married females per village), and environmental (ie, living in a village where Agent Orange (AO) spraying was conducted) factors. Village-level data for live births and infant mortality due to congenital anomalies (1970-1989) was collected from Guam's Office of Vital Statistics. Data on median age of village females, village fertility ratio, population density, persons per household, single mother households, and married females were obtained from the 1980 US Census. Estimates of village-level AO use were provided through personal communications, and villages were dichotomized into AO and non-AO spray areas. Village location was classified by usual residence of the mother. Linear regression was used to determine associations between infant mortality due to congenital anomalies and the behavioral, structural, and environmental factors. The association between AO spray area and infant mortality due to congenital anomalies was statistically significant under univariable (B [95%CI] = 1.88 [0.64,3.11], P = .005) and multivariable conditions (B [95%CI] = 2.02 [0.08,3.96], P = .042). These results suggest that infants born to mothers whose usual residence was in an AO spray area on Guam are at an increased risk of mortality due to congenital anomalies. Further studies using individual-level data are needed to validate these results.

  7. Disparities in Infant Mortality Due to Congenital Anomalies on Guam

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Sara; Haddock, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    In the 1970's and 1980's, there were large inter-village disparities in infant mortality due to congenital anomalies on Guam. A village-level analysis was conducted to determine if these disparities can be explained by behavioral (ie, median age of village females, village fertility ratio), structural (ie, population density, persons per household, single mother households per village, married females per village), and environmental (ie, living in a village where Agent Orange (AO) spraying was conducted) factors. Village-level data for live births and infant mortality due to congenital anomalies (1970–1989) was collected from Guam's Office of Vital Statistics. Data on median age of village females, village fertility ratio, population density, persons per household, single mother households, and married females were obtained from the 1980 US Census. Estimates of village-level AO use were provided through personal communications, and villages were dichotomized into AO and non-AO spray areas. Village location was classified by usual residence of the mother. Linear regression was used to determine associations between infant mortality due to congenital anomalies and the behavioral, structural, and environmental factors. The association between AO spray area and infant mortality due to congenital anomalies was statistically significant under univariable (B [95%CI] = 1.88 [0.64,3.11], P = .005) and multivariable conditions (B [95%CI] = 2.02 [0.08,3.96], P = .042). These results suggest that infants born to mothers whose usual residence was in an AO spray area on Guam are at an increased risk of mortality due to congenital anomalies. Further studies using individual-level data are needed to validate these results. PMID:26668770

  8. Disparities in Infant Mortality Due to Congenital Anomalies on Guam.

    PubMed

    Noel, Jonathan K; Namazi, Sara; Haddock, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    In the 1970's and 1980's, there were large inter-village disparities in infant mortality due to congenital anomalies on Guam. A village-level analysis was conducted to determine if these disparities can be explained by behavioral (ie, median age of village females, village fertility ratio), structural (ie, population density, persons per household, single mother households per village, married females per village), and environmental (ie, living in a village where Agent Orange (AO) spraying was conducted) factors. Village-level data for live births and infant mortality due to congenital anomalies (1970-1989) was collected from Guam's Office of Vital Statistics. Data on median age of village females, village fertility ratio, population density, persons per household, single mother households, and married females were obtained from the 1980 US Census. Estimates of village-level AO use were provided through personal communications, and villages were dichotomized into AO and non-AO spray areas. Village location was classified by usual residence of the mother. Linear regression was used to determine associations between infant mortality due to congenital anomalies and the behavioral, structural, and environmental factors. The association between AO spray area and infant mortality due to congenital anomalies was statistically significant under univariable (B [95%CI] = 1.88 [0.64,3.11], P = .005) and multivariable conditions (B [95%CI] = 2.02 [0.08,3.96], P = .042). These results suggest that infants born to mothers whose usual residence was in an AO spray area on Guam are at an increased risk of mortality due to congenital anomalies. Further studies using individual-level data are needed to validate these results. PMID:26668770

  9. Maternal water consumption during pregnancy and congenital cardiac anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.M.; Swan, S.H.; Harris, J.A.; Malcoe, L.H. )

    1990-05-01

    This case-control study, conducted in a California county that had a local incident of water contamination in 1981, investigated the relation between a mother's reported consumption of tap water during pregnancy and congenital cardiac anomalies in their offspring born during 1981-1983. Data were obtained from telephone interviews with 145 mothers of children born with a severe cardiac anomaly and 176 mothers of children born without such an anomaly. A positive association between a mother's consumption of home tap water during the first trimester of pregnancy and cardiac anomalies in her infant was unrelated to the incident of water contamination, the mother's race, or her educational level. A negative relation was found between a mother's use of bottled water and cardiac anomalies among the infants. These findings corresponded primarily to births in 1981. These data could not fully distinguish between a potential causal agent in the water and differential reporting of exposure by study subjects.

  10. Congenital optic nerve anomalies and hereditary optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Heidary, Gena

    2014-01-01

    Congenital and hereditary optic nerve anomalies represent a significant cause of visual dysfunction. While some optic nerve abnormalities affect the visual system alone, others may be associated with neurologic and systemic findings. Correct identification of the optic nerve disease therefore is crucial both for developing a treatment plan with respect to visual rehabilitation, but also for initiating the appropriate multidisciplinary evaluation. The purpose of this review is to highlight common examples of congenital and inherited optic nerve abnormalities in an effort to familiarize the clinician with salient clinical features of these diseases and to review important systemic testing when relevant. PMID:27625883

  11. Congenital optic nerve anomalies and hereditary optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Heidary, Gena

    2014-12-01

    Congenital and hereditary optic nerve anomalies represent a significant cause of visual dysfunction. While some optic nerve abnormalities affect the visual system alone, others may be associated with neurologic and systemic findings. Correct identification of the optic nerve disease therefore is crucial both for developing a treatment plan with respect to visual rehabilitation, but also for initiating the appropriate multidisciplinary evaluation. The purpose of this review is to highlight common examples of congenital and inherited optic nerve abnormalities in an effort to familiarize the clinician with salient clinical features of these diseases and to review important systemic testing when relevant. PMID:27625883

  12. Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and the Urinary Tract (CAKUT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the majority of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) with emphasis in Pediatric Pathology describing and illustrating lesions as varied as ureteral duplications, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, horseshoe kidney, posterior urethral valve and prune belly syndrome, obstructive renal dysplasia, nonmotile ciliopathies and several syndromes associated with renal malformations (Meckel–Joubert, short rib, Bardet–Biedl, asplenia/polysplenia, hereditary renal adysplasia, Zellweger, trisomies, VACTER-L, Potter, caudal dysplasia, and sirenomelia), as well as ADPK, and ARPK. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the congenital renal anomalies, but also to analyze the more recent therapeutic interventions that may modify the natural history of some of these severe conditions. PMID:25313840

  13. An unusual congenital facial anomaly: erectile proboscis-like structure.

    PubMed

    Mutaf, Mehmet; Isik, Dağhan; Büyükgüral, Berker

    2006-07-01

    We report a 3-week-old male infant with an unusual congenital facial anomaly, which is characterized by a proboscis-like erectile structure arising from the right malar region. Although it is a tubular structure resembling the proboscis lateralis, this case was more likely to be a new congenital anomaly because of the following reasons: (1) in contrast with the proboscis lateralis, which originates from the medial portion of the orbital roof, the structure was located at the right malar region in our case; (2) although it was soft and freely dangling on the face, this proboscis-like structure was strongly erectile, with contraction of the orbicularis oculi muscle when the infant cried; (3) histopathological examination revealed that the structure was composed by normal fibroadipose tissue and striated muscle covered with a healthy skin and subcutaneous tissue. In contrast with histopathological characteristics of a proboscis lateralis, there was neither osteocartilaginous tissue nor mucosa in the structure. Although it is a typical finding for a proboscis lateralis, no lumen was found in the presented anomaly. Because of these unique characteristics, which remarkably differ from previously reported facial anomalies, we thought this case worth reporting. A literature review revealed that no similar case has been reported in the literature. PMID:16799319

  14. Congenital anomalies and childhood cancer in Great Britain

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.A.; Hawkins, M.M.; Robertson, C.M.; Stiller, C.A.

    1997-03-01

    The presence of cancer and a congenital anomaly in the same child may be explained in certain cases by an underlying genetic abnormality. The study of these associations may lead to the identification of genes that are important in both processes. We have examined the records of 20,304 children with cancer in Britain, who were entered into the National Registry of Childhood Tumors (NRCT) during 1971-86, for the presence of congenital anomalies. The frequency of anomalies was much higher among children with solid tumors (4.4%) than among those with leukemia or lymphoma (2.6%; P < .0001). The types of cancer with the highest rates of anomalies were Wilms tumor (8.1 %), Ewing sarcoma (5.8%), hepatoblastoma (6.4%), and gonadal and germ-cell tumors (6.4%). Cases of spina bifida and abnormalities of the eye, ribs, and spine were more common in children with cancer than among population-based controls. Future studies may be directed toward identifying the developmental pathways and the relevant genes that are involved in the overlap between pediatric cancer and malformation. 46 refs., 12 tabs.

  15. Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Evaluation with the Use of Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Büyükbayraktar, Fatma Gül; Ölçer, Tülay; Cumhur, Turhan

    2009-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the aortic arch have clinical importance, as the anomalies may be associated with vascular rings or other congenital cardiovascular diseases. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography enables one to display the detailed anatomy of vascular structures and the spatial relationships with adjacent organs; this ability is the greatest advantage of the use of MDCT angiography in comparison to other imaging modalities in the evaluation of the congenital anomalies of the aortic arch. In this review article, we illustrate 16-slice MDCT angiography appearances of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch. PMID:19270864

  16. Fournier's gangrene in a child with congenital genitourinary anomalies.

    PubMed

    Cundy, Thomas P; Boucaut, Hilary A P; Kirby, Christopher P

    2012-04-01

    Fournier's gangrene is a rare urologic emergency in childhood that requires prompt diagnosis to deliver definitive and supportive care. Host susceptibility risk factors differ between adult and pediatric age groups with affected children usually otherwise systemically healthy. We present a case of Fournier's gangrene in a 2-year-old, from a genitourinary source of sepsis secondary to previously unreported genitourinary anatomical anomalies of congenital buried penis and hypospadias. Illustrative applied anatomy identifies the pathogenesis of this case, aiding recognition and understanding of this rapidly progressive and destructive pathology.

  17. Imaging diagnosis of congenital brain anomalies and injuries.

    PubMed

    Pooh, Ritsuko K

    2012-12-01

    Fetal brain is rapidly developing and changing its appearance week by week during pregnancy. The brain is the most important organ but it is quite hard to observe detailed structure of this organ by conventional transabdominal sonography. Transvaginal high-resolution ultrasound and three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound has been a great diagnostic tool for evaluation of three-dimensional structure of fetal central nervous system (CNS). This method has contributed to the prenatal assessment of congenital CNS anomalies, intracranial vascular anomalies and acquired brain damage in utero. It is possible to observe the whole brain structure by magnetic resonance imaging in the post half of pregnancy but transvaginal high-resolution 3D ultrasound is certainly powerful modality as well for understanding brain anatomy. Longitudinally and carefully evaluation of neurological short- or long-term prognosis should be required according to precise prenatal diagnosis, for proper counseling and management based on precise evidence.

  18. Congenital joint laxity and dwarfism: A feed-associated congenital anomaly of beef calves in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ribble, Carl S.; Janzen, Eugene D.; Proulx, Julien G.

    1989-01-01

    Five feeding trials were performed on three ranches to determine if a distinctive, recurring, congenital anomaly in beef calves was associated with feeding clover or grass silage without supplementation to pregnant cows overwinter. The anomaly, termed congenital joint laxity and dwarfism, was characterized at birth by generalized joint laxity, disproportionate dwarfism, and occasionally, superior brachygnathia. The anomaly had been documented for several consecutive years on these ranches and affected 2-46% of the calf crop. Pregnant cows were divided randomly into feeding groups, and the number of abnormal calves in each group was tabulated. Supplementation of the overwinter grass/clover silage diet with hay (2.5-4.5 kg/head/day) and rolled barley (0.75-1.5 kg/head/day) eliminated the problem. Supplementation of grain, without hay, was not as effective. Varying the proportions of grass and clover in the silage, and the age of the silage, did not alter the teratogenic potency of silage. Vitamin D3 supplementation did not reduce the risk of the condition. The definitive cause of congenital joint laxity and dwarfism was not determined. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:17423291

  19. Bartter syndrome type III and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract: an antenatal presentation.

    PubMed

    Westland, Rik; Hack, Wilfried W; van der Horst, Henricus J R; Uittenbogaard, Lukas B; van Hagen, Johanna M; van der Valk, Paul; Kamsteeg, Erik J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; van Wijk, Joanna A E

    2012-12-01

    Bartter syndrome encompasses a variety of inheritable renal tubular transport disorders characterized by hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome Type III is caused by genetic alterations in the chloride channel kidney B (CLCNKB) gene and often presents in the first 2 years of life, known as classic Bartter syndrome. However, in rare cases Bartter syndrome Type III has an antenatal presentation with polyhydramnios, premature delivery and severe dehydration in the first weeks of life. Associations between congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract and Bartter syndrome are extremely rare. This case report presents a girl with Bartter syndrome Type III due to a homozygous CLCNKB mutation and bilateral congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. In addition, we describe the antenatal presentation as well as its perinatal management.

  20. Congenital anomalies in the teratological collection of Museum Vrolik in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. II: Skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Oostra, R J; Baljet, B; Dijkstra, P F; Hennekam, R C

    1998-05-01

    The Museum Vrolik collection of the Department of Anatomy and Embryology of the University of Amsterdam, founded by Gerardus Vrolik (1775-1859) and his son Willem Vrolik (1801-1863), consists of more than five thousand specimens of human and animal anatomy, embryology, pathology, and congenital anomalies. Recently, the collection of congenital anomalies was recatalogued and redescribed according to contempory syndromological views. The original descriptions, as far as preserved, were compared with the clinical and radiographical findings. In 18 specimens the following skeletal dysplasias were diagnosed: achondrogenesis, achondroplasia, Blomstrand chondrodysplasia, Majewski syndrome, osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, osteogenesis imperfecta type I, osteogenesis imperfecta type II, and thanatophoric dysplasia with and without cloverleaf skull. Radiography did not yield a diagnosis in 4 specimens. The use of additional diagnostical techniques, such as MRI and CT scanning and fluorescence in situ hybridization in these specimens, is currently being investigated. PMID:9605285

  1. [Frequency of congenital anomalies in cattle: results from the practice in comparison with literature].

    PubMed

    Bähr, C; Distl, O

    2005-04-01

    The study gives a short survey of the literature of frequently observed congenital anomalies in cattle and refers to data on cases of congenital anomalies registered in a veterinary practice over a period of 8 years and in an AI (artificial insemination) station of the Rinder-Union West (RUW) during 4 years. The frequency of congenital anomalies was estimated at 0.013% in the area of the RUW. In the veterinary practice a frequency of 0.51% was found. The most prevalent anomalies were seen in legs (39% in the veterinary practice and 21% in RUW) followed by congenital anomalies of the spine (9% in the veterinary practice and 17% in RUW). Arthrogryposes were most frequent among the anomalies of the legs with 65% (veterinary practice) and 39% (RUW), respectively, of all cases of registered leg anomalies in the respective area. Umbilical hernia and atresia of segments of the intestinum were seen in 8-30% of all registered cases. The frequency of congenital anomalies differed not significantly among paternal half sib groups. A questionnaire was proposed for the registration of congenital anomalies in progeny tests of AI bulls. A series of photographs showing the most prevalent congenital anomalies is supporting the registration form. PMID:15900680

  2. Use of Special Education Services among Children With and without Congenital Gastrointestinal Anomalies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamrick, Shannon E. G.; Strickland, Matthew J.; Shapira, Stuart K.; Autry, Andrew; Schendel, Diana

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between congenital gastrointestinal anomalies requiring neonatal surgery and neurodevelopmental outcome. Among the children born in metropolitan Atlanta during 1982-2001 who survived to age 1 year (N = 762,824), we identified children with congenital gastrointestinal anomalies via linkage with the…

  3. Novel interstitial 2.6 Mb deletion on 9q21 associated with multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Pua, Heather H; Krishnamurthi, Swetha; Farrell, Jessica; Margeta, Marta; Ursell, Philip C; Powers, Martin; Slavotinek, Anne M; Jeng, Linda J B

    2014-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is now commonly used to identify copy number changes in individuals with developmental delay, intellectual disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, and/or multiple congenital anomalies. We report on an infant with multiple congenital anomalies and a novel 2.6 Mb interstitial deletion within 9q21.32q21.33 detected by aCGH. Her clinical presentation included dysmorphic craniofacial features, cleft palate, atrial septal defect, bicornuate uterus, bilateral hip dislocation, hypotonia, and recurrent pneumonia. Parental aCGH studies were negative for copy loss in this region. To our knowledge, no similar deletions have been reported in available databases or published literature. This deletion encompasses 12 genes, and prediction algorithms as well as experimental data suggest that a subset is likely to be haploinsufficient. Included are a neurotrophin receptor (NKG2D), a gene implicated in cilia function (KIF27), an adaptor protein important for ubiquitin-dependent protein quality control (UBQLN1), a gene important for transcription and signaling (HNRNPK), and a gene involved in maintaining genomic stability (RMI1). Identifying additional patients with similar copy losses and further study of these genes will contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of multiple congenital anomalies. PMID:24501764

  4. De novo mutations in congenital heart disease with neurodevelopmental and other congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Homsy, Jason; Zaidi, Samir; Shen, Yufeng; Ware, James S; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Karczewski, Konrad J; DePalma, Steven R; McKean, David; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Josh; Jin, Sheng Chih; Deanfield, John; Giardini, Alessandro; Porter, George A; Kim, Richard; Bilguvar, Kaya; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Tikhonova, Irina; Mane, Shrikant; Romano-Adesman, Angela; Qi, Hongjian; Vardarajan, Badri; Ma, Lijiang; Daly, Mark; Roberts, Amy E; Russell, Mark W; Mital, Seema; Newburger, Jane W; Gaynor, J William; Breitbart, Roger E; Iossifov, Ivan; Ronemus, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Kaltman, Jonathan R; Seidman, Jonathan G; Brueckner, Martina; Gelb, Bruce D; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Lifton, Richard P; Seidman, Christine E; Chung, Wendy K

    2015-12-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) patients have an increased prevalence of extracardiac congenital anomalies (CAs) and risk of neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDDs). Exome sequencing of 1213 CHD parent-offspring trios identified an excess of protein-damaging de novo mutations, especially in genes highly expressed in the developing heart and brain. These mutations accounted for 20% of patients with CHD, NDD, and CA but only 2% of patients with isolated CHD. Mutations altered genes involved in morphogenesis, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation, including multiple mutations in RBFOX2, a regulator of mRNA splicing. Genes mutated in other cohorts examined for NDD were enriched in CHD cases, particularly those with coexisting NDD. These findings reveal shared genetic contributions to CHD, NDD, and CA and provide opportunities for improved prognostic assessment and early therapeutic intervention in CHD patients.

  5. A study of associated congenital anomalies with biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Lucky; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose: This study aims to analyze the incidence and type of various associated anomalies among infants with extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA), compare their frequency with those quoted in the existing literature and assess their role in the overall management. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 137 infants who underwent the Kasai procedure for EHBA during the past 12 years. The medical records were reviewed for the incidence and type of associated anomalies in addition to the details of the management of the EHBA. Results: Of the137 infants, 40 (29.2%) were diagnosed as having 58 anomalies. The majority of patients had presented in the 3rd month of life; mean age was 81 ± 33 days (range = 20-150 days). There were 32 males and 8 females; boys with EHBA had a higher incidence of associated anomalies. Of these 40 patients, 22 (37.9%) had vascular anomalies, 13 patients (22.4%) had hernias (umbilical-10, inguinal-3), 7 patients (12.1%) had intestinal malrotation, 4 patients (6.8%) had choledochal cyst, 1 patient (1.7%) had Meckel's diverticulum, 3 patients (5%) had undergone prior treatment for jejunoileal atresias (jejunal-2, ileal-1), 2 patients (3.4%) had undergone prior treatment for esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula, 2 patients (3.4%) had spleniculi, and 2 patients (3.4%) were diagnosed as having situs inversus. Conclusions: The most common associated anomalies in our study were related to the vascular variation at the porta hepatis and the digestive system. The existence of anomalies in distantly developing anatomic regions in patients with EHBA supports the possibility of a “generalized” insult during embryogenesis rather than a “localized” defect. In addition, male infants were observed to have significantly more associated anomalies as compared with the female infants in contrast to earlier reports. PMID:26862288

  6. Epidemiological Risk Factors and Perinatal Outcomes of Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Lissa Fernandes Garcia; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Crott, Gerson Claudio; Okido, Marcos Masaru; Berezowski, Aderson Tadeu; Duarte, Geraldo; Marcolin, Alessandra Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Objectives To identify the epidemiological risk factors for congenital anomalies (CAs) and the impact of these fetal malformations on the perinatal outcomes. Methods This prospective cohort study comprised 275 women whose fetuses had CAs. Maternal variables to establish potential risk factors for each group of CA and perinatal outcomes were evaluated. The primary outcome was CA. Secondary outcomes included: fetal growth restriction (FGR); fetal distress (FD); premature rupture of membranes (PROM); oligohydramnios or polyhydramnios; preterm delivery (PTD); stillbirth; cesarean section; low birth weight; Apgar score < 7 at the 1st and 5th minutes; need for assisted ventilation at birth; neonatal infection; need for surgical treatment; early neonatal death; and hospitalization time. Chi-square (χ(2)) test and multilevel regression analysis were applied to compare the groups and determine the effects of maternal characteristics on the incidence of CAs. Results The general prevalence of CAs was of 2.4%. Several maternal characteristics were associated to CAs, such as: age; skin color; level of education; parity; folic acid supplementation; tobacco use; and history of previous miscarriage. There were no significant differences among the CA groups in relation to FGR, FD, PROM, 1-minute Apgar score > 7, and need for assisted ventilation at birth. On the other hand, the prevalence of the other considered outcomes varied significantly among groups. Preterm delivery was significantly more frequent in gastrointestinal tract/abdominal wall defects. The stillbirth rate was increased in all CAs, mainly in isolated fetal hydrops (odds ratio [OR]: 27.13; 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 2.90-253.47). Hospitalization time was higher for the urinary tract and congenital heart disease groups (p < 0.01). Neonatal death was significantly less frequent in the central nervous system anomalies group. Conclusion It was possible to identify several risk factors for CAs

  7. [Congenital anomalies of coronary artery origin: a diagnostic challenge].

    PubMed

    Iñiguez Romo, A; Macaya Miquel, C; Alfonso Monterola, F; San Román Calvar, J A; Goikolea Ruiz-Gómez, J; Zarco Gutiérrez, P

    1991-03-01

    From a series of 4,313 consecutive patients who underwent a diagnostic coronary angiogram, 16 (0.37%) presented a congenital anomalous origin of the coronary arteries. None of these patients had other congenital cardiac anomalies associated. Age was 57 +/- 9 years and 13 (81%) were male. The diagnostic catheterization was performed for unstable angina in 8 patients (50%), for stable angina in five (32%), for dyspnea in two and for atypical chest pain in the remaining patient. A previous myocardial infarction was present in 6 patients (37%) whereas one patient had apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We observed absence of coronary lesions in 4 patients and severe coronary stenosis lesions in 12 patients (75%), five of those with lesions located in the anomalous vessel. The most frequent abnormality found was an anomalous origin of left circumflex coronary artery in 8 cases (50%), followed by an abnormal origin of the right coronary artery in 5 cases (31%), and an abnormal origin of the left coronary tree in 3 cases (19%) (left anterior descending coronary artery arising from the right coronary artery, a single coronary artery which originated in the left coronary sinus, and a left main coronary artery which originated in the noncoronary sinus). The relationship of the anomalous coronary artery to the great vessels was the following: A retro-aortic course in 11 patient (69%), by the anterior free wall in two (12.5%), interarterial in two (12.5%), and septal in one (6%). Finally, as an index of the difficulty to visualize the anomalous coronary artery, an unusual catheter was needed in six (37%) of the diagnostic procedures to reach the target vessel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Impact of pre-pregnancy diabetes mellitus on congenital anomalies, Canada, 2002–2012

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S.; Rouleau, J.; León, J. A.; Sauve, R.; Joseph, K. S.; Ray, J. G.; System, Canadian Perinatal Surveillance

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To examine the impact of pre-pregnancy diabetes mellitus (DM) on the population birth prevalence of congenital anomalies in Canada. Methods: We carried out a population-based study of all women who delivered in Canadian hospitals (except those in the province of Quebec) between April 2002 and March 2013 and their live-born infants with a birth weight of 500 grams or more and/or a gestational age of 22 weeks or more. Pre-pregnancy type 1 or type 2 DM was identified using ICD-10 diagnostic codes. The association between DM and all congenital anomalies as well as specific congenital anomaly categories was estimated using adjusted odds ratios; the impact was calculated as a population attributable risk percent (PAR%). Results: There were 118 892 infants with a congenital anomaly among 2 839 680 live births (41.9 per 1000). While the prevalence of any congenital anomaly declined from 50.7 per 1000 live births in 2002/03 to 41.5 per 1000 in 2012/13, the corresponding PAR% for a congenital anomaly related to pre-pregnancy DM rose from 0.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.4–0.8) to 1.2% (95% CI: 0.9–1.4). Specifically, the PAR% for congenital cardiovascular defects increased from 2.3% (95% CI: 1.7–2.9) to 4.2% (95% CI: 3.5–4.9) and for gastrointestinal defects from 0.8% (95% CI: 0.2–1.9) to 1.4% (95% CI: 0.7–2.6) over the study period. Conclusion: Although there has been a relative decline in the prevalence of congenital anomalies in Canada, the proportion of congenital anomalies due to maternal pre-pregnancy DM has increased. Enhancement of preconception care initiatives for women with DM is recommended. PMID:26186019

  9. ZIKA VIRUS INFECTION; VERTICAL TRANSMISSION AND FOETAL CONGENITAL ANOMALIES.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Aziz-un-Nisa

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to flaviviridae family that includes Dengue, West Nile, and Yellow Fever among others. Zika virus was first discovered in 1947 in Zika forest of Uganda. It is a vector borne disease, which has been sporadically reported mostly from Africa, Pacific islands and Southeast Asia since its discovery. ZIKV infection presents as a mild illness with symptoms lasting for several days to a week after the bite of an infected mosquito. Majority of the patients have low grade fever, rash, headaches, joints pain, myalgia, and flu like symptoms. Pregnant women are more vulnerable to ZIKV infection and serious congenital anomalies can occur in foetus through trans-placental transmission. The gestation at which infection is acquired is important. Zika virus infection acquired in early pregnancy poses greater risk. There is no evidence so far about transmission through breast milk. Foetal microcephaly, Gillian Barre syndrome and other neurological and autoimmune syndromes have been reported in areas where Zika outbreaks have occurred. As infection is usually very mild no specific treatment is required. Pregnant women may be advised to take rest, get plenty of fluids. For fever and pain they can take antipyretics like paracetamol. So far no specific drugs or vaccines are available against Zika Virus Infection so prevention is the mainstay against this diseases. As ZIKV infection is a vector borne disease, prevention can be a multi-pronged strategy. These entail vector control interventions, personal protection, environmental sanitation and health education among others.

  10. ZIKA VIRUS INFECTION; VERTICAL TRANSMISSION AND FOETAL CONGENITAL ANOMALIES.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Aziz-un-Nisa

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to flaviviridae family that includes Dengue, West Nile, and Yellow Fever among others. Zika virus was first discovered in 1947 in Zika forest of Uganda. It is a vector borne disease, which has been sporadically reported mostly from Africa, Pacific islands and Southeast Asia since its discovery. ZIKV infection presents as a mild illness with symptoms lasting for several days to a week after the bite of an infected mosquito. Majority of the patients have low grade fever, rash, headaches, joints pain, myalgia, and flu like symptoms. Pregnant women are more vulnerable to ZIKV infection and serious congenital anomalies can occur in foetus through trans-placental transmission. The gestation at which infection is acquired is important. Zika virus infection acquired in early pregnancy poses greater risk. There is no evidence so far about transmission through breast milk. Foetal microcephaly, Gillian Barre syndrome and other neurological and autoimmune syndromes have been reported in areas where Zika outbreaks have occurred. As infection is usually very mild no specific treatment is required. Pregnant women may be advised to take rest, get plenty of fluids. For fever and pain they can take antipyretics like paracetamol. So far no specific drugs or vaccines are available against Zika Virus Infection so prevention is the mainstay against this diseases. As ZIKV infection is a vector borne disease, prevention can be a multi-pronged strategy. These entail vector control interventions, personal protection, environmental sanitation and health education among others. PMID:27323550

  11. Chlorination Disinfection By-Products and Risk of Congenital Anomalies in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Toledano, Mireille B.; Bennett, James; Best, Nicky; Hambly, Peter; de Hoogh, Cornelis; Wellesley, Diana; Boyd, Patricia A.; Abramsky, Lenore; Dattani, Nirupa; Fawell, John; Briggs, David; Jarup, Lars; Elliott, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background Increased risk of various congenital anomalies has been reported to be associated with trihalomethane (THM) exposure in the water supply. Objectives We conducted a registry-based study to determine the relationship between THM concentrations and the risk of congenital anomalies in England and Wales. Methods We obtained congenital anomaly data from the National Congenital Anomalies System, regional registries, and the national terminations registry; THM data were obtained from water companies. Total THM (< 30, 30 to < 60, ≥60 μg/L), total brominated exposure (< 10, 10 to < 20, ≥20 μg/L), and bromoform exposure (< 2, 2 to < 4, ≥4 μg/L) were modeled at the place of residence for the first trimester of pregnancy. We included 2,605,226 live births, stillbirths, and terminations with 22,828 cases of congenital anomalies. Analyses using fixed- and random-effects models were performed for broadly defined groups of anomalies (cleft palate/lip, abdominal wall, major cardiac, neural tube, urinary and respiratory defects), a more restricted set of anomalies with better ascertainment, and for isolated and multiple anomalies. Data were adjusted for sex, maternal age, and socioeconomic status. Results We found no statistically significant trends across exposure categories for either the broadly defined or more restricted sets of anomalies. For the restricted set of anomalies with isolated defects, there were significant (p < 0.05) excess risks in the high-exposure categories of total THMs for ventricular septal defects [odds ratio (OR) = 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00–2.04] and of bromoform for major cardiovascular defects and gastroschisis (OR = 1.18; 95% CI, 1.00–1.39; and OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.00–1.92, respectively). Conclusion In this large national study we found little evidence for a relationship between THM concentrations in drinking water and risk of congenital anomalies. PMID:18288321

  12. Congenital anomaly of combined atlas-odontoid process fusion and bipartite atlas.

    PubMed

    Gil, Jea Ryoung; Kim, Wan Tae; Seo, Min Jeong

    2015-12-01

    Congenital fusion of the atlas with the odontoid process of the axis is a very rare condition caused by a segmental defect of the first cervical somite. Only 9 such cases have been reported in the literature to date. The bipartite atlas, another well-documented rare anomaly, has been observed in only 0.1% of the general population. We describe the first case of a 70-year-old male with both of these complex congenital anomalies.

  13. Clinical and Imaging Features of a Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft in a Neonate: A Rare Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Pritish; Ibrahim, Zachary; Amodio, John

    2015-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft (CMCC) is a rare congenital anomaly. CMCC and its complications and treatment have been well described in ENT, dermatology, and pediatric surgery literature. However, to our knowledge, the imaging work-up has not been reported in the literature thus far. We present a case of CMCC in a neonate with description of clinical presentation and imaging features. PMID:26078904

  14. [Frequency of congenital anomalies at the Instituto Materno Infantil, Bogota, Colombia].

    PubMed

    García, Herbert; Salguero, Gustavo Andrés; Moreno, Jeffer; Arteaga, Clara; Giraldo, Alejandro

    2003-06-01

    At the Instituto Materno Infantil (IMI) in Bogotá (Colombia), 5,686 births (5,597 live births and 89 stillbirths) were analyzed during two periods: from October, 1997, to April, 1998, and from July to November, 2000 (12 months). Congenital anomalies were detected in 4.4% of live newborn babies and in 7.8% of stillbirths. Major anomalies corresponded to 69% and mild anomalies to 31% (3% and 1.4% of all live births, respectively). The newborn babies with major anomalies, in comparison to the normal controls, had higher mortality at hospital discharge (p = 0.0001), lower average birth weight (p = 0.003), and family history of congenital anomalies (p = 0.0001). The only significant association for mild anomalies was with family history of congenital anomalies (p = 0.0001). The frequency of congenital anomalies was similar to that in other studies, although certain kinds of anomalies showed noticeable frequency differences. This may be a consequence of differences in record keeping or in detection methods.

  15. Prevalence of congenital eye anomalies in a paediatric clinic in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ilechie, A A; Essuman, V A; Enyionam, S

    2014-01-09

    There is little information about the epidemiology of congenital eye anomalies in Ghana. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 485 admissions to the paediatric eye centre of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana (2004-2009) and 263 were diagnosed with at least one anomaly. Visual acuity was quantitatively assessed in 209 patients and 130 had some visual impairment; 49 with bilateral and 64 with unilateral blindness. The most frequent congenital anomaly overall was cataract (n = 44). In infants, cataract was the most frequent finding (28/121). Toddlers most frequently presented with retinoblastoma (10/65). Glaucoma was the most frequent anomaly in preschool (9/39) and school (10/38) children. We conclude that avoidable causes of childhood blindness caused most congenital eye anomalies. Intensification of community-based health promotion and preventive eye care, early detection and provision of adequate resources for effective therapy could reverse these trends.

  16. [Characteristics of ischemic stroke in patients with congenital anomalies of the circle of Willis].

    PubMed

    Popova, E N; Vishniakova, M V; Maratkanova, T V; Sherman, L A; Kotov, S V; Isakova, E V

    2011-01-01

    The study included 76 patients with ischemic stroke in the carotid system (56 patients) and in the vertebrobasilar system (20 patients). The magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed congenital anomalies of Willis circle in 31 patients. These anomalies were stratified as follows: back trifurcation of the internal carotid artery (ICA) (19 patients), anterior trifurcation of the ICA (4 patients), the combination of anterior trifurcation of the one of ICA and posterior trifurcation of the other ICA (4 patients), double back trifurcation of ICA (2 patients), the normal structure of the circle of Willis (45 patients). Patients with anomalies of the circle of Willis scored significantly higher on the Neurological deficit scale NIH-NINDS. Despite the lack of significant differences in the size of lesions in 2 groups, the foci in patients with the abnormalities of the circle of Willis were frequently localized in adjacent blood supply zones. The signs of vascular encephalopathy were seen as well. The data obtained suggest that the presence of anomalies in the circle of Willis is a risk factor, together with in the additional adversities, including iatrogenic factor, for the development of hemodynamic ischemic stroke.

  17. [Environmental and hygienic aspects of the prevalence of congenital anomalies in Primorskiĭ territory].

    PubMed

    Kiku, P F; Voronin, S V; Gel'tser, B I; Anan'ev, V Iu

    2011-01-01

    The authors have conducted an environmental and hygienic evaluation of the prevalence of congenital anomalies in the Primorye Territory. It has been found that there is a considerable rise in congenital anomalies in children and adolescents, which is predicted for the coming 5 years. The prevalence of congenital anomalies in the region depends on the bioclimatic zone and environmental situation. The highest incidence of the pathology is observed in the children living in the coastal bioclimatic zone and in the adolescents in the critical environmental areas of the continental bioclimatic zone. A combination of sanitary-and-hygienic and natural climatic factors was found to influence the incidence of congenital malformations differently. The sanitary-and-hygienic parameters of an inhabitancy play a leading role (44.5-63.1%).

  18. Clinical findings in children with congenital anomalies and misoprostol intrauterine exposure: a study of 38 cases

    PubMed Central

    Vendramini-Pittoli, Siulan; Guion-Almeida, Maria L.; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Santos, Juliana M.; Kokitsu-Nakata, Nancy M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical findings of 38 children with congenital anomalies and misoprostol intrauterine exposure. This study included 38 cases, ascertained from case series of the Hospital of Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies from University of São Paulo, with evidence of intrauterine exposure to misoprostol in the first trimester of the pregnancy. Information about misoprostol intake and drug administration route was obtained through interviews with mothers. Clinical evaluation showed 18 individuals with facial phenotype compatible with Moebius syndrome; 11 individuals with multiple congenital anomalies; and nine individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate. This study showed a widening of the phenotypic spectrum associated with misoprostol embryotoxicity.

  19. Clinical findings in children with congenital anomalies and misoprostol intrauterine exposure: a study of 38 cases.

    PubMed

    Vendramini-Pittoli, Siulan; Guion-Almeida, Maria L; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Santos, Juliana M; Kokitsu-Nakata, Nancy M

    2013-12-01

    The authors describe the clinical findings of 38 children with congenital anomalies and misoprostol intrauterine exposure. This study included 38 cases, ascertained from case series of the Hospital of Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies from University of São Paulo, with evidence of intrauterine exposure to misoprostol in the first trimester of the pregnancy. Information about misoprostol intake and drug administration route was obtained through interviews with mothers. Clinical evaluation showed 18 individuals with facial phenotype compatible with Moebius syndrome; 11 individuals with multiple congenital anomalies; and nine individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate. This study showed a widening of the phenotypic spectrum associated with misoprostol embryotoxicity. PMID:27625856

  20. Congenital anomalies of kidney and upper urinary tract in children with congenital hypothyroidism; a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Rafeie, Mohammad; Sharafkhah, Mojtaba; Safi, Fatemeh; Amiri, Mohammad; Ebrahimimonfared, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) may be significantly associated with congenital malformations. However, there is little evidence on the relationship between renal and urinary tract anomalies and CH. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the renal and upper urinary tract anomalies in children with and without primary CH (PCH). Patients and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 200 children aged 3 months to 1 year, referring to Amir-Kabir hospital, Arak, Iran. One hundred children with PCH, as the case group, and 100 children without CH, as the control group, were selected. For all children, ultrasonography and other diagnostic measures (if necessary) were performed to evaluate renal and upper urinary tract anomalies (ureter and bladder). Results: The frequency of renal and upper urinary tract anomalies among 43 children with primary CH, with 83 cases (72.8%), was significantly higher than the frequency of anomalies among the 19 children in the control group, with 31 cases (27.1%) (OR = 3; CI 95%: 1.6-5.4; P = 0.001). Among the anomalies studied, only the differences in frequency of uretero-pelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) (OR = 6; CI 95%: 1.3-28; P = 0.018) and hydronephrosis (OR = 22; CI 95%: 5-95; P = 0.001) was significant between the two groups. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that PCH is significantly associated with the frequency of congenital anomalies of the kidneys and upper urinary tracts. However, further studies are recommended to determine the necessity of conducting screening programs for anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract in children with CH at birth. PMID:26693499

  1. Assessment of congenital anomalies in infants born to pregnant women enrolled in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Sonja A; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Sahin, Leyla; Petrie, Carey R; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M; Frey, Sharon E; Mason, Robin M; Nesin, Mirjana; Carey, John C

    2014-12-15

    In 2011 and 2012, the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, held a series of meetings to provide guidance to investigators regarding study design of clinical trials of vaccines and antimicrobial medications that enroll pregnant women. Assessment of congenital anomalies among infants born to women enrolled in these trials was recognized as a challenging issue, and a workgroup with expertise in epidemiology, pediatrics, genetics, dysmorphology, clinical trials, and infectious diseases was formed to address this issue. The workgroup considered 3 approaches for congenital anomalies assessment that have been developed for use in other studies: (1) maternal report combined with medical records review, (2) standardized photographic assessment and physical examination by a health professional who has received specific training in congenital anomalies, and (3) standardized physical examination by a trained dysmorphologist (combined with maternal interview and medical records review). The strengths and limitations of these approaches were discussed with regard to their use in clinical trials. None of the approaches was deemed appropriate for use in all clinical trials. Instead, the workgroup acknowledged that decisions regarding the optimal method of assessment of congenital anomalies will likely vary depending on the clinical trial, its setting, and the agent under study; in some cases, a combination of approaches may be appropriate. The workgroup recognized the need for more research on approaches to the assessment of congenital anomalies to better guide investigators in optimal design of clinical trials that enroll pregnant women.

  2. Assessment of Congenital Anomalies in Infants Born to Pregnant Women Enrolled in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A.; Sahin, Leyla; Petrie, Carey R.; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M.; Frey, Sharon E.; Mason, Robin M.; Nesin, Mirjana; Carey, John C.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011 and 2012, the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, held a series of meetings to provide guidance to investigators regarding study design of clinical trials of vaccines and antimicrobial medications that enroll pregnant women. Assessment of congenital anomalies among infants born to women enrolled in these trials was recognized as a challenging issue, and a workgroup with expertise in epidemiology, pediatrics, genetics, dysmorphology, clinical trials, and infectious diseases was formed to address this issue. The workgroup considered 3 approaches for congenital anomalies assessment that have been developed for use in other studies: (1) maternal report combined with medical records review, (2) standardized photographic assessment and physical examination by a health professional who has received specific training in congenital anomalies, and (3) standardized physical examination by a trained dysmorphologist (combined with maternal interview and medical records review). The strengths and limitations of these approaches were discussed with regard to their use in clinical trials. None of the approaches was deemed appropriate for use in all clinical trials. Instead, the workgroup acknowledged that decisions regarding the optimal method of assessment of congenital anomalies will likely vary depending on the clinical trial, its setting, and the agent under study; in some cases, a combination of approaches may be appropriate. The workgroup recognized the need for more research on approaches to the assessment of congenital anomalies to better guide investigators in optimal design of clinical trials that enroll pregnant women. PMID:25425721

  3. Application of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization in Newborns with Multiple Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Nowakowska, Beata; Sobecka, Katarzyna; Smyk, Marta; Castaneda, Jennifer; Klapecki, Jakub; Kutkowska-Kaźmierczak, Anna; Śmigiel, Robert; Bocian, Ewa; Radkowski, Marek; Demkow, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Major congenital anomalies are detectable in 2-3 % of the newborn population. Some of their genetic causes are attributable to copy number variations identified by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). The value of aCGH screening as a first-tier test in children with multiple congenital anomalies has been studied and consensus adopted. However, array resolution has not been agreed upon, specifically in the newborn or infant population. Moreover, most array studies have been focused on mixed populations of intellectual disability/developmental delay with or without multiple congenital anomalies, making it difficult to assess the value of microarrays in newborns. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal quality and clinical sensitivity of high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization in neonates with multiple congenital anomalies. We investigated a group of 54 newborns with multiple congenital anomalies defined as two or more birth defects from more than one organ system. Cytogenetic studies were performed using OGT CytoSure 8 × 60 K microarray. We found ten rearrangements in ten newborns. Of these, one recurrent syndromic microduplication was observed, whereas all other changes were unique. Six rearrangements were definitely pathogenic, including one submicroscopic and five that could be seen on routine karyotype analysis. Four other copy number variants were likely pathogenic. The candidate genes that may explain the phenotype were discussed. In conclusion, high-resolution array comparative hybridization can be applied successfully in newborns with multiple congenital anomalies as the method detects a significant number of pathogenic changes, resulting in early diagnoses. We hypothesize that small changes previously considered benign or even inherited rearrangements should be classified as potentially pathogenic at least until a subsequent clinical assessment would exclude a developmental delay or dysmorphism. PMID:26987320

  4. Stillbirth Risk Among Fetuses With Ultrasound-Detected Isolated Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Heather A.; Odibo, Anthony O.; Dicke, Jeffrey M.; Shanks, Anthony L.; Macones, George A.; Cahill, Alison G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the risk of stillbirth among pregnancies complicated by a major isolated congenital anomaly detected by antenatal ultrasound, and the influence of incidental growth restriction. Methods A retrospective cohort study of all consecutive singleton pregnancies undergoing routine anatomic survey between 1990 and 2009 was performed. Stillbirth rates among fetuses with an ultrasound-detected isolated major congenital anomaly were compared to fetuses without major anomalies. Stillbirth rates were calculated per 1,000 ongoing pregnancies. Exclusion criteria included delivery prior to 24 weeks of gestation, multiple fetal anomalies, minor anomalies and chromosomal abnormalities. Analyses were stratified by gestational age at delivery (prior to 32 weeks vs. 32 weeks of gestation or after) and birth weight less than the 10th percentile. We adjusted for confounders using logistic regression. Results Among 65,308 singleton pregnancies delivered at 24 weeks of gestation or after, 873 pregnancies with an isolated major congenital anomaly (1.3%) were identified. The overall stillbirth rate among fetuses with a major anomaly was 55/1,000 compared to 4/1,000 in nonanomalous fetuses (aOR 15.17, 95% CI 11.03–20.86). Stillbirth risk in anomalous fetuses was similar prior to 32 weeks of gestation (26/1,000) and 32 weeks of gestation or after (31/1,000). Among growth-restricted fetuses, the stillbirth rate increased among anomalous (127/1,000) and nonanomalous fetuses (18/1,000), and congenital anomalies remained associated with higher rates of stillbirth (aOR 8.20, 95% CI 5.27–12.74). Conclusion The stillbirth rate is increased in anomalous fetuses regardless of incidental growth restriction. These risks can assist practitioners designing care plans for anomalous fetuses who have elevated and competing risks of stillbirth and neonatal death. PMID:24901272

  5. [Treatment strategy for patients with extracardiac structural anomalies and congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Arata

    2011-07-01

    The surgical treatment of patients with extracardiac structural anomalies and congenital heart disease often carries major risk and remains a challenging field. An appropriate, solid treatment plan should be developed during the early phase with interactive intelligence sharing between a pediatric surgery team and congenital heart surgery team. As the top of the chain of command, the role of a neonatologist is important. This article reviews the history of surgery for congenital heart disease and the progress of the Japan Congenital Cardiovascular Surgery Database. Finally, as an example of a combination of diseases, the clinical course and intelligence sharing during treatment of a patient with biliary atresia requiring living-donor liver transplantation and hypoplastic left heart syndrome is reported. The National Quality Forum provided structural measures, process measures, and outcome measures for congenital heart surgery. Structural measures provided by the National Quality Forum included participation in a preoperative multidisciplinary conference. To improve the outcome of surgical treatment of patients with congenital heart disease and extracardiac structural anomalies, the importance of a preoperative multidisciplinary conference involving not only pediatric surgeons, pediatric cardiologists, and pediatric cardiac surgeons but also neonatologists, anesthesiologists, and nurses cannot be overemphasized.

  6. Study of the association between the incidences of congenital anomalies and hydrocephalus in Sudanese fetuses.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mustafa Z; Dinar, Hussien A; Abdulla, Alsafi A; Babikir, Esameldeen; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim

    2014-04-27

    This study was designed with an aim to detect the congenital anomalies appear to be linked to and in conjunction with hydrocephalus fetuses in Sudan, when ultrasound is used to exam fetuses in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. This prospective cohort study was performed from December 2011 to December 2013, in a group consists of 5000 single gestation pregnant Sudanese women. In all cases, maternal ages were 35 years up to 48 years; mean age of 42.5 years. Pelvic; obstetric ultrasound scanning protocol used should meet the standards established by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) for scanning in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to analyze the results. Diagnosed hydrocephalus cases (0.4%) were found to be associated with other fetal anomalies as aqueduct stenosis (45%), spina bifida (30%), Arnold-Chiari malformation (20%) and Dandy-Walker malformation (5%). The incidence of congenital anomalies and hydrocephalus in Sudanese fetuses showed considerable variation among different regions of Sudan. Hydrocephalus is associated with certain congenital anomalies. In agreement with previous studies, hydrocephalus is predominantly in male rather than female fetuses. The prevalence of fetal anomalies and hydrocephalus are within previously reported ranges.

  7. Study of the Association between the Incidences of Congenital Anomalies and Hydrocephalus in Sudanese Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Mustafa Z.; Dinar, Hussien A.; Abdulla, Alsafi A.; Babikir, Esameldeen; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed with an aim to detect the congenital anomalies appear to be linked to and in conjunction with hydrocephalus fetuses in Sudan, when ultrasound is used to exam fetuses in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. This prospective cohort study was performed from December 2011 to December 2013, in a group consists of 5000 single gestation pregnant Sudanese women. In all cases, maternal ages were 35 years up to 48 years; mean age of 42.5 years. Pelvic; obstetric ultrasound scanning protocol used should meet the standards established by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) for scanning in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to analyze the results. Diagnosed hydrocephalus cases (0.4%) were found to be associated with other fetal anomalies as aqueduct stenosis (45%), spina bifida (30%), Arnold-Chiari malformation (20%) and Dandy-Walker malformation (5%). The incidence of congenital anomalies and hydrocephalus in Sudanese fetuses showed considerable variation among different regions of Sudan. Hydrocephalus is associated with certain congenital anomalies. In agreement with previous studies, hydrocephalus is predominantly in male rather than female fetuses. The prevalence of fetal anomalies and hydrocephalus are within previously reported ranges. PMID:25168985

  8. Non-mosaic tetrasomy 9p in a liveborn infant with multiple congenital anomalies: Case report and comparison with trisomy 9p

    SciTech Connect

    Leichtman, L.G.; Zackowski, J.L.; Storto, P.D.; Newlin, A.

    1996-06-14

    Tetrasomy of the short(p) arm of chromosome 9 has been reported in few cases. Most of these children present with microbrachycephaly, wide forehead, hypertelorism, lowset, malformed ears, beaked noses, and micrognathia. Additional anomalies include short neck, congenital heart disease, genital abnormalities, multiple limb defects, hypotonia, and early death.

  9. [Cynocephali and Blemmyae. Congenital anomalies and medieval exotic races].

    PubMed

    Bos, C A; Baljet, B

    1999-12-18

    In the mediaeval Dutch manuscript Der naturen bloeme ('On the flowers of nature') by Jacob van Maerlant (circa 1230-circa 1296), an encyclopaedia of descriptions of people, animals, plants and minerals dating from about 1270, many illustrations refer to the text. An intriguing part of the book is called 'Vreemde volkeren' ('Exotic people'). In another manuscript of Van Maerlant, Dit is die istory van Troyen ('The history of Troyes') in the chapter 'De wonderen van het Verre Oosten' ('The miracles of the Far East') the exotic people are also described. These exotic people have many features similar to congenital malformations. 'Hippopodes' are probably based on the lobster claw syndrome, 'Cynocephali' on anencephaly, 'Arimaspi' on cyclopia, 'Blemmyae' on acardiacus, the double-faced on diprosopus, 'Sciopods' on polydactyly and 'Antipodes' on the sirenomelia sequence.

  10. Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

  11. Interstitial deletion of 8q21{yields}22 associated with minor anomalies, congenital heart defect, and Dandy-Walker variant

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, M.L.; Ryan, R.M.

    1995-03-13

    We describe an infant with a deletion of 8q21{yields}22 who had distinct clinical manifestations including minor facial anomalies, a congenital heart defect, a Dandy-Walker variant, and mild to moderate developmental delay. Her facial characteristics included small, wide-spaced eyes, asymmetric bilateral epicanthal folds, a broad nasal bridge, a {open_quotes}carp-shaped{close_quotes} mouth, micrognathia, and prominent, apparently low-set ears. Three other reports describe children with larger proximal deletions of 8q that include 8q21 and q22. These four children all have similar facial appearance. Of the others reported, one had a congenital heart defect and one had craniosynostosis. This case, in addition to the previously noted three cases, helps in delineating a recognizable syndrome. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Anomaly Detection In Additively Manufactured Parts Using Laser Doppler Vibrometery

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Carlos A.

    2015-09-29

    Additively manufactured parts are susceptible to non-uniform structure caused by the unique manufacturing process. This can lead to structural weakness or catastrophic failure. Using laser Doppler vibrometry and frequency response analysis, non-contact detection of anomalies in additively manufactured parts may be possible. Preliminary tests show promise for small scale detection, but more future work is necessary.

  13. Multidetector Computed Tomography for Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Vascular Rings.

    PubMed

    García-Guereta, Luis; García-Cerro, Estefanía; Bret-Zurita, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The development of multidetector computed tomography has triggered a revolution in the study of the aorta and other large vessels and has replaced angiography in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch, particularly vascular rings. The major advantage of multidetector computed tomography is that it permits clear 3-dimensional assessment of not only vascular structures, but also airway and esophageal compression. The current update aims to summarize the embryonic development of the aortic arch and the developmental anomalies leading to vascular ring formation and to discuss the current diagnostic and therapeutic role of multidetector computed tomography in this field.

  14. Reproductive impact of congenital Müllerian anomalies.

    PubMed

    Raga, F; Bauset, C; Remohi, J; Bonilla-Musoles, F; Simón, C; Pellicer, A

    1997-10-01

    This retrospective longitudinal study was undertaken in order to determine the incidence and reproductive impact of uterine malformations on women desiring to conceive during their reproductive years. A total of 3181 patients in whom the morphology of the uterus was ascertained by hysterosalpingography (HSG) and laparoscopy/laparotomy during the years 1980-1995 was included in the study. The population analysed included fertile, infertile and sterile patients. The overall frequency of uterine malformations was 4.0%. Infertile patients (6.3%) had a significantly (P < 0.05) higher incidence of Müllerian anomalies, in comparison with fertile (3.8%) and sterile (2.4%) women. Septate (33.6%) and arcuate (32.8%) uteri were the most common malformations observed. Each malformation was individually analysed in fertile and infertile patients, in order to ascertain its actual reproductive impact. The performance of the unicornuate and didelphys uteri was similar with a chance of having a living child of 37-40%. The reproductive potential of the bicornuate uterus showed a live birth rate of 62.5% and the septate uterus showed a live birth rate of 62%. In all these abnormalities, early miscarriages (25-38%) and preterm deliveries (25-47%) were quite common. The arcuate uterus presented a live birth rate of 82.7%. It is concluded that uterine anomalies are relatively frequent in fertile women, and more frequent in infertile patients. Nevertheless, fertile patients with normal reproductive performance do exist, and Müllerian defects can permit an absolutely normal obstetric outcome. The reproductive performance of the unicornuate and didelphys uteri was poor, while that of the septate and bicornuate uteri was better than expected. The arcuate uterus had no impact on reproduction.

  15. Novel cytogenetic and molecular techniques in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies in newborns.

    PubMed

    Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Śmigiel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of what causes developmental disorders, including congenital structural defects/anomalies, in the newborn population, facilitates the choice of further investigations, therapy and rehabilitation, allows the use of appropriate prophylaxis against comorbidities, makes it possible to specify prognosis, as well as provide reliable family counselling (both pre- and postnatal). Attempting to formulate a clinical diagnosis of a specific congenital anomaly syndrome, with or without dysmorphic features, based on history and detailed physical examination, remains crucial for the selection of the right genetic testing. Modern methods of molecular cytogenetics and molecular biology are targeted in nature (microdeletion MLPA, single gene sequencing) or are capable of analyzing the genome as a whole (array CGH, newgeneration sequencing). Especially the latter techniques are now causing a rapid increase of diagnostic efficacy across different age groups, including newborns.

  16. Novel compound heterozygous PIGT mutations caused multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 3.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Mitsuko; Kashii, Hirofumi; Murakami, Yoshiko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Kubota, Masaya; Kinoshita, Taroh; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-08-01

    Recessive mutations in genes of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor synthesis pathway have been demonstrated as causative of GPI deficiency disorders associated with intellectual disability, seizures, and diverse congenital anomalies. We performed whole exome sequencing in a patient with progressive encephalopathies and multiple dysmorphism with hypophosphatasia and identified novel compound heterozygous mutations, c.250G>T (p. Glu84*) and c.1342C>T (p. Arg488Trp), in PIGT encoding a subunit of the GPI transamidase complex. The surface expression of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on patient granulocytes was lower than that of healthy controls. Transfection of the Arg488Trp mutant PIGT construct, but not the Glu84* mutant, into PIGT-deficient cells partially restored the expression of GPI-APs DAF and CD59. These results indicate that PIGT mutations caused neurological impairment and multiple congenital anomalies in this patient.

  17. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomalies. What can and should be done?

    PubMed Central

    Langer, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomalies provides an opportunity to prepare and counsel parents. It can lead to pregnancy termination; to a change in timing, mode, or location of delivery; or, in some cases, to prenatal intervention. Families with an affected fetus are best managed by a cohesive medical team. This article outlines the principles used to manage these cases. Images Figures 1-3 Figures 4-5 PMID:8471905

  18. Non-occupational exposure to paint fumes during pregnancy and risk of congenital anomalies: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to organic solvents during the 1st trimester of pregnancy has been associated with congenital anomalies. Organic solvents are also used in the home environments in paint products, but no study has investigated the effect of such exposure in a general population. Methods We studied associations between residential exposure to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy and predefined subgroups of congenital anomalies, using data from the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC). During 2001 and 2003, a total of 20 103 pregnant women, enrolled in the DNBC, were interviewed in the 30th week of gestation about the use of paint in their residence during pregnancy. By the end of first trimester, information about smoking habits, alcohol consumption and occupation were collected. Information on congenital anomalies was obtained from national registers. Associations were examined by estimating odds ratios (OR) using logistic regression. Results In total 1404 women (7%) had been exposed to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy and 1086 children were diagnosed with congenital anomalies; 73 children with congenital anomalies had been exposed to paint fumes in utero. Exposure to paint fumes seemed positively associated with congenital anomalies of the nervous system (OR 2.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.76 to 6.32), ear, face and neck (OR 2.15, 95% CI 0.84 to 5.55) and the renal system (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.02 to 4.58) after adjustment for maternal age, smoking, alcohol consumption and occupational solvent exposure. Congenital anomalies in the remaining subgroups were not associated with the exposure. Conclusions Our results suggest that in the general population, exposure to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy may increase the risk of some types of congenital anomalies, but the findings need to be confirmed. PMID:22892023

  19. The prevalence of congenital uterine anomalies in unselected and high-risk populations: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Y.Y.; Jayaprakasan, K.; Zamora, J.; Thornton, J.G.; Raine-Fenning, N.; Coomarasamy, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence of congenital uterine anomalies in high-risk women is unclear, as several different diagnostic approaches have been applied to different groups of patients. This review aims to evaluate the prevalence of such anomalies in unselected populations and in women with infertility, including those undergoing IVF treatment, women with a history of miscarriage, women with infertility and recurrent miscarriage combined, and women with a history of preterm delivery. METHODS Searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane register were performed. Study selection and data extraction were conducted independently by two reviewers. Studies were grouped into those that used ‘optimal’ and ‘suboptimal’ tests for uterine anomalies. Meta-analyses were performed to establish the prevalence of uterine anomalies and their subtypes within the various populations. RESULTS We identified 94 observational studies comprising 89 861 women. The prevalence of uterine anomalies diagnosed by optimal tests was 5.5% [95% confidence interval (CI), 3.5–8.5] in the unselected population, 8.0% (95% CI, 5.3–12) in infertile women, 13.3% (95% CI, 8.9–20.0) in those with a history of miscarriage and 24.5% (95% CI, 18.3–32.8) in those with miscarriage and infertility. Arcuate uterus is most common in the unselected population (3.9%; 95% CI, 2.1–7.1), and its prevalence is not increased in high-risk groups. In contrast, septate uterus is the most common anomaly in high-risk populations. CONCLUSIONS Women with a history of miscarriage or miscarriage and infertility have higher prevalence of congenital uterine anomalies compared with the unselected population. PMID:21705770

  20. Congenital Anomalies in Children Exposed to Antithyroid Drugs In-Utero: A Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiayou; Zeng, Rong; Feng, Na; Zhu, Na; Feng, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism affects about 0.2%-2.7% of all pregnancies, and is commonly managed with antithyroid drugs (ATDs). However, previous studies about the effects of ATDs on congenital anomalies are controversial. Therefore, the present meta-analysis was performed to explore the risk of congenital anomalies in children exposed to ATDs in-utero. Methods Embase, Pubmed, Web of Knowledge, and BIOSIS Citation Index were searched to find out studies about congenital anomalies in children exposed to ATDs in-utero reported up to May 2014. The references cited by the retrieved articles were also searched. The relative risks (RRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for the individual studies were pooled by fixed effects models, and heterogeneity was analyzed by chi-square and I2 tests. Results Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Exposure to propylthiouracil (PTU), methimazole/carbimazole (MMI/CMZ), and PTU & MMI/CMZ was investigated in 7, 7 and 2 studies, respectively. The pooled RR was 1.20 (95%CI: 1.02-1.42), 1.64 (95%CI: 1.39-1.92), and 1.83 (95%CI: 1.30-2.56) for congenital anomalies after exposure to PTU, MMI/CMZ, and PTU & MMI/CMZ, respectively. Conclusions The meta-analysis suggests that exposure to ATDs in-utero increases the risk of congenital anomalies. The use of ATDs in pregnancy should be limited when possible. Further research is needed to delineate the exact teratogenic risk for particular congenital anomaly. PMID:25974033

  1. Lateral congenital anomalies of the pharyngeal apparatus: part I. Normal developmental anatomy (embryogenesis) for the surgeon.

    PubMed

    Mirilas, Petros

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of the embryogenesis of the pharyngeal apparatus is the only means of understanding the "architecture" of the neck. The embryonic pharynx (which includes future oral and nasal cavities) is a much more extensive area than the adult pharynx. The main feature of the developing pharynx is a series of arches, internal pouches, and external clefts, which together comprise the pharyngeal apparatus. This structure is associated with other developing splanchna of the neck, e.g., the thyroid and parathyroid glands, tonsils, and thymus. Within each of the pharyngeal arches are the developing aortic arches and, specific for each arch, cranial nerves. The complex relations of the mesenchymal derivatives of arches (muscles, cartilage, bones) with the neurovascular bundles within each arch are presented and explained. The pharyngeal apparatus undergoes dramatic transformations: pouches and clefts disappear without interruption (interruption would produce gills and support the misnomer "branchial apparatus"). In addition, in the lateroventral neck, somites migrate to produce other muscles such as sternocleidomastoid and trapezius innervated by spinal nerves. Lateral congenital anomalies largely rely on persistence of a cleft/and or pouch or communication between the two. Their tracts have a "crooked" course among other entities generated by alterations that take place during embryogenesis. PMID:21944634

  2. Lateral congenital anomalies of the pharyngeal apparatus: part I. Normal developmental anatomy (embryogenesis) for the surgeon.

    PubMed

    Mirilas, Petros

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of the embryogenesis of the pharyngeal apparatus is the only means of understanding the "architecture" of the neck. The embryonic pharynx (which includes future oral and nasal cavities) is a much more extensive area than the adult pharynx. The main feature of the developing pharynx is a series of arches, internal pouches, and external clefts, which together comprise the pharyngeal apparatus. This structure is associated with other developing splanchna of the neck, e.g., the thyroid and parathyroid glands, tonsils, and thymus. Within each of the pharyngeal arches are the developing aortic arches and, specific for each arch, cranial nerves. The complex relations of the mesenchymal derivatives of arches (muscles, cartilage, bones) with the neurovascular bundles within each arch are presented and explained. The pharyngeal apparatus undergoes dramatic transformations: pouches and clefts disappear without interruption (interruption would produce gills and support the misnomer "branchial apparatus"). In addition, in the lateroventral neck, somites migrate to produce other muscles such as sternocleidomastoid and trapezius innervated by spinal nerves. Lateral congenital anomalies largely rely on persistence of a cleft/and or pouch or communication between the two. Their tracts have a "crooked" course among other entities generated by alterations that take place during embryogenesis.

  3. Correlation between serum biochemical markers and early amniocentesis in diagnosis of congenital fetal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Loncar, Dragan; Varjacic, Mirjana; Novakovic, Tanja; Milovanovic, Dragan; Jankovic, Slobodan

    2010-02-01

    A combined test performed at the 12th week of gestation enables us to classify the pregnancy as high risk (risk higher than 1:300) or low risk (risk lower than 1:300) for congenital foetal anomalies, with great accuracy of 85 - 90%. According to the available data, the frequency of false positive results is estimated at around 5%. The objective of the study was to examine possible correlation between the serum marker values and amniocentesis results in prenatal diagnostics of congenital foetal anomalies. The study included 745 pregnant women monitored by the Genetic Counselling Service of the Clinic of Gynaecology and Obstetrics of the Clinics Centre Kragujevac. The subjects were included in the study under condition that CRL (embryonic crown-rump length) was from 45 to 84 mm and that the gestational age was at 11-13+6 weeks. Free beta HCG and PAPP-A were determined from venous blood using commercial DPS-USA tests. Tests were based on the analytic principle of the immuno-chemiluminescence technique and were performed by application of the automatic Immulite 2000 analyzer by DPC-USA. The foetal nuchal translucency thickness (NT) and CRL were measured by Colour Doppler. The chromosome identification was performed after a certain number of cell divisions by stopping the cell division in metaphase of mitosis when the chromosomes were the most distinguishable. The foetal karyotype was prepared using G bands. In the total sample of pregnant women (n=745), there were six cases of pathological foetal karyotype. A statistical paradox in the frequency of congenital foetal anomalies in favour of younger population was noticed. A high coefficient of Spearman's rank correlation suggests great importance of the combined test in the detection of congenital foetal anomalies (p<0,05). A high consistency was also proved for components of biochemical screening and ultrasonographic markers. The combined test, as a method of prenatal screening in the first trimester of pregnancy, if

  4. Pattern of congenital anomalies in newborn: a hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    El Koumi, Mohamed A.; Al Banna, Ehab A.; Lebda, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Birth defects, encountered frequently by pediatricians, are important causes of childhood morbidity and mortality. Birth defects can be classified according to their severity, pathogenic mechanism, or whether they are involving a single system or multiple systems. This hospital-based prospective descriptive study highlights the prevalence of Congenital Anomalies (CAs) in one year among live born neonates delivered in Zagazig University Hospital (Egypt). All women giving birth to viable babies were included. Demographic details, associated risk factors and the type of CAs in all babies were recorded. Diagnosis of CAs was based on clinical evaluation, radiographic examination, ultrasonography, echocardiography and chromosomal analysis of the newborn whenever recommended. The overall incidence of CAs among live born neonates was 2.5%, as most of the cases were referred to Zagazig University Hospital (Egypt) for delivery. The musculoskeletal system (23%) was the most commonly involved followed by the central nervous system (20.3%). Involvement of more than one system was observed in (28.6%) cases. Among maternal and fetal risk factors; parental consanguinity, maternal under nutrition and obesity, positive history of an anomaly in the family, low birth weight, and prematurity were significantly associated with higher frequency of CAs (P<0.05), with non-significant differences for maternal age and the sex of the neonates. The current study highlights the prevalence of congenital anomalies in one year in Zagazig University Hospital. It revealed a high prevalence of congenital anomalies in our locality and stressed the importance of carrying out a thorough clinical examination of all neonates at birth. PMID:23667734

  5. Hazard potential ranking of hazardous waste landfill sites and risk of congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Vrijheid, M; Dolk, H; Armstrong, B; Boschi, G; Busby, A; Jorgensen, T; Pointer, P

    2002-01-01

    Background: A 33% increase in the risk of congenital anomalies has been found among residents near hazardous waste landfill sites in a European collaborative study (EUROHAZCON). Aims: To develop and evaluate an expert panel scoring method of the hazard potential of EUROHAZCON landfill sites, and to investigate whether sites classified as posing a greater potential hazard are those with a greater risk of congenital anomaly among nearby residents relative to more distant residents. Methods: A total of 1270 cases of congenital anomaly and 2308 non-malformed control births were selected in 14 study areas around 20 landfill sites. An expert panel of four landfill specialists scored each site in three categories—overall, water, and air hazard—based on readily available, documented data on site characteristics. Tertiles of the average ranking scores defined low, medium, and high hazard sites. Calculation of odds ratios was based on distance of residence from the sites, comparing a 0–3 km "proximate" with a 3–7 km "distant" zone. Results: Agreement between experts measured by intraclass correlation coefficients was 0.50, 0.44, and 0.20 for overall, water, and air hazard before a consensus meeting and 0.60, 0.56, and 0.53 respectively after this meeting. There was no evidence for a trend of increasing odds ratios with increasing overall hazard or air hazard. For non-chromosomal anomalies, odds ratios by water hazard category showed an increasing trend of borderline statistical significance (p = 0.06) from 0.79 in the low hazard category, 1.43 in the medium, to 1.60 in the high water hazard category. Conclusions: There is little evidence for a relation between risk of congenital anomaly in proximate relative to distant zones and hazard potential of landfill sites as classified by the expert panel, but without external validation of the hazard potential scoring method interpretation is difficult. Potential misclassification of sites may have reduced our ability to

  6. Neonatal head ultrasound: systematic approach to congenital Central Nervous System anomalies. A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Seong Whi

    2016-09-01

    Brain ultrasound is widely used for the screening of prematurely born babies. Although the best imaging modality for the central nervous system anomaly is brain MRI, the first imaging study in the post-natal period is brain ultrasonography in most cases. Anomalies could be found incidentally on screening ultrasound, or in those cases already suspected on prenatal ultrasound. In order not to miss congenital structural abnormalities of the brain on screening ultrasound, systematic approaches would be very helpful. The ventricles and sylvian fissures are very important structures to suspect central nervous system anomalies: they are symmetric structures so we should look for any asymmetry or maldevelopment. And then, on sagittal images, the midline structures including the corpus callosum and cerebellar vermis should be observed carefully. Finally, we should look for any abnormality in gyration or cortical development. Skull defect with herniation of intracranial contents, a spectrum of encephalo-meningocele, could be also identified on ultrasound. Congenital infections such as cytomegalovirus infection may show ventriculomegaly and malformation of the cortical development on imaging studies.

  7. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary sinus: anatomic variants and congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingming Amy; Nguyen, Elsie T; Dennie, Carole; Wald, Rachel M; Crean, Andrew M; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Jimenez-Juan, Laura

    2014-10-01

    The coronary sinus (CS) is an important vascular structure that allows for access into the coronary veins in multiple interventional cardiology procedures, including catheter ablation of arrhythmias, pacemaker implantation and retrograde cardioplegia. The success of these procedures is facilitated by the knowledge of the CS anatomy, in particular the recognition of its variants and anomalies. This pictorial essay reviews the spectrum of CS anomalies, with particular attention to the distinction between clinically benign variants and life-threatening defects. Emphasis will be placed on the important role of cardiac CT and cardiovascular magnetic resonance in providing detailed anatomic and functional information of the CS and its relationship to surrounding cardiac structures. Teaching Points • Cardiac CT and cardiovascular magnetic resonance offer 3D high-resolution mapping of the coronary sinus in pre-surgical planning.• Congenital coronary sinus enlargement occurs in the presence or absence of a left-to-right shunt.• Lack of recognition of coronary sinus anomalies can lead to adverse outcomes in cardiac procedures.• In coronary sinus ostial atresia, coronary venous drainage to the atria occurs via Thebesian or septal veins.• Coronary sinus diverticulum is a congenital outpouching of the coronary sinus and may predispose to cardiac arrhythmias.

  8. Neonatal head ultrasound: systematic approach to congenital Central Nervous System anomalies. A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Seong Whi

    2016-09-01

    Brain ultrasound is widely used for the screening of prematurely born babies. Although the best imaging modality for the central nervous system anomaly is brain MRI, the first imaging study in the post-natal period is brain ultrasonography in most cases. Anomalies could be found incidentally on screening ultrasound, or in those cases already suspected on prenatal ultrasound. In order not to miss congenital structural abnormalities of the brain on screening ultrasound, systematic approaches would be very helpful. The ventricles and sylvian fissures are very important structures to suspect central nervous system anomalies: they are symmetric structures so we should look for any asymmetry or maldevelopment. And then, on sagittal images, the midline structures including the corpus callosum and cerebellar vermis should be observed carefully. Finally, we should look for any abnormality in gyration or cortical development. Skull defect with herniation of intracranial contents, a spectrum of encephalo-meningocele, could be also identified on ultrasound. Congenital infections such as cytomegalovirus infection may show ventriculomegaly and malformation of the cortical development on imaging studies. PMID:27622417

  9. Rehabilitation of a child with partial unilateral cryptophthalmos and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, H; Merriam, J C; Jones, I S

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: This paper describes the surgical rehabilitation of a child with craniofacial anomalies, unilateral syndactyly, and partial unilateral cryptophthalmos associated with inferior colobomata of the iris and optic nerve and agenesis of the inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscles. The clinical presentation of cryptophthalmos is described. METHODS: The medical literature since the original description of cryptophthalmos in 1872 was reviewed to define patterns of inheritance and the incidence of associated anomalies. RESULTS: Including this patient, 149 case reports of cryptophthalmos were identified. In two families transmission from parent to child suggests dominant inheritance. None of the five dominant cases had any other anomalies, and all had bilateral complete cryptophthalmos. The incidence of cryptophthalmos in the remaining families is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. This group includes patients with bilateral, unilateral, and partial cryptophthalmos. Other anomalies are common, including those of the ear and nose, limbs, genitourinary system, and mouth and palate. Mortality in the perinatal period is associated with renal agenesis, laryngeal atresia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Cryptophthalmos is a rare congenital anomaly with two patterns of inheritance. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8719680

  10. Enrichment of ultraconserved elements among genomic imbalances causing mental delay and congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are defined as stretches of at least 200 base pairs of human DNA that match identically with corresponding regions in the mouse and rat genomes, albeit their real significance remains an intriguing issue. These elements are most often located either overlapping exons in genes involved in RNA processing or in introns or nearby genes involved in the regulation of transcription and development. Interestingly, human UCEs have been reported to be strongly depleted among segmental duplications and benign copy number variants (CNVs). However no comprehensive survey of a putative enrichment of these elements among pathogenic dose variants has yet been reported. Results A survey for UCEs was performed among the 26 cryptic genomic rearrangements detected in our series of 200 patients with idiopathic neurodevelopmental disorders associated to congenital anomalies. A total of 29 elements, out of the 481 described UCEs, were contained in 13 of the 26 pathogenic gains or losses detected in our series, what represents a highly significant enrichment of ultraconserved elements. In addition, here we show that these elements are preferentially found in pathogenic deletions (enrichment ratio 3.6 vs. 0.5 in duplications), and that this association is not related with a higher content of genes. In contrast, pathogenic CNVs lacking UCEs showed almost a threefold higher content in genes. Conclusions We propose that these elements may be interpreted as hallmarks for dose-sensitive genes, particularly for those genes whose gain or loss may be directly implied in neurodevelopmental disorders. Therefore, their presence in genomic imbalances of unknown effect might be suggestive of a clinically relevant condition. PMID:21092253

  11. Mosaic ring chromosome 6 in an infant with significant patent ductus arteriosus and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jae; Han, Dong Kyun; Cho, Hwa Jin; Cho, Young Kuk; Ma, Jae Sook

    2012-08-01

    The clinical features of ring chromosome 6 include central nervous system anomalies, growth retardation, facial dysmorphism and other congenital anomalies. Ring chromosome 6 occurs rarely and manifests as various phenotypes. We report the case of mosaic ring chromosome 6 by conventional karyotyping in a 7-day-old male infant diagnosed with a large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) with hypoplasia of aortic valve and aortic arch. These have not been previously reported with ring chromosome 6. He recovered from heart failure symptoms after ligation of the PDA. He showed infantile failure to thrive and delayed milestone in a follow-up evaluation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a Korean individual with ring chromosome 6 and hemodynamically significant PDA.

  12. Novel Hypomorphic Mutation in FANCD2 Gene Observed in a Fetus with Multiple Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Vazharova, Radoslava; Vragaleva, Svetlana; Dimitrova, Violeta; Ivanov, Samuil; Balabanski, Lubomir; Malinov, Maxim; Toncheva, Draga

    2016-01-01

    Congenital anomalies affect 1% to 2% of the newborns. The urinary tract and the kidneys are involved in 4-5% of the cases while upper-extremities abnormalities are present in 10%. Certain anomalies occur in isolation, whereas others are associated with systemic conditions. The prenatal detection of fetal anomalies compatible with life is a challenge for both the parents and the physician. The prognosis for the fetus/newborn and the reproductive decisions of the family largely depend on the causes underlying the disease. The reported case is of a G2P1 pregnant woman referred for routine ultrasound scan at 24 weeks of gestation (w.g.). The fetus had growth retardation, right kidney agenesis, bilateral absence of radial bones and thumbs, radial deviation of the wrists, and short humeri. Nuchal fold thickness was 5 mm and there was a single umbilical artery. After termination of pregnancy, SNP array genotyping and next-generation sequencing of targeted candidate-genes were performed trying to clarify the etiology of the fetal polymalformative syndrome. A new hypomorphic mutation in FANCD2 gene was found to underlie this fetal anomaly. The case illustrates that patients/families affected by rare monogenic disorders may benefit from application of modern technologies like microarrays and NGS. PMID:27642530

  13. Novel Hypomorphic Mutation in FANCD2 Gene Observed in a Fetus with Multiple Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Vragaleva, Svetlana; Ivanov, Samuil; Malinov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Congenital anomalies affect 1% to 2% of the newborns. The urinary tract and the kidneys are involved in 4-5% of the cases while upper-extremities abnormalities are present in 10%. Certain anomalies occur in isolation, whereas others are associated with systemic conditions. The prenatal detection of fetal anomalies compatible with life is a challenge for both the parents and the physician. The prognosis for the fetus/newborn and the reproductive decisions of the family largely depend on the causes underlying the disease. The reported case is of a G2P1 pregnant woman referred for routine ultrasound scan at 24 weeks of gestation (w.g.). The fetus had growth retardation, right kidney agenesis, bilateral absence of radial bones and thumbs, radial deviation of the wrists, and short humeri. Nuchal fold thickness was 5 mm and there was a single umbilical artery. After termination of pregnancy, SNP array genotyping and next-generation sequencing of targeted candidate-genes were performed trying to clarify the etiology of the fetal polymalformative syndrome. A new hypomorphic mutation in FANCD2 gene was found to underlie this fetal anomaly. The case illustrates that patients/families affected by rare monogenic disorders may benefit from application of modern technologies like microarrays and NGS. PMID:27642530

  14. Novel Hypomorphic Mutation in FANCD2 Gene Observed in a Fetus with Multiple Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Vragaleva, Svetlana; Ivanov, Samuil; Malinov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Congenital anomalies affect 1% to 2% of the newborns. The urinary tract and the kidneys are involved in 4-5% of the cases while upper-extremities abnormalities are present in 10%. Certain anomalies occur in isolation, whereas others are associated with systemic conditions. The prenatal detection of fetal anomalies compatible with life is a challenge for both the parents and the physician. The prognosis for the fetus/newborn and the reproductive decisions of the family largely depend on the causes underlying the disease. The reported case is of a G2P1 pregnant woman referred for routine ultrasound scan at 24 weeks of gestation (w.g.). The fetus had growth retardation, right kidney agenesis, bilateral absence of radial bones and thumbs, radial deviation of the wrists, and short humeri. Nuchal fold thickness was 5 mm and there was a single umbilical artery. After termination of pregnancy, SNP array genotyping and next-generation sequencing of targeted candidate-genes were performed trying to clarify the etiology of the fetal polymalformative syndrome. A new hypomorphic mutation in FANCD2 gene was found to underlie this fetal anomaly. The case illustrates that patients/families affected by rare monogenic disorders may benefit from application of modern technologies like microarrays and NGS.

  15. Lenz microphthalmia syndrome: three additional cases with rare associated anomalies.

    PubMed

    Temtamy, S A; Ismail, S I; Meguid, N A

    2000-01-01

    Lenz microphthalmia syndrome is an extremely rare inherited disorder, characterized by unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia. In rare cases affected patients exhibit complete absence of eye or blepharoptosis resulting in visual impairment. Additional physical abnormalities are often associated with this disorder, orofacial, digital, skeletal and urogenital abnormalities. Here we present three cases of Lenz microphthalmia with additional manifestations: two brothers of first cousin mating, the elder one has bilateral congenital cataract which is a rare ophthalmological finding in this syndrome and a third case who presented to us because of ambiguous genitalia. She was 12 years old, and reared as a female. Chromosomal analysis showed 46,XY karyotype, and hormonal studies indicated 5-alpha reductase deficiency. This is the first report of the association of 5-alpha reductase deficiency with Lenz microphthalmia syndrome.

  16. Molecular Detection of Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Among Infants with Congenital Anomalies in Khartoum State, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, Maha G.; Ali, Aisha S.; Mustafa, Mohamed O.; Musa, Dalal F.; El Hussein, Abdel Rahim M.; Elkhidir, Isam M.; Enan, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection still represents the most common potentially serious viral complication in humans and is a major cause of congenital anomalies in infants. This study is aimed to detect HCMV in infants with congenital anomalies. Study subjects consisted of infants born with neural tube defect, hydrocephalus and microcephaly. Fifty serum specimens (20 males, 30 females) were collected from different hospitals in Khartoum State. The sera were investigated for cytomegalovirus specific immunoglobin M (IgM) antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and for Cytomegalovirus DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Out of the 50 sera tested, one patient’s (2%) sample showed HCMV IgM, but with no detectable DNA, other 4(8.2 %) sera were positive for HCMV DNA but with no detectable IgM. Various diagnostic techniques should be considered to evaluate HCMV disease and routine screening for HCMV should be introduced for pregnant women in this setting. It is vital to initiate further research work with many samples from different area to assess prevalence and characterize HCMV and evaluate its maternal health implications. PMID:26862356

  17. Scoliosis and vertebral anomalies: additional abnormal phenotypes associated with chromosome 16p11.2 rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Al-Kateb, Hussam; Khanna, Geetika; Filges, Isabel; Hauser, Natalie; Grange, Dorothy K; Shen, Joseph; Smyser, Christopher D; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Shinawi, Marwan

    2014-05-01

    The typical chromosome 16p11.2 rearrangements are estimated to occur at a frequency of approximately 0.6% of all samples tested clinically and have been identified as a major cause of autism spectrum disorders, developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, and seizures. Careful examination of patients with these rearrangements revealed association with abnormal head size, obesity, dysmorphism, and congenital abnormalities. In this report, we extend this list of phenotypic abnormalities to include scoliosis and vertebral anomalies. We present detailed characterization of phenotypic and radiological data of 10 new patients, nine with the 16p11.2 deletion and one with the duplication within the coordinates chr16:29,366,195 and 30,306,956 (hg19) with a minimal size of 555 kb. We discuss the phenotypical and radiological findings in our patients and review 5 previously reported patients with 16p11.2 rearrangement and similar skeletal abnormalities. Our data suggest that patients with the recurrent 16p11.2 rearrangement have increased incidence of scoliosis and vertebral anomalies. However, additional studies are required to confirm this observation and to establish the incidence of these anomalies. We discuss the potential implications of our findings on the diagnosis, surveillance and genetic counseling of patients with 16p11.2 rearrangement. PMID:24458548

  18. Cytogenomic Evaluation of Children with Congenital Anomalies: Critical Implications for Diagnostic Testing and Genetic Counseling.

    PubMed

    Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Jakubiuk-Tomaszuk, Anna; Kędzior, Marta; Bernaciak, Joanna; Zdrodowska, Jolanta; Kurzątkowski, Wiesław; Radkowski, Marek; Demkow, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Identification of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations, as a cause of structural malformations, is currently performed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) or array CGH (array comparative genomic hybridization) techniques. The aim of this study was the evaluation of diagnostic usefulness of MLPA and array CGH in patients with congenital malformations or abnormalities (at least one major or minor birth defect, including dysmorphism) with or without intellectual disability or developmental delay and the optimization of genetic counseling in the context of the results obtained. The MLPA and array CGH were performed in 91 patients diagnosed with developmental disorders and major or minor congenital anomalies. A total of 49 MLPA tests toward common microdeletion syndromes, 42 MLPA tests for subtelomeric regions of chromosomes, two tests for common aberrations in autism, and five array CGH tests were performed. Eight (9 %) patients were diagnosed with microdeletion MLPA, four (4 %) patients with subtelomeric MLPA, one (1 %) patient with autism MLPA. Further three (3 %) individuals had rearrangements diagnosed by array CGH. Altogether, chromosomal microaberrations were found in 16 patients (17 %). All the MLPA-detected rearrangements were found to be pathogenic, but none detected with array CGH could unequivocally be interpreted as pathogenic. In patients with congenital anomalies, the application of MLPA and array CGH techniques is efficient in detecting syndromic and unique microrearrangements. Consistent pre-MLPA test phenotyping leads to better post-test genetic counseling. Incomplete penetrance and unknown inheritance of detected variants are major issues in clinical interpretation of array CGH data. PMID:26987321

  19. Prenatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene-contaminated drinking water and the risk of congenital anomalies: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior animal and human studies of prenatal exposure to solvents including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have shown increases in the risk of certain congenital anomalies among exposed offspring. Objectives This retrospective cohort study examined whether PCE contamination of public drinking water supplies in Massachusetts influenced the occurrence of congenital anomalies among children whose mothers were exposed around the time of conception. Methods The study included 1,658 children whose mothers were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water and a comparable group of 2,999 children of unexposed mothers. Mothers completed a self-administered questionnaire to gather information on all of their prior births, including the presence of anomalies, residential histories and confounding variables. PCE exposure was estimated using EPANET water distribution system modeling software that incorporated a fate and transport model. Results Children whose mothers had high exposure levels around the time of conception had an increased risk of congenital anomalies. The adjusted odds ratio of all anomalies combined among children with prenatal exposure in the uppermost quartile was 1.5 (95% CI: 0.9, 2.5). No meaningful increases in the risk were seen for lower exposure levels. Increases were also observed in the risk of neural tube defects (OR: 3.5, 95% CI: 0.8, 14.0) and oral clefts (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 0.7, 15.0) among offspring with any prenatal exposure. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the risk of certain congenital anomalies is increased among the offspring of women who were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water around the time of conception. Because these results are limited by the small number of children with congenital anomalies that were based on maternal reports, a follow-up investigation should be conducted with a larger number of affected children who are identified by independent records. PMID:19778411

  20. Usefulness of intraoperative bronchoscopy during surgical repair of a congenital cardiac anomaly with possible airway obstruction: three cases report.

    PubMed

    Oh, JongEun; Kim, Jung-Won; Shin, Won-Jung; Gwak, Mijeung; Park, Pyung Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Compression of the airway is relatively common in pediatric patients, although it is often an unrecognized complication of congenital cardiac and aortic arch anomalies. Aortopexy has been established as a surgical treatment for tracheobronchial obstruction associated with vascular anomaly, aortic arch anomaly, esophageal atresia, and tracheoesophageal fistula. The tissue-to-tissue arch repair technique could result in severe airway complication such as compression of the left main bronchus which was not a problem before the correction. We report three cases of corrective open heart surgery monitored by intraoperative bronchoscopy performed during prebypass, and performed immediately before weaning from bypass, to evaluate tracheobronchial obstruction caused by congenital, complex cardiac anomalies in the operating room. PMID:26885306

  1. Usefulness of intraoperative bronchoscopy during surgical repair of a congenital cardiac anomaly with possible airway obstruction: three cases report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, JongEun; Kim, Jung-won; Shin, Won-Jung; Park, Pyung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Compression of the airway is relatively common in pediatric patients, although it is often an unrecognized complication of congenital cardiac and aortic arch anomalies. Aortopexy has been established as a surgical treatment for tracheobronchial obstruction associated with vascular anomaly, aortic arch anomaly, esophageal atresia, and tracheoesophageal fistula. The tissue-to-tissue arch repair technique could result in severe airway complication such as compression of the left main bronchus which was not a problem before the correction. We report three cases of corrective open heart surgery monitored by intraoperative bronchoscopy performed during prebypass, and performed immediately before weaning from bypass, to evaluate tracheobronchial obstruction caused by congenital, complex cardiac anomalies in the operating room. PMID:26885306

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomalies requiring surgical correction. Implications for the future.

    PubMed

    Dibbins, A W; Curci, M R; McCrann, D J

    1985-04-01

    With the use of maternal ultrasonography, 22 infants had an anomaly identified before delivery. Nine had gastrochisis. In all, ultrasonography was performed because of an elevated maternal serum alpha 1 fetoprotein level. Ultrasonography for other indications identified three infants with omphaloceles, three with cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung, two with duodenal atresia, two with posterior urethral valves, and one each with obstruction of the ureteropelvic junction, a retroperitoneal teratoma, and an ovarian cyst. Infants were delivered in a neonatal center able to provide total care from the time of birth, thus the risks of transport over long distances were avoided. One of the infants with cystic adenomatoid malformation was incorrectly diagnosed as having a congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and the complete posterior urethral valve bilateral hydronephrosis complex was not identified in this infant until after delivery. The ability to diagnose complex anomalies correctly places new responsibilities on the surgeon who must counsel the parents on his ability to successfully treat the identified anomaly. Improved diagnostic accuracy, increased case findings, careful counselling, and delivery of high-risk infants in regional centers must be major priorities to improve neonatal surgical care in the next decade.

  3. Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deo, Nivedita

    1988-12-01

    counterterm. (v) A pair of gauge superfield configurations in supersymmetric non-abelian gauge theories in (2 + 1)-dimensions which exhibit the Wu-Yang ambiguity are identified and the effective action computed exactly for one of them, in analogy with (iv). Both configurations give rise to a parity anomaly in the effective action which cannot be removed by the addition of a counterterm.

  4. Early Developmental Assessment of Children with Major Non-Cardiac Congenital Anomalies Predicts Development at the Age of 5 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazer, Petra; Gischler, Saskia J.; van der Cammen-van Zijp, Monique H. M.; Tibboel, Dick; Bax, Nicolaas M. A.; Ijsselstijn, Hanneke; van Dijk, Monique; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate cognitive and motor development in children with major congenital anomalies and the predictability of development at age 5 years. Method: A prospective, longitudinal follow-up study was undertaken. The Dutch version of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development--Mental Developmental Index (MDI) and…

  5. The Association between Autism Spectrum Disorders and Congenital Anomalies by Organ Systems in a Finnish National Birth Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timonen-Soivio, Laura; Sourander, Andre; Malm, Heli; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Gissler, Mika; Brown, Alan; Vanhala, Raija

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with and without intellectual disability (ID) and congenital anomalies (CAs) by organ system. The sample included all children diagnosed with ASD (n = 4441) from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register during 1987-2000 and a total of four controls per…

  6. Associations between chromosomal anomalies and congenital heart defects: a database search.

    PubMed

    van Karnebeek, C D; Hennekam, R C

    1999-05-21

    Recent technical advances in molecular biology and cytogenetics, as well as a more developmental approach to congenital heart disorders (CHDs), have led to considerable progress in our understanding of their pathogenesis, especially of the important causative role of genetic factors. The complex embryology of the heart suggests the involvement of numerous genes, and hence, numerous chromosomal loci, such as the recently identified 22q11, in normal cardiomorphogenesis. In order to identify other loci, the Human Cytogenetics DataBase was searched for all chromosome anomalies associated with CHD. Through the application of several (arbitrary) criteria we have selected associations occurring so frequently that they may not be forfuituous, suggesting assignment of a gene or genes responsible for specific CHDs to certain chromosome regions. The results of this study may be a first step in the detection of specific chromosome defects responsible for CHD, which will be useful in daily patient care and may provide clues for further cytogenetic and molecular studies.

  7. Presence of accessory penis, colonic duplication and several other congenital anomalies in a child: a very rare association.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayan; Mondal, Prabodh Chandra; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan; Achar, Arun

    2014-10-01

    An accessory penis is a very rare anomaly. Only five cases have been reported thus far to our knowledge. We present the case of a child aged 2 years and 10 months who had a penis-like structure (containing phallus and glans) attached to the right buttock. Associated anomalies were a non-communicating type of colonic duplication, a paramedian stenosed anal opening, a horse-shoe kidney, posterior urethral valves, scoliosis of the lumbo-sacral spine, polydactyly and equino-varus deformity of the right foot. As far as we can tell, this is the first report of an accessory penis associated with colonic duplication and other congenital anomalies.

  8. Trauma due to Self-aggression in Patient with Waardenburg Syndrome associated with Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sara Nader; Kawakami, Roberto Yoshio; Sgavioli, Claudia Almeida Prado Piccino; Correa, Ana Eliza; D'Árk de Oliveira El Kadre, Guaniara; Carvalho, Ricardo Sandri

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an inherited autosomal dominant genetic disorder presenting variable penetrance and expressivity, with an estimated prevalence of 1:42,000. Clinical characteristics of WS include lateral displacement of the internal eye canthus, hyperplasia of the medial portion of the eyebrows, prominent and broad nasal base, congenital deafness, pigmentation of the iris and skin, and white forelock. A 24-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with WS, was referred to the Special Needs Dental Clinic of Sacred Heart University, Bauru, Brazil. Parents reported that the patient was experiencing self-mutilation, particularly in the oral region. He presented multiple congenital anomalies, including anophthalmia, mental retardation, low-set ears, and leg deformities. Clinical oral examination revealed hypodontia, abnormalities in dental morphology, extensive dental caries, periodontal disease, and fistulae. Extensive scars on the tongue, lips, and hands caused by self-mutilation were also observed. In accordance with his family and neurologist, full-mouth extraction under general anesthesia was performed, especially considering his severe self-aggressive behavior and the necessity to be fed with soft-food diet due to his inability to chew. After the surgical procedure, a significant reduction in the patient's irritability and gain of weight were reported in the follow-ups of 30, 60, and 180 days. PMID:27659091

  9. Trauma due to Self-aggression in Patient with Waardenburg Syndrome associated with Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sara Nader; Kawakami, Roberto Yoshio; Sgavioli, Claudia Almeida Prado Piccino; Correa, Ana Eliza; D'Árk de Oliveira El Kadre, Guaniara; Carvalho, Ricardo Sandri

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an inherited autosomal dominant genetic disorder presenting variable penetrance and expressivity, with an estimated prevalence of 1:42,000. Clinical characteristics of WS include lateral displacement of the internal eye canthus, hyperplasia of the medial portion of the eyebrows, prominent and broad nasal base, congenital deafness, pigmentation of the iris and skin, and white forelock. A 24-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with WS, was referred to the Special Needs Dental Clinic of Sacred Heart University, Bauru, Brazil. Parents reported that the patient was experiencing self-mutilation, particularly in the oral region. He presented multiple congenital anomalies, including anophthalmia, mental retardation, low-set ears, and leg deformities. Clinical oral examination revealed hypodontia, abnormalities in dental morphology, extensive dental caries, periodontal disease, and fistulae. Extensive scars on the tongue, lips, and hands caused by self-mutilation were also observed. In accordance with his family and neurologist, full-mouth extraction under general anesthesia was performed, especially considering his severe self-aggressive behavior and the necessity to be fed with soft-food diet due to his inability to chew. After the surgical procedure, a significant reduction in the patient's irritability and gain of weight were reported in the follow-ups of 30, 60, and 180 days.

  10. Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Valério, Flávia Cordeiro; Vasconcelos, Mariana Affonso; Miranda, Débora Marques; Oliveira, Eduardo Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24066006

  11. Congenital Cardiac, Aortic Arch, and Vascular Bed Anomalies in PHACE Syndrome (From The International PHACE Syndrome Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Michelle L.; Frommelt, Peter C.; Blei, Francine; Breur, Johannes M.P.J.; Cordisco, Maria R.; Frieden, Ilona J.; Goddard, Deborah S.; Holland, Kristen E.; Krol, Alfons L.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Metry, Denise W.; Morel, Kimberly D.; North, Paula E.; Pope, Elena; Shieh, Joseph T.; Southern, James F.; Wargon, Orli; Siegel, Dawn H.; Drolet, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    PHACE syndrome represents the association of large infantile hemangiomas of the head and neck with brain, cerebrovascular, cardiac, ocular, and ventral/midline defects. Cardiac and cerebrovascular anomalies are the most common extracutaneous features of PHACE, and they also constitute the greatest source of potential morbidity. Congenital heart disease in PHACE is incompletely described, and this study was conducted to better characterize its features. This study of the International PHACE Syndrome Registry represents the largest central review of clinical, radiology, and pathology data for cardiovascular anomalies in PHACE patients to date. 62/150 (41%) subjects had intracardiac, aortic arch, or brachiocephalic vessel anomalies. Aberrant origin of a subclavian artery was the most common cardiovascular anomaly (present in 31/150 (21%) of subjects). Coarctation was the second most common anomaly, identified in 28/150 (19%), and can be missed clinically in PHACE patients because of the frequent association of arch obstruction with aberrant subclavian origin. 23/62 (37%) subjects with cardiovascular anomalies required procedural intervention. A higher percentage of hemangiomas were located on the left side of the head/neck in patients with coarctation (46% vs. 39%); however, hemangioma distribution did not predict the presence of cardiovascular anomalies overall. In conclusion, PHACE is associated with a high risk of congenital heart disease. Cardiac and aortic arch imaging with detailed assessment of arch patency and brachiocephalic origins is essential for any patient suspected of having PHACE. Longitudinal investigation is needed to determine the long-term outcomes of cardiovascular anomalies in PHACE. PMID:24079520

  12. Timing of androgen receptor disruption and estrogen exposure underlies a spectrum of congenital penile anomalies.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhengui; Armfield, Brooke A; Cohn, Martin J

    2015-12-29

    Congenital penile anomalies (CPAs) are among the most common human birth defects. Reports of CPAs, which include hypospadias, chordee, micropenis, and ambiguous genitalia, have risen sharply in recent decades, but the causes of these malformations are rarely identified. Both genetic anomalies and environmental factors, such as antiandrogenic and estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), are suspected to cause CPAs; however, little is known about the temporal window(s) of sensitivity to EDCs, or the tissue-specific roles and downstream targets of the androgen receptor (AR) in external genitalia. Here, we show that the full spectrum of CPAs can be produced by disrupting AR at different developmental stages and in specific cell types in the mouse genital tubercle. Inactivation of AR during a narrow window of prenatal development results in hypospadias and chordee, whereas earlier disruptions cause ambiguous genitalia and later disruptions cause micropenis. The neonatal phase of penile development is controlled by the balance of AR to estrogen receptor α (ERα) activity; either inhibition of androgen or augmentation of estrogen signaling can induce micropenis. AR and ERα have opposite effects on cell division, apoptosis, and regulation of Hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein, and Wnt signaling in the genital tubercle. We identify Indian hedgehog (Ihh) as a novel downstream target of AR in external genitalia and show that conditional deletion of Ihh inhibits penile masculinization. These studies reveal previously unidentified cellular and molecular mechanisms by which antiandrogenic and estrogenic signals induce penile malformations and demonstrate that the timing of endocrine disruption can determine the type of CPA.

  13. Timing of androgen receptor disruption and estrogen exposure underlies a spectrum of congenital penile anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Armfield, Brooke A.; Cohn, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital penile anomalies (CPAs) are among the most common human birth defects. Reports of CPAs, which include hypospadias, chordee, micropenis, and ambiguous genitalia, have risen sharply in recent decades, but the causes of these malformations are rarely identified. Both genetic anomalies and environmental factors, such as antiandrogenic and estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), are suspected to cause CPAs; however, little is known about the temporal window(s) of sensitivity to EDCs, or the tissue-specific roles and downstream targets of the androgen receptor (AR) in external genitalia. Here, we show that the full spectrum of CPAs can be produced by disrupting AR at different developmental stages and in specific cell types in the mouse genital tubercle. Inactivation of AR during a narrow window of prenatal development results in hypospadias and chordee, whereas earlier disruptions cause ambiguous genitalia and later disruptions cause micropenis. The neonatal phase of penile development is controlled by the balance of AR to estrogen receptor α (ERα) activity; either inhibition of androgen or augmentation of estrogen signaling can induce micropenis. AR and ERα have opposite effects on cell division, apoptosis, and regulation of Hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein, and Wnt signaling in the genital tubercle. We identify Indian hedgehog (Ihh) as a novel downstream target of AR in external genitalia and show that conditional deletion of Ihh inhibits penile masculinization. These studies reveal previously unidentified cellular and molecular mechanisms by which antiandrogenic and estrogenic signals induce penile malformations and demonstrate that the timing of endocrine disruption can determine the type of CPA. PMID:26598695

  14. Unusual congenital aortic anomaly with rare common celiamesenteric trunk variation: MR angiography and digital substraction angiography findings.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Ozgur; Sanlidilek, Umman; Cetin, Huseyin; Ozdemir, Ozcan; Kurt, Aydin; Sakarya, Mehmet Emin; Tas, Ismet

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography and digital substraction angiography (DSA) findings in a case with a rare congenital thoracoabdominal aortic hypoplasia and common celiamesenteric trunk variation with occlusion of infrarenal abdominal aorta are described here. To our knowledge, this aortic anomaly has not been previously described in the English literature. DSA is the optimum imaging modality for determination of aortic hypoplasia, associated vascular malformations, collateral vessels, and direction of flow within vessels. PMID:17468907

  15. Unusual Congenital Aortic Anomaly with Rare Common Celiamesenteric Trunk Variation: MR Angiography and Digital Substraction Angiography Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Tosun, Ozgur Sanlidilek, Umman; Cetin, Huseyin; Ozdemir, Ozcan; Kurt, Aydin; Sakarya, Mehmet Emin; Tas, Ismet

    2007-09-15

    Magnetic resonance angiography and digital substraction angiography (DSA) findings in a case with a rare congenital thoracoabdominal aortic hypoplasia and common celiamesenteric trunk variation with occlusion of infrarenal abdominal aorta are described here. To our knowledge, this aortic anomaly has not been previously described in the English literature. DSA is the optimum imaging modality for determination of aortic hypoplasia, associated vascular malformations, collateral vessels, and direction of flow within vessels.

  16. [Ultrasound and color Doppler applications in nephrology. The normal kidney: anatomy, vessels and congenital anomalies].

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria; Giovannini, Lisa; Samoni, Sara; Dellafiore, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Gray-scale ultrasound is the diagnostic technique of choice in patients with suspected or known renal disease. Knowledge of the normal and abnormal sonographic morphology of the kidney and urinary tract is essential for a successful diagnosis. Conventional sonography must always be complemented by Doppler sampling of the principal arterial and venous vessels. B-mode scanning is performed with the patient in supine, prone or side position. The kidney can be imaged by the anterior, lateral or posterior approach using coronal, transverse and oblique scanning planes. Morphological parameters that must be evaluated are the coronal diameter, the parenchymal thickness and echogenicity, the structure and state of the urinary tract, and the presence of congenital anomalies that may mimic a pseudomass. The main renal artery and the hilar-intraparenchymal branches of the arterial and venous vessels should be accurately evaluated using color Doppler. Measurement of intraparenchymal resistance indices (IP, IR) provides an indirect and quantitative parameter of the stiffness and eutrophic or dystrophic remodeling of the intrarenal microvasculature. These parameters differ depending on age, diabetic and hypertensive disease, chronic renal glomerular disease, and interstitial, vascular and obstructive nephropathy.

  17. The pattern of pregnancy loss in women with congenital uterine anomalies and recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Saravelos, Sotirios H; Cocksedge, Karen A; Li, Tin-Chiu

    2010-03-01

    Congenital uterine anomalies (CUA) are a known cause of recurrent miscarriage (RM), but the pattern of pregnancy loss that different CUA produce remains unknown. This study included 665 women with RM who were screened for CUA using a combined two-dimensional ultrasound (2D-US) and hysterosalpingography (HSG) approach. All suspected CUA were definitively diagnosed and classified via a combined hysteroscopy/laparoscopy procedure. Pregnancy outcomes were evaluated and compared for each type of CUA versus a control group of women with no identifiable cause of RM (unexplained RM). Fifty-six women with CUA and 107 women with unexplained RM were identified. In total, 881 pregnancies were analysed. Analysis showed that women with a septate or bicornuate uterus suffered from significantly increased second-trimester miscarriages compared with controls (13.2% and 13.8% versus 1.0%; P<0.001 and P<0.05, respectively). Women with an arcuate, septate or bicornuate uterus showed significantly reduced rates of biochemical pregnancy losses compared with controls (9.5%, 11.1% and 11.1% versus 30.4%; P<0.01, P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). Pregnancies of women with RM and CUA are not associated with early implantation failure and are compromised at a more advanced gestational age.

  18. Developmental Genetics and Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Uy, Natalie; Reidy, Kimberly

    2016-03-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are common birth defects and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in children. There is a wide spectrum of renal abnormalities, from mild hydronephrosis to more severe cases, such as bilateral renal dysplasia. The etiology of the majority of cases of CAKUT remains unknown, but there is increasing evidence that genomic imbalance contributes to the pathogenesis of CAKUT. Advances in human and mouse genetics have contributed to increased understanding of the pathophysiology of CAKUT. Mutations in genes involved in both transcription factors and signal transduction pathways involved in renal development are associated with CAKUT. Large cohort studies suggest that copy number variants, genomic, or de novo mutations may explain up to one-third of all cases of CAKUT. One of the major challenges to the use of genetic information in the clinical setting remains the lack of strict genotype-phenotype correlation. However, identifying genetic causes of CAKUT may lead to improved diagnosis of extrarenal complications. With the advent of decreasing costs for whole genome and exome sequencing, future studies focused on genotype-phenotype correlations, gene modifiers, and animal models of gene mutations will be needed to translate genetic advances into improved clinical care. PMID:27617142

  19. Oral contraceptive use after conception in relation to the risk of congenital urinary tract anomalies.

    PubMed

    Li, D K; Daling, J R; Mueller, B A; Hickok, D E; Fantel, A G; Weiss, N S

    1995-01-01

    The authors conducted a case-control study of the relation of OC use after conception to the occurrence of congenital urinary tract anomalies (CUTAs). Singleton CUTA cases with no known chromosomal abnormality from seven counties in western Washington State born during the period January 1, 1990-December 31, 1991 were identified through the Washington State Birth Defect Registry. Controls without birth defects were randomly selected from singleton births that occurred in the same year as the cases in five large hospitals in King County. Mothers of the 118 cases and 369 controls were interviewed to obtain their contraceptive history as well as other information. Mothers of nine cases (7.6%) and eight controls (2.2%) had taken OCs at some time during the pregnancy. After adjustment for birth year and county of maternal residence, OC use after conception was associated with an almost five-fold increased risk of having a baby with a CUTA [odds ratio (OR) = 4.8, 95 percent confidence interval (CI), 1.6-14.1] relative to no contraception at or after conception. Use of other contraceptive methods after conception was not related to the risk of CUTAs. OC use during the 3 or 6 months prior to the conception also was not associated with the risk of CUTAs. Further adjustment for sociodemographic factors, reproductive history, perinatal exposure to exogenous agents, and past OC use did not change the results, nor did restricting the analysis to residents of King County.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. A community-based survey of visible congenital anomalies in rural Tamil Nadu

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, K.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive community-based survey of visible congenital defects covering 12.8 million children in rural Tamil Nadu state was conducted during the years 2004–05. A door-to-door survey was done utilizing the existing health care delivery system. More than 10,000 village health nurses were involved to collect the data. All children between the ages of 0 and 15 years were seen. The children with defects were seen by a medical officer and diagnosis was made as per chart. A total of 1.30% of children were born with some visible anomalies. The male:female ratio was 1.3:1. There was a family history in 9% and consanguinity in 32%. More than 5% mothers had taken some medication in the first trimester of pregnancy out of which anti-convulsants were 3.4%. Facial clefts showed a lower incidence of 1 in 1976 live births with peak incidence between March and June. Cleft palate alone showed a higher percentage (30%) than other studies. PMID:19884674

  1. The value of the study of natural history in genetic disorders and congenital anomaly syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J G

    1988-01-01

    The study of the natural history of genetic disorders and syndromes with congenital anomalies and dysmorphic features is a challenging and often neglected area. There are many reasons to pursue this type of research but it requires special clinical skills and a considerable amount of hard work. Setting up protocols and collecting data is complex and time consuming. Frequently, helpful clues for a particular disorder come from the study of the natural history of other disorders. Older affected subjects and unique cases with unusual features are often most important in unravelling the 'normal' course of a disease or recognising the basic defect. The study of natural history from individual patients and their records is complementary to population or registry based studies because it identifies individual variations and clinical heterogeneity. The understanding of the natural history of a particular disorder is of importance both to the affected person and their family and to the physicians caring for them. It is also useful to the basic researcher trying to determine the pathogenetic mechanism causing the disorder. In many ways, clinical geneticists have learned the art of caring for patients, as well as the challenges of clinical genetics, by becoming apprentices to and studying in depth specific disease entities. PMID:3050091

  2. [Genetic Basis of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract].

    PubMed

    Bodria, Monica; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) occur have an incidence of about 1% and they are one of the most common birth defects. CAKUT is the most common cause of end stage renal disease in children, leading to high morbidity and mortality in these patients. Recent studies indicate a strong genetic component in the determination of CAKUT. The genetic architecture of these malformations involves both point mutations and structural variants. The recent improvement in next-generation sequencing technologies resulted in a boost on discovery of new genes involved in CAKUT. Results from micro-array study have demonstrated that rare structural variants are an important source of genetic variation in patients with CAKUT. Moreover, these structural variants have been proven to be associated with developmental disorders that develop later in life, especially neurodevelopment diseases, such as autism, schizophrenia, epilepsy, intellectual disability, and others. The easy pre-natal diagnosis of CAKUT by ultrasound and the possibility of a rapid molecular diagnosis in a significant fraction of patients, implicate the kidney and urinary tract as new possible sentinels for other diseases that develop later in life, bearing strong implications for personalized medicine. PMID:26479062

  3. The Risk of Congenital Heart Anomalies Following Prenatal Exposure to Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors—Is Pharmacogenetics the Key?

    PubMed Central

    Daud, Aizati N. A.; Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S.; Groen, Henk; Wilffert, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are often prescribed during pregnancy. Previous studies that found an increased risk of congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart anomalies (CHA), with SRI use during pregnancy have created concern among pregnant women and healthcare professionals about the safety of these drugs. However, subsequent studies have reported conflicting results on the association between CHA and SRI use during pregnancy. These discrepancies in the risk estimates can potentially be explained by genetic differences among exposed individuals. In this review, we explore the potential pharmacogenetic predictors involved in the pharmacokinetics and mechanism of action of SRIs, and their relation to the risk of CHA. In general, the risk is dependent on the maternal concentration of SRIs and the foetal serotonin level/effect, which can be modulated by the alteration in the expression and/or function of the metabolic enzymes, transporter proteins and serotonin receptors involved in the serotonin signalling of the foetal heart development. Pharmacogenetics might be the key to understanding why some children exposed to SRIs develop a congenital heart anomaly and others do not. PMID:27529241

  4. The Risk of Congenital Heart Anomalies Following Prenatal Exposure to Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors-Is Pharmacogenetics the Key?

    PubMed

    Daud, Aizati N A; Bergman, Jorieke E H; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S; Groen, Henk; Wilffert, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are often prescribed during pregnancy. Previous studies that found an increased risk of congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart anomalies (CHA), with SRI use during pregnancy have created concern among pregnant women and healthcare professionals about the safety of these drugs. However, subsequent studies have reported conflicting results on the association between CHA and SRI use during pregnancy. These discrepancies in the risk estimates can potentially be explained by genetic differences among exposed individuals. In this review, we explore the potential pharmacogenetic predictors involved in the pharmacokinetics and mechanism of action of SRIs, and their relation to the risk of CHA. In general, the risk is dependent on the maternal concentration of SRIs and the foetal serotonin level/effect, which can be modulated by the alteration in the expression and/or function of the metabolic enzymes, transporter proteins and serotonin receptors involved in the serotonin signalling of the foetal heart development. Pharmacogenetics might be the key to understanding why some children exposed to SRIs develop a congenital heart anomaly and others do not. PMID:27529241

  5. FG syndrome, an X-linked multiple congenital anomaly syndrome: The clinical phenotype and an algorithm for diagnostic testing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robin Dawn; Graham, John M.; Friez, Michael J.; Hoo, Joe J.; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; McKeown, Carole; Moeschler, John B.; Raymond, F. Lucy; Rogers, R. Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E.; Battaglia, Agatino; Lyons, Michael J.; Stevenson, Roger E.

    2014-01-01

    FG syndrome is a rare X-linked multiple congenital anomaly-cognitive impairment disorder caused by the p.R961W mutation in the MED12 gene. We identified all known patients with this mutation to delineate their clinical phenotype and devise a clinical algorithm to facilitate molecular diagnosis. We ascertained 23 males with the p.R961W mutation in MED12 from 9 previously reported FG syndrome families and 1 new family. Six patients are reviewed in detail. These 23 patients were compared with 48 MED12 mutation-negative patients, who had the clinical diagnosis of FG syndrome. Traits that best discriminated between these two groups were chosen to develop an algorithm with high sensitivity and specificity for the p.R961W MED12 mutation. FG syndrome has a recognizable dysmorphic phenotype with a high incidence of congenital anomalies. A family history of X-linked mental retardation, deceased male infants, and/or multiple fetal losses was documented in all families. The algorithm identifies the p.R961W MED12 mutation-positive group with 100% sensitivity and 90% spec-ificity. The clinical phenotype of FG syndrome defines a recognizable pattern of X-linked multiple congenital anomalies and cognitive impairment. This algorithm can assist the clinician in selecting the patients for testing who are most likely to have the recurrent p.R961W MED12 mutation. PMID:19938245

  6. Unilateral renal agenesis associated with additional congenital abnormalities of the urinary tract in a Pekingese bitch.

    PubMed

    Agut, A; Fernandez del Palacio, M J; Laredo, F G; Murciano, J; Bayon, A; Soler, M

    2002-01-01

    An eight-month-old Pekingese bitch with urinary incontinence was found to have three congenital anomalies of the urinary tract: left renal agenesis, bilateral ectopic ureters with a left cranial blind-ending ureter, and urinary bladder hypoplasia. The diagnoses were made by retrograde vaginourethrography, excretory urography, ultrasonography and duplex Doppler ultrasonography. Although urological anomalies associated with renal agenesis have been frequently observed, a cranial blind-end ectopic ureter has not, to the authors' knowledge, been described in the bitch. The dog was managed medically with a restricted protein diet because of a compromised unilateral kidney with hydronephrosis and hydroureter.

  7. A population-based case-control study of drinking-water nitrate and congenital anomalies using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to develop individual-level exposure estimates.

    PubMed

    Holtby, Caitlin E; Guernsey, Judith R; Allen, Alexander C; Vanleeuwen, John A; Allen, Victoria M; Gordon, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Animal studies and epidemiological evidence suggest an association between prenatal exposure to drinking water with elevated nitrate (NO3-N) concentrations and incidence of congenital anomalies. This study used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to derive individual-level prenatal drinking-water nitrate exposure estimates from measured nitrate concentrations from 140 temporally monitored private wells and 6 municipal water supplies. Cases of major congenital anomalies in Kings County, Nova Scotia, Canada, between 1988 and 2006 were selected from province-wide population-based perinatal surveillance databases and matched to controls from the same databases. Unconditional multivariable logistic regression was performed to test for an association between drinking-water nitrate exposure and congenital anomalies after adjusting for clinically relevant risk factors. Employing all nitrate data there was a trend toward increased risk of congenital anomalies for increased nitrate exposure levels though this was not statistically significant. After stratification of the data by conception before or after folic acid supplementation, an increased risk of congenital anomalies for nitrate exposure of 1.5-5.56 mg/L (2.44; 1.05-5.66) and a trend toward increased risk for >5.56 mg/L (2.25; 0.92-5.52) was found. Though the study is likely underpowered, these results suggest that drinking-water nitrate exposure may contribute to increased risk of congenital anomalies at levels below the current Canadian maximum allowable concentration. PMID:24503976

  8. A population-based case-control study of drinking-water nitrate and congenital anomalies using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to develop individual-level exposure estimates.

    PubMed

    Holtby, Caitlin E; Guernsey, Judith R; Allen, Alexander C; Vanleeuwen, John A; Allen, Victoria M; Gordon, Robert J

    2014-02-05

    Animal studies and epidemiological evidence suggest an association between prenatal exposure to drinking water with elevated nitrate (NO3-N) concentrations and incidence of congenital anomalies. This study used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to derive individual-level prenatal drinking-water nitrate exposure estimates from measured nitrate concentrations from 140 temporally monitored private wells and 6 municipal water supplies. Cases of major congenital anomalies in Kings County, Nova Scotia, Canada, between 1988 and 2006 were selected from province-wide population-based perinatal surveillance databases and matched to controls from the same databases. Unconditional multivariable logistic regression was performed to test for an association between drinking-water nitrate exposure and congenital anomalies after adjusting for clinically relevant risk factors. Employing all nitrate data there was a trend toward increased risk of congenital anomalies for increased nitrate exposure levels though this was not statistically significant. After stratification of the data by conception before or after folic acid supplementation, an increased risk of congenital anomalies for nitrate exposure of 1.5-5.56 mg/L (2.44; 1.05-5.66) and a trend toward increased risk for >5.56 mg/L (2.25; 0.92-5.52) was found. Though the study is likely underpowered, these results suggest that drinking-water nitrate exposure may contribute to increased risk of congenital anomalies at levels below the current Canadian maximum allowable concentration.

  9. A Population-Based Case-Control Study of Drinking-Water Nitrate and Congenital Anomalies Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to Develop Individual-Level Exposure Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Holtby, Caitlin E.; Guernsey, Judith R.; Allen, Alexander C.; VanLeeuwen, John A.; Allen, Victoria M.; Gordon, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies and epidemiological evidence suggest an association between prenatal exposure to drinking water with elevated nitrate (NO3-N) concentrations and incidence of congenital anomalies. This study used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to derive individual-level prenatal drinking-water nitrate exposure estimates from measured nitrate concentrations from 140 temporally monitored private wells and 6 municipal water supplies. Cases of major congenital anomalies in Kings County, Nova Scotia, Canada, between 1988 and 2006 were selected from province-wide population-based perinatal surveillance databases and matched to controls from the same databases. Unconditional multivariable logistic regression was performed to test for an association between drinking-water nitrate exposure and congenital anomalies after adjusting for clinically relevant risk factors. Employing all nitrate data there was a trend toward increased risk of congenital anomalies for increased nitrate exposure levels though this was not statistically significant. After stratification of the data by conception before or after folic acid supplementation, an increased risk of congenital anomalies for nitrate exposure of 1.5–5.56 mg/L (2.44; 1.05–5.66) and a trend toward increased risk for >5.56 mg/L (2.25; 0.92–5.52) was found. Though the study is likely underpowered, these results suggest that drinking-water nitrate exposure may contribute to increased risk of congenital anomalies at levels below the current Canadian maximum allowable concentration. PMID:24503976

  10. Mutations in SOX17 are Associated with Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Gimelli, Stefania; Caridi, Gianluca; Beri, Silvana; McCracken, Kyle; Bocciardi, Renata; Zordan, Paola; Dagnino, Monica; Fiorio, Patrizia; Murer, Luisa; Benetti, Elisa; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Giorda, Roberto; Wells, James M; Gimelli, Giorgio; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2010-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and the urinary tract (CAKUT) represent a major source of morbidity and mortality in children. Several factors (PAX, SOX,WNT, RET, GDFN, and others) play critical roles during the differentiation process that leads to the formation of nephron epithelia. We have identified mutations in SOX17, an HMG-box transcription factor and Wnt signaling antagonist, in eight patients with CAKUT (seven vesico-ureteric reflux, one pelvic obstruction). One mutation, c.775T>A (p.Y259N), recurred in six patients. Four cases derived from two small families; renal scars with urinary infection represented the main symptom at presentation in all but two patients. Transfection studies indicated a 5–10-fold increase in the levels of the mutant protein relative to wild-type SOX17 in transfected kidney cells. Moreover we observed a corresponding increase in the ability of SOX17 p.Y259N to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin transcriptional activity, which is known to regulate multiple stages of kidney and urinary tract development. In conclusion, SOX17 p.Y259N mutation is recurrent in patients with CAKUT. Our data shows that this mutation correlates with an inappropriate accumulation of SOX17-p.Y259N protein and inhibition of the β-catenin/Wnt signaling pathway. These data indicate a role of SOX17 in human kidney and urinary tract development and implicate the SOX17–p.Y259N mutation as a causative factor in CAKUT. Hum Mutat 31:1352–1359, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20960469

  11. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids: Potential Role in the Etiology of Cancers, Pulmonary Hypertension, Congenital Anomalies, and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Edgar, John A; Molyneux, Russell J; Colegate, Steven M

    2015-01-20

    Large outbreaks of acute food-related poisoning, characterized by hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, hemorrhagic necrosis, and rapid liver failure, occur on a regular basis in some countries. They are caused by 1,2-dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids contaminating locally grown grain. Similar acute poisoning can also result from deliberate or accidental consumption of 1,2-dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing herbal medicines, teas, and spices. In recent years, it has been confirmed that there is also significant, low-level dietary exposure to 1,2-dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids in many countries due to consumption of common foods such as honey, milk, eggs, salads, and meat. The level of 1,2-dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids in these foods is generally too low and too intermittent to cause acute toxicity. However, these alkaloids are genotoxic and can cause slowly developing chronic diseases such as pulmonary arterial hypertension, cancers, cirrhosis, and congenital anomalies, conditions unlikely to be easily linked with dietary exposure to 1,2-dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids, especially if clinicians are unaware that such dietary exposure is occurring. This Perspective provides a comprehensive review of the acute and chronic toxicity of 1,2-dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids and their potential to initiate certain chronic diseases, and suggests some associative considerations or indicators to assist in recognizing specific cases of diseases that may have resulted from dietary exposure to these hazardous natural substances. If it can be established that low-level dietary exposure to 1,2-dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids is a significant cause of some of these costly and debilitating diseases, then this should lead to initiatives to reduce the level of these alkaloids in the food chain.

  12. Lamotrigine use in pregnancy and risk of orofacial cleft and other congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Loane, Maria; Morris, Joan; Garne, Ester; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Bakker, Marian; Barisic, Ingeborg; Doray, Berenice; Gatt, Miriam; Kallen, Karin; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Lahesmaa-Korpinen, Anna-Maria; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Mejnartowicz, Jan P.; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda; O'Mahony, Mary; Pierini, Anna; Rißmann, Anke; Tucker, David; Wellesley, Diana; Wiesel, Awi; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T.W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To test previous signals of a risk of orofacial cleft (OC) and clubfoot with exposure to the antiepileptic lamotrigine, and to investigate risk of other congenital anomalies (CA). Methods: This was a population-based case–malformed control study based on 21 EUROCAT CA registries covering 10.1 million births (1995–2011), including births to 2005 in which the clubfoot signal was generated and a subsequent independent study population of 6.3 million births. A total of 226,806 babies with CA included livebirths, stillbirths, and terminations of pregnancy following prenatal diagnosis. First-trimester lamotrigine monotherapy exposure in OC cases and clubfoot cases was compared to other nonchromosomal CA (controls). Odds ratios (OR) were adjusted for registry. An exploratory analysis compared the proportion of each standard EUROCAT CA subgroup among all babies with nonchromosomal CA exposed to lamotrigine monotherapy with non-AED exposed pregnancies. Results: There were 147 lamotrigine monotherapy-exposed babies with nonchromosomal CA. For all OC, ORadj was 1.31 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73–2.33), isolated OC 1.45 (95% CI 0.80–2.63), isolated cleft palate 1.69 (95% CI 0.69–4.15). Overall ORadj for clubfoot was 1.83 (95% CI 1.01–3.31) and 1.43 (95% CI 0.66–3.08) in the independent study population. No other specific CA were significantly associated with lamotrigine monotherapy. Conclusions: The risk of OC was not significantly raised and we estimate the excess risk of OC to be less than 1 in every 550 exposed babies. We have not found strong independent evidence of a risk of clubfoot subsequent to our original signal. Our study cannot assess the general malformation risk among lamotrigine-exposed pregnancies. PMID:27053714

  13. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case. PMID:26655010

  14. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-07-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation.

  15. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation. PMID:27630924

  16. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-07-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation. PMID:27630924

  17. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation.

  18. Folic acid flour fortification: impact on the frequencies of 52 congenital anomaly types in three South American countries.

    PubMed

    López-Camelo, Jorge S; Castilla, Eduardo E; Orioli, Iêda M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to search for a reduction in birth prevalence estimates of 52 selected types of congenital anomalies, associated with folic acid fortification programs in Chile, Argentina, and Brazil. The material included 3,347,559 total births in 77 hospitals of the three countries during the 1982-2007 period: 596,704 births (17 hospitals) in Chile, 1,643,341 (41 hospitals) in Argentina, and 1,107,514 (19 hospitals) in Brazil. We compared pre- and post-fortification rates within each hospital and the resulting Prevalence Rate Ratios (PRRs) were pooled by country. Statistically significant reductions in birth prevalence estimates after fortification were observed for neural tube defects (NTDs), septal heart defects, transverse limb deficiencies, and subluxation of the hip. However, only the reduction of NTDs appeared to be associated with folic acid fortification and not due to other factors, because of its consistency among the three countries, as well as with previously published reports, and its strong statistical significance. Among the NTDs, the maximum prevalence reduction was observed for isolated cephalic (cervical-thoracic) spina bifida, followed by caudal (lumbo-sacral) spina bifida, anencephaly, and cephalocele. This observation suggests etiologic and pathogenetic heterogeneity among different levels of spina bifida, as well as among different NTD subtypes. We concluded that food fortification with folic acid prevents NTDs but not other types of congenital anomalies.

  19. Prognosis and Risk Factors for Congenital Airway Anomalies in Children with Congenital Heart Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Sheng; Jeng, Mei-Jy; Tsao, Pei-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background The mortality risk associated with congenital airway anomalies (CAA) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the factors associated with CAA, and the associated mortality risk, among children with CHD. Methods This nationwide, population-based study evaluated 39,652 children with CHD aged 0–5 years between 2000 and 2011, using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). We performed descriptive, logistic regression, Kaplan–Meier, and Cox regression analyses of the data. Results Among the children with CHD, 1,591 (4.0%) had concomitant CAA. Children with CHD had an increased likelihood of CAA if they were boys (odds ratio [OR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33–1.64), infants (OR, 5.42; 95%CI, 4.06–7.24), or had a congenital musculoskeletal anomaly (OR, 3.19; 95%CI, 2.67–3.81), and were typically identified 0–3 years after CHD diagnosis (OR, 1.33; 95%CI 1.17–1.51). The mortality risk was increased in children with CHD and CAA (crude hazard ratio [HR], 2.05; 95%CI, 1.77–2.37), even after adjusting for confounders (adjusted HR, 1.76; 95%CI, 1.51–2.04). Mortality risk also changed by age and sex (adjusted HR and 95%CI are quoted): neonates, infants, and toddlers and preschool children, 1.67 (1.40–2.00), 1.93 (1.47–2.55), and 4.77 (1.39–16.44), respectively; and boys and girls, 1.62 (1.32–1.98) and 2.01 (1.61–2.50), respectively. Conclusion The mortality risk is significantly increased among children with CHD and comorbid CAA. Clinicians should actively seek CAA during the follow-up of children with CHD. PMID:26334302

  20. Uranium and other contaminants in hair from the parents of children with congenital anomalies in Fallujah, Iraq

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent reports have drawn attention to increases in congenital birth anomalies and cancer in Fallujah Iraq blamed on teratogenic, genetic and genomic stress thought to result from depleted Uranium contamination following the battles in the town in 2004. Contamination of the parents of the children and of the environment by Uranium and other elements was investigated using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Hair samples from 25 fathers and mothers of children diagnosed with congenital anomalies were analysed for Uranium and 51 other elements. Mean ages of the parents was: fathers 29.6 (SD 6.2); mothers: 27.3 (SD 6.8). For a sub-group of 6 women, long locks of hair were analysed for Uranium along the length of the hair to obtain information about historic exposures. Samples of soil and water were also analysed and Uranium isotope ratios determined. Results Levels of Ca, Mg, Co, Fe, Mn, V, Zn, Sr, Al, Ba, Bi, Ga, Pb, Hg, Pd and U (for mothers only) were significantly higher than published mean levels in an uncontaminated population in Sweden. In high excess were Ca, Mg, Sr, Al, Bi and Hg. Of these only Hg can be considered as a possible cause of congenital anomaly. Mean levels for Uranium were 0.16 ppm (SD: 0.11) range 0.02 to 0.4, higher in mothers (0.18 ppm SD 0.09) than fathers (0.11 ppm; SD 0.13). The highly unusual non-normal Fallujah distribution mean was significantly higher than literature results for a control population Southern Israel (0.062 ppm) and a non-parametric test (Mann Whitney-Wilcoxon) gave p = 0.016 for this comparison of the distribution. Mean levels in Fallujah were also much higher than the mean of measurements reported from Japan, Brazil, Sweden and Slovenia (0.04 ppm SD 0.02). Soil samples show low concentrations with a mean of 0.76 ppm (SD 0.42) and range 0.1-1.5 ppm; (N = 18). However it may be consistent with levels in drinking water (2.28 μgL-1) which had similar levels to water from wells (2.72 μgL-1) and the

  1. Mental retardation, congenital heart defect, cleft palate, short stature, and facial anomalies: A new X-linked multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome: Clinical description and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Mariman, E.C.M.; Beersum, S.E.C. van; Ropers, H.H.; Schoonbrood-Lenssen, A.M.J.

    1994-07-15

    We report on two brothers and their two maternal uncles with severe mental retardation, congenital heart defect, cleft or highly arched palate, short stature and craniofacial anomalies consisting of microcephaly, abnormal ears, bulbous nose, broad nasal bridge, malar hypoplasia, and micro-gnathia. Three of the four patients died at an early age. The mother of the two brothers had an atrial septal defect. She is assumed to be manifesting carrier of a mutant gene, which is expressed in her two sons and two brothers. By multipoint linkage analysis it is found that the most likely location of the responsible gene is the pericentromeric region Xp21.3-q21.3 with DMD and DXS3 as flanking markers. Maximum information is obtained with marker DXS453 (Z = 1.20 at {theta} = 0.0). 24 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Adaptation to the Birth of a Child with a Congenital Anomaly: A Prospective Longitudinal Study of Maternal Well-Being and Psychological Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nes, Ragnhild B.; Røysamb, Espen; Hauge, Lars J.; Kornstad, Tom; Landolt, Markus A.; Irgens, Lorentz M.; Eskedal, Leif; Kristensen, Petter; Vollrath, Margarete E.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the stability and change in maternal life satisfaction and psychological distress following the birth of a child with a congenital anomaly using 5 assessments from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study collected from Pregnancy Week 17 to 36 months postpartum. Participating mothers were divided into those having infants…

  3. Parenting an infant with a congenital anomaly: how are perceived burden and perceived personal benefits related to parenting stress?

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana; Nazaré, Bárbara; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to characterize parents' negative (perceived burden) and positive (perceived personal benefits) perceptions about parenting an infant with a congenital anomaly (CA), and to investigate their role in parenting stress. Forty-three couples (43 mothers and 36 fathers) whose 6-month-old infants had a CA completed several questionnaires: the Impact on Family Scale-Revised, the Positive Contributions Scale, and the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form. The results showed similarities between maternal and paternal perceptions. For mothers, higher levels of burden and lower levels of personal benefits were found to predict higher levels of parenting stress. For fathers, greater burden was associated with higher levels of parenting stress. Some dimensions of personal benefits moderated the relationship between burden and parenting stress, for both genders. Specific strategies targeting negative and positive perceptions should be considered when developing psychological interventions to promote the family's adaptation to the experience of parenting an infant with a CA.

  4. Structural chromosomal abnormalities in patients with mental retardation and/or multiple congenital anomalies: a new series of 24 patients.

    PubMed

    Tos, T; Karaman, A; Aksoy, A; Tukun, A

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a major cause of mental retardation and/or multiple congenital anomalies (MCA/MR). Screening for these chromosomal imbalances has mainly been done by standard karyotyping. The objective of this study was to report standard chromosome analysis and FISH screening of a series of 24 patients with MCA/MR. Structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 24 alterations and included 5 deletions, 2 duplications, 6 unbalanced translocations, 3 inversions, 2 insertions, 3 derivative chromosomes, 2 marker chromosomes and 1 isochromosome. We confirm that a high percentage of MCA/MR cases hitherto considered idiopathic is caused by chromosomal imbalances. We conclude that patients with MCA/MR should be routinely karyotyped.

  5. Mirror image duplication of the hands and feet: report of a sporadic case with multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Hersh, J H; Dela Cruz, T V; Pietrantoni, M; von Drasek-Ascher, G; Turnquest, M A; Yacoub, O A; Joyce, M R

    1995-11-20

    Mirror image duplication of the hands and feet is a rare entity. Based on 3 previous reports, findings include nasal abnormalities, dimelia of ulna and fibula, tibial hypoplasia and mirror image duplication of hands and feet. We report on a sporadic case in which mirror image duplication was associated with multiple congenital anomalies. Although these cases may represent variable expression of the same dominantly transmitted complex polysyndactyly syndrome, it is possible that mirror image duplication of the hands and feet is a manifestation common to a number of distinct clinical entities. During limb bud development, duplication and aberrant positioning of the zone of polarizing activity in relation to the apical ectodermal ridge may account for the anatomic abnormalities of the hands and feet in these patients. PMID:8599358

  6. Multiple congenital anomalies and developmental delay in a boy associated with a de novo 16p13.3 deletion.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Marc; Quinonez, Shane; Ackley, Todd; Iyer, Ram K; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2011-03-01

    We describe a patient with multiple congenital anomalies including tracheobronchomalacia, CT-proven metopic craniosynostosis, glandular hypospadias and severe ventral chordee, torticollis, esotropia, strabismus, fifth finger clinodactyly, hallux valgus, and global developmental delay. Using high resolution chromosomal microarray analysis, we identified a de novo deletion of 555 kb on chromosome 16p13.3, 444 kb telomeric to the CREBBP gene and 623 kb centromeric of PKD1. Review of the literature revealed numerous reports of individuals with deletions involving adjacent regions including CREBBP, but only one overlapping with this isolated region of 16p13.3. Haploinsufficiency for one or more of the 25 candidate genes in the deleted genomic region may be responsible for these clinical features. No copy number variants (CNVs) span the entire region, but several small CNVs within the 555 kb genomic region reduce the likelihood for effects due to haploinsufficiency to 18 genes.

  7. Parenting an infant with a congenital anomaly: how are perceived burden and perceived personal benefits related to parenting stress?

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana; Nazaré, Bárbara; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to characterize parents' negative (perceived burden) and positive (perceived personal benefits) perceptions about parenting an infant with a congenital anomaly (CA), and to investigate their role in parenting stress. Forty-three couples (43 mothers and 36 fathers) whose 6-month-old infants had a CA completed several questionnaires: the Impact on Family Scale-Revised, the Positive Contributions Scale, and the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form. The results showed similarities between maternal and paternal perceptions. For mothers, higher levels of burden and lower levels of personal benefits were found to predict higher levels of parenting stress. For fathers, greater burden was associated with higher levels of parenting stress. Some dimensions of personal benefits moderated the relationship between burden and parenting stress, for both genders. Specific strategies targeting negative and positive perceptions should be considered when developing psychological interventions to promote the family's adaptation to the experience of parenting an infant with a CA. PMID:25614325

  8. [Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. A vision for the paediatrician].

    PubMed

    Palacios Loro, M L; Segura Ramírez, D K; Ordoñez Álvarez, F A; Santos Rodríguez, F

    2015-12-01

    The congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are disorders with a high prevalence in the general population, with urinary tract dilations being the most frequent. CAKUT also account for the most important cause of chronic kidney disease in childhood. This paper focuses on the role of the primary care paediatrician in the diagnosis, assessment, and follow-up of children with CAKUT, with special emphasis on the associated urinary tract infections, the progression toward chronic renal failure, and the genetic basis.

  9. Unknown syndrome: ischiadic hypoplasia, renal dysfunction, immunodeficiency, and a pattern of minor congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Braegger, C; Bottani, A; Hallé, F; Giedion, A; Leumann, E; Seger, R; Willi, U; Schinzel, A

    1991-01-01

    We report a 6 year old male with a pattern of malformations and anomalies including intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, a pattern of craniofacial anomalies (flat face, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, strabismus, short nose, low set ears), hypospadias and cryptorchidism, bilateral partial cutaneous syndactyly between fingers 2 to 5 and toes 2 to 4, postaxial polydactyly of the fingers and toes, severe conductive hearing loss, hypoplasia of the ischiadic bones, complex renal dysfunction, hypogammaglobulinaemia with proneness to bacterial infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and recurrent pseudomembranous enterocolitis. The parents are cousins of Turkish origin.

  10. Classification of congenital anomalies of the hand and upper limb: development and assessment of a new system.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Michael A; Tolerton, Sarah K; Quick, Tom J; Harvey, Isaac; Lawson, Richard D; Smith, Nicholas C; Oberg, Kerby C

    2013-09-01

    The Oberg, Manske, and Tonkin (OMT) classification of congenital hand and upper limb anomalies was proposed in 2010 as a replacement for the Swanson International Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand classification system, which has been the accepted system of classification for the international surgical community since 1976. The OMT system separates malformations from deformations and dysplasias. Malformations are subdivided according to the axis of formation and differentiation that is primarily affected and whether the anomalies involve the whole limb or the hand plate. This review outlines the development of classification systems and explores the difficulty of incorporating our current knowledge of limb embryogenesis at a molecular level into current systems. An assessment of the efficacy of the OMT classification demonstrates acceptable inter- and intraobserver reliability. A prospective review of 101 patients confirms that all diagnoses could be classified within the OMT system. Consensus expert opinion allowed classification of those conditions for which there is not a clear understanding of the mechanism of dysmorphology. A refined and expanded OMT classification is presented.

  11. Familial glaucoma iridogoniodysplasia maps to a 6p25 region implicated in primary congenital glaucoma and iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, T; Ebenezer, N; Manners, R; McGill, J; Bhattacharya, S

    1997-01-01

    Familial glaucoma iridogoniodysplasia (FGI) is a form of open-angle glaucoma in which developmental anomalies of the iris and irido-corneal angle are associated with a juvenile-onset glaucoma transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. A single large family with this disorder was examined for genetic linkage to microsatellite markers. A peak LOD score of 11.63 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained with marker D6S967 mapping to chromosome 6p25. Haplotype analysis places the disease gene in a 6.4-cM interval between the markers D6S1713 and D6S1600. Two novel clinical appearances extend the phenotypic range and provide evidence of variable expressivity. The chromosome 6p25 region is now implicated in FGI, primary congenital glaucoma, and iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly. This may indicate the presence of a common causative gene or, alternatively, a cluster of genes involved in eye development/function. Images Figure 2 PMID:9382099

  12. [Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. A vision for the paediatrician].

    PubMed

    Palacios Loro, M L; Segura Ramírez, D K; Ordoñez Álvarez, F A; Santos Rodríguez, F

    2015-12-01

    The congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are disorders with a high prevalence in the general population, with urinary tract dilations being the most frequent. CAKUT also account for the most important cause of chronic kidney disease in childhood. This paper focuses on the role of the primary care paediatrician in the diagnosis, assessment, and follow-up of children with CAKUT, with special emphasis on the associated urinary tract infections, the progression toward chronic renal failure, and the genetic basis. PMID:26497631

  13. Prenatal diagnosis and assessment of congenital spinal anomalies: Review for prenatal counseling.

    PubMed

    Upasani, Vidyadhar V; Ketwaroo, Pamela Deaver; Estroff, Judy A; Warf, Benjamin C; Emans, John B; Glotzbecker, Michael P

    2016-07-18

    The last two decades have seen continuous advances in prenatal ultrasonography and in utero magnetic resonance imaging. These technologies have increasingly enabled the identification of various spinal pathologies during early stages of gestation. The purpose of this paper is to review the range of fetal spine anomalies and their management, with the goal of improving the clinician's ability to counsel expectant parents prenatally. PMID:27458551

  14. Prenatal diagnosis and assessment of congenital spinal anomalies: Review for prenatal counseling

    PubMed Central

    Upasani, Vidyadhar V; Ketwaroo, Pamela Deaver; Estroff, Judy A; Warf, Benjamin C; Emans, John B; Glotzbecker, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen continuous advances in prenatal ultrasonography and in utero magnetic resonance imaging. These technologies have increasingly enabled the identification of various spinal pathologies during early stages of gestation. The purpose of this paper is to review the range of fetal spine anomalies and their management, with the goal of improving the clinician’s ability to counsel expectant parents prenatally. PMID:27458551

  15. Congenital cardiac anomalies in relation to water contamination, Santa Clara County, California, 1981-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, S.H.; Shaw, G.; Harris, J.A.; Neutra, R.R.

    1989-05-01

    In November 1981, a leak of solvents from an underground storage tank was detected at an electronics manufacturing plant in Santa Clara County, California. Solvents (predominantly 1,1,1-trichloroethene, or methyl chloroform) were found in a nearby well which supplied drinking water to the surrounding community. Residents were concerned about a possible relation between adverse reproductive outcomes and consumption of contaminated water. To address this concern, the California Department of Health Services conducted two epidemiologic studies: one of these, reported here, is a county-wide study of cardiac anomalies. This study, which looked at major cardiac anomalies among births throughout Santa Clara County in 1981-1983, found an increased prevalence in the service area of the water company which operated the contaminated well. During the potentially exposed time period (January 1981 through August 1982), 12 babies with major cardiac anomalies were born to residents of this area. This represents an excess of six cases over the number expected based on the prevalence in the remainder of the county (relative risk = 2.2, 95 per cent confidence interval 1.2-4.0). No excess was observed in the unexposed time period (September 1982 through December 1983). However, the temporal distribution of major cardiac cases born during the exposed time period suggests that the solvent leak is an unlikely explanation for this excess.

  16. [Mosaic trisomy of chromosome 20 in a patient with congenital anomalies--10-years observation].

    PubMed

    Barg, Ewa; Gil, Justyna; Wikiera, Beata; Smigiel, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Trisomy 20 is one of the most often identified disorders in amniocytes, but in a postnatal analysis is detected rather rarely. We present a girl with dysmorphic features, congenital defects, tumor of a suprarenal gland, hypothyroidism and abnormal intelligence. The recognition of mosaic trisomy 20 was confirmed after cytogenetic examination of the skin fibroblast. The karyotype is described as mos 47,XX,+20/46,XX. The karyotype from peripheral blood lymphocytes, which was examined in the 1st year of life, was normal female (46,XX) and the Turner syndrome was excluded. During 10 years we observed that the dysmorphic features were increased and suggested genetic reasons of these features. In children with dysmorphic features and normal karyotype of blood lymphocytes a wide-ranged genetic counseling is necessary.

  17. Risk of congenital anomalies associated with antithyroid treatment during pregnancy: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Gui-Yang; Ma, Jian-Li; Zhou, Liang

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the association of either propylthiouracil or methimazole treatment for hyperthyroidism during pregnancy with congenital malformations, relevant studies were identified by searching Medline, PubMed, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE. We intended to include randomized controlled trials, but no such trials were identified. Thus, we included cohort studies and case-control studies in this meta-analysis. A total of 7 studies were included in the meta-analyses. The results revealed an increased risk of birth defects among the group of pregnant women with hyperthyroidism treated with methimazole compared with the control group (odds ratio 1.76, 95% confidence interval 1.47–2.10) or the non-exposed group (odds ratio 1.71, 95% confidence interval 1.39–2.10). A maternal shift between methimazole and propylthiouracil was associated with an increased odds ratio of birth defects (odds ratio 1.88, 95% confidence interval 1.27–2.77). An equal risk of birth defects was observed between the group of pregnant women with hyperthyroidism treated with propylthiouracil and the non-exposed group (odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 0.97–1.42). There was only a slight trend towards an increased risk of congenital malformations in infants whose mothers were treated with propylthiouracil compared with in infants whose mothers were healthy controls (odds ratio 1.29, 95% confidence interval 1.07–1.55). The children of women receiving methimazole treatment showed an increased risk of adverse fetal outcomes relative to those of mothers receiving propylthiouracil treatment. We found that propylthiouracil was a safer choice for treating pregnant women with hyperthyroidism according to the risk of birth defects but that a shift between methimazole and propylthiouracil failed to provide protection against birth defects. PMID:26106966

  18. Radiocolloid scintigraphy as an aid to the diagnosis of congenital portacaval anomalies in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Hornof, W.J.; Koblik, P.D.; Breznock, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    Five clinically normal dogs and 5 dogs in which portacaval anomalies were diagnosed angiographically were utilized to evaluate differences in the appearance of the radiocolloid liver scan between the 2 groups. The liver was clearly visualized in all dogs, allowing subjective evaluation of size. In the dogs with portacaval shunts, scintigraphy revealed an obviously small liver as well as pulmonary uptake of radiocolloid. The utility of this technique was then tested in a group of dogs with liver disease and was shown to be of value in differentiating dogs with primary portacaval shunts from other types of liver disease.

  19. AB024. Chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) for the diagnosis of children with developmental delay and multiple congenital anomalies in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Law, Hai-Yang; Brett, Maggie; Tan, Ene-Choo; Yong, Min-Hwee; Lai, Angeline

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) is a sensitive method to identify submicroscopic changes too small to be detected by conventional karyotyping. Due to its high-sensitivity in identifying regions with structural variation and hence the genes involved, it is recommended to be the first-tier genetic test for children with intellectual disabilities, development delay or multiple congenital anomalies, and is routinely available in USA and many countries in Europe. Our lab has started offering this as a clinical test based on the research experience on screening >400 children with developmental delay and multiple congenital anomalies since February 2014. To date, 271 patients have been screened using the Agilent 4×180K CGH + SNP array. Copy number variants (CNVs) ranging in size from 10 kb to 154 Mb were found in 109 patients (40%). Pathogenic and likely pathogenic CNVs were found in 55 (20%). These included 45 with deletions, 8 with duplications and 2 patients with both deletion and duplication. Recurrent microdeletion and microduplication syndromes including the Angelman/Prader-Willi syndrome [5], 1p36 microdeletion [3], Williams syndrome [2], 22q11.2 distal deletion syndrome [2], 16p13.3 microdeletion syndrome [2], Cat Eye syndrome, Cri du Chat syndrome, Miller Decker syndrome, 3q29 microdeletion, 15q24 microdeletion, and 1q43q44 syndrome were among the variants detected in our patients. CNVs of uncertain clinical significance were detected in 54 (20%) individuals: 32 were duplications, 18 were deletions and one with both deletion and duplication. However, due to the high cost of the test, parental testing was not performed and hence, significance of these variants could not be established conclusively. In conclusion, CMA is a powerful tool in identifying pathogenic chromosomal copy number alternations. However, due to the high cost of the test, parental testing for the cases where variants of uncertain significant are found is often not possible. CMA is useful

  20. Rare chromosome abnormalities, prevalence and prenatal diagnosis rates from population-based congenital anomaly registers in Europe.

    PubMed

    Wellesley, Diana; Dolk, Helen; Boyd, Patricia A; Greenlees, Ruth; Haeusler, Martin; Nelen, Vera; Garne, Ester; Khoshnood, Babak; Doray, Berenice; Rissmann, Anke; Mullaney, Carmel; Calzolari, Elisa; Bakker, Marian; Salvador, Joaquin; Addor, Marie-Claude; Draper, Elizabeth; Rankin, Judith; Tucker, David

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the prevalence and types of rare chromosome abnormalities (RCAs) in Europe for 2000-2006 inclusive, and to describe prenatal diagnosis rates and pregnancy outcome. Data held by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies database were analysed on all the cases from 16 population-based registries in 11 European countries diagnosed prenatally or before 1 year of age, and delivered between 2000 and 2006. Cases were all unbalanced chromosome abnormalities and included live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. There were 10,323 cases with a chromosome abnormality, giving a total birth prevalence rate of 43.8/10,000 births. Of these, 7335 cases had trisomy 21,18 or 13, giving individual prevalence rates of 23.0, 5.9 and 2.3/10,000 births, respectively (53, 13 and 5% of all reported chromosome errors, respectively). In all, 473 cases (5%) had a sex chromosome trisomy, and 778 (8%) had 45,X, giving prevalence rates of 2.0 and 3.3/10,000 births, respectively. There were 1,737 RCA cases (17%), giving a prevalence of 7.4/10,000 births. These included triploidy, other trisomies, marker chromosomes, unbalanced translocations, deletions and duplications. There was a wide variation between the registers in both the overall prenatal diagnosis rate of RCA, an average of 65% (range 5-92%) and the prevalence of RCA (range 2.4-12.9/10,000 births). In all, 49% were liveborn. The data provide the prevalence of families currently requiring specialised genetic counselling services in the perinatal period for these conditions and, for some, long-term care.

  1. The Classification of Swanson for Congenital Anomalies of Upper Limb Modified by the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Hand (JSSH).

    PubMed

    Iba, Kousuke; Horii, Emiko; Ogino, Toshihiko; Kazuki, Kenichi; Kashiwa, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce the classification of Swanson for congenital anomalies of upper limb modified by the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Hand (the JSSH modification) in English. The Swanson classification has been widely accepted by most hand surgeons. However, several authors have suggested that complex cases, particularly those involving the complex spectrum of cleft hand and symbrachydactyly, are difficult to classify into the classification schemes. In the JSSH modification, brachysyndactyly, so-called atypical cleft hand and transverse deficiency are included under the same concept of transverse deficiency. Cleft hand, central polydactyly, and syndactyly are included in the same category of abnormal induction of digital rays. We believe that the JSSH modification system is effective in providing hand surgeons with the clinical features and conditions for congenital anomalies.

  2. Application of Prospective ECG-Gated High-Pitch 128-Slice Dual-Source CT Angiography in the Diagnosis of Congenital Extracardiac Vascular Anomalies in Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ximing; Duan, Yanhua; Xu, Wenjian; Li, Haiou; Cao, Ting; Liu, Xuejun; Ji, Xiaopeng; Cheng, Zhaoping; Wang, Anbiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the value of prospective ECG-gated high-pitch 128-slice dual-source CT (DSCT) angiography in the diagnosis of congenital extracardiac vascular anomalies in infants and children in comparison with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Methods Eighty consecutive infants or children clinically diagnosed of congenital heart disease and suspected with extracardiac vascular anomaly were enrolled, and 75 patients were finally included in this prospective study. All patients underwent prospective ECG-gated high-pitch DSCT angiography after TTE with an interval of 1–7 days. The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of high-pitch DSCT angiography and TTE were compared according to the surgical/CCA findings. The image quality of DSCT was assessed using a five-point scale. The effective radiation dose (ED) was calculated. Results A total of 17 congenital heart diseases and 162 separate extracardiac vascular anomalies were confirmed by surgical/CCA findings in 75 patients. The diagnostic accuracy of high-pitch DSCT angiography and TTE was 99.67% and 97.89%, respectively. The sensitivity of high-pitch DSCT angiography and TTE was 97.53% and 79.62%, respectively. There was significant difference regarding to the diagnostic accuracy and the sensitivity between high-pitch DSCT angiography and TTE (χ2 = 23.561 and 28.013, P<0.05). The agreement on the image quality scoring of DSCT between the two observers was excellent (κ = 0.81), and the mean score of image quality was 4.1±0.7. The mean ED of DSCT was 0.29±0.08 mSv. Conclusions Prospective ECG-gated high-pitch 128-slice DSCT angiography with low radiation dose and high diagnostic accuracy has higher sensitivity compared to TTE in the detection of congenital extracardiac vascular anomalies in infants and children. PMID:25546178

  3. Equine Multiple Congenital Ocular Anomalies and Silver Coat Colour Result from the Pleiotropic Effects of Mutant PMEL

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Lisa S.; Wilbe, Maria; Viluma, Agnese; Cothran, Gus; Ekesten, Björn; Ewart, Susan; Lindgren, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Equine Multiple Congenital Ocular Anomalies (MCOA) syndrome is a heritable eye disorder mainly affecting silver colored horses. Clinically, the disease manifests in two distinct classes depending on the horse genotype. Horses homozygous for the mutant allele present with a wide range of ocular defects, such as iris stromal hypoplasia, abnormal pectinate ligaments, megaloglobus, iridociliary cysts and cataracts. The phenotype of heterozygous horses is less severe and predominantly includes iridociliary cysts, which occasionally extend into the temporal retina. In order to determine the genetic cause of MCOA syndrome we sequenced the entire previously characterized 208 kilobase region on chromosome 6 in ten individuals; five MCOA affected horses from three different breeds, one horse with the intermediate Cyst phenotype and four unaffected controls from two different breeds. This was performed using Illumina TruSeq technology with paired-end reads. Through the systematic exclusion of all polymorphisms barring two SNPs in PMEL, a missense mutation previously reported to be associated with the silver coat colour and a non-conserved intronic SNP, we establish that this gene is responsible for MCOA syndrome. Our finding, together with recent advances that show aberrant protein function due to the coding mutation, suggests that the missense mutation is causative and has pleiotrophic effect, causing both the horse silver coat color and MCOA syndrome. PMID:24086599

  4. Congenital anomalies of coronary arteries: role in the pathogenesis of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Cheitlin, Melvin D; MacGregor, John

    2009-06-01

    After hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, coronary artery anomalies of origin from the wrong sinus of Valsalva are the second most common cause of sudden death on the athletic field in the USA. Although the right coronary artery arising from the left coronary sinus (ARCA) is four times as common as the left coronary artery arising from the anterior sinus (ALCA), it is the latter that is by far the more common cause of sudden death with or shortly after vigorous physical activity. Of the four types of ALCA, the interarterial type, where the left coronary artery passes anteriorly between the aorta and the right ventricular outflow tract, is the only type that places the patient at risk of sudden death. Another feature of this syndrome is the fact that sudden death occurs associated with or shortly after vigorous exercise and is very unusual after the patient is > 35 years of age. The mechanism by which there is sudden occlusion of the interarterial coronary artery is at present unknown, although there are a number of hypotheses involving the oblique passage of the vessel as it leaves the aorta. Sudden death is probably rare considering the number of people who have these anomalies. Symptoms premonitory to a fatal event such as exertional syncope, chest pain, or palpitations are probably common in patients at risk, and surgical correction is indicated in symptomatic patients at any age. In older asymptomatic patients, surgery is not recommended, since the incidence of sudden death in this age group is extremely small. In asymptomatic young patients, a stress test, preferably with radioisotope myocardial perfusion imaging or stress echocardiogram, should be done and surgical correction performed in those with ischemia provoked in the appropriate myocardial region. Since there is evidence that in patients who have survived a potentially fatal event, it is rare to be able to provoke ischemia with equal or greater exercise than had precipitated the malignant arrhythmia, the

  5. Reconstruction of the lids of a child with microblepharon and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Merriam, J C; Stalnecker, M C; Merriam, G R

    1988-01-01

    The initial stages in the rehabilitation of a male child with severe microblepharon, corneal opacities, bilateral facial clefts, bilateral complete cleft lip and palate, and unilateral syndactyly are described. Review of the literature suggests that severe microblepharon is associated with other craniofacial anomalies, and often the child is stillborn or retarded. Surviving children have been abandoned because of their appearance. The child described in this case appears to be unique because his intelligence is normal, and, to our knowledge, this is the first reported case of penetrating keratoplasty after reconstruction of functional eyelids. The principal problems after corneal grafting appear to have been chronic partial exposure due to inadequate lid length and a poor Bell's reflex and the persistence of a rim of vascularized fibrous tissue around the corneal graft. Future reconstructive surgery is outlined. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 PMID:2979029

  6. Using a combination of MLPA kits to detect chromosomal imbalances in patients with multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation is a valuable choice for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Jehee, Fernanda Sarquis; Takamori, Jean Tetsuo; Medeiros, Paula F Vasconcelos; Pordeus, Ana Carolina B; Latini, Flavia Roche M; Bertola, Débora Romeo; Kim, Chong Ae; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2011-01-01

    Conventional karyotyping detects anomalies in 3-15% of patients with multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation (MCA/MR). Whole-genome array screening (WGAS) has been consistently suggested as the first choice diagnostic test for this group of patients, but it is very costly for large-scale use in developing countries. We evaluated the use of a combination of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) kits to increase the detection rate of chromosomal abnormalities in MCA/MR patients. We screened 261 MCA/MR patients with two subtelomeric and one microdeletion kits. This would theoretically detect up to 70% of all submicroscopic abnormalities. Additionally we scored the de Vries score for 209 patients in an effort to find a suitable cut-off for MLPA screening. Our results reveal that chromosomal abnormalities were present in 87 (33.3%) patients, but only 57 (21.8%) were considered causative. Karyotyping detected 15 abnormalities (6.9%), while MLPA identified 54 (20.7%). Our combined MLPA screening raised the total detection number of pathogenic imbalances more than three times when compared to conventional karyotyping. We also show that using the de Vries score as a cut-off for this screening would only be suitable under financial restrictions. A decision analytic model was constructed with three possible strategies: karyotype, karyotype + MLPA and karyotype + WGAS. Karyotype + MLPA strategy detected anomalies in 19.8% of cases which account for 76.45% of the expected yield for karyotype + WGAS. Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) of MLPA is three times lower than that of WGAS, which means that, for the same costs, we have three additional diagnoses with MLPA but only one with WGAS. We list all causative alterations found, including rare findings, such as reciprocal duplications of regions deleted in Sotos and Williams-Beuren syndromes. We also describe imbalances that were considered polymorphisms or rare variants, such as the new SNP

  7. Mutations of the SLIT2-ROBO2 pathway genes SLIT2 and SRGAP1 confer risk for congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Daw-Yang; Kohl, Stefan; Fan, Xueping; Vivante, Asaf; Chan, Stefanie; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Schulz, Julian; van Eerde, Albertien M; Hilger, Alina C; Gee, Heon Yung; Pennimpede, Tracie; Herrmann, Bernhard G; van de Hoek, Glenn; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Schell, Christoph; Huber, Tobias B; Reutter, Heiko M; Soliman, Neveen A; Stajic, Natasa; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Kehinde, Elijah O; Lifton, Richard P; Tasic, Velibor; Lu, Weining; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-08-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for 40-50% of chronic kidney disease that manifests in the first two decades of life. Thus far, 31 monogenic causes of isolated CAKUT have been described, explaining ~12% of cases. To identify additional CAKUT-causing genes, we performed whole-exome sequencing followed by a genetic burden analysis in 26 genetically unsolved families with CAKUT. We identified two heterozygous mutations in SRGAP1 in 2 unrelated families. SRGAP1 is a small GTPase-activating protein in the SLIT2-ROBO2 signaling pathway, which is essential for development of the metanephric kidney. We then examined the pathway-derived candidate gene SLIT2 for mutations in cohort of 749 individuals with CAKUT and we identified 3 unrelated individuals with heterozygous mutations. The clinical phenotypes of individuals with mutations in SLIT2 or SRGAP1 were cystic dysplastic kidneys, unilateral renal agenesis, and duplicated collecting system. We show that SRGAP1 is expressed in early mouse nephrogenic mesenchyme and that it is coexpressed with ROBO2 in SIX2-positive nephron progenitor cells of the cap mesenchyme in developing rat kidney. We demonstrate that the newly identified mutations in SRGAP1 lead to an augmented inhibition of RAC1 in cultured human embryonic kidney cells and that the SLIT2 mutations compromise the ability of the SLIT2 ligand to inhibit cell migration. Thus, we report on two novel candidate genes for causing monogenic isolated CAKUT in humans.

  8. Mutations of the SLIT2-ROBO2 pathway genes SLIT2 and SRGAP1 Confer Risk for Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Daw-Yang; Kohl, Stefan; Fan, Xueping; Vivante, Asaf; Chan, Stefanie; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Schulz, Julian; van Eerde, Albertien M; Hilger, Alina C; Gee, Heon Yung; Pennimpede, Tracie; Herrmann, Bernhard G; van de Hoek, Glenn; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Schell, Christoph; Huber, Tobias B; Reutter, Heiko M; Soliman, Neveen A; Stajic, Natasa; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Kehinde, Elijah O; Lifton, Richard P; Tasic, Velibor; Lu, Weining; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for 40–50% of chronic kidney disease that manifests in the first two decades of life. Thus far, 31 monogenic causes of isolated CAKUT have been described, explaining ~12% of cases. To identify additional CAKUT-causing genes, we performed whole exome sequencing followed by a genetic burden analysis in 26 genetically unsolved families with CAKUT. We identified two heterozygous mutations in SRGAP1 in 2 unrelated families. SRGAP1 is a small GTPase activating protein in the SLIT2-ROBO2 signaling pathway, which is essential for development of the metanephric kidney. We then examined the pathway-derived candidate gene SLIT2 for mutations in cohort of 749 individuals with CAKUT and we identified 3 unrelated individuals with heterozygous mutations. The clinical phenotypes of individuals with mutations in SLIT2 or SRGAP1 were cystic dysplastic kidneys, unilateral renal agenesis, and duplicated collecting system. We show that SRGAP1 is expressed in early mouse nephrogenic mesenchyme and that it is coexpressed with ROBO2 in SIX2-positive nephron progenitor cells of the cap mesenchyme in developing rat kidney. We demonstrate that the newly identified mutations in SRGAP1 lead to an augmented inhibition of RAC1 in cultured human embryonic kidney cells and that the SLIT2 mutations compromise the ability of the SLIT2 ligand to inhibit cell migration. Thus, we report on two novel candidate genes for causing monogenic isolated CAKUT in humans. PMID:26026792

  9. Gene of a new X-linked syndrome with multiple congenital anomalies and severe mental retardation maps in Xp22-pter

    SciTech Connect

    Wittwer, B.; Kircheisen, R.; Leutelt, J.

    1994-09-01

    We report on a family with 3 males presenting with a not yet described new X-chromosomal syndrome of multiple congenital anomalies and severe mental retardation. Two sisters have (with 3 different partners) 3 severely handicapped sons. In each case, oligohydramnios and intrauterine growth retardation were observed. Delivery was in the 34th, 31st, and 38th gestational week, respectively. Two of the patients had microcephaly (head circumference of the third case at birth is unknown). On physical examination, high and broad forehead, frontal bossing, downslanting palpebral fissures, long philtrum, thin upper lip, high arched palate, and deeply set anteverted ears were seen. One of the boys has microphthalmos and sclerocornea, while his cousin shows atrophy of the optic nerve. All three patients show a severe statomotor and mental retardation, they are most likely deaf and blind, have pathologic EEG, and seizures. Important additional findings are hydronephrosis, renal duplication, vesicorenal reflux, and agenesis of corpus callosum. The karyotype is normal (46,XY). We performed a segregation analysis in the family using more than 20 DNA polymorphisms distributed over the X chromosome. Linkage without recombination was found to KAL, DXS278, and DXS16 in Xp22. Analysis of multiple informative meioses suggested a location of the disease locus distal to DXS207. Recombinants were identified with all other marker loci from Xp22-Xpter.

  10. Mutations of the SLIT2-ROBO2 pathway genes SLIT2 and SRGAP1 confer risk for congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Daw-Yang; Kohl, Stefan; Fan, Xueping; Vivante, Asaf; Chan, Stefanie; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Schulz, Julian; van Eerde, Albertien M; Hilger, Alina C; Gee, Heon Yung; Pennimpede, Tracie; Herrmann, Bernhard G; van de Hoek, Glenn; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Schell, Christoph; Huber, Tobias B; Reutter, Heiko M; Soliman, Neveen A; Stajic, Natasa; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Kehinde, Elijah O; Lifton, Richard P; Tasic, Velibor; Lu, Weining; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-08-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for 40-50% of chronic kidney disease that manifests in the first two decades of life. Thus far, 31 monogenic causes of isolated CAKUT have been described, explaining ~12% of cases. To identify additional CAKUT-causing genes, we performed whole-exome sequencing followed by a genetic burden analysis in 26 genetically unsolved families with CAKUT. We identified two heterozygous mutations in SRGAP1 in 2 unrelated families. SRGAP1 is a small GTPase-activating protein in the SLIT2-ROBO2 signaling pathway, which is essential for development of the metanephric kidney. We then examined the pathway-derived candidate gene SLIT2 for mutations in cohort of 749 individuals with CAKUT and we identified 3 unrelated individuals with heterozygous mutations. The clinical phenotypes of individuals with mutations in SLIT2 or SRGAP1 were cystic dysplastic kidneys, unilateral renal agenesis, and duplicated collecting system. We show that SRGAP1 is expressed in early mouse nephrogenic mesenchyme and that it is coexpressed with ROBO2 in SIX2-positive nephron progenitor cells of the cap mesenchyme in developing rat kidney. We demonstrate that the newly identified mutations in SRGAP1 lead to an augmented inhibition of RAC1 in cultured human embryonic kidney cells and that the SLIT2 mutations compromise the ability of the SLIT2 ligand to inhibit cell migration. Thus, we report on two novel candidate genes for causing monogenic isolated CAKUT in humans. PMID:26026792

  11. Interkinetic nuclear migration in the mouse embryonic ureteric epithelium: Possible implication for congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Motoya, Tomoyuki; Ogawa, Noriko; Nitta, Tetsuya; Rafiq, Ashiq Mahmood; Jahan, Esrat; Furuya, Motohide; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Udagawa, Jun; Otani, Hiroki

    2016-05-01

    Interkinetic nuclear migration (INM) is a phenomenon in which progenitor cell nuclei migrate along the apico-basal axis of the pseudostratified epithelium, which is characterized by the presence of apical primary cilia, in synchrony with the cell cycle in a manner of apical mitosis. INM is suggested to regulate not only stem/progenitor cell proliferation/differentiation but also organ size and shape. INM has been reported in epithelia of both ectoderm and endoderm origin. We examined whether INM exists in the mesoderm-derived ureteric epithelium. At embryonic day (E) 11.5, E12.5 and E13.5, C57BL/6J mouse dams were injected with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and embryos were killed 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 h later. We immunostained transverse sections of the ureter for BrdU, and measured the position of BrdU (+) nuclei in the ureteric epithelia along the apico-basal axis at each time point. We analyzed the distribution patterns of BrdU (+) nuclei in histograms using the multidimensional scaling. Changes in the nucleus distribution patterns suggested nucleus movement characteristic of INM in the ureteric epithelia, and the mode of INM varied throughout the ureter development. While apical primary cilia are related with INM by providing a centrosome for the apical mitosis, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) include syndromes linked to primary ciliary dysfunction affecting epithelial tubular organs such as kidney, ureter, and brain. The present study showed that INM exists in the ureteric epithelium and suggests that INM may be related with the CAKUT etiology via primary ciliary protein function. PMID:26710751

  12. A 1.1Mb deletion in distal 13q deletion syndrome region with congenital heart defect and postaxial polydactyly: additional support for a CHD locus at distal 13q34 region.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Feng; Ai, Qi; Huang, Can; Chen, Jin-Lan; Wang, Jian; Xie, Li; Zhang, Wei-Zhi; Yang, Jin-Fu; Tan, Zhi-Ping

    2013-10-01

    13q deletion syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, especially for group 3 deletion (13q33-q34 deletion). Previously we described a patient with congenital heart defect and mental retardation and proposed that a distal 6Mb region might contain the causative gene of congenital heart defect. Here we present a new patient with congenital heart defects (CHD), hand and foot anomalies and mild mental retardation. We identified a 1.1Mb deletion at chromosome 13q34 with high resolution SNP-array BeadChips (HumanOmni1-Quad, Illumina, USA). This chromosome region contains ten annotated genes, including GRK1, TFDP1, RASA3 and GAS6. To our knowledge, this represents the smallest 13q34 deletion identified to date. Our study provides additional support that distal 13q34 deletion region might contain key gene(s) responsible for cardiac development.

  13. Branchio-oto-renal syndrome plus; a contiguous gene constellation of congenital anomalies?

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    A term female infant was referred to the University Hospital because of respiratory distress secondary to bilateral choanal stenosis. Her examination revealed bilateral pre-auricular pits, branchial fistulae, cupped shaped ears, and bilateral athelia. She failed ABR screening; her creatinine was elevated to 1.5 mgs% and renal ultra-sonography showed reduced kidney size bilaterally. She was the product of her mother`s third pregnancy. The first produced a now normal 5 year old son. The second pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios and resulted in a premature delivery at 27 weeks gestation. The infant expired secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia. The mother had bilateral neurosensory deafness, pre-auricular pits, cupped shaped ears, lacrimal stenois and bilateral athelia. She wore dentures having earlier been diagnosed with dentogeneis imperfecta. She was shorter than her three normal sisters and had experienced academic problems throughout her school years. The maternal grandfather had an adult onset neurosensory hearing loss, but he and the maternal grandmother exhibited no other features of the BOR syndrome. Althelia was present only in the mother and daughter. The mother clearly has BOR syndrome transmitted to one, and possibly two, of her three offspring. The additional features of athelia, choanal stenosis and dentogenesis imperfecta are thought to represent additional autosomal dominant traits. Greenberg described an infant with athelia and choanal atresia. By family linkage studies, the BOR syndrome has been mapped to 8q13-21 with no recombination observed with loci D8S530 and D8S279. Given a normal prophase karyotype in the proband, it is speculated that a sub-microscopic deletion at 8q13-21 is the likely basis for the constellation of birth defects seen in this mother and daughter. Analysis of D8S530 and D8S279 is currently underway in this family.

  14. “This bicycle gives me a headache”, a congenital anomaly

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Backround The combination of a presacral mass, a sacral bone deformity, and an anorectal malformation are also known as the Currarino triad or Currarino syndrome. The syndrome is associated with a very high rate of severe and intractable constipation and urinary incontinence. However, it can also result in less common complaints and symptoms. Although the syndrome is known since 1981 and the involved genes are clarified to a great extent, the diagnosis may be delayed or missed if unrecognized. Case presentation A 24-year old female presented with periodical headaches. She was born with an imperforate anus, absent rectum and colon, double bladder, and sacral defect. Soon after birth she underwent several surgical procedures for anorectal and bladder reconstructions. The patient now came to her pediatric urologist for urinary incontinence and mentioned severe headaches on the side, particularly when riding a bike. Finally, she solved her headache problem by stopping to ride her bicycle. On physical examination no abnormalities were found except the ileostomy that was present ever since soon after birth and her urinary incontinence. Blood tests showed no abnormalities. Additional MRI showed a large and previously not known anterior meningocele at the level of the sacrum. Surgical treatment consisted of closure of the dura by posterior approach. Conclusion In this case report we describe the late discovery with an atypical presentation of an anterior meningocele in a young adult with urinary incontinence, a sacral defect, an anorectal malformation and headaches during bicycle riding. After surgical treatment of our patient the meningocele regressed. Three months after successful surgery she had no complaints and was able to ride a bike again. PMID:24124700

  15. Congenital coronary artery anomalies: a bridge from embryology to anatomy and pathophysiology--a position statement of the development, anatomy, and pathology ESC Working Group.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pomares, José María; de la Pompa, José Luis; Franco, Diego; Henderson, Deborah; Ho, Siew Yen; Houyel, Lucile; Kelly, Robert G; Sedmera, David; Sheppard, Mary; Sperling, Silke; Thiene, Gaetano; van den Hoff, Maurice; Basso, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Congenital coronary artery anomalies are of major significance in clinical cardiology and cardiac surgery due to their association with myocardial ischaemia and sudden death. Such anomalies are detectable by imaging modalities and, according to various definitions, their prevalence ranges from 0.21 to 5.79%. This consensus document from the Development, Anatomy and Pathology Working Group of the European Society of Cardiology aims to provide: (i) a definition of normality that refers to essential anatomical and embryological features of coronary vessels, based on the integrated analysis of studies of normal and abnormal coronary embryogenesis and pathophysiology; (ii) an animal model-based systematic survey of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate coronary blood vessel development; (iii) an organization of the wide spectrum of coronary artery anomalies, according to a comprehensive anatomical and embryological classification scheme; (iv) current knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying symptoms and signs of coronary artery anomalies, with diagnostic and therapeutic implications. This document identifies the mosaic-like embryonic development of the coronary vascular system, as coronary cell types differentiate from multiple cell sources through an intricate network of molecular signals and haemodynamic cues, as the necessary framework for understanding the complex spectrum of coronary artery anomalies observed in human patients.

  16. Congenital coronary artery anomalies: a bridge from embryology to anatomy and pathophysiology--a position statement of the development, anatomy, and pathology ESC Working Group.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pomares, José María; de la Pompa, José Luis; Franco, Diego; Henderson, Deborah; Ho, Siew Yen; Houyel, Lucile; Kelly, Robert G; Sedmera, David; Sheppard, Mary; Sperling, Silke; Thiene, Gaetano; van den Hoff, Maurice; Basso, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Congenital coronary artery anomalies are of major significance in clinical cardiology and cardiac surgery due to their association with myocardial ischaemia and sudden death. Such anomalies are detectable by imaging modalities and, according to various definitions, their prevalence ranges from 0.21 to 5.79%. This consensus document from the Development, Anatomy and Pathology Working Group of the European Society of Cardiology aims to provide: (i) a definition of normality that refers to essential anatomical and embryological features of coronary vessels, based on the integrated analysis of studies of normal and abnormal coronary embryogenesis and pathophysiology; (ii) an animal model-based systematic survey of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate coronary blood vessel development; (iii) an organization of the wide spectrum of coronary artery anomalies, according to a comprehensive anatomical and embryological classification scheme; (iv) current knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying symptoms and signs of coronary artery anomalies, with diagnostic and therapeutic implications. This document identifies the mosaic-like embryonic development of the coronary vascular system, as coronary cell types differentiate from multiple cell sources through an intricate network of molecular signals and haemodynamic cues, as the necessary framework for understanding the complex spectrum of coronary artery anomalies observed in human patients. PMID:26811390

  17. Preferential Associated Anomalies in 818 Cases of Microtia in South America

    PubMed Central

    Luquetti, Daniela V; Cox, Timothy C; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge; Dutra, Maria da Graça; Cunningham, Michael L; Castilla, Eduardo E

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of microtia remains unknown in most cases. The identification of patterns of associated anomalies (i.e., other anomalies that occur with a given congenital anomaly in a higher than expected frequency), is a methodology that has been used for research into the etiology of birth defects. We conducted a study based on cases of microtia that were diagnosed from more than 5 million live (LB)- and stillbirths (SB) examined in hospitals participating in ECLAMC (Latin American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations) between 1967 and 2009. We identified 818 LB and SB with microtia and at least one additional non-related major congenital anomaly (cases) and 15,969 LB and SB with two or more unrelated major congenital anomalies except microtia (controls). A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the congenital anomalies preferentially associated with microtia. Preferential associations were observed for 10 congenital anomalies, most of them in the craniofacial region, including facial asymmetry, choanal atresia, and eyelid colobomata. The analysis by type of microtia showed that for anomalies such as cleft lip and palate, macrostomia, and limb reduction defects, the frequency increased with the severity of the microtia. In contrast, for other anomalies the frequency tended to be the same across all types of microtia. Based on these results we will integrate data on the developmental pathways related to preferentially associated congenital anomalies for future studies investigating the etiology of microtia. PMID:23554119

  18. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kadam, Kaushiki; Khole, Aalok; Gaikwad, Avinash; Kadam, Seema; Shah, Rupin; Kumaraswamy, Rangaswamy; Khole, Vrinda

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens and unilateral renal agenesis (CBAVD-URA) has been controversial. Here, we report the cases of five Indian males with CBAVD-URA. The objective was to evaluate the presence or absence of CFTR gene mutations and variants in CBAVD-URA. The female partners of these males were also screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier status. Methods: Direct DNA sequencing of CFTR gene was carried out in five Indian infertile males having CBAVD-URA. Female partners (n=5) and healthy controls (n=32) were also screened. Results: Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A) were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T), four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q) and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A) were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD). The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings. PMID:27488005

  19. Cytogenetic Studies of Rwandan Pediatric Patients Presenting with Global Developmental Delay, Intellectual Disability and/or Multiple Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Uwineza, Annette; Hitayezu, Janvier; Jamar, Mauricette; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Murorunkwere, Seraphine; Janvier, Ndinkabandi; Bours, Vincent; Mutesa, Leon

    2016-02-01

    Global developmental delay (GDD) is defined as a significant delay in two or more developmental domains: gross or fine motor, speech/language, cognitive, social/personal and activities of daily living. Many of these children will go on to be diagnosed with intellectual disability (ID), which is most commonly defined as having an IQ <75 in addition to impairment in adaptive functioning. Cytogenetic studies have been performed in 664 Rwandan pediatric patients presenting GDD/ID and/or multiple congenital abnormalities (MCA). Karyotype analysis was performed in all patients and revealed 260 chromosomal abnormalities. The most frequent chromosomal abnormality was Down syndrome and then Edward syndrome and Patau syndrome. Other identified chromosomal abnormalities included 47,XX,+del(9)(q11), 46,XY,del(13)(q34) and 46,XX,der(22)t(10;22)(p10;p10)mat. In conclusion, our results highlight the high frequency of cytogenetically detectable abnormalities in this series, with implications for the burden on the healthcare. This study demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic analysis in patients with GDD/ID and MCA. PMID:26507407

  20. Cytogenetic Studies of Rwandan Pediatric Patients Presenting with Global Developmental Delay, Intellectual Disability and/or Multiple Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Uwineza, Annette; Hitayezu, Janvier; Jamar, Mauricette; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Murorunkwere, Seraphine; Janvier, Ndinkabandi; Bours, Vincent; Mutesa, Leon

    2016-02-01

    Global developmental delay (GDD) is defined as a significant delay in two or more developmental domains: gross or fine motor, speech/language, cognitive, social/personal and activities of daily living. Many of these children will go on to be diagnosed with intellectual disability (ID), which is most commonly defined as having an IQ <75 in addition to impairment in adaptive functioning. Cytogenetic studies have been performed in 664 Rwandan pediatric patients presenting GDD/ID and/or multiple congenital abnormalities (MCA). Karyotype analysis was performed in all patients and revealed 260 chromosomal abnormalities. The most frequent chromosomal abnormality was Down syndrome and then Edward syndrome and Patau syndrome. Other identified chromosomal abnormalities included 47,XX,+del(9)(q11), 46,XY,del(13)(q34) and 46,XX,der(22)t(10;22)(p10;p10)mat. In conclusion, our results highlight the high frequency of cytogenetically detectable abnormalities in this series, with implications for the burden on the healthcare. This study demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic analysis in patients with GDD/ID and MCA.

  1. Congenital anomalies of the genitourinary system can help in diagnosis of the primary site of metastatic cancer: a case report and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Deptala, Andrzej; Romanowicz, Agnieszka; Czerw, Aleksandra; Walecki, Jerzy; Rogowski, Wojciech; Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze whether the presence of congenital anomalies of the genitourinary system that are accompanied by specific types of cancer and predispose patients to many complications, including infection, obstruction, stasis, calculus formation, and impaired renal function, could help in the diagnosis of the primary site of a metastatic tumor. Case presentation We report a case of a 58-year-old man with metastatic adenocarcinoma, in whom congenital anomalies of the genitourinary system proved helpful for the diagnosis of the primary site of cancer originating in the seminal vesicles. Conclusion We report an extremely rare case of primary adenocarcinoma arising probably from the left seminal vesicle associated with ipsilateral renal agenesis. The lesion was detected on ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography and confirmed histologically with ultrasound-guided biopsy. Serum markers, ie, CA19-9 and CA125, were elevated, while prostate-specific antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen were within normal limits. Such a constellation of markers strengthened the diagnosis. Our patient unfortunately presented very late in the course of the disease. Hence, we decided to initiate antiandrogen therapy and best supportive care in a hospice setting. Only early detection seems to be the key factor that may result in improved cure rates for cancer of the seminal vesicles. We also performed a literature search for current concepts related to the diagnosis and clinical management of primary adenocarcinoma of seminal vesicles. PMID:27499637

  2. Mutations in SMG9, Encoding an Essential Component of Nonsense-Mediated Decay Machinery, Cause a Multiple Congenital Anomaly Syndrome in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Ranad; Anazi, Shams; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Caddle, L. Brianna; Palmer, Kristina; Ali, Rehab; Alshidi, Tarfa; Hagos, Samya; Goodwin, Leslie; Hashem, Mais; Wakil, Salma M.; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Colak, Dilek; Murray, Stephen A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is an important process that is best known for degrading transcripts that contain premature stop codons (PTCs) to mitigate their potentially harmful consequences, although its regulatory role encompasses other classes of transcripts as well. Despite the critical role of NMD at the cellular level, our knowledge about the consequences of deficiency of its components at the organismal level is largely limited to model organisms. In this study, we report two consanguineous families in which a similar pattern of congenital anomalies was found to be most likely caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations in SMG9, encoding an essential component of the SURF complex that generates phospho-UPF1, the single most important step in NMD. By knocking out Smg9 in mice via CRISPR/Cas9, we were able to recapitulate the major features of the SMG9-related multiple congenital anomaly syndrome we observed in humans. Surprisingly, human cells devoid of SMG9 do not appear to have reduction of PTC-containing transcripts but do display global transcriptional dysregulation. We conclude that SMG9 is required for normal human and murine development, most likely through a transcriptional regulatory role, the precise nature of which remains to be determined. PMID:27018474

  3. Hypoplastic coronary arteries and high takeoff position of the right coronary ostium. A fatal combination of congenital coronary artery anomalies in an amateur athlete.

    PubMed

    Menke, D M; Waller, B F; Pless, J E

    1985-08-01

    This report describes a previously unrecognized combination of congenital coronary artery abnormalities in the heart of a 30-year-old amateur athlete who died suddenly during a basketball game. Both right and left circumflex coronary arteries were half of their normal length (hypoplastic) decreasing posterior ventricular myocardial perfusion. In addition, the right coronary ostium rose 5 mm above the sinotubular junction (high takeoff position), which also contributed to decreased right coronary artery perfusion. This combination of congenital coronary arterial lesions should be added to the list of structural cardiac defects associated with exercise-related sudden death.

  4. Apoptosis inhibitors and mini-agrin have additive benefits in congenital muscular dystrophy mice

    PubMed Central

    Meinen, Sarina; Lin, Shuo; Thurnherr, Raphael; Erb, Michael; Meier, Thomas; Rüegg, Markus A

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in LAMA2 cause a severe form of congenital muscular dystrophy, called MDC1A. Studies in mouse models have shown that transgenic expression of a designed, miniaturized form of the extracellular matrix molecule agrin (‘mini-agrin’) or apoptosis inhibition by either overexpression of Bcl2 or application of the pharmacological substance omigapil can ameliorate the disease. Here, we tested whether mini-agrin and anti-apoptotic agents act on different pathways and thus exert additive benefits in MDC1A mouse models. By combining mini-agrin with either transgenic Bcl2 expression or oral omigapil application, we show that the ameliorating effect of mini-agrin, which acts by restoring the mechanical stability of muscle fibres and, thereby, reduces muscle fibre breakdown and concomitant fibrosis, is complemented by apoptosis inhibitors, which prevent the loss of muscle fibres. Treatment of mice with both agents results in improved muscle regeneration and increased force. Our results show that the combination of mini-agrin and anti-apoptosis treatment has beneficial effects that are significantly bigger than the individual treatments and suggest that such a strategy might also be applicable to MDC1A patients. PMID:21674808

  5. AB086. Chromosomal microarray analysis—detection of both duplication and deletion in patients with multiple congenital anomalies and/or developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Ee, Hui Jing; Yon, Hui Yi; Tan, Mui Li; Roch, Robin; Brett, Maggie; Yong, Min Hwee; Law, Hai Yang; Lai, Angeline

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is recommended as first-tier genetic testing for patients with multiple congenital anomalies, developmental delay/intellectual disability and/or autism spectrum disorder. It detects chromosomal imbalance at a higher resolution than conventional chromosomal analysis. CMA diagnostic service was launched in our hospital in February 2014. The aim of this report is to review the incidence of detecting both duplication and deletion in patients referred for this test. Methods DNA was extracted using Gentra Puregene Blood Kit. CMA was performed using the Agilent 4×180 K CGH + SNP array and analysed with Agilent CytoGenomics. G-banding analysis was carried out on stimulated lymphocytes culture. Targeted fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using locus specific probes. Results From 1 February 2014 to 31 May 2015, a total of 205 patients were tested. Seven (3.4%) were identified to have both duplication and deletion of chromosomal segments that were pathogenic [5] or of uncertain clinical significance [2]. We present a case of a 1-day-old Chinese girl with oligohydramnios, prematurity (35+5 weeks) and multiple congenital anomalies including heart defect, cleft palate, ear anomalies, microcephaly, vaginal skin tag, bilateral clinodactyly and wide anterior fontanelle. Karyotyping and FISH analysis for 22q11 deletion were normal. CMA revealed a pathogenic gain of 2.143 Mb at 16p13.3 and a pathogenic loss of 0.271 Mb at 16q24.2q24.3. The gain at 16p13.3 affects 67 genes including CREBBP. The 16p13.3 duplication syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome characterized by normal to moderate intellectual disability, normal growth, mild arthrogryposis, frequently small and proximally implanted thumbs, characteristic facial features and occasionally, developmental defects of the heart, genitalia, palate or eyes. The 0.271 Mb deletion at 16q24.3 affects four genes including ANKRD11 and CDH15. The clinical

  6. Interstitial 1p32.1p32.3 deletion in a patient with multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kehrer, Martin; Schäferhoff, Karin; Bonin, Michael; Jauch, Anna; Bevot, Andrea; Tzschach, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Interstitial deletions encompassing chromosome bands 1p32.1p32.3 are rare. Only nine unrelated patients with partially overlapping 1p32.1p32.3 deletions of variable size and position have been reported to date. We report on a 17-month-old boy with choanal atresia, hearing loss, urogenital anomalies, and microcephaly in whom an interstitial de novo deletion of 6.4 Mb was detected in 1p32.1p32.3 (genomic position chr1:54,668,618-61,113,264 according to GRCh37/hg19). The deleted region harbors 31 RefSeq genes. Notable genes in the region are PCSK9, haploinsufficiency of which caused low LDL cholesterol plasma levels in the patient, and DAB1, which is a candidate gene for cognitive deficits, microcephaly, and cerebral abnormalities such as ventriculomegaly and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Choanal atresia, microcephaly, and severe hearing loss were previously not known to be associated with 1p32 deletions. Our reported patient thus broadens the spectrum of clinical findings in this chromosome region and further facilitates genotype-phenotype correlations. Additional patients with overlapping deletions and/or point mutations in genes of this region need to be identified to elucidate the role of individual genes for the complex clinical manifestations.

  7. Incidence and Risks of Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract in Newborns: A Population-Based Case-Control Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tain, You-Lin; Luh, Hsing; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2016-02-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are 1 of the major factors in young adults needing renal replacement therapy, but there is little extensive assessment of their incidence and risk factors. This study aimed to evaluate trends in the incidence of and risk factors for CAKUT among all births in Taiwan.This population-based case-control study design was conducted using the Taiwan national births registry, which contains detailed information about maternal health and characteristics of newborns, supplied by health professionals. Of 1,603,794 newborns registered between 2004 and 2014, 668 infants were reported to have CAKUT. Newborns without congenital anomalies were matched with CAKUT cases by birth year, month, and Apgar score in a ratio of 5:1. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for developing CAKUT were calculated using a conditional multivariate logistic regression model.The incidence of CAKUT was approximately 4.2 per 10,000 births. The adjusted ORs for CAKUT in newborns associated with maternal age of 20 to 29 (OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.11-4.28), or 30 to 39 (OR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.17-4.51), maternal gestational diabetes (OR, 2.22, 95% CI, 1.06-4.67), maternal thalassemia/hemochromatosis (OR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.35-5.27), polyhydramnios or oligohydramnios (OR, 9.16; 95% CI, 5.46-15.37), birth parity >1 (OR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.15-0.50), having a gestational age <37 weeks (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.23-1.78), and being a boy (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.53-2.19). Infants of mother with gestational diabetes were more likely to have congenital anomalies, small gestational age (<37 weeks) and low birth weight.CAKUT are associated with several maternal health risk factors. As Taiwan has the highest prevalence and incidence rates of end-stage renal disease in the world, these findings strongly support the need to develop professional guidelines for prenatal counseling and management of women at risk of adverse birth outcomes, to prevent kidney disease

  8. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and congenital heart defects: presentation of an additional 32 cases.

    PubMed

    Hills, Christine B; Kochilas, Lazaros; Schimmenti, Lisa A; Moller, James H

    2011-10-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is a rare genetic abnormality that has been linked to a mutation in the EVC or EVC2 genes. Common atrium (CA) is an uncommon cardiac malformation, and yet it is commonly found in patients with EVC. We performed a retrospective review of the cases submitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) between 1982 and 2007. A review of the English-language literature for previously published cases, as well as current genetic research findings, was also performed. Thirty-two pediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and EVC syndrome were identified in the PCCC database. Twenty-eight (88%) had an endocardial cushion defect, with 15 of these having primary failure of atrial septation resulting in CA. Persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) and pulmonary venous connection abnormalities were common. The incidence of persistent LSVC and pulmonary venous abnormalities were greater than previously reported for patients with EVC. Our study reviews the reported literature and adds 32 additional cases from the PCCC database. Review of the cardiac phenotype in patients with EVC syndrome reveals a characteristic pattern of atrioventricular canal defects with systemic and pulmonary venous abnormalities. The frequent association of these abnormalities is strongly reminiscent of the cardiac phenotype found in patients with heterotaxy syndromes. Emerging molecular and developmental studies suggest that EVC and EVC2 proteins may be important for cilia function, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of heterotaxy syndromes. It is speculated that coordinate function between the EVC proteins is required for a cilia-dependent cardiac morphogenesis.

  9. Strategies to achieve sustainability and quality in birth defects registries: the experience of the National Registry of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Groisman, Boris; Bidondo, Maria Paz; Gili, Juan Antonio; Barbero, Pablo; Liascovich, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    In many low-and middle-income countries, birth defects are not considered a public health priority and are perceived by the medical community as rare, unpreventable events. In this context, a registry of birth defects should address not only the collection, analysis, and dissemination of information but also contribute to local interventions like prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. We describe the National Registry of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina (RENAC) in terms of case definition, data collection, quality assurance, and data sending, coding, analysis, and information dissemination and we present the strategies used to ensure its sustainability. We emphasize strategies for motivating the people collecting data, such as training activities, participation in research projects, returning the processed data, making useful clinical information available, giving non-monetary rewards, and linking cases to genetic services. PMID:23778694

  10. Sex prevalence of major congenital anomalies in the United Kingdom: A national population-based study and international comparison meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sokal, Rachel; Tata, Laila J; Fleming, Kate M

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess sex differences in major congenital anomaly (CA) diagnoses within a national population sample; to examine the influence of sociodemographic and maternal factors on these risks; and to conduct a meta-analysis using estimates from other population-based studies. Methods We conducted a population-based study in a United Kingdom research database of prospectively collected primary care data (The Health Improvement Network) including children born 1990 to 2009 (n = 794,169) and identified major CA diagnoses using EUROCAT (European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies) classification. Prevalence ratios (PR) were used to estimate the risk of CA in males compared with females for any CA, system-specific subgroups and specific CA diagnoses. In a subpopulation of children whose medical records were linked to their mothers', we assessed the effect of adjusting for sociodemographic and maternal factors on sex odds ratios. PRs were pooled with measures from previously published studies. Results The prevalence of any CA was 307/10,000 in males (95% CI, 302–313) and 243/10,000 in females (95% CI, 238–248). Overall the risk of any CA was 26% greater in males (PR (male: female) 1.26, 95% CI, 1.23–1.30) however there was considerable variation across specific diagnoses. The magnitude and direction of risk did not change for any specific CA upon adjustment for sociodemographic and maternal factors. Our PRs were highly consistent with those from previous studies. Conclusion The overall risk of CA is greater in males than females, although this masked substantial variation by specific diagnoses. Sociodemographic and maternal factors do not appear to affect these risks. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 100:79–91, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24523198

  11. Array-CGH analysis in Rwandan patients presenting development delay/intellectual disability with multiple congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Array-CGH is considered as the first-tier investigation used to identify copy number variations. Right now, there is no available data about the genetic etiology of patients with development delay/intellectual disability and congenital malformation in East Africa. Methods Array comparative genomic hybridization was performed in 50 Rwandan patients with development delay/intellectual disability and multiple congenital abnormalities, using the Agilent’s 180 K microarray platform. Results Fourteen patients (28%) had a global development delay whereas 36 (72%) patients presented intellectual disability. All patients presented multiple congenital abnormalities. Clinically significant copy number variations were found in 13 patients (26%). Size of CNVs ranged from 0,9 Mb to 34 Mb. Six patients had CNVs associated with known syndromes, whereas 7 patients presented rare genomic imbalances. Conclusion This study showed that CNVs are present in African population and show the importance to implement genetic testing in East-African countries. PMID:25016475

  12. Congenital limb anomalies: frequency and aetiological factors: Data from the Edinburgh Register of the Newborn (1964-68)

    PubMed Central

    Rogala, E. J.; Wynne-Davies, R.; Littlejohn, A.; Gormley, J.

    1974-01-01

    This paper reports a detailed follow up of 156 patients with structural upper and lower limb anomalies, obtained from the Edinburgh Register of the Newborn (a registration of 52,029 consecutive births between 1964 and 1968). At the time of this survey the patients were between 4 and 9 years of age. The Register had noted probably 96% of all children born with limb defects in Edinburgh between 1964 and 1968. It was found that the diagnosis was completely accurate in only 26% of cases, and partially so in a further 42%. The frequency of each anomaly has been noted, subdivided into isolated anomalies; those that occurred with other limb anomalies, and those that formed part of a syndrome. Syndactyly of toes, post-axial polydactyly of the fingers, polysyndactyly, and brachydactyly were found to have a genetic basis. All `absence' defects, pre-axial polydactyly, and multiple limb deformities appeared to be sporadic. Amongst the sporadic group, the main aetiological factors noted were an excess of maternal toxaemia of pregnancy and of illegitimate children, when compared with the Register Control Data. PMID:4372353

  13. Does maternal exposure to benzene and PM10 during pregnancy increase the risk of congenital anomalies? A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vinceti, Marco; Malagoli, Carlotta; Malavolti, Marcella; Cherubini, Andrea; Maffeis, Giuseppe; Rodolfi, Rossella; Heck, Julia E; Astolfi, Gianni; Calzolari, Elisa; Nicolini, Fausto

    2016-01-15

    A few studies have suggested an association between maternal exposure to ambient air pollution from vehicular traffic and risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring, but epidemiologic evidence is neither strong nor entirely consistent. In a population-based case-control study in a Northern Italy community encompassing 228 cases of birth defects and 228 referent newborns, we investigated if maternal exposure to PM10 and benzene from vehicular traffic during early pregnancy, as estimated through a dispersion model, was associated with excess teratogenic risk. In conditional logistic regression analysis, and with adjustment for the other pollutant, we found that higher exposure to PM10 but not benzene was associated with increased risk of birth defects overall. Anomaly categories showing the strongest dose-response relation with PM10 exposure were musculoskeletal and chromosomal abnormalities but not cardiovascular defects, with Down syndrome being among the specific abnormalities showing the strongest association, though risk estimates particularly for the less frequent defects were statistically very unstable. Further adjustment in the regression model for potential confounders did not considerably alter the results. All the associations were stronger for average levels of PM10 than for their maximal level. Findings of this study give some support for an excess teratogenic risk following maternal exposure during pregnancy to PM10, but not benzene. Such association appears to be limited to some birth defect categories.

  14. The congenital anomalies registry in Belarus: a tool for assessing the public health impact of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Lazjuk, G; Verger, P; Gagnière, B; Kravchuk, Zh; Zatsepin, I; Robert-Gnansia, E

    2003-01-01

    A national population-based malformation registry (BNR) has been in operation since 1979 in Belarus, one of the countries most heavily exposed to the contamination from the Chernobyl accident of 26 April 1986. We describe its methodology and its compliance with established criteria, evaluate the completeness of its reporting, and analyze the data collected in four administrative regions with contrasting contamination levels from 1983 through 1999. Nine easily diagnosed malformations have been monitored since 1983. Reporting completeness exceeds 85% for all periods and all regions. In all periods, the prevalence at birth of these malformations was lower in the most contaminated regions and showed a similar positive time trend in areas of low and high contamination. We conclude that the BNR is a reliable tool for studying the possible effects on congenital malformations caused by the Chernobyl accident. Although the trend we observed may be explained by better ascertainment and prenatal diagnosis, a real increase cannot be ruled out.

  15. [Congenital ectropion of the upper eyelids due to an anomaly of the eyelids in down's syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hennighausen, U; Schmidt-Martens, F W; Reim, M

    1978-05-01

    A 5-months-old female baby with Down's Syndrome developed an intermittent spastic ectropion of the upper eyelids. The reasons for this are thought to be the flaccidity of the connective tissue, which is typical in Down's Syndrome, and a little anomaly of the eyelids, the tarsus was too short horizontally and very weak and the upper eyelids were somewhat larger than normal and elongated. Suturing Bangerter's lid-sheets on the upper eyelids for 15 days resulted in a scarring of the tarsus with the lax connective tissue of the upper eyelids. The ectropion disappeared and did not recur.

  16. Evaluation of a tissue-engineered bovine pericardial patch in paediatric patients with congenital cardiac anomalies: initial experience with the ADAPT-treated CardioCel® patch

    PubMed Central

    Neethling, William M.L.; Strange, Geoff; Firth, Laura; Smit, Francis E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study evaluated the safety, efficacy and clinical performance of the tissue-engineered ADAPT® bovine pericardial patch (ABPP) in paediatric patients with a range of congenital cardiac anomalies. METHODS In this single-centre, prospective, non-randomized clinical study, paediatric patients underwent surgery for insertion of the ABPP. Primary efficacy measures included early (<30 day) morbidity; incidence of device-related complications; haemodynamic performance derived from echocardiography assessment at 6- and 12-month follow-up and magnetic resonance imaging findings in 10 randomly selected patients at 12 months. Secondary measures included device-handling characteristics; shape and sizing characteristics and perioperative implant complications. The Aristotle complexity scoring system was used to score the complexity level of all surgical procedures. Patients completing the 12-month study were eligible to enter a long-term evaluation study. RESULTS Between April 2008 and September 2009, the ABPP was used in 30 paediatric patients. In the 30-day postoperative period, no graft-related morbidity was observed. In total, there were 5 deaths (2 in the 30-day postoperative period and 3 within the first 6 postoperative months). All deaths were deemed due to comorbid non-graft-related events. Echocardiography assessment at 6 and 12 months revealed intact anatomical and haemodynamically stable repairs without any visible calcification of the patch. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment in 10 patients at 12 months revealed no signs of calcification. Fisher's exact test demonstrated that patients undergoing more complex, higher risk surgical repairs (Aristotle complexity score >8) were significantly more likely to die (P = 0.0055, 58% survival compared with 100% survival for less complex surgical repairs). In 19 patients, echocardiographic data were available at 18–36 months with no evidence of device calcification, infection, thromboembolic events or

  17. Congenital coronary anomalies in adults: comparison of anatomic course visualization by catheter angiography and electron beam CT.

    PubMed

    Memisoglu, Esat; Hobikoglu, Gultekin; Tepe, M Savas; Norgaz, Tugrul; Bilsel, Tuba

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the anatomic course of anomalous coronary arteries by axial and three-dimensional volume-rendered electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) angiography and X-ray catheter angiography (CAG). We performed a blinded study where patients who previously underwent CAG with (n = 14) and without (n = 14; age- and gender-matched controls) anomalous coronary anatomy were studied with EBCT coronary angiography. Forty to 50 EKG-triggered 3 mm overlapping axial slices were acquired with 2 mm table movement within one breath hold during the i.v. injection of 140 cc of nonionic iodinated contrast (4 ml/sec). The axial source images and volume-rendered three-dimensional reconstructions were evaluated for the presence, type, and course of coronary anomalies and the results were compared to those of CAG. All normal and anomalous coronary arteries were identified by both modalities in all subjects. Identified anomalies include single coronary artery (n = 3), left-sided right coronary artery (n = 3), right-sided left main coronary artery (n = 3), anterior descending coronary artery (n = 2), circumflex coronary artery (n = 2), and separate left-sided ostia for left anterior descending and circumflex coronary arteries (n = 1). In five cases, there was discrepancy in the course of the anomalous vessels between the two modalities. Consensus reading among cardiologist and radiologists favored the interpretation of EBCT over catheter angiography. Noninvasive EBCT coronary angiography compares well with CAG in identifying anomalous coronary arteries and may provide confirmatory evaluation of their precise anatomic relationships to the heart and great vessels. PMID:16097013

  18. Interpretation of clinical relevance of X-chromosome copy number variations identified in a large cohort of individuals with cognitive disorders and/or congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Marjolein H; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Pfundt, Rolph; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Yntema, Helger G; Nillesen, Willy M; de Vries, Bert B A; van Bokhoven, Hans; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2012-11-01

    Genome-wide array studies are now routinely being used in the evaluation of patients with cognitive disorders (CD) and/or congenital anomalies (CA). Therefore, inevitably each clinician is confronted with the challenging task of the interpretation of copy number variations detected by genome-wide array platforms in a diagnostic setting. Clinical interpretation of autosomal copy number variations is already challenging, but assessment of the clinical relevance of copy number variations of the X-chromosome is even more complex. This study provides an overview of the X-Chromosome copy number variations that we have identified by genome-wide array analysis in a large cohort of 4407 male and female patients. We have made an interpretation of the clinical relevance of each of these copy number variations based on well-defined criteria and previous reports in literature and databases. The prevalence of X-chromosome copy number variations in this cohort was 57/4407 (∼1.3%), of which 15 (0.3%) were interpreted as (likely) pathogenic.

  19. Massively parallel sequencing of patients with intellectual disability, congenital anomalies and/or autism spectrum disorders with a targeted gene panel.

    PubMed

    Brett, Maggie; McPherson, John; Zang, Zhi Jiang; Lai, Angeline; Tan, Ee-Shien; Ng, Ivy; Ong, Lai-Choo; Cham, Breana; Tan, Patrick; Rozen, Steve; Tan, Ene-Choo

    2014-01-01

    Developmental delay and/or intellectual disability (DD/ID) affects 1-3% of all children. At least half of these are thought to have a genetic etiology. Recent studies have shown that massively parallel sequencing (MPS) using a targeted gene panel is particularly suited for diagnostic testing for genetically heterogeneous conditions. We report on our experiences with using massively parallel sequencing of a targeted gene panel of 355 genes for investigating the genetic etiology of eight patients with a wide range of phenotypes including DD/ID, congenital anomalies and/or autism spectrum disorder. Targeted sequence enrichment was performed using the Agilent SureSelect Target Enrichment Kit and sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq2000 using paired-end reads. For all eight patients, 81-84% of the targeted regions achieved read depths of at least 20×, with average read depths overlapping targets ranging from 322× to 798×. Causative variants were successfully identified in two of the eight patients: a nonsense mutation in the ATRX gene and a canonical splice site mutation in the L1CAM gene. In a third patient, a canonical splice site variant in the USP9X gene could likely explain all or some of her clinical phenotypes. These results confirm the value of targeted MPS for investigating DD/ID in children for diagnostic purposes. However, targeted gene MPS was less likely to provide a genetic diagnosis for children whose phenotype includes autism. PMID:24690944

  20. A unique de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 17, del(17)(q23.2q24.3) in a female newborn with multiple congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.L.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lewis, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Contiguous gene or microdeletion syndromes occurring on chromosome 17p include the Smith-Magenis and Miller-Dieker syndromes associated with interstitial deletions of 17p11.2 and 17p13.3, respectively. Other cytogenetically visible interstitial deletions on chromosome 17 are quite rare or unique. We describe a newborn with a novel interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 17 [del(17)(q23.2q24.3)] who died on day of life 17 during a recurrent apneic episode. We have compared our patient`s phenotype and karyotype to two reported patients with deletion 17q with minor clinical overlap. The most striking clinical features of this patient were severe intrauterine growth retardation, widespread skeletal malformations (split sutures, hypoplastic acetabulae and scapulae, vertebral anomalies, and digital hypoplasia), cutis verticis gyrata, dysmorphic facial features, and oropharyngeal malformations (absent uvula and submucous cleft palate). Mild congenital heart disease and anomalous optic nerves were also present. Parental karyotyps were normal. DNA from parents and patient has been collected and cell lines established on both parents. Genes which have been previously mapped to the region that is apparently deleted in this patient include: chorionic somatomammotropin A, growth hormone (normal), acid alpha-glucosidase, apolipoprotein H, and the alpha peptide of type 4 voltage gated sodium channel. As in other clinical cytogenetic syndromes, further descriptions of patients with similar or overlapping rearrangements in this region will be necessary to delineate genotype/phenotype correlations for chromosome 17.

  1. Beals-Hecht syndrome (congenital contractural arachnodactyly) with additional craniospinal abnormality: a case report.

    PubMed

    Meena, Jagdish P; Gupta, Ajay; Mishra, Devendra; Juneja, Monica

    2015-05-01

    Beals syndrome is an autosomal-dominant connective tissue disorder, characterized by multiple flexion contractures, arachnodactyly, severe kyphoscoliosis, crumpled ear, and muscular hypoplasia. It has similarities to Marfan syndrome (MFS) in many respects. It has much fewer incidences of eye and heart anomalies compared with MFS. Beals syndrome is caused by a mutation in the fibrillin-2 gene (FBN2) in 5q23; MFS is caused by mutations in fibrillin-1. With time, there is spontaneous improvement in joint contractures, but kyphosis tends to be progressive. The neonatal form results from new mutations and tends to be severe. Prenatal molecular diagnosis is possible. Ultrasound could be used to demonstrate hypokinesia and joint contractures in presumptive cases. We present a case of a patient with Beals syndrome who presented to the emergency department with pneumonia and was found to have narrowing of the foramen magnum, with partial fusion of C2-C3 vertebral bodies. To our knowledge, this has not been documented in the literature and could be characteristic in relation to Beals syndrome. PMID:25493702

  2. Dramatically different dizygotic twins: will we include them in Research? Twin research reviews: congenital anomalies, mirror-image effects in conjoined twins, older mothers of twins; Twin statistics: 'Massachusetts, land of twins'; Tribute: Dr Victor A. McKusick.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2008-10-01

    The increased frequency of interracial marriage is a likely source of unusual-looking dizygotic (DZ) twins. Some members of DZ twin pairs born to mixed-race couples inherit very different physical features from their parents. This raises several questions, such as: Will researchers wish to include such twins in their ongoing studies? Next, new twin research concerned with congenital anomalies, mirror-image effects in conjoined twins and older mothers of twins will be reviewed. New statistics on twinning rates in Massachusetts will also be summarized, followed by a tribute to the late medical geneticist Dr. Victor A. McKusick.

  3. First Trimester Exposure to Anxiolytic and Hypnotic Drugs and the Risks of Major Congenital Anomalies: A United Kingdom Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Lu; West, Joe; Gibson, Jack E.; Fiaschi, Linda; Sokal, Rachel; Doyle, Pat; Hubbard, Richard; Smeeth, Liam; Tata, Laila J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite their widespread use the effects of taking benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics during pregnancy on the risk of major congenital anomaly (MCA) are uncertain. The objectives were to estimate absolute and relative risks of MCAs in children exposed to specific anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs taken in the first trimester of pregnancy, compared with children of mothers with depression and/or anxiety but not treated with medication and children of mothers without diagnosed mental illness during pregnancy. Methods We identified singleton children born to women aged 15–45 years between 1990 and 2010 from a large United Kingdom primary care database. We calculated absolute risks of MCAs for children with first trimester exposures of different anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs and used logistic regression with a generalised estimating equation to compare risks adjusted for year of childbirth, maternal age, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status. Results Overall MCA prevalence was 2.7% in 1,159 children of mothers prescribed diazepam, 2.9% in 379 children with temazepam, 2.5% in 406 children with zopiclone, and 2.7% in 19,193 children whose mothers had diagnosed depression and/or anxiety but no first trimester drug exposures. When compared with 2.7% in 351,785 children with no diagnosed depression/anxiety nor medication use, the adjusted odds ratios were 1.02 (99% confidence interval 0.63–1.64) for diazepam, 1.07 (0.49–2.37) for temazepam, 0.96 (0.42–2.20) for zopiclone and 1.27 (0.43–3.75) for other anxiolytic/hypnotic drugs and 1.01 (0.90–1.14) for un-medicated depression/anxiety. Risks of system-specific MCAs were generally similar in children exposed and not exposed to such medications. Conclusions We found no evidence for an increase in MCAs in children exposed to benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics in the first trimester of pregnancy. These findings suggest that prescription of these drugs during early

  4. Genetic Syndromes associated with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that genetic alterations or variations contribute considerably to the development of congenital heart disease. Many kinds of genetic tests are commercially available, and more are currently under development. Congenital heart disease is frequently accompanied by genetic syndromes showing both cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies. Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of birth defects, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality during infancy and childhood. This review introduces common genetic syndromes showing various types of congenital heart disease, including Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, Williams syndrome, and Noonan syndrome. Although surgical techniques and perioperative care have improved substantially, patients with genetic syndromes may be at an increased risk of death or major complications associated with surgery. Therefore, risk management based on an accurate genetic diagnosis is necessary in order to effectively plan the surgical and medical management and follow-up for these patients. In addition, multidisciplinary approaches and care for the combined extra-cardiac anomalies may help to reduce mortality and morbidity accompanied with congenital heart disease. PMID:26413101

  5. Pre-conception Folic Acid and Multivitamin Supplementation for the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Neural Tube Defects and Other Folic Acid-Sensitive Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R Douglas; Wilson, R Douglas; Audibert, François; Brock, Jo-Ann; Carroll, June; Cartier, Lola; Gagnon, Alain; Johnson, Jo-Ann; Langlois, Sylvie; Murphy-Kaulbeck, Lynn; Okun, Nanette; Pastuck, Melanie; Deb-Rinker, Paromita; Dodds, Linda; Leon, Juan Andres; Lowel, Hélène L; Luo, Wei; MacFarlane, Amanda; McMillan, Rachel; Moore, Aideen; Mundle, William; O'Connor, Deborah; Ray, Joel; Van den Hof, Michiel

    2015-06-01

    Objectif : Offrir des renseignements à jour sur l’utilisation pré et postconceptionnelle d’acide folique par voie orale, avec ou sans supplément de multivitamines / micronutriments, aux fins de la prévention des anomalies du tube neural et d’autres anomalies congénitales. Ces renseignements aideront les médecins, les sages-femmes, les infirmières et les autres professionnels de la santé à contribuer aux efforts de sensibilisation des femmes quant à l’utilisation et aux posologies adéquates de la supplémentation en acide folique / multivitamines, avant et pendant la grossesse. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed, Medline, CINAHL et la Cochrane Library en janvier 2011 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « folic acid », « prenatal multivitamins », « folate sensitive birth defects », « congenital anomaly risk reduction », « pre-conception counselling »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre 1985 et juin 2014. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en juin 2014. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques, et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Coûts, risques et avantages : Les coûts financiers sont ceux de la supplémentation quotidienne en vitamines et de la consommation d’un régime alimentaire santé enrichi en folate. Les risques sont ceux qui sont li

  6. Taussig-Bing Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Igor E.

    2009-01-01

    Taussig-Bing anomaly is a rare congenital heart malformation that was first described in 1949 by Helen B. Taussig (1898–1986) and Richard J. Bing (1909–). Although substantial improvement has since been achieved in surgical results of the repair of the anomaly, management of the Taussig-Bing anomaly remains challenging. A history of the original description of the anomaly, the life stories of the individuals who first described it, and the current outcomes of its surgical management are reviewed herein. PMID:20069085

  7. Congenital anomalies associated with trisomy 18 or trisomy 13: A registry-based study in 16 European countries, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Springett, Anna; Wellesley, Diana; Greenlees, Ruth; Loane, Maria; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Bergman, Jorieke; Cavero-Carbonell, Clara; Csaky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Draper, Elizabeth S; Garne, Ester; Gatt, Miriam; Haeusler, Martin; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Lynch, Catherine; Dias, Carlos Matias; McDonnell, Robert; Nelen, Vera; O'Mahony, Mary; Pierini, Anna; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Rounding, Catherine; Stoianova, Sylvia; Tuckerz, David; Zymak-Zakutnia, Natalya; Morris, Joan K

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of trisomies 18 and 13 in Europe and the prevalence of associated anomalies. Twenty-five population-based registries in 16 European countries provided data from 2000-2011. Cases included live births, fetal deaths (20+ weeks' gestation), and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly (TOPFAs). The prevalence of associated anomalies was reported in live births. The prevalence of trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 were 4.8 (95%CI: 4.7-5.0) and 1.9 (95%CI: 1.8-2.0) per 10,000 total births. Seventy three percent of cases with trisomy 18 or trisomy 13 resulted in a TOPFA. Amongst 468 live born babies with trisomy 18, 80% (76-83%) had a cardiac anomaly, 21% (17-25%) had a nervous system anomaly, 8% (6-11%) had esophageal atresia and 10% (8-13%) had an orofacial cleft. Amongst 240 Live born babies with trisomy 13, 57% (51-64%) had a cardiac anomaly, 39% (33-46%) had a nervous system anomaly, 30% (24-36%) had an eye anomaly, 44% (37-50%) had polydactyly and 45% (39-52%) had an orofacial cleft. For babies with trisomy 18 boys were less likely to have a cardiac anomaly compared with girls (OR = 0.48 (0.30-0.77) and with trisomy 13 were less likely to have a nervous system anomaly [OR = 0.46 (0.27-0.77)]. Babies with trisomy 18 or trisomy 13 do have a high proportion of associated anomalies with the distribution of anomalies being different in boys and girls.

  8. Prognostic value of trisomy 8 as a single anomaly and the influence of additional cytogenetic aberrations in primary myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Saumell, Sílvia; Florensa, Lourdes; Luño, Elisa; Sanzo, Carmen; Cañizo, Consuelo; Hernández, Jesus M; Cervera, José; Gallart, Miguel A; Carbonell, Félix; Collado, Rosa; Arenillas, Leonor; Pedro, Carme; Bargay, Joan; Nomdedeu, Benet; Xicoy, Blanca; Vallespí, Teresa; Raya, José M; Belloch, Luis; Sanz, Guillermo F; Solé, Francesc

    2012-11-01

    Trisomy 8 is the most common chromosomal gain in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), however, little is known about the features of MDS with isolated trisomy 8 and the influence of additional cytogenetic aberrations. We determined the characteristics and prognostic factors of 72 patients with trisomy 8 as a single anomaly and analysed also the impact of other aberrations added to trisomy 8 in another 62 patients. According to our study, MDS with isolated trisomy 8 was more frequent in men, with more than one cytopenia in most patients (62%) and having about 4% bone marrow blasts. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that platelet count and percentage bone marrow blasts had the strongest impact on overall survival (OS). The median OS for isolated trisomy 8, trisomy 8 plus one aberration (tr8 + 1), plus two (tr8 + 2) and plus three or more aberrations (tr8 + ≥3) was 34·3, 40, 23·4 and 5·8 months, respectively (P < 0·001). Trisomy 8 confers a poorer prognosis than a normal karyotype in MDS patients with ≥5% bone marrow blasts. This study supports the view that MDS with isolated trisomy 8 should be included in the intermediate cytogenetic risk group.

  9. Imaging of congenital pulmonary malformations.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Parziale, Raffaele; Russo, Giuseppe; Gazzani, Silvia Eleonora; Rossi, Enrica; Borgia, Daniele; Mostardi, Maurizio; Bacchini, Emanuele; Cella, Simone; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a broad spectrum of anomalies that may result in varied clinical and pathologic pictures, ranging from recurrent pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which require timely drug therapy, up to large space-occupying lesions needing surgical treatment. This classification includes three distinct anatomical and pathological entities, represented by Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation, Bronchopulmonary Sequestration and Congenital Lobar Emphysema. The final result in terms of embryological and fetal development of these alterations is a Congenital Lung Hypoplasia. Since even Bronchial Atresia, Pulmonary Bronchogenic Cysts and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias are due to Pulmonary Hypoplasia, these diseases will be discussed in this review (1, 2). PMID:27467867

  10. Normalisation of a severely abnormal ductus venosus Doppler flow velocity waveform in a growth-retarded fetus with absent end-diastolic flow in the umbilical artery and congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Müller, T; Rehn, M; Girschick, G; Kristen, P; Dietl, J

    2001-01-01

    Doppler recordings of fetal venous blood flow seem to be superior to arterial velocimetry and CTG concerning the prediction of fetal outcome and optimal time of delivery in pregnancies with fetal growth retardation and AREDV. An improvement of arterial Doppler flow velocities has been described. We report the reappearance of a normal end-diastolic flow velocity in a ductus venosus temporarily showing reversed end-diastolic flow in a growth-retarded fetus with congenital anomalies. This normalization was accompanied by an improvement of the CTG, a loss of umbilical vein pulsations, a reappearance of umbilical diastolic flow and a progressive return of cerebral and venous blood flow into the 'normal' range. Improvement of fetal condition may be the explanation for our observation.

  11. Analysis of Renal Anomalies in VACTERL Association

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Bridget K.; Khromykh, Alina; Martinez, Ariel F.; Carney, Tyler; Hadley, Donald W.; Solomon, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    VACTERL association refers to a combination of congenital anomalies that can include: Vertebral anomalies, Anal atresia, Cardiac malformations, Tracheo-Esophageal fistula with esophageal atresia, Renal anomalies (typically structural renal anomalies), and Limb anomalies. We conducted a description of a case series to characterize renal findings in a cohort of patients with VACTERL association. Out of the overall cohort, 48 patients (with at least 3 component features of VACTERL and who had abdominal ultrasound performed) met criteria for analysis. Four other patients were additionally analyzed separately, with the hypothesis that subtle renal system anomalies may occur in patients who would not otherwise meet criteria for VACTERL association. Thirty-three (69%) of the 48 patients had a clinical manifestation affecting the renal system. The most common renal manifestation (RM) was vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in addition to a structural defect (present in 27%), followed by unilateral renal agenesis (24%), and then dysplastic/multicystic kidneys or duplicated collected system (18% for each). Twenty-two (88%) of the 25 patients with a structural RM had an associated anorectal malformation. Individuals with either isolated lower anatomic anomalies, or both upper and lower anatomic anomalies were not statistically more likely to have a structural renal defect than those with isolated upper anatomic anomalies (p=0.22, p=0.284 respectively). Given the high prevalence of isolated VUR in our cohort, we recommend a screening VCUG or other imaging modality be obtained to evaluate for VUR if initial renal US shows evidence of obstruction or renal scarring, as well as ongoing evaluation of renal health. PMID:25196458

  12. Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Glastonbury, Christine; Marcovici, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft is a rare anomaly that typically presents in the neonatal period as a thin suprasternal vertical band of erythematous skin with a nipple-like projection superiorly, which may exude fluid. We present the clinical and pathophysiologic features and the imaging findings of this uncommon, and rarely described entity in a newborn girl. PMID:25926928

  13. Two female siblings with congenital heart disease, postaxial polydactyly, ectopic neuropituitary gland, hair anomalies and characteristic facial features: a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Goossens, Linde; Janssens, Sandra; Meersschaut, Valerie; Peeters, Hilde; Devlieger, Hugo; Devriendt, Koen

    2006-04-01

    We present two siblings from unrelated parents presenting with intrauterine growth retardation, a congenital heart defect, postaxial polydactyly, a brain malformation (ectopic neuropituitary gland associated with a hypoplastic adenopituitary in one of them, and a hypoplastic cerebellum and vermis in the other), abnormal hair with temporal balding, a striking facial dysmorphism and, at least in the child who survived, postnatal growth retardation and severe developmental delay. This probably represents a novel syndrome.

  14. Unique de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 17, del(17) (q23.2q24.3) in a female newborn with multiple congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.L.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lewis, R.L.

    1995-01-02

    We describe a newborn with a novel interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 17 (del(17) (q23.2q24.3)) who died on day of life 17 during a recurrent apneic episode. Her phenotype included severe growth retardation, multiple facial anomalies, maldeveloped oralpharyngeal structures, and digital and widespread skeletal anomalies. This patient`s phenotype was compared to two other reported patients with deletion 17q with minor clinical overlap consistent with a unique deletion. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Leber congenital amaurosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Registry: Leber congenital amaurosis 9 National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis These resources from MedlinePlus ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis Educational Resources (3 links) ...

  16. Diminished plantar grasp response as an additional indicator of a shunt malfunction in a case of congenital hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Futagi, Y; Morimoto, K

    2001-06-01

    A male infant with congenital hydrocephalus who had undergone ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunting at 3 days of life exhibited a diminished plantar grasp response (PGR) from 2 months of age, which had clearly recovered 3 months after a shunt revision at 6 months of age. The diminished PGR was the only overt neurological sign in this patient. The precipitous decrease in PGR that occurs during early infancy in a hydrocephalic infant with VP shunting is a possible indicator of a prespastic condition caused by a shunt malfunction.

  17. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body in Balance › Congenital Hypothyroidism Fact Sheet Congenital Hypothyroidism March, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... MD Susan R. Rose, MD What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  18. Congenital malformations of the uterus: the role of ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Puscheck, Elizabeth E; Cohen, Leeber

    2008-05-01

    Congenital uterine anomalies in women often do not cause any symptoms, except when there is an obstruction of the uterine outflow tract, which occurs infrequently. Patients with congenital uterine anomalies often go undetected or are only discovered incidentally during an evaluation for something else. Consequently, it is difficult to determine the prevalence of congenital uterine anomalies in the general population, and it appears more frequently in certain populations, namely in those with recurrent pregnancy loss or infertility. This paper will review the pathogenesis of congenital uterine anomalies and the standard classification for these anomalies. We will focus on ultrasound and other diagnostic modalities (hysterosalpingogram, laparoscopy with hysteroscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging). We will compare the accuracy and differences between these diagnostic techniques. With the development of three-dimensional ultrasound, the diagnosis of congenital uterine anomalies can be made accurately, effectively, and with less invasiveness than with other procedures. We will briefly review the treatments and pregnancy outcomes in these different anomalies.

  19. Congenital scoliosis - Quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Debnath, Ujjwal K; Goel, Vivek; Harshavardhana, Nanjanduppa; Webb, John K

    2010-04-01

    Congenital spinal vertebral anomalies can present as scoliosis or kyphosis or both. The worldwide prevalence of the vertebral anomalies is 0.5-1 per 1000 live births. Vertebral anomalies can range from hemi vertebrae (HV) which may be single or multiple, vertebral bar with or without HV, block vertebrae, wedge shaped or butterfly vertebrae. Seventy per cent of congenital vertebral anomalies result in progressive deformities. The risk factors for progression include: type of defect, site of defect (junctional regions) and patient's age at the time of diagnosis. The key to success in managing these spinal deformities is early diagnosis and anticipation of progression. One must intervene surgically to halt the progression of deformity and prevent further complications associated with progressive deformity. Planning for surgery includes a preoperative MRI scan to rule out spinal anomalies such as diastematomyelia. The goals of surgical treatment for congenital spinal deformity are to achieve a straight growing spine, a normal standing sagittal profile, and a short fusion segment. The options of surgery include in situ fusion, convex hemi epiphysiodesis and hemi vertebra excision. These basic surgical procedures can be combined with curve correction, instrumentation and short segment fusion. Most surgeons prefer posterior (only) surgery for uncomplicated HV excision and short segment fusion. These surgical procedures can be performed through posterior, anterior or combined approaches. The advocates of combined approaches suggest greater deformity correction possibilities with reduced incidence of pseudoarthrosis and minimize crankshaft phenomenon. We recommend posterior surgery for curves involving only an element of kyphosis or modest deformity, whereas combined anterior and posterior approach is indicated for large or lordotic deformities. In the last decade, the use of growing rods and vertebral expandable prosthetic titanium rib has improved the armamentarium of the

  20. Whole-exome sequencing identifies mutations of TBC1D1 encoding a Rab-GTPase-activating protein in patients with congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT).

    PubMed

    Kosfeld, Anne; Kreuzer, Martin; Daniel, Christoph; Brand, Frank; Schäfer, Anne-Kathrin; Chadt, Alexandra; Weiss, Anna-Carina; Riehmer, Vera; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Klintschar, Michael; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Amann, Kerstin; Pape, Lars; Kispert, Andreas; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Haffner, Dieter; Weber, Ruthild G

    2016-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT) are genetically highly heterogeneous leaving most cases unclear after mutational analysis of the around 30 causative genes known so far. Assuming that phenotypes frequently showing dominant inheritance, such as CAKUT, can be caused by de novo mutations, de novo analysis of whole-exome sequencing data was done on two patient-parent-trios to identify novel CAKUT genes. In one case, we detected a heterozygous de novo frameshift variant in TBC1D1 encoding a Rab-GTPase-activating protein regulating glucose transporter GLUT4 translocation. Sequence analysis of 100 further CAKUT cases yielded three novel or rare inherited heterozygous TBC1D1 missense variants predicted to be pathogenic. TBC1D1 mutations affected Ser237-phosphorylation or protein stability and thereby act as hypomorphs. Tbc1d1 showed widespread expression in the developing murine urogenital system. A mild CAKUT spectrum phenotype, including anomalies observed in patients carrying TBC1D1 mutations, was found in kidneys of some Tbc1d1 (-/-) mice. Significantly reduced Glut4 levels were detected in kidneys of Tbc1d1 (-/-) mice and the dysplastic kidney of a TBC1D1 mutation carrier versus controls. TBC1D1 and SLC2A4 encoding GLUT4 were highly expressed in human fetal kidney. The patient with the truncating TBC1D1 mutation showed evidence for insulin resistance. These data demonstrate heterozygous deactivating TBC1D1 mutations in CAKUT patients with a similar renal and ureteral phenotype, and provide evidence that TBC1D1 mutations may contribute to CAKUT pathogenesis, possibly via a role in glucose homeostasis. PMID:26572137

  1. A Constellation of Cardiac Anomalies: Beyond Shone's Complex.

    PubMed

    Ganju, Neeraj K; Kandoria, Arvind; Thakur, Suresh; Ganju, Sunite A

    2016-01-01

    Shone's anomaly is a very rare congenital cardiac malformation characterized by four serial obstructive lesions of the left side of the heart (i) Supravalvular mitral membrane (ii) parachute mitral valve (iii) muscular or membranous subaortic stenosis and (iv) coarctation of aorta. We report a unique presentation of Shone's complex in a 14-year-old adolescent male. In addition to the four characteristic lesions the patient had bicuspid aortic valve, aneurysm of sinus of valsalva, patent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, persistent left superior vena cava opening into coronary sinus and severe pulmonary artery hypertension. This case report highlights the importance of a strong clinical suspicion of the coexistence of multiple congenital cardiac anomalies in Shone's complex and the significance of a careful comprehensive echocardiography. PMID:27293526

  2. A Constellation of Cardiac Anomalies: Beyond Shone's Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ganju, Neeraj K.; Kandoria, Arvind; Thakur, Suresh; Ganju, Sunite A.

    2016-01-01

    Shone's anomaly is a very rare congenital cardiac malformation characterized by four serial obstructive lesions of the left side of the heart (i) Supravalvular mitral membrane (ii) parachute mitral valve (iii) muscular or membranous subaortic stenosis and (iv) coarctation of aorta. We report a unique presentation of Shone's complex in a 14-year-old adolescent male. In addition to the four characteristic lesions the patient had bicuspid aortic valve, aneurysm of sinus of valsalva, patent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, persistent left superior vena cava opening into coronary sinus and severe pulmonary artery hypertension. This case report highlights the importance of a strong clinical suspicion of the coexistence of multiple congenital cardiac anomalies in Shone's complex and the significance of a careful comprehensive echocardiography. PMID:27293526

  3. A Constellation of Cardiac Anomalies: Beyond Shone's Complex.

    PubMed

    Ganju, Neeraj K; Kandoria, Arvind; Thakur, Suresh; Ganju, Sunite A

    2016-01-01

    Shone's anomaly is a very rare congenital cardiac malformation characterized by four serial obstructive lesions of the left side of the heart (i) Supravalvular mitral membrane (ii) parachute mitral valve (iii) muscular or membranous subaortic stenosis and (iv) coarctation of aorta. We report a unique presentation of Shone's complex in a 14-year-old adolescent male. In addition to the four characteristic lesions the patient had bicuspid aortic valve, aneurysm of sinus of valsalva, patent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, persistent left superior vena cava opening into coronary sinus and severe pulmonary artery hypertension. This case report highlights the importance of a strong clinical suspicion of the coexistence of multiple congenital cardiac anomalies in Shone's complex and the significance of a careful comprehensive echocardiography.

  4. Nomenclature and classification of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tynan, M J; Becker, A E; Macartney, F J; Jiménez, M Q; Shinebourne, E A; Anderson, R H

    1979-01-01

    At present there is no universally accepted nomenclature for congenital cardiac malformations. Much of the controversy results from failure to distinguish the structural connections of the heart from the morphology and spatial relations of its components. The confusion is compounded by an abundance of individual definitions, many of them speculative. The present article proposes a totally descriptive nomenclature. It describes in turn the connections of the cardiac segments, their morphology, their relations, and additional anomalies in any segment. Each step in the segmental approach is discrete. The overall effect is to force a succinct and comprehensive description of any cardiac malformation, no matter how complex. Images PMID:465224

  5. Co-occurrence of mosaic supernumerary isochromosome 18p and intermittent 2q13 deletions in a child with multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sushil Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Ali, Akhtar; Rai, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-15

    The present study deals with karyotpye-phenotype correlations in a six month old child with multiple congenital abnormalities. Cytogenetic analysis revealed mosaicism of a small metacentric supernumerary marker chromosome with a karyotype mos 47,XY+mar[34]/46,XY[31]. Cytogenetic microarray result showed three copies of chromosome 18p (15,400 kb in size). Moreover, 255 kbp intermittent deletion of chromosome 2q13 involving RGPD5, RGPD6, LIMS3, and LIMS3-LOC440895 was also observed. Correlating microarray data with the mosaic karyotype, the marker chromosome was identified as mosaic isochromosome 18p and was found to be 32,600 kbp in size. Baby resembled clinical characteristics of trisomy chromosome 18p, isochromosome 18p and trisomy chromosome 18. The present study suggested that deletion of evolutionarily conserved developmental genes (RGPD5, RGPD and LIMS3) in the 2q13 region might have contributed to more severity in phenotype as compared to so far such reported cases of 18p trisomy's, as these are involved in nuclear-cytoplasm trafficking, signaling for tissue patterning and differentiation.

  6. Chromothripsis with at least 12 breaks at 1p36.33-p35.3 in a boy with multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Bruno Faulin; Richieri-Costa, Antônio; Costa, Silvia; Rosenberg, Carla; Ribeiro-Bicudo, Lucilene Arilho

    2015-12-01

    Terminal deletion in the short arm of chromosome 1 results in a disorder described as 1p36 deletion syndrome. The resulting phenotype varies among patients including mental retardation, developmental delay, sensorineural hearing loss, seizures, heart defects, and distinct facies. In the present case, we performed array-comparative genomic hybridization in a boy with multiple congenital malformations presenting some features overlapping the 1p36 deletion phenotype for whom chromosomal analysis did not reveal a terminal deletion in 1p. Results showed complex chromosome rearrangements involving the 1p36.33-p35.3 region. While the mechanism of origin of these rearrangements is still unclear, chromothripsis-a single catastrophic event leading to shattering chromosomes or chromosome regions and rejoining of the segments-has been described to occur in a fraction of cancers. The presence of at least 12 clustered breaks at 1p and apparent lack of mosaicism in the present case suggests that a single event like chromothripsis occurred. This finding suggests that chromothripsis is responsible for some constitutive complex chromosome rearrangements.

  7. Renal complications in 6p duplication syndrome: microarray-based investigation of the candidate gene(s) for the development of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS).

    PubMed

    Yoshimura-Furuhata, Megumi; Nishimura-Tadaki, Akira; Amano, Yoshiro; Ehara, Takashi; Hamasaki, Yuko; Muramatsu, Masaki; Shishido, Seiichiro; Aikawa, Atsushi; Hamada, Riku; Ishikura, Kenji; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hidaka, Yoshihiko; Noda, Shunsuke; Koike, Kenichi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Awazu, Midori; Miyake, Noriko; Kosho, Tomoki

    2015-03-01

    6p duplication syndrome is a rare chromosomal disorder that frequently manifests renal complications, including proteinuria, hypoplastic kidney, and hydronephrosis. We report a girl with the syndrome, manifesting left hydronephrosis, proteinuria/hematuria, and focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS) resulting in chronic end-stage renal failure, successfully treated with renal transplantation. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization showed the derivative chromosome 6 to have a 6.4-Mb duplication at 6p25.3-p25.1 with 32 protein-coding genes and a 220-Kb deletion at 6p25.3 with two genes of no possible relation to the renal pathology. Review of the literature shows that variation of renal complications in the syndrome is compatible with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). FSGS, observed in another patient with 6p duplication syndrome, could be a non-coincidental complication. FOXC1, located within the 6.4-Mb duplicated region at 6p25.3-p25.2, could be a candidate gene for CAKUT, but its single gene duplication effect would not be sufficient. FSGS would be a primary defect associated with duplicated gene(s) albeit no candidate could be proposed, or might occur in association with CAKUT.

  8. [Numerical variants and congenital fusions of carpal bones].

    PubMed

    Senecail, B; Perruez, H; Colin, D

    2007-03-01

    The number of carpal bones may be increased or decreased by the fact of anatomical variants or true congenital anomalies. Numerical increment arises from additional or from split bones. Over twenty accessory carpal bones have been described but the commonest are the os centrale carpi, the os radiale externum, the triangular bone and the styloideum bone. Additional carpal bones usually result from a failure of fusion of their ossification centers. A congenital origin is not clearly established for all these ossicles. The scaphoid and lunate may split into two or three bones and several cases of bipartite hamulus of the hamatum have been reported. A carpus with only seven bones results from the congenital absence of a normal bone, which mainly affects the scaphoid, lunate and triquetrum, or from a synostosis between two carpal bones, usually the lunate and triquetrum. Congenital fusions originate from an absence of joint cavitation into the embryo and chondrification of the joint interzone. Numerical carpal variants are uncommon as independent entities but occur with a relative high frequency in association with complex malformations of the hand. These anomalies are detectable on plain radiographs of the wrist, but CT-scan and MR-Imaging are useful to differentiate bipartite and accessory bones from carpal fractures or posttraumatic injuries, carpal fusions having to be distinguished from bony ankylosis.

  9. Congenital absence of the portal vein associated with focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver and congenital heart disease (Abernethy malformation): A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    HAO, YABIN; HONG, XU; ZHAO, XINYAN

    2015-01-01

    Abernethy malformation is a rare congenital malformation defined by an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt. The majority of affected patients are young (<18 years of age) and experience various symptoms, including vomiting, jaundice, dyspnea and coma. The current study presents a case of Abernethy malformation in an asymptomatic adult male patient. The patient exhibited congenital absence of the portal vein, congenital heart disease (postoperative ventricular septal defect status), and multiple liver lesions, confirmed to be focal nodular hyperplasia by biopsy. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings revealing the liver lesions, type II congenital absence of the portal vein and the portosystemic shunt are presented. In addition, the common clinical presentations, associated anomalies, diagnostic workup and treatment options of this disorder are investigated by reviewing 101 previously reported cases. PMID:25624897

  10. Analysis of spacecraft anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.; Graham, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    The anomalies from 316 spacecraft covering the entire U.S. space program were analyzed to determine if there were any experimental or technological programs which could be implemented to remove the anomalies from future space activity. Thirty specific categories of anomalies were found to cover nearly 85 percent of all observed anomalies. Thirteen experiments were defined to deal with 17 of these categories; nine additional experiments were identified to deal with other classes of observed and anticipated anomalies. Preliminary analyses indicate that all 22 experimental programs are both technically feasible and economically viable.

  11. Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. It is one of the most common parasitic infections in humans and is most typically asymptomatic. However, primary infection in a pregnant woman can cause severe and disabling disease in the developing fetus. Recent developments have included increased understanding of the role of parasite genotype in determining infectivity and disease severity. Risk factors for acquisition of infection have been better defined, and the important role of foodborne transmission has been further delineated. In addition, strategies have emerged to decrease mother-to-child transmission through prompt identification of acutely infected pregnant women followed by appropriate treatment. Refined diagnostic tools, particularly the addition of immunoglobulin G avidity testing, allow for more accurate timing of maternal infection and hence better decision making during pregnancy. Congenitally infected children can be treated, beginning in utero and continuing through the first year of life, to ameliorate the severity of disease. However, despite these many advances in our understanding of congenital toxoplasmosis prevention and treatment, significant areas of study remain: we need better drugs, well defined strategies for screening of pregnant women, improved food safety, and improved diagnostic tests. PMID:25232475

  12. Two Cases of Malleostapedotomy in Congenital Oval Window Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang Hyeon; Kim, Da Hee; Choi, Jae Young

    2013-01-01

    Congenital anomaly of the oval window with an abnormal facial nerve course is an uncommon embryological defect, which is related to the underdevelopment of second branchial arch derivatives. Some treatments for improving hearing levels are available; these include hearing aids, vestibulotomy, neo-oval window formation, and stapes surgeries, including incudostapedotomy and malleostapedotomy. However, surgery for congenital anomalies of the oval window has rarely been described, usually in very small series of patients. We describe two cases of congenital anomalies of the oval window with aberrant facial nerve courses. One was a 40-year-old male diagnosed with unilateral congenital oval window atresia; the other was a 10-year-old male diagnosed with bilateral congenital oval window atresia. We also describe the clinical manifestations and treatment outcomes of malleostapedotomy for congenital anomalies of the oval window with aberrant facial nerve courses. PMID:24653925

  13. Scintigraphic demonstration of a gallbladder anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Holmes, R.A.; Witten, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the gallbladder are uncommon. In this paper the authors report a case of double gallbladder in which intravenous cholecystokinin analog (CCK) was used to confirm the presence of two ectopic gallbladders rather than other biliary tract anomalies or dilated hepatic ducts.

  14. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  15. Additions to Magnetic Trackline Archive For Improvements to Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2) and Improvements to Data Dissemination at NGDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B.; Jencks, J.; Barckhausen, U.; Ishihara, T.; Campagnoli, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is the primary archive of marine geophysical data worldwide. However, it has been challenging for scientist to discover and access data due to variable data formats, non-digital data holdings, and transitioning data discovery portals. In 2014, NGDC made a concerted effort to identify, ingest, and archive all publicly available magnetic trackline data for access via a new Trackline Geophysical Data web-based interface. Non-digital data were digitized and added to the Global Geophysical Database and are now available for download in a common MGD77 format. All ancillary and analog data are accessible via the same interface, without having to navigate through multiple directories or prompts. The result is over 16.5 million miles of magnetic trackline data are now available, both through NGDC's improved user interface and as a web service for incorporation into other portals. This allows the geoscience community unprecedented access to global geophysical magnetic trackline data from a secure long-term archive. The addition of 6.5 million miles of magnetic trackline data to the database, since the previous release of the Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2), will give NGDC the ability to improve the model coverage, especially in areas of low coverage, such as around the Eltanin Fracture Zone in the South Pacific. This poster will focus on some key data additions and how they will help us validate the accuracy of the ocean age model/directional gridding algorithm and improve the Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid going forward.

  16. Generalized additive mixed models for disentangling long-term trends, local anomalies, and seasonality in fruit tree phenology

    PubMed Central

    Polansky, Leo; Robbins, Martha M

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying temporal patterns of ephemeral plant structures such as leaves, flowers, and fruits gives insight into both plant and animal ecology. Different scales of temporal changes in fruits, for example within- versus across-year variability, are driven by different processes, but are not always easy to disentangle. We apply generalized additive mixed models (GAMMs) to study a long-term fruit presence–absence data set of individual trees collected from a high-altitude Afromontane tropical rain forest site within Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (BINP), Uganda. Our primary aim was to highlight and evaluate GAMM methodology, and quantify both intra- and interannual changes in fruit production. First, we conduct several simulation experiments to study the practical utility of model selection and smooth term estimation relevant for disentangling intra- and interannual variability. These simulations indicate that estimation of nonlinearity and seasonality is generally accurately identified using asymptotic theory. Applied to the empirical data set, we found that the forest-level fruiting variability arises from both regular seasonality and significant interannual variability, with the years 2009–2010 in particular showing a significant increase in the presence of fruits-driven by increased productivity of most species, and a regular annual peak associated occurring at the end of one of the two dry seasons. Our analyses illustrate a statistical framework for disentangling short-term increases/decreases in fruiting effort while pinpointing specific times in which fruiting is atypical, providing a first step for assessing the impacts of regular and irregular (e.g., climate change) abiotic covariates on fruiting phenology. Some consequences of the rich diversity of fruiting patterns observed here for the population biology of frugivores in BINP are also discussed. PMID:24102000

  17. Generalized additive mixed models for disentangling long-term trends, local anomalies, and seasonality in fruit tree phenology.

    PubMed

    Polansky, Leo; Robbins, Martha M

    2013-09-01

    Quantifying temporal patterns of ephemeral plant structures such as leaves, flowers, and fruits gives insight into both plant and animal ecology. Different scales of temporal changes in fruits, for example within- versus across-year variability, are driven by different processes, but are not always easy to disentangle. We apply generalized additive mixed models (GAMMs) to study a long-term fruit presence-absence data set of individual trees collected from a high-altitude Afromontane tropical rain forest site within Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (BINP), Uganda. Our primary aim was to highlight and evaluate GAMM methodology, and quantify both intra- and interannual changes in fruit production. First, we conduct several simulation experiments to study the practical utility of model selection and smooth term estimation relevant for disentangling intra- and interannual variability. These simulations indicate that estimation of nonlinearity and seasonality is generally accurately identified using asymptotic theory. Applied to the empirical data set, we found that the forest-level fruiting variability arises from both regular seasonality and significant interannual variability, with the years 2009-2010 in particular showing a significant increase in the presence of fruits-driven by increased productivity of most species, and a regular annual peak associated occurring at the end of one of the two dry seasons. Our analyses illustrate a statistical framework for disentangling short-term increases/decreases in fruiting effort while pinpointing specific times in which fruiting is atypical, providing a first step for assessing the impacts of regular and irregular (e.g., climate change) abiotic covariates on fruiting phenology. Some consequences of the rich diversity of fruiting patterns observed here for the population biology of frugivores in BINP are also discussed.

  18. Familial Ebstein's anomaly.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenmann, A; Arad, I; Simcha, A; Schaap, T

    1976-01-01

    A family is described in which both a father and son are affected with Ebstein's anomaly, while several other family members manifest different cardiac malformations. Five additional instances of familial Ebstein's anomaly were found in the literature and compared with our family. Inspection of possible modes of inheritance in this group of families suggests that Ebstein's anomaly is probably inherited as a polygenic character with a threshold phenomenon. PMID:1018315

  19. Congenital skull defect and neurofibroma: without scalp and other abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie-Cong; Wei, Liu; Xu, Jia; Liu, Jian-Feng; Gui, Lai

    2012-07-01

    Congenital skull defect is a rare malformation that is usually associated with congenital anomalies of the scalp and comparable lesions in the brain, spinal cord, limbs, and skeletal muscle. Most previously reported cases have described skull defects with aplasia cutis congenita and other congenital abnormalities. Very few patients with skull defects present with an intact scalp or neurofibroma. The authors report an adult patient with a rare congenital skull defect and local neurofibroma.

  20. Congenital hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-09-01

    Congenital hemangiomas are rare solitary vascular tumors that do not proliferate after birth. They are characterized as either rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICHs) or noninvoluting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs) based on their clinical progression. NICHs have no associated complications, but are persistent. RICH, while usually asymptomatic, may ulcerate or bleed early in their presentation, but involute quickly during the first few months of life. Hepatic RICHs are not associated with cutaneous RICHs, but may result in high-output cardiac failure due to arteriovenous or portovenous shunting. In the following review, the clinical characteristics and current management specific to congenital hemangiomas is discussed.

  1. Congenital hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-03-01

    Congenital hemangiomas are rare solitary vascular tumors that do not proliferate after birth. They are characterized as either rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICHs) or noninvoluting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs) based on their clinical progression. NICHs have no associated complications, but are persistent. RICH, while usually asymptomatic, may ulcerate or bleed early in their presentation, but involute quickly during the first few months of life. Hepatic RICHs are not associated with cutaneous RICHs, but may result in high-output cardiac failure due to arteriovenous or portovenous shunting. In the following review, the clinical characteristics and current management specific to congenital hemangiomas is discussed. PMID:27607320

  2. MR evaluation of cardiovascular physiology in congenital heart disease: flow and function.

    PubMed

    Weber, Oliver M; Higgins, Charles B

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become the method of choice in the evaluation of a number of questions in congenital heart disease. In addition to morphology, modern CMR techniques allow the visualization of function and flow in a temporally resolved manner. Among the pathologies where these methods play a major role are shunts, septal defects, aortic coarctation, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, and valvular regurgitation. This paper explains the basics of functional and flow encoded CMR and discusses their application in the assessment of several types of congenital heart disease.

  3. Morning glory disc anomaly with Chiari type I malformation.

    PubMed

    Arlow, Tim; Arepalli, Sruthi; Flanders, Adam E; Shields, Carol L

    2014-04-30

    Morning glory disc anomaly is a rare optic nerve dysplasia associated with various neovascular abnormalities. Due to these associations, children with morning glory disc anomaly have brain imaging and angiography to detect other congenital defects. The authors report the case of an infant with morning glory disc anomaly and coexisting Chiari type I malformation.

  4. [First branchial cleft anomalies].

    PubMed

    Nikoghosyan, Gohar; Krogdahl, Annelise; Godballe, Christian

    2008-05-12

    First branchial cleft anomalies are congenital rare lesions that can sometimes be difficult to diagnose. During the normal embryonic development the outer ear canal derives from the first branchial cleft. Abnormal development can result in production of a cyst, sinus or fistula with recurring infections. Early and correct diagnosis is necessary for the correct choice of surgical set-up in which identification and preservation of the facial nerve is an important step. A case of first branchial cleft sinus is presented with further discussion of classification, diagnostics and treatment. PMID:18489895

  5. Genetics and epidemiology, congenital anomalies and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, J.M.

    1997-03-01

    Many of the basic statistical methods used in epidemiology - regression, analysis of variance, and estimation of relative risk, for example - originally were developed for the genetic analysis of biometric data. The familiarity that many geneticists have with this methodology has helped geneticists to understand and accept genetic epidemiology as a scientific discipline. It worth noting, however, that most of the work in genetic epidemiology during the past decade has been devoted to linkage and other family studies, rather than to population-based investigations of the type that characterize much of mainstream epidemiology. 30 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. The Neural Crest in Cardiac Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Keyte, Anna; Hutson, Mary Redmond

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the function of neural crest as they relate to cardiovascular defects. The cardiac neural crest cells are a subpopulation of cranial neural crest discovered nearly 30 years ago by ablation of premigratory neural crest. The cardiac neural crest cells are necessary for normal cardiovascular development. We begin with a description of the crest cells in normal development, including their function in remodeling the pharyngeal arch arteries, outflow tract septation, valvulogenesis, and development of the cardiac conduction system. The cells are also responsible for modulating signaling in the caudal pharynx, including the second heart field. Many of the molecular pathways that are known to influence specification, migration, patterning and final targeting of the cardiac neural crest cells are reviewed. The cardiac neural crest cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various human cardiocraniofacial syndromes such as DiGeorge, Velocardiofacial, CHARGE, Fetal Alcohol, Alagille, LEOPARD, and Noonan syndromes, as well as Retinoic Acid Embryopathy. The loss of neural crest cells or their dysfunction may not always directly cause abnormal cardiovascular development, but are involved secondarily because crest cells represent a major component in the complex tissue interactions in the head, pharynx and outflow tract. Thus many of the human syndromes linking defects in the heart, face and brain can be better understood when considered within the context of a single cardiocraniofacial developmental module with the neural crest being a key cell type that interconnects the regions. PMID:22595346

  7. Simultaneous Occurrence of Glial Heterotopia and Meningocele in the Orbit with Clinical Anophthalmia and Neurological Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Pushker, Neelam; Bajaj, Mandeep S; Mehta, Mridula; Kashyap, Seema; Yadav, Prashant; Meel, Rachna; Sudhan, Madhu

    2009-11-01

    The authors describe a 5-year-old boy who had three congenital anomalies (clinical anophthalmos, meningocele, and glial heterotopia) in the orbit. These were associated with multiple neurological anomalies.

  8. Coronary artery problems and disease in adults with congenital heart disease: how to evaluate, how to prevent, how to treat.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, S; Stuart, A G

    2014-10-01

    There are a wide variety of coronary artery anomalies and disease in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). In fact, the increasing burden of acquired coronary artery disease (CAD) has to be considered in addition to congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries, isolated or associated to other congenital diseases. This is largely a consequence of the increasing number of patients reaching older age. Due to complex underlying cardiac anatomy, previous surgery and comorbidities, treatment can be challenging. Individualized and multidisciplinary management involving congenital heart cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, coronary interventionists and imaging specialists is essential. This review gives an overview of coronary artery involvement in adults with CHD, summarizes the current literature and focuses on prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The potential role of cardiovascular risk factors for CAD is also discussed.

  9. Maternal Caffeine Consumption and Risk of Congenital Limb Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Bell, Erin M.; Browne, Marilyn L.; Druschel, Charlotte M.; Romitti, Paul A.; Schmidt, Rebecca J.; Burns, Trudy L.; Moslehi, Roxana; Olney, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Animal studies have shown that high doses of caffeine might cause congenital limb deficiencies (LDs); however, no epidemiologic studies have explored this relation. METHODS This case-control study assessed associations between maternal dietary caffeine and congenital LDs using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS), with 844 LD cases and 8069 controls from 1997 to 2007. Caffeine intakes from beverages (coffee, tea, and soda) and chocolate combined and by beverage type were examined. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for subtypes of isolated LDs (no additional major anomalies) and LDs with other major anomalies separately, comparing the odds of 10 to <100, 100 to <200, 200 to <300, and 300+ mg/day total caffeine intake to 0 to <10 mg/day. RESULTS All total dietary caffeine intake categories of 10 mg/day and above were marginally associated with odds of all isolated LDs combined (aOR, 1.4–1.7), isolated longitudinal LDs (aOR, 1.2–1.6), and isolated transverse LDs (aOR, 1.3–1.8) compared to the lowest intake category. A dose-response pattern for total dietary caffeine intake was not observed. CONCLUSIONS A weak increased risk of congenital LDs associated with maternal dietary caffeine consumption was observed in this study; however, risk did not vary by amount of caffeine consumed. PMID:22903936

  10. Bangui Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    Bangui anomaly is the name given to one of the Earth s largest crustal magnetic anomalies and the largest over the African continent. It covers two-thirds of the Central African Republic and therefore the name derives from the capitol city-Bangui that is also near the center of this feature. From surface magnetic survey data Godivier and Le Donche (1962) were the first to describe this anomaly. Subsequently high-altitude world magnetic surveying by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (Project Magnet) recorded a greater than 1000 nT dipolar, peak-to-trough anomaly with the major portion being negative (figure 1). Satellite observations (Cosmos 49) were first reported in 1964, these revealed a 40nT anomaly at 350 km altitude. Subsequently the higher altitude (417-499km) POGO (Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Observatory) satellite data recorded peak-to-trough anomalies of 20 nT these data were added to Cosmos 49 measurements by Regan et al. (1975) for a regional satellite altitude map. In October 1979, with the launch of Magsat, a satellite designed to measure crustal magnetic anomalies, a more uniform satellite altitude magnetic map was obtained. These data, computed at 375 km altitude recorded a -22 nT anomaly (figure 2). This elliptically shaped anomaly is approximately 760 by 1000 km and is centered at 6%, 18%. The Bangui anomaly is composed of three segments; there are two positive anomalies lobes north and south of a large central negative field. This displays the classic pattern of a magnetic anomalous body being magnetized by induction in a zero inclination field. This is not surprising since the magnetic equator passes near the center of this body.

  11. Congenital Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... arms and legs, droopy eyelids, and problems with eye movements. Weakness often gets worse with time. Central core ... difficulties occur as well. Some children have weakened eye movements. Congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy is a rare ...

  12. Congenital syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital lues; Fetal syphilis ... which is passed from mother to child during fetal development or at birth. Nearly half of all ... Saunders; 2014:chap 143. Duff P. Maternal and fetal infections. In: Creasy RK, Resnik R, Iams JD, ...

  13. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... mother is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  14. Congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Romero, Norma Beatriz; Clarke, Nigel F

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myopathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders, characterized by the predominance of particular histopathological features on muscle biopsy, such as cores (central core disease) or rods (nemaline myopathy). Clinically, early onset of the disease, stable or slowly progressive muscle weakness, hypotonia and delayed motor development are common in most forms. As a result, the diagnosis of a subtype of congenital myopathy is largely based on the presence of specific structural abnormalities in the skeletal muscle detected by enzyme-histochemistry and electron microscopy studies. During the last decades there have been significant advances in the identification of the genetic basis of most congenital myopathies. However, there is significant genetic heterogeneity within the main groups of congenital myopathies, and mutations in one particular gene may also cause diverse clinical and morphological phenotypes. Thus, the nosography and nosology in this field is still evolving. PMID:23622357

  15. Genetic basis for vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kirkorian, A Yasmine; Grossberg, Anna L; Püttgen, Katherine B

    2016-03-01

    The fundamental genetics of many isolated vascular anomalies and syndromes associated with vascular anomalies have been elucidated. The rate of discovery continues to increase, expanding our understanding of the underlying interconnected molecular pathways. This review summarizes genetic and clinical information on the following diagnoses: capillary malformation, venous malformation, lymphatic malformation, arteriovenous malformation, PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS), Proteus syndrome, SOLAMEN syndrome, Sturge-Weber syndrome, phakomatosis pigmentovascularis, congenital hemangioma, verrucous venous malformation, cutaneomucosal venous malformation, blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome, Parkes-Weber syndrome, and Maffucci syndrome. PMID:27607321

  16. Craniofacial Microsomia: Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Bilateral Congenital Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, U. D.; Adhikari, S.

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) includes a spectrum of malformations primarily involving structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Patients with hemifacial microsomia and epibulbar dermoids are said to have Goldenhar syndrome (GHS). Four-month-old boy with whitish pupillary reflex presented with the features of GHS in pediatric ophthalmology clinic. The child had ocular and auricular manifestations. There were no vertebral anomalies, but he had bilateral congenital cataract. The peculiarity of this case is the presence of the bilateral total congenital cataract, in association with CFM. There is absence of epibulbar dermoid or lipodermoid in the eyes, although the child had features of GHS. In addition to it, anesthetic intubation was smooth in this case. Any case diagnosed with CFM and/or GHS needs treatment through multidisciplinary approach, consultation in ophthalmology department is one of them. PMID:26635984

  17. [Congenital analgesia].

    PubMed

    Accornero, N; Bini, G; Cruccu, G

    1980-01-01

    The case of a 12 years old boy with a congenital anaesthesia covering all cutaneous and visceral districts is reported. There were no other neurological abnormalities apart a light mental retardation and loss of axon reflex after intradermal injection of hystamine. Notwithstanding this last finding a diagnosis of congenital indifference to pain was made. The differential diagnosis between indifference and insensitivity to pain is discussed. PMID:6162189

  18. Fourth Branchial Anomaly Presenting with a Lateral Neck Mass in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Ha-Shin; Park, Kwi-Won

    2014-01-01

    Branchial cleft anomalies are an important differential diagnosis in congenital neck masses in infants. The third and fourth branchial anomalies are rare branchial cleft anomalies, which are hard to differentiate. We report here an uncommon case of the fourth branchial anomaly that was presented as an asymptomatic neck mass in a neonate. PMID:26023505

  19. Update: Interim Guidance for the Evaluation and Management of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, August 2016.

    PubMed

    Russell, Kate; Oliver, Sara E; Lewis, Lillianne; Barfield, Wanda D; Cragan, Janet; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Staples, J Erin; Fischer, Marc; Peacock, Georgina; Oduyebo, Titilope; Petersen, Emily E; Zaki, Sherif; Moore, Cynthia A; Rasmussen, Sonja A

    2016-01-01

    CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers with possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy (1). Laboratory testing is recommended for 1) infants born to mothers with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy and 2) infants who have abnormal clinical or neuroimaging findings suggestive of congenital Zika syndrome and a maternal epidemiologic link suggesting possible transmission, regardless of maternal Zika virus test results. Congenital Zika syndrome is a recently recognized pattern of congenital anomalies associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy that includes microcephaly, intracranial calcifications or other brain anomalies, or eye anomalies, among others (2). Recommended infant laboratory evaluation includes both molecular (real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [rRT-PCR]) and serologic (immunoglobulin M [IgM]) testing. Initial samples should be collected directly from the infant in the first 2 days of life, if possible; testing of cord blood is not recommended. A positive infant serum or urine rRT-PCR test result confirms congenital Zika virus infection. Positive Zika virus IgM testing, with a negative rRT-PCR result, indicates probable congenital Zika virus infection. In addition to infant Zika virus testing, initial evaluation of all infants born to mothers with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy should include a comprehensive physical examination, including a neurologic examination, postnatal head ultrasound, and standard newborn hearing screen. Infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection should have a comprehensive ophthalmologic exam and hearing assessment by auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing before 1 month of age. Recommendations for follow-up of infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection depend on whether abnormalities consistent with congenital Zika syndrome

  20. Craniorachischisis Totalis with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia-A Rare Presentation of Fryns Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aneet; Pilli, Ganga S; Bannur, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Fryns syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with an autosomal recessive inheritance. Here we describe the autopsy case findings of a 19-week male fetus, born out of a consanguineous marriage. The dissection revealed left-sided diaphragmatic hernia, resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia and shift of heart to the right side. In addition, anencephaly and spina bifida throughout the vertebral column were observed. All six criteria for Fryns syndrome were met. Such a presentation of Fryns syndrome associated with Craniorachischisis Totalis has not been reported so far. We have also tabulated the overlapping features of some multiple congenital anomaly syndromes that need to be distinguished at autopsy for an accurate diagnosis. PMID:27064748

  1. Congenital Cataract Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender. PMID:27621790

  2. Congenital Cataract Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  3. Congenital Cataract Screening.

    PubMed

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender. PMID:27621790

  4. Congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Mohammad A; Afifi, Ashraf M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is defined as thyroid hormone deficiency present at birth. Babies with CH who are not identified and treated promptly develop severe mental retardation. Most of the babies with CH do not manifest the typical known signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism, and this is most likely due to transplacental passage of some maternal thyroid hormone in addition to some residual neonatal thyroid function, as might be seen with thyroid hypoplasia, an ectopic gland, or mild dyshormonogenesis. Screening for CH has enabled the virtual eradication of the devastating effects of mental retardation due to sporadic CH in most developed countries of the world. CH is classified into permanent and transient forms, which in turn can be divided into primary, secondary, or peripheral etiologies. Permanent CH refers to a persistent deficiency of thyroid hormone that requires life-long treatment. Transient CH refers to a temporary deficiency of thyroid hormone that is discovered at birth but recovers to normal in the first few months or years of life. In the last several decades, there have been exciting advances in our understanding of fetal and neonatal thyroid physiology. In addition, advances in molecular biology have helped in understanding the early events in thyroid gland embryogenesis, mechanisms of thyroid action in the brain, the molecular basis for many of the inborn errors of thyroid hormonogenesis, and thyroid hormone action. However, many questions and challenges are still not answered. For example, the increasing numbers of surviving small and premature neonates with abnormalities in thyroid function need definite diagnostic criteria and whether they require medical therapy. Another challenge is the dilemma of finding the best screening methodology that is sensitive and cost effective. PMID:22570946

  5. Gall-Bladder Agenesis and Associated Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Brian; Spigelman, Allan D.

    1995-01-01

    Congenital absence of the gall-bladder is a rare condition. It is sometimes associated with other congenital defects. We report here two cases of gall-bladder agenesis discovered at laparoscopy. Both had a history of skeletal and cardiovascular anomalies. The investigation of patients with absent gall-bladder can be very difficult. Ultrasound scanning is usually inconclusive and further noninvasive tests should be performed to establish the diagnosis and prevent an unnecessary operation. The presence of other congenital defects should alert the clinician to the possibility of gall-bladder agenesis. PMID:18612357

  6. Congenital varicella syndrome: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ki Hoon; Park, Yun-Jung; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Ji-Sung; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2016-07-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a teratogen that can cross the placenta and cause the congenital varicella syndrome (CVS), which is characterised by multi-system anomalies. There have been 130 reported cases of CVS from 1947 to 2013. The estimated incidence of CVS was 0.59% and 0.84% for women infected with VZV during the entire pregnancy and for those infected the first 20 weeks of pregnancy, respectively. Nine cases were reported at 21-27 weeks of gestation and one case was identified at 36 weeks. Herpes zoster caused CVS in two cases. Regarding treatment, varicella zoster immunoglobulin treatment, irrespective of gestational age, should be considered in addition to antiviral drugs for women who have been exposed to or infected with virus. PMID:26965725

  7. Splenic Anomalies of Shape, Size, and Location: Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Adalet Elcin; Ariyurek, Macit Orhan; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2013-01-01

    Spleen can have a wide range of anomalies including its shape, location, number, and size. Although most of these anomalies are congenital, there are also acquired types. Congenital anomalies affecting the shape of spleen are lobulations, notches, and clefts; the fusion and location anomalies of spleen are accessory spleen, splenopancreatic fusion, and wandering spleen; polysplenia can be associated with a syndrome. Splenosis and small spleen are acquired anomalies which are caused by trauma and sickle cell disease, respectively. These anomalies can be detected easily by using different imaging modalities including ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and also Tc-99m scintigraphy. In this pictorial essay, we review the imaging findings of these anomalies which can cause diagnostic pitfalls and be interpreted as pathologic processes. PMID:23710135

  8. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Paul; Balaji, Seshadri

    2009-01-01

    Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy. PMID:19898654

  9. A surprising content of congenital hernia: complete splenogonadal fusion band

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Prakash Manikka; Reddy, Ajit Kumar; Nutakki, Aditya

    2014-01-01

    Splenogonadal fusion is a rare congenital anomaly. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with a left inguinoscrotal swelling. With a clinical diagnosis of left congenital inguinal hernia the patient was taken up for explorative laparotomy where a transperitoneal band was noted adherent to the left testis. Biopsy revealed normal splenic tissue. Postoperatively the boy was imaged and a diagnosis of splenogonadal fusion was made. This article illustrates the imaging features of this rare anomaly. PMID:24671325

  10. Common Dental Anomalies in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    HAQUE, Sanjida; ALAM, Mohammad Khursheed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is the most common orofacial congenital malformation in live births. CLP can occur individually or in combination with other congenital deformities. Affected patients experience a number of dental, aesthetic, speech, hearing, and psychological complications and have a higher incidence of severe dental conditions. The purpose of this study is to characterise the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with CLP patients based on a literature survey. Methods: By literature survey, this study characterises the different types of dental anomalies that are frequently associated with cleft lip and palate patients. Results: Common dental anomalies associated with CLP are supernumerary tooth, congenitally missing tooth, delayed tooth development, morphological anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentition, delayed eruption of permanent maxillary incisors, microdontia, and abnormal tooth number. Conclusion: The incidence of certain dental anomalies is strongly correlated with Cleft lip and palate, a finding that is consistent with previous studies. PMID:26023296

  11. You are never too old for a congenital disease!

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Mukul; Sarkisian, Saro; Tran, Phu; Ghobrial, Ibrahim I.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital diseases are sometimes overlooked by physicians because of their rarity or because of late onset of symptoms, which may delay treatment plans. This is illustrated in our patient who presented with dysphagia along with chest pain and who was found to have a congenital vascular anomaly, detected in her fifth decade of life. PMID:24392213

  12. [Congenital torticollis].

    PubMed

    Wicart, P

    2012-03-01

    Congenital torticollis is a very common postural deformity, characterized by a more or less severe retraction of sternocleidomastoid muscle. Any treatment, else that "good sense" counsels given to the parents, is indicated. The evolution is spontaneously favorable in the majority of cases before the age of one year old. The elimination of differential diagnosis (vertebral and/or neurological malformations, ocular, tumor) is the key-point. Screening of congenital hip dislocation is mandatory because the physiopathology is the same in both diseases. A remaining torticolis after 18 months of age may be an indication to sternocleidomastoid muscle lengthening.

  13. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  14. Congenital amusias.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap." PMID:25726292

  15. Ebstein's anomaly in neonates.

    PubMed

    Moura, C; Guimarães, H; Areias, J C; Moreira, J

    2001-09-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a rare congenital heart disease abnormality in which the tricuspid valve leaflets do not attach normally to the tricuspid valve annulus. The effective tricuspid valve orifice is displaced apically into the right ventricle (RV), near the junction of the inlet and the trabecular parts of the RV. The authors present a retrospective study of the patients with Ebstein's anomaly admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit, in the period between January 1993 and March 2000. There were ten patients, representing 0.24% of total neonates and 1.99% of total congenital heart disease admitted to the institution in the same period. Fifty per cent were male and only one case had prenatal diagnosis. Holosystolic murmur (100%) from tricuspid regurgitation and cyanosis (80%) were the most frequent clinical findings. Chest X-ray was abnormal in 90% of the neonates, with a "balloon-shaped" enlarged heart. The main electrocardiographic findings were right atrial enlargement (70%) and arrhythmias (40%). Apical displacement of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve, to a maximum of 20 mm, and leaflets tethering to underlying RV myocardium were found in all patients. Tricuspid valve regurgitation was found in 90% (severe form in four cases). An atrial intracardiac shunt, mostly right-to-left, was also found in 50%. Digoxin was used (40%) to restore sinus rhythm. Fifty per cent of the neonates received intravenous prostaglandins. Two patients required a surgical procedure. Two patients died in the neonatal period. During the follow-up period (range 0.3-74.6 months), only one episode of supraventricular tachycardia was recorded. At present seven patients are clinically stable, three of them on medication.

  16. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva without characteristic skeletal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Hasan

    2012-05-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a rare but extremely disabling genetic disease of the skeletal system. This disease is characterized by progression of heterotopic ossification within skeletal muscles, ligaments and tendons. Most patients with FOP are misdiagnosed early in life before the appearance of heterotopic ossification and undergo diagnostic procedures such as biopsy that can cause lifelong disability. Almost all of the patients have some peculiar congenital anomalies, including short great toes, hallux valgus, short thumbs and hypoplasia of digital phalanges. These congenital defects support the diagnosis of FOP, but are not constantly observed in the totality of patients. If necessary, genetic studies can be performed to confirm the diagnosis. Once diagnosed, patients should be advised in order to avoid unnecessary traumas, surgical procedures, biopsies, intramuscular injections and vaccinations. Here, we describe a patient with FOP without characteristic congenital skeletal anomalies.

  17. Congenital Agenesis of the Left Lung: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Yetim, Tülin Durgun; Bayaroğullari, Hanifi; Yalçin, Hülya Polat; Arιca, Vefik; Arιca, Seçil Gunher

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly, the etiology of which is not clearly known. Other systemic comorbidities such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and urogenital system anomalies can be observed in more than half of the patients. It is usually diagnosed during childhood. Diagnosis in adulthood is very rare. We present a case of pulmonary agenesis diagnosed in an adult. PMID:22059149

  18. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  19. DOWN'S ANOMALY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.

    BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S ANOMALY, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)…

  20. Uhl's anomaly.

    PubMed Central

    Vecht, R J; Carmichael, D J; Gopal, R; Philip, G

    1979-01-01

    Uhl's anomaly of the heart is a rare condition. Another well-documented case is presented with a review of the published reports outlining the main clinical features and the bad overall prognosis. Right atriotomy should be avoided if closure of the atrial septal defect is attempted. Images PMID:465242

  1. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure.

  2. [Congenital aniridia].

    PubMed

    Chiruţa, Daria; Stan, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Aniridia is a rare congenital, hereditary, bilateral disease which is associated with various systemic and ocular defects. We present the case of a 61 year old patient who was admitted in the hospital of ophthalmology Cluj Napoca, for the symptoms caused by the ocular defects associated with aniridia. In this case, aniridia is autosomal dominant transmitted with incomplete penetrance and it is not accompanied by any systemic defects. The disease also affects three of her sons and two nephews of the patient.

  3. Congenital sternal foramen in a stillborn Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Shahrzad; Bakhtiary, Mohsen Khosravi; Goodarzi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Congenital sternal foramen is an anomaly whose occurrence is rare in human but is especially unusual in animals. This defect was formed when fusion of multiple ossification centers was incomplete. It may be associated with other lesions in body organs especially cardiac anomalies. In the present study, we report a very rare case of congenital sternal foramen in a Holstein calf. The oval defect was like a gunshot wound and located at the lower third of the sternum. Apparently, the rest of skeleton system seems normal. The awareness of the anomaly is important for better diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

  4. PHACE syndrome associated with congenital oculomotor nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Ramesh; Naik, Milind N; Desai, Savari; Honavar, Santosh G

    2009-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a multisystem disorder presenting with facial hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, posterior fossa malformations and eye abnormalities. The eye abnormalities include microphthalmos, cataracts, optic atrophy and iris hypoplasia. Amongst the neurological anomalies, posterior fossa malformations are common. Fourth nerve palsy has been reported with PHACE syndrome. We report a child presenting with a triad of congenital third nerve palsy, cerebellar hypoplasia and facial capillary hemangioma.

  5. Congenital abnormalities of the posterior fossa.

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Orman, Gunes; Boltshauser, Eugen; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Nowadays, conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities has been demonstrated, including malformations (anomalies due to an alteration of the primary developmental program caused by a genetic defect) and disruptions (anomalies due to the breakdown of a structure that had a normal developmental potential). Familiarity with the spectrum of congenital posterior fossa anomalies and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. The authors discuss the spectrum of posterior fossa malformations and disruptions, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and risk of recurrence.

  6. Congenital abnormalities of the posterior fossa.

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Orman, Gunes; Boltshauser, Eugen; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Nowadays, conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities has been demonstrated, including malformations (anomalies due to an alteration of the primary developmental program caused by a genetic defect) and disruptions (anomalies due to the breakdown of a structure that had a normal developmental potential). Familiarity with the spectrum of congenital posterior fossa anomalies and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. The authors discuss the spectrum of posterior fossa malformations and disruptions, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and risk of recurrence. PMID:25590398

  7. Mitochondrial Factors and VACTERL Association-Related Congenital Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Siebel, S.; Solomon, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    VACTERL/VATER association is a group of congenital malformations characterized by at least 3 of the following findings: vertebral defects, anal atresia, cardiac defects, tracheo-esophageal fistula, renal anomalies, and limb abnormalities. To date, no unifying etiology for VACTERL/VATER association has been established, and there is strong evidence for causal heterogeneity. VACTERL/VATER association has many overlapping characteristics with other congenital disorders that involve multiple malformations. In addition to these other conditions, some of which have known molecular causes, certain aspects of VACTERL/VATER association have similarities with the manifestations of disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction can result from a number of distinct causes and can clinically manifest in diverse presentations; accurate diagnosis can be challenging. Case reports of individuals with VACTERL association and confirmed mitochondrial dysfunction allude to the possibility of mitochondrial involvement in the pathogenesis of VACTERL/VATER association. Further, there is biological plausibility involving mitochondrial dysfunction as a possible etiology related to a diverse group of congenital malformations, including those seen in at least a subset of individuals with VACTERL association. PMID:23653577

  8. [Pediatric cardiology and congenital heart disease: from fetus to adult].

    PubMed

    Subirana, M Teresa; Oliver, José M; Sáez, José M; Zunzunegui, José L

    2012-01-01

    This article contains a review of some of the most important publications on congenital heart disease and pediatric cardiology that appeared in 2010 and up until September 2011. Of particular interest were studies on demographic changes reported in this patient population and on the need to manage the patients' transition from the pediatric to the adult cardiology department. This transition has given rise to the appearance of new areas of interest: for example, pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease, and the effect of genetic factors on the etiology and transmission of particular anomalies. In addition, this review considers some publications on fetal cardiology from the perspective of early diagnosis and, if possible, treatment. There follows a discussion on new contributions to Eisenmenger's syndrome and arrhythmias, as well as on imaging techniques, interventional catheterization and heart transplantation. Finally, there is an overview of the new version of clinical practice guidelines on the management of adult patients with congenital heart disease and of recently published guidelines on pregnancy in women with heart disease, both produced by the European Society of Cardiology.

  9. Post-mortem cytogenomic investigations in patients with congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Dias, Alexandre Torchio; Zanardo, Évelin Aline; Dutra, Roberta Lelis; Piazzon, Flavia Balbo; Novo-Filho, Gil Monteiro; Montenegro, Marilia Moreira; Nascimento, Amom Mendes; Rocha, Mariana; Madia, Fabricia Andreia Rosa; Costa, Thais Virgínia Moura Machado; Milani, Cintia; Schultz, Regina; Gonçalves, Fernanda Toledo; Fridman, Cintia; Yamamoto, Guilherme Lopes; Bertola, Débora Romeo; Kim, Chong Ae; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici

    2016-08-01

    Congenital anomalies are the second highest cause of infant deaths, and, in most cases, diagnosis is a challenge. In this study, we characterize patterns of DNA copy number aberrations in different samples of post-mortem tissues from patients with congenital malformations. Twenty-eight patients undergoing autopsy were cytogenomically evaluated using several methods, specifically, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), microsatellite marker analysis with a MiniFiler kit, FISH, a cytogenomic array technique and bidirectional Sanger sequencing, which were performed on samples of different tissues (brain, heart, liver, skin and diaphragm) preserved in RNAlater, in formaldehyde or by paraffin-embedding. The results identified 13 patients with pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs). Of these, eight presented aneuploidies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y (two presented inter- and intra-tissue mosaicism). In addition, other abnormalities were found, including duplication of the TYMS gene (18p11.32); deletion of the CHL1 gene (3p26.3); deletion of the HIC1 gene (17p13.3); and deletion of the TOM1L2 gene (17p11.2). One patient had a pathogenic missense mutation of g.8535C>G (c.746C>G) in exon 7 of the FGFR3 gene consistent with Thanatophoric Dysplasia type I. Cytogenomic techniques were reliable for the analysis of autopsy material and allowed the identification of inter- and intra-tissue mosaicism and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of congenital malformations. PMID:27450648

  10. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is part of the new 15q24 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, Hilde; Backx, Liesbeth; Pijkels, Elly; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The recurrent microdeletion 15q24 syndrome is rare with only 5 cases reported thus far. Here we describe an additional patient with this deletion, presenting with many features common to this syndrome, including developmental delay, loose connective tissue, digital and genital anomalies and a distinct facial gestalt. Interestingly, in addition, this patient has a large congenital diaphragmatic hernia, as was described in one other patient with a 15q24 microdeletion, indicating that this feature might be part of the syndrome. Chromosome 15q24 has a highly polymorphic architecture that is prone to genomic rearrangements underlying this novel microdeletion syndrome.

  11. Congenital hypoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Sethupathi, Vanathi; Vijayakumar, M; Janakiraman, Lalitha; Nammalwar, B R

    2008-08-01

    Congenital hypoaldosteronism due to an isolated aldosterone biosynthesis defect is rare. We report a 4 month old female infant who presented with failure to thrive, persistent hyponatremia and hyperkalemia. Investigations revealed normal serum 17 hydroxy progesterone and cortisol. A decreased serum aldosterone and serum 18 hydroxy corticosterone levels with a low 18 hydroxy corticosterone: aldosterone ratio was suggestive of corticosterone methyl oxidase type I deficiency. She was started on fludrocortisone replacement therapy with a subsequent normalization of electrolytes. Further molecular analysis is needed to ascertain the precise nature of the mutation.

  12. New patterns in genetic and congenital otonephropathies.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, L; Thompson, P; Wood, R P

    1979-02-01

    In a series of chronic renal and congenitally deaf patients 24 were identified as having inborn renal and otologic disease. Sixteen patients, representing 14 families, had genetic disorders. Only two had the features of Alport's syndrome. The patients were classified as follows: 1) Probable Alport's--2 patients (1 family); 2) Atypical hereditary nephritis and sensorineural hearing loss--7 patients; 3) Renal and inner ear anomalies--1 patient; 4) Renal, inner ear and multiple anomalies--4 patients. The temporal bone pathology in one case showed primary neural atrophy and a mild Mondini malformation. In another a Scheibe defect and unusual calcific structures were found in the cochlear duct. 5) Renal, external or middle ear and multiple anomalies--6 patients (5 families); 6 Renal, middle and inner ear anomalies and multiple anomalies--2 patients. A temporal bone obtained from one case showed combined middle and inner ear defects. In the other, who had a chromosome defect, predominantly middle ear anomalies were found. 7) Nephrotic syndrome and congenital hearing loss--1 patient; 8) Unclassified--1 patient. Some cases represent entities apparently not previously described. Probably most interesting is the delineation of hereditary nephritis and deafness distinct from Alport's disease. PMID:423658

  13. Congenital Absence of the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, Francesco; Balzano, Silverio; Nardella, Michele; Strizzi, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Mario; Bozzini, Vincenzo; Catapano, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    1999-01-15

    We report three cases of congenital absence of an internal carotid artery (ICA), diagnosed incidentally by digital subtraction angiography. The analysis of the cases is based on the classification of segmental ICA agenesis proposed by Lasjaunias and Berenstein. Usually the patients with this rare vascular anomaly are asymptomatic; some may have symptoms related to cerebrovascular insufficiency, compression by enlarged intracranial collateral vessels, or complications associated with cerebral aneurysms. Diagnosis of congenital absence of ICA is made by skull base computed tomography (CT) scan, CT and magnetic resonance angiography, and conventional or digital subtraction angiography.

  14. Perinatal Management of Major Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Eiméar; Sands, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common form of congenital anomaly. Prenatal diagnosis of CHD has been associated with decreased morbidity and mortality for some forms of major CHD. As most cases of major CHD are not identified prenatally, clinical examination of the newborn and pulse oximetry are also important means of identifying more cases. Clinicians must suspect CHD as a diagnosis in a cyanosed or shocked neonate and be familiar with appropriate management, namely the commencement of prostaglandin if a duct dependent cardiac lesion is suspected. Telemedicine can aid prompt diagnosis of CHD and therefore direct appropriate management. PMID:25484461

  15. Acrofacial Dysostosis, Cincinnati Type, a Mandibulofacial Dysostosis Syndrome with Limb Anomalies, Is Caused by POLR1A Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, K. Nicole; Watt, Kristin E. Noack; Hufnagel, Robert B.; Navajas Acedo, Joaquin; Linscott, Luke L.; Sund, Kristen L.; Bender, Patricia L.; König, Rainer; Lourenco, Charles M.; Hehr, Ute; Hopkin, Robert J.; Lohmann, Dietmar R.; Trainor, Paul A.; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Saal, Howard M.

    2015-01-01

    We report three individuals with a cranioskeletal malformation syndrome that we define as acrofacial dysostosis, Cincinnati type. Each individual has a heterozygous mutation in POLR1A, which encodes a core component of RNA polymerase 1. All three individuals exhibit varying degrees of mandibulofacial dysostosis, and two additionally have limb anomalies. Consistent with this observation, we discovered that polr1a mutant zebrafish exhibited cranioskeletal anomalies mimicking the human phenotype. polr1a loss of function led to perturbed ribosome biogenesis and p53-dependent cell death, resulting in a deficiency of neural-crest-derived skeletal precursor cells and consequently craniofacial anomalies. Our findings expand the genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity of congenital acrofacial disorders caused by disruption of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25913037

  16. Esophageal atresia and anal atresia in a newborn with heterotaxia combined with other congenital defects

    PubMed Central

    Smigiel, Robert; Misiak, Blazej; Golebiowski, Waldemar; Lebioda, Arleta; Dorobisz, Urszula; Zielinska, Marzena; Patkowski, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Heterotaxia (HTX) is a heterogeneous group of laterality defects characterized by abnormal discordance of asymmetric thoracic and abdominal organs. Esophageal anomalies occur rarely in HTX cases although additional defects associated with esophageal atresia are common. We report on a rare case of a neonate with HTX and multiple congenital malformations as well as specific facial dysmorphism, corresponding only to a few cases described in literature. Clinical examination of the proband revealed esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula, anal atresia, abdominal situs inversus, dextrocardia with complex congenital heart defect and left lung agenesis. A complex genetic analysis revealed no genetic abnormalities. Despite extensive diagnostic procedures, the cause of the laterality sequence disruption remains unclear, indicating its multifactorial etiology.

  17. Esophageal atresia and anal atresia in a newborn with heterotaxia combined with other congenital defects.

    PubMed

    Smigiel, Robert; Misiak, Blazej; Golebiowski, Waldemar; Lebioda, Arleta; Dorobisz, Urszula; Zielinska, Marzena; Patkowski, Dariusz

    2012-03-01

    Heterotaxia (HTX) is a heterogeneous group of laterality defects characterized by abnormal discordance of asymmetric thoracic and abdominal organs. Esophageal anomalies occur rarely in HTX cases although additional defects associated with esophageal atresia are common. We report on a rare case of a neonate with HTX and multiple congenital malformations as well as specific facial dysmorphism, corresponding only to a few cases described in literature. Clinical examination of the proband revealed esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula, anal atresia, abdominal situs inversus, dextrocardia with complex congenital heart defect and left lung agenesis. A complex genetic analysis revealed no genetic abnormalities. Despite extensive diagnostic procedures, the cause of the laterality sequence disruption remains unclear, indicating its multifactorial etiology. PMID:27625802

  18. Chromosome 8p23.1 Deletions as a Cause of Complex Congenital Heart Defects and Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Wat, Margaret J.; Shchelochkov, Oleg A.; Holder, Ashley M.; Breman, Amy M.; Dagli, Aditi; Bacino, Carlos; Scaglia, Fernando; Zori, Roberto T.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Scott, Daryl A.; Kang, Sung-Hae Lee

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent interstitial deletion of a region of 8p23.1 flanked by the low copy repeats 8p-OR-REPD and 8p-OR-REPP is associated with a spectrum of anomalies that can include congenital heart malformations and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Haploinsufficiency of GATA4 is thought to play a critical role in the development of these birth defects. We describe two individuals and a monozygotic twin pair discordant for anterior CDH all of whom have complex congenital heart defects caused by this recurrent interstitial deletion as demonstrated by array comparative genome hybridization. To better define the genotype/phenotype relationships associated with alterations of genes on 8p23.1, we review the spectrum of congenital heart and diaphragmatic defects that have been reported in individuals with isolated GATA4 mutations and interstitial, terminal, and complex chromosomal rearrangements involving the 8p23.1 region. Our findings allow us to clearly define the CDH minimal deleted region on chromosome 8p23.1 and suggest that haploinsufficiency of other genes, in addition to GATA4, may play a role in the severe cardiac and diaphragmatic defects associated with 8p23.1 deletions. These findings also underscore the importance of conducting a careful cytogenetic/molecular analysis of the 8p23.1 region in all prenatal and postnatal cases involving congenital defects of the heart and/or diaphragm. PMID:19606479

  19. Chromosome 8p23.1 deletions as a cause of complex congenital heart defects and diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Wat, Margaret J; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Holder, Ashley M; Breman, Amy M; Dagli, Aditi; Bacino, Carlos; Scaglia, Fernando; Zori, Roberto T; Cheung, Sau Wai; Scott, Daryl A; Kang, Sung-Hae Lee

    2009-08-01

    Recurrent interstitial deletion of a region of 8p23.1 flanked by the low copy repeats 8p-OR-REPD and 8p-OR-REPP is associated with a spectrum of anomalies that can include congenital heart malformations and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Haploinsufficiency of GATA4 is thought to play a critical role in the development of these birth defects. We describe two individuals and a monozygotic twin pair discordant for anterior CDH all of whom have complex congenital heart defects caused by this recurrent interstitial deletion as demonstrated by array comparative genomic hybridization. To better define the genotype/phenotype relationships associated with alterations of genes on 8p23.1, we review the spectrum of congenital heart and diaphragmatic defects that have been reported in individuals with isolated GATA4 mutations and interstitial, terminal, and complex chromosomal rearrangements involving the 8p23.1 region. Our findings allow us to clearly define the CDH minimal deleted region on chromosome 8p23.1 and suggest that haploinsufficiency of other genes, in addition to GATA4, may play a role in the severe cardiac and diaphragmatic defects associated with 8p23.1 deletions. These findings also underscore the importance of conducting a careful cytogenetic/molecular analysis of the 8p23.1 region in all prenatal and postnatal cases involving congenital defects of the heart and/or diaphragm.

  20. Congenital dislocation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Ko, J Y; Shih, C H; Wenger, D R

    1999-01-01

    Between February 1988 and June 1995, 24 congenital dislocations of the knee joints (17 patients) were reduced with closed methods including immediate reduction, serial casting, or traction in patients from 10 min to 26 days old. At an average follow-up of 4 years and 10 months, an excellent or good result was achieved if there were no associated anomalies. Fair or poor results were the result of delayed treatment or associated musculoskeletal anomalies including arthrogryposis multiplex congenita or Larsen's syndrome. Routine check of the hip dislocation is suggested. Diagnosis with manual testing was difficult, and other methods such as radiography or sonography were suggested in combination to detect hip dysplasia. The dislocated knee should be reduced before treating the hip dislocation. Concomitant treatment of the congenital dislocation of the knee and the hip with Pavlik harness provided satisfactory results. When late, progressive, genu valgus deformity occurred because of global instability of the knee and asymmetric physeal growth, reconstruction of the medial structures of the knee and prolonged bracing provided good results. PMID:10088699

  1. Congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Maynika V; LaFranchi, Stephen H

    2010-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) occurs in approximately 1:2,000 to 1:4,000 newborns. The clinical manifestations are often subtle or not present at birth. This likely is due to trans-placental passage of some maternal thyroid hormone, while many infants have some thyroid production of their own. Common symptoms include decreased activity and increased sleep, feeding difficulty, constipation, and prolonged jaundice. On examination, common signs include myxedematous facies, large fontanels, macroglossia, a distended abdomen with umbilical hernia, and hypotonia. CH is classified into permanent and transient forms, which in turn can be divided into primary, secondary, or peripheral etiologies. Thyroid dysgenesis accounts for 85% of permanent, primary CH, while inborn errors of thyroid hormone biosynthesis (dyshormonogeneses) account for 10-15% of cases. Secondary or central CH may occur with isolated TSH deficiency, but more commonly it is associated with congenital hypopitiutarism. Transient CH most commonly occurs in preterm infants born in areas of endemic iodine deficiency. In countries with newborn screening programs in place, infants with CH are diagnosed after detection by screening tests. The diagnosis should be confirmed by finding an elevated serum TSH and low T4 or free T4 level. Other diagnostic tests, such as thyroid radionuclide uptake and scan, thyroid sonography, or serum thyroglobulin determination may help pinpoint the underlying etiology, although treatment may be started without these tests. Levothyroxine is the treatment of choice; the recommended starting dose is 10 to 15 mcg/kg/day. The immediate goals of treatment are to rapidly raise the serum T4 above 130 nmol/L (10 ug/dL) and normalize serum TSH levels. Frequent laboratory monitoring in infancy is essential to ensure optimal neurocognitive outcome. Serum TSH and free T4 should be measured every 1-2 months in the first 6 months of life and every 3-4 months thereafter. In general, the prognosis

  2. Congenital Portosystemic Shunt: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Timpanaro, Tiziana; Passanisi, Stefano; Sauna, Alessandra; Trombatore, Claudia; Pennisi, Monica; Petrillo, Giuseppe; Smilari, Pierluigi; Greco, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Congenital portosystemic venous malformations are rare abnormalities in which the portal blood drains into a systemic vein and which are characterized by extreme clinical variability. Case Presentations. The authors present two case reports of a congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (Type II). In the first patient, apparently nonspecific symptoms, such as headache and fatigue, proved to be secondary to hypoglycemic episodes related to the presence of a portosystemic shunt, later confirmed on imaging. During portal vein angiography, endovascular embolization of the portocaval fistula achieved occlusion of the anomalous venous tract. In the second patient, affected by Down's syndrome, the diagnosis of a portosystemic malformation was made by routine ultrasonography, performed to rule out concurrent congenital anomalies. Because of the absence of symptoms, we chose to observe this patient. Conclusions. These two case reports demonstrate the clinical heterogeneity of this malformation and the need for a multidisciplinary approach. As part of a proper workup, clinical evaluation must always be followed by radiographic diagnosis. PMID:25709849

  3. Associated dental anomalies in an Etruscan adolescent.

    PubMed

    Baccetti, T; Franchi, L; Cecchi, J M; Pacciani, E

    1995-01-01

    Three fragments of the upper jaw of an Etruscan adolescent of the 6th century B.C. discovered at the necropolis of Cancellone 1 (Magliano in Tuscany, Grosseto, Italy) were examined. A triad of associated dental anomalies was found: congenitally missing second premolars, "peg-shaped" permanent lateral incisors, and ectopic (palatal) eruption of a permanent canine. These findings provided the opportunity to discuss etiopathogenetic aspects of the associations among different types of tooth abnormalities. PMID:7726465

  4. Congenital diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lentze, M

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in knowledge on the genetic origin of diseases within the gastrointestinal tract the number of congenital diseases, which already manifest during childhood have drastically increased. Due to the large application of molecular genetics the number is steadily increasing. To make the access to these rare diseases fast and efficient the data base of the National Library of Medicine (Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man - OMIN) is a very helpful online tool, with which all these disease entities can be found easily (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim). Detailed tables are given to find most of the congenitally inherited disease, which affect the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of congenital diarrheas with disturbances of digestion, hydrolysis, absorption and secretion is described in detail: lactose intolerance, sucrose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, fructose malabsorption, trehalase and enterokinase deficiency, congenital chloride and sodium diarrhea, congenital hypomagnesaemia, primary bile acid malabsorption, acrodermatitis enteropathica and Menke's syndrome. Also described in detail are diseases with structural anomalies of the intestine like microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy and IPEX syndrome. The diagnosis in the disturbances of carbohydrate hydrolysis or absorption can be established by H2-breath tests after appropriate sugar challenge. Treatment consists of elimination of the responsible sugar from the diet. The diagnosis of the congenital secretory diarrheas is established by investigation of electrolytes in blood and stool. Substitution of high doses of the responsible mineral can improve the clinical outcome. In acrodermatitis enteropathica low serum zinc level together with the typical skin lesions guide to the diagnosis. High doses of oral zinc aspartate can cure the symptoms of the disease. The diagnosis of structural congenital lesions of the intestine can be established by histology and

  5. Gauge anomalies, gravitational anomalies, and superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    The structure of gauge and gravitational anomalies will be reviewed. The impact of these anomalies on the construction, consistency, and application of the new superstring theories will be discussed. 25 refs.

  6. Congenitally absent lumbar pedicle: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Wortzman, G.; Steinhardt, M.I.

    1984-09-01

    Three patients who had a diagnosis of congenitally absent lumbar pedicle underwent CT examination. Findings showed that each patient had an aberrant hypoplastic pedicle plus a retroisthmic defect in their ipsilateral lamina rather than an absent pedicle. Axial CT was the diagnostic modality of choice; reformated images were of little value. The differential diagnosis to be considered from the findings of plain film radiography includes pediculate thinning, neoplastic disease, neurofibroma, mesodermal dysplasia associated with neurofibromatosis, and vascular anomalies.

  7. ANOMALY STRUCTURE OF SUPERGRAVITY AND ANOMALY CANCELLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Butter, Daniel; Gaillard, Mary K.

    2009-06-10

    We display the full anomaly structure of supergravity, including new D-term contributions to the conformal anomaly. This expression has the super-Weyl and chiral U(1){sub K} transformation properties that are required for implementation of the Green-Schwarz mechanism for anomaly cancellation. We outline the procedure for full anomaly cancellation. Our results have implications for effective supergravity theories from the weakly coupled heterotic string theory.

  8. The elliptic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janin, G.; Bond, V. R.

    1980-01-01

    An independent variable different from the time for elliptic orbit integration is used. Such a time transformation provides an analytical step-size regulation along the orbit. An intermediate anomaly (an anomaly intermediate between the eccentric and the true anomaly) is suggested for optimum performances. A particular case of an intermediate anomaly (the elliptic anomaly) is defined, and its relation with the other anomalies is developed.

  9. Multiple Complex Congenital Malformations in a Rabbit Kit (Oryctolagus cuniculi)

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jennifer L; Peng, Xuwen; Baccon, Jennifer; Cooper, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    Congenital malformations may occur during early embryogenesis in cases of genetic abnormalities or various environmental factors. Affected subjects most often have only one or 2 abnormalities; subjects rarely have several unrelated congenital defects. Here we describe a case of a stillborn New Zealand white rabbit with multiple complex congenital malformations, including synophthalmia, holoprosencephaly, gastroschisis, and a supernumerary hindlimb, among other anomalies. There was no historical exposure to teratogens or other known environmental causes. Although not confirmed, this case was most likely a rare spontaneous genetic event. PMID:24209970

  10. Congenital myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Irene; Scoto, Mariacristina; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Robb, Stephanie A.; Maggi, Lorenzo; Gowda, Vasantha; Cullup, Thomas; Yau, Michael; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the natural history of congenital myopathies (CMs) due to different genotypes. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study based on case-note review of 125 patients affected by CM, followed at a single pediatric neuromuscular center, between 1984 and 2012. Results: Genetic characterization was achieved in 99 of 125 cases (79.2%), with RYR1 most frequently implicated (44/125). Neonatal/infantile onset was observed in 76%. At birth, 30.4% required respiratory support, and 25.2% nasogastric feeding. Twelve percent died, mainly within the first year, associated with mutations in ACTA1, MTM1, or KLHL40. All RYR1-mutated cases survived and did not require long-term ventilator support including those with severe neonatal onset; however, recessive cases were more likely to require gastrostomy insertion (p = 0.0028) compared with dominant cases. Independent ambulation was achieved in 74.1% of all patients; 62.9% were late walkers. Among ambulant patients, 9% eventually became wheelchair-dependent. Scoliosis of variable severity was reported in 40%, with 1/3 of (both ambulant and nonambulant) patients requiring surgery. Bulbar involvement was present in 46.4% and required gastrostomy placement in 28.8% (at a mean age of 2.7 years). Respiratory impairment of variable severity was a feature in 64.1%; approximately half of these patients required nocturnal noninvasive ventilation due to respiratory failure (at a mean age of 8.5 years). Conclusions: We describe the long-term outcome of a large cohort of patients with CMs. While overall course is stable, we demonstrate a wide clinical spectrum with motor deterioration in a subset of cases. Severity in the neonatal/infantile period is critical for survival, with clear genotype-phenotype correlations that may inform future counseling. PMID:25428687

  11. A first branchial cleft anomaly within the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Koltai, P J; Winkelmann, P E

    1980-01-01

    Although the parotid glands are affected more frequently by cysts and congenital lesions than other salivary glands, the benign multigerminal cyst arising from a duplication anomaly of the first branchial cleft within the parotid gland is extremely rare. Forty-two cases of this unusual cause of parotid swelling have been reported in the literature. An example of a first branchial cleft anomaly appearing clinically as a parotid tumor is reported.

  12. Craniofacial anomalies associated with hypospadias. Description of a hospital based population in South America

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Escobar, Rebeca; Zarante, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Hypospadias is a congenital abnormality of the penis, in which there is incomplete development of the distal urethra. There are numerous reports showing an increase of prevalence of hypospadias. Association of craniofacial malformations in patients diagnosed with hypospadias is rare. The aim of this study is to describe the association between hypospadias and craniofacial congenital anomalies. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the Latin-American collaborative study of congenital malformations (ECLAMC) data was performed between January 1982 and December 2011. We included children diagnosed with associated hypospadias and among them we selected those that were associated with any craniofacial congenital anomaly. Results: Global prevalence was 11.3 per 10.000 newborns. In this population a total of 809 patients with 1117 associated anomalies were identified. On average there were 1.7 anomalies per patient. Facial anomalies were present in 13.2%. The most commonly major facial anomaly associated to hypospadias was cleft lip/palate with 52 cases. We identified that 18% have an association with other anomalies, and found an association between craniofacial anomalies and hypospadias in 0.59 cases/10.000 newborns. Discussion: Hypospadias is the most common congenital anomaly affecting the genitals. Its association with other anomalies is rare. It has been reported that other malformations occur in 29.3% of the cases with hypospadias. The more proximal the meatus, the higher the risk for having another associated anomaly. Conclusion: Associated hypospadias are rare, and it is important to identify the concurrent occurrence of craniofacial anomalies to better treat patients that might need a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27564292

  13. Congenital Intralabyrinthine Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sanjay; Prasad, Kiran; Azadarmaki, Roya

    2014-01-01

    A patient with a congenital intralabyrinthine cholesteatoma is presented. High-resolution computerized tomographic scans and intraoperative photomicrographs display features of intralabyrinthine extension. We discuss pathogenetic theories for the development of congenital intralabyrinthine cholesteatoma. The distinction of this condition from congenital cholesteatoma with labyrinthine erosion is discussed. PMID:25057421

  14. Congenital isolation of the subclavian artery in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, G A; Weathers, S

    1997-01-01

    The congenital anomaly of isolation of the subclavian artery, on the left side, is associated with a right aortic arch. The subclavian artery loses its connection with the aorta and is connected to the left pulmonary artery via the ligamentum arteriosum. Subclavian steal syndrome accompanies this anomaly in a minority of patients. We report 2 cases of adults with subclavian artery isolation, one of whom was symptomatic, and we discuss the importance of recognizing its presence. Images PMID:9068141

  15. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  16. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  17. First report of a de novo 18q11.2 microdeletion including GATA6 associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bui, Peter H; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Wong, Derek; Perens, Gregory; Dipple, Katrina M; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 have been previously reported in many patients. Most cases involve the more distal regions of the long arm (18q21.1->qter). However, proximal interstitial deletions involving 18q11.2 are extremely rare. Here we report on a 14-month-old female with a 4.7 Mb (19,667,062-24,401,876 hg19) de novo interstitial deletion within chromosomal band 18q11.2, which includes GATA6 and 24 other RefSeq genes. The clinical features of our patient include complex congenital heart defects, a double outlet right ventricle, a subaortic ventricular septal defect, D-malposed great arteries, an atrial septal defect, a dysplastic aortic valve and patent ductus arteriosus. In addition, she had renal anomalies-a duplicated collecting system on the left and mild right hydronephrosis. These heart and renal defects are not reported in other patients with 18q proximal interstitial deletions. Heterozygous point mutations in GATA6, encoding for a zinc finger transcription factor, have been shown to cause congenital heart defects. Given the well-established biological role of GATA6 in cardiac development, a deletion of GATA6 is very likely responsible for our patient's complex congenital heart defects. This is the smallest and most proximal 18q11.2 deletion involving GATA6 that is associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal anomalies.

  18. [Congenital heart disease, heterotaxia and laterality].

    PubMed

    Icardo, José Manuel; García Rincón, Juan Manuel; Ros, María Angeles

    2002-09-01

    Congenital heart disease occurs in about 0,8% of all newborns. Many cardiac malformations occur among relatives and have a polymorphic presentation. The origin of most congenital heart disease is thought to be multifactorial, implying both anomalous expression of genes and the influence of epigenetic factors. However, in a small number of cases, the origin of congenital heart disease has been directly related to chromosomal anomalies or to defects in a single gene. Curiously, defects in a single gene can explain a polymorphic presentation if the anomalous gene controls a basic embryonic process that affects different organs in time and space. Some of these genes appear to control the establishment of laterality. The establishment of the left-right asymmetry starts at the Hensen node. Here, the initial embryonic symmetry is broken by cascades of gene activation that confer specific properties on the left and right sides of the embryo. Although there are variations between species, some basic patterns of gene expression (Nodal, Pitx2) appear to be maintained along the phylogenetic scale. Anomalous expression of these genes induces the heterotaxia syndrome, which usually courses with congenital heart disease. The development of heart malformations is illustrated with the mouse mutant iv/iv, which is a model for the heterotaxia syndrome and the associated congenital heart disease.

  19. Ultrasonography in Diagnosis of Congenital Absence of the Vas Deferens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Liang, Chaozhao

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital absence of the vas deferens is an important cause of obstructive azoospermia, and the lack of an imaging diagnostic test is a critical problem. The aim of this study is to discuss the use of ultrasonography in congenital absence of vas deferens, including dysplasia of the epididymis and the seminal vesical. Material/Methods Five fresh spermatic cord specimens were detected by ultrasonography (US) to evaluate the image of the spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens. Fifty normal males had scrotal US to confirm whether the normal spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens can be detected and to measure the internal and external diameter on the long axis view. Forty-six males clinically diagnosed as having congenital absence of vas deferens underwent scrotal US to evaluate the spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens and the epididymis. The seminal vesicals were detected with transrectal ultrasonography. We evaluated images of the vas deferens, epididymis, and seminal vesical. Results Scrotal ultrasonography can distinguish the vas deferens from the other cord-like structures in the spermatic cord, and the vas deferens has a characteristic image. Scrotal ultrasonography detected all 50 normal males and measured the diameter. No statistically significant difference was found between the left and right measurements. In the 46 patients, the following anomalies were observed: 1) 42 cases of congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens; 2) 2 cases of congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens; and 3) 1 case of congenital segmental absence of the vas deferens. All 46 cases were accompanied with epididymis and seminal vesical anomalies. Conclusions The spermatic cord segment of the vas deferens can be detected by US, which is a valuable tool in diagnosis of congenital absence of the vas deferens. Seminal vesical and epididymis anomalies often associated with congenital absence of the vas deferens were revealed by ultrasonography. PMID

  20. Imaging diagnosis of congenital uterine malformation.

    PubMed

    Pui, Margaret H

    2004-10-01

    Congenital anomaly of the female reproductive system is associated with higher rate of infertility, spontaneous abortion, intrauterine growth retardation, premature birth and postpartum bleed. Because of the variable clinical pictures of obstruction of menstrual flow in adolescence to hypomenorrhea, vaginal discharge, dyspareunia, and fertility problems in adult life, early and accurate diagnosis is difficult. Complete uterine and vaginal septum can be easily confused with uterus didelphys. Management of these two müllerian duct anomalies is different. With improved treatment methods for complete relief of symptoms and prevention of further sequelae, comprehensive evaluation is important to identify the underlying problem and formulate appropriate therapeutic plan. The embryology, classification, and clinical presentation of uterine malformation, advantages and limitations of diagnostic methods including hysterosalpingogram, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, laparoscopy, and hysteroscopy are discussed. The imaging features of different types of uterine anomalies are illustrated.

  1. [Enzymopathic congenital hyperlactacidemia].

    PubMed

    Leroux, J P; Marsac, C; Saudubray, J M

    1976-01-01

    Congenital enzymopathic hyperlactacidemia results from a defect of utilisation of pyruvate either at the level of the pyruvate junction (pyruvate-carboxylase, pyruvate-dehydrogenase and Kreb's cycle), or at the level of the unidirectional enzymes on neo-glucogenesis and of neo-glycogenogenesis, e.g. glucose-6-phosphatase, phosphoenol-pyruvate-carboxykinase and glycogen synthetase. The enzymopathies which affect neoglucogenesis associate hyper-lactacidemia and fasting hypoglycemia and more or less marked hepatomegaly. Type I glycogenesis (von Gierke's disease) is the best known example. Enzymopathies which affect the pyruvate junction and the Krebs cycle, may be manifested in addition by: --either chronic neuropathies, e.g. Leigh's disease, recurrent ataxia, and moderate hyperalactacidemia,--or, as in congenital lactic acidoses, which have a rapid and severe prognosis with major hyperlactacidemia. Functional investigation, in particular, loading tests are of great value in orientation and justify the practice of tissue biopsy which permits the enzyme diagnosis. Recent, still unconfirmed knowledge of the pathogenesis of these diseases emphasizes the considerable importance of estimation of blood lactic acid in the investigation of metabolic acidoses of hereditary origin. PMID:184725

  2. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Bale, James F.; Miner, Lonnie; Petheram, Susan J.

    2002-05-01

    Intrauterine infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), a betaherpesvirus, remains the most frequent congenital virus infection in many regions of the world. Although most CMV-infected newborns lack signs of CMV infection, approximately 10% have signs that can consist of low birth weight, jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, skin rash, microcephaly, and chorioretinitis. Neonates with signs of CMV infection at birth have high rates of audiologic and neurodevelopmental sequelae. Although postnatal therapy with ganciclovir transiently reduces virus shedding and may lessen the audiologic consequences of CMV in some infected infants, additional strategies are needed to prevent congenital CMV disease and to improve the neurodevelopmental prognosis of infants infected with CMV in utero. Some cases of intrauterine infections can be prevented in susceptible women by avoiding contact with the urine or saliva of young children who may be shedding CMV. Vaccines against CMV remain in the experimental stages of development. Termination of pregnancy can be offered to women whose infants have evidence of intrauterine CMV infection and sonographic signs of central nervous system damage. Infants who survive symptomatic intrauterine infections have high rates of neurodevelopmental sequelae and require comprehensive evaluation and therapy through center and home-based early intervention programs. PMID:11931729

  3. Chiral anomalies and differential geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zumino, B.

    1983-10-01

    Some properties of chiral anomalies are described from a geometric point of view. Topics include chiral anomalies and differential forms, transformation properties of the anomalies, identification and use of the anomalies, and normalization of the anomalies. 22 references. (WHK)

  4. Pulmonary agenesis and pulmonary sling anomaly in an infant with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takci, S; Yigit, S; Haliloglu, M; Boduroglu, K; Kiper, N

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly presenting with normal karyotype in most of the cases. Rarely pulmonary agenesis is associated with chromosomal abnormalities and other genetic disorders such as Oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum, VACTERL association and velo-cardio-facial syndrome. This report presents a patient with pulmonary agenesis, pulmonary sling anomaly and Down syndrome. PMID:24341150

  5. Ebstein's Anomaly, Left Ventricular Noncompaction, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Michael; Warner, Luke; Collins, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a congenital disorder characterized by apical displacement of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve. Ebstein's anomaly may be seen in association with other cardiac conditions, including patent foramen ovale, atrial septal defect, and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). LVNC is characterized by increased trabeculation within the left ventricular apex. Echocardiography is often used to diagnose LVNC; however, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers superior characterization of the myocardium. We report a case of sudden cardiac death in a patient with Ebstein's anomaly with unrecognized LVNC noted on post mortem examination with screening documenting the presence of LVNC in one of the patient's twin sons. PMID:26240764

  6. Congenital hypotrichosis and partial anodontia in a crossbred beef calf

    PubMed Central

    Barlund, Christy S.; Clark, Edward G.; Leeb, Tosso; Drögemüller, Cord; Palmer, Colin W.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical examination, skin biopsies, skull radiographs, and DNA analysis of a 2-day-old Red Angus-Charolais-Simmental cross bull calf confirmed the diagnosis of congenital hypotrichosis and anodontia defect (HAD), also called anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, which is a rare anomaly caused by a deletion in the bovine EDA gene on the X chromosome. PMID:17616058

  7. Congenital Syndromes and Mildly Handicapped Students: Implications for Special Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra M.

    1989-01-01

    Many learning disabilities or cases of mild retardation are due to medically diagnosable, congenital syndromes, such as fetal alcohol syndrome, sex chromosome abnormalities, multiple anomaly syndromes, phenylketonuria, and Tourette Syndrome. These syndromes are discussed, and suggestions are given for special education management. (Author/JDD)

  8. Congenital aganglionosis in a 3-day-old Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Necropsy of a 3-day-old Holstein heifer revealed proximal megacolon and distal colorectal hypoplasia. Histologically, the hypoplastic distal colon and rectum lacked submucosal and myenteric ganglia. Clinical history, physical examination, and pathologic findings were consistent with intestinal aganglionosis, a congenital anomaly well documented in humans and foals but not previously reported in cattle. PMID:15943121

  9. Basic imaging in congenital heart disease. 3rd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Swischuk, L.E.; Sapire, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The book retains its previous format with chapters on embryology, plain film interpretation, classification of pulmonary vascular patterns, cardiac malpositions and vascular anomalies, and illustrative cases. The book is organized with an abundance of illustrative figures, diagrams, and image reproductions. These include plain chest radiographs, angiograms, echocardiograms, and MR images. The authors present the pathophysiology and imaging of congenital heart lesions.

  10. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Blei, Francine

    2015-04-01

    Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies encompass entities with a vascular anomaly as the predominant feature vs those syndromes with predominant somatic overgrowth and a vascular anomaly as a more minor component. The focus of this article is to categorize these syndromes phenotypically, including updated clinical criteria, radiologic features, evaluation, management issues, pathophysiology, and genetic information. A literature review was conducted in PubMed using key words "overgrowth syndromes and vascular anomalies" as well as specific literature reviews for each entity and supportive genetic information (e.g., somatic mosaicism). Additional searches in OMIM and Gene Reviews were conducted for each syndrome. Disease entities were categorized by predominant clinical features, known genetic information, and putative affected signaling pathway. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, often with variable clinical expression, due to germline or somatic mutations. Overgrowth can be focal (e.g., macrocephaly) or generalized, often asymmetrically (and/or mosaically) distributed. All germ layers may be affected, and the abnormalities may be progressive. Patients with overgrowth syndromes may be at an increased risk for malignancies. Practitioners should be attentive to patients having syndromes with overgrowth and vascular defects. These patients require proactive evaluation, referral to appropriate specialists, and in some cases, early monitoring for potential malignancies. Progress in identifying vascular anomaly-related overgrowth syndromes and their genetic etiology has been robust in the past decade and is contributing to genetically based prenatal diagnosis and new therapies targeting the putative causative genetic mutations. PMID:25937473

  11. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Blei, Francine

    2015-04-01

    Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies encompass entities with a vascular anomaly as the predominant feature vs those syndromes with predominant somatic overgrowth and a vascular anomaly as a more minor component. The focus of this article is to categorize these syndromes phenotypically, including updated clinical criteria, radiologic features, evaluation, management issues, pathophysiology, and genetic information. A literature review was conducted in PubMed using key words "overgrowth syndromes and vascular anomalies" as well as specific literature reviews for each entity and supportive genetic information (e.g., somatic mosaicism). Additional searches in OMIM and Gene Reviews were conducted for each syndrome. Disease entities were categorized by predominant clinical features, known genetic information, and putative affected signaling pathway. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, often with variable clinical expression, due to germline or somatic mutations. Overgrowth can be focal (e.g., macrocephaly) or generalized, often asymmetrically (and/or mosaically) distributed. All germ layers may be affected, and the abnormalities may be progressive. Patients with overgrowth syndromes may be at an increased risk for malignancies. Practitioners should be attentive to patients having syndromes with overgrowth and vascular defects. These patients require proactive evaluation, referral to appropriate specialists, and in some cases, early monitoring for potential malignancies. Progress in identifying vascular anomaly-related overgrowth syndromes and their genetic etiology has been robust in the past decade and is contributing to genetically based prenatal diagnosis and new therapies targeting the putative causative genetic mutations.

  12. Congenital duplication of the gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Safioleas, Michael C; Papavassiliou, Vassilios G; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Angouras, Dimitrios C; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2006-03-01

    Duplication of the gallbladder is a rare congenital anomaly of the biliary system. In this article, two cases of gallbladder duplication are presented. The first case is a patient with double gallbladder and concomitant choledocholithiasis. The probable diagnosis of double gallbladder was made preoperatively by computed tomography. The patient underwent a successful open cholecystectomy and common bile duct exploration. In the second case, two cystic formations in the place of gallbladder are demonstrated with ultrasound scan in a woman with acute cholecystitis. At surgery, two gallbladders were found. A brief review of epidemiology and anatomy of double gallbladder is included, along with a discussion of the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment of this condition.

  13. Congenital lateral abdominal wall hernia.

    PubMed

    Montes-Tapia, Fernando; Cura-Esquivel, Idalia; Gutiérrez, Susana; Rodríguez-Balderrama, Isaías; de la O-Cavazos, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Congenital abdominal wall defects that are located outside of the anterior wall are extremely rare and difficult to classify because there are no well accepted guidelines. There are two regions outside of the anterior wall: the flank or lateral wall; and the lumbar region. We report the case of a patient with an oval 3 cm-diameter hernia defect located above the anterior axillary line, which affects all layers of the muscular wall. An anorectal malformation consisting of a recto-vestibular fistula was also identified, and chest X-ray showed dextrocardia. The suggested treatment is repair of the defect before 1 year of age. Given that the anomalies described may accompany lateral abdominal wall hernia, it is important to diagnose and treat the associated defects.

  14. Treatment of congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Sara Yvonne; Rall, Katharina; Campo, Rudi; Oppelt, Peter; Isaacson, Keith

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of müllerian malformations is 1 in 200, or 0.5%. A third of the anomalies are septate, a third bicornuate uteri, 10% arcuate uterus, 10% didelphis and unicornuate uterus, and < 5% uterine and vaginal aplasia. Correct diagnosis of the malformation is most important but often very difficult. Correct treatment can only be performed if the malformation is clear. Longitudinal vaginal septums have to be removed due to potential obstetric problems. Transverse vaginal septums can cause hematocolpos and pain and have to be incised crosswise and excised so as not to shorten the vagina at the same time. Congenital vaginal agenesis occurs in Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome patients and in androgen insensitivity syndrome. The first choice for surgical treatment should be the new laparoscopic-assisted creation of a neovagina. Septate uterus has to be distinguished from a bicornuate uterus. Even if it is not proven to be a cause for infertility, the chance of miscarriage can be diminished by performing hysteroscopic metroplasty. Repair of a uterine septum in infertility patients often improves pregnancy rates. In contrast, surgical repair of a bicornuate uterus requires an abdominal metroplasty. This should only be performed if the patient has recurrent fetal loss due to the uterine structural defect. In a unicornuate uterus it is most important to determine if there is a second uterine horn that can cause cyclic pain if it has functioning endometrium. The only surgical option in these cases is to remove the rudimentary uterus with endometrium and hematometra, respectively.

  15. Prevalence of Associated Anomalies in Cleft Lip and/or Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi Fakhim, Shahin; Shahidi, Nikzad; Lotfi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Orofacial clefts are among the most common congenital anomalies. Patients presenting with orofacial clefts often require surgery or other complex procedures. A cleft lip or palate can be a single anomaly or a part of multiple congenital anomalies. The reported prevalence of cleft disease and associated anomalies varies widely across the literature, and is dependent on the diagnostic procedure used. In this study we determined the prevalence of associated anomalies in patients with a cleft lip and/or palate, with a specific focus on cardiac anomalies. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 526 patients with a cleft lip and /or palate admitted to the children’s referral hospital between 2006 and 2011 were evaluated. All associated anomalies were detected and recorded. Patient information collected included age, gender, type and side of cleft, craniofacial anomalies and presence of other anomalies, including cardiac anomalies. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results: Of the 526 patients enrolled in the study, 58% (305) were male and 42% (221) were female. In total, 75% of patients (396) were aged between 4 and 8 years and 25% (130) were aged less than 4 years. The most common cleft type in our study was bilateral cleft palate. The most commonly associated anomaly among cleft patients, in 12% of cleft patients, was a cardiac anomaly. The most common cardiac anomaly was atrial septal defect (ASD). Conclusion: The prevalence of associated anomalies among orofacial cleft patients is high. The most common associated anomaly is cardiac anomaly, with ASD being the most common cardiac anomaly. There are no significant relationships between type of cleft and associated cardiac anomalies. PMID:27280100

  16. Congenital Chagas disease: an update

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Yves; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Luquetti, Alejandro O; Buekens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Congenital infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is a global problem, occurring on average in 5% of children born from chronically infected mothers in endemic areas, with variations depending on the region. This presentation aims to focus on and update epidemiological data, research methods, involved factors, control strategy and possible prevention of congenital infection with T. cruzi. Considering that etiological treatment of the child is always effective if performed before one year of age, the diagnosis of infection in pregnant women and their newborns has to become the standard of care and integrated into the surveillance programs of syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus. In addition to the standard tests, polymerase chain reaction performed on blood of neonates of infected mothers one month after birth might improve the diagnosis of congenital infection. Recent data bring out that its transmission can be prevented through treatment of infected women before they become pregnant. The role of parasite genotypes and host genetic factors in parasite transmission and development of infection in foetuses/neonates has to be more investigated in order to better estimate the risk factors and impact on health of congenital infection with T. cruzi. PMID:25760448

  17. Congenital scoliosis in non-identical twins: case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Dean; Bogar, William

    2014-01-01

    Congenital scoliosis due to vertebral anomalies may occur in less than 0.1% of the population. Several different theories have been put forth in the literature to account for the etiology of congenital scoliosis and the vertebral anomalies which contribute to its development. The study of scoliosis in twins has contributed to the understanding of causative factors including genetics, environment and in utero events during embryologic development. Case reports of fraternal (non-identical) juvenile male twins with congenital scoliosis associated with differing congenital vertebral anomalies are presented. Both children were asymptomatic at the time of the initial consultation and showed no signs of neurologic compromise. Rapidly progressive, severe genetic scoliosis requires prudent observation and referral to a pediatric orthopedic surgeon to determine appropriate options for care and to screen for potentially life threatening disorders. Chiropractors may be seen as gatekeepers for scoliosis and a thorough understanding of appropriate standards of care is required. PMID:25202158

  18. Pleural and pericardial effusion: a potential ultrasonographic marker for the prenatal differential diagnosis between congenital diaphragmatic eventration and congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Jeanty, C; Nien, JK; Espinoza, J; Kusanovic, JP; Goncalves, LF; Qureshi, F; Jacques, S; Lee, W; Romero, R

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether or not the presence of pleural and/or pericardial effusion can be used prenatally as an ultrasonographic marker for the differential diagnosis between diaphragmatic eventration and diaphragmatic hernia. Methods We present two case reports of non-isolated diaphragmatic eventration associated with pleural and/or pericardial effusion. Additionally, we reviewed the literature for all cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and diaphragmatic eventration that met the following criteria: (1) prenatal diagnosis of a diaphragmatic defect and (2) definitive diagnosis by autopsy or surgery. The frequencies of pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and hydrops were compared between the two conditions using the Fisher’s exact test. A subanalysis was conducted of cases with isolated diaphragmatic defects (i.e. diaphragmatic defects not associated with hydrops and other major structural or chromosomal anomalies). Results A higher proportion of fetuses with diaphragmatic eventration had associated pleural and pericardial effusions compared with fetuses with diaphragmatic hernia (58% (7/12) vs. 3.7% (14/382), respectively, P < 0.001). This observation remained true when only cases of diaphragmatic defects not associated with hydrops and other major structural or chromosomal anomalies were compared (29% (2/7) with eventration vs. 2.2% (4/178) with CDH, P < 0.02). Conclusions The presence of pleural and/or pericardial effusion in patients with diaphragmatic defects should raise the possibility of a congenital diaphragmatic eventration. This information is clinically important for management and counseling because the prognosis and treatment for CDH and congenital diaphragmatic eventration are different. PMID:17366518

  19. Congenital web of the common bile duct in association with cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Papaziogas, Basilios; Lazaridis, Charalampos; Pavlidis, Theodoros; Galanis, Ioannis; Paraskevas, George; Papaziogas, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Congenital web formations are extremely rare anomalies of the extrahepatic biliary tree. The age at presentation and the clinical symptomatology of these anomalies depend on the grade of the biliary obstruction. We report a case of a common bile duct septum in association with cholelithiasis in a 30-year-old woman. The diagnosis was made on preoperative magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and confirmed with intraoperative cholangiography. Because all known causes of acquired web formation were excluded, a congenital origin of the web was assumed. The patient was treated with a hepaticoduodenostomy above the level of the septum. The embryological aspects of this rare anomaly are described.

  20. Congenital anterior urethrocutaneous fistula at the penoscrotal junction with proximal penile megalourethra: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shih-Yao; Chen, Shyh-Jye; Lai, Hong-Shiee

    2016-01-01

    Congenital anterior urethrocutaneous fistula and megalourethra are both rare anomalies. These anomalies are commonly associated with other anorectal or genitourinary anomalies and evaluated with voiding cystourethrography. We examined a 34-month-old boy who presented with a fistula at the penoscrotal junction. A voiding cystourethrogram showed a jet of urine coming through the fistula and proximal saccular dilatation of the penile urethra. We present the imaging findings of the first case of an association between a congenital anterior urethrocutaneous fistula at the penoscrotal junction and a proximal penile megalourethra. We also discuss the etiology, management, and differential diagnosis of this entity, and review the literature. PMID:27200160

  1. Experimental Anomalies in Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamara, Ornella

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, experimental anomalies ranging in significance (2.8-3.8 σ) have been reported from a variety of experiments studying neutrinos over baselines less than 1 km. Results from the LSND and MiniBooNE short-baseline νe /νe appearance experiments show anomalies which cannot be described by oscillations between the three standard model neutrinos (the ``LSND anomaly''). In addition, a re-analysis of the anti-neutrino flux produced by nuclear power reactors has led to an apparent deficit in νe event rates in a number of reactor experiments (the ``reactor anomaly''). Similarly, calibration runs using 51Cr and 37Ar radioactive sources in the Gallium solar neutrino experiments GALLEX and SAGE have shown an unexplained deficit in the electron neutrino event rate over very short distances (the ``Gallium anomaly''). The puzzling results from these experiments, which together may suggest the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model and hint at exciting new physics, including the possibility of additional low-mass sterile neutrino states, have raised the interest in the community for new experimental efforts that could eventually solve this puzzle. Definitive evidence for sterile neutrinos would be a revolutionary discovery, with implications for particle physics as well as cosmology. Proposals to address these signals by employing accelerator, reactor and radioactive source experiments are in the planning stages or underway worldwide. In this talk some of these will be reviewed, with emphasis on the accelerator programs.

  2. [Monitoring of pregnancies exposed to drugs in France: the experience of the registries of congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Doray, Bérénice

    2014-01-01

    Registries of congenital malformations were implemented in many industrialized countries following the drama of thalidomide. In 2013, four French registries of congenital malformations in France provide the systematic epidemiological surveillance of birth defects. All are part of international networks of registries, especially European surveillance of congenital anomalies (EUROCAT). If the development of prevention actions including prenatal diagnosis has gradually led the registries to play a key role of assessment on the impact of public health policies, one of the major roles of registries of congenital malformations remains early detection of clusters of malformations secondary to teratogenic effects.

  3. Bilateral agenesis of the superior vena cava associated with congenital hydrothorax.

    PubMed

    Römer, S; Opgen-Rhein, B; Chaoui, R; Scheer, I; Czernik, C; Obladen, M

    2006-11-01

    Agenesis of the superior vena cava is a rare anomaly that is generally asymptomatic in the neonate. We report a male neonate with bilateral (total) agenesis of the superior vena cava with obstructed thoracic duct and subsequent congenital hydrothorax, anomalies that were detected by prenatal ultrasound at 25 weeks' gestation. The cardiac anomaly was confirmed by postnatal magnetic resonance angiography. The chylothorax disappeared with conservative therapy.

  4. Congenital myopathies: an update.

    PubMed

    Nance, Jessica R; Dowling, James J; Gibbs, Elizabeth M; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2012-04-01

    Congenital myopathy is a clinicopathological concept of characteristic histopathological findings on muscle biopsy in a patient with early-onset weakness. Three main categories are recognized within the classical congenital myopathies: nemaline myopathy, core myopathy, and centronuclear myopathy. Recent evidence of overlapping clinical and histological features between the classical forms and their different genetic entities suggests that there may be shared pathomechanisms between the congenital myopathies. Animal models, especially mouse and zebrafish, have been especially helpful in elucidating such pathomechanisms associated with the congenital myopathies and provide models in which future therapies can be investigated. PMID:22392505

  5. Anophthalmos with limb anomalies (Waardenburg opththalmo-acromelic syndrome): report of a new Italian case with renal anomaly and review.

    PubMed

    Garavelli, L; Pedori, S; Dal Zotto, R; Franchi, F; Marinelli, M; Croci, G F; Bellato, S; Ammenti, A; Virdis, R; Banchini, G; Superti-Furga, A

    2006-01-01

    Anophthalmos with limb anomalies (Waardenburg Opththalmo-Acromelic Syndrome) is a very rare autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome, first described by Waardenburg et al. in 1961 (MIM 206920). It is characterized by mono or more often bilateral anophthalmia/microphthalmia and foot malformations, which can be observed in 91% of the patients. The most common anomaly of the feet is the presence of four toes. The hands are affected bilaterally in 77% of the cases. The most characteristic anomaly is the synostosis of the fourth and fifth metacarpals. To date, 33 cases from 19 families have been reported. We present an Italian case of anophthalmia with limb anomalies and a renal malformation, which has never been described in the literature.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital hypothyroidism congenital hypothyroidism Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  7. Lymphatic Anomalies Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Lymphatic Malformation; Generalized Lymphatic Anomaly (GLA); Central Conducting Lymphatic Anomaly; CLOVES Syndrome; Gorham-Stout Disease ("Disappearing Bone Disease"); Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome; Kaposiform Lymphangiomatosis; Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma/Tufted Angioma; Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome; Lymphangiomatosis

  8. Vascular anomalies: differential diagnosis and mimickers.

    PubMed

    Garzon, Maria C; Weitz, Nicole; Powell, Julie

    2016-03-01

    Vascular anomalies are very common in children and encompass a wide spectrum of diseases. Many vascular anomalies can be mistaken for infantile hemangioma (IH). In addition, there is a variety of rare disorders including benign and malignant tumors that may mimic IH and other types of vascular anomalies. Understanding the clinical features, natural history, and typical clinical course of different types of vascular anomalies is essential in order to make the correct diagnosis and guide management. Radiologic imaging plays an important role in establishing the diagnosis; and when the diagnosis remains in doubt, a biopsy performed by a surgical specialist with expertise may prove to be lifesaving. PMID:27607326

  9. Magnetic Anomalies over Iceland.

    PubMed

    Serson, P H; Hannaford, W; Haines, G V

    1968-10-18

    An aeromagnetic survey of Iceland reveals broad anomalies of large amplitude over zones of recent volcanic activity. The source of the anomalies is ascribed to large masses of basalt that have been coherently remagnetized by intrusive heating. A simple correlation of the Icelandic anomalies with those of the ocean floor therefore appears unjustified.

  10. Genetics of Nonsyndromic Congenital Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Egilmez, Oguz Kadir; Kalcioglu, M Tayyar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hearing impairment affects nearly 1 in every 1000 live births and is the most frequent birth defect in developed societies. Hereditary types of hearing loss account for more than 50% of all congenital sensorineural hearing loss cases and are caused by genetic mutations. HL can be either nonsyndromic, which is restricted to the inner ear, or syndromic, a part of multiple anomalies affecting the body. Nonsyndromic HL can be categorised by mode of inheritance, such as autosomal dominant (called DFNA), autosomal recessive (DFNB), mitochondrial, and X-linked (DFN). To date, 125 deafness loci have been reported in the literature: 58 DFNA loci, 63 DFNB loci, and 4 X-linked loci. Mutations in genes that control the adhesion of hair cells, intracellular transport, neurotransmitter release, ionic hemeostasis, and cytoskeleton of hair cells can lead to malfunctions of the cochlea and inner ear. In recent years, with the increase in studies about genes involved in congenital hearing loss, genetic counselling and treatment options have emerged and increased in availability. This paper presents an overview of the currently known genes associated with nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and mutations in the inner ear. PMID:26989561

  11. Sources of Near Side Lunar Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Nicola C.; Hood, Lon L.; Halekas, J. S.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Binder, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    Lunar Prospector magnetometer data has been used to identify a number of nearside magnetic anomalies. Some of the features identified appear to correlate with impact ejecta, supporting a basin ejecta origin to the nearside anomalies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Congenital amusia in childhood: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Marie-Andrée; Moreau, Patricia; McNally-Gagnon, Andréane; Mignault Goulet, Geneviève; Peretz, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    Here we describe the first documented case of congenital amusia in childhood. AS is a 10-year-old girl who was referred to us by her choir director for persisting difficulties in singing. We tested her with the child version of the Montreal Battery for the Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) which confirmed AS's severe problems with melodic and rhythmic discrimination and memory for melodies. The disorder appears to be limited to music since her audiometry as well as her intellectual and language skills are normal. Furthermore, the musical disorder is associated to a severe deficit in detecting small pitch changes. The electrical brain responses point to an anomaly in the early stages of auditory processing, such as reflected by an abnormal mismatch negativity (MMN) response to small pitch changes. In singing, AS makes more pitch than time errors. Thus, despite frequent and regular musical practice, AS's profile is similar to the adult form of congenital amusia. PMID:21453912

  13. [Congenital laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft].

    PubMed

    Sørensen, J A; Godballe, C; Jørgensen, K; Pedersen, S A

    1989-01-01

    A typical case of congenital laryngo-trachea-esophageal cleft (LTEC) is presented with a Review of the literature. LTEC is a rare congenital anomaly caused by defective fusion of the septum between larynx/trachea and hypopharynx/esophagus. The septum is formed by fusion of two lateral folds growing medially in very early foetal life. Fusion progresses in a cranial direction. Disturbances in septum formation result in LTEC. The disease gives respiratory problems with aspiration and excessive salivary production. The diagnosis is best made by intubating the larynx and examining the postcricoid region and anterior wall of the esophagus endoscopically. Stapling of the stomach, tracheostomy and secondary operative closure of the cleft has proved effective in the treatment of LTEC. PMID:2911891

  14. Congenital lobar emphysema: Pitfalls in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chinya, Abhishek; Pandey, Prince Raj; Sinha, Shandip Kumar; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lobar emphysema (CLE) is a rare but life-threatening congenital anomaly leading to respiratory distress in early childhood. Diagnosis requires a strong clinical suspicion. We report a case of a 31/2-month-old infant who was initially diagnosed with pneumonia requiring multiple hospital admissions. After computed tomography of the thorax, a diagnosis on CLE was made. The child was planned for surgery in the next available routine operation theatre. However, suddenly in the evening, she developed respiratory distress and needed emergency surgical intervention. The child improved dramatically after surgery, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Early diagnosis and treatment in such cases can lead to dramatic results. PMID:27185998

  15. Congenital CMV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... CMV Babies Born with CMV (Congenital CMV Infection) Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Detection and Intervention Helping Children With Congenital CMV Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  16. Congenital heat disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Silverman, N.H.; Kersting-Somerhoff, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The book covers the tomographic anatomy of the normal and congenitally malformed heart and tomographic imaging of the normal heat. It then compares echocardiographic evaluation and the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of individual congenital cardiac malformations.

  17. [Fetal ocular anomalies: the advantages of prenatal magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Brémond-Gignac, D; Copin, H; Elmaleh, M; Milazzo, S

    2010-05-01

    Congenital ocular malformations are uncommon and require prenatal diagnosis. Severe anomalies are more often detected by trained teams and minor anomalies are more difficult to identify and must be systematically sought, particularly when multiple malformations or a family and maternal history is known. The prenatal diagnosis-imaging tool most commonly used is ultrasound but it can be completed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which contributes crucial information. Fetal dysmorphism can occur in various types of dysfunction and prenatal diagnosis must recognize fetal ocular anomalies. After systematic morphologic ultrasound imaging, different abnormalities detected by MRI are studied. Classical parameters such as binocular and interorbital measurements are used to detect hypotelorism and hypertelorism. Prenatal ocular anomalies such as cataract microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma have been described. Fetal MRI added to prenatal sonography is essential in detecting cerebral and general anomalies and can give more information on the size and morphology of the eyeball. Fetal abnormality detection includes a detailed family and maternal history, an amniotic fluid sample for karyotype, and other analyses for a better understanding of the images. Each pregnancy must be discussed with all specialists for genetic counseling. With severe malformations, termination of pregnancy is proposed because of risk of blindness and associated cerebral or systemic anomalies. Early prenatal diagnosis of ocular malformations can also detect associated abnormalities, taking congenital cataracts that need surgical treatment into account as early as possible. Finally, various associated syndromes need a pediatric check-up that could lead to emergency treatment.

  18. Lifshitz scale anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arav, Igal; Chapman, Shira; Oz, Yaron

    2015-02-01

    We analyse scale anomalies in Lifshitz field theories, formulated as the relative cohomology of the scaling operator with respect to foliation preserving diffeomorphisms. We construct a detailed framework that enables us to calculate the anomalies for any number of spatial dimensions, and for any value of the dynamical exponent. We derive selection rules, and establish the anomaly structure in diverse universal sectors. We present the complete cohomologies for various examples in one, two and three space dimensions for several values of the dynamical exponent. Our calculations indicate that all the Lifshitz scale anomalies are trivial descents, called B-type in the terminology of conformal anomalies. However, not all the trivial descents are cohomologically non-trivial. We compare the conformal anomalies to Lifshitz scale anomalies with a dynamical exponent equal to one.

  19. [Congenital Anomalies Detected at Birth in Newborns of Adolescent Women].

    PubMed

    dos Reis, Leandro Valim; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Guazzelli, Cristina Aparecida Falbo; Cernach, Mirlene Cecilia Soares Pinho; Torloni, Maria Regina; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: Analisar a prevalência das anomalias congénitas, detetadas no nascimento, entre filhos de gestantes adolescentes, enfatizando os tipos mais comuns e a época do diagnóstico. Material e Métodos: Estudo retrospetivo do tipo censo, no qual foram analisados todos recém-nascidos, vivos ou mortos, com peso superior a 500 g, de mulheres que tiveram o parto no Hospital São Paulo num período de seis anos. Os produtos da conceção portadores de anomalias foram identificados no período pré-natal ou através do exame físico pós-natal, segundo os critérios do Estudo Colaborativo Latino-Americano das Malformações Congênitas. Os resultados são apresentados de forma descritiva através de valores absolutos e relativos, calcula-se a prevalência das anomalias e comparam-se os diferentes grupos recorrendo a testes não paramétricos. Resultados: Foram analisadas 6 257 gestações, das quais 577 resultaram em recém-nascidos com alguma anomalia congénita identificada no nascimento (prevalência de 9,2%). Do total de gestações, 907 eram de adolescentes (idade inferior a 20 anos), para as quais se verificou uma prevalência de anomalias nos recém-nascidos de 9,9%. Comparando os recém-nascidos de adolescentes com os das mulheres com idade superior a 20 anos, apenas se encontrou diferença estatisticamente significativa para a prevalência dos defeitos do tubo neural (p = 0,027). Discussão: Observamos uma alta taxa de partos em adolescentes, acima das taxas dos países desenvolvidos. Observamos também alta frequência de anomalias congénitas em recém-nascidos, provavelmente por sermos um serviço terciário de referência. A elevada prevalência dos defeitos do tubo neural entre grávidas jovens pode ser explicada pela não suplementação pré-concecional de ácido fólico em gravidezes não planeadas, como é característico nas adolescentes.Conclusão: A prevalência e momento do diagnóstico das anomalias congénitas em recém-nascidos apresentam comportamentos semelhantes entre grávidas com idade inferior ou superior a 20 anos, exceto para os defeitos do tubo neural, de maior prevalência nos recém-nascidos das grávidas adolescentes.

  20. FastStats: Birth Defects or Congenital Anomalies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  1. MRI in congenital duplication of urethra

    PubMed Central

    Bhadury, S; Parashari, Umesh C; Singh, Ragini; Kohli, Neera

    2009-01-01

    Congenital urethral duplication is a rare anomaly, with less than 200 cases described in the literature. The investigations that are usually performed are micturating cystourethrography (MCU) and retrograde urethrography (RGU), which can diagnose the presence of duplication but cannot diagnose the precise relationship of the duplicated urethra with other pelvic structures. MRI, because of the excellent tissue contrast that it provides and its multiplanar ability, can demonstrate with precision, the size, shape and position of the two urethras. We describe below a case where MRI was able to show this exquisitely. PMID:19881093

  2. Congenital defects in northern elephant seals stranded along the central California coast.

    PubMed

    Trupkiewicz, J G; Gulland, F M; Lowenstine, L J

    1997-04-01

    Eleven cases of congenital anomalies were identified in 210 (5%) juvenile northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) found stranded along the central California (USA) coast from 1 January 1988 to 31 December 1995. Seven individuals had mild-to-moderate hydrocephalus involving the lateral ventricles bilaterally, or the lateral and third ventricles. Two animals had severe cardiac anomalies: hypoplasia of the right ventricle with overriding aorta, and ventricular septal defect. Other anomalies included single cases of hydronephrosis, focal pulmonary dysplasia, and congenital epidermal angiomatosis. Common intercurrent disease processes were verminous pneumonia and arteritis, verminous enteritis and coliti, and splenic and hepatic hemosiderosis. The more severe anomalies were considered to be the cause of debilitation and stranding. Milder anomalies were found incidentally during routine gross necropsy and histopathologic examination. PMID:9131551

  3. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  4. Genetics of congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Park, S; Chatterjee, V

    2005-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is the most common neonatal metabolic disorder and results in severe neurodevelopmental impairment and infertility if untreated. Congenital hypothyroidism is usually sporadic but up to 2% of thyroid dysgenesis is familial, and congenital hypothyroidism caused by organification defects is often recessively inherited. The candidate genes associated with this genetically heterogeneous disorder form two main groups: those causing thyroid gland dysgenesis and those causing dyshormonogenesis. Genes associated with thyroid gland dysgenesis include the TSH receptor in non-syndromic congenital hypothyroidism, and Gsα and the thyroid transcription factors (TTF-1, TTF-2, and Pax-8), associated with different complex syndromes that include congenital hypothyroidism. Among those causing dyshormonogenesis, the thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin genes were initially described, and more recently PDS (Pendred syndrome), NIS (sodium iodide symporter), and THOX2 (thyroid oxidase 2) gene defects. There is also early evidence for a third group of congenital hypothyroid conditions associated with iodothyronine transporter defects associated with severe neurological sequelae. This review focuses on the genetic aspects of primary congenital hypothyroidism. PMID:15863666

  5. Coronary artery anomalies.

    PubMed

    Earls, James P

    2006-12-01

    Coronary artery anomalies are uncommon findings but can be of significant clinical importance in a small number of individuals. Clinical presentation depends on the specific anomaly. Most coronary artery anomalies are benign and clinically insignificant, however, some anomalies are potentially significant and can lead to heart failure and even death. Noninvasive imaging has emerged as the preferred way to image coronary anomalies. Both electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) are useful for the diagnosis of anomalous coronary arteries. Recently, MDCT has also proven to be very useful in the detection and characterization of anomalous coronary arteries. This chapter will review the appearance of the most commonly encountered coronary anomalies on MDCT. PMID:17709086

  6. Pattern of central nervous system anomalies in a population with a high rate of consanguineous marriages.

    PubMed

    Al-Gazali, L I; Sztriha, L; Dawodu, A; Bakir, M; Varghese, M; Varady, E; Scorer, J; Abdulrazzaq, Y M; Bener, A; Padmanabhan, R

    1999-02-01

    Nine thousand six hundred and ten births were prospectively studied in the three major hospitals in Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates (UAE) between October 1995 and January 1997. Babies suspected of, or diagnosed, as having central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities were evaluated by a neonatologist, a clinical geneticist and a pediatric neurologist. Brain computerized tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) was performed on all babies suspected of having CNS abnormalities. In addition, metabolic screening and chromosome analysis were also performed when indicated. Of the 225 babies with congenital anomalies identified, 31 had CNS abnormalities (3.2/1000). Syndromic abnormalities of the CNS were present in 13 cases (42%), chromosomal abnormalities in one case (3.2%) and the rest included: neural tube defect (NTD) in 11 cases (36%), holoprosencephaly in two cases (6.4%) and hydrocephalus in four cases (12.9%). Detailed analysis of the syndromic types revealed that out of the 13 cases, 12 were inherited as autosomal recessive (AR) and in one case the inheritance was undetermined. Consanguinity with high level of inbreeding was present in 12 cases and the majority of the syndromes identified were extremely rare. The study indicates that CNS anomalies are fairly common in the UAE, particularly, the recessive syndromic types. Careful and detailed analysis of such anomalies is required so that accurate genetic advice can be given. PMID:10189086

  7. WF4 Anomaly Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biretta, John

    2005-07-01

    A serious anomaly has been found in images from the WF4 CCD in WFPC2. The WF4 CCD bias level appears to have become unstable, resulting in sporadic images with either low or zero bias level. The severity and frequency of the problem is rapidly increasing, and it is possible that WF4 will soon become unusable if no work-around is found. The other three CCDs {PC1, WF2, and WF3} appear to be unaffected and continue to operate properly. The impacts from "low" and "zero" bias are somewhat different, but in both cases the effects are immediately obvious. Images with low bias will tend to have horizontal {x-direction} streaks and stripes with an amplitude of ? about 0.5 DN in WF4. We believe these data should be mostly recoverable with some effort, though at a loss in the detectability of faint targets. "Zero bias" is a much more serious problem and is evidenced by images which are blank in WF4, except for showing occasional cosmic rays, bright targets, and negative pixels from dark subtraction. These images with zero bias are probably unusable for most purposes. Both the CCD gain settings of 7 and 14 are affected. The frequency of the anomaly is rapidly increasing. The first significant instances of low bias appear to have been in late 2004 when a few images were impacted. However, within the last few weeks over half the images are beginning to show the low bias problem. The more serious "zero bias" problem appears to have first occurred in Feb. 2005, but it is also increasing and now impacts 10% to 20% of WFPC2 images. At present there are still many images which appear fine and unaffected, but the situation is quickly evolving. We believe the science impact for most observers will be minimal. Targets are by default placed on either PC1 or WF3 which continue to operate properly. However, observers requiring the full field of view {survey projects, large targets, etc.} will potentially lose one-third of their imaging area. Our understanding of this anomaly is still

  8. Nolen-Schiffer anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, S.C.; Wiringa, R.B.

    1995-08-01

    The Argonne v{sub 18} potential contains a detailed treatment of the pp, pn and nn electromagnetic potential, including Coulomb, vacuum polarization, Darwin Foldy and magnetic moment terms, all with suitable form factors and was fit to pp and pn data using the appropriate nuclear masses. In addition, it contains a nuclear charge-symmetry breaking (CSB) term adjusted to reproduce the difference in the experimental pp and nn scattering lengths. We have used these potential terms to compute differences in the binding energies of mirror isospin-1/2 nuclei (Nolen-Schiffer [NS] anomaly). Variational Monte Carlo calculations for the {sup 3}He-{sup 3}H system and cluster variational Monte Carlo for the {sup 15}O-{sup 15}N and {sup 17}F-{sup 17}O systems were made. In the first case, the best variational wave function for the A = 3 nuclei was used. However, because our {sup 16}O wave function does not reproduce accurately the {sup 16}O rms radius, to which the NS anomaly is very sensitive, we adjusted the A = 15 and A = 17 wave functions to reproduce the experimental density profiles. Our computed energy differences for these three systems are 0.757 {plus_minus} .001, 3.544 {plus_minus} .018 and 3.458 {plus_minus} .040 MeV respectively, which are to be compared with the experimental differences of 0.764, 3.537, and 3.544 MeV. Most of the theoretical uncertainties are due to uncertainties in the experimental rms radii. The nuclear CSB potential contributes 0.066, 0.188, and 0.090 MeV to these totals. We also attempted calculations for A = 39 and A = 41. However, in these cases, the experimental uncertainties in the rms radius make it impossible to extract useful information about the contribution of the nuclear CSB potential.

  9. Congenital lobar emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Tural-Kara, Tuğçe; Özdemir, Halil; Çiftçi, Ergin; İnce, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lobar emphysema is a rare disease, which is characterized by pulmoner hyperinflation. Depending on the degree of bronchial obstruction, the clinical presentation may be variable. We report a rare case with congenital lobar emphysema in a 38-days-old male infant who presented with severe respiratory distress and hypertension. Air trapping in the left upper lung and significant mediastinal shift to the right were observed on the chest x-ray. Emphysematous changes were detected on the thorax computed tomography and considered as congenital lobar emphysema. The upper left lobectomy was successfully performed by pediatric surgeons. On postoperative follow up, no sign of respiratory distress occurred and the patient was normotensive. In this report, a case with congenital lobar emphysema, which is a rare cause of respiratory distress and hypertension is discussed. PMID:27381542

  10. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... pigmented nevus; Giant hairy nevus; Giant pigmented nevus; Bathing trunk nevus; Congenital melanocytic nevus - large ... baby grows in the womb. In some families bathing trunk nevi may be inherited. The condition may ...

  11. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  12. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be high. There may be signs of malnutrition. A urinalysis reveals fat and large amounts of ... The disorder often leads to infection, malnutrition, and kidney failure. ... die within the first year. Congenital nephrotic syndrome ...

  13. Congenital platelet function defects

    MedlinePlus

    Platelet storage pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... disorder may also cause severe bleeding. Platelet storage pool disorder (also called platelet secretion disorder) occurs when ...

  14. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  15. Congenital mirror movements

    PubMed Central

    Méneret, Aurélie; Depienne, Christel; Riant, Florence; Trouillard, Oriane; Bouteiller, Delphine; Cincotta, Massimo; Bitoun, Pierre; Wickert, Julia; Lagroua, Isabelle; Westenberger, Ana; Borgheresi, Alessandra; Doummar, Diane; Romano, Marcello; Rossi, Simone; Defebvre, Luc; De Meirleir, Linda; Espay, Alberto J.; Fiori, Simona; Klebe, Stephan; Quélin, Chloé; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Plessis, Ghislaine; Dale, Russell C.; Sklower Brooks, Susan; Dziezyc, Karolina; Pollak, Pierre; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Vidailhet, Marie; Brice, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We screened a large series of individuals with congenital mirror movements (CMM) for mutations in the 2 identified causative genes, DCC and RAD51. Methods: We studied 6 familial and 20 simplex CMM cases. Each patient had a standardized neurologic assessment. Analysis of DCC and RAD51 coding regions included Sanger sequencing and a quantitative method allowing detection of micro rearrangements. We then compared the frequency of rare variants predicted to be pathogenic by either the PolyPhen-2 or the SIFT algorithm in our population and in the 4,300 controls of European origin on the Exome Variant Server. Results: We found 3 novel truncating mutations of DCC that segregate with CMM in 4 of the 6 families. Among the 20 simplex cases, we found one exonic deletion of DCC, one DCC mutation leading to a frameshift, 5 missense variants in DCC, and 2 missense variants in RAD51. All 7 missense variants were predicted to be pathogenic by one or both algorithms. Statistical analysis showed that the frequency of variants predicted to be deleterious was significantly different between patients and controls (p < 0.001 for both RAD51 and DCC). Conclusion: Mutations and variants in DCC and RAD51 are strongly associated with CMM, but additional genes causing CMM remain to be discovered. PMID:24808016

  16. Autosomal dominant optic nerve colobomas, vesicoureteral reflux, and renal anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmenti, L.A.; Pierpont, M.E.; Carpenter, B.L.M.

    1995-11-06

    We describe a father and 3 sons with optic nerve colobomas, vesicoureteral reflux, and renal anomalies. The youngest son had congenital renal failure and ultimately underwent renal transplantation. The father and one son had high frequency hearing loss. There were no other affected relatives. We conclude that the association of optic nerve colobomas, renal anomalies, and vesicoureteral reflux comprises a unique autosomal dominant syndrome. Molecular investigations have determined this disorder to be associated with a single nucleotide deletion in the PAX2 gene. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Third branchial cleft anomaly presenting as a retropharyngeal abscess.

    PubMed

    Huang, R Y; Damrose, E J; Alavi, S; Maceri, D R; Shapiro, N L

    2000-08-31

    Branchial cleft anomalies are congenital developmental defects that typically present as a soft fluctuant mass or fistulous tract along the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. However, branchial anomalies can manifest atypically, presenting diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Error or delay in diagnosis can lead to complications, recurrences, and even life-threatening emergencies. We describe a case of an infected branchial cleft cyst that progressed to a retropharyngeal abscess in a 5-week-old female patient. The clinical, radiographic, and histologic findings of this rare presentation of branchial cleft cyst are discussed.

  18. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  19. Competing Orders and Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-08

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation "laws" could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the 't Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  20. Competing Orders and Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-01-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation "laws" could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the 't Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed. PMID:27499184

  1. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-01-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed. PMID:27499184

  2. A rare presentation of a child with osteogenesis imperfecta and congenital laryngomalacia for herniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Roshith; Dave, Nandini; Padvi, Amit; Garasia, Madhu

    2011-01-01

    Sometimes anaesthesiologists come across rare congenital anomalies in their practice. The inherent complications associated with the disorder necessitate tailor-made approaches for providing anaesthesia to even seemingly simple surgical interventions. Here, we share our experience of anaesthesia management of an infant with congenital laryngomalacia and recently diagnosed osteogenesis imperfecta type 1 who had presented to us with an acute abdomen for a semi-emergency herniotomy. PMID:22174477

  3. A rare presentation of a child with osteogenesis imperfecta and congenital laryngomalacia for herniotomy.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Roshith; Dave, Nandini; Padvi, Amit; Garasia, Madhu

    2011-09-01

    Sometimes anaesthesiologists come across rare congenital anomalies in their practice. The inherent complications associated with the disorder necessitate tailor-made approaches for providing anaesthesia to even seemingly simple surgical interventions. Here, we share our experience of anaesthesia management of an infant with congenital laryngomalacia and recently diagnosed osteogenesis imperfecta type 1 who had presented to us with an acute abdomen for a semi-emergency herniotomy. PMID:22174477

  4. A Triad of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia, Meckel's Diverticulum, and Heterotopic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Mandhan, Parkash; Al Saied, Amer; Ali, Mansour J.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a common developmental anomaly encountered by paediatric surgeons. It is known to be associated with extradiaphragmatic malformations, which include cardiac, renal, genital, and chromosomal abnormalities. Herein, we report a newborn born with concurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia, Meckel's diverticulum, and heterotopic pancreatic tissue. This is the first case report of such a triad with description of possible mechanisms of the development. PMID:24804135

  5. Familial occurrence of congenital incomplete prepyloric mucosal diaphragm.

    PubMed Central

    Gahukamble, D B

    1998-01-01

    Incomplete prepyloric mucosal diaphragm (IPMD) is an uncommon congenital anomaly that leads to gastric outlet obstruction in infancy and childhood. This report describes the occurrence of IPMD in six children in a closely knit tribal family from a geographically isolated desert town with a small population in the Sahara. Their records showed similarities of clinical, radiological, operative, and histopathological features. These features, as well as its occurrence in brothers, sisters, and cousins, suggest that this unusual anomaly is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Images PMID:9863605

  6. Congenital ocular and adnexal disorders in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Mikel; Pérez, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Ocular and adnexal congenital disorders are those that manifest at birth and could involve single or multiple tissues. Several abnormalities have been reported in literature affecting reptilian ocular and/or adnexal tissues. The objectives of this review are: (i) review those disorders previously reported in reptile literature; (ii) present new cases; (iii) provide a basic classification of them according to the moment of occurrence and (iv) indirectly, encourage the clinician dealing with these cases to go further in their diagnosis. The authors consider that categorizing ocular and adnexal congenital disorders could help the clinician to deal with them. The categorization of these disorders required an intense review of cases previously reported in literature and allows the authors suspect that some of them could not have been accurately diagnosed according to the definitions of the anomalies and/or not accurately described. The authors consider that ocular and adnexal congenital disorders could have been underestimated in reptiles and further studies could be helpful to promote the description of new disorders and to expand the knowledge about those previously reported. The review will first describe abnormalities reported during organogenesis (describing possible etiopathogenesis, cases reported, an approach to their diagnosis and recommended therapeutic options).Then a mention of the ocular disorders occurring after organogenesis is made. These disorders are divided when possible in those affecting all or most part of the globe and those affecting only specific tissues (surface ectoderm, neurocrest and mesenchyma and neuroectoderm).

  7. Ebstein's anomaly in a child with osteogenesis imperfecta type I.

    PubMed

    D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Celli, Mauro; Versacci, Paolo; Zambrano, Anna; Lodato, Valentina; Persiani, Pietro; Sangiorgi, Luca

    2011-05-01

    Cardiovascular involvement is relatively rare in osteogenesis imperfecta and has a predilection for left-sided cardiac valves. We report a 5 years old female child affected by osteogenesis imperfecta type I in which an asymptomatic mild form of Ebstein's anomaly, a congenital tricuspid malformation, was diagnosed during routinely investigation. The association of these two relatively rare entities could provide new insight to better understand the pathogenesis of cardiac involvement in osteogenesis imperfecta. PMID:22461818

  8. Female Urethral Duplication: Rare Anomaly with Unusual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Jadhav, Vinay; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S

    2015-01-01

    Urethral duplication (UD) in females is a rare congenital anomaly and requires a high degree of clinical suspicion for diagnosis. The preoperative evaluation requires thorough investigations to delineate anatomy which is imperative for surgical reconstruction to provide excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We describe the successful management of a 6-year-old girl with UD (presented as ambiguous genitalia and urinary incontinence) along with a review of pertinent literature. PMID:27512541

  9. Female Urethral Duplication: Rare Anomaly with Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M. Narendra; Jadhav, Vinay; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S.

    2015-01-01

    Urethral duplication (UD) in females is a rare congenital anomaly and requires a high degree of clinical suspicion for diagnosis. The preoperative evaluation requires thorough investigations to delineate anatomy which is imperative for surgical reconstruction to provide excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We describe the successful management of a 6-year-old girl with UD (presented as ambiguous genitalia and urinary incontinence) along with a review of pertinent literature. PMID:27512541

  10. Adrenal glands in patients with cogenital renal anomalies: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, P.J.; Robbins, G.L.; Ellis, D.A.; Spirt, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    The CT appearance of the adrenal glands was investigated in 30 patients with congenital renal anomalies. The ipsilateral adrenal was clearly identified in 83% of these patients; in all of them, the adrenal was a paraspinal disk-shaped organ, which appeared linear on CT. Conversely, the adrenals retained their normal shape in a control group of 20 patients with acquired renal atrophy or prior simple nephrectomy.

  11. Ultrasound diagnosis of bilateral cataracts in a fetus with possible cerebro-ocular congential muscular dystrophy during the routine second trimester anomaly scan.

    PubMed

    Drought, Alexandra; Wimalasundera, Ruwan; Holder, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The finding of bilateral congenital cataracts in the fetus is rare. We report bilateral congenital cataracts detected during the routine second trimester anomaly scan, which subsequently were found to be associated with other congenital anomalies and the parents opted for a termination of pregnancy. At post-mortem, Muscle-Eye Brain disease or Walker-Warburg Syndrome was considered likely, which are autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy disorders associated with cerebral, cerebellar, muscle and eye anomalies. On ultrasound, bilateral cataracts appear as echogenic, solid areas within the fetal orbits. The examination of the fetal face and orbits plays an important role in confirming fetal well-being antenatally. We propose that it should become a routine part of the structural survey of fetal anatomy during the obstetric anomaly scan. This is especially important in pregnancies previously affected by fetal cataracts or pregnancies at risk of rare genetic syndromes. PMID:27433255

  12. Ultrasound diagnosis of bilateral cataracts in a fetus with possible cerebro-ocular congential muscular dystrophy during the routine second trimester anomaly scan.

    PubMed

    Drought, Alexandra; Wimalasundera, Ruwan; Holder, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The finding of bilateral congenital cataracts in the fetus is rare. We report bilateral congenital cataracts detected during the routine second trimester anomaly scan, which subsequently were found to be associated with other congenital anomalies and the parents opted for a termination of pregnancy. At post-mortem, Muscle-Eye Brain disease or Walker-Warburg Syndrome was considered likely, which are autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy disorders associated with cerebral, cerebellar, muscle and eye anomalies. On ultrasound, bilateral cataracts appear as echogenic, solid areas within the fetal orbits. The examination of the fetal face and orbits plays an important role in confirming fetal well-being antenatally. We propose that it should become a routine part of the structural survey of fetal anatomy during the obstetric anomaly scan. This is especially important in pregnancies previously affected by fetal cataracts or pregnancies at risk of rare genetic syndromes.

  13. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve: A Rare Congenital Cause of Aortic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Shah, Priyank; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly causing aortic regurgitation usually in the fifth to sixth decade of life. Earlier, the diagnosis was mostly during postmortem or intraoperative, but now with the advent of better imaging techniques such as transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, more cases are being diagnosed in asymptomatic patients. We present a case of a 39-year-old male who was found to have QAV, with the help of TEE, while undergoing evaluation for a diastolic murmur. The patient was found to have Type B QAV with moderate aortic regurgitation. We also present a brief review of classification, pathophysiology, and embryological basis of this rare congenital anomaly. The importance of diagnosing QAV lies in the fact that majority of these patients will require surgery for aortic regurgitation and close follow-up so that aortic valve replacement/repair is done before the left ventricular decompensation occurs. PMID:27195176

  14. Prevalence of inner ear anomalies among cochlear implant candidates

    PubMed Central

    Aldhafeeri, Ahmad M.; Alsanosi, Abdulrahman A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of inner ear anomalies and the frequency of different anomaly types among cochlear implant recipients. Methods: This study included a retrospective chart review of all patients who received cochlear implants between January 2009 and January 2013 in King Abdulaziz University Hospital cochlear implant program in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All subjects underwent thin-cut CT of the temporal bone and MRI. The collected data included age, gender, and CT and MRI findings regarding temporal bone anomalies. Patients with any identified congenital inner ear anomalies were included in the study. Results: In total, 316 patients’ cases were reviewed. Inner ear malformations were identified in 24 patients, which represented a prevalence of 7.5%. Among these 24 patients, 8 (33.3%) presented with a large vestibular aqueduct (LVA), 8 (33.3%) semicircular canal (SCC) dysplasia, 7 (29.1%) classical Mondini deformity, and one (4.1%) cochlear hypoplasia. Conclusion: The prevalence of inner ear anomalies among cochlear implant recipients was 7.5%. This result is consistent with findings worldwide. The most common anomalies were LVA and SCC hypoplasia; by contrast, in other regions, the most common anomaly is either the Mondini deformity, or LVA. PMID:27652360

  15. Prophylactic arrhythmia surgery in association with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Deal, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Certain congenital heart anomalies make patients more susceptible to arrhythmia development throughout their lives. This poses the question whether prophylactic arrhythmia surgery should be incorporated into reparative open heart procedures for congenital heart disease. There is currently no consensus on what constitutes a standard prophylactic procedure, owing to the questions that remain regarding lesions to be performed; energy sources to use; proximity of energy source or incisions to coronary arteries, sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node; circumstances for right atrial, left atrial, or biatrial appendectomy; and whether to perform a right, left, or biatrial maze procedure. These considerations are important because prophylactic arrhythmia procedures are performed without knowing if the patient will actually develop an arrhythmia in his or her lifetime. By reviewing and summarizing the literature, congenital heart disease patients who are at risk for developing atrial arrhythmias can be identified and lesion sets can be suggested in an effort to standardize experimental protocols for prophylactic arrhythmia surgery.

  16. 46,XY Disorders of Sex Development and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: A Case with Dysmorphic Facies, Truncus Arteriosus, Bifid Thymus, Gut Malrotation, Rhizomelia, and Adactyly

    PubMed Central

    Esplin, Edward D.; Chaib, Hassan; Haney, Michael; Martin, Brock; Homeyer, Margaret; Urban, Alexander E.; Bernstein, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The association of 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD) with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is rare, but has been previously described with and without other congenital anomalies. Literature review identified five cases of 46,XY DSD associated with CDH and other congenital anomalies. These five cases share characteristics including CDH, 46,XY karyotype with external female appearing or ambiguous genitalia, cardiac anomalies, and decreased life span. The present case had novel features including truncus arteriosus, bifid thymus, gut malrotation, and limb anomalies consisting of rhizomelia and adactyly. With this case report, we present a review of the literature of cases of 46,XY DSD and CDH in association with multiple congenital abnormalities. This case may represent a unique syndrome of 46,XY DSD and diaphragmatic hernia or a more severe presentation of a syndrome represented in the previously reported cases. PMID:25898814

  17. 46,XY disorders of sex development and congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a case with dysmorphic facies, truncus arteriosus, bifid thymus, gut malrotation, rhizomelia, and adactyly.

    PubMed

    Esplin, Edward D; Chaib, Hassan; Haney, Michael; Martin, Brock; Homeyer, Margaret; Urban, Alexander E; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2015-06-01

    The association of 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD) with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is rare, but has been previously described with and without other congenital anomalies. Literature review identified five cases of 46,XY DSD associated with CDH and other congenital anomalies. These five cases share characteristics including CDH, 46,XY karyotype with external female appearing or ambiguous genitalia, cardiac anomalies, and decreased life span. The present case had novel features including truncus arteriosus, bifid thymus, gut malrotation, and limb anomalies consisting of rhizomelia and adactyly. With this case report, we present a review of the literature of cases of 46,XY DSD and CDH in association with multiple congenital abnormalities. This case may represent a unique syndrome of 46,XY DSD and diaphragmatic hernia or a more severe presentation of a syndrome represented in the previously reported cases.

  18. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: where and what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Losty, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) retains high mortality and morbidity due to lung hypoplasia, pulmonary hypertension and severe co-existent anomalies. This article offers a comprehensive state-of-the-art review for the paediatric surgeon whilst also describing key contributions from the basic sciences in the search to uncover the cause of the birth defect together with efforts to develop new and better therapies for CDH. PMID:25459012

  19. A novel heterozygous SOX2 mutation causing congenital bilateral anophthalmia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Macchiaroli, Annamaria; Kelberman, Daniel; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Drury, Suzanne; Islam, Lily; Giangiobbe, Sara; Ironi, Gabriele; Lench, Nicholas; Sowden, Jane C; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario; Cavallo, Luciano; Gasperi, Maurizio; Faienza, Maria Felicia

    2014-01-25

    Heterozygous de novo mutations in SOX2 have been reported in approximately 10-20% of patients with unilateral or bilateral anophthalmia or microphthalmia. An additional phenotype of hypopituitarism, with anterior pituitary hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, has been reported in patients carrying SOX2 alterations. We report a novel heterozygous mutation in the SOX2 gene in a male affected with congenital bilateral anophthalmia, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and growth hormone deficiency. The mutation we describe is a cytosine deletion in position 905 (c905delC) which causes frameshift and an aberrant C-terminal domain. Our report highlights the fact that subjects affected with eye anomalies and harboring SOX2 mutations are at high risk for gonadotropin deficiency, which has important implications for their clinical management.

  20. Current Concepts in the Management of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Infants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vasanth H S

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic approach to congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) has shifted from one of immediate repair to management of pulmonary hypertension, physiologic stabilization, and delayed surgical repair. Lung hypoplasia, remodeled pulmonary vasculature, and ventricular dysfunction all contribute to the high morbidity and mortality associated with CDH. In addition, genetic syndromes associated with CDH can increase the incidence of serious anomalies and hence impact survival. Prenatal and postnatal management of infants with CDH is challenging in the best of circumstances and need multidisciplinary teams for optimal outcomes. However, advances using ultrasound and fetal MRI can predict prognosis and survival and plan for postnatal management. Survival rates for patients with CDH have increased for the past decade with better management at resuscitation; implementation of gentle ventilation strategies; and medical management of pulmonary hypertension, physiologic stabilization, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. However, follow-up of these infants for long-term morbidities is essential for optimal outcomes after discharge. PMID:26702239

  1. De Novo Truncating Variants in SON Cause Intellectual Disability, Congenital Malformations, and Failure to Thrive.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Mari J; Braxton, Alicia A; Shao, Yunru; Lewis, Andrea M; Vincent, Marie; Küry, Sébastien; Besnard, Thomas; Isidor, Bertrand; Latypova, Xénia; Bézieau, Stéphane; Liu, Pengfei; Motter, Connie S; Melver, Catherine Ward; Robin, Nathaniel H; Infante, Elena M; McGuire, Marianne; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Littlejohn, Rebecca O; McLean, Scott D; Bi, Weimin; Bacino, Carlos A; Lalani, Seema R; Scott, Daryl A; Eng, Christine M; Yang, Yaping; Schaaf, Christian P; Walkiewicz, Magdalena A

    2016-09-01

    SON is a key component of the spliceosomal complex and a critical mediator of constitutive and alternative splicing. Additionally, SON has been shown to influence cell-cycle progression, genomic integrity, and maintenance of pluripotency in stem cell populations. The clear functional relevance of SON in coordinating essential cellular processes and its presence in diverse human tissues suggests that intact SON might be crucial for normal growth and development. However, the phenotypic effects of deleterious germline variants in SON have not been clearly defined. Herein, we describe seven unrelated individuals with de novo variants in SON and propose that deleterious variants in SON are associated with a severe multisystem disorder characterized by developmental delay, persistent feeding difficulties, and congenital malformations, including brain anomalies. PMID:27545676

  2. De Novo Truncating Variants in SON Cause Intellectual Disability, Congenital Malformations, and Failure to Thrive.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Mari J; Braxton, Alicia A; Shao, Yunru; Lewis, Andrea M; Vincent, Marie; Küry, Sébastien; Besnard, Thomas; Isidor, Bertrand; Latypova, Xénia; Bézieau, Stéphane; Liu, Pengfei; Motter, Connie S; Melver, Catherine Ward; Robin, Nathaniel H; Infante, Elena M; McGuire, Marianne; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Littlejohn, Rebecca O; McLean, Scott D; Bi, Weimin; Bacino, Carlos A; Lalani, Seema R; Scott, Daryl A; Eng, Christine M; Yang, Yaping; Schaaf, Christian P; Walkiewicz, Magdalena A

    2016-09-01

    SON is a key component of the spliceosomal complex and a critical mediator of constitutive and alternative splicing. Additionally, SON has been shown to influence cell-cycle progression, genomic integrity, and maintenance of pluripotency in stem cell populations. The clear functional relevance of SON in coordinating essential cellular processes and its presence in diverse human tissues suggests that intact SON might be crucial for normal growth and development. However, the phenotypic effects of deleterious germline variants in SON have not been clearly defined. Herein, we describe seven unrelated individuals with de novo variants in SON and propose that deleterious variants in SON are associated with a severe multisystem disorder characterized by developmental delay, persistent feeding difficulties, and congenital malformations, including brain anomalies.

  3. Novel MPZ mutations and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Hugh J.; Santagata, Sandro; Shapiro, Frederic; Batish, Sat Dev; Couchon, Libby; Donnelly, Stephen; Kang, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    We report two new MPZ mutations causing congenital hypomyelinating neuropathies; c.368_382delGCACGTTCACTTGTG (in-frame deletion of five amino acids) and c.392A>G, Asn131Ser. Each child had clinical and electrodiagnostic features consistent with an inherited neuropathy, confirmed by sural nerve biopsy. The cases illustrate the clinically heterogeneity that exists even within early-onset forms of this disease. They also lend additional support to the emerging clinical and laboratory evidence that impaired intracellular protein trafficking may represent the cause of some congenital hypomyelinating neuropathies. PMID:20621479

  4. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation type I

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Frederico Becker; Schultz, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is an hamartomatous congenital pulmonary airway malformation with incidence ranging between 1:10,000 and 1:35,000 newborns. Currently CCAM is classified into five groups according to clinical and pathological features. The clinical outcome varies depending on the subtype and the extent of involvement. The authors report the case of a premature male newborn with the prenatal diagnosis of CCAM Type 1 associated with cardiac right axis deviation, who died 67 hours after birth due to respiratory failure. In addition to the autopsy report of this rare entity, the authors present its classification and prognosis. PMID:26558243

  5. [Evaluation of congenital heart disease in adults].

    PubMed

    Oliver Ruiz, José María; Mateos García, Marta; Bret Zurita, Montserrat

    2003-06-01

    Improvements in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of congenital heart disease during infancy and childhood have resulted in an outstanding increase in the prevalence of these entities during adulthood. Congenital heart disease in the adult represents a new diagnostic challenge to the consultant cardiologist, unfamiliar with the anatomical and functional complexities of cardiac malformations. Assessment of adult congenital heart disease with imaging techniques can be as accurate as in children. However, these techniques cannot substitute for a detailed clinical assessment. Physical examination, electrocardiography and chest x-rays remain the three main pillars of bedside diagnosis. Transthoracic echocardiography is undoubtedly the imaging technique which provides most information, and in many situations no additional studies are needed. Nevertheless, ultrasound imaging properties in adults are not as favorable as in children, and prior surgical procedures further impair image quality. Despite recent advances in ultrasound technologies such as harmonic or contrast imaging, other diagnostic procedures are sometimes required. Fortunately, transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging are easily performed in the adult, and do not require anaesthetic support, in contrast to pediatric patients. These techniques, together with nuclear cardiology and cardiac catheterization, complete the second tier of diagnostic techniques for congenital heart disease. To avoid unnecessary repetition of diagnostic procedures, the attending cardiologist should choose the sequence of diagnostic techniques carefully; although the information this yields is often redundant, it is also frequently complementary. This article aims to compare the diagnostic utility of different imaging techniques in adult patients with congenital heart disease, both with and without prior surgical repair.

  6. Genetics of Congenital Cataract.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Lembo, Andrea; Serafino, Massimiliano; Nucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a type of cataract that presents at birth or during early childhood, and it is one of the most easily treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of 1-6 cases per 10,000 live births. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases may have a genetic cause, and such cases are quite heterogeneous. Although congenital nuclear cataract can be caused by multiple factors, genetic mutation remains the most common cause. All three types of Mendelian inheritance have been reported for cataract; however, autosomal dominant transmission seems to be the most frequent. The transparency and high refractive index of the lens are achieved by the precise architecture of fiber cells and homeostasis of the lens proteins in terms of their concentrations, stabilities, and supramolecular organization. Research on hereditary congenital cataract has led to the identification of several classes of candidate genes that encode proteins such crystallins, lens-specific connexins, aquaporin, cytoskeletal structural proteins, and developmental regulators. In this review, we highlight the identified genetic mutations that account for congenital nuclear cataract.

  7. Behavioral economics without anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Rachlin, H

    1995-01-01

    Behavioral economics is often conceived as the study of anomalies superimposed on a rational system. As research has progressed, anomalies have multiplied until little is left of rationality. Another conception of behavioral economics is based on the axiom that value is always maximized. It incorporates so-called anomalies either as conflicts between temporal patterns of behavior and the individual acts comprising those patterns or as outcomes of nonexponential time discounting. This second conception of behavioral economics is both empirically based and internally consistent. PMID:8551195

  8. Congenital muscular torticollis: experience of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Das, B K; Matin, A; Hassan, G Z; Hossain, M Z; Zaman, M A

    2010-10-01

    Congenital Muscular Torticollis (CMT) is a postural deformity of head and neck detected at birth or shortly after birth, primarily resulting from unilateral shortening of Sternocleidomastoid Muscle (SCM). In neonates and infants, patient may cure conservatively by physiotherapy but surgery is the treatment of choice for children and adolescents. There are various techniques of surgery. Here we show our experience regarding management of congenital muscular torticollis. In the present retrospective case series, fourteen patients of congenital muscular torticollis were treated. The cases were enrolled between Nov' 2005 to Oct' 2007 in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Gonosasthaya Somaj Vittik Medical College Hospital, Dhaka and different private clinics of Dhaka city of Bangladesh. Neonates and infants were treated conservatively with physiotherapy and others treated surgically by transection of both sternal and clavicular head of SCM under general anesthesia. Operated patients were released on following post operative day with advised to do physiotherapy. Patients age range from 7 days to 15 years of which ten were female and four male. SCM was shortened in all cases (8 on right side and 6 on left side). Eleven were female and three male. Of 14 patients, 2 neonates, 7 infants and 5 were more than 1 year age. There was no associated anomaly. Out of 9 neonates and infants 8 cured conservatively with physiotherapy and another one significantly improved. Six were treated surgically including one failed physiotherapy. Post operative period was uneventful and there was no complication. Results were evaluated clinically and comments of peers. Most of the patient of congenital muscular torticollis can be treated conservatively during infancy. Division of both sternal and clavicular head of SCM is easy and safe surgical technique for the treatment of CMT of older children and adolescents.

  9. Imaging of facial anomalies.

    PubMed

    Castillo, M; Mukherji, S K

    1995-01-01

    Anomalies of the face may occur in its lower or middle segments. Anomalies of the lower face generally involve the derivatives of the branchial apparatus and therefore manifest as defects in the mandible, pinnae, external auditory canals, and portions of the middle ears. These anomalies are occasionally isolated, but most of them occur in combination with systemic syndromes. These anomalies generally do not occur with respiratory compromise. Anomalies of the midface may extend from the upper lip to the forehead, reflecting the complex embryology of this region. Most of these deformities are isolated, but some patients with facial clefts, notably the midline cleft syndrome and holoprosencephaly, have anomalies in other sites. This is important because these patients will require detailed imaging of the face and brain. Anomalies of the midface tend to involve the nose and its air-conducting passages. We prefer to divide these anomalies into those with and without respiratory obstruction. The most common anomalies that result in airway compromise include posterior choanal stenoses and atresias, bilateral cysts (mucoceles) of the distal lacrimal ducts, and stenosis of the pyriform (anterior) nasal aperture. These may be optimally evaluated with computed tomography (CT) and generally require immediate treatment to ensure adequate ventilation. Rare nasal anomalies that also result in airway obstruction are agenesis of the pharynx, agenesis of the nose, and hypoplasia of the nasal alae. Agenesis of the nasopharynx and nose are complex anomalies that require both CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The diagnosis of hypoplasia of the nasal alae is a clinical one; these anomalies do not require imaging studies. Besides facial clefts, anomalies of the nose without respiratory obstruction tend to be centered around the nasofrontal region. This is the site of the most common sincipital encephaloceles. Patients with frontonasal and nasoethmoidal encephaloceles require both

  10. Congenital malformations in experimental diabetic pregnancy: aetiology and antioxidative treatment. Minireview based on a doctoral thesis.

    PubMed

    Simán, M

    1997-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus in pregnancy causes congenital malformations in the offspring. The aim of this work was to characterize biochemical and morphologic anomalies in the conceptus of an animal model of diabetic pregnancy. In addition, a preventive treatment against diabetes-induced dysmorphogenesis was developed. Congenital cataract was often found in the offspring of diabetic rats. The fetal lenses had increased water accumulation, sorbitol concentration and aldose reductase activity compared to control lenses. The results suggest that the cataracts form via osmotic attraction of water due to sorbitol accumulation in the fetal lens. Another set of malformations, with possible neural crest cell origin, occurred frequently in offspring of diabetic rats. These included low set ears, micrognathia, hypoplasia of the thymus, thyroid and parathyroid glands, as well as anomalies of the heart and great vessels. Furthermore, diabetes caused intrauterine death and resorptions more frequently in the late part of gestation. When the pregnant diabetic rats were treated with the antioxidants butylated hydroxytoluene, vitamin E or vitamin C, the occurrence of gross malformations was reduced from approximately 25% to less than 8%, and late resorptions from 17% to 7%. This suggests that an abnormal handling of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is involved in diabetes-induced dysmorphogenesis in vivo. Indeed, an increased concentration of lipid peroxides, indicating damage caused by ROS, was found in fetuses of diabetes rats. In addition, embryos of diabetic rats had low concentrations of the antioxidant vitamin E compared to control embryos. These biochemical alterations were normalized by vitamin E treatment of the pregnant diabetic rats. The antioxidants are likely to have prevented ROS injury in the embryos of the diabetic rats, in particular in the neural crest cells, thereby normalizing embryonic development. These results provide a rationale for developing new anti

  11. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Apr ... topic from the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: ...

  12. A fusional anomaly of the epididymis associated with recurrent testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Aminu, Sani; Syed, Kamran; Gunendran, Thiru; Young, Graham

    2012-01-01

    A 31-year-old man with recurrent testicular torsion and infertility was found to have a fusional anomaly of the epididymis on scrotal exploration in which only the head of epididymis was attached to the testis, while the body and tail were completely free. He had bilateral orchidopexy, which relieved pain and recurrent torsion. He was then referred for fertility treatment. Literature search has shown that infertility is more associated with congenital anomalies of the epididymis and not with recurrent torsions.

  13. Differential Protein Expression in Congenital and Acquired Cholesteatomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Huhn; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cholesteatomas are epithelial lesions that present as an epithelial pearl behind an intact eardrum. Congenital and acquired cholesteatomas progress quite differently from each other and progress patterns can provide clues about the unique origin and pathogenesis of the abnormality. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms by which cholesteatomas develop remain unknown. In this study, key proteins that directly affect cholesteatoma pathogenesis are investigated with proteomics and immunohistochemistry. Congenital cholesteatoma matrices and retroauricular skin were harvested during surgery in 4 patients diagnosed with a congenital cholesteatoma. Tissue was also harvested from the retraction pocket in an additional 2 patients during middle ear surgery. We performed 2-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis to detect and analyze spots that are expressed only in congenital cholesteatoma and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) to separate proteins by molecular weight. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The image analysis of 2D electrophoresis showed that 4 congenital cholesteatoma samples had very similar protein expression patterns and that 127 spots were exclusively expressed in congenital cholesteatomas. Of these 127 spots, 10 major spots revealed the presence of titin, forkhead transcription activator homolog (FKH 5–3), plectin 1, keratin 10, and leucine zipper protein 5 by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that FKH 5–3 and titin were expressed in congenital cholesteatoma matrices, but not in acquired cholesteatomas. Our study shows that protein expression patterns are completely different in congenital cholesteatomas, acquired cholesteatomas, and skin. Moreover, non-epithelial proteins, including FKH 5–3 and titin, were unexpectedly expressed in congenital cholesteatoma tissue. Our data indicates that congenital cholesteatoma origins may differ

  14. Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Richard J; Butler, Colin R; Maughan, Elizabeth F; Elliott, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis is a rare disease characterized by complete tracheal rings that can affect variable lengths of the tracheobronchial tree. It causes high levels of morbidity and mortality both due to the stenosis itself and to the high incidence of other associated congenital malformations. Successful management of this complex condition requires a highly individualized approach delivered by an experienced multidisciplinary team, which is best delivered within centralized units with the necessary diverse expertise. In such settings, surgical correction by slide tracheoplasty has become increasingly successful over the past 2 decades such that long-term survival now exceeds 88%, with normalization of quality of life scores for patients with non-syndrome-associated congenital tracheal stenosis. Careful assessment and planning of treatment strategies is of paramount importance for both successful management and the provision of patients and carers with accurate and realistic treatment counseling. PMID:27301600

  15. [STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF MINERAL FERTILIZERS ON THE NEONATAL MORBIDITY RATE IN INFANTS WITH CONGENITAL MALFORMATIONS (CM) IN THE BELGOROD REGION].

    PubMed

    Verzilina, I N; Chumosov, M I; Evdokimov, V I

    2015-01-01

    Results of the performed study showed that the use of mineral fertilizers for crops increases the risk of morbidity in neonates with congenital malformations (CM). P-elevated levels of relative environmental risk is established for: anomalies of the musculoskeletal system, multiple congenital malformations, the CM as a whole. Maximum environmental risk in the conditions of high load offertilizers on farmland is established for congenital abnormalities of the development of reproductive system in newborn infants (RR = 2,76).

  16. Isolated congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries with dextroversion discovered incidentally in a patient with cocaine-induced acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Anumeha; Bose, Rahul; Yoon, Anthony D.

    2016-01-01

    Complex cardiac congenital anomalies can occasionally be found in adult patients who have no knowledge of their condition. Here we present the case of a 27-year-old man with cocaine-induced acute myocardial infarction in whom an isolated congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries with dextroversion was discovered incidentally. PMID:27034558

  17. Congenital heart disease in spondylothoracic dysostosis: two familial cases.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J M; Cook, A; Fagg, N L; MacLachlan, N A; Sharland, G K

    1995-01-01

    Two familial cases of spondylothoracic dysostosis are reported. Both cases had severe congenital heart disease in addition to the skeletal malformations which are characteristic of the condition. Images PMID:7473656

  18. Dual diaphragmatic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Arjun; Thomas, Abin Varghese

    2016-01-01

    Although diaphragmatic anomalies such as an eventration and hiatus hernia are commonly encountered in incidental chest X-ray imaging, the presence of concomitant multiple anomalies is extremely rare. This is all the more true in adults. Herein, we present the case of a 75-year-old female, while undergoing a routine chest X-ray imaging, was found to have eventration of right hemidiaphragm along with a hiatus hernia as well. PMID:27625457

  19. Dual diaphragmatic anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Arjun; Thomas, Abin Varghese

    2016-01-01

    Although diaphragmatic anomalies such as an eventration and hiatus hernia are commonly encountered in incidental chest X-ray imaging, the presence of concomitant multiple anomalies is extremely rare. This is all the more true in adults. Herein, we present the case of a 75-year-old female, while undergoing a routine chest X-ray imaging, was found to have eventration of right hemidiaphragm along with a hiatus hernia as well.

  20. Dual diaphragmatic anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Arjun; Thomas, Abin Varghese

    2016-01-01

    Although diaphragmatic anomalies such as an eventration and hiatus hernia are commonly encountered in incidental chest X-ray imaging, the presence of concomitant multiple anomalies is extremely rare. This is all the more true in adults. Herein, we present the case of a 75-year-old female, while undergoing a routine chest X-ray imaging, was found to have eventration of right hemidiaphragm along with a hiatus hernia as well. PMID:27625457

  1. Congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-07-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy.

  2. Congenital muscular torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-01-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy. PMID:24205484

  3. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  4. Congenital Absence of Superior Vena Cava with no Manifestation of Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Soon; Kim, Jeong Jae

    2016-01-01

    Total absence of superior vena cava (SVC) is a very rare anomaly, and the patient usually suffers from SVC syndrome or conduction disturbances. We report an asymptomatic 27 year-old male, with complete absence of SVC. Transthoracic echocardiography and computed tomography demonstrated the absence of SVC and other congenital cardiac anomalies, but the presence of prominent collateral vessels that allow a sufficient venous return.

  5. SADM potentiometer anomaly investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian; Mussett, David; Cattaldo, Olivier; Rohr, Thomas

    2005-07-01

    During the last 3 years Contraves Space have been developing a Low Power (1-2kW) Solar Array Drive Mechanism (SADM) aimed at small series production. The mechanism was subjected to two test programmes in order to qualify the SADM to acceptable levels. During the two test programmes, anomalies were experienced with the Potentiometers provided by Eurofarad SA and joint investigations were undertaken to resolve why these anomalies had occurred. This paper deals with the lessons learnt from the failure investigation on the two Eurofarad (rotary) Potentiometer anomaly. The Rotary Potentiometers that were used were fully redundant; using two back to back mounted "plastic tracks". It is a pancake configuration mounted directly to the shaft of the Slip Ring Assembly at the extreme in-board end of the SADM. It has no internal bearings. The anomaly initially manifested itself as a loss of performance in terms of linearity, which was first detected during Thermal Vacuum testing. A subsequent anomaly manifested itself by the complete failure of the redundant potentiometer again during thermal vacuum testing. This paper will follow and detail the chain of events following this anomaly and identifies corrective measures to be applied to the potentiometer design and assembly process.

  6. Incidence of legal abortions and congenital abnormalities in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Czeizel, A E

    1991-01-01

    The annual and monthly distributions of congenital abnormalities and pregnancy outcomes as confounding factors were evaluated in Hungary in reflection of the accident at the Chernobyl reactor. The different congenital abnormality entities and the components of fetal radiation syndrome did not show a higher rate after the Chernobyl accident in the data-set of the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry. Among confounding factors, the rate of induced abortions did not increase after the Chernobyl accident in Hungary. In the 9th month after the peak of public concern (May and June, 1986) the rate of livebirths decreased. Three indicator conditions: 15 sentinel anomalies as indicators of germinal dominant gene mutations, Down syndrome as an indicator of germinal numerical and structural chromosomal mutations, and unidentified multiple congenital abnormalities as indicators of germinal dominant gene and chromosomal mutations were selected from the material of the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry. Diagnoses were checked, familial and sporadic cases were separated and only the sporadic cases were evaluated. The analysis of indicator conditions did not reveal any measurable germinal mutagenic effect of the Chernobyl accident in Hungary.

  7. Congenital Corneal Anesthesia and Neurotrophic Keratitis: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mantelli, Flavio; Nardella, Chiara; Tiberi, Eloisa; Sacchetti, Marta; Bruscolini, Alice; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophic keratitis (NK) is a rare degenerative disease of the cornea caused by an impairment of corneal sensory innervation, characterized by decreased or absent corneal sensitivity resulting in epithelial keratopathy, ulceration, and perforation. The aetiopathogenesis of corneal sensory innervation impairment in children recognizes the same range of causes as adults, although they are much less frequent in the pediatric population. Some extremely rare congenital diseases could be considered in the aetiopathogenesis of NK in children. Congenital corneal anesthesia is an extremely rare condition that carries considerable diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Typically the onset is up to 3 years of age and the cornea may be affected in isolation or the sensory deficit may exist as a component of a congenital syndrome, or it may be associated with systemic somatic anomalies. Accurate diagnosis and recognition of risk factors is important for lessening long-term sequelae of this condition. Treatment should include frequent topical lubrication and bandage corneal or scleral contact lenses. Surgery may be needed in refractory cases. The purpose of this review is to summarize and update data available on congenital causes and treatment of corneal hypo/anesthesia and, in turn, on congenital NK. PMID:26451380

  8. The congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, N J; Chilton, J K

    2015-07-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD) encompass a number of related conditions and includes Duane syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the external ocular muscles, Möbius syndrome, congenital ptosis and hereditary congenital facial paresis. These are congenital disorders where the primary findings are non-progressive and are caused by developmental abnormalities of cranial nerves/nuclei with primary or secondary dysinnervation. Several CCDD genes have been found, which enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in brain stem development and axonal guidance. PMID:25633065

  9. [Diagnosis of congenital infection].

    PubMed

    Sampedro Martínez, Antonio; Martínez, Luis Aliaga; Teatino, Pablo Mazuelas; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier

    2011-12-01

    In general, congenital diagnosis is based on: a) maternal serologic assays; b) microbiologic study of amniotic fluid or fetal blood sampling; and c) serology in children and microorganism detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or culture. Congenital infections due to cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, varicella, B19 erythrovirus and toxoplasmosis are usually the result of primary infection in the mother. Therefore, when IgG antibodies are detected before pregnancy, these infections are ruled out. Definitive serologic diagnosis of acute infection in pregnant women requires the demonstration of seroconversion (i.e., from seronegative to seropositive). In these cases, amniotic fluid or fetal blood sampling should be performed to determine the presence of intrauterine congenital infection. Cytomegalovirus, rubella and toxoplasmosis can be diagnosed by detection of specific IgM antibodies in fetal blood. However, PCR in amniotic fluid has replaced conventional prenatal diagnostic techniques, including fetal blood sampling, in the diagnosis of these infections. In the newborn, these infections may be confirmed by measuring IgM specific antibodies. B19 erythrovirus can be detected by PCR in amniotic fluid or fetal blood. Congenital varicella-zoster infection may be diagnosed on the basis of persistence of IgG antibodies after birth. Definitive diagnosis of herpes simplex virus infection requires viral isolation. Swabs or scraping from clinical specimens can be inoculated into susceptible cell lines for isolation. PMID:22305665

  10. Congenital complete atrioventricular block.

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, N J; Fenrich, A L; Friedman, R A

    1997-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular block is found in 1 of 22,000 live births. Over time, it has become apparent that these patients represent not a single distinct disease process, but several processes with the common manifestation of atrioventricular block. The evaluation of these patients to determine their risk of sudden death and need for pacing is not well defined. Images PMID:9456483

  11. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  12. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Barmash and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright ©1996 - 2016 C.H.I.N. All rights reserved TX4-390-685 Original site design and HTML by Panoptic Communications

  13. Autism and Congenital Blindness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, R. Peter; Lee, Anthony; Brown, Rachel

    1999-01-01

    This study compared a group of nine children (ages 3 to 8) with congenital blindness and an autism-like syndrome with nine sighted children. Children with autism had more severe abnormalities in terms of their relationships with people and emotional expressions, and were more impaired in the area of pretend play. (CR)

  14. Multiple congenital coagulation deficiencies.

    PubMed

    BONNIN, J A; HICKS, N D; INNIS, M D; SIMPSON, D A

    1960-07-01

    A 6-week-old infant is presented who suffered from a congenital haemorrhagic disorder which caused death from subdural haemorrhage following mild trauma. Haematological investigation revealed deficiencies of factor VII and Christmas factor. Prower-Stuart factor was probably also deficient although investigation of this clotting factor was carried out only on serum obtained at necropsy.

  15. [Treatment of congenital urethral stenosis (urethral ring) in children. Optic internal urethrotomy in the congenital bulbar urethral stenosis in boys].

    PubMed

    Mori, Y; Matsui, T; Ogino, T; Hosokawa, S; Tsujimoto, S; Ihara, H; Terakawa, T; Shima, H; Shimada, K; Arima, M

    1989-05-01

    Congenital urethral stenosis in boys occurs at the junction of the entodermal primary urethra and ectodermal secondary urethra. Endoscopically this lesion is recognized as a ring-form stenosis just distal to the external urethral sphincter. It has been considered as rare congenital anomaly in American literature. But in our experience congenital urethral stenosis is an important cause of recurrent urinary tract infections, enuresis, pollakisuria or hematuria in pediatric urological practice. It also disturbs spontaneous healing of vesicoureteral reflux. The most effective treatment of this lesion is optic internal urethrotomy under direct vision. We would like to report our experience of optic internal urethrotomy for congenital urethral stenosis in boys. From 1974 to 1986, 226 boys with congenital bulbar urethral stenosis were treated in our clinic. Optic internal urethrotomy was performed using a Sachse urethrotome with a 10 or 13 Fr. sheath. Of the 176 ureters with vesicoureteral reflux, spontaneous disappearance of reflux after optic internal urethrotomy was noted in 62.5% of Grade I-II, 65.0% of Grade III, 28.9% of Grade IV and 16.7% of Grade V ureters. These spontaneous disappearance rates were significantly higher than those of primary vesicoureteral reflux in Grade III, IV and V ureters. Of the drug-resistant enuretic boys with a congenital bulbar urethral stenosis, enuresis disappeared or ameliorated in 69.4% after optic internal urethrotomy. Furthermore, urinary tract infections were mostly prevented by optic internal urethrotomy, irrespective of the presence or absence of vesicoureteral reflux. Our results support the view that congenital urethral stenosis (urethral ring) is an important clinical entity in pediatric urology.

  16. Astrometric solar system anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, John D

    2009-01-01

    There are at least four unexplained anomalies connected with astrometric data. perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital energy per unit mass. next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm yr{sup -1}. The other two anomalies are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth anomaly is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is produent to suspect that all four anomalies have mundane explanations, or that one or more anomalies are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.

  17. Intestinal Rotation Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Pelayo, Juan Carlos; Lo, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal rotation abnormality (IRA) predisposes to lethal midgut volvulus. An understanding of intestinal development illustrates the process of normal intestinal rotation and fixation. An appreciation of the clinical presentation and consequences of missed IRA will enhance clinical suspicion and timely evaluation. Selecting the appropriate imaging modality to diagnose IRA requires an understanding of the benefits and limitations of each. The Ladd's procedure continues to be the appropriate surgical treatment for IRA with or without volvulus. Laparoscopy has emerged as an option for the diagnosis and treatment of IRA. Populations in which IRA is always associated, but a Ladd's procedure rarely required, include patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia and abdominal wall defects. Prevalence of IRA is higher in children with congenital heart disease and heterotaxy syndrome; asymptomatic patients require multidisciplinary consideration of the risks and benefits of screening for IRA, whether a Ladd's procedure is required, and the timing thereof. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(7):e247-e250.]. PMID:27403672

  18. Magnetic anomalies. [Magsat studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.

    1983-01-01

    The implications and accuracy of anomaly maps produced using Magsat data on the scalar and vector magnetic field of the earth are discussed. Comparisons have been made between the satellite maps and aeromagnetic survey maps, showing smoother data from the satellite maps and larger anomalies in the aircraft data. The maps are being applied to characterize the structure and tectonics of the underlying regions. Investigations are still needed regarding the directions of magnetization within the crust and to generate further correlations between anomaly features and large scale geological structures. Furthermore, an increased data base is recommended for the Pacific Ocean basin in order to develop a better starting model for Pacific tectonic movements. The Pacific basin was large farther backwards in time and subduction zones surround the basin, thereby causing difficulties for describing the complex break-up scenario for Gondwanaland.

  19. Hereditary pancreatic hypoplasia, diabetes mellitus, and congenital heart disease: a new syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Yorifuji, T; Matsumura, M; Okuno, T; Shimizu, K; Sonomura, T; Muroi, J; Kuno, C; Takahashi, Y; Okuno, T

    1994-01-01

    We report on a Japanese family with hereditary pancreatic hypoplasia, diabetes mellitus, and congenital heart disease. The disease was apparently inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The patients in this family had no major anomalies other than those of the heart and pancreas. To our knowledge, this combination has not previously been reported. Images PMID:8071961

  20. Congenital malformations of uterus and vagina.

    PubMed

    Forstner, R; Hricak, H

    1994-07-01

    Congenital malformations of uterus and vagina result from failure of development, failure of fusion or septal reabsorption of the Mullerian ducts. They present with a spectrum of findings ranging from agenesis to duplications. They are of clinical importance because of their association with menstrual disorders and impaired fertility. Furthermore, women with Mullerian duct anomalies (MDAs) have a significant risk of obstetric complications such as spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and preterm delivery. Hysterosalpingography (HSG) and laparoscopy have long played a pivotal role in the evaluation of MDAs. Ultrasonography and recently magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have emerged as noninvasive modalities that are used complementarily or as alternative diagnostic tools. The radiographic findings according to the classification of Buttram and Gibbons are described for HSG, ultrasound and MRI. The advantages and limitations of each method are discussed, and finally an algorithm for imaging is recommended.

  1. Congenital Heart Diseases in Adults: A Review of Echocardiogram Records in Enugu, South-East Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ejim, EC; Anisiuba, BC; Oguanobi, NI; Ubani-Ukoma, BC; Nwaneli, UC; Ugwu, C; Ike, SO

    2014-01-01

    Background: Congenital abnormalities of the heart and cardiovascular system are reported in almost 1% of live births, and about half of these children need medical or surgical help in infancy. In the first decade, a further 25% require surgery to maintain or improve their life. Only 10% survive to adolescence without treatment. Of these 10%, however, many live a normal life for years before their abnormality is discovered. Aim: The aim of this study was to find the most common congenital heart diseases in adults presenting for echocardiographic examination in Enugu, and to determine whether there are any gender differences in frequency. Materials and Methods: The consecutive echocardiogram reports of 5058 adults done over a period of 9 years (2003-2012) were retrospectively reviewed. All adults who had congenital anomaly on transthoracic echocardiography were included in the study. Results: Congenital heart diseases were found in 115 adults representing 2.5% of the adult population (115/4539). The most common congenital anomalies were ventricular septal defects (VSD) - 31.3%, (36/115), atrial septal defects - 28.7% (33/115) and tetralogy of fallot - 10.4% (12/115). Conclusion: VSD are the most common congenital heart diseases in adults presenting for echocardiographic examination in Enugu, Nigeria. PMID:25221697

  2. Congenital hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qingqiang; Zhang, Minfeng; Yang, Cheng; Cai, Wenchang; Zhao, Qian; Shen, Weifeng; Yang, Jiamei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Fast-growing congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage are rare in clinical practice. Additionally, the clinical manifestations of and laboratory and imaging findings for this condition are often nonspecific and are particularly difficult to differentiate from those of hepatobiliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma, thus posing great challenges for diagnosis and treatment. The 2 case reports presented here aim to analyze the diagnosis and treatment of 2 rare cases of congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage in the Chinese Han population to provide an important reference for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Diagnoses: These 2 case reports present 2 rare cases of congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage. Case 1 involved a 31-year-old patient with a very large, fast-growing hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage and elevated carbohydrate antigen 199. Case 2 involved a patient with intense, paroxysmal right upper abdominal pain; computed tomography suggested a hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage and possibly hepatobiliary cystadenoma. Outcomes: Both patients underwent liver resection. Postoperative follow-up showed that for both patients, the symptoms improved, the laboratory findings returned to normal levels, and the surgical outcomes were satisfactory. Conclusion: Liver resection is an ideal treatment for patients with congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage, and especially those with fast-growing, symptomatic hepatic cysts or hepatic cysts that are difficult to differentiate from hepatobiliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma. PMID:27759646

  3. Why prevent, diagnose and treat congenital toxoplasmosis?

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Rima; Kieffer, Francois; Sautter, Mari; Hosten, Tiffany; Pelloux, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Evidence that prevention, diagnosis and treatment of toxoplasmosis is beneficial developed as follows: antiparasitic agents abrogate Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite growth, preventing destruction of infected, cultured, mammalian cells and cure active infections in experimental animals, including primates. They treat active infections in persons who are immune-compromised, limit destruction of retina by replicating parasites and thereby treat ocular toxoplasmosis and treat active infection in the fetus and infant. Outcomes of untreated congenital toxoplasmosis include adverse ocular and neurologic sequelae described in different countries and decades. Better outcomes are associated with treatment of infected infants throughout their first year of life. Shorter intervals between diagnosis and treatment in utero improve outcomes. A French approach for diagnosis and treatment of congenital toxoplasmosis in the fetus and infant can prevent toxoplasmosis and limit adverse sequelae. In addition, new data demonstrate that this French approach results in favorable outcomes with some early gestation infections. A standardized approach to diagnosis and treatment during gestation has not yet been applied generally in the USA. Nonetheless, a small, similar experience confirms that this French approach is feasible, safe, and results in favorable outcomes in the National Collaborative Chicago-based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study cohort. Prompt diagnosis, prevention and treatment reduce adverse sequelae of congenital toxoplasmosis. PMID:19430661

  4. Update on congenital glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Anil K; Chakrabarti, Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Congenital glaucoma is a global problem and poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the ophthalmologist. A detailed evaluation under general anesthesia is advisable to establish the diagnosis and plan for management. Medical therapy has a limited role and surgery remains the primary therapeutic modality. While goniotomy or trabeculotomy ab externo is valuable in the management of congenital glaucoma, primary combined trabeculotomy–trabeculectomy offers the best hope of success in advanced cases. Trabeculectomy with antifibrotic agent and glaucoma drainage devices has a role in the management of refractory cases, and cyclodestructive procedures should be reserved for patients where these procedures have failed. Early diagnosis, prompt therapeutic intervention and proper refractive correction are keys to success. Management of residual vision and visual rehabilitation should be an integral part of the management of children with low vision and lifelong follow-up is a must. PMID:21150027

  5. Congenital idiopathic clubfoot deformities.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S P; Stark, S L

    1995-03-01

    Clubfoot is a birth defect that is marked primarily by a deformed talus (ie, ankle) and calcaneous (ie, heel) that give the foot a characteristic "club-like" appearance. In congenital idiopathic clubfoot (ie, talipes equinovarus), the infant's foot points downward (ie, equinus) and turns inward (ie, varus), while the forefoot curls toward the heel (ie, adduction). This congenital disorder has an incidence of 1 in 400 live births, with boys affected twice as often as girls. Unilateral clubfoot is somewhat more common than bilateral clubfoot and may occur as an isolated defect or in association with other disorders (eg, chromosomal aberrations, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, arthrogryposis). Infantile clubfoot deformity is painless and is correctable with early diagnosis and prompt treatment. PMID:7778903

  6. Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Deshingkar, S A; Barpande, S R; Bhavthankar, J D

    2011-07-01

    Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia (CHH) is a rare congenital malformation characterized by marked unilateral overdevelopment of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in CHH is usually evident at birth and accentuated with age, especially at puberty. The affected side grows at a rate proportional to the nonaffected side so that the disproportion is maintained thr oughout the life. Multisystem involvement has resulted in etiological heterogeneity including heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, atypical forms of twinning, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions; however, no single theory explains the etiology adequately. Deformities of all tissues of face, including teeth and their related tissues in the jaw, are key findings for correct diagnosis of CHH. Here an attempt has been made to present a case of CHH with its archetypal features and to supplement existing clinical knowledge. PMID:22090778

  7. Congenital lipodystrophies and dyslipidemias.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Xavier; Le May, Cedric; Magré, Jocelyne; Cariou, Bertrand

    2014-09-01

    Lipodystrophies are rare acquired and genetic disorders characterized by the selective loss of adipose tissue. One key metabolic feature of patients with congenital inherited lipodystrophy is hypertriglyceridemia. The precise mechanisms by which the lack of adipose tissue causes dyslipidemia remain largely unknown. In recent years, new insights have arisen from data obtained in vitro in adipocytes, yeast, drosophila, and very recently in several genetically modified mouse models of generalized lipodystrophy. A common metabolic pathway involving accelerated lipolysis and defective energy storage seems to contribute to the dyslipidemia associated with congenital generalized lipodystrophy syndromes, although the pathophysiological changes may vary with the nature of the mutation involved. Therapeutic management of dyslipidemia in patients with lipodystrophy is primarily based on specific approaches using recombinant leptin therapy. Preclinical studies suggest a potential efficacy of thiazolidinediones that remains to be assessed in dedicated clinical trials.

  8. Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Deshingkar, S. A.; Barpande, S. R.; Bhavthankar, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia (CHH) is a rare congenital malformation characterized by marked unilateral overdevelopment of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in CHH is usually evident at birth and accentuated with age, especially at puberty. The affected side grows at a rate proportional to the nonaffected side so that the disproportion is maintained thr oughout the life. Multisystem involvement has resulted in etiological heterogeneity including heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, atypical forms of twinning, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions; however, no single theory explains the etiology adequately. Deformities of all tissues of face, including teeth and their related tissues in the jaw, are key findings for correct diagnosis of CHH. Here an attempt has been made to present a case of CHH with its archetypal features and to supplement existing clinical knowledge. PMID:22090778

  9. Improving the geological interpretation of magnetic and gravity satellite anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W. (Principal Investigator); Vonfrese, R. R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Current limitations in the quantitative interpretation of satellite-elevation geopotential field data and magnetic anomaly data were investigated along with techniques to overcome them. A major result was the preparation of an improved scalar magnetic anomaly map of South America and adjacent marine areas directly from the original MAGSAT data. In addition, comparisons of South American and Euro-African data show a strong correlation of anomalies along the Atlantic rifted margins of the continents.

  10. Congenital brachymetatarsia: three cases.

    PubMed

    Ferrández, L; Yubero, J; Usabiaga, J; Ramos, L

    1993-01-01

    We report on three cases with congenital brachymetatarsia, one with bilateral affectation, together with the results of a lengthening of the short metatarsal bones by progressive axial distraction using an external minifixator. The method proved to be easy to implement, permitting immediate functionality of the ankle and early load bearing. The immediate results (cosmetic) and later findings (functional) were excellent in all three cases. PMID:8314189

  11. Imaging of congenital Zika virus infection: the route to identification of prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Vouga, Manon; Baud, David

    2016-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has recently emerged as a novel teratogenic agent associated with severe neurological complications. The risk associated with maternal infection remains to be exactly defined but appears to be significant. Like other TORCH agents (toxoplasmosis, other agents, rubella, cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex), it is unlikely that all affected fetuses will be symptomatic at birth. It is therefore urgent to better define the spectrum of anomalies observed in infected fetuses to provide adequate parental counseling. In this review, we provide a comprehensive analysis of major cases described to date and highlight specific prenatal and postnatal radiological findings of congenital ZIKV infection. A total of 19 reports were included in our analysis. ZIKV seemed to harbor a specific tropism for the central nervous system, and anomalies were mostly limited to the brain. Major radiological findings were ventriculomegaly, diffuse calcifications and signs of abnormal gyration as well as cortical development. In addition, a significant number of fetuses suffered from intra uterine growth restriction. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for adequate radiological monitoring of at-risk pregnancies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27481629

  12. Imaging of congenital Zika virus infection: the route to identification of prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Vouga, Manon; Baud, David

    2016-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has recently emerged as a novel teratogenic agent associated with severe neurological complications. The risk associated with maternal infection remains to be exactly defined but appears to be significant. Like other TORCH agents (toxoplasmosis, other agents, rubella, cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex), it is unlikely that all affected fetuses will be symptomatic at birth. It is therefore urgent to better define the spectrum of anomalies observed in infected fetuses to provide adequate parental counseling. In this review, we provide a comprehensive analysis of major cases described to date and highlight specific prenatal and postnatal radiological findings of congenital ZIKV infection. A total of 19 reports were included in our analysis. ZIKV seemed to harbor a specific tropism for the central nervous system, and anomalies were mostly limited to the brain. Major radiological findings were ventriculomegaly, diffuse calcifications and signs of abnormal gyration as well as cortical development. In addition, a significant number of fetuses suffered from intra uterine growth restriction. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for adequate radiological monitoring of at-risk pregnancies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. QCD trace anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens O.; Leganger, Lars E.; Strickland, Michael; Su, Nan

    2011-10-15

    In this brief report we compare the predictions of a recent next-to-next-to-leading order hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory (HTLpt) calculation of the QCD trace anomaly to available lattice data. We focus on the trace anomaly scaled by T{sup 2} in two cases: N{sub f}=0 and N{sub f}=3. When using the canonical value of {mu}=2{pi}T for the renormalization scale, we find that for Yang-Mills theory (N{sub f}=0) agreement between HTLpt and lattice data for the T{sup 2}-scaled trace anomaly begins at temperatures on the order of 8T{sub c}, while treating the subtracted piece as an interaction term when including quarks (N{sub f}=3) agreement begins already at temperatures above 2T{sub c}. In both cases we find that at very high temperatures the T{sup 2}-scaled trace anomaly increases with temperature in accordance with the predictions of HTLpt.

  14. X-linked congenital retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Kellner, U; Brümmer, S; Foerster, M H; Wessing, A

    1990-01-01

    The natural history and electrophysiological findings of 52 patients with X-linked congenital retinoschisis with a follow-up of up to 26 years are described. The mean visual acuity was reduced to 0.24 +/- 0.2 and remained unchanged in most patients during this time. If visual loss occurred, it usually happened in the first decennium. The complications were retinal detachments in 11% and vitreous hemorrhages in 4% of the eyes. In general, the vitreous hemorrhages resolved spontaneously. Retinal detachments were treated successfully with conventional buckling procedures. Redetachments occurred in about 40%. Prophylactic laser coagulation was of no use because it was complicated by detachment in 43% of our series. The electro-oculogram was usually normal. In addition to the known electrorentinographic findings of normal a-wave and reduced b-wave amplitudes, we found prolonged b-wave latencies and implicit times, as well as a reduced 30 Hz flicker response.

  15. Management of Congenital Tracheal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Watters, Karen; Rahbar, Reza; Fynn-Thompson, Francis

    2015-09-01

    Congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS) is a serious and rare condition. In most cases, stenotic lesions are composed of complete tracheal rings of cartilage.The severity of symptoms correlates with the length of affected trachea, the presence of concomitant respiratory conditions, degree of luminal narrowing,and any bronchial involvement. Critically, CTS is a disorder that can lead to life-threatening respiratory insufficiency in children. Thus, it is a clinical entity that demands timely diagnosis and treatment. This review will firstly discuss the anatomy and pathophysiology of CTS and outline the various clinical presentations associated with the disorder. In addition, methods of diagnosis and treatment strategies will be reviewed, with a focus on contemporary surgical techniques. Finally, postoperative care of patients with CTS will be reviewed, and a contemporary multidisciplinary management approach will be presented.

  16. Whole exome sequence analysis of Peters anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Weh, Eric; Reis, Linda M.; Happ, Hannah C.; Levin, Alex V.; Wheeler, Patricia G.; David, Karen L.; Carney, Erin; Angle, Brad; Hauser, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Peters anomaly is a rare form of anterior segment ocular dysgenesis, which can also be associated with additional systemic defects. At this time, the majority of cases of Peters anomaly lack a genetic diagnosis. We performed whole exome sequencing of 27 patients with syndromic or isolated Peters anomaly to search for pathogenic mutations in currently known ocular genes. Among the eight previously recognized Peters anomaly genes, we identified a de novo missense mutation in PAX6, c.155G>A, p.(Cys52Tyr), in one patient. Analysis of 691 additional genes currently associated with a different ocular phenotype identified a heterozygous splicing mutation c.1025+2T>A in TFAP2A, a de novo heterozygous nonsense mutation c.715C>T, p.(Gln239*) in HCCS, a hemizygous mutation c.385G>A, p.(Glu129Lys) in NDP, a hemizygous mutation c.3446C>T, p.(Pro1149Leu) in FLNA, and compound heterozygous mutations c.1422T>A, p.(Tyr474*) and c.2544G>A, p.(Met848Ile) in SLC4A11; all mutations, except for the FLNA and SLC4A11 c.2544G>A alleles, are novel. This is the frst study to use whole exome sequencing to discern the genetic etiology of a large cohort of patients with syndromic or isolated Peters anomaly. We report five new genes associated with this condition and suggest screening of TFAP2A and FLNA in patients with Peters anomaly and relevant syndromic features and HCCS, NDP and SLC4A11 in patients with isolated Peters anomaly. PMID:25182519

  17. Persistent left superior vena cava, absence of the innominate vein, and upper sinus venosus defect : a rare anomaly detected using bubbles.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, I; Sayin, M R; Karabag, T; Dogan, S M; Sen, S T; Gudul, N E; Aydin, M

    2013-05-01

    Superior vena cava anomalies are rare malformations that are typically seen with other congenital cardiac defects. Although a persistent left superior vena cava is the most common anomaly of the systemic venous return in the thorax, its combination with an upper sinus venosus defect and absence of the innominate vein is extremely rare. Here, we report a patient diagnosed with these anomalies based on a bubble study and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Genetic, Biochemical and Clinical Insights into Primary Congenital Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Faiq, Muneeb; Sharma, Reetika; Dada, Rima; Mohanty, Kuldeep; Saluja, Daman

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glaucoma is an irreversible form of optic neuropathy in which the optic nerve suffers damage in a characteristic manner with optic nerve cupping and retinal ganglion cell death. Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is an idiopathic irreversible childhood blinding disorder which manifests at birth or within the first year of life. PCG presents with a classical triad of symptoms (viz epiphora, photophobia and blepharospasm) though there are many additional symptoms, including large eye ball and hazy cornea. The only anatomical anomaly found in PCG is trabecular meshwork (TM) dysgenesis. PCG is an inheritable disease with established genetic etiology. It transmits through autosomal recessive mode. A number of cases are sporadic also. Mutations in many genes have been found to be causative in PCG and many are yet to be found. Mutations in cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1) gene have been found to be the predominant cause of PCG. Other genes that have been implicated in PCG etiology are myocilin, Forkhead-related transcription factor C1 (FOXC1) and latent transforming growth factor beta-binding protein 2 (LTBP2). Mutations in these genes have been reported from many parts of the world. In addition to this, mitochondrial genome mutations are also thought to be involved in its pathogenesis. There appears to be some mechanism involving more than one genetic factor. In this review, we will discuss the various clinical, biochemical and genetic aspects of PCG. We emphasize that etiology of PCG does not lie in a single gene or genetic factor. Research needs to be oriented into a direction where gene-gene interactions, ocular embryology, ophthalmic metabolism and systemic oxidative status need to be studied in order to understand this disorder. We also accentuate the need for ophthalmic genetic facilities in all ophthalmology setups. How to cite this article: Faiq M, Sharma R, Dada R, Mohanty K, Saluja D, Dada T. Genetic, Biochemical and Clinical Insights into Primary Congenital

  19. The genetic basis of inherited anomalies of the teeth. Part 2: syndromes with significant dental involvement.

    PubMed

    Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Berdal, Ariane; Vinckier, Frans; de Ravel, Thomy; Fryns, Jean Pierre; Verloes, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Teeth are specialized structural components of the craniofacial skeleton. Developmental defects occur either alone or in combination with other birth defects. In this paper, we review the dental anomalies in several multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndromes, in which the dental component is pivotal in the recognition of the phenotype and/or the molecular basis of the disorder is known. We will consider successively syndromic forms of amelogenesis imperfecta or enamel defects, dentinogenesis imperfecta (i.e. osteogenesis imperfecta) and other dentine anomalies. Focusing on dental aspects, we will review a selection of MCA syndromes associated with teeth number and/or shape anomalies. A better knowledge of the dental phenotype may contribute to an earlier diagnosis of some MCA syndromes involving teeth anomalies. They may serve as a diagnostic indicator or help confirm a syndrome diagnosis. PMID:18599376

  20. Congenital hemangiopericytoma: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Bosch, A M; Hack, W W; Ekkelkamp, S

    1998-03-01

    Congenital hemangiopericytoma is a rare tumor consisting of capillaries surrounded by pericytes. Only histologically can the tumor be distinguished from other vascular hamartomas. For a long time the congenital type was considered benign; however, metastases have recently been described. A histologic diagnosis of all soft-tissue sarcomas should be made. We describe two patients with congenital hemangiopericytomas in whom the diagnosis was not suspected until after histologic examination. Long-term follow-up is indicated.

  1. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Premi, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The implications of a diagnosis of congenital dislocation of the hip and the importance of the role of the family physician in early detection and treatment are identified. A review of the salient clinical features of congenital dislocation of the hip is undertaken. The results of a survey carried out in the author's practice on an unusual incidence of congenital dislocated hip are reviewed. PMID:21308053

  2. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  3. Uterine anomalies. A retrospective, matched-control study.

    PubMed

    Ben-Rafael, Z; Seidman, D S; Recabi, K; Bider, D; Mashiach, S

    1991-10-01

    The obstetric risk associated with congenital uterine malformations was studied in a group of 67 women who had undergone hysterosalpingography (HSG) during an eight-year period. HSG was performed to investigate primary (21% of the cases) and secondary (19%) infertility (group 1) or recurrent early fetal loss (60%) (group 2). The study group was compared with a random control group of 130 patients with HSG-proven normal uteri, matched for the presenting symptom. Prematurity and intrauterine fetal death were found to be significantly more common (P less than .05) for women in group 1 with uterine anomalies. The mean birth weight for preterm infants (less than 37 weeks) was significantly lower (P less than .01) for women with malformed uteri. The incidence of antepartum bleeding during pregnancy (P less than .01), breech presentation and cesarean section (P less than .001) was significantly higher for the study group. Premature rupture of the membranes was diagnosed more frequently (P less than .05) only in group 1. Patients with congenital uterine anomalies are a high-risk obstetric group. Primary infertility may be a more common presenting complaint in women with uterine anomalies than previously recognized.

  4. [Aortic vascular anomalies and Kommerell's diverticulum, an imagiologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Vasco; Marques, Hugo; Valentim, Hugo; Guerra, Adalgisa; Afonso, P Diana; Ventura, Carlos; Gaspar, Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Aortic vascular anomalies are complex anatomic entities requiring often complex and problematic surgical approaches. The authors report the clinical case of a Kommerell's diverticulum and right-sided aortic arch. Right-sided aortic arch is an uncommon congenital defect of the aorta and it is rare in the setting of an otherwise normal heart. A right-sided aortic arch was described more than two centuries ago. Several classifications of these anomalies have been proposed on the basis of the arrangement of the arch vessels, relationships with the esophagus, or the presence of congenital heart anomalies. In the adult population, a right-sided aortic arch is often asymptomatic, unless aneurismal disease develops. This usually occurs at the level of the take-off of an aberrant left subclavian artery and is known as a Kommerell's diverticulum. In spite of its rarity, this condition is clinically relevant due to the mortality associated with rupture, morbidity caused by compression of mediastinal structures, and complexity of surgery.

  5. Micropenis and congenital adrenal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, M J; Jones, B; Waagner, D C; Dunn, D

    1989-01-01

    Micropenis is often an early sign of congenital hypopituitarism. It has also been associated with congenital adrenal hypoplasia in infants with anencephaly and pituitary agenesis. This report is on two infants with micropenis and congenital adrenal hypoplasia. One presented with a similar clinical course and postmortem findings to previously reported cases of adrenal hypoplasia and pituitary agenesis. The other patient represents the first reported case of an infant with micropenis and congenital adrenal hypoplasia in the absence of pituitary agenesis. The histologic patterns of adrenal hypoplasia, as well as the etiologic and clinical implications of its association with micropenis, are discussed.

  6. Coronary artery anomalies overview: The normal and the abnormal

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Adriana DM; Sammut, Eva; Nair, Arjun; Rajani, Ronak; Bonamini, Rodolfo; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive and concise overview of coronary embryology and normal coronary anatomy, describe common variants of normal and summarize typical patterns of anomalous coronary artery anatomy. Extensive iconography supports the text, with particular attention to images obtained in vivo using non-invasive imaging. We have divided this article into three groups, according to their frequency in the general population: Normal, normal variant and anomaly. Although congenital coronary artery anomalies are relatively uncommon, they are the second most common cause of sudden cardiac death among young athletes and therefore warrant detailed review. Based on the functional relevance of each abnormality, coronary artery anomalies can be classified as anomalies with obligatory ischemia, without ischemia or with exceptional ischemia. The clinical symptoms may include chest pain, dyspnea, palpitations, syncope, cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia, myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. Moreover, it is important to also identify variants and anomalies without clinical relevance in their own right as complications during surgery or angioplasty can occur. PMID:27358682

  7. [Magnetic resonance in the evaluation of Mullerian duct anomalies].

    PubMed

    Fischetti, S G; Politi, G; Lomeo, E; Garozzo, G

    1995-01-01

    Müllerian duct alterations in development or fusion in the embryo cause congenital uterine anomalies which may be responsible for decreased fertility or problems in carrying out a normal pregnancy. In this study, the MR findings in uterine agenesis (1 case), unicornuate (2 cases), didelphys (3 cases), bicornuate (3 cases), arcuate (6 cases) and septate uterus (8 cases) are described, together with the optimal section planes for their demonstration. The examinations were performed with an 0.5-T superconductive magnet, the spin-echo technique and mostly T2-weighted sequences. The anomalies were grouped according to Buttram and Gibbons classification, which is the most used in clinics. In particular, the bicornuate uterus was distinguished from the septate uterus, the latter associated with the highest spontaneous abortion rates, on the basis of external fundal outline appearance. In such anomalies, the muscular or fibrotic nature of any intracavitary septum was assessed based on septal thickness more than on signal intensity at this level. MR diagnostic accuracy in 23 patients with Müllerian anomalies, compared with surgical, hysteroscopic, laparotomic and laparoscopic findings, was 100%. Nevertheless, if Müllerian duct anomalies responsible for gynecologic-obstetric problems are known or suspected, MRI should always be used, on the basis of a close gynecologist-radiologist collaboration, for classification agreement and the evaluation of any intracavitary septum morpho-biometric appearance and possibly nature, to discuss treatment options.

  8. Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification Analysis of GATA4 Gene Copy Number Variations in Patients with Isolated Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Valentina; Lepri, Francesca; Vijzelaar, Raymon; De Zorzi, Andrea; Versacci, Paolo; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; De Luca, Alessandro; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    GATA4 mutations are found in patients with different isolated congenital heart defects (CHDs), mostly cardiac septal defects and tetralogy of Fallot. In addition, GATA4 is supposed to be the responsible gene for the CHDs in the chromosomal 8p23 deletion syndrome, which is recognized as a malformation syndrome with clinical symptoms of facial anomalies, microcephaly, mental retardation, and congenital heart defects. Thus far, no study has been carried out to investigate the role of GATA4 copy number variations (CNVs) in non-syndromic CHDs. To explore the possible occurrence of GATA4 gene CNVs in isolated CHDs, we analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) a cohort of 161 non-syndromic patients with cardiac anomalies previously associated with GATA4 gene mutations. The patients were mutation-negative for GATA4, NKX2.5, and FOG2 genes after screening with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography. MLPA analysis revealed that normalized MLPA signals were all found within the normal range values for all exons in all patients, excluding a major contribution of GATA4 gene CNVs in CHD pathogenesis. PMID:20592452

  9. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hepatic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions congenital hepatic fibrosis congenital hepatic fibrosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a disease of the liver that is ...

  10. Bilateral congenital lumbar hernias in a patient with central core disease--A case report.

    PubMed

    Lazier, Joanna; Mah, Jean K; Nikolic, Ana; Wei, Xing-Chang; Samedi, Veronica; Fajardo, Carlos; Brindle, Mary; Perrier, Renee; Thomas, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lumbar hernias are rare malformations caused by defects in the development of the posterior abdominal wall. A known association exists with lumbocostovertebral syndrome; however other associated anomalies, including one case with arthrogryposis, have been previously reported. We present an infant girl with bilateral congenital lumbar hernias, multiple joint contractures, decreased muscle bulk and symptoms of malignant hyperthermia. Molecular testing revealed an R4861C mutation in the ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) gene, known to be associated with central core disease. This is the first reported case of the co-occurrence of congenital lumbar hernias and central core disease. We hypothesize that ryanodine receptor 1 mutations may interrupt muscle differentiation and development. Further, this case suggests an expansion of the ryanodine receptor 1-related myopathy phenotype to include congenital lumbar hernias.

  11. Anesthetic management in a case of congenital sternal cleft diagnosed incidentally on the operating table

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priyamvada; Kumar, Alok; Jethava, D. D.; Jethava, Durga

    2014-01-01

    Congenital absence of sternum, also known as sternal cleft, is a rare anomaly. It is due to impaired organogenesis leading to nonfusion of sternal bars. It may be of two types- complete or incomplete. It may be associated with other congenital malformations viz., cardiac, anorectal etc., or may be a part of Cantrell's pentalogy. Besides cosmetic concerns, mediastinal structures are at increased risk to damage in case of trauma to the anterior chest wall. Due to restricted mediastinal space, there may be restrictive pulmonary dysfunctions and unstable hemodynamics. It usually presents in the neonatal period or early infancy, rarely in adult age. The defect should be surgically closed as early as possible. If cardiac arrest occurs due to any reason, the only option is open cardiac massage. We report a case of complete congenital sternal cleft accidentally diagnosed on the operation table, while preparing the patient for diagnostic laparotomy. The patient was retrospectively assessed for the presence of other congenital malformations. PMID:25886344

  12. Homozygous Mutation of the FGFR1 Gene Associated with Congenital Heart Disease and 46,XY Disorder of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Mazen, Inas; Amin, Heba; Kamel, Alaa; El Ruby, Mona; Bignon-Topalovic, Joelle; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are the most common cause of all birth defects and account for nearly 25% of all major congenital anomalies leading to mortality in the first year of life. Extracardiac anomalies including urogenital aberrations are present in ∼30% of all cases. Here, we present a rare case of a 46,XY patient with CHD associated with ambiguous genitalia consisting of a clitoris-like phallus and a bifid scrotum. Exome sequencing revealed novel homozygous mutations in the FGFR1 and STARD3 genes that may be associated with the phenotype. PMID:27055092

  13. Hysterosalpingographic features of cervical abnormalities: acquired structural anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Zafarani, F; Shahrzad, G

    2015-01-01

    Cervical abnormalities may be congenital or acquired. Congenital cervical structural anomalies are relatively uncommon, whereas acquired cervical abnormalities are commonly seen in gynaecology clinics. Acquired abnormalities of the cervix can cause cervical factor infertility and recurrent spontaneous abortion. Various imaging tools have been used for evaluation of the uterine cavity and fallopian tubes. Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is a quick and minimally invasive tool for evaluation of infertility that facilitates visualization of the inner surfaces of the uterine cavity and fallopian tubes, as well as the cervical canal and isthmus. The lesions of the uterine cervix show various imaging manifestations on HSG such as narrowing, dilatation, filling defects, irregularities and diverticular projections. This pictorial review describes and illustrates the hysterosalpingographic appearances of normal variants and acquired structural abnormalities of the cervix. Accurate diagnosis of such cases is considered essential for optimal treatment. The pathological findings and radiopathological correlation will be briefly discussed. PMID:26111269

  14. Amaurosis fugax associated with congenital vascular defect

    PubMed Central

    Giltner, John W; Thomas, Edward R; Rundell, William K

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old female with no significant past medical history presented with loss of vision in the lower half of her left eye that lasted <5 minutes. No abnormalities were found on ocular or physical exam. Computed tomography angiography and carotid ultrasound were performed, which confirmed the diagnosis as amaurosis fugax with two abnormalities leading to the transient retinal vessel occlusion. First, it was found that the patient has a congenital vascular anomaly, which consisted most notably of a right-sided aortic arch. This vascular anomaly also consisted of abnormal branching of the left subclavian and common carotid arteries, predisposing the patient to turbulent blood flow and increased risk of the formation of an atherosclerotic plaque at the origin of the common carotid artery. This is an abnormal location for a plaque leading to amaurosis fugax compared to the most common location at the carotid bifurcation. Endarterectomy was not performed because of the difficult location of the plaque and tortuosity of the vessel. Rather, medical intervention with antiplatelet and lipid-lowering therapy was initiated to lower the risk of future retinal or cerebral thromboembolic events. PMID:27445507

  15. Double congenital fistulae with aneurysm diagnosed by combining imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Motomi; Mukouhara, Naoki; Hirami, Ryouichi; Fujio, Hideki; Yumoto, Akihisa; Watanuki, Yutaka; Hayashi, Aiko; Suminoe, Isao; Koudani, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Congenital coronary pulmonary artery fistula (CAF) is rare, and systemic-to-pulmonary artery fistula (SPAF) is even more so. Furthermore, congenital coronary pulmonary fistula associated with congenital SPAF is extremely rare. As far as we know, CAF and SPAF connected with an aneurysm have not been described very often. We described an 83-year-old woman with an aneurysm originating from a CAF connected to an aortopulmonary artery fistula. Chest radiography revealed a shadow at the left edge of the heart line. Multi-detector-row computed tomography (MDCT) with contrast enhancement and coronary cine angiography revealed that the shadow was an aneurysm connected to a tortuous fistula at the left anterior descending coronary artery. The aneurysm was formed by congenital coronary pulmonary and aortopulmonary artery fistulae. Echocardiography revealed predominantly systolic blood flow in the fistula from the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Although neither MDCT, echocardiography nor coronary angiography alone could provide a comprehensive image of the anomaly, including the hemodynamics in the fistulae and their relationship with surrounding organs and tissues, their combination could provided important facts the led to a deeper understanding of this very uncommon occurrence. PMID:24145730

  16. Continental and oceanic magnetic anomalies: Enhancement through GRM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    In contrast to the POGO and MAGSAT satellites, the Geopotential Research Mission (GRM) satellite system will orbit at a minimum elevation to provide significantly better resolved lithospheric magnetic anomalies for more detailed and improved geologic analysis. In addition, GRM will measure corresponding gravity anomalies to enhance our understanding of the gravity field for vast regions of the Earth which are largely inaccessible to more conventional surface mapping. Crustal studies will greatly benefit from the dual data sets as modeling has shown that lithospheric sources of long wavelength magnetic anomalies frequently involve density variations which may produce detectable gravity anomalies at satellite elevations. Furthermore, GRM will provide an important replication of lithospheric magnetic anomalies as an aid to identifying and extracting these anomalies from satellite magnetic measurements. The potential benefits to the study of the origin and characterization of the continents and oceans, that may result from the increased GRM resolution are examined.

  17. Z2 and Chiral Anomalies in Topological Dirac Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, Anton A.; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that topological Dirac semimetals, which possess two Dirac nodes, separated in momentum space along a rotation axis and protected by rotational symmetry, exhibit an additional quantum anomaly, distinct from the chiral anomaly. This anomaly, which we call the Z2 anomaly, is a consequence of the fact that the Dirac nodes in topological Dirac semimetals carry a Z2 topological charge. The Z2 anomaly refers to nonconservation of this charge in the presence of external fields due to quantum effects and has observable consequences due to its interplay with the chiral anomaly. We discuss possible implications of this for the interpretation of magnetotransport experiments on topological Dirac semimetals. We also provide a possible explanation for the magnetic field dependent angular narrowing of the negative longitudinal magnetoresistance, observed in a recent experiment on Na3Bi .

  18. Vascular Anomalies and Airway Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Caroline; Lee, Edward I.; Edmonds, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies, both tumors and malformations, can occur anywhere in the body, including the airway, often without any external manifestations. However, vascular anomalies involving the airway deserve special consideration as proper recognition and management can be lifesaving. In this article, the authors discuss vascular anomalies as they pertains to the airway, focusing on proper diagnosis, diagnostic modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:25045336

  19. Does this baby have a tail?: a case of congenital isolated perineal lipoma presenting as human pseudo-tail.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Hong; Cho, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hae Young

    2016-01-01

    A pseudo-tail is defined as a tail-like lesion in the lumbosacrococcygeal region that is not a true tail but one caused by disease. Perineal lipoma is one of the conditions that may present as a pseudo-tail. Congenital perineal lipoma is a rare disease and in particular, isolated congenital perineal lipoma without other anomalies is extremely rare. Here we report a case of congenital isolated perineal lipoma presenting as a pseudo-tail and also include a literature review of the condition.

  20. Does this baby have a tail?: a case of congenital isolated perineal lipoma presenting as human pseudo-tail

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Hong; Cho, Yong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    A pseudo-tail is defined as a tail-like lesion in the lumbosacrococcygeal region that is not a true tail but one caused by disease. Perineal lipoma is one of the conditions that may present as a pseudo-tail. Congenital perineal lipoma is a rare disease and in particular, isolated congenital perineal lipoma without other anomalies is extremely rare. Here we report a case of congenital isolated perineal lipoma presenting as a pseudo-tail and also include a literature review of the condition. PMID:26793694

  1. Mass Anomalies on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Anderson, J. D.; Jacobson, R. A.; Lau, E. L.; Moore, W. B.; Palguta, J.

    2004-01-01

    Radio Doppler data from two Ganymede encounters (G1 and G2) on the first two orbits in the Galileo mission have been analyzed previously for gravity information . For a satellite in hydrostatic equilibrium, its gravitational field can be modeled adequately by a truncated spherical harmonic series of degree two. However, a fourth degree field is required in order to fit the second Galileo flyby (G2). This need for a higher degree field strongly suggests that Ganymede s gravitational field is perturbed by a gravity anomaly near the G2 closest approach point (79.29 latitude, 123.68 west longitude). In fact, a plot of the Doppler residuals , after removal of the best-fit model for the zero degree term (GM) and the second degree moments (J2 and C22), suggests that if an anomaly exists, it is located downtrack of the closest approach point, closer to the equator.

  2. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-26

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  3. Dominant syndrome with isolated cryptophthalmos and ocular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Saal, H M; Traboulsi, E I; Gavaris, P; Samango-Sprouse, C A; Parks, M

    1992-07-15

    We report on a mother and daughter with nonsyndromal cryptophthalmos. Both patients have additional ocular anomalies, including microphthalmia, retinal dysplasia, and Peters anomaly. The periocular and lid changes seen in these individuals are distinct from those seen in typical cryptophthalmos. The apparent dominant mode of inheritance in this family distinguishes this condition from autosomal recessive isolated cryptophthalmos and from the Fraser or cryptophthalmos syndrome.

  4. Neural correlates of taste perception in congenital olfactory impairment.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Léa; Vestergaard, Martin; Madsen, Kristoffer; Karstensen, Helena G; Siebner, Hartwig; Tommerup, Niels; Kupers, Ron; Ptito, Maurice

    2014-09-01

    Olfaction and gustation contribute both to the appreciation of food flavours. Although acquired loss of smell has profound consequences on the pleasure of eating, food habits and body weight, less is known about the impact of congenital olfactory impairment on gustatory processing. Here we examined taste identification accuracy and its neural correlates using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 12 congenitally olfactory impaired individuals and 8 normosmic controls. Results showed that taste identification was worse in congenitally olfactory impaired compared to control subjects. The fMRI results demonstrated that olfactory impaired individuals had reduced activation in medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) relative to normosmic subjects while tasting. In addition, olfactory performance as measured with the Sniffin' Sticks correlated positively with taste-induced blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in bilateral mOFC and anterior insula. Our data provide a neurological underpinning for the reduced taste perception in congenitally olfactory impaired individuals.

  5. Appropriately grown baby with multiple congenital abnormalities: a case report.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Devangi; Aladangady, Narendra

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a full-term baby girl (Baby A) born with multiple congenital abnormalities that were suggested by prenatal scans. The mother had declined further antenatal diagnostic testing. Postnatal chromosomal analyses revealed the karyotype of the baby to be trisomy 18. After detailed, compassionate discussions with the parents, it was decided to provide palliative care in the best interest of the baby, who died on day 15 of life. This case illustrates ethical difficulties in the care of neonates with congenital anomalies with poor prognoses, such as trisomy 18. Recommending palliative care and "do not resuscitate" orders to optimistic parents is extremely difficult and needs to be done in the most sensitive manner possible.

  6. Congenital echovirus 21 infection causing fulminant hepatitis in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Cristina; Lage, Maria João; Virella, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Enteroviral infection in pregnancy is common and there is growing evidence relating it to congenital anomalies and neonatal mortality. Neonatal disease may range from unapparent infection to overwhelming systemic illness. Passively acquired maternal serotype specific antibodies determine the severity of the disease in the newborn. A fatal case of congenital echovirus 21 infection, confirmed by PCR in the patient's blood and positive culture of the mother's stools, is reported. A sibling had symptoms of respiratory tract infection and their mother had fever, which prompted iatrogenic delivery that same day. The newborn presented with bradycardia and hypotonia in the first minutes of life and later developed respiratory distress, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, fulminant hepatitis, acute renal failure and necrotising enterocolitis. Death occurred on the 8 day of life. This case highlights the potential severity of Enteroviral infection in the newborn. Since only supportive treatment is available, prevention is paramount. PMID:23576650

  7. [Dysphonia in children due to congenital laryngeal web. Case series].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Hugo; Cuestas, Giselle; Zanetta, Adrián

    2013-01-01

    Dysphonia is common in children. Its main cause is the abuse or misuse of the voice. Congenital, neoplastic, infectious, neurological or iatrogenic causes are less frequent. The laryngeal web is a rare congenital anomaly resulting from an incomplete recanalization of the primitive larynx. This condition should be suspected in any newborn with dysphonic cry with or without stridor and respiratory distress. The diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic examination. Therapy depends on the extent and thickness of the membrane and the severity of the symptoms. We describe our experience with 8 patients suffering this condition, and we emphasize the need to recognize voice disorders and to evaluate the airway for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment in every newborn, infant or child with persistent dysphonia.

  8. Congenital Midline Tongue Base Mass in An Infant: Lingual Hamartoma

    PubMed Central

    Azman, Mawaddah; See, Goh Bee

    2016-01-01

    Lingual hamartoma is a rare finding of congenital midline posterior tongue mass. The lesion may be seen as a single anomaly or maybe associated with syndrome especially the Oral Facial Digital Syndrome (OFDS). Here, we report an otherwise normal and healthy two-month-old boy with a congenital midline base of tongue mass presented with snoring and episodic vomiting since the age of 1 month. Tumour excision from the area of foramen of caecum recovered a pinkish pedunculated tumour. Histopathology examination confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyomatous lingual hamartoma. Differential diagnosis, especially for midline tongue mass and other paediatric tongue lesions are discussed. We also discuss the epidemiology, histopathologic features, treatment and prognosis of lingual hamartoma based on the literature review. PMID:27790477

  9. [Congenital nasal obstruction due to choanal atresia: case series].

    PubMed

    Zanetta, Adrián; Rodríguez, Hugo; Quiroga, Víctor; Cuestas, Giselle; Tiscornia, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Nasal obstruction in neonates is a potential fatal condition because of their exclusive nasal breathing. The most common congenital causes include choanal atresia, dermoid cyst, glioma and encephalocele. Choanal atresia is the most common congenital nasal anomaly. When bilateral, it presents with respiratory distress at birth. Unilateral atresia is manifested by respiratory failure and unilateral rhinorrhea, and may go along unnoticed. Diagnosis is suspected in the absence of airfow in the nasal cavity and for the inability to advance a nasogastric tube. Diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic examination and computed tomography. The definitive treatment is surgical, and there are different techniques and surgical approaches. We describe our experience with 7 patients with this disease, successfully treated by transnasal endoscopic technique. PMID:22451289

  10. [Dysphonia in children due to congenital laryngeal web. Case series].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Hugo; Cuestas, Giselle; Zanetta, Adrián

    2013-01-01

    Dysphonia is common in children. Its main cause is the abuse or misuse of the voice. Congenital, neoplastic, infectious, neurological or iatrogenic causes are less frequent. The laryngeal web is a rare congenital anomaly resulting from an incomplete recanalization of the primitive larynx. This condition should be suspected in any newborn with dysphonic cry with or without stridor and respiratory distress. The diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic examination. Therapy depends on the extent and thickness of the membrane and the severity of the symptoms. We describe our experience with 8 patients suffering this condition, and we emphasize the need to recognize voice disorders and to evaluate the airway for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment in every newborn, infant or child with persistent dysphonia. PMID:23912298

  11. Perineal Groove: A Rare Congenital Midline Defect of Perineum.

    PubMed

    Harsono, Mimily; Pourcyrous, Massroor

    2016-03-01

    Perineal groove is a rare congenital malformation that is characterized by an exposed wet sulcus with nonkeratinized mucous membrane that extends from the posterior vaginal fourchette to the anterior ridge of the anal orifice. This condition is one of the uncommon anomalies of urogenital/anogenital region that is unknown to many clinicians. Although, this condition may be self-resolved before the age of 2 years, this nonepithelized mucous membrane can pose the risk of local irritation and infection, urinary tract infection, and the possibility of nonself-resolved condition that eventually needs surgical correction. Only a few reported cases (n = 23) were found in current medical literatures. This lesion could be misdiagnosed as contact dermatitis, trauma, or even sexual abuse. Therefore, recognition of the congenital perineal groove at birth is important for the health care providers to deliver an appropriate parental counseling and appropriate follow-up. PMID:26929866

  12. Congenital granular cell epulis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Rachel; Perez, Mia C N

    2014-01-01

    Congenital granular cell epulis is a rarely reported lesion of unknown histogenesis with a strong predilection for the maxillary alveolar ridge of newborn girls. Microscopically, it demonstrates nests of polygonal cells with granular cytoplasm, a prominent capillary network, and attenuated overlying squamous epithelium. The lesion lacks immunoreactivity for S-100, laminin, chromogranin, and most other markers except neuron-specific enolase and vimentin. Through careful observation of its unique clinical, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical features, this lesion can be distinguished from the more common adult granular cell tumor as well as other differential diagnoses.

  13. Neonatal congenital microvillus atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pecache, N; Patole, S; Hagan, R; Hill, D; Charles, A; Papadimitriou, J

    2004-01-01

    Congenital microvillous atrophy (CMVA) is the leading cause of neonatal secretory diarrhoea with onset either in the first 72 hours of life (early onset) or at 6–8 weeks after birth (late onset). To date over 30 cases have been reported worldwide. The prognosis for this life threatening condition continues to be poor. Therapeutic agents like somatostatin and epidermal growth factor are either ineffective or of marginal benefit. Overall five year survival after small bowel transplantation is currently ∼50%. The following brief review is aimed towards helping neonatologists/perinatologists in the early diagnosis, and management of CMVA and in counselling the parents appropriately. PMID:14970294

  14. [Congenital linear nevus sebaceus].

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Anders; Bygum, Anette; Fenger-Grøn, Jesper

    2011-09-01

    An unusual case of nevus sebaceous is described. Nevus sebaceous is a congenital epidermal hamartoma of the skin and the predilection site is the head or neck. In this case the nevus followed the lines of Blaschko along the back of the left lower extremity. The linear lesion seemed papulovesicular which caused suspicion of incontinentia pigmenti or infection, and the boy received antimicrobial treatment until a biopsy revealed the correct diagnosis. We wish to emphasize this clinical picture to spare the patient and relatives from unnecessary tests, treatment and concern. PMID:21893006

  15. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Ansari, Ms

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum (CAUD) may be found all along the anterior urethra and may present itself at any age, from infant to adult. Most children with this condition present with difficulty in initiating micturition, dribbling of urine, poor urinary stream, or urinary tract infection. A careful history will reveal that these children never had a good urinary stream since birth, and the telltale sign is a cystic swelling of the penile urethra. In this paper, we present two cases of CAUD that were managed by excision of the diverticulum with primary repair. PMID:26328174

  16. The Hubble Space Telescope attitude observer anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Arsdall, Morgan M.; Ramsey, Patrick R.; Swain, Scott R.

    2006-06-01

    In mid-2004, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) began experiencing occasional losses of lock during Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) guide star acquisitions, threatening a potential loss of science. These failures were associated with an increasing disparity between the FGS-derived estimates of gyro bias calculated in orbit day and those calculated in orbit night. Early efforts to mitigate the operational effects of this Attitude Observer Anomaly (AOA) succeeded; however, the magnitude of the anomaly continued to increase at a linear rate and operational problems resumed in mid-2005. Continued analysis led to an additional on-orbit mitigation strategy that succeeded in reducing the AOA signature. Before the investigation could be completed, HST began operations under the life-extending Two Gyro Science mode. This eliminated both the operational effects of and the visibility into the AOA phenomenon. Possible causes of the anomaly at the vehicle system level included component hardware failures, flight software errors in control law processing, distortion of the telescope optical path, and deformation of vehicle structure. Although the mechanism of the AOA was not definitively identified, the Anomaly Review Board (ARB) chartered to investigate the anomaly concluded that the most likely root cause lies within one of HST's 6 rate-integrating gyroscopes. This paper provides a summary of the initial paths of investigation, the analysis and testing performed to attempt to isolate the source, and a review of the findings of the ARB. The possibility of future operational impacts and available methods of on-orbit mitigation are also addressed.

  17. Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries in an 83-year-old asymptomatic patient: description and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Placci, Angelo; Lovato, Luigi; Bonvicini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of an 83-year-old asymptomatic man followed in our centre. Transoesophageal echocardiography disclosed congenitally corrected transposition of great arteries (CCTGA) with no associated anomalies and only mild aortic regurgitation. Cardiac MR confirmed the diagnosis and revealed preserved systemic ventricle systolic function with a normal perfusional pathway. This report is a demonstration that CCTGA without associated anomalies can reach older life in an asymptomatic condition. This is the oldest asymptomatic living patient with CCTGA ever described. PMID:25336547

  18. [Approach to congenital heart disease in adults].

    PubMed

    Alva Espinosa, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    After a few decades treating patients with congenital heart disease during childhood, we now face the problem of dealing with many of them as adults and few cases with disorders detected in adult life. The number of patients, with and without surgery is growing up rapidly. Conservatively speaking, there are in Mexico approximately 300 thousands patients with this condition, increasing by 15 thousands patients per year. In addition to the complexity of the congenital pathology, the knowledge of acquired diseases should be incorporated as well as the genetic advise, pregnancy care and specialized psychological support. The approach to these patients begins with stratification; diagnosis and treatment requiring a multidisciplinary, well informed and an capable to perform together medical team.

  19. [Genetics of congenital lipodystrophies].

    PubMed

    Buffet, A; Lombes, M; Caron, P

    2015-10-01

    Congenital lipodystrophies are heterogeneous genetic diseases, leading to the loss of adipose tissue. This loss of adipose tissue can be generalized or partial, thus defining different phenotypes. These lipodystrophies have a major metabolic impact, secondary to lipotoxicity. This lipotoxicity is responsible for insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis. The severity of the metabolic impact correlates with the severity of the loss of adipose tissue. Mutations in 15 predisposition genes are currently described; BSCL2 and AGPT2 genes are the major genes in the generalized forms. On the contrary, LMNA and PPARG gene mutations are recovered in partial lipodystrophies forms. These different genes encode for proteins involved in adipocyte physiology, altering adipocyte differentiation, triglycerides synthesis and lysis or playing a major role in the lipid droplet formation. Congenital lipodystrophies treatment is based on the management of metabolic comorbidities but recombinant leptin therapy appears to have promising results. These different points have been recently discussed during the 2015 Endocrine Society Congress, notably by S. O'Rahilly and are highlighted in this review.

  20. [Genetics of congenital deafness].

    PubMed

    Faundes, Víctor; Pardo, Rosa Andrea; Castillo Taucher, Silvia

    2012-10-20

    Congenital deafness is defined as the hearing loss which is present at birth and, consequently, before speech development. It is the most prevalent sensor neural disorder in developed countries, and its incidence is estimated between 1-3 children per 1,000 newborns, of which more than 50% are attributable to genetics causes. Deafness can be classified as syndromic or non-syndromic. In the first case, it is associated with outer ear malformations and/or systemic findings. More than 400 syndromes accompanied of deafness have been described, which represent about 30% of cases of congenital hearing loss. The remaining percentage corresponds to non-syndromic cases: 75-85% are autosomal recessive, 15-24% are autosomal dominant, and 1-2% are X-linked. The evaluation of a child with deafness requires a multidisciplinary collaboration among specialists, who must coordinate themselves and give information to the affected family. The aims of establishing a diagnosis are to predict other manifestations that may suggest some syndrome and to anticipate their management, as well as to perform genetic counseling to parents and affected individuals.