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Sample records for additional congenital anomalies

  1. Congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Kunisaki, Shaun M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, amniotic fluid-derived stem cells have emerged as a novel, experimental approach for the treatment of a wide variety of congenital anomalies diagnosed either in utero or postnatally. There are a number of unique properties of amniotic fluid stem cells that have allowed it to become a major research focus. These include the relative ease of accessing amniotic fluid cells in a minimally invasive fashion by amniocentesis as well as the relatively rich population of progenitor cells obtained from a small aliquot of fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells, c-kit positive stem cells, as well as induced pluripotent stem cells have all been derived from human amniotic fluid in recent years. This article gives a pediatric surgeon’s perspective on amniotic fluid stem cell therapy for the management of congenital anomalies. The current status in the use of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells, particularly as they relate as substrates in tissue engineering-based applications, is described in various animal models. A roadmap for further study and eventual clinical application is also proposed. PMID:22986340

  2. Congenital anomalies associated with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Stoll, C; Dott, B; Alembik, Y; Koehl, C

    1999-01-01

    The French national neonatal screening program for congenital hypothyroidism (CH) was initiated in 1978. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the incidence of congenital extrathyroid anomalies (ETAs) among the infants with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) and to compare it with the Northeastern France Birth Defect Monitoring System data from 1979 to 1996. Among 129 CH infants on whom adequate data were available, 20 infants (15.5%) had associated congenital anomalies. Eight out of 76 infants with persistent CH had ETAs (10.5%) whereas 12 out of 53 children with transient hypothyroidism had ETAs (22.6%, p < 0.05). Some additional anomalies were considerably more common than in the general population. Nine infants had congenital cardiac anomalies (6.9%). This rises the question if teratogenic effects active during organogenesis may affect simultaneously many organs, including the developing thyroid, causing a relatively high percentage of CH infants with congenital ETAs.

  3. Radionuclide imaging of rare congenital renal fusion anomalies.

    PubMed

    Volkan, Bilge; Ceylan, Emel; Kiratli, Pinar Ozgen

    2003-03-01

    Demonstration of a congenital renal anomaly plays an important role in the treatment of patients with renal infection. These patients are prone to infections because of coexisting urinary tract anomalies such as duplicated ureter, ureter opening anomalies, and urinary stasis. Assessment of renal parenchymal damage resulting from acute or chronic renal infection is the primary indication for radionuclide imaging with Tc-99m DMSA. In addition, this technique allows congenital anomalies to be identified. The authors review congenital renal fusion anomalies identified in children through Tc-99m DMSA imaging. They conclude that Tc-99m DMSA imaging can reveal important diagnostic information about various congenital anomalies, including fusion anomalies.

  4. Congenital basis of posterior fossa anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Cotes, Claudia; Bonfante, Eliana; Lazor, Jillian; Jadhav, Siddharth; Caldas, Maria; Swischuk, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    The classification of posterior fossa congenital anomalies has been a controversial topic. Advances in genetics and imaging have allowed a better understanding of the embryologic development of these abnormalities. A new classification schema correlates the embryologic, morphologic, and genetic bases of these anomalies in order to better distinguish and describe them. Although they provide a better understanding of the clinical aspects and genetics of these disorders, it is crucial for the radiologist to be able to diagnose the congenital posterior fossa anomalies based on their morphology, since neuroimaging is usually the initial step when these disorders are suspected. We divide the most common posterior fossa congenital anomalies into two groups: 1) hindbrain malformations, including diseases with cerebellar or vermian agenesis, aplasia or hypoplasia and cystic posterior fossa anomalies; and 2) cranial vault malformations. In addition, we will review the embryologic development of the posterior fossa and, from the perspective of embryonic development, will describe the imaging appearance of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. Knowledge of the developmental bases of these malformations facilitates detection of the morphological changes identified on imaging, allowing accurate differentiation and diagnosis of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. PMID:26246090

  5. Congenital anomalies surveillance in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lowry, R Brian

    2008-01-01

    Congenital anomalies (CA) are present in approximately 3% of all newborn babies and account for about 12% of paediatric hospital admissions. They represent an important public health problem. Surveillance is especially important so that preventive measures such as folic acid fortification can be properly assessed without resorting to a series of ad hoc studies. Canada's surveillance of CAs is weak, with only Alberta and British Columbia having established sytems. Most provinces have perinatal systems but their CA data are incomplete and they do not capture terminations of pregnancy. The same is true of the Public Health Agency of Canada's system. A new system, the Fetal Alert Network, has been proposed for Ontario, which represents a start but will require additional sources of ascertainment if it is to be a truly population-based system for Ontario.

  6. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Lubinsky, M.S.

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  7. Congenital pancreatic anomalies, variants, and conditions.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Lauren F

    2012-05-01

    Understanding pancreatic development and the congenital anomalies and variants that result from alterations in normal development allows for better recognition of these anomalies at diagnostic imaging. This article reviews normal pancreatic embryology and anatomy, and the appearance of the more common developmental anomalies and ductal variants, with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Common mimics of masses are also covered.

  8. Cervicobrachialgia with congenital vertebral anomalies and diastematomyelia.

    PubMed

    Roosen, N; De Moor, J

    1984-05-01

    A case of diastematomyelia in an adult female patient is reported. The relationship of the cervicobrachialgia, which was the presenting sign, to the diastematomyelia and the congenital vertebral anomalies is discussed.

  9. Minor congenital anomalies and ataxic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, G

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of minor congenital anomalies was examined in 36 patients with ataxic cerebral palsy, in unaffected family members, and in 100 unrelated control subjects. None of the control subjects or family members had more than four anomalies, and 25 of 36 (69%) of the patients had more than four. The distribution of anomalies differed considerably, with 60% of the index cases having seven or more, and 94% of the controls having three or less. The number occurring in the patients was significantly more than in their relatives. Of the 25 patients with more than four anomalies, 16 (64%) had undergone potentially adverse perinatal or early postnatal events. Thus minor congenital anomalies were considerably more frequent in those with ataxic cerebral palsy than in related or unrelated control subjects. These anomalies may be markers of early prenatal factors that contributed to the adverse outcome either directly or by predisposing to perinatal difficulties. PMID:2751330

  10. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD.

  11. Congenital anomalies of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Hans G; Belman, A Barry

    2014-01-01

    The upper urinary tract forms as a consequence of the reciprocal inductive signals between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. A clue to the timing of events leading to an abnormality of the upper urinary tract can be the presence also of associated anomalies of internal genitalia since separation of these systems occurs at about the 10th week of gestation. Prenatal sonography has facilitated the detection of urological abnormalities presenting with hydronephrosis. Hydronephrosis suggests obstruction, but by itself cannot be equated with it. Instead, further radiographic imaging is required to delineate anatomy and function. Now, moreover, non-surgical management of CAKUT should be considered whenever possible. Despite the widespread use of prenatal screening sonography that usually identifies the majority of congenital anomalies of the urinary tract, many children still present with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). Regardless of the etiology for the presentation, the goal of management is preservation of renal function through mitigation of the risk for recurrent UTI and/or obstruction. In the past many children underwent surgical repair aimed at normalization of the appearance of the urinary tract. Today, management has evolved such that in most cases surgical reconstruction is performed only after a period of observation - with or without urinary prophylaxis. The opinions presented in this section are not espoused by all pediatric urologists but represent instead the practice that has evolved at Children's National Medical Center (Washington DC) based significantly on information obtained by nuclear renography, in addition to sonography and contrast cystography.

  12. Congenital hand anomalies in Upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abulezz, Tarek; Talaat, Mohamed; Elsani, Asem; Allam, Karam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hand anomalies are numerous and markedly variant. Their significance is attributed to the frequent occurrence and their serious social, psychological and functional impacts on patient's life. Patients and Methods: This is a follow-up study of 64 patients with hand anomalies of variable severity. All patients were presented to Plastic Surgery Department of Sohag University Hospital in a period of 24 months. Results: This study revealed that failure of differentiation and duplication deformities were the most frequent, with polydactyly was the most common anomaly encountered. The mean age of presentation was 6 years and female to male ratio was 1.46:1. Hand anomalies were either isolated, associated with other anomalies or part of a syndrome. Conclusion: Incidence of congenital hand anomalies in Upper Egypt is difficult to be estimated due to social and cultural concepts, lack of education, poor registration and deficient medical survey. Management of hand anomalies should be individualised, carefully planned and started as early as possible to achieve the best outcome. PMID:27833283

  13. Congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Toka, Hakan R; Toka, Okan; Hariri, Ali; Nguyen, Hiep T

    2010-07-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract anatomy (CAKUT) are common in children and represent approximately 30% of all prenatally diagnosed malformations. CAKUT is phenotypically variable and can affect the kidney(s) alone and/or the lower urinary tract. The spectrum includes more common anomalies such as vesicoureteral reflux and, rarely, more severe malformations such as bilateral renal agenesis. In young children, congenital anomalies are the leading cause of kidney failure and for kidney transplantation or dialysis. CAKUT can also lead to significant renal problems in adulthood and may present itself with hypertension and/or proteinuria. Congenital renal anomalies can be sporadic or familial, syndromic (also affecting nonrenal or non-urinary tract tissues), or nonsyndromic. Genetic causes have been identified for the syndromic forms and have shed some light into the molecular mechanisms of kidney development in human beings. The genetic causes for the more common nonsyndromic forms of CAKUT are unknown. The role of prenatal interventions and postnatal therapies as well as the benefits of screening affected individuals and their family members are not clear.

  14. Congenital anomalies of the optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Amador-Patarroyo, Manuel J.; Pérez-Rueda, Mario A.; Tellez, Carlos H.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital optic nerve head anomalies are a group of structural malformations of the optic nerve head and surrounding tissues, which may cause congenital visual impairment and blindness. Each entity in this group of optic nerve anomalies has individually become more prevalent as our ability to differentiate between them has improved due to better characterization of cases. Access to better medical technology (e.g., neuroimaging and genetic analysis advances in recent years) has helped to expand our knowledge of these abnormalities. However, visual impairment may not be the only problem in these patients, some of these entities will be related to ophthalmologic, neurologic and systemic features that will help the physician to identify and predict possible outcomes in these patients, which sometimes may be life-threatening. Herein we present helpful hints, associations and management (when plausible) for them. PMID:25859137

  15. Congenital renal anomalies detected in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Muttarak, M; Sriburi, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective To document the types of congenital renal anomalies detected in adulthood, the clinical presentation and complications of these renal anomalies, and the most useful imaging modality in detecting a renal anomaly. Materials and methods This study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was waived. Between January 2007 and January 2011, the clinical data and imaging studies of 28 patients older than 18 years diagnosed with renal anomaly at the authors’ institution were retrospectively reviewed. Renal anomalies in this study included only those with abnormality in position and in form. Results Of these 28 patients, 22 underwent imaging studies and their results constituted the material of this study. Of the 22 patients, 14 had horseshoe kidneys (HSK), four had crossed renal ectopia and four had malrotation. Sixteen patients were men and six were women. The patients ranged in age from 19 to 74 years (mean age 51.1 years). Clinical presentations were abdominal pain (13), fever (13), haematuria (4), palpable mass (2), asymptomatic (2), polyuria (1) dysuria (1), blurred vision (1), and headache with weakness of left extremities (1). Imaging studies included abdominal radiograph (15), intravenous pyelography (IVP) (8), retrograde pyelography (RP) (4), ultrasonography (US) (7), and computed tomography (CT) (9). Associated complications included urinary tract stones (17), urinary tract infection (16), hydronephrosis (12), and tumours (2). Abdominal radiograph suggested renal anomalies in nine out of 15 studies. IVP, RP, US and CT suggested anomalies in all patients who had these studies performed. However, CT was the best imaging modality to evaluate anatomy, function and complications of patients with renal anomalies. Conclusion HSK was the most common renal anomaly, with abdominal pain and fever being the most common presentations. UTI and stones were the most common complications. IVP, RP, US and CT can be used to diagnose renal

  16. Congenital glioblastoma coexisting with vascular developmental anomaly.

    PubMed

    Laure-Kamionowska, Milena; Szymanska, Krystyna; Biekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika; Gierowska-Bogusz, Barbara; Michalak, Elżbieta; Klepacka, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Congenital central nervous tumours form a unique group of neoplasms. They are different from other tumour groups not only due to the onset time but also to their histopathology, anatomic location, and biologic behaviour. Congenital glioblastoma is one of the rarest types of congenital brain tumours and is uncommon in the prenatal period. We report a rare case of congenital glioblastoma detected prenatally by ultrasound examination and magnetic resonance imaging at 26 gestational weeks. Based on MRI findings and consultation of a team of specialists, pregnancy was terminated at 28 weeks. The newborn presented hydrops foetal. The child died shortly after birth due to cardiorespiratory insufficiency. At autopsy a large tumour with a spongy-like appearance was found. The tumour involved nearly the whole right cerebral hemisphere and led to marked hydrocephalus. In the histological and immunohistochemical examination, the tumour presented features of glioblastoma. Neoplastic cells were immunopositive for GFAP, S-100 protein and negative for neuronal markers. Frequent mitoses and high MIB-1 labelling index were seen in the tumour areas. The coexistence of tumour and vascular developmental anomaly was stated. The conglomerates of numerous, distended, thin-walled foetal-like blood vessels were located beside the tumour tissue, which presented disturbance in differentiation and maturation of the vascular net. Such coexistence of malignant glioma with vascular developmental anomaly is unique.

  17. Ectopia cordis: a rare congenital anomaly.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Abigail; Donnelly, Joseph; Kuc, Alexander; Good, Daniel; Doros, Gabriela; Matusz, Petru; Loukas, Marios

    2014-11-01

    Ectopia cordis (EC) is a rare congenital anomaly associated with the heart positioned outside of the thoracic cavity either partially or completely. The ectopic heart can be found along a spectrum of anatomical locations, including the cervical, thoracic and abdominal regions and in most cases, it protrudes outside the chest through a split sternum. Although the first case of EC was identified during the early 1600s only 91 cases have been reported since then in the literature. This review will discuss the history and prevalence of EC, its etiology, morphology, presentation and symptoms, complications, diagnosis, treatment and management and prognosis.

  18. Congenital anomalies of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Klimo, Paul; Rao, Ganesh; Brockmeyer, Douglas

    2007-07-01

    There are numerous congenital anomalies of the cervical spine. They can be simple and clinically inconsequential to complex with serious neurologic and structural implications. They can occur in isolation or as one of several maldeveloped organs in the patients. Many are discovered incidentally. The more common anomalies seen by pediatric spine surgeons include defects of the anterior or posterior arches of C1, occipital assimilation of the atlas, basilar invagination or impression, os odontoideum, and Klippel-Feil syndrome. Management begins with a detailed history, physical examination, and imaging studies. In general, those lesions that are causing or have caused neurologic injury, chronic pain, or spinal deformity or place the patient at high risk for developing these require treatment.

  19. Congenital anomalies of the uterus, and ultrasound diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Miseljic, Nenad; Izetbegovic, Sebija; Mehmedbasic, Senad; Miseljic, Sanja

    2010-01-01

    Sonographic detection and evaluation of congenital anomalies of the uterus represent an important segment in the additional therapeutic procedure, that is, treatment of patients with congenital anomalies of the uterus. Besides the primary reason that is manifested in the total cure of the patients, the secondary reason represents the decrease of costs of treatment of congenital anomalies of the uterus. Both descriptive and analytical methods were used in this paper. In 1997 Kurjak and Kupesic compared the sensitivity and specificity of transvaginal ultra sound, color Doppler, hysterosonography and three-dimensional ultrasound during diagnosis of the uterus septum. Representation of pathological findings in our paper in comparison to the examined group is: uterus subseptus = 15.38%, double horned uterus = 10.25%. The examined group includes intrauterine abnormalities of the uterus, analyzing, in that process, individual, pathological entities of intrauterine abnormalities. The research is a prospective, target, clinical study. In the examined group, due to the clinical suspicion of intrauterine abnormalities, 78 patients were examined in the following manner: two-dimensional transabdominal and transvaginal black-and-white and color Doppler ultrasound examinations were made and then three-dimensional transabdominal black-and-white and color Doppler ultrasound examinations. This means that in the detection of congenital anomalies of the uterus, the same sonographic techniques were first applied on the conventional and then also on the multidimensional base. Our research showed that three-dimensional technique is a more reliable diagnostic tool than two-dimensional technique. Sensitivity and specificity rate as well as positive predictive value show that this technique is an extraordinary one for assessing the volume, and position of congenital abnormalities.

  20. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  1. The association of congenital spinal anomalies with imperforate anus.

    PubMed

    Denton, J R

    1982-01-01

    Ninety-four patients with congenital imperforate anus were studied to investigate: (1) the incidence of congenital spinal anomalies; (2) the orthopedic significance of these anomalies; (3) the incidence of other musculoskeletal disorders; and (4) the incidence of anomalies in other organ systems in the anal-spine anomaly group. There was a 38% incidence of spinal anomalies in 94 patients with congenital imperforate anus. Most of these abnormalities were sacral, and there were no related or progressive spinal deformities. The incidence of other musculoskeletal anomalies was much lower than of the spine (only 9% of the total). The triad of caudal regression-imperforate anus, spinal anomalies, and genitourinary tract anomalies-was present in 19 (53%) of the 36 cases, much more than any other combination of major system abnormalities such as the VATER of VACTEL syndromes.

  2. Genotype–Phenotype Correlation of Congenital Anomalies in Multiple Congenital Anomalies Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome (MCAHS1)/ PIGN-Related Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Leah; Lemmon, Monica; Beck, Natalie; Johnson, Maria; Mu, Weiyi; Murdock, David; Bodurtha, Joann; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Cohn, Ronald; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Barañano, Kristin; Hamosh, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in PIGN, resulting in multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor deficiency, have been published in four families to date. We report four patients from three unrelated families with epilepsy and hypotonia in whom whole exome sequencing yielded compound heterozygous variants in PIGN. As with previous reports Patients 1 and 2 (full siblings) have severe global developmental delay, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and minor dysmorphic features, including high palate, bitemporal narrowing, depressed nasal bridge, and micrognathia; Patient 3 had early global developmental delay with later progressive spastic quadriparesis, intellectual disability, and intractable generalized epilepsy; Patient 4 had bilateral narrowing as well but differed by the presence of hypertelorism, markedly narrow palpebral fissures, and long philtrum, had small distal phalanges of fingers 2, 3, and 4, absent distal phalanx of finger 5 and similar toe anomalies, underdeveloped nails, unusual brain anomalies, and a more severe early clinical course. These patients expand the known clinical spectrum of the disease. The severity of the presentations in conjunction with the patients’ mutations suggest a genotype–phenotype correlation in which congenital anomalies are only seen in patients with biallelic loss-of-function. In addition, PIGN mutations appear to be panethnic and may be an underappreciated cause of epilepsy. PMID:26394714

  3. Major congenital anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome: a EUROCAT population-based registry study.

    PubMed

    Morris, Joan K; Garne, Ester; Wellesley, Diana; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Beres, Judit; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Budd, Judith; Dias, Carlos Matias; Gatt, Miriam; Klungsoyr, Kari; Khoshnood, Babak; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Mullaney, Carmel; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; O'Mahony, Mary; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Rounding, Cath; Sipek, Antonin; Stoianova, Sylvia; Tucker, David; de Walle, Hermien; Yevtushok, Lyubov; Loane, Maria; Dolk, Helen

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that over 40% of babies with Down syndrome have a major cardiac anomaly and are more likely to have other major congenital anomalies. Since 2000, many countries in Europe have introduced national antenatal screening programs for Down syndrome. This study aimed to determine if the introduction of these screening programs and the subsequent termination of prenatally detected pregnancies were associated with any decline in the prevalence of additional anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome. The study sample consisted of 7,044 live births and fetal deaths with Down syndrome registered in 28 European population-based congenital anomaly registries covering seven million births during 2000-2010. Overall, 43.6% (95% CI: 42.4-44.7%) of births with Down syndrome had a cardiac anomaly and 15.0% (14.2-15.8%) had a non-cardiac anomaly. Female babies with Down syndrome were significantly more likely to have a cardiac anomaly compared to male babies (47.6% compared with 40.4%, P < 0.001) and significantly less likely to have a non-cardiac anomaly (12.9% compared with 16.7%, P < 0.001). The prevalence of cardiac and non-cardiac congenital anomalies in babies with Down syndrome has remained constant, suggesting that population screening for Down syndrome and subsequent terminations has not influenced the prevalence of specific congenital anomalies in these babies.

  4. Vertebral and Intraspinal Anomalies in Indian Population with Congenital Scoliosis: A Study of 119 Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    S, Rajasekaran; G, Balamurali; Shetty, Ajoy

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case study by clinical and radiological data analysis. Purpose To analyze different types of vertebral anomalies and the incidence of associated intraspinal anomalies in the Indian population. Overview of Literature This is the largest study of congenital scoliosis and associated intraspinal anomalies in Indian population. Incidence of intraspinal anomaly in this series is 47% which is higher than previous literature. Hemivertebra was the most common anomaly as seen in previous studies. Methods A total of 119 patients with congenital scoliosis who underwent surgery between December 2006 and December 2012 were studied. Data was reviewed with medical records, plain radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Results Thoracolumbar curve was most common, seen in 43.6% of patients. In addition to scoliotic deformity, kyphosis was seen in 26% of patients. Failure of formation, the most common vertebral anomaly, was seen in 51.2% of patients, failure of segmentation was seen in 19.3% of patients, and there were 29.4% patients having both formation and segmentation anomalies. Hemivertebra was the most common vertebral anomaly seen in 66.3% of patients and for whom 63.2% were in thoracic spine. Intraspinal anomalies were associated with 47% of patients with congenital scoliosis. Tethered cord was the most common intraspinal abnormality and was found in 48.2% patients with intraspinal anomalies. The patients with failure of segmentation and mixed deformities were found to have a significantly higher incidence of intraspinal anomalies (65% and 57%, respectively) than those with failure of formation (34%). Out of 31 patients with kyphotic deformity 29% had intraspinal anomalies, and amongst them tethered cord was the most common anomaly seen in 66% patients. Out of 12 patients with neurocutaneous markers, 83% patients had intraspinal anomaly. Conclusions Intraspinal anomalies were seen in 47% of patients with congenital scoliosis in the

  5. Repair of congenital 'disconnected uterus': a new female genital anomaly?

    PubMed

    Kisu, Iori; Tanaka, Kyoko; Banno, Kouji; Okuda, Shigeo; Aoki, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Congenital uterine anomaly is a female genital disorder caused by developmental anomaly of the Müllerian ducts. In this report, we present a case of repair of congenital 'disconnected uterus' between the cervix and the body of the uterus. The case did not correspond to the consensus classifications that have been proposed for congenital uterine anomaly. The patient was a young woman whose chief complaints were not having first menstruation and experiencing monthly severe lower abdominal pain. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the uterine body was separated from the uterine cervix. Uteroplasty was conducted to anastomose the separated uterus. Periodic menstruation started 1 month after surgery and abdominal pain was improved. Performance of uteroplasty in this case was extremely significant and greatly improved the quality of life of the patient.

  6. Unfused renal ectopia: a rare form of congenital renal anomaly.

    PubMed

    Nursal, Gül Nihal; Büyükdereli, Gülgün

    2005-09-01

    Unfused crossed renal ectopia observed 1 in 75,000 autopsies is a rare congenital anomaly. Typically one kidney is located in the proximity of the other kidney, and the ureter of the anatomically anomalous kidney crosses the midline to insert to the bladder in its normal anatomic position. Although renal function is usually not affected, the condition is generally accompanied by other congenital anomalies. In this case report, static and dynamic scintigraphic images of two patients with unfused crossed renal ectopia are presented. Besides properties of imaging modalities, clinical features are discussed in light of the available literature.

  7. Risk of congenital anomalies in pregnant users of statin drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ofori, Benjamin; Rey, Evelyne; Bérard, Anick

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Cholesterol is known to be essential for fetal development. Statins, which inhibit cholesterol production, have therefore been considered as potential teratogens and are contraindicated in pregnancy. Data available thus far on the risks of congenital anomalies associated with statin therapy have come from non-analytic postmarketing surveillance studies. Given the increasing use of statins in women of childbearing age, there is a need for a population-based study on the risks of congenital anomalies associated with gestational statin use. What this study adds In this pharmacoepidemiological study, we determined the risk of congenital anomalies in women who filled prescriptions for statins during the first trimester of pregnancy, compared with women who had stopped statins before pregnancy or those who used fibrates during pregnancy. We found no evidence of an increased risk of fetal anomalies among first-trimester statin users, or any discernable pattern of congenital anomalies among live births. However, in the absence of outcome data on nonlive births, conclusions remain uncertain. Aims Evidence from animal studies suggests that statin medications should not be taken during pregnancy. Our aim was to examine the association between the use of statins in early pregnancy and the incidence of congenital anomalies. Methods A population-based pregnancy registry was built. Three study groups were assembled: women prescribed statins in the first trimester (group A), fibrate/nicotinic acid in the first trimester (group B) and statins between 1 year and 1 month before conception, but not during pregnancy (group C). Among live-born infants, we selected as cases infants with any congenital anomaly diagnosed in the first year of life. Controls were defined as infants with no congenital anomalies. The rate of congenital anomalies in the respective groups was calculated. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were

  8. The impact of environmental pollution on congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Dolk, Helen; Vrijheid, Martine

    2003-01-01

    Major congenital anomalies are diagnosed in 2-4% of births. In this paper we review epidemiological studies that have specifically looked at congenital anomalies as a possible outcome of community exposure to chemical exposures associated with environmental pollution. These include studies of drinking water contaminants (heavy metals and nitrates, chlorinated and aromatic solvents, and chlorination by-products), residence near waste disposal sites and contaminated land, pesticide exposure in agricultural areas, air pollution and industrial pollution sources, food contamination, and disasters involving accidental, negligent or deliberate chemical releases of great magnitude. We conclude that there are relatively few environmental pollution exposures for which we can draw strong conclusions about the potential to cause congenital anomalies and, if so, the chemical constituents implicated, to provide an evidence base for public health and clinical practice. A precautionary approach should be adopted at both community and individual level. In order to prevent congenital anomalies, one must reduce exposure to potential teratogens before pregnancy is recognized (i.e. preconceptionally and in the first few weeks of pregnancy). It is a challenge to develop effective strategies for preconceptional care within the primary care framework. Prenatal service providers and counsellors need to be aware of the uncertainties regarding environmental pollution when addressing parental concerns.

  9. Using scan statistics for congenital anomalies surveillance: the EUROCAT methodology.

    PubMed

    Teljeur, Conor; Kelly, Alan; Loane, Maria; Densem, James; Dolk, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Scan statistics have been used extensively to identify temporal clusters of health events. We describe the temporal cluster detection methodology adopted by the EUROCAT (European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies) monitoring system. Since 2001, EUROCAT has implemented variable window width scan statistic for detecting unusual temporal aggregations of congenital anomaly cases. The scan windows are based on numbers of cases rather than being defined by time. The methodology is imbedded in the EUROCAT Central Database for annual application to centrally held registry data. The methodology was incrementally adapted to improve the utility and to address statistical issues. Simulation exercises were used to determine the power of the methodology to identify periods of raised risk (of 1-18 months). In order to operationalize the scan methodology, a number of adaptations were needed, including: estimating date of conception as unit of time; deciding the maximum length (in time) and recency of clusters of interest; reporting of multiple and overlapping significant clusters; replacing the Monte Carlo simulation with a lookup table to reduce computation time; and placing a threshold on underlying population change and estimating the false positive rate by simulation. Exploration of power found that raised risk periods lasting 1 month are unlikely to be detected except when the relative risk and case counts are high. The variable window width scan statistic is a useful tool for the surveillance of congenital anomalies. Numerous adaptations have improved the utility of the original methodology in the context of temporal cluster detection in congenital anomalies.

  10. Maternal water consumption during pregnancy and congenital cardiac anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.M.; Swan, S.H.; Harris, J.A.; Malcoe, L.H. )

    1990-05-01

    This case-control study, conducted in a California county that had a local incident of water contamination in 1981, investigated the relation between a mother's reported consumption of tap water during pregnancy and congenital cardiac anomalies in their offspring born during 1981-1983. Data were obtained from telephone interviews with 145 mothers of children born with a severe cardiac anomaly and 176 mothers of children born without such an anomaly. A positive association between a mother's consumption of home tap water during the first trimester of pregnancy and cardiac anomalies in her infant was unrelated to the incident of water contamination, the mother's race, or her educational level. A negative relation was found between a mother's use of bottled water and cardiac anomalies among the infants. These findings corresponded primarily to births in 1981. These data could not fully distinguish between a potential causal agent in the water and differential reporting of exposure by study subjects.

  11. Hepatic heterotopia in congenital diaphragmatic anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ramnik V; Wadhwani, Veena; Wyatt-Ashmead, Josephine; Abel, Robin M

    2013-01-01

    An antenatally diagnosed case of a left congenital diaphragmatic hernia is reported. The diaphragmatic eventration hernia sac consisted of a sheet of ectopic liver tissue in continuity with a hypoplastic left lobe which formed the medial anterior and posterior walls of the hernia is presented. The operative management of this combination of defects has not previously been described in English literature. Embryological considerations, limitations of accurate preoperative diagnosis, technical challenge in the operative repair of the defect and need for drainage is discussed. PMID:24042207

  12. [Perineal Groove: A Rare Congenital Anomaly].

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Manuel; Alves, Nuno; Fontes, Natacha

    2016-10-01

    Perineal groove is a rare congenital anorectal malformation, with incidence yet undetermined. It is almost exclusive to the female newborn and its embryogenic origin remains uncertain. We present a case-report of a newborn girl that was discharged from the nursery without complications. At her first appointment at primary care we noted a wet sulcus connecting the posterior vaginal commissure and the anus. This case report emphasizes the rarity of the perineal groove and the importance of a good quality history and physical examination at primary care.

  13. Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and the Urinary Tract (CAKUT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the majority of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) with emphasis in Pediatric Pathology describing and illustrating lesions as varied as ureteral duplications, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, horseshoe kidney, posterior urethral valve and prune belly syndrome, obstructive renal dysplasia, nonmotile ciliopathies and several syndromes associated with renal malformations (Meckel–Joubert, short rib, Bardet–Biedl, asplenia/polysplenia, hereditary renal adysplasia, Zellweger, trisomies, VACTER-L, Potter, caudal dysplasia, and sirenomelia), as well as ADPK, and ARPK. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the congenital renal anomalies, but also to analyze the more recent therapeutic interventions that may modify the natural history of some of these severe conditions. PMID:25313840

  14. Prevalence of congenital anomalies in newborns with congenital heart disease diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Egbe, Alexander; Lee, Simon; Ho, Deborah; Uppu, Santosh; Srivastava, Shubhika

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a known association between congenital heart disease (CHD) and other congenital anomalies (CA). These associations have been altered by changes in prenatal factors in recent time. We reviewed the largest database of inpatient hospitalization information and analyzed the current association between common CHD diagnoses and other congenital anomalies. Materials and Methods: Case-control study design. We reviewed the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 1998 to 2008 and identified all live births with CHD diagnosis (case) and live births without CHD diagnosis (control). We compared prevalence of associated congenital anomalies between the case and control groups. Results: Our cohort consisted of 97,154 and 12,078,482 subjects in the case and control groups, respectively. In the CHD population, prevalence of non-syndromic congenital anomaly (NSCA), genetic syndrome (GS), and overall extra-cardiac congenital anomaly (CA) were 11.4, 2.2, and 13.6%, respectively. In the control group, prevalence of NSCA, GS, and CA were 6.7, 0.3, and 7.0%, respectively. NSCA (odds ratio (OR): 1.88, confidence interval (CI): 1.73-1.94), GS (OR 2.52, CI 2.44-2.61), and overall CA (OR: 2.01, CI: 1.97-2.14) were strongly associated with CHD. Prevalence of GS and multiple organ-system CA decreased significantly over the study period. Conclusions: This is the largest and most comprehensive population-based study evaluating association between CHD and extra-cardiac malformation (ECM) in newborns. There was significant decrease in prevalence of GS and multiple CA over the study period. PMID:24987252

  15. Congenital absence of preputial foreskin: an extremely uncommon anomaly.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Palacios, Maria; Mendez-Gallart, Roberto; Rodriguez-Barca, Pablo; Estevez-Martinez, Elina; Bautista-Casasnovas, Adolfo

    2013-02-01

    The part of the penile skin that covers the glans penis is named prepuce or foreskin. The embryologic development of the prepuce and urethra is related. Several congenital anomalies of the prepuce have been previously reported, but the absence of the prepuce with a normal development of the urethra is a very rare association. We report a sporadic case with absence of the prepuce and normal urethral development.

  16. Endometrial cancer with congenital uterine anomalies: three case reports and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinping; Zhang, Jintian; Tian, Wenyan; Teng, Fei; Zhang, Huiying; Zhang, Xuhong; Wang, Yingmei; Xue, Fengxia

    2017-01-24

    Background Uterine malformation is a rare deformity in woman, and only a few cases concerning endometrial cancer arising in patients with congenital uterine anomalies have been reported. Herein, we present three cases of endometrial cancer with different congenital uterine anomalies, and review studies involving congenital uterine anomalies associated with endometrial cancer in the past 25 years, in order to identify similarities and differences in clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis between endometrial cancer associated with uterine anomalies, and normal uterus.

  17. Congenital anomalies and childhood cancer in Great Britain.

    PubMed Central

    Narod, S A; Hawkins, M M; Robertson, C M; Stiller, C A

    1997-01-01

    The presence of cancer and a congenital anomaly in the same child may be explained in certain cases by an underlying genetic abnormality. The study of these associations may lead to the identification of genes that are important in both processes. We have examined the records of 20,304 children with cancer in Britain, who were entered into the National Registry of Childhood Tumors (NRCT) during 1971-86, for the presence of congenital anomalies. The frequency of anomalies was much higher among children with solid tumors (4.4%) than among those with leukemia or lymphoma (2.6%; P < .0001). The types of cancer with the highest rates of anomalies were Wilms tumor (8.1%), Ewing sarcoma (5.8%), hepatoblastoma (6.4%), and gonadal and germ-cell tumors (6.4%). Cases of spina bifida and abnormalities of the eye, ribs, and spine were more common in children with cancer than among population-based controls. Future studies may be directed toward identifying the developmental pathways and the relevant genes that are involved in the overlap between pediatric cancer and malformation. PMID:9042906

  18. Congenital anomalies and childhood cancer in Great Britain

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.A.; Hawkins, M.M.; Robertson, C.M.; Stiller, C.A.

    1997-03-01

    The presence of cancer and a congenital anomaly in the same child may be explained in certain cases by an underlying genetic abnormality. The study of these associations may lead to the identification of genes that are important in both processes. We have examined the records of 20,304 children with cancer in Britain, who were entered into the National Registry of Childhood Tumors (NRCT) during 1971-86, for the presence of congenital anomalies. The frequency of anomalies was much higher among children with solid tumors (4.4%) than among those with leukemia or lymphoma (2.6%; P < .0001). The types of cancer with the highest rates of anomalies were Wilms tumor (8.1 %), Ewing sarcoma (5.8%), hepatoblastoma (6.4%), and gonadal and germ-cell tumors (6.4%). Cases of spina bifida and abnormalities of the eye, ribs, and spine were more common in children with cancer than among population-based controls. Future studies may be directed toward identifying the developmental pathways and the relevant genes that are involved in the overlap between pediatric cancer and malformation. 46 refs., 12 tabs.

  19. A sonographic approach to prenatal classification of congenital spine anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Meiri; Sia, Sock Bee

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To develop a classification system for congenital spine anomalies detected by prenatal ultrasound. Methods: Data were collected from fetuses with spine abnormalities diagnosed in our institution over a five‐year period between June 2005 and June 2010. The ultrasound images were analysed to determine which features were associated with different congenital spine anomalies. Findings of the prenatal ultrasound images were correlated with other prenatal imaging, post mortem findings, post mortem imaging, neonatal imaging, karyotype, and other genetic workup. Data from published case reports of prenatal diagnosis of rare congenital spine anomalies were analysed to provide a comprehensive work. Results: During the study period, eighteen cases of spine abnormalities were diagnosed in 7819 women. The mean gestational age at diagnosis was 18.8w ± 2.2 SD. While most cases represented open NTD, a spectrum of vertebral abnormalities were diagnosed prenatally. These included hemivertebrae, block vertebrae, cleft or butterfly vertebrae, sacral agenesis, and a lipomeningocele. The most sensitive features for diagnosis of a spine abnormality included flaring of the vertebral arch ossification centres, abnormal spine curvature, and short spine length. While reported findings at the time of diagnosis were often conservative, retrospective analysis revealed good correlation with radiographic imaging. 3D imaging was found to be a valuable tool in many settings. Conclusions: Analysis of the study findings showed prenatal ultrasound allowed detection of disruption to the normal appearances of the fetal spine. Using the three features of flaring of the vertebral arch ossification centres, abnormal spine curvature, and short spine length, an algorithm was devised to aid with the diagnosis of spine anomalies for those who perform and report prenatal ultrasound. PMID:28191204

  20. The anomalies associated with congenital solitary functioning kidney in children.

    PubMed

    Akl, Kamal

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of associated urological and non-urological anomalies as well as the renal outcome in patients with a congenital solitary func-tioning kidney (CSFK). A retrospective review of 30 consecutive cases of CSFK seen at the pediatric renal service at the Jordan University Hospital between 2004 and 2008 was performed. There were 20 males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from five days to 14 years. In 20 patients (67%), the left kidney was absent. Associated anomalies were detected in 23 (77%) of the 30 patients; urological anomalies accounted for 47% (14/30) and non-urological anomalies were found in 19/30 (53%) patients. The latter included anomalies of the ear, nose and throat (ENT) in 9/30 (30%), musculoskeletal system (one with hypermobile joints) in 8/30 (27%), gastrointestinal (GI) in 7/30 (23%), cardiovascular (CV) in 4/30 (13%) and dermatological with epidermolysis bullosa, endocrine (euthyroid goiter) and gynecological (cervical cyst) in one patient each (3%). Proteinuria was seen in 6/30 (20%) and hypertension in 2/30 (7%) patients. Chronic renal failure (CRF) was seen in 6/30 (20%) patients, of whom three had end-stage renal failure (ESRF). CRF was seen mainly in patients with more than two associated urological anomalies. Idiopathic hyperuricosuria was found in five of the six tested patients (83%). In our study, the most common associated anomalies with CSFK were urological. The presence of more than two associated urological anomalies increased the risk of CRF.

  1. Association of citalopram with congenital anomalies: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyun-Hye; Ahn, Ki Hoon; Kwon, Bo Yong; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Ji-Sung; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2017-01-01

    Objective The antenatal use of citalopram, a widely prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been suspected to be associated with congenital, particularly cardiac, anomalies. This study aimed to prove the association between citalopram use and congenital anomalies. Methods We searched the English literature from July 1998 to July 2015, by using the search terms ‘ citalopram’, ‘ pregnancy’, ‘ birth defects’, ‘ congenital anomalies’, and ‘ malformations’ in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library. Results Eight eligible articles were analyzed including a total of 1,507,896 participants. The odds ratio (OR) of major malformations associated with citalopram use during pregnancy was 1.07 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98 to 1.17). Concerning cardiac malformations, the OR for all included studies was 1.31 (95% CI, 0.88 to 1.93). The analysis of cardiac malformations was repeated to reduce heterogeneity after excluding one outlier study (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.26). Conclusion From our data, it can be concluded that citalopram use is not associated with major birth defects. However, physicians should carefully weigh the benefits against the potential risks of citalopram use, and counsel patients accordingly. PMID:28344955

  2. [Congenital anomalies of cerebral artery and intracranial aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, K; Ito, Z; Hen, R; Uemura, K; Matsuoka, S

    1976-02-01

    It is well known that congenital anomalies such as polycystic kidney, aortic coarctation, Marfan syndrome, Ehler-Danlos syndrome are apt to be complicated by intracranial aneurysms. In this report we attempt to reveal the relation and incidence between cerebrovascular anomalies and intracranial aneurysms. The etiology of aneurysms has been discussed, too. 12 cases of persistent trigeminl artery, 2 cases of persistent hypoglossal artery and 11 cases of fenestration were obtained from 3841 patients who were angiographically examined in our clinic for 5 years. The incidence is 0.31%, 0.05% and 0.29%, respectively. Persistent trigeminal arteries were complicated by 2 cases of intracranial aneurysms and one case of arterivenous malformations (AVM), persistent hypoglossal arteries were complicated by one case of aneurysm, and fenestrations were complicated by 2 cases of aneurysms and one case of AVM. One case of congenital agenesis of right internal carotid artery was obtained which was complicated by aneurysm of anterior communicating artery. Totally, 8 cases of aneurysms and AVM were obtained from 26 cases of cerebrovascular anomalies (incidence 30.8%). On the other hand, thalamic or caudate hemorrhage revealed the highest incidence of complication of intracranial aneurysms among intracerebral hematomas (10.7%). Compared with the incidence of aneurysms between cerebro vascular anomalies (30.8%) and thalamic or caudate hemorrhage (10.7%), the difference is statistically signigicant (P less than 0.05). The cause of intracranial aneurysm has not yet been clarified. But it is well accepted that the defect of tunica media vasorum is most responsible factor as to the occurrence of intracranial aneurysms. We concluded that the genetic error of cerebral vessels including defect of media caused intracranial aneurysms, and this result was supported from the evidence that cerebrovascular anomalies showed statistically high incidence of complication of intracranial aneurysms.

  3. CONGENITAL ANOMALIES OF THE LIMBS: II. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL ASPECTS.

    PubMed

    GINGRAS, G; MONGEAU, M; MOREAULT, P; DUPUIS, M; HEBERT, B; CORRIVEAU, C

    1964-07-18

    As a preparatory step towards the development of a complete habilitation program for children with congenital limb anomalies associated with maternal ingestion of thalidomide, the medical records of all patients with congenital limb anomalies referred to the Rehabilitation Institute of Montreal in the past decade were studied, and an examination and a thorough reassessment were made of 41 patients (21 males and 20 females). The medical and prosthetic aspects were dealt with in Part I of this paper. Part II describes, in a joint report, the results of psychiatric, psychological and educational assessments.There was no evidence of major emotional disorder in any of the patients, although conflicts were intensified by the presence of the physical anomaly. No relation was found between intelligence, emotional adjustment and disability. The patient's attitude towards his disability and prosthesis is definitely influenced by the degree of parental acceptance of the handicap and by the character of the emotional undertones in the total environment. In order to favour the occurrence of the healthiest modes of development in these children, the authors believe that the medical profession should be made fully aware of the physical and emotional problems which may arise after the birth of a deformed child. It is considered very important that the mother should receive psychotherapeutic support as soon as possible after the child is born.

  4. [Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava: role of imaging].

    PubMed

    Manfredi, R; Cotroneo, A R; Pirronti, T; Macis, G; Marano, P

    1995-10-01

    In recent years, clinics and radiology of congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava have increased in importance in planning abdominal surgery, liver or kidney transplantation, or new interventional or diagnostic procedures such as the positioning of inferior vena cava filters to prevent pulmonary embolism, varicocel sclerotherapy and renal venous sampling. In the past, the radiologic assessment of these rare anomalies was performed only with angiography, which remains the most accurate diagnostic method. Today, besides angiography, less invasive examinations can be performed, e.g., US, CT and MRI, with MRA. In the last two years, 5 patients with inferior vena cava anomalies were examined: 3 had double inferior vena cava and 2 azygos continuation. All of them were submitted to US, CT, MRI and MRA and 3 patients underwent also angiography, two of them with double puncture. US can suggest the diagnosis but may be limited by technical factors and in the assessment of the whole inferior vena cava. Enhanced CT can depict anomaly extent, but uses contrast agents and ionizing radiations. Angiography better depicts craniocaudal spread and collateral networks but is an invasive procedure and sometimes needs a double puncture (double inferior vena cava). MRI, with MRA, yields the same information as the other modalities, but without contrast agents or ionizing radiations. The development of velocity encoded sequences will probably make this technique the method of choice in the study of inferior vena cava anomalies. Our study was aimed at reviewing the embryo-genesis of inferior vena cava anomalies and to assess the relative importance of different diagnostic procedures in the diagnosis and staging of these anomalies.

  5. Oral clefts with associated anomalies: findings in the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sárközi, Andrea; Wyszynski, Diego F; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2005-01-01

    Background Over the years, great efforts have been made to record the frequency of orofacial clefts in different populations. However, very few studies were able to account for the etiological and phenotypic heterogeneity of these conditions. Thus, data of cases with syndromic orofacial clefts from large population-based studies are infrequent. Methods Clinically recognized and notified syndromes and associations including cleft lip with or without cleft palate and other congenital anomalies were selected from the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry (HCAR) between 1973 and 1982 and prevalence rates were calculated. Results Of 3,110 cases reported as having orofacial clefts, 653 had multiple congenital abnormalities. Of these, 60 (9.2%) had a known etiology (monogenic: 25 or 3.8%, chromosomal: 31 or 4.7%, teratogenic: 4 or 0.6%). Seventy-three subjects (11.2%) had schisis in addition to the oral cleft. Skeletal anomalies were the most common malformations among cases with cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL/P) and cleft palate (CP). Disorders of the central nervous system and cardiovascular malformations were also frequently associated. Conclusion Surveillance systems, such as the HCAR, provide useful information about prevalence rates of congenital anomalies in a population. However, in a field where new syndromes are being discovered and classifications regularly updated, these rates should only be accepted as provisional. PMID:15985166

  6. Congenital joint laxity and dwarfism: A feed-associated congenital anomaly of beef calves in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ribble, Carl S.; Janzen, Eugene D.; Proulx, Julien G.

    1989-01-01

    Five feeding trials were performed on three ranches to determine if a distinctive, recurring, congenital anomaly in beef calves was associated with feeding clover or grass silage without supplementation to pregnant cows overwinter. The anomaly, termed congenital joint laxity and dwarfism, was characterized at birth by generalized joint laxity, disproportionate dwarfism, and occasionally, superior brachygnathia. The anomaly had been documented for several consecutive years on these ranches and affected 2-46% of the calf crop. Pregnant cows were divided randomly into feeding groups, and the number of abnormal calves in each group was tabulated. Supplementation of the overwinter grass/clover silage diet with hay (2.5-4.5 kg/head/day) and rolled barley (0.75-1.5 kg/head/day) eliminated the problem. Supplementation of grain, without hay, was not as effective. Varying the proportions of grass and clover in the silage, and the age of the silage, did not alter the teratogenic potency of silage. Vitamin D3 supplementation did not reduce the risk of the condition. The definitive cause of congenital joint laxity and dwarfism was not determined. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:17423291

  7. Multiple congenital genitourinary anomalies in a polled goat.

    PubMed

    King, William W; Young, Melvin E; Fox, M Eugene

    2002-09-01

    A 1-day-old, Toggenburg/Nubian crossbred goat of polled parentage was referred for necropsy because of a large (diameter, 5 cm) bladder-like mass protruding from the perineal midline and difficult urination. Differential diagnoses included cutaneous cyst, ectopic urinary bladder, and urethral diverticulum/dilatation. Several genitourinary aberrations were noted. A second, smaller (diameter, 1 cm), more distal cystic structure was adjacent to an ambiguous prepuce. Testicles were discovered within a constricted, subcutaneous space near the inguinal canals. A rudimentary penis was located dorsal to the penile urethra with no appreciable urethral process. A tiny external urethral orifice was discerned only after liquid was injected into the lumen of the cystic structures, confirming their identity as urethral dilatations. The dilatations were separated by a constricting band of fibrous tissue. No other significant findings were detected. This case illustrates a combination of congenital anomalies including bilateral cryptorchidism with scrotal absence, segmental urethral hypoplasia, and urethral dilatation, most likely associated with the intersex condition seen in polled breeds. The continued production and use of small ruminants as animal models demands the prompt recognition of congenital anomalies. This case also exemplifies the precautions required when breeding goats with polled ancestry.

  8. Genitourinary anomaly in congenital varicella syndrome: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hisayo; Yoshii, Akira; Maeda, Jun; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Shishido, Seiichiro; Nakai, Hideo; Awazu, Midori

    2004-05-01

    We describe a 1-year-old boy with congenital varicella syndrome who had vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and neurogenic bladder. His mother had varicella during the 3rd month of pregnancy. At birth the patient presented with right microphthalmia, right microcornea, and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous of the right eye. He had chronic constipation from 3 months of age. He had urinary tract infection at 1 year of age. Urological investigation revealed left grade V VUR and neurogenic bladder. His varicella zoster virus IgG titer measured by ELISA was 39.4 antibody index (normal <0.1). He had repeated episodes of urinary tract infection despite antibiotic prophylaxis and clean intermittent catheterization, and underwent a uretero-vesiconeostomy at 2 years of age. Maternal infection during early pregnancy and the serological evidence of varicella zoster IgG antibodies without a history of varicella after birth led to the diagnosis of congenital varicella syndrome. Urogenital anomalies have previously been described in 14 cases of congenital varicella syndrome. Most of these patients had neurogenic bladder, the pathophysiology of which could be explained by the known neurotropic nature of the virus.

  9. [Frequency of congenital anomalies in cattle: results from the practice in comparison with literature].

    PubMed

    Bähr, C; Distl, O

    2005-04-01

    The study gives a short survey of the literature of frequently observed congenital anomalies in cattle and refers to data on cases of congenital anomalies registered in a veterinary practice over a period of 8 years and in an AI (artificial insemination) station of the Rinder-Union West (RUW) during 4 years. The frequency of congenital anomalies was estimated at 0.013% in the area of the RUW. In the veterinary practice a frequency of 0.51% was found. The most prevalent anomalies were seen in legs (39% in the veterinary practice and 21% in RUW) followed by congenital anomalies of the spine (9% in the veterinary practice and 17% in RUW). Arthrogryposes were most frequent among the anomalies of the legs with 65% (veterinary practice) and 39% (RUW), respectively, of all cases of registered leg anomalies in the respective area. Umbilical hernia and atresia of segments of the intestinum were seen in 8-30% of all registered cases. The frequency of congenital anomalies differed not significantly among paternal half sib groups. A questionnaire was proposed for the registration of congenital anomalies in progeny tests of AI bulls. A series of photographs showing the most prevalent congenital anomalies is supporting the registration form.

  10. [Genetics of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Zwolińska, Danuta; Polak-Jonkisz, Dorota; Makulska, Irena

    2011-12-15

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) occur at a frequency of 1 in 500 live births and are a common cause of renal insufficiency in childhood. CAKUT encompass a wide spectrum of malformations including anomalies of the kidney, collecting system, bladder and urethra. Most cases of CAKUT are sporadic and limited to the urinary tract, but some of them are syndromic or associated with positive family history. To understand the basis of human renal anomalies, knowledge of kidney and urinary tract development is necessary. This process is very complicated, requires precise integration of a variety of progenitor cell populations of diverse embryonic origins and is controlled by many factors at every stage of development. This review focuses on the genetic factors leading to developmental errors of important morphogenetic processes, particularly in metanephric kidney induction and ureteric bud branching. The essential results of genetic studies in regard to CAKUT, performed on experimental models and in humans, are presented. However, further investigations are required to complete understanding of the complex molecular network, which will help us to determine novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for CAKUT.

  11. Use of Special Education Services among Children With and without Congenital Gastrointestinal Anomalies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamrick, Shannon E. G.; Strickland, Matthew J.; Shapira, Stuart K.; Autry, Andrew; Schendel, Diana

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between congenital gastrointestinal anomalies requiring neonatal surgery and neurodevelopmental outcome. Among the children born in metropolitan Atlanta during 1982-2001 who survived to age 1 year (N = 762,824), we identified children with congenital gastrointestinal anomalies via linkage with the…

  12. A study of associated congenital anomalies with biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Lucky; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose: This study aims to analyze the incidence and type of various associated anomalies among infants with extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA), compare their frequency with those quoted in the existing literature and assess their role in the overall management. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 137 infants who underwent the Kasai procedure for EHBA during the past 12 years. The medical records were reviewed for the incidence and type of associated anomalies in addition to the details of the management of the EHBA. Results: Of the137 infants, 40 (29.2%) were diagnosed as having 58 anomalies. The majority of patients had presented in the 3rd month of life; mean age was 81 ± 33 days (range = 20-150 days). There were 32 males and 8 females; boys with EHBA had a higher incidence of associated anomalies. Of these 40 patients, 22 (37.9%) had vascular anomalies, 13 patients (22.4%) had hernias (umbilical-10, inguinal-3), 7 patients (12.1%) had intestinal malrotation, 4 patients (6.8%) had choledochal cyst, 1 patient (1.7%) had Meckel's diverticulum, 3 patients (5%) had undergone prior treatment for jejunoileal atresias (jejunal-2, ileal-1), 2 patients (3.4%) had undergone prior treatment for esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula, 2 patients (3.4%) had spleniculi, and 2 patients (3.4%) were diagnosed as having situs inversus. Conclusions: The most common associated anomalies in our study were related to the vascular variation at the porta hepatis and the digestive system. The existence of anomalies in distantly developing anatomic regions in patients with EHBA supports the possibility of a “generalized” insult during embryogenesis rather than a “localized” defect. In addition, male infants were observed to have significantly more associated anomalies as compared with the female infants in contrast to earlier reports. PMID:26862288

  13. De novo mutations in congenital heart disease with neurodevelopmental and other congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Homsy, Jason; Zaidi, Samir; Shen, Yufeng; Ware, James S; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Karczewski, Konrad J; DePalma, Steven R; McKean, David; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Josh; Jin, Sheng Chih; Deanfield, John; Giardini, Alessandro; Porter, George A; Kim, Richard; Bilguvar, Kaya; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Tikhonova, Irina; Mane, Shrikant; Romano-Adesman, Angela; Qi, Hongjian; Vardarajan, Badri; Ma, Lijiang; Daly, Mark; Roberts, Amy E; Russell, Mark W; Mital, Seema; Newburger, Jane W; Gaynor, J William; Breitbart, Roger E; Iossifov, Ivan; Ronemus, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Kaltman, Jonathan R; Seidman, Jonathan G; Brueckner, Martina; Gelb, Bruce D; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Lifton, Richard P; Seidman, Christine E; Chung, Wendy K

    2015-12-04

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) patients have an increased prevalence of extracardiac congenital anomalies (CAs) and risk of neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDDs). Exome sequencing of 1213 CHD parent-offspring trios identified an excess of protein-damaging de novo mutations, especially in genes highly expressed in the developing heart and brain. These mutations accounted for 20% of patients with CHD, NDD, and CA but only 2% of patients with isolated CHD. Mutations altered genes involved in morphogenesis, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation, including multiple mutations in RBFOX2, a regulator of mRNA splicing. Genes mutated in other cohorts examined for NDD were enriched in CHD cases, particularly those with coexisting NDD. These findings reveal shared genetic contributions to CHD, NDD, and CA and provide opportunities for improved prognostic assessment and early therapeutic intervention in CHD patients.

  14. Congenital anomalies and termination of pregnancy in Iran.

    PubMed

    Samadirad, Bahram; Khamnian, Zhila; Hosseini, Mohammad Bager; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document some epidemiological features of termination of pregnancy for birth defects in Iran. We studied 603 pregnant women who were diagnosed/recommended for the termination of pregnancy as having a fetus with some types of birth defect(s). Most women (87.2 percent) had at least one ultrasound examination. The proportion of other screening tests including amniocentesis and genetic tests were 2.8 and 4.6 percent, respectively. Of 603 women, 201 terminated the pregnancy giving a prevalence rate of 33.3 percent (CI 95%: 29.6-37.6). The remaining 402 subjects were unable to get the permission for abortion because of untimely diagnosis/application for termination (20th week of pregnancy and/or later). Forty-eight percent of termination of pregnancies was performed before the 18th week of pregnancy. Neural tube defects, limb deformation, hydrops fetalis, hydrocephaly, and chromosomal anomalies including Down syndrome accounted proportionally for about 65 percent of defects eligible for abortion in the region. Although the rate of termination of pregnancy for birth defects is acceptable at the current situation in the country, more efforts should still be made to convince the community authorities to give more possibility and ease for the termination of pregnancy for congenital anomalies.

  15. Congenital Auricular Malformations: Description of Anomalies and Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bartel-Friedrich, Sylva

    2015-12-01

    Half of the malformations in the ear, nose, and throat region affect the ear. Malformations of the external ear (pinna or auricle with external auditory canal [EAC]) are collectively termed microtia. Microtia is a congenital anomaly that ranges in severity from mild structural abnormalities to complete absence of the external ear (anotia). Microtia occurs more frequently in males (∼2 or 3:1), is predominantly unilateral (∼70-90%), and more often involves the right ear (∼60%). The reported prevalence varies geographically from 0.83 to 17.4 per 10,000 births. Microtia may be genetic (with family history, spontaneous mutations) or acquired. Malformations of the external ear can also involve the middle ear and/or inner ear. Microtia may be an isolated birth defect, but associated anomalies or syndromes are described in 20 to 60% of cases, depending on study design. These generally fit within the oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum; defects are located most frequently in the facial skeleton, facial soft tissues, heart, and vertebral column, or comprise a syndrome (e.g., Treacher Collins syndrome). Diagnostic investigation of microtia includes clinical examination, audiologic testing, genetic analysis and, especially in higher grade malformations with EAC deformities, computed tomography (CT) or cone-beam CT for the planning of surgery and rehabilitation procedures, including implantation of hearing aids.

  16. Prevalence of Congenital Anomalies in an Indian Maternal Cohort: Healthcare, Prevention, and Surveillance Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bhide, Prajkta; Gund, Pooja; Kar, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Background India lacks a national birth defects surveillance. Data on the prevalence of congenital anomalies are available mostly from hospital-based, cross-sectional studies. This is the first cohort study from India, where 2107 women were followed till pregnancy outcome, in order to measure the prevalence and types of congenital anomalies, their contribution to neonatal mortality, implications for surveillance, and the health service needs for prevention and management. Methods The study followed a cohort of 2107 pregnant women till outcome which was miscarriage, termination of pregnancy, live or stillbirth, neonatal and post-neonatal mortality. Case ascertainment of congenital anomalies was done through visual examination, followed by various investigations. Rates of congenital anomaly affected births were reported per 10 000 births. Health service needs were described through retrospective analysis of events surrounding the diagnosis of a congenital anomaly. Results Among 1822 births, the total prevalence of major congenital anomalies was 230.51 (170.99–310.11) per 10 000 births. Congenital heart defects were the most commonly reported anomalies in the cohort with a prevalence of 65.86 (37.72–114.77) per 10 000 births. Although neural tube defects were two and a half times less as compared to congenital heart defects, they were nevertheless significant at a prevalence of 27.44 (11.73–64.08) per 10 000 births. In this cohort, congenital anomalies were the second largest cause of neonatal deaths. The congenital anomaly prenatal diagnosis prevalence was 10.98 per 1000 births and the congenital anomaly termination of pregnancy rate was 4.39 per 1000 births. Conclusions This first cohort study from India establishes that the congenital anomaly rates were high, affecting one in forty four births in the cohort. The prevalence of congenital anomalies was identical to the stillbirth prevalence in the cohort, highlighting their public health importance. The results

  17. Congenital Anomalies in Contaminated Sites: A Multisite Study in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Michele; Minichilli, Fabrizio; Pierini, Anna; Astolfi, Gianni; Bisceglia, Lucia; Carbone, Pietro; Conti, Susanna; Dardanoni, Gabriella; Iavarone, Ivano; Ricci, Paolo; Scarano, Gioacchino; Bianchi, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    The health impact on populations residing in industrially contaminated sites (CSs) is recognized as a public health concern especially in relation to more vulnerable population subgroups. The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of congenital anomalies (CAs) in Italian CSs. Thirteen CSs covered by regional CA registries were investigated in an ecological study. The observed/expected ratios (O/E) with 90% confidence intervals (CI) for the total and specific subgroups of CAs were calculated using the regional areas as references. For the CSs with waste landfills, petrochemicals, and refineries, pooled estimates were calculated. The total number of observed cases of CAs was 7085 out of 288,184 births (prevalence 245.8 per 10,000). For some CSs, excesses for several CA subgroups were observed, in particular for genital and heart defects. The excess of genital CAs observed in Gela (O/E 2.36; 90% CI 1.73–3.15) is consistent with findings from other studies. For CSs including petrochemical and landfills, the pooled risk estimates were 1.10 (90% CI 1.01–1.19) and 1.07 (90% CI 1.02–1.13), respectively. The results are useful in identifying priority areas for analytical investigations and in supporting the promotion of policies for the primary prevention of CAs. The use of short-latency effect indicators is recommended for the health surveillance of the populations residing in CSs. PMID:28287452

  18. ZIKA VIRUS INFECTION; VERTICAL TRANSMISSION AND FOETAL CONGENITAL ANOMALIES.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Aziz-un-Nisa

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to flaviviridae family that includes Dengue, West Nile, and Yellow Fever among others. Zika virus was first discovered in 1947 in Zika forest of Uganda. It is a vector borne disease, which has been sporadically reported mostly from Africa, Pacific islands and Southeast Asia since its discovery. ZIKV infection presents as a mild illness with symptoms lasting for several days to a week after the bite of an infected mosquito. Majority of the patients have low grade fever, rash, headaches, joints pain, myalgia, and flu like symptoms. Pregnant women are more vulnerable to ZIKV infection and serious congenital anomalies can occur in foetus through trans-placental transmission. The gestation at which infection is acquired is important. Zika virus infection acquired in early pregnancy poses greater risk. There is no evidence so far about transmission through breast milk. Foetal microcephaly, Gillian Barre syndrome and other neurological and autoimmune syndromes have been reported in areas where Zika outbreaks have occurred. As infection is usually very mild no specific treatment is required. Pregnant women may be advised to take rest, get plenty of fluids. For fever and pain they can take antipyretics like paracetamol. So far no specific drugs or vaccines are available against Zika Virus Infection so prevention is the mainstay against this diseases. As ZIKV infection is a vector borne disease, prevention can be a multi-pronged strategy. These entail vector control interventions, personal protection, environmental sanitation and health education among others.

  19. Human exposure to environmental contaminants and congenital anomalies: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Foster, Warren G; Evans, Jane A; Little, Julian; Arbour, Laura; Moore, Aideen; Sauve, Reg; Andrés León, Juan; Luo, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Congenital anomalies are an important cause of infant mortality and disability. Developmental exposure to environmental contaminants is thought to increase the risk for congenital anomalies. Herein, we describe a critical review of the literature conducted between February and March 2014 yielding 3057 references from which 97 unique relevant articles published from 2003 through 2014 were evaluated. Common congenital anomalies including hypospadias, cryptorchidism, anogenital distance (AGD), congenital heart defects and oral clefts were well represented in the literature whereas other outcomes such as neural tube defects, limb deficiency defects and gastroschisis were rarely described. While definitions used for congenital anomalies and methods of ascertainment were usually consistent across studies, inconsistencies were frequently found in grouping of different congenital heart defects. Despite strong links between some congenital anomalies and parental occupation, these studies are unable to provide clear insight into the specific chemicals responsible owing to lack of direct measures of exposure. In comparison, data are mixed for contaminant exposures at concentrations representative of results from contemporary biomonitoring studies. Of the environmental contaminants studied, the association between phthalate exposures and developmental abnormalities of the male reproductive tract received the greatest attention. Important limitations of the literature studied relate to adequacy of sample size, absence of or weaknesses in exposure assessment methodologies, failure to account for biological plausibility and grouping of congenital anomalies with divergent mechanisms. We conclude that the literature is inadequate at this time to support a conclusion that exposure to environmental contaminants are or are not associated with increased risks for congenital anomalies in the general population.

  20. Congenital anomaly of combined atlas-odontoid process fusion and bipartite atlas.

    PubMed

    Gil, Jea Ryoung; Kim, Wan Tae; Seo, Min Jeong

    2015-12-01

    Congenital fusion of the atlas with the odontoid process of the axis is a very rare condition caused by a segmental defect of the first cervical somite. Only 9 such cases have been reported in the literature to date. The bipartite atlas, another well-documented rare anomaly, has been observed in only 0.1% of the general population. We describe the first case of a 70-year-old male with both of these complex congenital anomalies.

  1. Insulin analogues in pregnancy and specific congenital anomalies: a literature review.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Josta; Garne, Ester; Wender-Ozegowska, Ewa; Morgan, Margery; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W; Wang, Hao

    2016-05-01

    Insulin analogues are commonly used in pregnant women with diabetes. It is not known if the use of insulin analogues in pregnancy is associated with any higher risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring compared with use of human insulin. We performed a literature search for studies of pregnant women with pregestational diabetes using insulin analogues in the first trimester and information on congenital anomalies. The studies were analysed to compare the congenital anomaly rate among foetuses of mothers using insulin analogues with foetuses of mothers using human insulin. Of 29 studies, we included 1286 foetuses of mothers using short-acting insulin analogues with 1089 references of mothers using human insulin and 768 foetuses of mothers using long-acting insulin analogues with 685 references of mothers using long-acting human insulin (Neutral Protamine Hagedorn). The congenital anomaly rate was 4.84% and 4.29% among the foetuses of mothers using lispro and aspart. For glargine and detemir, the congenital anomaly rate was 2.86% and 3.47%, respectively. No studies on the use of insulin glulisine and degludec in pregnancy were found. There was no statistically significant difference in the congenital anomaly rate among foetuses exposed to insulin analogues (lispro, aspart, glargine or detemir) compared with those exposed to human insulin or Neutral Protamine Hagedorn insulin. The total prevalence of congenital anomalies was not increased for foetuses exposed to insulin analogues. The small samples in the included studies provided insufficient statistical power to identify a moderate increased risk of specific congenital anomalies.

  2. Single-gene causes of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) in humans.

    PubMed

    Vivante, Asaf; Kohl, Stefan; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-04-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) cover a wide range of structural malformations that result from defects in the morphogenesis of the kidney and/or urinary tract. These anomalies account for about 40-50 % of children with chronic kidney disease worldwide. Knowledge from genetically modified mouse models suggests that single gene mutations in renal developmental genes may lead to CAKUT in humans. However, until recently, only a handful of CAKUT-causing genes were reported, most of them in familial syndromic cases. Recent findings suggest that CAKUT may arise from mutations in a multitude of different single gene causes. We focus here on single-gene causes of CAKUT and their developmental origin. Currently, more than 20 monogenic CAKUT-causing genes have been identified. High-throughput sequencing techniques make it likely that additional CAKUT-causing genes will be identified in the near future.

  3. Clinical and Imaging Features of a Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft in a Neonate: A Rare Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Pritish; Ibrahim, Zachary; Amodio, John

    2015-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft (CMCC) is a rare congenital anomaly. CMCC and its complications and treatment have been well described in ENT, dermatology, and pediatric surgery literature. However, to our knowledge, the imaging work-up has not been reported in the literature thus far. We present a case of CMCC in a neonate with description of clinical presentation and imaging features. PMID:26078904

  4. Three-dimensional MR imaging of brain surface anomalies in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Toda, T; Watanabe, T; Matsumura, K; Sunada, Y; Yamada, H; Nakano, I; Mannen, T; Kanazawa, I; Shimizu, T

    1995-05-01

    Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), the second most common childhood muscular dystrophy in Japan, is characterized by the association with severe brain anomalies such as pachygyria and focal interhemispheric fusion. Conventional imaging techniques such as X-ray CT scan and MRI are ineffective for visualization of these brain surface anomalies. Here we investigated the efficacy of three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of brain surface MR images for the detection of brain anomalies in FCMD patients. 3-D brain surface MR images clearly visualized anomalies of cerebral gyrus such as pachygyria, as well as focal interhemispheric fusion. In addition, reconstructed horizontal images visualized structural derangement such as abnormal protrusion of white matter into gray matter. MR image abnormalities were confirmed by autopsy in 1 patient. These abnormalities were never observed in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. Our results indicate the efficacy of the present method for the differential diagnosis between FCMD and DMD with severe mental retardation, which is essential for the genetic study to identify the causative gene of FCMD.

  5. Congenital thoracic vascular anomalies: evaluation with state-of-the-art MR imaging and MDCT.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Daubert, Melissa; Lee, Edward Y; Epelman, Monica

    2011-09-01

    Congenital thoracic vascular anomalies include embryologic developmental disorders of the thoracic aorta, aortic arch branch arteries, pulmonary arteries, thoracic systemic veins, and pulmonary veins. Diagnostic evaluation of these anomalies in pediatric patients has evolved with innovations in diagnostic imaging technology. State-of-the-art magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR angiography multidetector-row computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography, and advanced postprocessing visualization techniques offer accurate and reliable high-resolution two-dimensional and three-dimensional noninvasive anatomic displays for interpretation and clinical management of congenital thoracic vascular anomalies. This article reviews vascular MR imaging, MR angiography, MDCT angiography, and advanced visualization techniques and applications for the assessment of congenital thoracic vascular anomalies, emphasizing clinical embryology and the characteristic imaging findings.

  6. The association between congenital anomalies and autism spectrum disorders in a Finnish national birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    TIMONEN-SOIVIO, LAURA; VANHALA, RAIJA; MALM, HELI; LEIVONEN, SUSANNA; JOKIRANTA, ELINA; HINKKA-YLI-SALOMÄKI, SUSANNA; GISSLER, MIKA; BROWN, ALAN S; SOURANDER, ANDRE

    2014-01-01

    Aim The first aim of this study was to evaluate the association between different subgroups of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) (childhood autism, Asperger syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder/pervasive developmental disorder – not otherwise specified [PDD/PDD-NOS]) and congenital anomalies. Second, we assessed the association among intellectually disabled children with ASDs in the subgroups of childhood autism and PDD/PDD-NOS. Method Nationwide population-based register data for children with a diagnosis of ASD (n=4449; 3548 males, 901 females) were collected during years 1987–2000 from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. Data on congenital anomalies were derived from the National Register of Congenital Malformations. Conditional logistic regression models were used as a statistical method. The association between ASD subgroups and congenital anomalies was stratified by the presence or absence of intellectual disability. Results Congenital anomalies occurred more frequently in all subgroups of ASD than in comparison participants (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for major congenital anomalies 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5–2.2, p<0.001). The association between congenital anomalies and childhood autism (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.6–3.6, p<0.001) and between congenital anomalies and PDD/PDD-NOS (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.4–5.7, p<0.001) among children with an intellectual disability was strong but remained significant also without intellectual disability (childhood autism: OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.3–2.3, p<0.001; PDD/PDD-NOS: OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.9–2.8, p<0.001). Interpretation The results suggest a significant association between ASDs and congenital anomalies regardless of the ASD subgroup. The association between childhood autism and PDD/PDD-NOS and congenital anomalies is stronger among children with intellectual disability is stronger than among those without intellectual disability. These results may have relevance in examining early risk factors in autism during

  7. [Post-traumatic torticollis in a schoolchild: fracture, congenital anomaly or age-appropriate radiological findings of the atlas?].

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, M; Garcia, P; Fries, P; Heinzmann, J; Pohlemann, T; Pizanis, A

    2010-03-01

    We describe the case of a 6-year-old girl with post-traumatic torticollis after falling on her head. The suspected fractures of the dens axis and/or atlas were ruled out after performing CT and MRI examinations as well as dynamic fluoroscopy. Radiological findings showed no further instability but there was a congenital non-fusion of the posterior arch and an age-appropriate non-fused anterior arch of the atlas. In addition to discoligamental injuries and fractures, congenital anomalies and normal variants of the immature anatomy of the cervical spine should also be considered in the diagnosis of the pediatric cervical spine after trauma.

  8. Congenital anomalies of kidney and upper urinary tract in children with congenital hypothyroidism; a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Rafeie, Mohammad; Sharafkhah, Mojtaba; Safi, Fatemeh; Amiri, Mohammad; Ebrahimimonfared, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) may be significantly associated with congenital malformations. However, there is little evidence on the relationship between renal and urinary tract anomalies and CH. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the renal and upper urinary tract anomalies in children with and without primary CH (PCH). Patients and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 200 children aged 3 months to 1 year, referring to Amir-Kabir hospital, Arak, Iran. One hundred children with PCH, as the case group, and 100 children without CH, as the control group, were selected. For all children, ultrasonography and other diagnostic measures (if necessary) were performed to evaluate renal and upper urinary tract anomalies (ureter and bladder). Results: The frequency of renal and upper urinary tract anomalies among 43 children with primary CH, with 83 cases (72.8%), was significantly higher than the frequency of anomalies among the 19 children in the control group, with 31 cases (27.1%) (OR = 3; CI 95%: 1.6-5.4; P = 0.001). Among the anomalies studied, only the differences in frequency of uretero-pelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) (OR = 6; CI 95%: 1.3-28; P = 0.018) and hydronephrosis (OR = 22; CI 95%: 5-95; P = 0.001) was significant between the two groups. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that PCH is significantly associated with the frequency of congenital anomalies of the kidneys and upper urinary tracts. However, further studies are recommended to determine the necessity of conducting screening programs for anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract in children with CH at birth. PMID:26693499

  9. Multiple congenital anomalies: issues for birth defects surveillance.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jane A

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 200 individuals and 20 percent to 30 percent of those in whom any major structural malformation is found will have 2 or more serious and potentially unrelated birth defects. In addition to the challenges that multiple malformations create for affected persons, their families, and the health care system, appropriate surveillance of such complex patterns can be a concern for birth defects registries. This paper provides examples of how monitoring of multiple anomalies can be beneficial from clinical and public health perspectives; presents a staged approach to documentation of such defects, including suggestions for their coding; describes the types of patterns in which they occur; and discusses some of the unique issues that arise with respect to statistical analysis of multiple versus isolated birth defects.

  10. Assessment of congenital anomalies in infants born to pregnant women enrolled in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Sonja A; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Sahin, Leyla; Petrie, Carey R; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M; Frey, Sharon E; Mason, Robin M; Nesin, Mirjana; Carey, John C

    2014-12-15

    In 2011 and 2012, the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, held a series of meetings to provide guidance to investigators regarding study design of clinical trials of vaccines and antimicrobial medications that enroll pregnant women. Assessment of congenital anomalies among infants born to women enrolled in these trials was recognized as a challenging issue, and a workgroup with expertise in epidemiology, pediatrics, genetics, dysmorphology, clinical trials, and infectious diseases was formed to address this issue. The workgroup considered 3 approaches for congenital anomalies assessment that have been developed for use in other studies: (1) maternal report combined with medical records review, (2) standardized photographic assessment and physical examination by a health professional who has received specific training in congenital anomalies, and (3) standardized physical examination by a trained dysmorphologist (combined with maternal interview and medical records review). The strengths and limitations of these approaches were discussed with regard to their use in clinical trials. None of the approaches was deemed appropriate for use in all clinical trials. Instead, the workgroup acknowledged that decisions regarding the optimal method of assessment of congenital anomalies will likely vary depending on the clinical trial, its setting, and the agent under study; in some cases, a combination of approaches may be appropriate. The workgroup recognized the need for more research on approaches to the assessment of congenital anomalies to better guide investigators in optimal design of clinical trials that enroll pregnant women.

  11. [Congenital anomalies of the excretory system and their relationship to endemic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Tanchev, I

    1975-01-01

    The author has studied the congenital anomalies of the urogenital system according to the clinical data of the Nephrology Ward, District Hospital--Vratza, by means of urography, ascending pyelography and reno-vasography. A total of 1960 patients were examined and congenital anomalies of the urogenital system established in 167 (8, 5%). Congenital anomalies of the excretory system, according to the author, are more often met in females (59, 9%) as compated with males (40, 1%) and in left kidney (58, 6%) as compared with the right one (35, 9%). At the same time, the most frequent complication of renal embryopathies was established to be the inflammation process of urinary ducts and kidneys (41, 9%) urinary-calculus disease (19.1%) and endemic nephropathy (8, 9%). The combination of endemic nephropathy and congenital anomalies of the urogenital system is rare (1, 1%) and most likely by chance. The author admits that endemic nephropathy most probably is not causality with the congenital anomalies of the excretory system.

  12. Associations Between Pediatric Choledochal Cysts, Biliary Atresia, and Congenital Cardiac Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Andrew J.; Axt, Jason R.; Lovvorn, Harold N.

    2012-01-01

    Background In our institutional experience treating pediatric choledochal cysts over the last 12 years, we noted 7/32 patients (21.9%) had comorbid congenital cardiac anomalies. This association has not been previously described other than in isolated case reports. We aimed to quantify this association on a national level. Materials and Methods We queried the 2009 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database. Patients with a diagnosis of choledochal cyst (ICD-9-CM 75169, 75162, 75160) or biliary atresia (75161) were identified. Cardiac anomalies were defined using the Clinical Classification Software code (CCS 213). Comorbid choledochal cysts or biliary atresia and congenital cardiac anomalies were quantified in both infant (<12 mos) and child (1–18 yrs) subpopulations. Results Of 1,646 estimated discharges for patients with choledochal cysts, 506 (30.7%) were for patients who also had congenital cardiac anomalies, compared to 2.6% in the general hospitalized population (χ2, p<0.0001). The frequency of congenital cardiac anomalies was lower in 1,973 hospitalizations for biliary atresia (13.8%) than in those for patients with choledochal cysts (χ2, p<0.0001). Cardiac anomalies were detected in 44.9% of choledochal cyst hospitalizations for infants <12 months (vs. 3.44% general hospitalized population; χ2, p<0.0001), but in 6.9% of for children ages 1–18 yrs (vs. 1.3% general hospitalized population; χ2, p<0.0001). Conclusions A strong association was observed between pediatric choledochal cysts and congenital cardiac anomalies that more commonly manifests in infancy. When choledochal cysts are diagnosed either prenatally or in infancy, we suggest echocardiographic screening for cardiac anomalies, which may impact timing of surgery and anesthetic planning. PMID:22572617

  13. Maternal cancer and congenital anomalies in children – a Danish nationwide cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Momen, Natalie C.; Ernst, Andreas; Arendt, Linn Håkonsen; Olsen, Jørn; Li, Jiong; Gissler, Mika; Rasmussen, Finn; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst

    2017-01-01

    Several studies on pregnancy-associated cancers have suggested an association with congenital anomalies in offspring. Previous studies have included maternal cancers diagnosed up to 2 years after pregnancy; however, long latency periods of some cancers mean that cancers diagnosed many years postpartum might have been present during pregnancy in a preclinical state. This paper considers the association between maternal cancers diagnosed from 2 years prior to pregnancy until the mother reaches 50 years of age, and congenital anomalies, as diagnosed at birth or within the first year of life. The current population-based study looks at associations of cancers in mothers with congenital anomalies in their children. Children were followed up from birth to diagnosis of a congenital anomaly, death, emigration or end of follow-up (whichever occurred first). A total of 56,016 children (2.6%) were considered exposed to a maternal cancer of any type; and they had a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.04 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00, 1.09) compared with unexposed children. The greatest HR was seen among children whose mothers had been diagnosed with cancers before or during pregnancy (HR: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.75). Similar results were seen when paternal cancers were used as a ‘negative control’. Statistically significant associations were seen for some specific congenital anomalies of organ systems (congenital anomalies of the musculoskeletal system [HR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.25]) and for some specific types of maternal cancer (leukaemia [HR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.61], The results of the main analyses suggest a small increase in risk of congenital anomalies in offspring of mothers diagnosed with cancer from 2 years before pregnancy, until the mother reaches 50 years of age; with the greatest increase seen for exposure in the pre-pregnancy and pregnancy period. These results may reflect shared causes for some cancers and some congenital anomalies. The similar results seen for

  14. Paper 3: EUROCAT data quality indicators for population-based registries of congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Loane, Maria; Dolk, Helen; Garne, Ester; Greenlees, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    The European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network of population-based congenital anomaly registries is an important source of epidemiologic information on congenital anomalies in Europe covering live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation, and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. EUROCAT's policy is to strive for high-quality data, while ensuring consistency and transparency across all member registries. A set of 30 data quality indicators (DQIs) was developed to assess five key elements of data quality: completeness of case ascertainment, accuracy of diagnosis, completeness of information on EUROCAT variables, timeliness of data transmission, and availability of population denominator information. This article describes each of the individual DQIs and presents the output for each registry as well as the EUROCAT (unweighted) average, for 29 full member registries for 2004-2008. This information is also available on the EUROCAT website for previous years. The EUROCAT DQIs allow registries to evaluate their performance in relation to other registries and allows appropriate interpretations to be made of the data collected. The DQIs provide direction for improving data collection and ascertainment, and they allow annual assessment for monitoring continuous improvement. The DQI are constantly reviewed and refined to best document registry procedures and processes regarding data collection, to ensure appropriateness of DQI, and to ensure transparency so that the data collected can make a substantial and useful contribution to epidemiologic research on congenital anomalies.

  15. Increased risk of death with congenital anomalies in the offspring of male semiconductor workers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Chun; Wang, Jung-Der; Hsieh, Gong-Yih; Chang, Yu-Yin; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2008-01-01

    Female workers in the semiconductor industry have higher risks of subfertility and spontaneous abortion, but no studies exploring male-mediated developmental toxicity have been published. This study aimed to investigate whether the offspring of male workers employed in the semiconductor manufacturing industry had an increased risk of death with congenital anomalies. The 6,834 male workers had been employed in the eight semiconductor companies in Taiwan between 1980 and 1994. We identified the live born children with or without congenital anomalies of the workers using the National Birth and Death Registries from the Department of Health, Taiwan. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) of birth outcomes and deaths, controlling for infant sex, maternal age, and paternal education. A total of 5,702 children were born to male workers during the period 1980-1994. There were increased risks of deaths with congenital anomalies (adjusted OR, 3.26; and 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-9.44) and heart anomalies (OR, 4.15; 95% CI, 1.08-15.95) in the offspring of male workers who were employed during the two months before conception. We found evidence of a possible link between paternal preconception exposure of semiconductor manufacturing and an increased risk of congenital anomalies, especially of the heart. The possible etiological basis needs to be corroborated in further research.

  16. Congenital facial nerve aplasia: MR depiction of a rare anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ishan; Verma, Ashish; Ojha, Ritu; Aggarwal, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    We report two infants presenting with unilateral congenital facial palsy since birth. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in both the cases revealed complete unilateral aplasia of facial nerve. To our knowledge, this is the first reported MR depiction of nonsyndromic isolated facial nerve aplasia. Imaging features and the pertinent anatomy is discussed along with a brief review of literature. PMID:28104950

  17. Congenital anomalies of the inner ear: introducing a new classification of labyrinthine anomalies.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, S; Sando, I

    1979-01-01

    In a literature review of 108 articles a special effort was made to find and classify inner ear anomalies and diseases associated with inner ear anomalies. This study showed the following. Most of the diseases associated with inner ear anomalies are also associated with anomalies in other parts of the body. Hereditary characteristics comprise the most common etiological factor among the diseases associated with inner ear anomalies. Among anomalies observed in the cochlea, the vestibule, and the semicircular canals, anomalies in the cochlea are most frequently associated with various diseases and were observed in 30 of 40 diseases. Anomalies of the vestibule were observed in 25 diseases, and those of the semicircular canals in 18 diseases. Anomalies in both the osseous and the membranous labyrinth were most frequently associated with the diseases studied, as they were observed to occur with 10 of the 43 diseases. In this paper a new classification system for labyrinthine anomalies is introduced, based on this study of the literature.

  18. Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

  19. Spectrum of Congenital Anomalies among Surgical Patients at a Tertiary Care Centre over 4 Years

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, K. N.; Dhiman, Ankur; Rattan, Ananta

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Congenital anomalies are important causes of childhood death, chronic illness, and disability in many countries. Congenital malformations are rapidly emerging as one of the major worldwide problems. Aim. To study the percentage of various congenital anomalies among the patients admitted in Department of Pediatric Surgery at a tertiary care centre over a period of four years from 2011 to 2015 in our centre. Results. Neural tube defects were found to be the most common anomalies in 24.3% of the children admitted. Other common anomalies were anorectal malformation (20.7%), tracheoesophageal fistula (20%), and intestinal obstruction (14.84%). Majority (60.5%) of the patients were males. Conclusion. Congenital malformations are rapidly emerging as one of the major worldwide problems as they can result in long-term disability, which may have significant impacts on individuals, families, health-care systems, and societies. Regular antenatal visits and prenatal diagnosis are recommended for prevention, early intervention, and even planned termination, when needed. PMID:28280513

  20. A Study of Maternal Attachment among Mothers of Infants with Congenital Anomalies in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ylmaz, Hatice Bal; Kavlak, Oya; Isler, Aysegul; Liman, Tulin; Van Sell, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors that affect maternal attachment among mothers whose infants were born with congenital anomalies. A questionnaire was used to collect individual sociodemographic data, and the Maternal Attachment Inventory was used to collect information about the emotional attachment of mothers to infants…

  1. Pentalogy of Cantrell: An Extremely Rare Congenital Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Suresh; Ari, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    A baby with the complete form of pentalogy of Cantrell was delivered at 33 weeks of gestation. The hallmark of this syndrome is ectopia cordis (EC) with omphalocele. Even though a fetal diagnosis was made at 14 weeks, parents have decided to continue with the pregnancy. Early antenatal ultrasonographic diagnosis is essential as survival depends mostly on the EC, associated cardiac anomalies and degree of thoraco-abdominal defect. Fetal diagnosis of this lethal anomaly before viability gives the parents an option of termination. PMID:24049753

  2. Sirenomelia: a rare case of foetal congenital anomaly.

    PubMed

    Dharmraj, Meena; Gaur, Sumitra

    2012-10-01

    Sirenomelia, alternatively known as 'mermaid syndrome' is a very rare congenital deformity in which the legs are fused together, giving them the appearance of the tail of a mermaid'. Other birth defects are always associated with sirenomelia, most commonly abnormalities of the kidneys, large intestines, and genitalia. The present case is a one of sirenomelia associated with an absent right kidney, mild left hydronephrosis, single umbilical artery, and severe oligohydramnios. We discuss the findings, relative to the present literature and related etiopathogenesis.

  3. [Treatment strategy for patients with extracardiac structural anomalies and congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Arata

    2011-07-01

    The surgical treatment of patients with extracardiac structural anomalies and congenital heart disease often carries major risk and remains a challenging field. An appropriate, solid treatment plan should be developed during the early phase with interactive intelligence sharing between a pediatric surgery team and congenital heart surgery team. As the top of the chain of command, the role of a neonatologist is important. This article reviews the history of surgery for congenital heart disease and the progress of the Japan Congenital Cardiovascular Surgery Database. Finally, as an example of a combination of diseases, the clinical course and intelligence sharing during treatment of a patient with biliary atresia requiring living-donor liver transplantation and hypoplastic left heart syndrome is reported. The National Quality Forum provided structural measures, process measures, and outcome measures for congenital heart surgery. Structural measures provided by the National Quality Forum included participation in a preoperative multidisciplinary conference. To improve the outcome of surgical treatment of patients with congenital heart disease and extracardiac structural anomalies, the importance of a preoperative multidisciplinary conference involving not only pediatric surgeons, pediatric cardiologists, and pediatric cardiac surgeons but also neonatologists, anesthesiologists, and nurses cannot be overemphasized.

  4. Study of the association between the incidences of congenital anomalies and hydrocephalus in Sudanese fetuses.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mustafa Z; Dinar, Hussien A; Abdulla, Alsafi A; Babikir, Esameldeen; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim

    2014-04-27

    This study was designed with an aim to detect the congenital anomalies appear to be linked to and in conjunction with hydrocephalus fetuses in Sudan, when ultrasound is used to exam fetuses in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. This prospective cohort study was performed from December 2011 to December 2013, in a group consists of 5000 single gestation pregnant Sudanese women. In all cases, maternal ages were 35 years up to 48 years; mean age of 42.5 years. Pelvic; obstetric ultrasound scanning protocol used should meet the standards established by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) for scanning in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to analyze the results. Diagnosed hydrocephalus cases (0.4%) were found to be associated with other fetal anomalies as aqueduct stenosis (45%), spina bifida (30%), Arnold-Chiari malformation (20%) and Dandy-Walker malformation (5%). The incidence of congenital anomalies and hydrocephalus in Sudanese fetuses showed considerable variation among different regions of Sudan. Hydrocephalus is associated with certain congenital anomalies. In agreement with previous studies, hydrocephalus is predominantly in male rather than female fetuses. The prevalence of fetal anomalies and hydrocephalus are within previously reported ranges.

  5. Economic activity and congenital anomalies: an ecologic study in Argentina. ECLAMC ECOTERAT Group.

    PubMed Central

    Castilla, E E; Campaña, H; Camelo, J S

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the association between industrial activity and the occurrence of 34 congenital anomalies. We selected 21 counties in Argentina during 1982-1994 and examined a total of 614,796 births in these counties in consecutive series. We used the International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities (United Nations, 1968) as an indicator of exposure to 80 specific industrial activities. Incidence rate ratios for each congenital anomaly were adjusted by the socioeconomic level of the county according to a census index of social deprivation. For a given exposure/anomaly association to be considered as significant and relevant, the exposure had to be a statistically significant risk for the occurrence of the anomaly and an increase in the birth prevalence rate of the congenital anomaly type involved had to be observed in those counties where the putative causal activity was being performed. Significant associations (p < 0.01) were identified between textile industry and anencephaly, and between the manufacture of engines and turbines and microcephaly. These observations are consistent with previous reports on occupational exposure, and their further investigation by means of case-control studies is recommended. PMID:10706523

  6. Two sib cases of Leber congenital amaurosis with cerebellar vermis hypoplasia and multiple systemic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Oda, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, S; Matsuishi, T; Kojima, K; Abe, T; Kato, H

    1998-08-06

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), a type of congenital blindness, is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and often associated with systemic anomalies. We report on two sisters who were born to a consanguineous couple and had retinitis pigmentosa-like pigmented retinal lesions, alternating exotropia, bilateral cataracts, and anomalous coarse facies characterized by deformed skull with narrow forehead, low anterior hairline, hypertelorism, short philtrum, thin upper lip, and prominent jaw; cerebellar vermis hypoplasia; dilatation of the fourth ventricle; severe mental retardation; tremor; brisk deep tendon reflexes and abnormal behavior; and skeletal abnormalities such as limited extension of elbow and/ or finger joints and talipes equinovalgus. Skin defect and renal anomalies were seen in only one patient. Our patients are the first familial LCA associated with cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and the disease involving particular multiple systemic anomalies may represent a distinct clinical entity.

  7. Anomaly Detection In Additively Manufactured Parts Using Laser Doppler Vibrometery

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Carlos A.

    2015-09-29

    Additively manufactured parts are susceptible to non-uniform structure caused by the unique manufacturing process. This can lead to structural weakness or catastrophic failure. Using laser Doppler vibrometry and frequency response analysis, non-contact detection of anomalies in additively manufactured parts may be possible. Preliminary tests show promise for small scale detection, but more future work is necessary.

  8. Sirenomelia: A Rare Case of Foetal Congenital Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Dharmraj, Meena; Gaur, Sumitra

    2012-01-01

    Sirenomelia, alternatively known as ‘mermaid syndrome’ is a very rare congenital deformity in which the legs are fused together, giving them the appearance of the tail of a mermaid’. Other birth defects are always associated with sirenomelia, most commonly abnormalities of the kidneys, large intestines, and genitalia. The present case is a one of sirenomelia associated with an absent right kidney, mild left hydronephrosis, single umbilical artery, and severe oligohydramnios. We discuss the findings, relative to the present literature and related etiopathogenesis. PMID:24027732

  9. Non-mosaic tetrasomy 9p in a liveborn infant with multiple congenital anomalies: Case report and comparison with trisomy 9p

    SciTech Connect

    Leichtman, L.G.; Zackowski, J.L.; Storto, P.D.; Newlin, A.

    1996-06-14

    Tetrasomy of the short(p) arm of chromosome 9 has been reported in few cases. Most of these children present with microbrachycephaly, wide forehead, hypertelorism, lowset, malformed ears, beaked noses, and micrognathia. Additional anomalies include short neck, congenital heart disease, genital abnormalities, multiple limb defects, hypotonia, and early death.

  10. Biventricular repair of right atrial isomerism with complex congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kirali, Kaan; Sasmazel, Ahmet; Mataraci, Ilker; Erdem, Hasan; Guzelmeric, Fusun

    2010-01-01

    Biventricular repair is usually difficult to achieve in patients who have right atrial isomerism, which is typically associated with other complex cardiac anomalies. The procedure can be used in patients who have balanced ventricular structures. Herein, we report a successful surgical reconstruction, including biventricular repair, in a 4-year-old boy. The child's right atrial isomerism was associated with double-outlet right ventricle, a large atrial septal defect, a subaortic ventricular septal defect, valvular and infundibular pulmonary stenosis, left persistent superior vena cava, and hemiazygos continuation of an interrupted inferior vena cava. Balanced ventricles enabled biventricular repair, which we consider to be preferable to the Fontan procedure in such circumstances.

  11. Managing tracheal extubation in infants with stridor and congenital neuraxial anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Saigal, Deepti; Ganjoo, Pragati; Sharma, Megha U.; Singh, Daljit

    2016-01-01

    Stridor is a serious complication of congenital neuraxial anomalies, which though, can get completely resolved with early neurosurgical correction of the anomaly. However, stridor relief may or may not be achieved soon after surgery. Persistent postoperative stridor can potentially cause extubation failure that may be difficult to handle in small children. There are no extubation guidelines for difficult pediatric airways as yet, and fewer appropriate airway-assist devices for routine use. Management of an infant with occipital encephalocele, hydrocephalus and bilateral abductor vocal cord palsy, who developed post-extubation respiratory distress due to stridor is discussed, together with the relevant tracheal extubation issues in such cases. PMID:28217159

  12. Multidetector Computed Tomography for Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Vascular Rings.

    PubMed

    García-Guereta, Luis; García-Cerro, Estefanía; Bret-Zurita, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The development of multidetector computed tomography has triggered a revolution in the study of the aorta and other large vessels and has replaced angiography in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch, particularly vascular rings. The major advantage of multidetector computed tomography is that it permits clear 3-dimensional assessment of not only vascular structures, but also airway and esophageal compression. The current update aims to summarize the embryonic development of the aortic arch and the developmental anomalies leading to vascular ring formation and to discuss the current diagnostic and therapeutic role of multidetector computed tomography in this field.

  13. Novel cytogenetic and molecular techniques in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies in newborns.

    PubMed

    Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Śmigiel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of what causes developmental disorders, including congenital structural defects/anomalies, in the newborn population, facilitates the choice of further investigations, therapy and rehabilitation, allows the use of appropriate prophylaxis against comorbidities, makes it possible to specify prognosis, as well as provide reliable family counselling (both pre- and postnatal). Attempting to formulate a clinical diagnosis of a specific congenital anomaly syndrome, with or without dysmorphic features, based on history and detailed physical examination, remains crucial for the selection of the right genetic testing. Modern methods of molecular cytogenetics and molecular biology are targeted in nature (microdeletion MLPA, single gene sequencing) or are capable of analyzing the genome as a whole (array CGH, newgeneration sequencing). Especially the latter techniques are now causing a rapid increase of diagnostic efficacy across different age groups, including newborns.

  14. Renal function in congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kemper, M J; Müller-Wiefel, D E

    2001-11-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract are a major cause of chronic and end-stage renal failure in children. The molecular mechanisms having been elaborated, there is now growing evidence that kidney function is to a large extent determined genetically at an early stage. Assessment of kidney function is an important tool in clinical medicine and is feasible in utero. Postnatally, determination of absolute glomerular filtration rate and also of split and excretory renal function play an important role in the determination of treatment and prognosis. This is supplemented by other biochemical, molecular and interventional prognostic factors, which are of help in preservation of kidney survival by minimizing modulating factors. If chronic or terminal renal failure ensues in childhood or even in early infancy, however, improved medical care has led to encouraging results, ultimately influencing the motivation in the care of children with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

  15. Lateral congenital anomalies of the pharyngeal apparatus: part II. anatomy of the abnormal for the surgeon.

    PubMed

    Mirilas, Petros

    2011-09-01

    "Anatomy of the abnormal"-a branch of surgical anatomy-deals with relations of an anomaly to surrounding entities. Here, lateral congenital anomalies of the pharyngeal apparatus are examined; their relations to entities of the neck can be explained embryologically. Location of embryonic pharyngeal arches, clefts, and pouches in the adult is presented and terminology of these anomalies (fistulas, sinuses, cysts) is defined. First "cleft and pouch" anomalies relate with the parotid and facial nerve. Second cleft and pouch anomalies course deeply to second arch structures and superficially to third arch structures. Consequently, they relate with hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal nerves and internal and external carotid arteries. Third cleft and pouch anomalies pass deep to third arch entities and superficial to those of the fourth arch and relate with glossopharyngeal, hypoglossal, superior and recurrent laryngeal nerves, and the internal carotid artery. The complicated course of fourth cleft and pouch anomalies brings them into relationship with glossopharyngeal, hypoglossal, superior and recurrent nerves, internal carotid, aorta, and subclavian arteries. Found superficially are veins (external and anterior jugular, common facial, communicating), nerves (transverse cervical, great auricular, mandibular, cervical branches of facial), and relevant spinal nerves (e.g., accessory). Knowledge of these anatomical relations helps prevent anatomical complications.

  16. Conservative correction of uterine anomalies in cases of congenital and posttraumatic infertility.

    PubMed

    Danezis, J; Soumplis, A; Papathanassiou, Z

    1978-01-01

    Uterine anomalies are due either to primary congenital malformations, or to secondary traumatic lesions of the intrauterine cavity as well as to pathology of the endometrium. The latter two etiologic factors create difficulties in the correct diagnosis of a congenital malformation and despite the convincing hysterosalpingographic findings a false diagnosis of a congenital malformation and despite the convincing hysterosalpingographic findings a false diagnosis is frequent. On the other hand the various degrees of uterine anomalies cannot always convince the gynecologist to undertake a plastic operation where the results for future fertility are doubtful. In our experience the extensive beneficial use of a variety of selected IUDs for the correction of intrauterine lesions also resulted in the correction of the size and shape of the uteri, previously diagnosed as malformed. The preliminary results of treatment in 110 cases of uterine anomalies after the application of a selected IUD combined with the administration of high doses of gestagens, showed an overall satisfactory improvement or complete reconstruction to a normal uterus in 86 (78%) of the cases. Higher fertility rate, better pregnancy outcome, correct diagnosis of the existing malformation, and safer decisions for further correction have also been attributed to the beneficial effects of the above treatment.

  17. Novel PIGT Variant in Two Brothers: Expansion of the Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Skauli, Nadia; Wallace, Sean; Chiang, Samuel C. C.; Barøy, Tuva; Holmgren, Asbjørn; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Bryceson, Yenan T.; Strømme, Petter; Frengen, Eirik; Misceo, Doriana

    2016-01-01

    Biallelic PIGT variants were previously reported in seven patients from three families with Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 (MCAHS3), characterized by epileptic encephalopathy, hypotonia, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and skeletal, ophthalmological, cardiac, and genitourinary abnormalities. We report a novel homozygous PIGT missense variant c.1079G>T (p.Gly360Val) in two brothers with several of the typical features of MCAHS3, but in addition, pyramidal tract neurological signs. Notably, they are the first patients with MCAHS3 without skeletal, cardiac, or genitourinary anomalies. PIGT encodes a crucial subunit of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) transamidase complex, which catalyzes the attachment of proteins to GPI-anchors, attaching the proteins to the cell membrane. In vitro studies in cells from the two brothers showed reduced levels of GPI-anchors and GPI-anchored proteins on the cell surface, supporting the pathogenicity of the novel PIGT variant. PMID:27916860

  18. Congenital anomalies in Canada 2013: a perinatal health surveillance report by the Public Health Agency of Canada's Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Irvine, B; Luo, W; León, J A

    2015-03-01

    Congenital Anomalies in Canada 2013: A Perinatal Health Surveillance Report is the second national surveillance report from the Public Health Agency of Canada dedicated to congenital anomalies. It provides comprehensive data on congenital anomalies in Canada, focussing on 6 categories of congenital anomalies: Down syndrome, neural tube defects, congenital heart defects, orofacial clefts, limb deficiency defects and gastroschisis. The report presents national-level birth prevalence data and temporal trends, provincial and territorial estimates, and international comparisons. Known risk factors, prevalence-related impacts of prenatal diagnosis and preventative measures are also discussed.

  19. Impact of prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound on the prevalence of congenital anomalies at birth in southern France.

    PubMed Central

    Julian-Reynier, C; Philip, N; Scheiner, C; Aurran, Y; Chabal, F; Maron, A; Gombert, A; Aymé, S

    1994-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aims were (1) to assess whether termination of pregnancy after prenatal screening by ultrasound affected the prevalence of congenital anomalies at birth, and (2) to examine the trend of this pattern over time. DESIGN--This study deals with congenital anomalies, possibly detectable prenatally or at birth, which were classified as isolated and multiple anomalies; chromosomal anomalies were not included. The prevalence rates of congenital anomalies at birth were determined from case registration data in the Marseille district, France, from the registry of congenital malformations (Eurocat no 22), which covers 23,500 births a year. The chi 2 test for homogeneity in proportions was used to test whether the differences in the total prevalence rates were significant over time. SETTING--The population was defined as all children born to parents living in the Marseille district between January 1 1984 and December 31 1990. PATIENTS--Among the 164,509 pregnancy outcomes monitored during the study, 1795 children with a single congenital anomaly and 288 with multiple congenital anomalies detectable at birth were assessed. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--The percentage of pregnancy terminations was higher in the case of multiple anomalies (16%) than with single ones (7.5%). Leaving aside the lethal birth defects, this percentage became 7.9% in the case of multiple anomalies and 4.3% with isolated ones. A significant increase (p < 0.001) occurred over the seven year study period in the total percentage of terminations because of isolated anomalies but not in that involving multiple ones. The increase observed in the former case was found to be mainly attributable to an increase in the number of terminations of pregnancy undertaken because of anomalies which were either lethal or associated with very low survival rates (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS--Termination of pregnancy after prenatal ultrasound examination was found to have a definite impact on the prevalence

  20. Computer based extraction of phenoptypic features of human congenital anomalies from the digital literature with natural language processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Karakülah, Gökhan; Dicle, Oğuz; Koşaner, Ozgün; Suner, Aslı; Birant, Çağdaş Can; Berber, Tolga; Canbek, Sezin

    2014-01-01

    The lack of laboratory tests for the diagnosis of most of the congenital anomalies renders the physical examination of the case crucial for the diagnosis of the anomaly; and the cases in the diagnostic phase are mostly being evaluated in the light of the literature knowledge. In this respect, for accurate diagnosis, ,it is of great importance to provide the decision maker with decision support by presenting the literature knowledge about a particular case. Here, we demonstrated a methodology for automated scanning and determining of the phenotypic features from the case reports related to congenital anomalies in the literature with text and natural language processing methods, and we created a framework of an information source for a potential diagnostic decision support system for congenital anomalies.

  1. Rehabilitation of a child with partial unilateral cryptophthalmos and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, H; Merriam, J C; Jones, I S

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: This paper describes the surgical rehabilitation of a child with craniofacial anomalies, unilateral syndactyly, and partial unilateral cryptophthalmos associated with inferior colobomata of the iris and optic nerve and agenesis of the inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscles. The clinical presentation of cryptophthalmos is described. METHODS: The medical literature since the original description of cryptophthalmos in 1872 was reviewed to define patterns of inheritance and the incidence of associated anomalies. RESULTS: Including this patient, 149 case reports of cryptophthalmos were identified. In two families transmission from parent to child suggests dominant inheritance. None of the five dominant cases had any other anomalies, and all had bilateral complete cryptophthalmos. The incidence of cryptophthalmos in the remaining families is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. This group includes patients with bilateral, unilateral, and partial cryptophthalmos. Other anomalies are common, including those of the ear and nose, limbs, genitourinary system, and mouth and palate. Mortality in the perinatal period is associated with renal agenesis, laryngeal atresia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Cryptophthalmos is a rare congenital anomaly with two patterns of inheritance. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8719680

  2. Treatment of calculi in kidneys with congenital anomalies: an assessment of the efficacy of lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Al-Tawheed, Adel R; Al-Awadi, Khaleel A; Kehinde, Elijah O; Abdul-Halim, Hamdy; Hanafi, Akram M; Ali, Yusuf

    2006-10-01

    We studied the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) in the treatment of stones in kidneys with congenital anomalies to determine factors that may affect the results. Patients found to have renal calculi in kidneys with different types of congenital anomalies were treated using ESWL. All patients were investigated by intravenous urography (IVU) to confirm the diagnosis. J stents were inserted prior to therapy in renal units with calculi exceeding 1.5 cm in diameter. Complications encountered and factors affecting success using this treatment modality were analysed. Twenty-five patients (18 males, 7 females) were studied between August 1988 and July 2005. There were nine patients with horseshoe kidneys, eight with ectopic kidneys, three with malrotated kidneys, two with duplex renal system, and one patient each with polycystic kidneys and hypoplastic kidney. The IVU showed 31 isolated calyceal or renal pelvic stones with mean stone burden of 1.44cc. All 25 patients were treated by lithotripsy. Twenty-four (77.4%) renal units (in 19 patients) were completely cleared of stones, 2 (6.5%) renal units (2 patients) were partially cleared of calculi and the procedures failed in 5 (16.1%) renal units (4 patients). Out of five renal units in which the procedures failed, open surgery was performed in three renal units and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) was performed in two. None of the 25 patients developed any major complications. No significant adverse changes in renal function tests were observed at 3-month follow-up. The stone-free rate was influenced and reduced by stone size and location in the pelvi-calyceal system. Calculi in kidneys with congenital anomalies may be treated successfully by ESWL as a first-line therapy in the majority of patients. With position modifications, localization of stones may be facilitated and disintegrated. The outcome in patients so treated does not differ significantly from that in those with normal kidneys.

  3. Scoliosis and vertebral anomalies: additional abnormal phenotypes associated with chromosome 16p11.2 rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Al-Kateb, Hussam; Khanna, Geetika; Filges, Isabel; Hauser, Natalie; Grange, Dorothy K; Shen, Joseph; Smyser, Christopher D; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Shinawi, Marwan

    2014-05-01

    The typical chromosome 16p11.2 rearrangements are estimated to occur at a frequency of approximately 0.6% of all samples tested clinically and have been identified as a major cause of autism spectrum disorders, developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, and seizures. Careful examination of patients with these rearrangements revealed association with abnormal head size, obesity, dysmorphism, and congenital abnormalities. In this report, we extend this list of phenotypic abnormalities to include scoliosis and vertebral anomalies. We present detailed characterization of phenotypic and radiological data of 10 new patients, nine with the 16p11.2 deletion and one with the duplication within the coordinates chr16:29,366,195 and 30,306,956 (hg19) with a minimal size of 555 kb. We discuss the phenotypical and radiological findings in our patients and review 5 previously reported patients with 16p11.2 rearrangement and similar skeletal abnormalities. Our data suggest that patients with the recurrent 16p11.2 rearrangement have increased incidence of scoliosis and vertebral anomalies. However, additional studies are required to confirm this observation and to establish the incidence of these anomalies. We discuss the potential implications of our findings on the diagnosis, surveillance and genetic counseling of patients with 16p11.2 rearrangement.

  4. Primary-care management of patients with congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Boris, Jeffrey R; Brothers, Julie A

    2015-12-01

    Congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries, although uncommon, have the potential to cause serious myocardial damage, ischaemic cardiomyopathy, and sudden cardiac death. This article summarises aspects of care for these patients in the outpatient setting, including clinical history and physical examination findings, ancillary testing, decision-making regarding the need for surgical intervention, and recommendations for physical activity. Although there are limited data regarding some of these recommendations, it is hoped that these can be used as an initial benchmark against which further data will lead to a more evidence-based approach.

  5. Home birth of infants with congenital anomalies: a case study and ethical analysis of careproviders' obligations.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Jane; Burcher, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the case of a mother who is planning a home birth with a midwife with the shared knowledge that the fetus would have congenital anomalies of unknown severity. We discuss the right of women to choose home birth, the caregivers' duty to the infant, and the careproviders' dilemma about how to respond to this request. The ethical duties of concerned careproviders are explored and reframed as professional obligations to the mother, infant, and their profession at large. Recommendations are offered based on this case in order to clarify the considerations surrounding not only home birth of a fetus with anticipated anomalies, but also to address the ethical obligations of caregivers who must navigate the unique tension between respecting the mother's wishes and the duty of the careproviders to deliver optimal care.

  6. Mosaic ring chromosome 6 in an infant with significant patent ductus arteriosus and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jae; Han, Dong Kyun; Cho, Hwa Jin; Cho, Young Kuk; Ma, Jae Sook

    2012-08-01

    The clinical features of ring chromosome 6 include central nervous system anomalies, growth retardation, facial dysmorphism and other congenital anomalies. Ring chromosome 6 occurs rarely and manifests as various phenotypes. We report the case of mosaic ring chromosome 6 by conventional karyotyping in a 7-day-old male infant diagnosed with a large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) with hypoplasia of aortic valve and aortic arch. These have not been previously reported with ring chromosome 6. He recovered from heart failure symptoms after ligation of the PDA. He showed infantile failure to thrive and delayed milestone in a follow-up evaluation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a Korean individual with ring chromosome 6 and hemodynamically significant PDA.

  7. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) Antidepressants in Pregnancy and Congenital Anomalies: Analysis of Linked Databases in Wales, Norway and Funen, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Joan K.; Davies, Gareth I.; Tucker, David; Thayer, Daniel S.; Luteijn, Johannes M.; Morgan, Margery; Garne, Ester; Hansen, Anne V.; Klungsøyr, Kari; Engeland, Anders; Boyle, Breidge; Dolk, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothesised associations between in utero exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart defects (CHD), remain controversial. We investigated the putative teratogenicity of SSRI prescription in the 91 days either side of first day of last menstrual period (LMP). Methods and Findings Three population-based EUROCAT congenital anomaly registries- Norway (2004–2010), Wales (2000–2010) and Funen, Denmark (2000–2010)—were linked to the electronic healthcare databases holding prospectively collected prescription information for all pregnancies in the timeframes available. We included 519,117 deliveries, including foetuses terminated for congenital anomalies, with data covering pregnancy and the preceding quarter, including 462,641 with data covering pregnancy and one year either side. For SSRI exposures 91 days either side of LMP, separately and together, odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (ORs, 95%CI) for all major anomalies were estimated. We also explored: pausing or discontinuing SSRIs preconception, confounding, high dose regimens, and, in Wales, diagnosis of depression. Results were combined in meta-analyses. SSRI prescription 91 days either side of LMP was associated with increased prevalence of severe congenital heart defects (CHD) (as defined by EUROCAT guide 1.3, 2005) (34/12,962 [0.26%] vs. 865/506,155 [0.17%] OR 1.50, 1.06–2.11), and the composite adverse outcome of 'anomaly or stillbirth' (473/12962, 3.65% vs. 15829/506,155, 3.13%, OR 1.13, 1.03–1.24). The increased prevalence of all major anomalies combined did not reach statistical significance (3.09% [400/12,962] vs. 2.67% [13,536/506,155] OR 1.09, 0.99–1.21). Adjusting for socio-economic status left ORs largely unchanged. The prevalence of anomalies and severe CHD was reduced when SSRI prescriptions were stopped or paused preconception, and increased when >1 prescription was recorded, but differences were

  8. Molecular Detection of Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Among Infants with Congenital Anomalies in Khartoum State, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, Maha G.; Ali, Aisha S.; Mustafa, Mohamed O.; Musa, Dalal F.; El Hussein, Abdel Rahim M.; Elkhidir, Isam M.; Enan, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection still represents the most common potentially serious viral complication in humans and is a major cause of congenital anomalies in infants. This study is aimed to detect HCMV in infants with congenital anomalies. Study subjects consisted of infants born with neural tube defect, hydrocephalus and microcephaly. Fifty serum specimens (20 males, 30 females) were collected from different hospitals in Khartoum State. The sera were investigated for cytomegalovirus specific immunoglobin M (IgM) antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and for Cytomegalovirus DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Out of the 50 sera tested, one patient’s (2%) sample showed HCMV IgM, but with no detectable DNA, other 4(8.2 %) sera were positive for HCMV DNA but with no detectable IgM. Various diagnostic techniques should be considered to evaluate HCMV disease and routine screening for HCMV should be introduced for pregnant women in this setting. It is vital to initiate further research work with many samples from different area to assess prevalence and characterize HCMV and evaluate its maternal health implications. PMID:26862356

  9. Prenatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene-contaminated drinking water and the risk of congenital anomalies: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior animal and human studies of prenatal exposure to solvents including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have shown increases in the risk of certain congenital anomalies among exposed offspring. Objectives This retrospective cohort study examined whether PCE contamination of public drinking water supplies in Massachusetts influenced the occurrence of congenital anomalies among children whose mothers were exposed around the time of conception. Methods The study included 1,658 children whose mothers were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water and a comparable group of 2,999 children of unexposed mothers. Mothers completed a self-administered questionnaire to gather information on all of their prior births, including the presence of anomalies, residential histories and confounding variables. PCE exposure was estimated using EPANET water distribution system modeling software that incorporated a fate and transport model. Results Children whose mothers had high exposure levels around the time of conception had an increased risk of congenital anomalies. The adjusted odds ratio of all anomalies combined among children with prenatal exposure in the uppermost quartile was 1.5 (95% CI: 0.9, 2.5). No meaningful increases in the risk were seen for lower exposure levels. Increases were also observed in the risk of neural tube defects (OR: 3.5, 95% CI: 0.8, 14.0) and oral clefts (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 0.7, 15.0) among offspring with any prenatal exposure. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the risk of certain congenital anomalies is increased among the offspring of women who were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water around the time of conception. Because these results are limited by the small number of children with congenital anomalies that were based on maternal reports, a follow-up investigation should be conducted with a larger number of affected children who are identified by independent records. PMID:19778411

  10. Congenital Variants and Anomalies of the Pancreas and Pancreatic Duct: Imaging by Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreaticography and Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Erden, Ayşe; Türkoğlu, Mehmet Akif; Yener, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    Though congenital anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are relatively uncommon and they are often discovered as an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients, some of these anomalies may lead to various clinical symptoms such as recurrent abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Recognition of these anomalies is important because these anomalies may be a surgically correctable cause of recurrent pancreatitis or the cause of gastric outlet obstruction. An awareness of these anomalies may help in surgical planning and prevent inadvertent ductal injury. The purpose of this article is to review normal pancreatic embryology, the appearance of ductal anatomic variants and developmental anomalies of the pancreas, with emphasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography and multidetector computed tomography. PMID:24265565

  11. Congenital absence of flexor pollicis longus tendon without associated anomalies of thumb hypoplasia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demirseren, Mustafa Erol; Afandiyev, Kamran; Durgun, Mustafa; Kilicarslan, Kasim; Yorubulut, Mehmet

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl with congenital aplasia of the flexor pollicis longus tendon who had no other associated anomalies of thumb hypoplasia and no trauma history. Flexor pollicis longus tendon anomalies are rare; several types of this congenital anomaly have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis should be considered if a patient is unable to flex the interphalangeal joint of the thumb. A hypoplastic thumb or an absent interphalangeal joint crease may be a diagnostic feature in such cases. Besides physical examination, we also used direct radiography and magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose this rare congenital anomaly in our patient.

  12. [Congenital cardiac anomalies (pentalogy of Fallot) in a two year old ram with brachygnathia inferior].

    PubMed

    Pielmeier, Ricarda; Engelke, Elisabeth; Legler, Marko; Haist, Verena; Hopster-Iversen, Charlotte; Distl, Ottmar

    2013-01-01

    In a nearly two-year-old ram, descending from a breeding trial to investigate the effects of shortness of the lower jaw (brachygnathia inferior), a congenital cardiac anomaly was observed. At the age often months the affected animal, a cross breed of Cameroon Sheep and East Friesian Milk Sheep, showed exercise-induced respiratory distress for the first time. Auscultation revealed a loud systolic heart murmur (grade 5) on both sides of the thorax, most prominent over the left third intercostal space at shoulder height. Postmortem examination of the ram's heart showed a pentalogy of Fallot, consisting of a pulmonic stenosis, a ventricular septal defect, an overriding aorta, a right ventricular hypertrophy and a patent foramen ovale. A genetic defect has to be considered as a possible reason.

  13. Unusual congenital pulmonary anomaly with presumed left lung hypoplasia in a young dog.

    PubMed

    Lee, C M; Kim, J H; Kang, M H; Eom, K D; Park, H M

    2014-05-01

    A seven-month-old, entire, male miniature schnauzer dog was referred with acute vomiting, inappetence and depression primarily as a result of a gastric foreign body (pine cones). During investigations, thoracic radiographs revealed increased volume of the right lung lobes, deviated cardiomediastinal structures and elevation of the heart from the sternum. Thoracic computed tomography revealed left cranial lung lobe hypoplasia and extension of the right cranial lung parenchyma across the midline to the left hemithorax. Branches of the right pulmonary vessels and bronchi also crossed the midline and extended to the left caudal lung lobe. These findings suggested that the right and left lungs were fused. In humans this finding is consistent with horseshoe lung, which is an uncommon congenital malformation. To the authors' knowledge, this case represents the first report of such a pulmonary anomaly in a dog.

  14. Early Developmental Assessment of Children with Major Non-Cardiac Congenital Anomalies Predicts Development at the Age of 5 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazer, Petra; Gischler, Saskia J.; van der Cammen-van Zijp, Monique H. M.; Tibboel, Dick; Bax, Nicolaas M. A.; Ijsselstijn, Hanneke; van Dijk, Monique; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate cognitive and motor development in children with major congenital anomalies and the predictability of development at age 5 years. Method: A prospective, longitudinal follow-up study was undertaken. The Dutch version of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development--Mental Developmental Index (MDI) and…

  15. The Association between Autism Spectrum Disorders and Congenital Anomalies by Organ Systems in a Finnish National Birth Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timonen-Soivio, Laura; Sourander, Andre; Malm, Heli; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Gissler, Mika; Brown, Alan; Vanhala, Raija

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with and without intellectual disability (ID) and congenital anomalies (CAs) by organ system. The sample included all children diagnosed with ASD (n = 4441) from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register during 1987-2000 and a total of four controls per…

  16. Presence of accessory penis, colonic duplication and several other congenital anomalies in a child: a very rare association.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayan; Mondal, Prabodh Chandra; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan; Achar, Arun

    2014-10-01

    An accessory penis is a very rare anomaly. Only five cases have been reported thus far to our knowledge. We present the case of a child aged 2 years and 10 months who had a penis-like structure (containing phallus and glans) attached to the right buttock. Associated anomalies were a non-communicating type of colonic duplication, a paramedian stenosed anal opening, a horse-shoe kidney, posterior urethral valves, scoliosis of the lumbo-sacral spine, polydactyly and equino-varus deformity of the right foot. As far as we can tell, this is the first report of an accessory penis associated with colonic duplication and other congenital anomalies.

  17. Changing concepts in urological management of the congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract, CAKUT.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Hideo; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Shishido, Seiichiro; Kitahara, Satoshi; Yasuda, Kosaku

    2003-10-01

    Recent advancement in ultrasonographic evaluation has prompted early detection and diagnosis of congenital anomalies in the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) in the asymptomatic phase. Consequently, early surgical intervention has become possible in the asymptomatic phase for the purpose of controlling manifestations early, thereby avoiding renal functional deterioration. However, some lesions detected by ultrasonography have been shown to often resolve or disappear without intervention. Thus, it has become more important to identify and understand the natural history of CAKUT. For the precise evaluation of the results of surgical intervention, one must understand the maturational process of renal function during infancy. Without considering this process, we cannot differentiate the renal significance of the surgical management from the natural course of CAKUT. Recent advancement in the field of radioisotopic studies has also made a major contribution to the more precise assessment of renal function. Recent progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology and the natural history of CAKUT has helped rationalize its treatment and management. Improvement in the surgical techniques and tools, together with improvements in pediatric anesthesiology, have made an appreciably positive impact on the outcome. Herein, we present the emerging concepts in the urological management of CAKUT, specifically, multicystic dysplastic kidney, vesicoureteral reflux, congenital hydronephrosis, ectopic ureters and ureteroceles.

  18. Medical management of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2003-10-01

    Renal damage in children has been found to be more congenital in origin than was previously thought. Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) involve renal dysplasia, renal hypoplasia, urinary tract obstruction and vesicoureteral reflux. CAKUT are sometimes bilateral and different types often coexist. Depending on their types and severity, children with CAKUT often have varying degrees of a reduced number of nephrons at birth. CAKUTare now the leading cause of renal failure in children. Children with renal dysplasia or obstructive uropathy may have abnormal renal tubules, and tend to lose essential water and sodium in urine. This can lead to poor body growth unless they are supplemented with water and sodium. Children with severe ureteric reflux often develop urinary infection and renal scarring. Renal scarring can further increase the risk of renal failure in children who already have other CAKUTand fewer nephrons than normal. Hypertension and proteinuria may develop in children with renal dysplasia and further aggravate renal function unless they are treated. Recent advances in the understanding and management of CAKUT make it possible for children with CAKUT to grow normally, have fewer complications such as urinary infection, have longer renal survival, and survive even with end-stage renal diseases through renal replacement therapy.

  19. Trauma due to Self-aggression in Patient with Waardenburg Syndrome associated with Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sara Nader; Kawakami, Roberto Yoshio; Sgavioli, Claudia Almeida Prado Piccino; Correa, Ana Eliza; D'Árk de Oliveira El Kadre, Guaniara; Carvalho, Ricardo Sandri

    2016-08-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an inherited autosomal dominant genetic disorder presenting variable penetrance and expressivity, with an estimated prevalence of 1:42,000. Clinical characteristics of WS include lateral displacement of the internal eye canthus, hyperplasia of the medial portion of the eyebrows, prominent and broad nasal base, congenital deafness, pigmentation of the iris and skin, and white forelock. A 24-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with WS, was referred to the Special Needs Dental Clinic of Sacred Heart University, Bauru, Brazil. Parents reported that the patient was experiencing self-mutilation, particularly in the oral region. He presented multiple congenital anomalies, including anophthalmia, mental retardation, low-set ears, and leg deformities. Clinical oral examination revealed hypodontia, abnormalities in dental morphology, extensive dental caries, periodontal disease, and fistulae. Extensive scars on the tongue, lips, and hands caused by self-mutilation were also observed. In accordance with his family and neurologist, full-mouth extraction under general anesthesia was performed, especially considering his severe self-aggressive behavior and the necessity to be fed with soft-food diet due to his inability to chew. After the surgical procedure, a significant reduction in the patient's irritability and gain of weight were reported in the follow-ups of 30, 60, and 180 days.

  20. Studies of the development of congenital anomalies in rats. III. Effects of inhibition of mitochondrial energy systems on embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Mackler, B; Grace, R; Tippit, D F; Lemire, R J; Shepard, T H; Kelley, V C

    1975-12-01

    Pregnant rats were treated with various inhibitors of mitochondrial oxidative energy metabolism and with lowered oxygen tension, and the embryo fetuses examined for the occurrence of congenital malformations and for changes in enzymatic activities. Treatment with all agents tested resulted in the production of skeletal anomalies. Sodium phenobarbital was the most teratogenic of the drugs tested and produced a high incidence of malformations which included cleft palate, tail anomalies, spinal retroflexion, domed head, and facial hypoplasia. Diphenylhydantoin produced a low incidence of syndactyly and oligodactyly. In addition to its effects on fetal growth and development chloramphenicol appeared to interfere with implantation. Tissue preparations from embryos exposed to sodium phenobarbital and chloramphenicol showed markedly lowered levels of DPNH oxidase activity. Cytochrome oxidase activity was also markedly lowered in the preparations from chloramphenicol-exposed embryos. Enzyme activities in preparations from embryos exposed to malonate and diphenylhydantoin appeared unaffected, although the drugs are strong inhibitors of electron transport in vitro; the lack of apparent effect may be due to the fact that both drugs do not bind to the enzyme preparations and were diluted 100- to 200-fold during preparation and assay of the tissue homogenates.

  1. Role of angiotensin in the congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract in the mouse and the human.

    PubMed

    Yerkes, E; Nishimura, H; Miyazaki, Y; Tsuchida, S; Brock, J W; Ichikawa, I

    1998-09-01

    The role of angiotensin in fluid and electrolyte and blood pressure homeostasis is well known. Recent developments indicate that angiotensin has a profound role not only in the developing urinary tract but also in the response of the urinary tract to specific noxious stimuli. Furthermore, the role of angiotensin II and its receptor has been understood quite poorly with respect to the developing renal unit. Knockout mice for the ATR2 gene show a significant incidence of congenital urinary tract anomalies. The congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) seen in these mice are very similar to the anomalies observed in humans. This has been supported further by the finding of an abnormality in the genetic sequence in patients with CAKUT. This article reviews experimental laboratory data as well as the potential implications for humans.

  2. Equine Multiple Congenital Ocular Anomalies (MCOA) syndrome in PMEL17 (Silver) mutant ponies: five cases

    PubMed Central

    Komáromy, András M.; Rowlan, Jessica S.; La Croix, Noelle C.; Mangan, Brendan G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical phenotype and genetics of equine Multiple Congenital Ocular Anomalies (MCOA) syndrome in PMEL17 (Silver) mutant ponies. Animals studied Five presumably unrelated ponies. Procedures The ponies were examined under field conditions in their barn by slit lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, and applanation tonometry. Blood was collected and genomic DNA extracted for MCOA genotyping using the PMEL17ex11 marker. Results One pony solely presented with temporal ciliary body cysts, suggestive of the less severe Cyst phenotype of MCOA; the animal was heterozygous at the MCOA locus. Multiple bilateral anterior segment anomalies were identified in four ponies, consistent with the more severe MCOA phenotype characterized by cornea globosa, iris hypoplasia, encircling granula iridica along the pupillary ruff, and cataracts. These animals were homozygous for the mutant MCOA allele. Four of the ponies had a silver dapple or chocolate coat color with white or flaxen manes and tails. Silver dappling was masked by the palomino coloring of a 5th pony that was homozygous at the MCOA locus. Conclusions The MCOA syndrome can be seen in ponies. The results of both clinical evaluation and genotyping resembled the previously described MCOA of both Rocky Mountain and Kentucky Mountain Saddle horses. PMID:21929608

  3. Interactions between cytokines, congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Valério, Flávia Cordeiro; Vasconcelos, Mariana Affonso; Miranda, Débora Marques; Oliveira, Eduardo Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1-5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence.

  4. Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Valério, Flávia Cordeiro; Vasconcelos, Mariana Affonso; Miranda, Débora Marques; Oliveira, Eduardo Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24066006

  5. Birth weight and congenital anomalies following poisonous mushroom intoxication during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tímár, L; Czeizel, A E

    1997-01-01

    A series of 22 women who suffered from mushroom poisoning while pregnant have been identified among adults receiving treatment between 1960 and 1993 in a specialist clinic in Budapest, Hungary. In most cases, the poisonings were attributed to Amanita phalloides, verna, and related species. Of these, 20 went to term, and data were collected on gestational age, birth weight, and both major and minor congenital anomalies. Mean birth weight (but not gestational age) was lower than in the control series, suggesting that maternal poisoning may have led to intrauterine growth retardation. Two children were identified with major abnormalities (one of whom had fetal alcohol syndrome related to alcohol abuse by the mother). The prevalences of both major and minor anomalies were similar to the prevalence in the matched control group and to the rate in a more recent control series examined according to the same protocols. However, the statistical power to detect teratogenic effects is limited, especially as only five of the mothers suffered the poisoning episode during the first trimester.

  6. Epidemiology of congenital coronary artery anomalies: a coronary arteriography study on a central European population.

    PubMed

    Kardos, A; Babai, L; Rudas, L; Gaál, T; Horváth, T; Tálosi, L; Tóth, K; Sárváry, L; Szász, K

    1997-11-01

    The anatomical patterns and frequency of occurrence of congenital coronary anomalies (CCA) in a Central European cohort has not yet been studied. The angiographic data of 7,694 consecutive patients undergoing coronary arteriography at the Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical University, Szeged, Hungary, from 1984 to 1994 were analyzed. CCA were found in 103 patients (1.34% incidence). Ninety-eight of them (95.2%) had anomalies of origin and distribution, and five (4.8%) had coronary artery fistulae. The incidence was the highest for the separate origin of left descending artery and left circumflex from the left sinus of Valsalva (52.42%). Anomalous origin of the left circumflex coronary artery from the right coronary was 8.7% while from the right sinus of Valsalva 18.4%. CCA, which may be associated with potentially serious events, such as ectopic coronary origin from the opposite aortic sinus (1.9%) and single coronary arteries (3.88%), were not frequent. The incidence of CCA in the Central European cohort under study was similar to that of the largest North American study. The anatomic classification presented can be useful from both clinical and surgical standpoints.

  7. Congenital anomalies of soft tissues: birth defects depending on tissue engineering solutions and present advances in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Amulya K

    2010-10-01

    Congenital anomalies encompass a wide range of malformations that could affect various organs and tissues in the newborn and infant population. These disorders that involve defects in or injury to a developing fetus may be a result of genetic abnormalities or mutations, alterations in the intrauterine environment, irregularities in morphogenesis, or chromosomal aberration. The outcome of these defects could lead to minor anomalies or major malformations that are dependent on the complex processes between the prenatal deficit and postnatal environment. Often multiple malformations occur within the same fetus and give rise to a malformation syndrome. Since congenital anomalies are evident at birth, solutions must be found to improve the clinical state and quality of life that a newborn has to lead from infancy through adolescence into adulthood. Transplantation options in this age group are limited due to the shortage of organs and the discrepancy in adult donor size mismatch. Over the past 2 decades tremendous strides have been made in the research of biomaterials, stem cells, organ generation, and tissue engineering to provide viable solutions to a wide range of organ and tissue losses focusing on the adult population. This review intends to highlight the shortage of tissue and organs in neonates and infants with congenital malformations. This is also the first monograph that presents estimation of incidences of the congenital malformations based on an extensive literature search. It also outlines the challenges in clinical management of these entities and presents an organ-based demand for engineered tissues.

  8. Trends in the prevalences of congenital anomalies and age at motherhood in a southern European region: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Cambra, K; Ibañez, B; Urzelai, D; Portillo, I; Montoya, I; Esnaola, S; Cirarda, F B

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalences of the main groups of congenital anomalies and to assess their trend over time. Design Population-based study of prevalences. Setting The Basque Country, Spain. Participants All births and all congenital anomalies diagnosed prenatally, at birth or during the first year of age, in all hospitals of the country, from 1999 to 2008. Main outcomes measures Total diagnosed prevalences and prevalences at birth of all chromosomal and non-chromosomal anomalies, Down's syndrome, anomalies of the nervous system, urinary, limbs, digestive system and congenital heart defects. Results Mean age (SD) of women at childbirth and the proportion of them over 35 years of age shifted from 32.1 (4.5) years, with 18.3% in 1999–2001, to 32.3 (4.7) years, with 23.9% in 2006–2008. Between 1999 and 2008, 991 cases of chromosomal anomalies and 3090 of non-chromosomal anomalies were diagnosed, which yields, respectively, total prevalences of 5.2‰ and of 16.2‰. Among chromosomal anomalies, Down's syndrome is the most frequent (2.9‰). With marginal statistical significance, the results point at an increasing trend in total diagnosed chromosomal anomalies, but a decreasing one in prevalences at birth. Among non-chromosomal congenital anomalies, congenital heart defects are the most frequent (5.2‰) one. Rates of all non-chromosomal, urinary and limb anomalies grew during the study period, whereas those of congenital heart defects and anomalies of the digestive system did not change significantly. Conclusions In the Basque Country, rates of chromosomal anomalies are higher than the overall estimated prevalence in European countries, and continue to increase slightly, which may be related to the rise in maternal age. Rates of non-chromosomal anomalies are within the European frequent range of values, and the increases observed need to be checked in the following years. PMID:24589823

  9. Congenital Cardiac, Aortic Arch, and Vascular Bed Anomalies in PHACE Syndrome (From The International PHACE Syndrome Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Michelle L.; Frommelt, Peter C.; Blei, Francine; Breur, Johannes M.P.J.; Cordisco, Maria R.; Frieden, Ilona J.; Goddard, Deborah S.; Holland, Kristen E.; Krol, Alfons L.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Metry, Denise W.; Morel, Kimberly D.; North, Paula E.; Pope, Elena; Shieh, Joseph T.; Southern, James F.; Wargon, Orli; Siegel, Dawn H.; Drolet, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    PHACE syndrome represents the association of large infantile hemangiomas of the head and neck with brain, cerebrovascular, cardiac, ocular, and ventral/midline defects. Cardiac and cerebrovascular anomalies are the most common extracutaneous features of PHACE, and they also constitute the greatest source of potential morbidity. Congenital heart disease in PHACE is incompletely described, and this study was conducted to better characterize its features. This study of the International PHACE Syndrome Registry represents the largest central review of clinical, radiology, and pathology data for cardiovascular anomalies in PHACE patients to date. 62/150 (41%) subjects had intracardiac, aortic arch, or brachiocephalic vessel anomalies. Aberrant origin of a subclavian artery was the most common cardiovascular anomaly (present in 31/150 (21%) of subjects). Coarctation was the second most common anomaly, identified in 28/150 (19%), and can be missed clinically in PHACE patients because of the frequent association of arch obstruction with aberrant subclavian origin. 23/62 (37%) subjects with cardiovascular anomalies required procedural intervention. A higher percentage of hemangiomas were located on the left side of the head/neck in patients with coarctation (46% vs. 39%); however, hemangioma distribution did not predict the presence of cardiovascular anomalies overall. In conclusion, PHACE is associated with a high risk of congenital heart disease. Cardiac and aortic arch imaging with detailed assessment of arch patency and brachiocephalic origins is essential for any patient suspected of having PHACE. Longitudinal investigation is needed to determine the long-term outcomes of cardiovascular anomalies in PHACE. PMID:24079520

  10. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: problems with developmental anomalies of the external genitalia and sex assignment.

    PubMed

    Al-Maghribi, Hussein

    2007-09-01

    A retrospective study was performed on all patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) who were followed up at the King Hussein Medical Center (KHMC), Amman, Jordan, during the period from January 1996 to June 2006. The aim was to evaluate the clinical features, special problems, and corrective interventions for these patients. The records of 73 children (39 were genetic females and 34 were genetic males) with CAH were reviewed in the study. The age of the patients at last follow-up was between five months and 18 years. Diagnostic criteria for CAH were typical clinical features of the illness (salt loss, dehydration, virilization, macrogenitosomia, ambiguous genitalia, and accelerated growth) and typical hormonal abnormalities (decreased serum cortisol and elevated serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone). There were 62 patients with classical presentation; among them, salt-wasting (SW) form was seen in 41 patients (66%). There were 5 patients with the nonclassic form, while 6 others had cryptic presentation. Seven patients (9%) had hypertension, mostly due to salt-retaining CAH. Among the 39 females with CAH, 27 had developed mental anomalies of the external genitalia; 20 of them underwent surgical interventions of their external genitalia. Fourteen genetically female patients were wrongly diagnosed as 'male sex' at birth due to severe virilization. Seven of them were reassigned 'female sex' socially, legally, and surgically; the parents of one of them (a four-year-old girl) wanted the surgical intervention postponed for two to three years. Hysterectomy and gonadectomy were carried out for 6 of the other 7 patients who chose to keep the male gender. Our study indicates that newborns with developmental anomalies of the external genitalia should be diagnosed as early as possible so that medical, psychological, and social complications are minimized. A neonatal screening program for such a disorder can identify infants at risk for the development of life

  11. Subtelomeric Copy Number Variations: The Importance of 4p/4q Deletions in Patients with Congenital Anomalies and Developmental Disability.

    PubMed

    Novo-Filho, Gil M; Montenegro, Marília M; Zanardo, Évelin A; Dutra, Roberta L; Dias, Alexandre T; Piazzon, Flavia B; Costa, Taís V M M; Nascimento, Amom M; Honjo, Rachel S; Kim, Chong A; Kulikowski, Leslie D

    2016-01-01

    The most prevalent structural variations in the human genome are copy number variations (CNVs), which appear predominantly in the subtelomeric regions. Variable sizes of 4p/4q CNVs have been associated with several different psychiatric findings and developmental disability (DD). We analyzed 105 patients with congenital anomalies (CA) and developmental and/or intellectual disabilities (DD/ID) using MLPA subtelomeric specific kits (P036 /P070) and 4 of them using microarrays. We found abnormal subtelomeric CNVs in 15 patients (14.3%), including 8 patients with subtelomeric deletions at 4p/4q (53.3%). Additional genomic changes were observed at 1p36, 2q37.3, 5p15.3, 5q35.3, 8p23.3, 13q11, 14q32.3, 15q11.2, and Xq28/Yq12. This indicates the prevalence of independent deletions at 4p/4q, involving PIGG, TRIML2, and FRG1. Furthermore, we identified 15 genes with changes in copy number that contribute to neurological development and/or function, among them CRMP1, SORCS2, SLC25A4, and HELT. Our results highlight the association of genes with changes in copy number at 4p and 4q subtelomeric regions and the DD phenotype. Cytogenomic characterization of additional cases with distal deletions should help clarifying the role of subtelomeric CNVs in neurological diseases.

  12. The urological evaluation and management of patients with congenital lower urinary tract anomalies prior to renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, F F; Smolev, J K; Spees, E K; Jeffs, R D; Burdick, J F

    1982-06-01

    Previously, patients with chronic renal failure and major congenital anomalies of the lower urinary tract (often with urinary diversion) were thought to be poor candidates for renal transplantation. Pre-transplant evaluation and possible urinary reconstruction are essential in these patients to achieve successful renal transplantation. Ten patients, including 7 adults, presented with congenital anomalies of the lower urinary tract that were responsible for renal failure. Percutaneous suprapubic cystostomy aided in the assessment of bladder function. Undiagnosed posterior urethral valves were found in 2 adults. Patients with exstrophy, neurogenic bladder or a contracted bladder (with augmentation cystoplasty) had urinary drainage into the bladder at the time of renal transplantation. Sometimes an imperfect bladder can be used for urinary drainage with transplantation but, otherwise, intestinal conduits are still a viable alternative.

  13. Temporal High-Resolution Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Congenital Inner Ear Anomalies in Children.

    PubMed

    Palabiyik, Figen Bakirtas; Hacikurt, Kadir

    2016-10-01

    Imaging plays an important role in determining indications of cochlear implantation and choosing candidates for the procedure in children. Temporal high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can display precisely the complex anatomic structure of inner ear. Although HRCT permits detailed imaging of bony structures, MRI gives valuable information about membranous labyrinth, internal acoustic canal, and vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging examination of the brain should be performed at the same time to evaluate any coexistent brain parenchymal abnormality. These imaging modalities are complementary methods in evaluating congenital inner ear anomalies. The aim of this pictorial essay is to reviewing temporal HRCT and MRI findings of congenital inner ear anomalies.

  14. MR imaging of the female pelvis: current perspectives and review of genital tract congenital anomalies, and benign and malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Patel, V H; Somers, S

    1997-10-01

    MR imaging continues to be an integral problem-solving modality in the evaluation of congenital anomalies and acquired diseases of the female genital tract organs and provides effective clinical information to the practicing gynecologist in those patients in whom sonography is technically suboptimal or the results are equivocal. This article describes the state-of-the art MR imaging of the female pelvis and addresses its current perspectives in the following sections: (1) technical aspects of MR in imaging the female pelvis, (2) normal pelvic anatomy and variations that are seen on MRI, (3) role of MRI in the diagnosis of congenital uterine and vaginal anomalies, (4) MR imaging approach to diagnose congenital uterine and vaginal anomalies, (5) advantages and limitations of MR in the evaluation of various benign diseases and malignant neoplasms of the female genital tract, (6) a MR staging system and criteria for each gynecologic malignancy, (7) fundamental MR criteria to differentiate benign from malignant tumors and recurrent tumors from fibrosis, and (8) the present cost-effective value of MR in pregnancy and obstetrics. Magnetic resonance (MR) technology continues to be an important problem-solving modality in the evaluation of benign, malignant, and recurrent diseases of the female pelvic organs with the development of new software and improved hardware over the last few years. The main issues addressed in this article are (1) to review the basic and expanded applications of the current state-of-the art MR imaging in the diagnosis and management of various congenital and acquired disorders of the female pelvic organs, (2) to illustrate a simplified clinico-radiologic (MRI) approach to the diagnosis of congenital and acquired pathologies of the pelvic organs, (3) to provide relevant information to the clinicians to make rational choices among the competing imaging modalities, and (4) to outline the future potential of this modality in the pelvis.

  15. Developmental Genetics and Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Natalie; Reidy, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are common birth defects and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in children. There is a wide spectrum of renal abnormalities, from mild hydronephrosis to more severe cases, such as bilateral renal dysplasia. The etiology of the majority of cases of CAKUT remains unknown, but there is increasing evidence that genomic imbalance contributes to the pathogenesis of CAKUT. Advances in human and mouse genetics have contributed to increased understanding of the pathophysiology of CAKUT. Mutations in genes involved in both transcription factors and signal transduction pathways involved in renal development are associated with CAKUT. Large cohort studies suggest that copy number variants, genomic, or de novo mutations may explain up to one-third of all cases of CAKUT. One of the major challenges to the use of genetic information in the clinical setting remains the lack of strict genotype–phenotype correlation. However, identifying genetic causes of CAKUT may lead to improved diagnosis of extrarenal complications. With the advent of decreasing costs for whole genome and exome sequencing, future studies focused on genotype–phenotype correlations, gene modifiers, and animal models of gene mutations will be needed to translate genetic advances into improved clinical care. PMID:27617142

  16. The genomic landscape of balanced cytogenetic abnormalities associated with human congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Redin, Claire; Brand, Harrison; Collins, Ryan L; Kammin, Tammy; Mitchell, Elyse; Hodge, Jennelle C; Hanscom, Carrie; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Seabra, Catarina M; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Aberg, Erika; Adley, Rhett; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; An, Yu; Anderson, Mary-Anne; Antolik, Caroline; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Atkin, Joan F; Bartell, Tina; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Beyer, Elizabeth; Blumenthal, Ian; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Brilstra, Eva H; Brown, Chester W; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Callewaert, Bert; Chiang, Colby; Corning, Ken; Cox, Helen; Cuppen, Edwin; Currall, Benjamin B; Cushing, Tom; David, Dezso; Deardorff, Matthew A; Dheedene, Annelies; D'Hooghe, Marc; de Vries, Bert B A; Earl, Dawn L; Ferguson, Heather L; Fisher, Heather; FitzPatrick, David R; Gerrol, Pamela; Giachino, Daniela; Glessner, Joseph T; Gliem, Troy; Grady, Margo; Graham, Brett H; Griffis, Cristin; Gripp, Karen W; Gropman, Andrea L; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Harris, David J; Hayden, Mark A; Hill, Rosamund; Hochstenbach, Ron; Hoffman, Jodi D; Hopkin, Robert J; Hubshman, Monika W; Innes, A Micheil; Irons, Mira; Irving, Melita; Jacobsen, Jessie C; Janssens, Sandra; Jewett, Tamison; Johnson, John P; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Kahler, Stephen G; Koolen, David A; Korzelius, Jerome; Kroisel, Peter M; Lacassie, Yves; Lawless, William; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Leppig, Kathleen; Levin, Alex V; Li, Haibo; Li, Hong; Liao, Eric C; Lim, Cynthia; Lose, Edward J; Lucente, Diane; Macera, Michael J; Manavalan, Poornima; Mandrile, Giorgia; Marcelis, Carlo L; Margolin, Lauren; Mason, Tamara; Masser-Frye, Diane; McClellan, Michael W; Mendoza, Cinthya J Zepeda; Menten, Björn; Middelkamp, Sjors; Mikami, Liya R; Moe, Emily; Mohammed, Shehla; Mononen, Tarja; Mortenson, Megan E; Moya, Graciela; Nieuwint, Aggie W; Ordulu, Zehra; Parkash, Sandhya; Pauker, Susan P; Pereira, Shahrin; Perrin, Danielle; Phelan, Katy; Aguilar, Raul E Piña; Poddighe, Pino J; Pregno, Giulia; Raskin, Salmo; Reis, Linda; Rhead, William; Rita, Debra; Renkens, Ivo; Roelens, Filip; Ruliera, Jayla; Rump, Patrick; Schilit, Samantha L P; Shaheen, Ranad; Sparkes, Rebecca; Spiegel, Erica; Stevens, Blair; Stone, Matthew R; Tagoe, Julia; Thakuria, Joseph V; van Bon, Bregje W; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; van Der Burgt, Ineke; van Essen, Ton; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Vergult, Sarah; Volker-Touw, Catharina M L; Warburton, Dorothy P; Waterman, Matthew J; Wiley, Susan; Wilson, Anna; Yerena-de Vega, Maria de la Concepcion A; Zori, Roberto T; Levy, Brynn; Brunner, Han G; de Leeuw, Nicole; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Thorland, Erik C; Morton, Cynthia C; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    Despite the clinical significance of balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs), their characterization has largely been restricted to cytogenetic resolution. We explored the landscape of BCAs at nucleotide resolution in 273 subjects with a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Whole-genome sequencing revised 93% of karyotypes and demonstrated complexity that was cryptic to karyotyping in 21% of BCAs, highlighting the limitations of conventional cytogenetic approaches. At least 33.9% of BCAs resulted in gene disruption that likely contributed to the developmental phenotype, 5.2% were associated with pathogenic genomic imbalances, and 7.3% disrupted topologically associated domains (TADs) encompassing known syndromic loci. Remarkably, BCA breakpoints in eight subjects altered a single TAD encompassing MEF2C, a known driver of 5q14.3 microdeletion syndrome, resulting in decreased MEF2C expression. We propose that sequence-level resolution dramatically improves prediction of clinical outcomes for balanced rearrangements and provides insight into new pathogenic mechanisms, such as altered regulation due to changes in chromosome topology.

  17. [Ultrasound and color Doppler applications in nephrology. The normal kidney: anatomy, vessels and congenital anomalies].

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria; Giovannini, Lisa; Samoni, Sara; Dellafiore, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Gray-scale ultrasound is the diagnostic technique of choice in patients with suspected or known renal disease. Knowledge of the normal and abnormal sonographic morphology of the kidney and urinary tract is essential for a successful diagnosis. Conventional sonography must always be complemented by Doppler sampling of the principal arterial and venous vessels. B-mode scanning is performed with the patient in supine, prone or side position. The kidney can be imaged by the anterior, lateral or posterior approach using coronal, transverse and oblique scanning planes. Morphological parameters that must be evaluated are the coronal diameter, the parenchymal thickness and echogenicity, the structure and state of the urinary tract, and the presence of congenital anomalies that may mimic a pseudomass. The main renal artery and the hilar-intraparenchymal branches of the arterial and venous vessels should be accurately evaluated using color Doppler. Measurement of intraparenchymal resistance indices (IP, IR) provides an indirect and quantitative parameter of the stiffness and eutrophic or dystrophic remodeling of the intrarenal microvasculature. These parameters differ depending on age, diabetic and hypertensive disease, chronic renal glomerular disease, and interstitial, vascular and obstructive nephropathy.

  18. HNF1B alterations associated with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Makiko; Nozu, Kandai; Goto, Yuki; Kamei, Koichi; Ito, Shuichi; Sato, Hidenori; Emi, Mitsuru; Nakanishi, Koichi; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2010-06-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1beta (HNF1beta) abnormalities have been recognized to cause congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), predominantly affecting bilateral renal malformations. To further understand the spectrum of HNF1beta related phenotypes, we performed HNF1B gene mutation and deletion analyses in Japanese patients with renal hypodysplasia (n = 31), unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK; n = 14) and others (n = 5). We identified HNF1B alterations in 5 out of 50 patients (10%). De novo heterozygous complete deletions of HNF1B were found in 3 patients with unilateral MCDK. Two of the patients showed contralateral hypodysplasia, whereas the other patient showed a radiologically normal contralateral kidney with normal renal function. Copy number variation analyses showed 1.4 Mb microdeletions involving the whole HNF1B gene with breakpoints in flanking segmental duplications. We also identified 1 novel truncated mutation (1007insC) and another missense mutation (226G>T) in patients with bilateral hypodysplasia. HNF1B alterations leading to haploinsufficiency affect a diverse spectrum of CAKUT. The existence of a patient with unilateral MCDK with normal renal function might provide genetic insight into the etiology of these substantial populations of only unilateral MCDK. The recurrent microdeletions encompassing HNF1B could have a significant impact on the mechanism of HNF1B deletions.

  19. Congenital keratoglobus with multiple cardiac anomalies: a case presentation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Pinar A; Yalniz-Akkaya, Zuleyha

    2015-07-01

    Keratoglobus is a rare condition of bilateral corneal ectasia, which results in high myopia, irregular astigmatism, scarring, and rarely spontaneous globe rupture. Globoid protrusion of a clear, diffusely thin cornea is the pathology. The congenital form has been associated with blue sclera in which there is a systemic connective tissue disorder with abnormal collagen synthesis like Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and osteogenesis imperfecta. Some concomitant abnormalities reported with kertoglobus include joint hypermobility, dental and skeletal abnormalities, osteal fragility, and deafness. Acquired forms have been reported to be associated with vernal keratoconjunctivitis and thyroid ophthalmopathy. We report the case of a 16-year-old boy with keratoglobus who presented with a history of photophobia and a low vision in both eyes since birth. He has been followed up by our pediatric cardiology department due to multiple cardiac anomalies. He had hypermobility of large joints, easy bruising, thin and hyperextensible skin with visible veins, which were also described in his elder brother. We aimed to discuss the etiology and the association of keratoglobus with some systemic abnormalities caused by collogen tissue disturbance, and make a brief review about the recent literature concerning the management of keratoglobus patients.

  20. Unusual Congenital Aortic Anomaly with Rare Common Celiamesenteric Trunk Variation: MR Angiography and Digital Substraction Angiography Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Tosun, Ozgur Sanlidilek, Umman; Cetin, Huseyin; Ozdemir, Ozcan; Kurt, Aydin; Sakarya, Mehmet Emin; Tas, Ismet

    2007-09-15

    Magnetic resonance angiography and digital substraction angiography (DSA) findings in a case with a rare congenital thoracoabdominal aortic hypoplasia and common celiamesenteric trunk variation with occlusion of infrarenal abdominal aorta are described here. To our knowledge, this aortic anomaly has not been previously described in the English literature. DSA is the optimum imaging modality for determination of aortic hypoplasia, associated vascular malformations, collateral vessels, and direction of flow within vessels.

  1. Molecular karyotyping by array CGH in a Russian cohort of children with intellectual disability, autism, epilepsy and congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has been repeatedly shown to be a successful tool for the identification of genomic variations in a clinical population. During the last decade, the implementation of array CGH has resulted in the identification of new causative submicroscopic chromosome imbalances and copy number variations (CNVs) in neuropsychiatric (neurobehavioral) diseases. Currently, array-CGH-based technologies have become an integral part of molecular diagnosis and research in individuals with neuropsychiatric disorders and children with intellectual disability (mental retardation) and congenital anomalies. Here, we introduce the Russian cohort of children with intellectual disability, autism, epilepsy and congenital anomalies analyzed by BAC array CGH and a novel bioinformatic strategy. Results Among 54 individuals highly selected according to clinical criteria and molecular and cytogenetic data (from 2426 patients evaluated cytogenetically and molecularly between November 2007 and May 2012), chromosomal imbalances were detected in 26 individuals (48%). In two patients (4%), a previously undescribed condition was observed. The latter has been designated as meiotic (constitutional) genomic instability resulted in multiple submicroscopic rearrangements (including CNVs). Using bioinformatic strategy, we were able to identify clinically relevant CNVs in 15 individuals (28%). Selected cases were confirmed by molecular cytogenetic and molecular genetic methods. Eight out of 26 chromosomal imbalances (31%) have not been previously reported. Among them, three cases were co-occurrence of subtle chromosome 9 and 21 deletions. Conclusions We conducted an array CGH study of Russian patients suffering from intellectual disability, autism, epilepsy and congenital anomalies. In total, phenotypic manifestations of clinically relevant genomic variations were found to result from genomic rearrangements affecting 1247 disease-causing and pathway

  2. A higher risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring of personnel who served aboard a Norwegian missile torpedo boat

    PubMed Central

    Mageroy, N; Mollerlokken, O J; Riise, T; Koefoed, V; Moen, B E

    2006-01-01

    Background In the 1990s, congenital anomalies were reported among children whose fathers had served aboard a Norwegian missile torpedo boat (MTB). The Royal Norwegian Navy asked the University of Bergen to look into this problem as one part of a general health and work environment surveillance. Aims To estimate any increased risk of having children with congenital anomalies and having stillborn children among the offspring of workers that had served aboard the MTB and to investigate possible differences in exposure and other risk factors between these groups. Methods Data from a cross‐sectional study among all current employees of the Norwegian Navy (n = 2265, response rate 58%) were analysed. Results The prevalence ratio of having a child with congenital malformations associated with working on the ship was 4.0 (95% CI 1.9 to 8.6). The prevalence ratio of having a child who was stillborn or died within one week was 4.1 (95% CI 1.7 to 9.9). Conclusion Service aboard the MTB was associated with an increased risk of having children with congenital birth defects and having children that were stillborn. The causes of these findings are unknown. PMID:16421386

  3. The Risk of Congenital Heart Anomalies Following Prenatal Exposure to Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors—Is Pharmacogenetics the Key?

    PubMed Central

    Daud, Aizati N. A.; Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S.; Groen, Henk; Wilffert, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are often prescribed during pregnancy. Previous studies that found an increased risk of congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart anomalies (CHA), with SRI use during pregnancy have created concern among pregnant women and healthcare professionals about the safety of these drugs. However, subsequent studies have reported conflicting results on the association between CHA and SRI use during pregnancy. These discrepancies in the risk estimates can potentially be explained by genetic differences among exposed individuals. In this review, we explore the potential pharmacogenetic predictors involved in the pharmacokinetics and mechanism of action of SRIs, and their relation to the risk of CHA. In general, the risk is dependent on the maternal concentration of SRIs and the foetal serotonin level/effect, which can be modulated by the alteration in the expression and/or function of the metabolic enzymes, transporter proteins and serotonin receptors involved in the serotonin signalling of the foetal heart development. Pharmacogenetics might be the key to understanding why some children exposed to SRIs develop a congenital heart anomaly and others do not. PMID:27529241

  4. Spectrum of renal pathology in adult patients with congenital renal anomalies-a series from a tertiary cancer center.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Jasreman; Mohanty, Sambit K; Kim, Tim; Sexton, Wade J; Powsang, Julio; Spiess, Philippe E

    2014-02-01

    Congenital renal anomalies (CRAs) detected in adults include horseshoe kidney (HK), crossed renal ectopia, and malrotation. Congenital renal anomalies are rare, and renal lesions associated with CRA are rarer. Thirteen patients (11 men and 2 women) were referred to our center with renal masses in the context of CRAs, which included HK (10 cases), crossed renal ectopia (2 cases), and a pelvic kidney (1 case). The mean age at diagnosis was 60 years (37-76 years). All patients were treated with open surgery; 10, partial nephrectomies; 4, radical nephrectomies; and 1, nephroureterectomy with division of the renal isthmus. Pathology ranged from benign (simple cortical cysts, chronic pyelonephritis with secondary hydronephrosis) to malignant (12 cases of renal cell carcinomas [RCCs] and 1 case of urothelial carcinoma). Two patients of HKs presented with bilateral renal masses. The size of the RCC ranged from 2.5 to 13 cm. There were 11 cases of clear cell RCC, 1 case of papillary RCC (type 1), and 1 case of urothelial carcinoma. All the cases of RCC had negative surgical margins. Follow-up available in all patients ranged from 1 month up to 49 months. None of the patients developed any locoregional recurrences or distant metastases. In this patient cohort, the most common congenital anomaly associated with RCC is HK. All tumors behaved in an indolent fashion with prognosis related to pathologic tumor stage. Partial nephrectomy is a safe and effective procedure in appropriately selected patients.

  5. Working-class Filipino women's perspectives on factors that facilitate or hinder prenatal micronutrients supplementation to prevent congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Gamboa, Henrietta

    2012-11-01

    The study was conducted to plan for a community-health campaign to inform working-class Filipinos about the causes and prevention of orofacial clefting. Prenatal micronutrients may play a role in preventing orofacial clefting. Therefore, women's practices and perspectives on barriers to and facilitators of micronutrient supplementation were elicited. A total of 43 women and 22 health care workers were interviewed. Barriers to taking supplements included side effects, late prenatal care, the view that micronutrients are medications, inadequate supply, and health care workers who were unaware that prenatal vitamin supplements prevent congenital anomalies. The main facilitator was women's understanding that prenatal micronutrients improve the physical well-being of both mother and child. Given that women view having healthy babies as a reason to take micronutrients and that the health care workers lacked knowledge related to the use of micronutrients to prevent congenital anomalies, uptake of prenatal micronutrient supplementation programs may improve by specifically promoting the health benefit of preventing congenital anomalies.

  6. A Population-Based Case-Control Study of Drinking-Water Nitrate and Congenital Anomalies Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to Develop Individual-Level Exposure Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Holtby, Caitlin E.; Guernsey, Judith R.; Allen, Alexander C.; VanLeeuwen, John A.; Allen, Victoria M.; Gordon, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies and epidemiological evidence suggest an association between prenatal exposure to drinking water with elevated nitrate (NO3-N) concentrations and incidence of congenital anomalies. This study used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to derive individual-level prenatal drinking-water nitrate exposure estimates from measured nitrate concentrations from 140 temporally monitored private wells and 6 municipal water supplies. Cases of major congenital anomalies in Kings County, Nova Scotia, Canada, between 1988 and 2006 were selected from province-wide population-based perinatal surveillance databases and matched to controls from the same databases. Unconditional multivariable logistic regression was performed to test for an association between drinking-water nitrate exposure and congenital anomalies after adjusting for clinically relevant risk factors. Employing all nitrate data there was a trend toward increased risk of congenital anomalies for increased nitrate exposure levels though this was not statistically significant. After stratification of the data by conception before or after folic acid supplementation, an increased risk of congenital anomalies for nitrate exposure of 1.5–5.56 mg/L (2.44; 1.05–5.66) and a trend toward increased risk for >5.56 mg/L (2.25; 0.92–5.52) was found. Though the study is likely underpowered, these results suggest that drinking-water nitrate exposure may contribute to increased risk of congenital anomalies at levels below the current Canadian maximum allowable concentration. PMID:24503976

  7. A population-based case-control study of drinking-water nitrate and congenital anomalies using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to develop individual-level exposure estimates.

    PubMed

    Holtby, Caitlin E; Guernsey, Judith R; Allen, Alexander C; Vanleeuwen, John A; Allen, Victoria M; Gordon, Robert J

    2014-02-05

    Animal studies and epidemiological evidence suggest an association between prenatal exposure to drinking water with elevated nitrate (NO3-N) concentrations and incidence of congenital anomalies. This study used Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to derive individual-level prenatal drinking-water nitrate exposure estimates from measured nitrate concentrations from 140 temporally monitored private wells and 6 municipal water supplies. Cases of major congenital anomalies in Kings County, Nova Scotia, Canada, between 1988 and 2006 were selected from province-wide population-based perinatal surveillance databases and matched to controls from the same databases. Unconditional multivariable logistic regression was performed to test for an association between drinking-water nitrate exposure and congenital anomalies after adjusting for clinically relevant risk factors. Employing all nitrate data there was a trend toward increased risk of congenital anomalies for increased nitrate exposure levels though this was not statistically significant. After stratification of the data by conception before or after folic acid supplementation, an increased risk of congenital anomalies for nitrate exposure of 1.5-5.56 mg/L (2.44; 1.05-5.66) and a trend toward increased risk for >5.56 mg/L (2.25; 0.92-5.52) was found. Though the study is likely underpowered, these results suggest that drinking-water nitrate exposure may contribute to increased risk of congenital anomalies at levels below the current Canadian maximum allowable concentration.

  8. Congenital anomalies of the IVC—embryological perspective and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Ghandour, Abed; Partovi, Sasan; Karuppasamy, Karunakaravel

    2016-01-01

    With the increased use of cross-sectional imaging, systemic venous anomalies are more frequently being recognized in asymptomatic patients. Accurate characterization of systemic venous anomalies plays a major role in the appropriate selection of a surgical approach or interventional procedure. In this article, we review common and uncommon inferior vena cava (IVC) anomalies. We describe the embryological basis and clinical implications of these anomalies, particularly from an interventional radiology perspective. We also discuss the complications and treatments of these anomalies. PMID:28123970

  9. Genetic Studies of Strabismus, Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders (CCDDs), and Their Associated Anomalies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-16

    Congenital Fibrosis of Extraocular Muscles; Duane Retraction Syndrome; Duane Radial Ray Syndrome; Mobius Syndrome; Brown Syndrome; Marcus Gunn Syndrome; Strabismus Congenital; Horizontal Gaze Palsy; Horizontal Gaze Palsy With Progressive Scoliosis; Facial Palsy; Facial Paresis, Hereditary, Congenital; Third Nerve Palsy; Fourth Nerve Palsy; Sixth Nerve Palsy; Synkinesis; Ocular Motility Disorders; Levator-Medial Rectus Synkinesis; Athabaskan Brainstem Dysgenesis; Tongue Paralysis; Ninth Nerve Disorder; Fifth Nerve Palsy; Seventh Nerve Palsy; Eleventh Nerve Disorder; Twelfth Nerve Disorder; Vagus Nerve Paralysis; Moebius Sequence

  10. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case.

  11. Leber's congenital amaurosis. Relationship of structural CNS anomalies to psychomotor retardation.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, J M; Gleaton, M; Weidner, W A; Young, R S

    1984-02-01

    Three patients (two of them siblings) had Leber's congenital amaurosis and cerebellar disease. Despite blindness and severe motor deficits, all three patients have achieved relatively normal intellectual and psychosocial milestones. Computed tomographic scans, performed in two patients, demonstrated hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis in both. The presence of delayed speech and motor development as well as structural CNS abnormalities in children with Leber's congenital amaurosis does not necessarily imply that severe intellectual impairment will be present.

  12. Folic acid flour fortification: impact on the frequencies of 52 congenital anomaly types in three South American countries.

    PubMed

    López-Camelo, Jorge S; Castilla, Eduardo E; Orioli, Iêda M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to search for a reduction in birth prevalence estimates of 52 selected types of congenital anomalies, associated with folic acid fortification programs in Chile, Argentina, and Brazil. The material included 3,347,559 total births in 77 hospitals of the three countries during the 1982-2007 period: 596,704 births (17 hospitals) in Chile, 1,643,341 (41 hospitals) in Argentina, and 1,107,514 (19 hospitals) in Brazil. We compared pre- and post-fortification rates within each hospital and the resulting Prevalence Rate Ratios (PRRs) were pooled by country. Statistically significant reductions in birth prevalence estimates after fortification were observed for neural tube defects (NTDs), septal heart defects, transverse limb deficiencies, and subluxation of the hip. However, only the reduction of NTDs appeared to be associated with folic acid fortification and not due to other factors, because of its consistency among the three countries, as well as with previously published reports, and its strong statistical significance. Among the NTDs, the maximum prevalence reduction was observed for isolated cephalic (cervical-thoracic) spina bifida, followed by caudal (lumbo-sacral) spina bifida, anencephaly, and cephalocele. This observation suggests etiologic and pathogenetic heterogeneity among different levels of spina bifida, as well as among different NTD subtypes. We concluded that food fortification with folic acid prevents NTDs but not other types of congenital anomalies.

  13. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation. PMID:27630924

  14. The combination of vestibular impairment and congenital sensorineural hearing loss predisposes patients to ocular anomalies, including Usher syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kletke, S; Batmanabane, V; Dai, T; Vincent, A; Li, S; Gordon, K A; Papsin, B C; Cushing, S L; Héon, E

    2016-10-15

    The co-occurrence of hearing impairment and visual dysfunction is devastating. Most deaf-blind etiologies are genetically determined, the commonest being Usher syndrome (USH). While studies of the congenitally deaf population reveal a variable degree of visual problems, there are no effective ophthalmic screening guidelines. We hypothesized that children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and vestibular impairment were at an increased risk of having USH. A retrospective chart review of 33 cochlear implants recipients for severe to profound SNHL and measured vestibular dysfunction was performed to determine the ocular phenotype. All the cases had undergone ocular examination and electroretinogram (ERG). Patients with an abnormal ERG underwent genetic testing for USH. We found an underlying ocular abnormality in 81.81% (27/33) of cases; of which 75% had refractive errors, and 50% of those patients showed visual improvement with refractive correction. A total of 14 cases (42.42%; 14/33) had generalized rod-cone dysfunction on ERG suggestive of Usher syndrome type 1, confirmed by mutational analysis. This work shows that adding vestibular impairment as a criterion for requesting an eye exam and adding the ERG to detect USH increases the chances of detecting ocular anomalies, when compared with previous literature focusing only on congenital SNHL.

  15. Esophageal Atresia with or without Tracheoesophageal Fistula (EA/TEF): Association of Different EA/TEF Subtypes with Specific Co-occurring Congenital Anomalies and Implications for Diagnostic Workup.

    PubMed

    Bogs, Thomas; Zwink, Nadine; Chonitzki, Vera; Hölscher, Alice; Boemers, Thomas M; Münsterer, Oliver; Kurz, Ralf; Heydweiller, Andreas; Pauly, Marcus; Leutner, Andreas; Ure, Benno M; Lacher, Martin; Deffaa, Oliver Johannes; Thiele, Holger; Bagci, Soyhan; Jenetzky, Ekkehart; Schumacher, Johannes; Reutter, Heiko

    2017-01-06

    Background Esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) represents the most common developmental malformation of the upper digestive tract. It is classified into six subtypes according to the classification of Vogt, depending on anatomical variation of this malformation. Around 50% of the patients with EA/TEF present additional anomalies, which often influence, next to the EA/TEF subtype, the overall prognosis of EA/TEF newborns. Here, we investigated the association of the different EA/TEF subtypes with co-occurring congenital anomalies in EA/TEF patients and demonstrate their implications for postnatal diagnostic workup. Materials and Methods We investigated 333 patients of a large German multicenter study born between 1980 and 2012. After evaluation of all available clinical records, 235 patients were included in our analysis. We compared our results with existing data. Results The highest risk for co-occurring anomalies was seen in patients with most common Vogt 3b (p = 0.024), especially for additional gastrointestinal anomalies (p = 0.04). Co-occurring anomalies of the skin were significantly more common in patients with subtype Vogt 2 (p = 0.024). A significant correlation was observed for an impaired neurodevelopmental outcome and EA/TEF Vogt 3a (p = 0.041). Patients with EA/TEF showed a higher risk to present with any additional congenital anomaly compared with the general population (p < 0.001). Conclusion Our results warrant thorough clinical workup for gastrointestinal anomalies especially in patients with Vogt 3b. Moreover, it might be necessary to focus on a thorough aftercare for neurocognitive development in patients with Vogt 3a. The here presented observations need to be confirmed by future studies.

  16. Peri-conception hyperglycaemia and nephropathy are associated with risk of congenital anomaly in women with pre-existing diabetes: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bell, R; Glinianaia, S V; Tennant, P W G; Bilous, R W; Rankin, J

    2012-02-08

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to quantify the risk of major congenital anomaly, and to assess the influence of peri-conception HbA(1c) and other clinical and socio-demographic factors on the risk of congenital anomaly occurrence in offspring of women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes diagnosed before pregnancy. METHODS: This was a population-based cohort study using linked data from registers of congenital anomaly and diabetes in pregnancy. A total of 401,149 singleton pregnancies (1,677 in women with diabetes) between 1996 and 2008 resulting in live birth, fetal death at ≥20 weeks' gestation or termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly were included. RESULTS: The rate of non-chromosomal major congenital anomaly in women with diabetes was 71.6 per 1,000 pregnancies (95% CI 59.6, 84.9), a relative risk of 3.8 (95% CI 3.2, 4.5) compared with women without diabetes. There was a three- to sixfold increased risk across all common anomaly groups. In a multivariate analysis, peri-conception glycaemic control (adjusted OR [aOR] 1.3 [95% CI 1.2, 1.4] per 1% [11 mmol/mol] linear increase in HbA(1c) above 6.3% [45 mmol/mol]) and pre-existing nephropathy (aOR 2.5 [95% CI 1.1, 5.3]) were significant independent predictors of congenital anomaly. Associations with gestation at booking (aOR 1.1 [95% CI 1.0, 1.1]) and parity (aOR 1.6 [95% CI 1.0, 2. 5]) were not significant. Unadjusted risk was higher for women from deprived areas or who did not take folate. Type and duration of diabetes, ethnicity, age, BMI, preconception care, smoking and fetal sex were not associated with congenital anomaly risk. CONCLUSIONS: Peri-conception glycaemia is the most important modifiable risk factor for congenital anomaly in women with diabetes. The association with nephropathy merits further study.

  17. Prognosis and Risk Factors for Congenital Airway Anomalies in Children with Congenital Heart Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Sheng; Jeng, Mei-Jy; Tsao, Pei-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background The mortality risk associated with congenital airway anomalies (CAA) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the factors associated with CAA, and the associated mortality risk, among children with CHD. Methods This nationwide, population-based study evaluated 39,652 children with CHD aged 0–5 years between 2000 and 2011, using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). We performed descriptive, logistic regression, Kaplan–Meier, and Cox regression analyses of the data. Results Among the children with CHD, 1,591 (4.0%) had concomitant CAA. Children with CHD had an increased likelihood of CAA if they were boys (odds ratio [OR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33–1.64), infants (OR, 5.42; 95%CI, 4.06–7.24), or had a congenital musculoskeletal anomaly (OR, 3.19; 95%CI, 2.67–3.81), and were typically identified 0–3 years after CHD diagnosis (OR, 1.33; 95%CI 1.17–1.51). The mortality risk was increased in children with CHD and CAA (crude hazard ratio [HR], 2.05; 95%CI, 1.77–2.37), even after adjusting for confounders (adjusted HR, 1.76; 95%CI, 1.51–2.04). Mortality risk also changed by age and sex (adjusted HR and 95%CI are quoted): neonates, infants, and toddlers and preschool children, 1.67 (1.40–2.00), 1.93 (1.47–2.55), and 4.77 (1.39–16.44), respectively; and boys and girls, 1.62 (1.32–1.98) and 2.01 (1.61–2.50), respectively. Conclusion The mortality risk is significantly increased among children with CHD and comorbid CAA. Clinicians should actively seek CAA during the follow-up of children with CHD. PMID:26334302

  18. An unusual combination of congenital anomalies in an adult patient: patent ductus arteriosus, Kommerell's diverticulum with aberrant right subclavian artery, and heterotaxy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Celik, Murat; Celik, Turgay; Iyisoy, Atila; Guler, Adem

    2011-01-01

    The heterotaxy syndrome is a rare and sporadic disorder. This syndrome presents with situs ambiguus, splenic malformations such as asplenia or polysplenia, and congenital heart disease. Congenital heart diseases associated with this syndrome include a broad variety of manifestations. Patent ductus arteriosus is one of them and percutaneous transcatheter closure can be challenging in the setting of this syndrome. Kommerell's diverticulum is a saccular aneurysmal dilation at the origin of an aberrant subclavian artery, and can be related with other congenital anomalies. However, there is no previous report of Kommerell's diverticulum being found together with patent ductus arteriosus and heterotaxy syndrome.

  19. Uranium and other contaminants in hair from the parents of children with congenital anomalies in Fallujah, Iraq

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent reports have drawn attention to increases in congenital birth anomalies and cancer in Fallujah Iraq blamed on teratogenic, genetic and genomic stress thought to result from depleted Uranium contamination following the battles in the town in 2004. Contamination of the parents of the children and of the environment by Uranium and other elements was investigated using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Hair samples from 25 fathers and mothers of children diagnosed with congenital anomalies were analysed for Uranium and 51 other elements. Mean ages of the parents was: fathers 29.6 (SD 6.2); mothers: 27.3 (SD 6.8). For a sub-group of 6 women, long locks of hair were analysed for Uranium along the length of the hair to obtain information about historic exposures. Samples of soil and water were also analysed and Uranium isotope ratios determined. Results Levels of Ca, Mg, Co, Fe, Mn, V, Zn, Sr, Al, Ba, Bi, Ga, Pb, Hg, Pd and U (for mothers only) were significantly higher than published mean levels in an uncontaminated population in Sweden. In high excess were Ca, Mg, Sr, Al, Bi and Hg. Of these only Hg can be considered as a possible cause of congenital anomaly. Mean levels for Uranium were 0.16 ppm (SD: 0.11) range 0.02 to 0.4, higher in mothers (0.18 ppm SD 0.09) than fathers (0.11 ppm; SD 0.13). The highly unusual non-normal Fallujah distribution mean was significantly higher than literature results for a control population Southern Israel (0.062 ppm) and a non-parametric test (Mann Whitney-Wilcoxon) gave p = 0.016 for this comparison of the distribution. Mean levels in Fallujah were also much higher than the mean of measurements reported from Japan, Brazil, Sweden and Slovenia (0.04 ppm SD 0.02). Soil samples show low concentrations with a mean of 0.76 ppm (SD 0.42) and range 0.1-1.5 ppm; (N = 18). However it may be consistent with levels in drinking water (2.28 μgL-1) which had similar levels to water from wells (2.72 μgL-1) and the

  20. The load of genetic and partially genetic disorders in man. I. Congenital anomalies: estimates of detriment in terms of years of life lost and years of impaired life.

    PubMed

    Czeizel, A; Sankaranarayanan, K

    1984-08-01

    This paper represents an attempt to estimate quantitatively, the detriment associated with spontaneously arising congenital anomalies in man. The system used in the International Classification of Diseases (Chapter XIV, entries 740-759) has been followed to classify the congenital anomalies. Detriment was assessed using estimates of the years of life lost, years of life potentially impaired and years of life actually impaired, as indicators. The data on birth prevalences for the various conditions were derived from several epidemiological surveys carried out in Hungary and from the Hungarian Congenital Malformation Registry. Most of the information on mortality profiles was obtained from the records of the Hungarian Central Statistical Office, Budapest. An overall comparison of the prevalence figures in Hungary with those for the U.S. (this study aimed at complete ascertainment) and for the Canadian province of British Columbia (in this study, ascertainment is believed to be incomplete) showed that, in Hungary, at least certain classes of congenital anomalies, particularly some of the less severe ones, have been under-ascertained. Since detriment estimates are heavily dependent on accurate estimates of birth prevalences, we believe that the estimates of detriment arrived at using the Hungarian data may also be underestimates. In Hungary, the total birth prevalence of all isolated major congenital anomalies is of the order of about 600/10(4). Our calculations show that these congenital anomalies may cause, per 10(4) livebirths, about 4800 years of life loss, about 37000 years of potentially impaired life and about 4500 years of actually impaired life. In these calculations, it has been assumed that the average life-expectancy at live birth for the general population is 70 years. These estimates are considerably higher than those made by Carter for detriment associated with spontaneously arising monogenic disorders.

  1. Parenting an infant with a congenital anomaly: how are perceived burden and perceived personal benefits related to parenting stress?

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana; Nazaré, Bárbara; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to characterize parents' negative (perceived burden) and positive (perceived personal benefits) perceptions about parenting an infant with a congenital anomaly (CA), and to investigate their role in parenting stress. Forty-three couples (43 mothers and 36 fathers) whose 6-month-old infants had a CA completed several questionnaires: the Impact on Family Scale-Revised, the Positive Contributions Scale, and the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form. The results showed similarities between maternal and paternal perceptions. For mothers, higher levels of burden and lower levels of personal benefits were found to predict higher levels of parenting stress. For fathers, greater burden was associated with higher levels of parenting stress. Some dimensions of personal benefits moderated the relationship between burden and parenting stress, for both genders. Specific strategies targeting negative and positive perceptions should be considered when developing psychological interventions to promote the family's adaptation to the experience of parenting an infant with a CA.

  2. True oblique axis fracture associated with congenital anomalies of the upper cervical spine: Case report of an unusual fracture pattern

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Luis A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute traumatic axis fractures are common cervical spine injuries often caused by road accidents or falls. They are usually classified into three different types, namely, odontoid fractures, Hangman's fractures, and miscellaneous fractures. Congenital malformations of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ), although typically asymptomatic, may result in neural compression or instability, especially following trauma. Here, the authors present an unusual oblique axis fracture occurring in conjunction with several malformations of the upper cervical spine. Case Description: Following a motor vehicle accident, a 25-year-old female's radiographic studies showed an oblique axis fracture involving both the anterior and posterior elements along with an anterior and posterior Klippel–Feil syndrome (KFS) anomaly. Following treatment in a halo vest, the patient maintained alignment, and ultimately the fracture was fused. Conclusions: True oblique fractures of the axis are rare, as in the case presented, and may occasionally occur in conjunction with KFS of the upper cervical spine. PMID:28217386

  3. Structural chromosomal abnormalities in patients with mental retardation and/or multiple congenital anomalies: a new series of 24 patients.

    PubMed

    Tos, T; Karaman, A; Aksoy, A; Tukun, A

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a major cause of mental retardation and/or multiple congenital anomalies (MCA/MR). Screening for these chromosomal imbalances has mainly been done by standard karyotyping. The objective of this study was to report standard chromosome analysis and FISH screening of a series of 24 patients with MCA/MR. Structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 24 alterations and included 5 deletions, 2 duplications, 6 unbalanced translocations, 3 inversions, 2 insertions, 3 derivative chromosomes, 2 marker chromosomes and 1 isochromosome. We confirm that a high percentage of MCA/MR cases hitherto considered idiopathic is caused by chromosomal imbalances. We conclude that patients with MCA/MR should be routinely karyotyped.

  4. Revisiting Sports Precautions in Children With Solitary Kidneys and Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Papagiannopoulos, Dimitri; Gong, Edward

    2017-03-01

    This review article explores sports and recreational precautions in children with solitary kidneys. In 2001, the American Academy of Pediatrics published recommendations for activity in children with medical conditions. Those with solitary kidneys were graded a "qualified yes": no restriction in noncontact sports, and individual assessment for limited-contact, contact, and collision sports. Recent trauma data suggest that classification according to the degree of contact is inaccurate. We propose an updated, data-driven classification of sports or recreation according to the risk of high-grade renal trauma or loss of renal unit. Given the paucity of literature on the topic and lack of consensus, children with congenital renal anomalies should exercise caution in both sports and recreation.

  5. Adaptation to the Birth of a Child with a Congenital Anomaly: A Prospective Longitudinal Study of Maternal Well-Being and Psychological Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nes, Ragnhild B.; Røysamb, Espen; Hauge, Lars J.; Kornstad, Tom; Landolt, Markus A.; Irgens, Lorentz M.; Eskedal, Leif; Kristensen, Petter; Vollrath, Margarete E.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the stability and change in maternal life satisfaction and psychological distress following the birth of a child with a congenital anomaly using 5 assessments from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study collected from Pregnancy Week 17 to 36 months postpartum. Participating mothers were divided into those having infants…

  6. Individual variation in organ histogenesis as a causative factor in the developmental origins of health and disease: unnoticed congenital anomalies?

    PubMed

    Otani, Hiroki; Udagawa, Jun; Hatta, Toshihisa; Kagohashi, Yukiko; Hashimoto, Ryuju; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Satow, Fumio; Nimura, Masayuki

    2010-12-01

    Morphological studies of congenital anomalies have mainly focused on abnormal shape (i.e. malformation) and thus on disturbed organogenesis. However, in regard to postnatal functions of organs that develop through branching mechanisms, organ size is another important morphological feature. These organs consist of a large number of structural and functional units, such as nephrons in the kidney, and the total number of these units, that is approximately proportional to the organ size, has been shown to vary widely among individuals. Organ-specific cells are differentiated and organized to form structural units and realize organ-specific functions during the histogenetic period (i.e. from mid-gestation to the early postnatal period). The total number of units is attained at the end of histogenesis and determines the total functional capacity, including the functional reserve of the organ, and thus may be related to predispositions to postnatal organ-based diseases, because the functional reserve decreases during the course of life and eventually become short of the minimum requirement of each organ. Therefore, it may be hypothesized that a smaller number of units of organs at the end of histogenesis is one of the predisposing factors for postnatal diseases (i.e. a form of unnoticed but late-manifested congenital anomalies), in this era of extended longevity. However, the mechanisms that control the total number of units in each organ during histogenesis and the possible relationship among the numbers of units in different organs remain unknown. Here, we review our trials based on the above hypothesis in order to (1) mathematically analyze the morphometric data of the different organs in fetuses to elucidate relationship among developing organs, (2) analyze the developing neuro-immuno-endocrine network as a series of mechanisms to systemically correlate the histogenesis of multiple organs, and (3) examine the maternal environment, including dietary fat, as a factor to

  7. [Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. A vision for the paediatrician].

    PubMed

    Palacios Loro, M L; Segura Ramírez, D K; Ordoñez Álvarez, F A; Santos Rodríguez, F

    2015-12-01

    The congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are disorders with a high prevalence in the general population, with urinary tract dilations being the most frequent. CAKUT also account for the most important cause of chronic kidney disease in childhood. This paper focuses on the role of the primary care paediatrician in the diagnosis, assessment, and follow-up of children with CAKUT, with special emphasis on the associated urinary tract infections, the progression toward chronic renal failure, and the genetic basis.

  8. Familial glaucoma iridogoniodysplasia maps to a 6p25 region implicated in primary congenital glaucoma and iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, T; Ebenezer, N; Manners, R; McGill, J; Bhattacharya, S

    1997-01-01

    Familial glaucoma iridogoniodysplasia (FGI) is a form of open-angle glaucoma in which developmental anomalies of the iris and irido-corneal angle are associated with a juvenile-onset glaucoma transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. A single large family with this disorder was examined for genetic linkage to microsatellite markers. A peak LOD score of 11.63 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained with marker D6S967 mapping to chromosome 6p25. Haplotype analysis places the disease gene in a 6.4-cM interval between the markers D6S1713 and D6S1600. Two novel clinical appearances extend the phenotypic range and provide evidence of variable expressivity. The chromosome 6p25 region is now implicated in FGI, primary congenital glaucoma, and iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly. This may indicate the presence of a common causative gene or, alternatively, a cluster of genes involved in eye development/function. Images Figure 2 PMID:9382099

  9. Agenesis of the lung--a rare congenital anomaly of the lung.

    PubMed

    De, Arun

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a very rare condition and many of them are associated with a variety of cardiac and non-cardiac malformations. We report an eight-month old girl with chronic lung infection due to right sided pulmonary agenesis without any associated major cardiac or non-cardiac abnormalities. The case brings in forth the importance of investigating any infant presenting with features of chronic lung infection for any congenital abnormality of the lung including aplasia of the lung. This case also emphasizes that mildness of the attack does not exclude right sided aplasia of the lung.

  10. Prenatal diagnosis and assessment of congenital spinal anomalies: Review for prenatal counseling

    PubMed Central

    Upasani, Vidyadhar V; Ketwaroo, Pamela Deaver; Estroff, Judy A; Warf, Benjamin C; Emans, John B; Glotzbecker, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen continuous advances in prenatal ultrasonography and in utero magnetic resonance imaging. These technologies have increasingly enabled the identification of various spinal pathologies during early stages of gestation. The purpose of this paper is to review the range of fetal spine anomalies and their management, with the goal of improving the clinician’s ability to counsel expectant parents prenatally. PMID:27458551

  11. Congenital cardiac anomalies in relation to water contamination, Santa Clara County, California, 1981-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, S.H.; Shaw, G.; Harris, J.A.; Neutra, R.R.

    1989-05-01

    In November 1981, a leak of solvents from an underground storage tank was detected at an electronics manufacturing plant in Santa Clara County, California. Solvents (predominantly 1,1,1-trichloroethene, or methyl chloroform) were found in a nearby well which supplied drinking water to the surrounding community. Residents were concerned about a possible relation between adverse reproductive outcomes and consumption of contaminated water. To address this concern, the California Department of Health Services conducted two epidemiologic studies: one of these, reported here, is a county-wide study of cardiac anomalies. This study, which looked at major cardiac anomalies among births throughout Santa Clara County in 1981-1983, found an increased prevalence in the service area of the water company which operated the contaminated well. During the potentially exposed time period (January 1981 through August 1982), 12 babies with major cardiac anomalies were born to residents of this area. This represents an excess of six cases over the number expected based on the prevalence in the remainder of the county (relative risk = 2.2, 95 per cent confidence interval 1.2-4.0). No excess was observed in the unexposed time period (September 1982 through December 1983). However, the temporal distribution of major cardiac cases born during the exposed time period suggests that the solvent leak is an unlikely explanation for this excess.

  12. Congenital coronary artery anomalies silent until geriatric age: non-invasive assessment, angiography tips, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rigatelli, Gianluca; Dell'Avvocata, Fabio; Van Tan, Nguyen; Daggubati, Rames; Nanijundappa, Aravinda

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery anomalies (CAAs) may be discovered more often as incidental findings during the normal diagnostic process for other cardiac diseases or less frequently on the basis of manifestations of myocardial ischemia. The cardiovascular professional may be involved in their angiographic diagnosis, functional assessment and eventual endovascular treatment. A complete angiographic definition is mandatory in order to understand the functional effects and plan any intervention in CAAs: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful non-invasive tools to detect three-dimensional morphology of the anomalies and its relationships with contiguous cardiac structures, whereas coronary arteriography remains the gold standard for a definitive anatomic picture. A practical idea of the possible functional significance is mandatory for deciding how to manage CAAs: non-invasive stress tests and in particular the invasive pharmacological stress tests with or without intravascular ultrasound monitoring can assess correctly the functional significance of the most CAAs. Finally, the knowledge of the particular endovascular techniques and material is of paramount importance for achieving technical and clinical success. CAAs represent a complex issue, which rarely involve the cardiovascular professional at different levels. A timely practical knowledge of the main issues regarding CAAs is important in the management of such entities. PMID:25678906

  13. Ebstein anomaly: a review.

    PubMed

    Galea, Joseph; Ellul, Sarah; Schembri, Aaron; Schembri-Wismayer, Pierre; Calleja-Agius, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac congenital abnormalities are a leading cause in neonatal mortality occurring in up to 1 in 200 of live births. Ebstein anomaly, also known as Kassamali anomaly, accounts for 1 percent of all congenital cardiac anomalies. This congenital abnormality involves malformation of the tricuspid valve and of the right ventricle. In this review, the causes of the anomaly are outlined and the pathophysiology is discussed, with a focus on the symptoms, management, and treatments available to date.

  14. AB024. Chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) for the diagnosis of children with developmental delay and multiple congenital anomalies in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Law, Hai-Yang; Brett, Maggie; Tan, Ene-Choo; Yong, Min-Hwee; Lai, Angeline

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) is a sensitive method to identify submicroscopic changes too small to be detected by conventional karyotyping. Due to its high-sensitivity in identifying regions with structural variation and hence the genes involved, it is recommended to be the first-tier genetic test for children with intellectual disabilities, development delay or multiple congenital anomalies, and is routinely available in USA and many countries in Europe. Our lab has started offering this as a clinical test based on the research experience on screening >400 children with developmental delay and multiple congenital anomalies since February 2014. To date, 271 patients have been screened using the Agilent 4×180K CGH + SNP array. Copy number variants (CNVs) ranging in size from 10 kb to 154 Mb were found in 109 patients (40%). Pathogenic and likely pathogenic CNVs were found in 55 (20%). These included 45 with deletions, 8 with duplications and 2 patients with both deletion and duplication. Recurrent microdeletion and microduplication syndromes including the Angelman/Prader-Willi syndrome [5], 1p36 microdeletion [3], Williams syndrome [2], 22q11.2 distal deletion syndrome [2], 16p13.3 microdeletion syndrome [2], Cat Eye syndrome, Cri du Chat syndrome, Miller Decker syndrome, 3q29 microdeletion, 15q24 microdeletion, and 1q43q44 syndrome were among the variants detected in our patients. CNVs of uncertain clinical significance were detected in 54 (20%) individuals: 32 were duplications, 18 were deletions and one with both deletion and duplication. However, due to the high cost of the test, parental testing was not performed and hence, significance of these variants could not be established conclusively. In conclusion, CMA is a powerful tool in identifying pathogenic chromosomal copy number alternations. However, due to the high cost of the test, parental testing for the cases where variants of uncertain significant are found is often not possible. CMA is useful

  15. Rare chromosome abnormalities, prevalence and prenatal diagnosis rates from population-based congenital anomaly registers in Europe.

    PubMed

    Wellesley, Diana; Dolk, Helen; Boyd, Patricia A; Greenlees, Ruth; Haeusler, Martin; Nelen, Vera; Garne, Ester; Khoshnood, Babak; Doray, Berenice; Rissmann, Anke; Mullaney, Carmel; Calzolari, Elisa; Bakker, Marian; Salvador, Joaquin; Addor, Marie-Claude; Draper, Elizabeth; Rankin, Judith; Tucker, David

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the prevalence and types of rare chromosome abnormalities (RCAs) in Europe for 2000-2006 inclusive, and to describe prenatal diagnosis rates and pregnancy outcome. Data held by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies database were analysed on all the cases from 16 population-based registries in 11 European countries diagnosed prenatally or before 1 year of age, and delivered between 2000 and 2006. Cases were all unbalanced chromosome abnormalities and included live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. There were 10,323 cases with a chromosome abnormality, giving a total birth prevalence rate of 43.8/10,000 births. Of these, 7335 cases had trisomy 21,18 or 13, giving individual prevalence rates of 23.0, 5.9 and 2.3/10,000 births, respectively (53, 13 and 5% of all reported chromosome errors, respectively). In all, 473 cases (5%) had a sex chromosome trisomy, and 778 (8%) had 45,X, giving prevalence rates of 2.0 and 3.3/10,000 births, respectively. There were 1,737 RCA cases (17%), giving a prevalence of 7.4/10,000 births. These included triploidy, other trisomies, marker chromosomes, unbalanced translocations, deletions and duplications. There was a wide variation between the registers in both the overall prenatal diagnosis rate of RCA, an average of 65% (range 5-92%) and the prevalence of RCA (range 2.4-12.9/10,000 births). In all, 49% were liveborn. The data provide the prevalence of families currently requiring specialised genetic counselling services in the perinatal period for these conditions and, for some, long-term care.

  16. Whole-Exome Sequencing in the molecular diagnosis of individuals with congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract and identification of a new causative gene

    PubMed Central

    Bekheirnia, Mir Reza; Bekheirnia, Nasim; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Gu, Shen; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Gambin, Tomek; Janzen, Nicolette K.; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Michael, Mini; Brewer, Eileen D.; Elenberg, Ewa; Kale, Arundhati S.; Riley, Alyssa A.; Swartz, Sarah J.; Scott, Daryl A.; Yang, Yaping; Srivaths, Poyyapakkam R.; Wenderfer, Scott E.; Bodurtha, Joann; Applegate, Carolyn D.; Velinov, Milen; Myers, Angela; Borovik, Lior; Craigen, William J.; Hanchard, Neil A.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Lewis, Richard Alan; Gonzales, Edmond T.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Belmont, John W.; Roth, David R.; Eng, Christine; Braun, Michael C.; Lupski, James R.; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the utility of whole-exome sequencing (WES) to define a molecular diagnosis in patients clinically diagnosed with congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). Methods WES was performed in 62 families with CAKUT. WES data were analyzed for Single Nucleotide Variants (SNVs) in 35 known CAKUT genes, putatively deleterious sequence changes in new candidate genes, and potentially disease-associated copy-number variants (CNVs). Results In approximately 5% of families, pathogenic SNVs were identified in PAX2, HNF1B, and EYA1. Observed phenotypes in these families expand the current understanding about the role of these genes in CAKUT. Four pathogenic CNVs were also identified using two CNV detection tools. In addition, we found one deleterious de novo SNV in FOXP1 among the 62 families with CAKUT. Database of clinical BMGL laboratory was queried and seven additional unrelated individuals with novel de novo SNVs in FOXP1 were identified. Six of these 8 individuals with FOXP1 SNVs, have syndromic urinary tract defects, implicating this gene in urinary tract development. Conclusion We conclude that WES can be used to identify the molecular etiology (SNVs, CNVs) in a subset of individuals with CAKUT. WES can also help identify novel CAKUT genes. PMID:27657687

  17. Parental psychological distress and confidence after an infant's birth: the role of attachment representations in parents of infants with congenital anomalies and parents of healthy infants.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana; Nazaré, Bárbara; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2013-06-01

    The present study aimed to examine parental psychological distress and confidence after an infant's birth, when parenting an infant with a diagnosis of a congenital anomaly, and to understand the role of attachment representations on parental adjustment. Parents of infants with a congenital anomaly (44 couples) and parents of healthy infants (46 couples) completed measures of adult attachment representations and of psychological distress and parental confidence (one month after the infant's birth). Results showed no group differences in psychological distress. Mothers in the clinical group presented lower confidence than mothers in the comparison group, while for fathers the inverse pattern was found, showing their involvement in the caretaking of the infant. Insecure attachment representations predicted parental psychological distress, and a moderator role of group was found only for fathers. These results highlight the role of secure attachment representations as an individual resource in stress-inducing situations.

  18. Mardini-Nyhan association (lung agenesis, congenital heart, and thumb anomalies): three new cases and possible recurrence in a sib-is there a distinct recessive syndrome?

    PubMed

    Hastings, Rob; Harding, David; Donaldson, Alan; Liebling, Rachel; Hayes, Alison; Kraus, Alison; Joss, Shelagh; Narayanaswamy, Shuba; Turnpenny, Peter; Smithson, Sarah

    2009-12-01

    In 1985, Mardini and Nyhan described three patients from consanguineous families with unilateral complete/partial lung agenesis, congenital cardiac defects, and ipsilateral thumb anomalies. Although there have been many reports of lung agenesis with other malformations, especially hemifacial microsomia and radial ray anomalies, very few demonstrate this triad of defects. We describe three patients with the Mardini-Nyhan association which may represent a distinct entity, although this remains uncertain at present. A fourth patient is also described, the sister of one of the other patients, with complex congenital cardiac disease and bilateral lung lobation abnormalities. This is the first reported incidence of a possible recurrence within a family and suggests, together with the consanguinity observed by Mardini and Nyhan, that recessive inheritance should be considered in genetic counseling for this disorder.

  19. A modified panel of sentinel congenital anomalies for potential use in mutation epidemiology based on birth defects registry data.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Peter H; Moffitt, Karen B; Scheuerle, Angela E

    2014-09-01

    Since 1983, several authors have used panels of "sentinel" congenital anomalies that might serve as indicators of the human genome mutation rate. The current study suggests a considerably updated panel, and applies it to public health birth defects registry data to determine the potential number of de novo cases. Data were taken from deliveries in 1999-2009 from the Texas Birth Defects Registry, an active surveillance program. Cases with one of the conditions or syndromes in the panel were identified using codes and text searches. Frequencies and birth prevalence were calculated for the overall panel and subcategories within it. Of the 60 conditions appearing in previous papers on sentinel phenotypes, 21 (35%) were used in the current study along with 27 new phenotypes. We found 1,694 cases. Of those, 1,100 exhibited phenotypes thought to arise de novo in at least 90% of the cases ("all/almost all" subpanel), and 594 considered de novo in roughly 50-90% of cases ("most" subpanel). Chromosomal deletion disorders were present in 523 cases and imprinting disorders in 243. After adjusting for maternal age, occurrence of cases in the total panel, "most" subpanel, and imprinting disorders subpanel were significantly associated with paternal age. Our panel of sentinel phenotypes differs from previous panels due to evolved knowledge of genetic disorders, different approaches with respect to interviewing, and different operational definitions. It is hoped that using an overall panel as well as subpanels may maximize statistical power as well as suggest potential mechanisms.

  20. Consensus Statement: Chromosomal Microarray Is a First-Tier Clinical Diagnostic Test for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities or Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Miller, David T.; Adam, Margaret P.; Aradhya, Swaroop; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Brothman, Arthur R.; Carter, Nigel P.; Church, Deanna M.; Crolla, John A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Epstein, Charles J.; Faucett, W. Andrew; Feuk, Lars; Friedman, Jan M.; Hamosh, Ada; Jackson, Laird; Kaminsky, Erin B.; Kok, Klaas; Krantz, Ian D.; Kuhn, Robert M.; Lee, Charles; Ostell, James M.; Rosenberg, Carla; Scherer, Stephen W.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J.; Tepperberg, James H.; Thorland, Erik C.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Waggoner, Darrel J.; Watson, Michael S.; Martin, Christa Lese; Ledbetter, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray (CMA) is increasingly utilized for genetic testing of individuals with unexplained developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), or multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Performing CMA and G-banded karyotyping on every patient substantially increases the total cost of genetic testing. The International Standard Cytogenomic Array (ISCA) Consortium held two international workshops and conducted a literature review of 33 studies, including 21,698 patients tested by CMA. We provide an evidence-based summary of clinical cytogenetic testing comparing CMA to G-banded karyotyping with respect to technical advantages and limitations, diagnostic yield for various types of chromosomal aberrations, and issues that affect test interpretation. CMA offers a much higher diagnostic yield (15%–20%) for genetic testing of individuals with unexplained DD/ID, ASD, or MCA than a G-banded karyotype (∼3%, excluding Down syndrome and other recognizable chromosomal syndromes), primarily because of its higher sensitivity for submicroscopic deletions and duplications. Truly balanced rearrangements and low-level mosaicism are generally not detectable by arrays, but these are relatively infrequent causes of abnormal phenotypes in this population (<1%). Available evidence strongly supports the use of CMA in place of G-banded karyotyping as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for patients with DD/ID, ASD, or MCA. G-banded karyotype analysis should be reserved for patients with obvious chromosomal syndromes (e.g., Down syndrome), a family history of chromosomal rearrangement, or a history of multiple miscarriages. PMID:20466091

  1. Mild recessive mutations in six Fraser syndrome-related genes cause isolated congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Stefan; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Hilger, Alina C; Saisawat, Pawaree; Vivante, Asaf; Stajic, Natasa; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Reutter, Heiko M; Kehinde, Elijah O; Tasic, Velibor; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for approximately 40% of children with ESRD in the United States. Hitherto, mutations in 23 genes have been described as causing autosomal dominant isolated CAKUT in humans. However, >90% of cases of isolated CAKUT still remain without a molecular diagnosis. Here, we hypothesized that genes mutated in recessive mouse models with the specific CAKUT phenotype of unilateral renal agenesis may also be mutated in humans with isolated CAKUT. We applied next-generation sequencing technology for targeted exon sequencing of 12 recessive murine candidate genes in 574 individuals with isolated CAKUT from 590 families. In 15 of 590 families, we identified recessive mutations in the genes FRAS1, FREM2, GRIP1, FREM1, ITGA8, and GREM1, all of which function in the interaction of the ureteric bud and the metanephric mesenchyme. We show that isolated CAKUT may be caused partially by mutations in recessive genes. Our results also indicate that biallelic missense mutations in the Fraser/MOTA/BNAR spectrum genes cause isolated CAKUT, whereas truncating mutations are found in the multiorgan form of Fraser syndrome. The newly identified recessive biallelic mutations in these six genes represent the molecular cause of isolated CAKUT in 2.5% of the 590 affected families in this study.

  2. Equine Multiple Congenital Ocular Anomalies and Silver Coat Colour Result from the Pleiotropic Effects of Mutant PMEL

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Lisa S.; Wilbe, Maria; Viluma, Agnese; Cothran, Gus; Ekesten, Björn; Ewart, Susan; Lindgren, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Equine Multiple Congenital Ocular Anomalies (MCOA) syndrome is a heritable eye disorder mainly affecting silver colored horses. Clinically, the disease manifests in two distinct classes depending on the horse genotype. Horses homozygous for the mutant allele present with a wide range of ocular defects, such as iris stromal hypoplasia, abnormal pectinate ligaments, megaloglobus, iridociliary cysts and cataracts. The phenotype of heterozygous horses is less severe and predominantly includes iridociliary cysts, which occasionally extend into the temporal retina. In order to determine the genetic cause of MCOA syndrome we sequenced the entire previously characterized 208 kilobase region on chromosome 6 in ten individuals; five MCOA affected horses from three different breeds, one horse with the intermediate Cyst phenotype and four unaffected controls from two different breeds. This was performed using Illumina TruSeq technology with paired-end reads. Through the systematic exclusion of all polymorphisms barring two SNPs in PMEL, a missense mutation previously reported to be associated with the silver coat colour and a non-conserved intronic SNP, we establish that this gene is responsible for MCOA syndrome. Our finding, together with recent advances that show aberrant protein function due to the coding mutation, suggests that the missense mutation is causative and has pleiotrophic effect, causing both the horse silver coat color and MCOA syndrome. PMID:24086599

  3. Maternal use of drug substrates of placental transporters and the effect of transporter-mediated drug interactions on the risk of congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Oktora, Monika P.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S.; Groen, Henk; Bos, Jens H.; Hak, Eelko; Wilffert, Bob

    2017-01-01

    Background A number of transporter proteins are expressed in the placenta, and they facilitate the placental transfer of drugs. The inhibition of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was previously found to be associated with an increase in the risk of congenital anomalies caused by drug substrates of this transporter. We now explore the role of other placental transporter proteins. Methods A population-based case-referent study was performed using cases with congenital anomalies (N = 5,131) from EUROCAT Northern Netherlands, a registry of congenital anomalies. The referent population (N = 31,055) was selected from the pregnancy IADB.nl, a pharmacy prescription database. Results Ten placental transporters known to have comparable expression levels in the placenta to that of P-gp, were selected in this study. In total, 147 drugs were identified to be substrates, inhibitors or inducers, of these transporters. Fifty-eight of these drugs were used by at least one mother in our cases or referent population, and 28 were used in both. The highest user rate was observed for the substrates of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1, mainly folic acid (6% of cases, 8% of referents), and breast cancer resistance protein, mainly nitrofurantoin (2.3% of cases, 2.9% of referents). In contrast to P-gp, drug interactions involving substrates of these transporters did not have a significant effect on the risk of congenital anomalies. Conclusions Some of the drugs which are substrates or inhibitors of placental transporters were commonly used during pregnancy. No significant effect of transporter inhibition was found on fetal drug exposure, possibly due to a limited number of exposures. PMID:28288183

  4. Proximal ureteral atresia, a rare congenital anomaly-incidental finding: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bleve, Cosimo; Conighi, Maria Luisa; Fasoli, Lorella; Bucci, Valeria; Battaglino, Francesco; Chiarenza, Salvatore Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Ureteral atresia is a rare disease usually associated with a non-functioning dysplastic kidney. The condition may be unilateral or bilateral; focal, short or long and may involve any part of the ureter. Association with other urinary anomalies is rare. We report the case of a 10-month-old boy with prenatal diagnosis of multicystic right kidney. This suspicion was confirmed after birth by ultrasound and static scintigraphy; a right vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was recorded at cystography. The boy presented a regular renal function but was hospitalized twice for suspected pyelonephritis between the 8th and the 10th month of life and were recorded occasional mild changes in blood pressure. Antibiotic prophylaxis was administered until surgery. When he was 10-month underwent retroperitoneoscopy to perform a nephroureterectomy finding a complete atresia of the upper third of the ureter with the blind end at the level of the uretero-pelvic-junction. The programmed surgery was performed. By a revision of literature, only few cases of imperforate distal ureter have been described. This condition is associated with a kidney dysplasia. The atresia of the ureter with no signs of infection in the dysplastic kidney may be unknown up to adulthood or throughout one's life. Prognosis usually depends on the severity of the obstruction.

  5. Reconstruction of the lids of a child with microblepharon and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Merriam, J C; Stalnecker, M C; Merriam, G R

    1988-01-01

    The initial stages in the rehabilitation of a male child with severe microblepharon, corneal opacities, bilateral facial clefts, bilateral complete cleft lip and palate, and unilateral syndactyly are described. Review of the literature suggests that severe microblepharon is associated with other craniofacial anomalies, and often the child is stillborn or retarded. Surviving children have been abandoned because of their appearance. The child described in this case appears to be unique because his intelligence is normal, and, to our knowledge, this is the first reported case of penetrating keratoplasty after reconstruction of functional eyelids. The principal problems after corneal grafting appear to have been chronic partial exposure due to inadequate lid length and a poor Bell's reflex and the persistence of a rim of vascularized fibrous tissue around the corneal graft. Future reconstructive surgery is outlined. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 PMID:2979029

  6. Using a combination of MLPA kits to detect chromosomal imbalances in patients with multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation is a valuable choice for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Jehee, Fernanda Sarquis; Takamori, Jean Tetsuo; Medeiros, Paula F Vasconcelos; Pordeus, Ana Carolina B; Latini, Flavia Roche M; Bertola, Débora Romeo; Kim, Chong Ae; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2011-01-01

    Conventional karyotyping detects anomalies in 3-15% of patients with multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation (MCA/MR). Whole-genome array screening (WGAS) has been consistently suggested as the first choice diagnostic test for this group of patients, but it is very costly for large-scale use in developing countries. We evaluated the use of a combination of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) kits to increase the detection rate of chromosomal abnormalities in MCA/MR patients. We screened 261 MCA/MR patients with two subtelomeric and one microdeletion kits. This would theoretically detect up to 70% of all submicroscopic abnormalities. Additionally we scored the de Vries score for 209 patients in an effort to find a suitable cut-off for MLPA screening. Our results reveal that chromosomal abnormalities were present in 87 (33.3%) patients, but only 57 (21.8%) were considered causative. Karyotyping detected 15 abnormalities (6.9%), while MLPA identified 54 (20.7%). Our combined MLPA screening raised the total detection number of pathogenic imbalances more than three times when compared to conventional karyotyping. We also show that using the de Vries score as a cut-off for this screening would only be suitable under financial restrictions. A decision analytic model was constructed with three possible strategies: karyotype, karyotype + MLPA and karyotype + WGAS. Karyotype + MLPA strategy detected anomalies in 19.8% of cases which account for 76.45% of the expected yield for karyotype + WGAS. Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) of MLPA is three times lower than that of WGAS, which means that, for the same costs, we have three additional diagnoses with MLPA but only one with WGAS. We list all causative alterations found, including rare findings, such as reciprocal duplications of regions deleted in Sotos and Williams-Beuren syndromes. We also describe imbalances that were considered polymorphisms or rare variants, such as the new SNP

  7. Gene of a new X-linked syndrome with multiple congenital anomalies and severe mental retardation maps in Xp22-pter

    SciTech Connect

    Wittwer, B.; Kircheisen, R.; Leutelt, J.

    1994-09-01

    We report on a family with 3 males presenting with a not yet described new X-chromosomal syndrome of multiple congenital anomalies and severe mental retardation. Two sisters have (with 3 different partners) 3 severely handicapped sons. In each case, oligohydramnios and intrauterine growth retardation were observed. Delivery was in the 34th, 31st, and 38th gestational week, respectively. Two of the patients had microcephaly (head circumference of the third case at birth is unknown). On physical examination, high and broad forehead, frontal bossing, downslanting palpebral fissures, long philtrum, thin upper lip, high arched palate, and deeply set anteverted ears were seen. One of the boys has microphthalmos and sclerocornea, while his cousin shows atrophy of the optic nerve. All three patients show a severe statomotor and mental retardation, they are most likely deaf and blind, have pathologic EEG, and seizures. Important additional findings are hydronephrosis, renal duplication, vesicorenal reflux, and agenesis of corpus callosum. The karyotype is normal (46,XY). We performed a segregation analysis in the family using more than 20 DNA polymorphisms distributed over the X chromosome. Linkage without recombination was found to KAL, DXS278, and DXS16 in Xp22. Analysis of multiple informative meioses suggested a location of the disease locus distal to DXS207. Recombinants were identified with all other marker loci from Xp22-Xpter.

  8. Study of stillbirth and major congenital anomaly among newborns in the high-level natural radiation areas of Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Jaikrishan, G; Sudheer, K R; Andrews, V J; Koya, P K M; Madhusoodhanan, M; Jagadeesan, C K; Seshadri, M

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring newborns for adverse outcomes like stillbirth and major congenital anomalies (MCA) is being carried out in government hospitals since 1995 in and around high-level natural radiation areas, a narrow strip of land on the southwest coast of Kerala, India. Natural deposits of monazite sand containing thorium and its daughter products account for elevated levels of natural radiation. Among 141,540 newborns [140,558 deliveries: 139,589 singleton, 957 twins (6.81 ‰), 11 triplets (0.078 ‰), and one quadruplet] screened, 615 (4.35 ‰) were stillbirth and MCA were seen in 1,370 (9.68 ‰) newborns. Clubfoot (404, 2.85 ‰) was the most frequent MCA followed by hypospadias (152, 2.10 ‰ among male newborns), congenital heart disease (168, 1.19 ‰), cleft lip/palate (149, 1.05 ‰), Down syndrome (104, 0.73 ‰), and neural tube defects (72, 0.51 ‰). Newborns with MCA among stillbirths were about 20-fold higher at 190.24 ‰ (117/615) compared to 8.89 ‰ (1,253/140,925) among live births (P < .001). Logistic regression was carried out to compare stillbirth, overall, and specific MCA among newborns from areas with dose levels of ≤1.5, 1.51-3.0, 3.01-6.0 and >6 mGy/year after controlling for maternal age at birth, gravida, consanguinity, ethnicity, and gender of the baby. Clubfoot showed higher prevalence of 3.26 ‰ at dose level of 1.51-3.0 mGy/year compared to 2.33 ‰ at ≤1.5 mGy/year (OR = 1.39; 95 % CI, 1.12-1.72), without indication of any clear dose-response. Prevalences of stillbirth, overall MCA, and other specific MCA were similar across different dose levels and were relatively lower than that reported elsewhere in India, probably due to better literacy, health awareness, and practices in the study population.

  9. Complex chromosome 17p rearrangements associated with low-copy repeats in two patients with congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, L. E. L. M.; Stankiewicz, P.; Yatsenko, S. A.; Crawford, E.; Creswick, H.; Proud, V. K.; de Vries, B. B. A.; Pfundt, R.; Marcelis, C. L. M.; Zackowski, J.; Bi, W.; van Kessel, A. Geurts; Lupski, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent molecular cytogenetic data have shown that the constitution of complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs) may be more complicated than previously thought. The complicated nature of these rearrangements challenges the accurate delineation of the chromosomal breakpoints and mechanisms involved. Here, we report a molecular cytogenetic analysis of two patients with congenital anomalies and unbalanced de novo CCRs involving chromosome 17p using high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). In the first patient, a 4-month-old boy with developmental delay, hypotonia, growth retardation, coronal synostosis, mild hypertelorism, and bilateral club feet, we found a duplication of the Charcot-Marie–Tooth disease type 1A and Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) chromosome regions, inverted insertion of the Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome region into the SMS region, and two microdeletions including a terminal deletion of 17p. The latter, together with a duplication of 21q22.3-qter detected by array CGH, are likely the unbalanced product of a translocation t(17;21)(p13.3;q22.3). In the second patient, an 8-year-old girl with mental retardation, short stature, microcephaly and mild dysmorphic features, we identified four submicroscopic interspersed 17p duplications. All 17 breakpoints were examined in detail by FISH analysis. We found that four of the breakpoints mapped within known low-copy repeats (LCRs), including LCR17pA, middle SMS-REP/LCR17pB block, and LCR17pC. Our findings suggest that the LCR burden in proximal 17p may have stimulated the formation of these CCRs and, thus, that genome architectural features such as LCRs may have been instrumental in the generation of these CCRs. PMID:17457615

  10. Interkinetic nuclear migration in the mouse embryonic ureteric epithelium: Possible implication for congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Motoya, Tomoyuki; Ogawa, Noriko; Nitta, Tetsuya; Rafiq, Ashiq Mahmood; Jahan, Esrat; Furuya, Motohide; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Udagawa, Jun; Otani, Hiroki

    2016-05-01

    Interkinetic nuclear migration (INM) is a phenomenon in which progenitor cell nuclei migrate along the apico-basal axis of the pseudostratified epithelium, which is characterized by the presence of apical primary cilia, in synchrony with the cell cycle in a manner of apical mitosis. INM is suggested to regulate not only stem/progenitor cell proliferation/differentiation but also organ size and shape. INM has been reported in epithelia of both ectoderm and endoderm origin. We examined whether INM exists in the mesoderm-derived ureteric epithelium. At embryonic day (E) 11.5, E12.5 and E13.5, C57BL/6J mouse dams were injected with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and embryos were killed 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 h later. We immunostained transverse sections of the ureter for BrdU, and measured the position of BrdU (+) nuclei in the ureteric epithelia along the apico-basal axis at each time point. We analyzed the distribution patterns of BrdU (+) nuclei in histograms using the multidimensional scaling. Changes in the nucleus distribution patterns suggested nucleus movement characteristic of INM in the ureteric epithelia, and the mode of INM varied throughout the ureter development. While apical primary cilia are related with INM by providing a centrosome for the apical mitosis, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) include syndromes linked to primary ciliary dysfunction affecting epithelial tubular organs such as kidney, ureter, and brain. The present study showed that INM exists in the ureteric epithelium and suggests that INM may be related with the CAKUT etiology via primary ciliary protein function.

  11. Branchio-oto-renal syndrome plus; a contiguous gene constellation of congenital anomalies?

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    A term female infant was referred to the University Hospital because of respiratory distress secondary to bilateral choanal stenosis. Her examination revealed bilateral pre-auricular pits, branchial fistulae, cupped shaped ears, and bilateral athelia. She failed ABR screening; her creatinine was elevated to 1.5 mgs% and renal ultra-sonography showed reduced kidney size bilaterally. She was the product of her mother`s third pregnancy. The first produced a now normal 5 year old son. The second pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios and resulted in a premature delivery at 27 weeks gestation. The infant expired secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia. The mother had bilateral neurosensory deafness, pre-auricular pits, cupped shaped ears, lacrimal stenois and bilateral athelia. She wore dentures having earlier been diagnosed with dentogeneis imperfecta. She was shorter than her three normal sisters and had experienced academic problems throughout her school years. The maternal grandfather had an adult onset neurosensory hearing loss, but he and the maternal grandmother exhibited no other features of the BOR syndrome. Althelia was present only in the mother and daughter. The mother clearly has BOR syndrome transmitted to one, and possibly two, of her three offspring. The additional features of athelia, choanal stenosis and dentogenesis imperfecta are thought to represent additional autosomal dominant traits. Greenberg described an infant with athelia and choanal atresia. By family linkage studies, the BOR syndrome has been mapped to 8q13-21 with no recombination observed with loci D8S530 and D8S279. Given a normal prophase karyotype in the proband, it is speculated that a sub-microscopic deletion at 8q13-21 is the likely basis for the constellation of birth defects seen in this mother and daughter. Analysis of D8S530 and D8S279 is currently underway in this family.

  12. A 1.1Mb deletion in distal 13q deletion syndrome region with congenital heart defect and postaxial polydactyly: additional support for a CHD locus at distal 13q34 region.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Feng; Ai, Qi; Huang, Can; Chen, Jin-Lan; Wang, Jian; Xie, Li; Zhang, Wei-Zhi; Yang, Jin-Fu; Tan, Zhi-Ping

    2013-10-01

    13q deletion syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, especially for group 3 deletion (13q33-q34 deletion). Previously we described a patient with congenital heart defect and mental retardation and proposed that a distal 6Mb region might contain the causative gene of congenital heart defect. Here we present a new patient with congenital heart defects (CHD), hand and foot anomalies and mild mental retardation. We identified a 1.1Mb deletion at chromosome 13q34 with high resolution SNP-array BeadChips (HumanOmni1-Quad, Illumina, USA). This chromosome region contains ten annotated genes, including GRK1, TFDP1, RASA3 and GAS6. To our knowledge, this represents the smallest 13q34 deletion identified to date. Our study provides additional support that distal 13q34 deletion region might contain key gene(s) responsible for cardiac development.

  13. Congenital coronary artery anomalies: a bridge from embryology to anatomy and pathophysiology--a position statement of the development, anatomy, and pathology ESC Working Group.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pomares, José María; de la Pompa, José Luis; Franco, Diego; Henderson, Deborah; Ho, Siew Yen; Houyel, Lucile; Kelly, Robert G; Sedmera, David; Sheppard, Mary; Sperling, Silke; Thiene, Gaetano; van den Hoff, Maurice; Basso, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Congenital coronary artery anomalies are of major significance in clinical cardiology and cardiac surgery due to their association with myocardial ischaemia and sudden death. Such anomalies are detectable by imaging modalities and, according to various definitions, their prevalence ranges from 0.21 to 5.79%. This consensus document from the Development, Anatomy and Pathology Working Group of the European Society of Cardiology aims to provide: (i) a definition of normality that refers to essential anatomical and embryological features of coronary vessels, based on the integrated analysis of studies of normal and abnormal coronary embryogenesis and pathophysiology; (ii) an animal model-based systematic survey of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate coronary blood vessel development; (iii) an organization of the wide spectrum of coronary artery anomalies, according to a comprehensive anatomical and embryological classification scheme; (iv) current knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying symptoms and signs of coronary artery anomalies, with diagnostic and therapeutic implications. This document identifies the mosaic-like embryonic development of the coronary vascular system, as coronary cell types differentiate from multiple cell sources through an intricate network of molecular signals and haemodynamic cues, as the necessary framework for understanding the complex spectrum of coronary artery anomalies observed in human patients.

  14. Evidence for a recurrent microdeletion at chromosome 16p11.2 associated with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Matthew G; Coughlin, Curtis R; Kaplan, Paige; Conlin, Laura K; Meyers, Kevin E C; Zackai, Elaine H; Spinner, Nancy B; Copelovitch, Lawrence

    2010-10-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract can be associated with Hirschsprung disease. We report on three children with a similar 16p11.2 microdeletion with a spectrum of clinical anomalies consisting of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract in two patients (Patients 1 and 2) and Hirschsprung disease in two patients (Patients 1 and 3), leading us to hypothesize that a gene in this region is associated with these phenotypes. Patient 1 presented with left renal agenesis, grade-IV vesicoureteral reflux, and Hirschsprung disease, Patient 2 with left renal agenesis, chronic kidney disease, chronic constipation, seizures, and developmental delay, and Patient 3 with Hirschsprung disease and normal kidneys. Genome-wide microarray analysis demonstrated overlapping microdeletions within 16p11.2. The shortest region of overlap in the three patients contained only eight genes, including the SH2 domain-containing binding protein 1 (SH2B1), an adaptor protein which has been implicated in enhancement of the tyrosine kinase activity of RET, whose role in developmental disease of the kidney and enteric enervation is well established. Our findings suggest that 16p11.2 deletions are associated with abnormalities of renal and enteric development and we hypothesize that deletion of SH2B1 may account for the observed phenotype.

  15. Identification of a Novel Mutation in BRD4 that Causes Autosomal Dominant Syndromic Congenital Cataracts Associated with Other Neuro-Skeletal Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Jeonhyun; Kwak, Woori; Jeong, Hyeonsoo; Lim, Gyu-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Congenital cataracts can occur as a non-syndromic isolated ocular disease or as a part of genetic syndromes accompanied by a multi-systemic disease. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases have a heterogeneous genetic basis. Here, we describe three generations of a family with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern and common complex phenotypes, including bilateral congenital cataracts, short stature, macrocephaly, and minor skeletal anomalies. We did not find any chromosomal aberrations or gene copy number abnormalities using conventional genetic tests; accordingly, we conducted whole-exome sequencing (WES) to identify disease-causing genetic alterations in this family. Based on family WES data, we identified a novel BRD4 missense mutation as a candidate causal variant and performed cell-based experiments by ablation of endogenous BRD4 expression in human lens epithelial cells. The protein expression levels of connexin 43, p62, LC3BII, and p53 differed significantly between control cells and cells in which endogenous BRD4 expression was inhibited. We inferred that a BRD4 missense mutation was the likely disease-causing mutation in this family. Our findings may improve the molecular diagnosis of congenital cataracts and support the use of WES to clarify the genetic basis of complex diseases. PMID:28076398

  16. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kadam, Kaushiki; Khole, Aalok; Gaikwad, Avinash; Kadam, Seema; Shah, Rupin; Kumaraswamy, Rangaswamy; Khole, Vrinda

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens and unilateral renal agenesis (CBAVD-URA) has been controversial. Here, we report the cases of five Indian males with CBAVD-URA. The objective was to evaluate the presence or absence of CFTR gene mutations and variants in CBAVD-URA. The female partners of these males were also screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier status. Methods: Direct DNA sequencing of CFTR gene was carried out in five Indian infertile males having CBAVD-URA. Female partners (n=5) and healthy controls (n=32) were also screened. Results: Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A) were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T), four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q) and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A) were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD). The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings. PMID:27488005

  17. [Genetics of congenital cardiopathies].

    PubMed

    Moreno García, M; Gómez Rodríguez, M J; Barreiro Miranda, E

    2000-07-01

    Congenital heart malformations are the most common of all birth defects, affecting 0.5-1% of all live births. Some of these malformations are due to genetic anomalies. Patterns of autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked inheritance have been described. Mitochondrial inheritance and chromosomal anomalies can also be responsible for congenital heart malformations. Several genes for congenital heart defects have been identified. We review current knowledge on the genetic etiology of congenital heart disease.

  18. Cytogenetic Studies of Rwandan Pediatric Patients Presenting with Global Developmental Delay, Intellectual Disability and/or Multiple Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Uwineza, Annette; Hitayezu, Janvier; Jamar, Mauricette; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Murorunkwere, Seraphine; Janvier, Ndinkabandi; Bours, Vincent; Mutesa, Leon

    2016-02-01

    Global developmental delay (GDD) is defined as a significant delay in two or more developmental domains: gross or fine motor, speech/language, cognitive, social/personal and activities of daily living. Many of these children will go on to be diagnosed with intellectual disability (ID), which is most commonly defined as having an IQ <75 in addition to impairment in adaptive functioning. Cytogenetic studies have been performed in 664 Rwandan pediatric patients presenting GDD/ID and/or multiple congenital abnormalities (MCA). Karyotype analysis was performed in all patients and revealed 260 chromosomal abnormalities. The most frequent chromosomal abnormality was Down syndrome and then Edward syndrome and Patau syndrome. Other identified chromosomal abnormalities included 47,XX,+del(9)(q11), 46,XY,del(13)(q34) and 46,XX,der(22)t(10;22)(p10;p10)mat. In conclusion, our results highlight the high frequency of cytogenetically detectable abnormalities in this series, with implications for the burden on the healthcare. This study demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic analysis in patients with GDD/ID and MCA.

  19. Cytogenetic Studies of Rwandan Pediatric Patients Presenting with Global Developmental Delay, Intellectual Disability and/or Multiple Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Uwineza, Annette; Hitayezu, Janvier; Jamar, Mauricette; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Murorunkwere, Seraphine; Janvier, Ndinkabandi; Bours, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Global developmental delay (GDD) is defined as a significant delay in two or more developmental domains: gross or fine motor, speech/language, cognitive, social/personal and activities of daily living. Many of these children will go on to be diagnosed with intellectual disability (ID), which is most commonly defined as having an IQ <75 in addition to impairment in adaptive functioning. Cytogenetic studies have been performed in 664 Rwandan pediatric patients presenting GDD/ID and/or multiple congenital abnormalities (MCA). Karyotype analysis was performed in all patients and revealed 260 chromosomal abnormalities. The most frequent chromosomal abnormality was Down syndrome and then Edward syndrome and Patau syndrome. Other identified chromosomal abnormalities included 47,XX,+del(9)(q11), 46,XY,del(13)(q34) and 46,XX,der(22)t(10;22)(p10;p10)mat. In conclusion, our results highlight the high frequency of cytogenetically detectable abnormalities in this series, with implications for the burden on the healthcare. This study demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic analysis in patients with GDD/ID and MCA. PMID:26507407

  20. A case of multiple congenital anomalies in association with Rett syndrome confirmed by MECP2 mutation screening.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, C J; Badawi, N; Raffaele, L; Christodoulou, J; Leonard, H

    2001-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder. Apparently normal at birth, girls with RTT undergo developmental regression and acquire a neurological and behavioural phenotype that has been used to define clinical diagnostic criteria for the disorder. Recently mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2), located on Xq28 have been identified in females with RTT. We report a girl whose clinical course was complicated by congenital abnormalities of the respiratory tract and gastrointestinal system. In addition neurological abnormalities were evident in the newborn period. By the age of 3 years she had developed a phenotype very suggestive of RTT, but had not demonstrated deceleration of head growth and the development of expressive language was prevented by the presence of the tracheostomy. The clinical impression of RTT was confirmed by the recent finding of a mutation in the MECP2 gene. This case report highlights the importance of considering the clinical diagnosis of RTT even in the presence of other conditions and emphasises that girls with RTT may not be normal from birth.

  1. European recommendations for primary prevention of congenital anomalies: a joined effort of EUROCAT and EUROPLAN projects to facilitate inclusion of this topic in the National Rare Disease Plans.

    PubMed

    Taruscio, Domenica; Arriola, Larraitz; Baldi, Francesca; Barisic, Ingeborg; Bermejo-Sánchez, Eva; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Calzolari, Elisa; Carbone, Pietro; Curran, Rhonda; Garne, Ester; Gatt, Miriam; Latos-Bieleńska, Anna; Khoshnood, Babak; Irgens, Lorentz; Mantovani, Alberto; Martínez-Frías, Maria Luisa; Neville, Amanda; Rißmann, Anke; Ruggeri, Stefania; Wellesley, Diana; Dolk, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Congenital anomalies (CA) are the paradigm example of rare diseases liable to primary prevention actions due to the multifactorial etiology of many of them, involving a number of environmental factors together with genetic predispositions. Yet despite the preventive potential, lack of attention to an integrated preventive strategy has led to the prevalence of CA remaining relatively stable in recent decades. The 2 European projects, EUROCAT and EUROPLAN, have joined efforts to provide the first science-based and comprehensive set of recommendations for the primary prevention of CA in the European Union. The resulting EUROCAT-EUROPLAN 'Recommendations on Policies to Be Considered for the Primary Prevention of Congenital Anomalies in National Plans and Strategies on Rare Diseases' were issued in 2012 and endorsed by EUCERD (European Union Committee of Experts on Rare Diseases) in 2013. The recommendations exploit interdisciplinary expertise encompassing drugs, diet, lifestyles, maternal health status, and the environment. The recommendations include evidence-based actions aimed at reducing risk factors and at increasing protective factors and behaviors at both individual and population level. Moreover, consideration is given to topics specifically related to CA (e.g. folate status, teratogens) as well as of broad public health impact (e.g. obesity, smoking) which call for specific attention to their relevance in the pre- and periconceptional period. The recommendations, reported entirely in this paper, are a comprehensive tool to implement primary prevention into national policies on rare diseases in Europe.

  2. Mutations in SMG9, Encoding an Essential Component of Nonsense-Mediated Decay Machinery, Cause a Multiple Congenital Anomaly Syndrome in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Ranad; Anazi, Shams; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Caddle, L. Brianna; Palmer, Kristina; Ali, Rehab; Alshidi, Tarfa; Hagos, Samya; Goodwin, Leslie; Hashem, Mais; Wakil, Salma M.; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Colak, Dilek; Murray, Stephen A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is an important process that is best known for degrading transcripts that contain premature stop codons (PTCs) to mitigate their potentially harmful consequences, although its regulatory role encompasses other classes of transcripts as well. Despite the critical role of NMD at the cellular level, our knowledge about the consequences of deficiency of its components at the organismal level is largely limited to model organisms. In this study, we report two consanguineous families in which a similar pattern of congenital anomalies was found to be most likely caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations in SMG9, encoding an essential component of the SURF complex that generates phospho-UPF1, the single most important step in NMD. By knocking out Smg9 in mice via CRISPR/Cas9, we were able to recapitulate the major features of the SMG9-related multiple congenital anomaly syndrome we observed in humans. Surprisingly, human cells devoid of SMG9 do not appear to have reduction of PTC-containing transcripts but do display global transcriptional dysregulation. We conclude that SMG9 is required for normal human and murine development, most likely through a transcriptional regulatory role, the precise nature of which remains to be determined. PMID:27018474

  3. Incidence and Risks of Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract in Newborns: A Population-Based Case-Control Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tain, You-Lin; Luh, Hsing; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2016-02-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are 1 of the major factors in young adults needing renal replacement therapy, but there is little extensive assessment of their incidence and risk factors. This study aimed to evaluate trends in the incidence of and risk factors for CAKUT among all births in Taiwan.This population-based case-control study design was conducted using the Taiwan national births registry, which contains detailed information about maternal health and characteristics of newborns, supplied by health professionals. Of 1,603,794 newborns registered between 2004 and 2014, 668 infants were reported to have CAKUT. Newborns without congenital anomalies were matched with CAKUT cases by birth year, month, and Apgar score in a ratio of 5:1. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for developing CAKUT were calculated using a conditional multivariate logistic regression model.The incidence of CAKUT was approximately 4.2 per 10,000 births. The adjusted ORs for CAKUT in newborns associated with maternal age of 20 to 29 (OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.11-4.28), or 30 to 39 (OR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.17-4.51), maternal gestational diabetes (OR, 2.22, 95% CI, 1.06-4.67), maternal thalassemia/hemochromatosis (OR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.35-5.27), polyhydramnios or oligohydramnios (OR, 9.16; 95% CI, 5.46-15.37), birth parity >1 (OR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.15-0.50), having a gestational age <37 weeks (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.23-1.78), and being a boy (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.53-2.19). Infants of mother with gestational diabetes were more likely to have congenital anomalies, small gestational age (<37 weeks) and low birth weight.CAKUT are associated with several maternal health risk factors. As Taiwan has the highest prevalence and incidence rates of end-stage renal disease in the world, these findings strongly support the need to develop professional guidelines for prenatal counseling and management of women at risk of adverse birth outcomes, to prevent kidney disease

  4. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant use in first trimester pregnancy and risk of specific congenital anomalies: a European register-based study.

    PubMed

    Wemakor, Anthony; Casson, Karen; Garne, Ester; Bakker, Marian; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Gatt, Miriam; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Nelen, Vera; O'Mahoney, Mary; Pierini, Anna; Rissmann, Anke; Tucker, David; Boyle, Breidge; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje; Dolk, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Evidence of an association between early pregnancy exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and congenital heart defects (CHD) has contributed to recommendations to weigh benefits and risks carefully. The objective of this study was to determine the specificity of association between first trimester exposure to SSRIs and specific CHD and other congenital anomalies (CA) associated with SSRI exposure in the literature (signals). A population-based case-malformed control study was conducted in 12 EUROCAT CA registries covering 2.1 million births 1995-2009 including livebirths, fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. Babies/fetuses with specific CHD (n = 12,876) and non-CHD signal CA (n = 13,024), were compared with malformed controls whose diagnosed CA have not been associated with SSRI in the literature (n = 17,083). SSRI exposure in first trimester pregnancy was associated with CHD overall (OR adjusted for registry 1.41, 95% CI 1.07-1.86, fluoxetine adjOR 1.43 95% CI 0.85-2.40, paroxetine adjOR 1.53, 95% CI 0.91-2.58) and with severe CHD (adjOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.02-2.39), particularly Tetralogy of Fallot (adjOR 3.16, 95% CI 1.52-6.58) and Ebstein's anomaly (adjOR 8.23, 95% CI 2.92-23.16). Significant associations with SSRI exposure were also found for ano-rectal atresia/stenosis (adjOR 2.46, 95% CI 1.06-5.68), gastroschisis (adjOR 2.42, 95% CI 1.10-5.29), renal dysplasia (adjOR 3.01, 95% CI 1.61-5.61), and clubfoot (adjOR 2.41, 95% CI 1.59-3.65). These data support a teratogenic effect of SSRIs specific to certain anomalies, but cannot exclude confounding by indication or associated factors.

  5. Partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 15q associated with congenital hydrocephalus, diaphragmatic hernia, urinary tract anomalies, congenital heart defect and kyphoscoliosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Lee, C C; Pan, C W; Kir, T Y; Chen, B F

    1998-12-01

    We describe perinatal findings in a female fetus with partial trisomy 8q(8q24.1-->8qter) and partial monosomy 15q(15q26.1-->15qter) resulting from a paternal t(8;15) reciprocal translocation. Prenatal sonographic examination showed intra-uterine growth retardation, bilateral ventriculomegaly, cardiomegaly with arrhythmia, anhydramnios, and absent kidney and urinary bladder images. The pregnancy was terminated at 28 weeks of gestation. At birth, the infant manifested typical dysmorphic features of partial trisomy 8q. Necropsy further revealed hydrocephalus, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, ventricular septal defect, a horseshoe kidney with renal hypoplasia, and kyphoscoliosis. Our case shows that the coexistence of partial trisomy 8q24.1-->8qter and partial monosomy 15q26.1-->15qter are more detrimental than either defect alone and can result in a complex of major malformations. Prenatal ultrasound examination and cytogenetic assessment should be offered in subsequent pregnancies.

  6. Anomalous origin of the left circumflex coronary artery from the pulmonary artery. A very rare congenital anomaly in an adult patient diagnosed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Korosoglou, Grigorios; Ringwald, Gerd; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo A

    2008-01-21

    Here we report for the first time on the diagnostic potential of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) to delineate the proximal course of an anomalous left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) originating from the right pulmonary artery in an adult patient with no other form of congenital heart disease. The patient was referred to our institution due to exertional chest discomfort. X-Ray coronary angiography showed a normal left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and right coronary artery (RCA), while the LCX was filled retrograde by collateral flow through the LAD and the RCA. The origin of the LCX was postulated to be the pulmonary artery, but the exact origin of the anomalous artery could not be depicted on conventional angiograms. CMR provided the unambiguous depiction of the origin of the anomalous LCX from the right pulmonary artery and the delineation of its proximal course in this case of a very rare coronary anomaly in adults.

  7. Strategies to achieve sustainability and quality in birth defects registries: the experience of the National Registry of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Groisman, Boris; Bidondo, Maria Paz; Gili, Juan Antonio; Barbero, Pablo; Liascovich, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    In many low-and middle-income countries, birth defects are not considered a public health priority and are perceived by the medical community as rare, unpreventable events. In this context, a registry of birth defects should address not only the collection, analysis, and dissemination of information but also contribute to local interventions like prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. We describe the National Registry of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina (RENAC) in terms of case definition, data collection, quality assurance, and data sending, coding, analysis, and information dissemination and we present the strategies used to ensure its sustainability. We emphasize strategies for motivating the people collecting data, such as training activities, participation in research projects, returning the processed data, making useful clinical information available, giving non-monetary rewards, and linking cases to genetic services.

  8. Role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor gene in congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, CAKUT, of mice and men.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, H; Yerkes, E; Hohenfellner, K; Miyazaki, Y; Ma, J; Hunley, T E; Yoshida, H; Ichiki, T; Threadgill, D; Phillips, J A; Hogan, B M; Fogo, A; Brock, J W; Inagami, T; Ichikawa, I

    1999-01-01

    Angiotensin type 2 receptor gene null mutant mice display congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). Various features of mouse CAKUT impressively mimic human CAKUT. Studies of the human type 2 receptor (AGTR2) gene in two independent cohorts found that a significant association exists between CAKUT and a nucleotide transition within the lariat branchpoint motif of intron 1, which perturbs AGTR2 mRNA splicing efficiency. AGTR2, therefore, has a significant ontogenic role for the kidney and urinary tract system. Studies revealed that the establishment of CAKUT is preceded by delayed apoptosis of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells surrounding the urinary tract during key ontogenic events, from the ureteral budding to the expansive growth of the kidney and ureter.

  9. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and congenital heart defects: presentation of an additional 32 cases.

    PubMed

    Hills, Christine B; Kochilas, Lazaros; Schimmenti, Lisa A; Moller, James H

    2011-10-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is a rare genetic abnormality that has been linked to a mutation in the EVC or EVC2 genes. Common atrium (CA) is an uncommon cardiac malformation, and yet it is commonly found in patients with EVC. We performed a retrospective review of the cases submitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) between 1982 and 2007. A review of the English-language literature for previously published cases, as well as current genetic research findings, was also performed. Thirty-two pediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and EVC syndrome were identified in the PCCC database. Twenty-eight (88%) had an endocardial cushion defect, with 15 of these having primary failure of atrial septation resulting in CA. Persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) and pulmonary venous connection abnormalities were common. The incidence of persistent LSVC and pulmonary venous abnormalities were greater than previously reported for patients with EVC. Our study reviews the reported literature and adds 32 additional cases from the PCCC database. Review of the cardiac phenotype in patients with EVC syndrome reveals a characteristic pattern of atrioventricular canal defects with systemic and pulmonary venous abnormalities. The frequent association of these abnormalities is strongly reminiscent of the cardiac phenotype found in patients with heterotaxy syndromes. Emerging molecular and developmental studies suggest that EVC and EVC2 proteins may be important for cilia function, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of heterotaxy syndromes. It is speculated that coordinate function between the EVC proteins is required for a cilia-dependent cardiac morphogenesis.

  10. Surgical management of a neonate with congenitally corrected transposition of the great vessels, hypoplastic right aortic arch, and Ebstein anomaly.

    PubMed

    Filippelli, Sergio; Perri, Gianluigi; Kirk, Richard; Hasan, Asif; Griselli, Massimo

    2013-11-01

    We report a neonate with a primary diagnosis of congenitally corrected transposition (ccTGA) of the great vessels, hypoplastic right aortic arch, and a severely regurgitant Ebstein tricuspid valve (TV). During the fetal period, she was listed for heart transplantation, and two weeks after birth due to a deterioration of her general condition, we performed a Norwood-Sano modified procedure. After 58 days a donor heart became available and the baby successfully received a orthotopic heart transplantation.

  11. Array-CGH analysis in Rwandan patients presenting development delay/intellectual disability with multiple congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Array-CGH is considered as the first-tier investigation used to identify copy number variations. Right now, there is no available data about the genetic etiology of patients with development delay/intellectual disability and congenital malformation in East Africa. Methods Array comparative genomic hybridization was performed in 50 Rwandan patients with development delay/intellectual disability and multiple congenital abnormalities, using the Agilent’s 180 K microarray platform. Results Fourteen patients (28%) had a global development delay whereas 36 (72%) patients presented intellectual disability. All patients presented multiple congenital abnormalities. Clinically significant copy number variations were found in 13 patients (26%). Size of CNVs ranged from 0,9 Mb to 34 Mb. Six patients had CNVs associated with known syndromes, whereas 7 patients presented rare genomic imbalances. Conclusion This study showed that CNVs are present in African population and show the importance to implement genetic testing in East-African countries. PMID:25016475

  12. Congenital limb anomalies: frequency and aetiological factors: Data from the Edinburgh Register of the Newborn (1964-68)

    PubMed Central

    Rogala, E. J.; Wynne-Davies, R.; Littlejohn, A.; Gormley, J.

    1974-01-01

    This paper reports a detailed follow up of 156 patients with structural upper and lower limb anomalies, obtained from the Edinburgh Register of the Newborn (a registration of 52,029 consecutive births between 1964 and 1968). At the time of this survey the patients were between 4 and 9 years of age. The Register had noted probably 96% of all children born with limb defects in Edinburgh between 1964 and 1968. It was found that the diagnosis was completely accurate in only 26% of cases, and partially so in a further 42%. The frequency of each anomaly has been noted, subdivided into isolated anomalies; those that occurred with other limb anomalies, and those that formed part of a syndrome. Syndactyly of toes, post-axial polydactyly of the fingers, polysyndactyly, and brachydactyly were found to have a genetic basis. All `absence' defects, pre-axial polydactyly, and multiple limb deformities appeared to be sporadic. Amongst the sporadic group, the main aetiological factors noted were an excess of maternal toxaemia of pregnancy and of illegitimate children, when compared with the Register Control Data. PMID:4372353

  13. Craniosynostosis and congenital tracheal anomalies in an infant with Pfeiffer syndrome carrying the W290C FGFR2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-P; Lin, S-P; Su, Y-N; Chien, S-C; Tsai, F-J; Wang, W

    2008-01-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome (OMIM 101600) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midface hypoplasia, ocular proptosis and digital malformations. We report on a type II Pfeiffer female infant with craniosynostosis, hydrocephalus, and characteristic craniofacial and digital abnormalities. The patient had a history of airway difficulty. Bronchoscopy at age four months revealed low tracheal stenosis and fibrous cartilaginous rings. She underwent tracheostomy for the treatment of cyanotic episodes. Molecular analysis revealed a de novo missense mutation c.870 G>T (TGG>TGT) in the FGFR2 gene that predicts a substitution of cysteine for tryptophan at the codon 290, (W290C). There is phenotypic heterogeneity of tracheal anomalies due to FGFR2 mutations. A review of the literature shows that Pfeiffer patients with the similar tracheal abnormalities can be caused by different FGFR2 mutations and, likewise, the patients with the same FGFR2 mutation may manifest different kinds of tracheal anomalies. Tracheal anomalies may occur in Pfeiffer patients and cause morbidity and mortality because of airway obstruction. Recognition and detailed evaluation of tracheal anomalies should be included in the early diagnostic workup for severe Pfeiffer patients.

  14. Beyond Trisomy 21: Additional Chromosomal Anomalies Detected through Routine Aneuploidy Screening

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Amy; Hippman, Catriona; Pastuck, Melanie; Johnson, Jo-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal screening is often misconstrued by patients as screening for trisomy 21 alone; however, other chromosomal anomalies are often detected. This study aimed to systematically review the literature and use diagnostic meta-analysis to derive pooled detection and false positive rates for aneuploidies other than trisomy 21 with different prenatal screening tests. Non-invasive prenatal testing had the highest detection (DR) and lowest false positive (FPR) rates for trisomy 13 (DR: 90.3%; FPR: 0.2%), trisomy 18 (DR: 98.1%; FPR: 0.2%), and 45,X (DR: 92.2%; FPR: 0.1%); however, most estimates came from high-risk samples. The first trimester combined test also had high DRs for all conditions studied (trisomy 13 DR: 83.1%; FPR: 4.4%; trisomy 18 DR: 91.9%; FPR: 3.5%; 45,X DR: 70.1%; FPR: 5.4%; triploidy DR: 100%; FPR: 6.3%). Second trimester triple screening had the lowest DRs and highest FPRs for all conditions (trisomy 13 DR: 43.9%; FPR: 8.1%; trisomy 18 DR: 70.5%; FPR: 3.3%; 45,X DR: 77.2%; FPR: 9.3%). Prenatal screening tests differ in their ability to accurately detect chromosomal anomalies. Patients should be counseled about the ability of prenatal screening to detect anomalies other than trisomy 21 prior to undergoing screening. PMID:26237381

  15. Does maternal exposure to benzene and PM10 during pregnancy increase the risk of congenital anomalies? A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vinceti, Marco; Malagoli, Carlotta; Malavolti, Marcella; Cherubini, Andrea; Maffeis, Giuseppe; Rodolfi, Rossella; Heck, Julia E; Astolfi, Gianni; Calzolari, Elisa; Nicolini, Fausto

    2016-01-15

    A few studies have suggested an association between maternal exposure to ambient air pollution from vehicular traffic and risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring, but epidemiologic evidence is neither strong nor entirely consistent. In a population-based case-control study in a Northern Italy community encompassing 228 cases of birth defects and 228 referent newborns, we investigated if maternal exposure to PM10 and benzene from vehicular traffic during early pregnancy, as estimated through a dispersion model, was associated with excess teratogenic risk. In conditional logistic regression analysis, and with adjustment for the other pollutant, we found that higher exposure to PM10 but not benzene was associated with increased risk of birth defects overall. Anomaly categories showing the strongest dose-response relation with PM10 exposure were musculoskeletal and chromosomal abnormalities but not cardiovascular defects, with Down syndrome being among the specific abnormalities showing the strongest association, though risk estimates particularly for the less frequent defects were statistically very unstable. Further adjustment in the regression model for potential confounders did not considerably alter the results. All the associations were stronger for average levels of PM10 than for their maximal level. Findings of this study give some support for an excess teratogenic risk following maternal exposure during pregnancy to PM10, but not benzene. Such association appears to be limited to some birth defect categories.

  16. Does maternal exposure to benzene and PM10 during pregnancy increase the risk of congenital anomalies? A population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Vinceti, Marco; Malagoli, Carlotta; Malavolti, Marcella; Cherubini, Andrea; Maffeis, Giuseppe; Rodolfi, Rossella; Heck, Julia E.; Astolfi, Gianni; Calzolari, Elisa; Nicolini, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    A few studies have suggested an association between maternal exposure to ambient air pollution from vehicular traffic and risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring, but epidemiologic evidence is neither strong nor entirely consistent. In a population-based case-control study in a Northern Italy community encompassing 228 cases of birth defects and 228 referent newborns, we investigated if maternal exposure to PM10 and benzene from vehicular traffic during early pregnancy, as estimated through a dispersion model, was associated with excess teratogenic risk. In conditional logistic regression analysis, and with adjustment for the other pollutant, we found that higher exposure to PM10 but not benzene was associated with increased risk of birth defects overall. Anomaly categories showing the strongest dose-response relation with PM10 exposure were musculoskeletal and chromosomal abnormalities but not cardiovascular defects, with Down syndrome being among the specific abnormalities showing the strongest association, though risk estimates particularly for the less frequent defects were statistically very unstable. Further adjustment in the regression model for potential confounders did not considerably alter the results. All the associations were stronger for average levels of PM10 than for their maximal level. Findings of this study give some support for an excess teratogenic risk following maternal exposure during pregnancy to PM10, but not benzene. Such association appears to be limited to some birth defect categories. PMID:26410719

  17. Diagnostic value of echocardiography in isolated congenital unilateral lung agenesis combined with different anomalies: Two rare cases in children.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Sun, Feifei; Ren, Weidong; Wang, Yonghuai; Xu, Shu

    2016-10-01

    Unilateral lung agenesis, a rare congenital deformity, is secondary to abnormal embryonic development, leading to a shift of the mediastinum and remaining lung. In our case reports, we describe the diagnostic courses of two pediatric patients with unilateral lung agenesis admitted to our hospital in 2014. We present and compare the findings in transthoracic echocardiography with that in CT. Echocardiography played a pivotal role in revealing pulmonary deformities and leading to the diagnosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:514-517, 2016.

  18. Congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Kose, Nusret; Campbell, Robert M

    2004-05-01

    The management of congenital scoliosis requires a systematic approach with careful attention to detail. Any fortuitous diagnosis of vertebral anomalies in infancy, even if there is no significant scoliosis at that time on x-ray, requires frequent clinical and radiographic follow-up to detect progression. The presence of associated anomalies of the spinal cord, the kidneys and the heart should be evaluated by MRI, renal ultrasound or IVP, with cardiology evaluation as indicated. Curve progression or severe vertebral anomalies known to cause curve progression require immediate treatment to prevent deformity. Significant thoracic deformity, especially in a patient with thoracic insufficiency syndrome, is best treated with expansion thoracoplasty. The patient with congenital scoliosis requires a long term commitment to care with frequent orthopaedic follow-up throughout the growing years along with routine pulmonary function assessment once the patient is able to cooperate with testing.

  19. Congenital anomalies among live births in a high environmental risk area--a case-control study in Brindisi (southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Gianicolo, Emilio Antonio Luca; Mangia, Cristina; Cervino, Marco; Bruni, Antonella; Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Latini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Maternal exposure to ambient pollution has been increasingly linked to the risk of congenital anomalies (CAs) in the fetus and newborns. Recently, a descriptive study in the high environmental risk city of Brindisi (Italy) revealed an increased prevalence of total CAs, especially congenital heart disease (CHD) and ventricular septal defects (VSDs), both at the local level and in comparison with the pool of EUROCAT registries. This paper concerns a population-based case control study to investigate the association between maternal exposure to air pollutants - sulfur dioxide (SO2) and total suspended particulate (TSP) matter - and the risk of CA. Cases were newborns up to 28 days of age, born to mothers resident in Brindisi between 2001 and 2010, and discharged with a diagnosis of CA. Cases and controls were individually matched according to sex, socio-economic status of the census area of residence of the mother, and year of beginning of pregnancy. Up to four controls were extracted for each case. Concentration data from monitoring stations were used to estimate air pollution exposure. Each case and control was assigned pollutant concentration values as mean and 90th percentile of the daily average values during weeks 3-8 of pregnancy. Exposure as both continuous and categorical variables was considered and a conditional logistic regression model was constructed to quantify the odds ratios of exposure to air pollutants and the occurrence of total CAs, CHDs and VSDs. We found exposure to the 90th percentile of SO2 to be associated with CHDs (p for trend =0.01) and VSDs (p for trend <0.05). Findings for TSP were less consistent. In conclusion, in the studied area, maternal exposure to sulfur dioxide increased risk of CHD.

  20. Evaluation of a tissue-engineered bovine pericardial patch in paediatric patients with congenital cardiac anomalies: initial experience with the ADAPT-treated CardioCel® patch

    PubMed Central

    Neethling, William M.L.; Strange, Geoff; Firth, Laura; Smit, Francis E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study evaluated the safety, efficacy and clinical performance of the tissue-engineered ADAPT® bovine pericardial patch (ABPP) in paediatric patients with a range of congenital cardiac anomalies. METHODS In this single-centre, prospective, non-randomized clinical study, paediatric patients underwent surgery for insertion of the ABPP. Primary efficacy measures included early (<30 day) morbidity; incidence of device-related complications; haemodynamic performance derived from echocardiography assessment at 6- and 12-month follow-up and magnetic resonance imaging findings in 10 randomly selected patients at 12 months. Secondary measures included device-handling characteristics; shape and sizing characteristics and perioperative implant complications. The Aristotle complexity scoring system was used to score the complexity level of all surgical procedures. Patients completing the 12-month study were eligible to enter a long-term evaluation study. RESULTS Between April 2008 and September 2009, the ABPP was used in 30 paediatric patients. In the 30-day postoperative period, no graft-related morbidity was observed. In total, there were 5 deaths (2 in the 30-day postoperative period and 3 within the first 6 postoperative months). All deaths were deemed due to comorbid non-graft-related events. Echocardiography assessment at 6 and 12 months revealed intact anatomical and haemodynamically stable repairs without any visible calcification of the patch. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment in 10 patients at 12 months revealed no signs of calcification. Fisher's exact test demonstrated that patients undergoing more complex, higher risk surgical repairs (Aristotle complexity score >8) were significantly more likely to die (P = 0.0055, 58% survival compared with 100% survival for less complex surgical repairs). In 19 patients, echocardiographic data were available at 18–36 months with no evidence of device calcification, infection, thromboembolic events or

  1. An isolated single L-II type coronary artery anomaly: A rare coronary anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Ermis, Emrah; Demirelli, Selami; Korkmaz, Ali Fuat; Sahin, Bingul Dilekci; Kantarci, Abdulmecit

    2015-01-01

    Summary The incidence of congenital artery anomalies is 0.2–1.4%, and most are benign. Single coronary artery (SCA) anomalies are very rare. The right coronary artery (RCA) originating from the left coronary system is one such SCA anomaly, and the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) increases if it courses between the pulmonary artery and aorta and coexists with other congenital heart diseases. Additionally, coursing of the RCA between the great vessels increases the risk of atherosclerosis. We herein present the case of a 57 year-old man who was admitted to our cardiology outpatient clinic and diagnosed with an SCA anomaly in which the RCA arose from the left main coronary artery (LMCA) and coursed between the pulmonary artery and aorta. However a critical stenosis was not detected in imaging techniques, and myocardial perfusion scintigraphic evidence of ischaemia was found in a small area. Therefore, he was managed with conservative medical therapy. PMID:26668781

  2. Parenting an infant with a congenital anomaly: An exploratory study on patterns of adjustment from diagnosis to six months post birth.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana; Nazaré, Bárbara; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2014-06-01

    The present study examined psychological adjustment in parents of infants with congenital anomalies (CAs), focusing on the interval from the disclosure of the diagnosis to six months after the infant's birth and considering the effects of the parent's gender and the timing of diagnosis (pre- vs postnatal). Within-group diversity was also examined by identifying distinct patterns of individual adjustment over time. Parents of 43 infants (43 mothers and 36 fathers) with a pre- or postnatal diagnosis of a CA answered questionnaires assessing psychological distress and quality of life one month after the disclosure of the diagnosis and six months after the infant's birth. Results showed a significant reduction in psychological distress and a significant increase in physical quality of life over time, for both parents, regardless of the timing of diagnosis. In all, 57% of parents presented a pattern of recovery from diagnosis to six months post birth and 26.6% presented a pattern of resilience. However, 15.2% of parents showed chronic adjustment difficulties. Findings suggest that most parents tend to adjust to their infant's CA, although some experienced difficulties and should be targeted for specialised counselling. Both members of the couple should be acknowledged, as both experience similar patterns of adjustment.

  3. The role of satisfaction with social support in perceived burden and stress of parents of six-month-old infants with a congenital anomaly: Actor and partner effects.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana; Nazaré, Bárbara; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2014-06-01

    This exploratory study examined the role of satisfaction with support from family and friends on the burden and stress of parents of infants with a congenital anomaly (CA). The effects of social support were examined within the couple (actor and partner effects). A total of 36 couples whose six-month-old infant has a CA participated in this study. The parents completed questionnaires regarding satisfaction with support, burden (Impact on Family Scale - Revised), and parenting stress (Parenting Stress Index). The results showed that fathers directly benefited from the support they received from friends in reducing their burden, while mothers only indirectly benefited from it through the father's adjustment. The pattern was different for stress: mothers directly benefited from the support they received from their family in reducing their stress levels, while fathers benefited both directly from the support they received from friends and indirectly from the support that their partners received from family. These results highlight that (1) the different support needs of mothers and fathers (due to their different roles during transition to parenthood) and (2) the diffusion of benefits of social support within the couple should be taken into account when developing strategies to promote support to families of six-month-old infants with a CA.

  4. A clear bias in parental origin of de novo pathogenic CNVs related to intellectual disability, developmental delay and multiple congenital anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ruiyu; Deng, Linbei; Xia, Yan; Wei, Xianda; Cao, Yingxi; Guo, Ruolan; Zhang, Rui; Guo, Jing; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2017-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is of great significance in human evolution and disorders. Through tracing the parent-of-origin of de novo pathogenic CNVs, we are expected to investigate the relative contributions of germline genomic stability on reproductive health. In our study, short tandem repeat (STR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) were used to determine the parent-of-origin of 87 de novo pathogenic CNVs found in unrelated patients with intellectual disability (ID), developmental delay (DD) and multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). The results shown that there was a significant difference on the distribution of the parent-of-origin for different CNVs types (Chi-square test, p = 4.914 × 10−3). An apparently paternal bias existed in deletion CNVs and a maternal bias in duplication CNVs, indicating that the relative contribution of paternal germline variations is greater than that of maternal to the origin of deletions, and vice versa to the origin of duplications. By analyzing the sequences flanking the breakpoints, we also confirmed that non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) served as the major mechanism for the formation of recurrent CNVs whereas non-SDs-based mechanisms played a part in generating rare non-recurrent CNVs and might relate to the paternal germline bias in deletion CNVs. PMID:28322228

  5. Interpretation of clinical relevance of X-chromosome copy number variations identified in a large cohort of individuals with cognitive disorders and/or congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Marjolein H; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Pfundt, Rolph; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Yntema, Helger G; Nillesen, Willy M; de Vries, Bert B A; van Bokhoven, Hans; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2012-11-01

    Genome-wide array studies are now routinely being used in the evaluation of patients with cognitive disorders (CD) and/or congenital anomalies (CA). Therefore, inevitably each clinician is confronted with the challenging task of the interpretation of copy number variations detected by genome-wide array platforms in a diagnostic setting. Clinical interpretation of autosomal copy number variations is already challenging, but assessment of the clinical relevance of copy number variations of the X-chromosome is even more complex. This study provides an overview of the X-Chromosome copy number variations that we have identified by genome-wide array analysis in a large cohort of 4407 male and female patients. We have made an interpretation of the clinical relevance of each of these copy number variations based on well-defined criteria and previous reports in literature and databases. The prevalence of X-chromosome copy number variations in this cohort was 57/4407 (∼1.3%), of which 15 (0.3%) were interpreted as (likely) pathogenic.

  6. A unique de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 17, del(17)(q23.2q24.3) in a female newborn with multiple congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.L.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lewis, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Contiguous gene or microdeletion syndromes occurring on chromosome 17p include the Smith-Magenis and Miller-Dieker syndromes associated with interstitial deletions of 17p11.2 and 17p13.3, respectively. Other cytogenetically visible interstitial deletions on chromosome 17 are quite rare or unique. We describe a newborn with a novel interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 17 [del(17)(q23.2q24.3)] who died on day of life 17 during a recurrent apneic episode. We have compared our patient`s phenotype and karyotype to two reported patients with deletion 17q with minor clinical overlap. The most striking clinical features of this patient were severe intrauterine growth retardation, widespread skeletal malformations (split sutures, hypoplastic acetabulae and scapulae, vertebral anomalies, and digital hypoplasia), cutis verticis gyrata, dysmorphic facial features, and oropharyngeal malformations (absent uvula and submucous cleft palate). Mild congenital heart disease and anomalous optic nerves were also present. Parental karyotyps were normal. DNA from parents and patient has been collected and cell lines established on both parents. Genes which have been previously mapped to the region that is apparently deleted in this patient include: chorionic somatomammotropin A, growth hormone (normal), acid alpha-glucosidase, apolipoprotein H, and the alpha peptide of type 4 voltage gated sodium channel. As in other clinical cytogenetic syndromes, further descriptions of patients with similar or overlapping rearrangements in this region will be necessary to delineate genotype/phenotype correlations for chromosome 17.

  7. Glomerular filtration rate and renal volume in dogs with congenital portosystemic vascular anomalies before and after surgical ligation.

    PubMed

    Deppe, T A; Center, S A; Simpson, K W; Erb, H N; Randolph, J F; Dykes, N L; Yeager, A E; Reynolds, A J

    1999-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal volume were evaluated in dogs with confirmed portosystemic vascular anomalies (PSVA) before and after surgical ligation of their PSVA. Pre- and postligation CBC, serum biochemistry, urinalysis, abdominal ultrasonography with measurement of renal volume, and per rectal scintigraphy were performed to document resolution of abnormalities consistent with portosystemic shunting. GFR was estimated by plasma 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA) clearance before (n = 21) and after (n = 12) surgical correction of PSVA. Preligation 99mTc-DTPA GFR was increased (median, 5.64 mL/minute/kg; range, 3.53-8.49 mL/minute/kg; reference range, 2.83-4.47 mL/minute/kg) in 81% (17/21) of dogs. Postligation 99mTc-DTPA GFR decreased in all 12 evaluated dogs (median change = -42%; P < .001). Preligation renal volume was above the reference range for the left and right kidneys in 71% (10/14) and 69% (11/16) of dogs evaluated, respectively. Right renal volume decreased significantly (n = 5; median change, -45%; P = .03) after surgical ligation of PSVA. These findings document increased GFR and renal volume in dogs with PSVA, which may explain in part the low blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine concentrations encountered in these dogs. Knowledge of changes in GFR associated with PSVA ligation may prove helpful in the anesthetic, drug, and dietary management of affected dogs.

  8. Testable radiative neutrino mass model without additional symmetries and explanation for the b →s ℓ+ℓ- anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Kingman; Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    We propose a one-loop radiative Majorana-type neutrino-mass matrix without any kind of additional symmetries by introducing two leptoquark-like bosons only. In this scenario, we show that the anomaly appearing in the process b →s ℓℓ ¯ can be explained without any conflicts against various constraints such as lepton-flavor violations, flavor-changing neutral currents, oblique parameters Δ S , Δ T , and the Drell-Yan process. We make the predictions for the flavor-violating lepton-pair production (e μ , e τ , and μ τ ) at the LHC, as well as the cross sections for pair production of these leptoquark-like bosons.

  9. Taussig-Bing Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Igor E.

    2009-01-01

    Taussig-Bing anomaly is a rare congenital heart malformation that was first described in 1949 by Helen B. Taussig (1898–1986) and Richard J. Bing (1909–). Although substantial improvement has since been achieved in surgical results of the repair of the anomaly, management of the Taussig-Bing anomaly remains challenging. A history of the original description of the anomaly, the life stories of the individuals who first described it, and the current outcomes of its surgical management are reviewed herein. PMID:20069085

  10. First Trimester Exposure to Anxiolytic and Hypnotic Drugs and the Risks of Major Congenital Anomalies: A United Kingdom Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Lu; West, Joe; Gibson, Jack E.; Fiaschi, Linda; Sokal, Rachel; Doyle, Pat; Hubbard, Richard; Smeeth, Liam; Tata, Laila J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite their widespread use the effects of taking benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics during pregnancy on the risk of major congenital anomaly (MCA) are uncertain. The objectives were to estimate absolute and relative risks of MCAs in children exposed to specific anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs taken in the first trimester of pregnancy, compared with children of mothers with depression and/or anxiety but not treated with medication and children of mothers without diagnosed mental illness during pregnancy. Methods We identified singleton children born to women aged 15–45 years between 1990 and 2010 from a large United Kingdom primary care database. We calculated absolute risks of MCAs for children with first trimester exposures of different anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs and used logistic regression with a generalised estimating equation to compare risks adjusted for year of childbirth, maternal age, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status. Results Overall MCA prevalence was 2.7% in 1,159 children of mothers prescribed diazepam, 2.9% in 379 children with temazepam, 2.5% in 406 children with zopiclone, and 2.7% in 19,193 children whose mothers had diagnosed depression and/or anxiety but no first trimester drug exposures. When compared with 2.7% in 351,785 children with no diagnosed depression/anxiety nor medication use, the adjusted odds ratios were 1.02 (99% confidence interval 0.63–1.64) for diazepam, 1.07 (0.49–2.37) for temazepam, 0.96 (0.42–2.20) for zopiclone and 1.27 (0.43–3.75) for other anxiolytic/hypnotic drugs and 1.01 (0.90–1.14) for un-medicated depression/anxiety. Risks of system-specific MCAs were generally similar in children exposed and not exposed to such medications. Conclusions We found no evidence for an increase in MCAs in children exposed to benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics in the first trimester of pregnancy. These findings suggest that prescription of these drugs during early

  11. Pre-conception Folic Acid and Multivitamin Supplementation for the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Neural Tube Defects and Other Folic Acid-Sensitive Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R Douglas; Wilson, R Douglas; Audibert, François; Brock, Jo-Ann; Carroll, June; Cartier, Lola; Gagnon, Alain; Johnson, Jo-Ann; Langlois, Sylvie; Murphy-Kaulbeck, Lynn; Okun, Nanette; Pastuck, Melanie; Deb-Rinker, Paromita; Dodds, Linda; Leon, Juan Andres; Lowel, Hélène L; Luo, Wei; MacFarlane, Amanda; McMillan, Rachel; Moore, Aideen; Mundle, William; O'Connor, Deborah; Ray, Joel; Van den Hof, Michiel

    2015-06-01

    Objectif : Offrir des renseignements à jour sur l’utilisation pré et postconceptionnelle d’acide folique par voie orale, avec ou sans supplément de multivitamines / micronutriments, aux fins de la prévention des anomalies du tube neural et d’autres anomalies congénitales. Ces renseignements aideront les médecins, les sages-femmes, les infirmières et les autres professionnels de la santé à contribuer aux efforts de sensibilisation des femmes quant à l’utilisation et aux posologies adéquates de la supplémentation en acide folique / multivitamines, avant et pendant la grossesse. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed, Medline, CINAHL et la Cochrane Library en janvier 2011 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « folic acid », « prenatal multivitamins », « folate sensitive birth defects », « congenital anomaly risk reduction », « pre-conception counselling »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre 1985 et juin 2014. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en juin 2014. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques, et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Coûts, risques et avantages : Les coûts financiers sont ceux de la supplémentation quotidienne en vitamines et de la consommation d’un régime alimentaire santé enrichi en folate. Les risques sont ceux qui sont li

  12. Patient-specific in vitro models for hemodynamic analysis of congenital heart disease - Additive manufacturing approach.

    PubMed

    Medero, Rafael; García-Rodríguez, Sylvana; François, Christopher J; Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro

    2017-03-21

    Non-invasive hemodynamic assessment of total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) is challenging due to the complex anatomy. Additive manufacturing (AM) is a suitable alternative for creating patient-specific in vitro models for flow measurements using four-dimensional (4D) Flow MRI. These in vitro systems have the potential to serve as validation for computational fluid dynamics (CFD), simulating different physiological conditions. This study investigated three different AM technologies, stereolithography (SLA), selective laser sintering (SLS) and fused deposition modeling (FDM), to determine differences in hemodynamics when measuring flow using 4D Flow MRI. The models were created using patient-specific MRI data from an extracardiac TCPC. These models were connected to a perfusion pump circulating water at three different flow rates. Data was processed for visualization and quantification of velocity, flow distribution, vorticity and kinetic energy. These results were compared between each model. In addition, the flow distribution obtained in vitro was compared to in vivo. The results showed significant difference in velocities measured at the outlets of the models that required internal support material when printing. Furthermore, an ultrasound flow sensor was used to validate flow measurements at the inlets and outlets of the in vitro models. These results were highly correlated to those measured with 4D Flow MRI. This study showed that commercially available AM technologies can be used to create patient-specific vascular models for in vitro hemodynamic studies at reasonable costs. However, technologies that do not require internal supports during manufacturing allow smoother internal surfaces, which makes them better suited for flow analyses.

  13. Congenital anomalies associated with trisomy 18 or trisomy 13: A registry-based study in 16 European countries, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Springett, Anna; Wellesley, Diana; Greenlees, Ruth; Loane, Maria; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Bergman, Jorieke; Cavero-Carbonell, Clara; Csaky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Draper, Elizabeth S; Garne, Ester; Gatt, Miriam; Haeusler, Martin; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Lynch, Catherine; Dias, Carlos Matias; McDonnell, Robert; Nelen, Vera; O'Mahony, Mary; Pierini, Anna; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Rounding, Catherine; Stoianova, Sylvia; Tuckerz, David; Zymak-Zakutnia, Natalya; Morris, Joan K

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of trisomies 18 and 13 in Europe and the prevalence of associated anomalies. Twenty-five population-based registries in 16 European countries provided data from 2000-2011. Cases included live births, fetal deaths (20+ weeks' gestation), and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly (TOPFAs). The prevalence of associated anomalies was reported in live births. The prevalence of trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 were 4.8 (95%CI: 4.7-5.0) and 1.9 (95%CI: 1.8-2.0) per 10,000 total births. Seventy three percent of cases with trisomy 18 or trisomy 13 resulted in a TOPFA. Amongst 468 live born babies with trisomy 18, 80% (76-83%) had a cardiac anomaly, 21% (17-25%) had a nervous system anomaly, 8% (6-11%) had esophageal atresia and 10% (8-13%) had an orofacial cleft. Amongst 240 Live born babies with trisomy 13, 57% (51-64%) had a cardiac anomaly, 39% (33-46%) had a nervous system anomaly, 30% (24-36%) had an eye anomaly, 44% (37-50%) had polydactyly and 45% (39-52%) had an orofacial cleft. For babies with trisomy 18 boys were less likely to have a cardiac anomaly compared with girls (OR = 0.48 (0.30-0.77) and with trisomy 13 were less likely to have a nervous system anomaly [OR = 0.46 (0.27-0.77)]. Babies with trisomy 18 or trisomy 13 do have a high proportion of associated anomalies with the distribution of anomalies being different in boys and girls.

  14. Multiple congenital anomalies-intellectual disability (MCA-ID) and neuroblastoma in a patient harboring a de novo 14q23.1q23.3 deletion.

    PubMed

    Lehalle, Daphné; Sanlaville, Damien; Guimier, Anne; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Leblanc, Thierry; Galmiche, Louise; Radford, Isabelle; Romana, Serge; Colleaux, Laurence; de Pontual, Loïc; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne

    2014-05-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most frequent extra cranial solid tumor in infants and children. Genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma has been suspected previously due to familial cases of sporadic NB and predisposition to NB in several syndromes. Here, we report on a de novo 14q23.1-q23.3 microdeletion in a male presenting with a neuroblastoma diagnosed at 9 months, and spherocytosis, congenital heart defect, cryptorchidism, hypoplasia of corpus callosum, epilepsy, and developmental delay. Myc-associated-factor X (MAX) haploinsufficiency could be regarded as the predisposing factor to NB. Indeed 14q deletion is a recurrent somatic rearrangement in NB and MAX somatic and germline loss of function mutation have recently been described in pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. However, MAX was expressed in the tumor of the patient we report on and, accordingly, loss of heterozygosity, mutation, or promoter methylation were excluded. In addition, we discuss the potential involvement in the clinical spectrum presented by the patient of five of the deleted genes, namely DAAM1, PLEKHG3, SPTB, AKAP5, and ARID4A.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... right ventricle, D-transposition of the great arteries , Ebstein anomaly, hypoplastic left heart syndrome , interrupted aortic arch, ... Testing Registry: Congenital heart disease Genetic Testing Registry: Ebstein's anomaly Genetic Testing Registry: Hypoplastic left heart syndrome ...

  16. Unique de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 17, del(17) (q23.2q24.3) in a female newborn with multiple congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.L.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lewis, R.L.

    1995-01-02

    We describe a newborn with a novel interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 17 (del(17) (q23.2q24.3)) who died on day of life 17 during a recurrent apneic episode. Her phenotype included severe growth retardation, multiple facial anomalies, maldeveloped oralpharyngeal structures, and digital and widespread skeletal anomalies. This patient`s phenotype was compared to two other reported patients with deletion 17q with minor clinical overlap consistent with a unique deletion. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 2q32-34 associated with multiple congenital anomalies and a urea cycle defect (CPS I deficiency).

    PubMed

    Loscalzo, M L; Galczynski, R L; Hamosh, A; Summar, M; Chinsky, J M; Thomas, G H

    2004-07-30

    A de novo deletion of the long arm of chromosome 2 at 2q31-33 was observed in the fetal amniocyte G-banded karyotype performed because of possible multiple malformations identified by ultrasound at 23 weeks gestation. Two days after the uneventful term delivery of a 2.45 kg male, the neonate experienced cardiopulmonary decompensation and biochemical changes compatible with carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I (CPS I) deficiency (elevated ammonia with a peak of 948 micromol/L, deficiency of citrulline, and no increase in orotic acid). The child died on day 3 of life. Physical anomalies confirmed at autopsy included double superior vena cava, ectopic adrenal tissue, and metatarsus adductus. The autopsy also revealed histologic evidence consistent with CPS deficiency, most notably microvesicular steatosis of the liver and Alzheimer's Type II changes with hypertrophic astrocytes in the basal ganglia. A postnatal lymphocyte karyotype confirmed the chromosome 2q31-33 deletion. Enzyme analysis on postmortem liver tissue confirmed the diagnosis of CPS deficiency. CPS I is reported to be mapped to 2q35 by NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mapview/) and 2q34 by ENSEMBL (http://www.ensembl.org/). The UCSC Human Genome Browser July 2003 assembly also places the gene at 2q34 (http://genome.UCSC.edu/). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with a BAC clone (RP11-349G4) of CPS I demonstrated that one copy of the gene was deleted in this infant. Using additional probes corresponding to the bands in the region of deletion, we identified the deleted region as 2q32-2q34. Our observations support the CPS I map position (ENSEMBL, UCSC) at 2q34. Additionally, potential conditions associated with deletions narrowly defined by standard cytogenetic techniques merit consideration in prenatal counseling. As demonstrated here, deletions may not only result in malformations and mental retardation but also increase the likelihood of revealing mutated genes located in the undeleted

  18. Syndromes and anomalies associated with cleft

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, R.

    2009-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are one of the commonest birth defects, and may be associated with other congenital anomalies. The majority of these orofacial clefts are nonsyndromic. A significant percentage of these clefts both syndromic and non-syndromic may have associated anomalies. Apart from reviewing other studies, this article also analyses a study of associated anomalies from a tertiary cleft centre in India. PMID:19884681

  19. Craniorachischisis Totalis with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia-A Rare Presentation of Fryns Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aneet; Pilli, Ganga S; Bannur, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Fryns syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with an autosomal recessive inheritance. Here we describe the autopsy case findings of a 19-week male fetus, born out of a consanguineous marriage. The dissection revealed left-sided diaphragmatic hernia, resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia and shift of heart to the right side. In addition, anencephaly and spina bifida throughout the vertebral column were observed. All six criteria for Fryns syndrome were met. Such a presentation of Fryns syndrome associated with Craniorachischisis Totalis has not been reported so far. We have also tabulated the overlapping features of some multiple congenital anomaly syndromes that need to be distinguished at autopsy for an accurate diagnosis.

  20. Modern Strategy for Identification of Congenital Heart Defects in the Neonatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Kardasevic, Mediha; Jovanovic, Ida; Samardzic, Jelica Predojevic

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital heart defects are the most common congenital anomalies and occur with an incidence from 0.8 to 1% per 1000 live births. In recent years, the pulse oximetry has become a strong candidate for detecting cyanogen congenital heart defects and in combination with routine clinical exam can improve diagnostic of congenital heart diseases. Objective: To apply the modern algorithm for early detection of congenital heart defects in order to improve the diagnosis in the neonatal period. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective study that included children born in Bihac Cantonal Hospital during 2012. The diagnostic algorithm included a clinical examination of the newborn, measuring of transcutaneous oxygen saturation with the pulse oximeter between 24 and 48 hours of life, and, in some cases, additional tests (cardiac ultrasound). Results: A total of 1,865 children were examined. The application of diagnostic protocol identified the existence of congenital heart defects in 29 children. In re-evaluating the auscultator and ultrasound findings, we identified congenital heart defects in 19 children. Conclusion: The application of the modern algorithm for early detection of congenital heart diseases in the neonatal period can significantly improve the making of diagnosis of these anomalies. The concept is simple, inexpensive and applicable in most maternity wards. PMID:27994302

  1. A Rare Coexistence of Bilateral Congenital Wilms Tumor with Ductal Plate Malformation at Autopsy.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Suvradeep; Chatterjee, Debajyoti; Gowda, Kiran; Das, Ashim

    2016-01-01

    Congenital Wilms tumor is a tumor of childhood. Here we present an unusual case of bilateral congenital Wilms tumor with associated ductal plate malformation. In addition, there was also associated oligohydramnios, pulmonary hypoplasia, and multiple skeletal anomalies in this index case. Although various syndromic associations of Wilms tumor are well described in the literature, an association of congenital Wilms tumor with ductal plate malformation, polysplenia, and skeletal malformations is not reported. We believe that this is the first reported case of such an association.

  2. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  3. A Constellation of Cardiac Anomalies: Beyond Shone's Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ganju, Neeraj K.; Kandoria, Arvind; Thakur, Suresh; Ganju, Sunite A.

    2016-01-01

    Shone's anomaly is a very rare congenital cardiac malformation characterized by four serial obstructive lesions of the left side of the heart (i) Supravalvular mitral membrane (ii) parachute mitral valve (iii) muscular or membranous subaortic stenosis and (iv) coarctation of aorta. We report a unique presentation of Shone's complex in a 14-year-old adolescent male. In addition to the four characteristic lesions the patient had bicuspid aortic valve, aneurysm of sinus of valsalva, patent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, persistent left superior vena cava opening into coronary sinus and severe pulmonary artery hypertension. This case report highlights the importance of a strong clinical suspicion of the coexistence of multiple congenital cardiac anomalies in Shone's complex and the significance of a careful comprehensive echocardiography. PMID:27293526

  4. A Constellation of Cardiac Anomalies: Beyond Shone's Complex.

    PubMed

    Ganju, Neeraj K; Kandoria, Arvind; Thakur, Suresh; Ganju, Sunite A

    2016-01-01

    Shone's anomaly is a very rare congenital cardiac malformation characterized by four serial obstructive lesions of the left side of the heart (i) Supravalvular mitral membrane (ii) parachute mitral valve (iii) muscular or membranous subaortic stenosis and (iv) coarctation of aorta. We report a unique presentation of Shone's complex in a 14-year-old adolescent male. In addition to the four characteristic lesions the patient had bicuspid aortic valve, aneurysm of sinus of valsalva, patent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, persistent left superior vena cava opening into coronary sinus and severe pulmonary artery hypertension. This case report highlights the importance of a strong clinical suspicion of the coexistence of multiple congenital cardiac anomalies in Shone's complex and the significance of a careful comprehensive echocardiography.

  5. Analysis of spacecraft anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.; Graham, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    The anomalies from 316 spacecraft covering the entire U.S. space program were analyzed to determine if there were any experimental or technological programs which could be implemented to remove the anomalies from future space activity. Thirty specific categories of anomalies were found to cover nearly 85 percent of all observed anomalies. Thirteen experiments were defined to deal with 17 of these categories; nine additional experiments were identified to deal with other classes of observed and anticipated anomalies. Preliminary analyses indicate that all 22 experimental programs are both technically feasible and economically viable.

  6. Novel interstitial deletion of 10q24.3-25.1 associated with multiple congenital anomalies including lobar holoprosencephaly, cleft lip and palate, and hypoplastic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Peltekova, Iskra T; Hurteau-Millar, Julie; Armour, Christine M

    2014-12-01

    Chromosome 10q deletions are rare and phenotypically diverse. Such deletions differ in length and occur in numerous regions on the long arm of chromosome 10, accounting for the wide clinical variability. Commonly reported findings include dysmorphic facial features, microcephaly, developmental delay, and genitourinary abnormalities. Here, we report on a female patient with a novel interstitial 5.54 Mb deletion at 10q24.31-q25.1. This patient had findings in common with a previously reported patient with an overlapping deletion, including renal anomalies and an orofacial cleft, but also demonstrated lobar holoprosencephaly and a Dandy-Walker malformation, features which have not been previously reported with 10q deletions. An analysis of the region deleted in our patient showed numerous genes, such as KAZALD1, PAX2, SEMA4G, ACTRA1, INA, and FGF8, whose putative functions may have played a role in the phenotype seen in our patient.

  7. Noninvasive evaluation for congenital arteriovenous fistulas and malformations.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Robert B

    2012-03-01

    Although relatively rare, congenital arteriovenous fistulas and other vascular anomalies present a diagnostic challenge to the clinician. The same noninvasive tests that are used for diagnosing arterial occlusive disease in the extremities will also detect arteriovenous fistulas. These tests include segmental limb pressure measurements, segmental plethysmography, and arterial waveform analysis. Additionally, magnetic resonance imaging can be used to determine the extent of these vascular anomalies and the involvement of muscle skin and bone, all of which have a direct bearing on resectability. This article will examine these diagnostic modalities and explain how they can be used in this setting.

  8. Chromothripsis with at least 12 breaks at 1p36.33-p35.3 in a boy with multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Bruno Faulin; Richieri-Costa, Antônio; Costa, Silvia; Rosenberg, Carla; Ribeiro-Bicudo, Lucilene Arilho

    2015-12-01

    Terminal deletion in the short arm of chromosome 1 results in a disorder described as 1p36 deletion syndrome. The resulting phenotype varies among patients including mental retardation, developmental delay, sensorineural hearing loss, seizures, heart defects, and distinct facies. In the present case, we performed array-comparative genomic hybridization in a boy with multiple congenital malformations presenting some features overlapping the 1p36 deletion phenotype for whom chromosomal analysis did not reveal a terminal deletion in 1p. Results showed complex chromosome rearrangements involving the 1p36.33-p35.3 region. While the mechanism of origin of these rearrangements is still unclear, chromothripsis-a single catastrophic event leading to shattering chromosomes or chromosome regions and rejoining of the segments-has been described to occur in a fraction of cancers. The presence of at least 12 clustered breaks at 1p and apparent lack of mosaicism in the present case suggests that a single event like chromothripsis occurred. This finding suggests that chromothripsis is responsible for some constitutive complex chromosome rearrangements.

  9. Co-occurrence of mosaic supernumerary isochromosome 18p and intermittent 2q13 deletions in a child with multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sushil Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Ali, Akhtar; Rai, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-15

    The present study deals with karyotpye-phenotype correlations in a six month old child with multiple congenital abnormalities. Cytogenetic analysis revealed mosaicism of a small metacentric supernumerary marker chromosome with a karyotype mos 47,XY+mar[34]/46,XY[31]. Cytogenetic microarray result showed three copies of chromosome 18p (15,400 kb in size). Moreover, 255 kbp intermittent deletion of chromosome 2q13 involving RGPD5, RGPD6, LIMS3, and LIMS3-LOC440895 was also observed. Correlating microarray data with the mosaic karyotype, the marker chromosome was identified as mosaic isochromosome 18p and was found to be 32,600 kbp in size. Baby resembled clinical characteristics of trisomy chromosome 18p, isochromosome 18p and trisomy chromosome 18. The present study suggested that deletion of evolutionarily conserved developmental genes (RGPD5, RGPD and LIMS3) in the 2q13 region might have contributed to more severity in phenotype as compared to so far such reported cases of 18p trisomy's, as these are involved in nuclear-cytoplasm trafficking, signaling for tissue patterning and differentiation.

  10. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Outflow tract obstruction, coarctation of the aorta, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Silversides, Candice K; Beauchesne, Luc; Bradley, Timothy; Connelly, Michael; Niwa, Koichiro; Mulder, Barbara; Webb, Gary; Colman, Jack; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part II of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and bicuspid aortic valve disease, coarctation of the aorta, right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan’s syndrome. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts that are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352138

  11. [Congenital gastrointestinal diseases with manifestations in adulthood].

    PubMed

    Rösch, W

    1977-02-03

    A genetic background is discussed in many disorders of the gastrointestinal tract with a disposition in addition to environmental factors. The pathophysiology of most hereditary diseases is unknown although the mode of inheritance is established. Biochemical analysis may show molecular defects or inborn lack of enzymes, cytogenetic studies may reveal chromosomal abnormalities. The knowledge of genetic factors in gastrointestinal disorders may contribute to the early detection of persons afflicted but not yet symptomatic, in some rare syndromes genetic counseling may become mandatory. Finally, there are many congenital malformations which may not cause symptoms for many years so that doubts may arise whether they are developmental anomalies or acquired conditions.

  12. Congenital lobar emphysema associated with polysplenia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Choh, Naseer A.; Choh, Suhil A.; Jehangir, Majid; Naikoo, Bashir A.

    2010-01-01

    Polysplenia, or left isomerism, is a rare heterotaxy syndrome characterized by bilateral bi-lobed lungs, bilateral pulmonary atria, a symmetrical midline liver, and multiple aberrant splenic nodules. We report a case of polysplenia associated with congenital lobar emphysema apart from other typical anomalies. Such an association has not been previously reported. The patient was a young male with progressive exertional breathlessness referred for high resolution CT of the lungs. CT, MRI and echocardiography revealed (in addition to congenital lobar emphysema of right lung) a hemiazygos continuation of the inferior vena cava, a persistent left superior vena cava, multiple splenunculi in the right hypochondrium, midline liver, bilateral bilobed lungs, a large pulmonary artery (suggestive of severe pulmonary artery hypertension) and a large VSD—a typical constellation of findings described in polysplenia syndrome. PMID:20864788

  13. Additions to Magnetic Trackline Archive For Improvements to Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2) and Improvements to Data Dissemination at NGDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B.; Jencks, J.; Barckhausen, U.; Ishihara, T.; Campagnoli, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is the primary archive of marine geophysical data worldwide. However, it has been challenging for scientist to discover and access data due to variable data formats, non-digital data holdings, and transitioning data discovery portals. In 2014, NGDC made a concerted effort to identify, ingest, and archive all publicly available magnetic trackline data for access via a new Trackline Geophysical Data web-based interface. Non-digital data were digitized and added to the Global Geophysical Database and are now available for download in a common MGD77 format. All ancillary and analog data are accessible via the same interface, without having to navigate through multiple directories or prompts. The result is over 16.5 million miles of magnetic trackline data are now available, both through NGDC's improved user interface and as a web service for incorporation into other portals. This allows the geoscience community unprecedented access to global geophysical magnetic trackline data from a secure long-term archive. The addition of 6.5 million miles of magnetic trackline data to the database, since the previous release of the Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2), will give NGDC the ability to improve the model coverage, especially in areas of low coverage, such as around the Eltanin Fracture Zone in the South Pacific. This poster will focus on some key data additions and how they will help us validate the accuracy of the ocean age model/directional gridding algorithm and improve the Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid going forward.

  14. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  15. Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    De Laey, J J

    1991-01-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by the onset of blindness before the age of 6 months, a variable fundus aspect and an absent or extremely pathological ERG. The disorder may be isolated or associated with systemic involvement, such as nephronophtisis (Senior-Loken syndrome), nephronophtisis, cone-shaped epiphyses of the hand and cerebellar ataxia (Saldino-Mainzer syndrome), vermis hypoplasia, oculomotor anomalies and respiratory problems in the neonatal period (Joubert syndrome) or cardiomyopathy. It should be differentiated from other forms or chorioretinal dystrophies (juvenile retinitis pigmentosa or congenital stationary night blindness), cortical blindness or maturation delay and metabolic disorders. Children with possible congenital Leber amaurosis should not only have a thorough ophthalmological examination, but should also be seen by a paediatrician experienced in metabolic disorders.

  16. Free radicals and antioxidants status in neonates with congenital malformation

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Bedabrata; Gongopadhyay, Ajay Narayan; Rani, Anjali; Gavel, Roshni; Mishra, Surendra Pratap

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies using animal models have shown that oxidative stress during pregnancy may play an important role in causing birth defects. Congenital anomalies affect an estimated 270,000 newborns who die during the first 28 days of life every year from different birth defects. Hence, at present many research works are going on to reduce the infant mortality from congenital anomaly.[1] Objective: The objective was to measure the oxidant and antioxidant level in the serum of newborn babies with the congenital anomaly and compare these levels with age and sex matched normal neonates. This is to identify any role of oxidative stress in the causation of congenital anomaly. Materials and Methods: This case-control study included 159 participants: 106 newborns with the congenital anomaly and 53 healthy newborns. The markers of oxidative stress like serum malondialdehyde (MDA) level, protein carbonyl (PC) level, and the activity of antioxidants such as Vitamin C, glutathione were measured in both cases (neonates with congenital anomaly) and controls (normal healthy neonates). These parameters were statistically compared. Results: MDA levels and PC levels were significantly higher (P < 0.0001), and Vitamin C and reduced glutathione levels were significantly lower (P < 0.0001), in newborns with congenital malformation than in healthy newborns. Conclusions: Increased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation might play an important role in the pathogenesis of congenital anomaly. Impairment of the free radical/antioxidant balance is leading to increased free radical damage in neonates with congenital malformation. PMID:26628809

  17. Bilateral first and second arch anomalies: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Virad; Narula, Vineet; Meher, Ravi; Raj, Anoop

    2012-04-01

    Branchial sinuses are one of the most common congenital anomalies present. They are usually unilateral; bilateral cases are present but are rare. The presentation of bilateral branchial sinus anomalies along with bilateral first arch anomalies is very rare. Here, we present a case of bilateral first arch anomalies co-existing with bilateral second arch anomalies in a patient with no related family history and no associated syndrome.

  18. XYY chromosome anomaly and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, M; MacBeth, R; Varma, S L

    1998-02-07

    Sex chromosome anomalies have been associated with psychoses, and most of the evidence is linked to the presence of an additional X chromosome. We report a patient with XYY chromosome anomaly who developed schizophrenia.

  19. Constitutional 560.49 kb chromosome 2p24.3 duplication including the MYCN gene identified by SNP chromosome microarray analysis in a child with multiple congenital anomalies and bilateral Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Micale, Mark A; Embrey, Bedford; Macknis, Jacqueline K; Harper, Cheryl E; Aughton, David J

    2016-12-01

    Fewer than 100 patients with partial chromosome 2p trisomy have been reported. Clinical features are variable and depend on the size of the duplicated segment, but generally include psychomotor delay, facial anomalies, congenital heart defect, and other abnormalities. We report a 560.49 kb duplication of chromosome 2p in a 13 month-old male with hydrocephaly, ventricular septal defect, partial agenesis of the corpus callosum, and bilateral Wilms tumor. After discovery of bilateral renal masses at four months of age, the child underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by right radical nephrectomy that revealed triphasic Wilms' tumor. A needle core biopsy on one of two lesions on the left kidney also revealed Wilms tumor. A partial left nephrectomy revealed focally positive margins that necessitated left flank radiotherapy. The tumor karyotype was 46,XY,t(7;8)(q36;p11)[8]/46,XY [12] while his constitutional karyotype was 46,XY, suggesting that the t(7;8)(q36;p11) was associated with the malignancy. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chromosome microarray analysis of peripheral blood identified a maternally-inherited 560.49 kb chromosome 2p24.3 duplication that involved four OMIM genes: NBAS, DDX1, MYCNOS, and MYCN. SNP array analysis of the tumor revealed the same 2p24.3 duplication. At present, the now 5-year-old boy continues to do well without clinical or radiographic evidence of recurrent disease. This case is instructive because the child's health insurer initially denied authorization for chromosome microarray analysis (CMA), and it took more than one year before such authorization was finally granted. That initial decision to deny coverage could have had untoward health implications for this child, as the identification of constitutional MYCN duplication necessitated surveillance imaging for a number of pediatric malignancies associated with MYCN overexpression/dysregulation.

  20. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2017-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  1. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Congenital Hypothyroidism March 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... Pediatric Endocrine Society MedlinePlus (NIH) What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  2. Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. It is one of the most common parasitic infections in humans and is most typically asymptomatic. However, primary infection in a pregnant woman can cause severe and disabling disease in the developing fetus. Recent developments have included increased understanding of the role of parasite genotype in determining infectivity and disease severity. Risk factors for acquisition of infection have been better defined, and the important role of foodborne transmission has been further delineated. In addition, strategies have emerged to decrease mother-to-child transmission through prompt identification of acutely infected pregnant women followed by appropriate treatment. Refined diagnostic tools, particularly the addition of immunoglobulin G avidity testing, allow for more accurate timing of maternal infection and hence better decision making during pregnancy. Congenitally infected children can be treated, beginning in utero and continuing through the first year of life, to ameliorate the severity of disease. However, despite these many advances in our understanding of congenital toxoplasmosis prevention and treatment, significant areas of study remain: we need better drugs, well defined strategies for screening of pregnant women, improved food safety, and improved diagnostic tests. PMID:25232475

  3. A case of congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries discovered on coronary computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Marler, Adam T; Slim, Jennifer N; Batts, Travis; Watts, James; Slim, Ahmad M

    2013-01-01

    Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries is a rare condition accounting for less than 1% of all congenital cardiac diseases. The fundamental nature of this condition involves a blend of atrioventricular as well as ventriculoarterial discordance. Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries is classically associated with three additional abnormalities, including ventricular septal defect, right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, and tricuspid valve abnormalities. Patients with this anomaly have been shown to exhibit reduced exercise tolerance as well as reduced health-related quality of life when compared to patients with normal cardiovascular anatomy. We present the case of a 33-year-old active duty lieutenant in the United States Air Force referred to the cardiology clinic for evaluation of valvular heart disease with subsequent discovery of congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries on cardiac gated computed tomography.

  4. Megadolichobasilar anomaly, basilar impression and occipito-vertebral anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Dehaene, I; Pattyn, G; Calliauw, L

    1975-01-01

    The authors describe a case of a megadolichobasilar anomaly associated with basilar impression, bilateral megadolichocarotid arteries and an occipito-vertebral anastomosis. The concurrence of these anomalies lends support to the hypothesis that congenital factors play a part in the origin of the megadolichobasilar anomaly.

  5. Holonomy anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Bagger, J.; Nemeschansky, D.; Yankielowicz, S.

    1985-05-01

    A new type of anomaly is discussed that afflicts certain non-linear sigma models with fermions. This anomaly is similar to the ordinary gauge and gravitational anomalies since it reflects a topological obstruction to the reparametrization invariance of the quantum effective action. Nonlinear sigma models are constructed based on homogeneous spaces G/H. Anomalies arising when the fermions are chiral are shown to be cancelled sometimes by Chern-Simons terms. Nonlinear sigma models are considered based on general Riemannian manifolds. 9 refs. (LEW)

  6. Bangui Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    Bangui anomaly is the name given to one of the Earth s largest crustal magnetic anomalies and the largest over the African continent. It covers two-thirds of the Central African Republic and therefore the name derives from the capitol city-Bangui that is also near the center of this feature. From surface magnetic survey data Godivier and Le Donche (1962) were the first to describe this anomaly. Subsequently high-altitude world magnetic surveying by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (Project Magnet) recorded a greater than 1000 nT dipolar, peak-to-trough anomaly with the major portion being negative (figure 1). Satellite observations (Cosmos 49) were first reported in 1964, these revealed a 40nT anomaly at 350 km altitude. Subsequently the higher altitude (417-499km) POGO (Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Observatory) satellite data recorded peak-to-trough anomalies of 20 nT these data were added to Cosmos 49 measurements by Regan et al. (1975) for a regional satellite altitude map. In October 1979, with the launch of Magsat, a satellite designed to measure crustal magnetic anomalies, a more uniform satellite altitude magnetic map was obtained. These data, computed at 375 km altitude recorded a -22 nT anomaly (figure 2). This elliptically shaped anomaly is approximately 760 by 1000 km and is centered at 6%, 18%. The Bangui anomaly is composed of three segments; there are two positive anomalies lobes north and south of a large central negative field. This displays the classic pattern of a magnetic anomalous body being magnetized by induction in a zero inclination field. This is not surprising since the magnetic equator passes near the center of this body.

  7. Penile agenesis and congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis: an association or a random coexistence?

    PubMed

    Yagmurlu, Aydin; Vargun, Rahsan; Gollu, Gulnur; Gokcora, I Haluk

    2004-01-01

    A neonate with penile agenesis and congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is presented. The patterns of associated anomalies with penile agenesis, and those of congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis are discussed.

  8. The Neural Crest in Cardiac Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Keyte, Anna; Hutson, Mary Redmond

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the function of neural crest as they relate to cardiovascular defects. The cardiac neural crest cells are a subpopulation of cranial neural crest discovered nearly 30 years ago by ablation of premigratory neural crest. The cardiac neural crest cells are necessary for normal cardiovascular development. We begin with a description of the crest cells in normal development, including their function in remodeling the pharyngeal arch arteries, outflow tract septation, valvulogenesis, and development of the cardiac conduction system. The cells are also responsible for modulating signaling in the caudal pharynx, including the second heart field. Many of the molecular pathways that are known to influence specification, migration, patterning and final targeting of the cardiac neural crest cells are reviewed. The cardiac neural crest cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various human cardiocraniofacial syndromes such as DiGeorge, Velocardiofacial, CHARGE, Fetal Alcohol, Alagille, LEOPARD, and Noonan syndromes, as well as Retinoic Acid Embryopathy. The loss of neural crest cells or their dysfunction may not always directly cause abnormal cardiovascular development, but are involved secondarily because crest cells represent a major component in the complex tissue interactions in the head, pharynx and outflow tract. Thus many of the human syndromes linking defects in the heart, face and brain can be better understood when considered within the context of a single cardiocraniofacial developmental module with the neural crest being a key cell type that interconnects the regions. PMID:22595346

  9. The phenotypic spectrum of congenital Zika syndrome.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Miguel; Feitosa, Ian M L; Ribeiro, Erlane M; Horovitz, Dafne D G; Pessoa, André L S; França, Giovanny V A; García-Alix, Alfredo; Doriqui, Maria J R; Wanderley, Hector Y C; Sanseverino, Maria V T; Neri, João I C F; Pina-Neto, João M; Santos, Emerson S; Verçosa, Islane; Cernach, Mirlene C S P; Medeiros, Paula F V; Kerbage, Saile C; Silva, André A; van der Linden, Vanessa; Martelli, Celina M T; Cordeiro, Marli T; Dhalia, Rafael; Vianna, Fernanda S L; Victora, Cesar G; Cavalcanti, Denise P; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2017-04-01

    In October 2015, Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MoH). In response, the Brazilian Society of Medical Genetics established a task force (SBGM-ZETF) to study the phenotype of infants born with microcephaly due to ZIKV congenital infection and delineate the phenotypic spectrum of this newly recognized teratogen. This study was based on the clinical evaluation and neuroimaging of 83 infants born during the period from July, 2015 to March, 2016 and registered by the SBGM-ZETF. All 83 infants had significant findings on neuroimaging consistent with ZIKV congenital infection and 12 had confirmed ZIKV IgM in CSF. A recognizable phenotype of microcephaly, anomalies of the shape of skull and redundancy of the scalp consistent with the Fetal Brain Disruption Sequence (FBDS) was present in 70% of infants, but was most often subtle. In addition, features consistent with fetal immobility, ranging from dimples (30.1%), distal hand/finger contractures (20.5%), and feet malpositions (15.7%), to generalized arthrogryposis (9.6%), were present in these infants. Some cases had milder microcephaly or even a normal head circumference (HC), and other less distinctive findings. The detailed observation of the dysmorphic and neurologic features in these infants provides insight into the mechanisms and timings of the brain disruption and the sequence of developmental anomalies that may occur after prenatal infection by the ZIKV.

  10. Congenital malformations of the brain and spine.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Prashant; Zamora, Carlos; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we briefly address the most common congenital brain and spinal anomalies as well as their most salient imaging, especially magnetic resonance, findings. Some of them, such as Chiari II, and open spinal defects, have become relatively rare due to their detection in utero and repair of the spinal malformation. Regardless of the type of brain anomaly, the most common clinical symptoms are mental retardation, hydrocephalus, and seizure; the latter two may need to be surgically and medically addressed. The most commonly found spinal congenital anomalies include the filum terminale lipoma which is generally asymptomatic and incidental and the caudal regression syndrome for which no primary treatment exists. Any spinal congenital anomaly may present in adulthood as a consequence of spinal cord tethering and/or development of syringomyelia.

  11. Ebstein Anomaly: An Overview for Nursing.

    PubMed

    Johnstad, Christine M; Hecker-Fernandes, Jill Renee; Fernandes, Regis

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital heart defect. Many nurses have probably never encountered this anomaly, with very few able to accurately depict the pathological anatomy of the condition. As technology further develops, providers are better equipped to recognize and manage Ebstein anomaly. There are important considerations for nurses when caring for an individual with Ebstein anomaly. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the condition exploring the pathophysiology, how patients typically present, and how to effectively care for a patient with Ebstein anomaly regarding medical and surgical courses of treatment. It is important for nurses to have a resource to reference on Ebstein anomaly, and the majority of current literature is solely based for medical providers. Furthermore, Ebstein patients may be seen on a variety of units in the hospital beyond cardiology (i.e., pregnant patient with a diagnosis of Ebstein anomaly).

  12. Congenital hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-09-01

    Congenital hemangiomas are rare solitary vascular tumors that do not proliferate after birth. They are characterized as either rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICHs) or noninvoluting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs) based on their clinical progression. NICHs have no associated complications, but are persistent. RICH, while usually asymptomatic, may ulcerate or bleed early in their presentation, but involute quickly during the first few months of life. Hepatic RICHs are not associated with cutaneous RICHs, but may result in high-output cardiac failure due to arteriovenous or portovenous shunting. In the following review, the clinical characteristics and current management specific to congenital hemangiomas is discussed.

  13. An unusual occurrence of Karsch-Neugebauer syndrome with orodental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Mathian, Veerabadran Mahesh; Sundaram, Allagappan Meenakshi; Karunakaran, Ramachandran; Vijayaragavan, Rangasamy; Vinod, Selvaraj; Rubini, Ramachandran

    2012-08-01

    Karsch-Neugebauer syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by split foot, split hand anomalies in association with congenital nystagmus. It is an inherited condition and often occurs in both the hands and the feet. Its pattern of inheritance is autosomal dominant, though occasionally it can skip a generation. It affects about 1 in 90,000 babies, with males and females equally being affected. This rare syndrome may be associated with additional abnormalities such as hypodontia, delayed eruption, variation in morphology and position of teeth, but it is not widely documented. In view of the low incidence of this syndrome and of the limited number of reports on this in the literature, the objective of this article is to highlight the oral findings of this syndrome.

  14. Vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    Sando, I; Orita, Y; Miura, M; Balaban, C D

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews the histopathologic features of vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders affecting the inner ear, based upon a comprehensive literature survey and a review of cases in our temporal bone collection. The review proceeds in three systematic steps. First, we surveyed associated diseases with the major phenotypic features of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear (including the internal auditory canal and otic capsule). Second, the vestibular anomalies are examined specifically. Finally, the anomalies are discussed from a developmental perspective. Among vestibular anomalies, a hypoplastic endolymphatic duct and sac are observed most frequently. Anomalies of the semicircular canals are also often observed. From embryological and clinical viewpoints, many of these resemble the structural features from fetal stages and appear to be associated with vestibular dysfunction. It is expected that progress in genetic analysis and accumulation of temporal bone specimens with vestibular abnormalities in congenital diseases will provide crucial information not only for pathology of those diseases, but also for genetic factors that are responsible for the specific vestibular abnormalities.

  15. [Mild type of the Ebstein anomaly].

    PubMed

    Jedliński, Ireneusz; Jamrozek-Jedlińska, Maria; Bugajski, Paweł; Waśniewski, Michał; Poprawski, Kajetan; Słomczyński, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a congenital malformation of the heart that is characterised by apical displacement of the septal and posterior tricuspid valve leaflets, leading to atrialisation of the right ventricle with a variable degree of malformation and displacement of the anterior leaflet. We present a case of a mild type Ebstein anomaly leading to moderate tricuspid valve regurgitation and some degree of right ventricular dysfunction.

  16. Update: Interim Guidance for the Evaluation and Management of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, August 2016.

    PubMed

    Russell, Kate; Oliver, Sara E; Lewis, Lillianne; Barfield, Wanda D; Cragan, Janet; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Staples, J Erin; Fischer, Marc; Peacock, Georgina; Oduyebo, Titilope; Petersen, Emily E; Zaki, Sherif; Moore, Cynthia A; Rasmussen, Sonja A

    2016-08-26

    CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers with possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy (1). Laboratory testing is recommended for 1) infants born to mothers with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy and 2) infants who have abnormal clinical or neuroimaging findings suggestive of congenital Zika syndrome and a maternal epidemiologic link suggesting possible transmission, regardless of maternal Zika virus test results. Congenital Zika syndrome is a recently recognized pattern of congenital anomalies associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy that includes microcephaly, intracranial calcifications or other brain anomalies, or eye anomalies, among others (2). Recommended infant laboratory evaluation includes both molecular (real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [rRT-PCR]) and serologic (immunoglobulin M [IgM]) testing. Initial samples should be collected directly from the infant in the first 2 days of life, if possible; testing of cord blood is not recommended. A positive infant serum or urine rRT-PCR test result confirms congenital Zika virus infection. Positive Zika virus IgM testing, with a negative rRT-PCR result, indicates probable congenital Zika virus infection. In addition to infant Zika virus testing, initial evaluation of all infants born to mothers with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy should include a comprehensive physical examination, including a neurologic examination, postnatal head ultrasound, and standard newborn hearing screen. Infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection should have a comprehensive ophthalmologic exam and hearing assessment by auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing before 1 month of age. Recommendations for follow-up of infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection depend on whether abnormalities consistent with congenital Zika syndrome

  17. [Congenital thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2016-03-01

    Congenital thrombophilia is a thrombotic diathesis caused by a variety of genetic abnormalities in blood coagulation factors or their inhibitory factors associated with physiological thrombus formation. Patients with congenital thrombophilia often present with unusual clinical episodes of venous thrombosis (occasionally combined with pulmonary embolism, known as venous thromboembolism) at a young age and recurrence in atypical vessels, such as the mesenteric vein and superior sagittal sinus, often with a family history of this condition. Studies in Japan as well as in western countries have shown congenital thrombophilia to be caused by a wide variety of genetic abnormalities in natural anticoagulant proteins, such as antithrombin, protein C, and protein S. However, there may still be many unknown causes of hereditary thrombosis. We recently reported a case of hereditary thrombosis induced by a novel mechanism of antithrombin resistance, that is, congenital thrombophilia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the coagulation factor prothrombin.

  18. Congenital cataract

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congenital and inherited cataracts. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology . 16th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott ... Cataracts and systemic disease. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology . 16th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott ...

  19. Congenital Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... arms and legs, droopy eyelids, and problems with eye movements. Weakness often gets worse with time. Central core ... difficulties occur as well. Some children have weakened eye movements. Congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy is a rare ...

  20. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at birth. ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; ...

  1. Congenital syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital lues; Fetal syphilis ... which is passed from mother to child during fetal development or at birth. Nearly half of all ... Saunders; 2014:chap 143. Duff P. Maternal and fetal infections. In: Creasy RK, Resnik R, Iams JD, ...

  2. Congenital Symmastia: A 3-Step Approach

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Atef A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Congenital symmastia is a medial confluence of the breasts. It is a rare anomaly with few reports in the literature and no standard treatment. In this article, we present a case of congenital symmastia treated by 3 steps: liposuction, fixation of the skin to the chest wall in the area of the intermammary sulcus, and postoperative intermammary compression. A successful result was achieved with normal cleavage between the breasts. So, this is considered the ideal treatment for this condition.

  3. [Congenital diarrhoea].

    PubMed

    Buda, Piotr; Friedman-Gruszczyńska, Joanna; Książyk, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Congenital diarrhoea of heterogenic etiology is a rare cause of chronic diarrhoea. Characteristic features are: onset in the first weeks of life, life-threatening severe dehydratation and electrolyte disorders leading to a necessity of long-term parenteral nutrition. The clinical onset may be delayed and the degree of diarrhoea may be modest, making the diagnosis difficult. The main causes of congenital diarrhoea such as intestine electrolytes, carbohydrates, lipid and protein transport disorders and congenital enzymatic deficiencies, enterocyte polarization disorders, hormonal, immunological, metabolic, genetic and congenital anatomic disorders are presented in the paper. Some of them, such as: microvillus inclusion disease, tufting enteropathy, intestinal anedocrynosis, IPEX syndrome (immunodysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome) have been described recently. One of the basic investigations, when congenital diarrhea is suspected, is general examination of the stool, its electrolyte concentration and serum electrolytes and blood gas analysis. Often, small bowel biopsy with histological examination (with the use of electronic microscopy and PAS staining) is indicated. In some cases molecular examination is possible and indicated. In differential diagnosis other, more frequent causes of chronic diarrhea of infancy, have to be excluded. In most of the cases of congenital diarrhoea there is no casual treatment available - usually long-term parenteral nutrition is necessary.

  4. DOWN'S ANOMALY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.

    BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S ANOMALY, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)…

  5. A collection of rare anomalies: multiple digital glomuvenous malformations, epidermal naevus, temporal alopecia, heterochromia and abdominal lipoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hill, S; Rademaker, M

    2009-12-01

    Glomuvenous malformations are a subtype of venous malformations, which present in infancy or childhood. We describe a teenage girl who presented with multiple digital glomuvenous malformations from birth. In addition, she had an epidermal naevus on the upper lip, an area of congenital alopecia of the scalp, heterochromia irides and an abdominal lipoblastoma. We are unaware of any reports of the association of multiple glomuvenous malformations with the other uncommon developmental anomalies seen in our patient, and a common link eludes us.

  6. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva without characteristic skeletal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Hasan

    2012-05-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a rare but extremely disabling genetic disease of the skeletal system. This disease is characterized by progression of heterotopic ossification within skeletal muscles, ligaments and tendons. Most patients with FOP are misdiagnosed early in life before the appearance of heterotopic ossification and undergo diagnostic procedures such as biopsy that can cause lifelong disability. Almost all of the patients have some peculiar congenital anomalies, including short great toes, hallux valgus, short thumbs and hypoplasia of digital phalanges. These congenital defects support the diagnosis of FOP, but are not constantly observed in the totality of patients. If necessary, genetic studies can be performed to confirm the diagnosis. Once diagnosed, patients should be advised in order to avoid unnecessary traumas, surgical procedures, biopsies, intramuscular injections and vaccinations. Here, we describe a patient with FOP without characteristic congenital skeletal anomalies.

  7. A surprising content of congenital hernia: complete splenogonadal fusion band.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Prakash Manikka; Reddy, Ajit Kumar; Nutakki, Aditya

    2014-03-26

    Splenogonadal fusion is a rare congenital anomaly. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with a left inguinoscrotal swelling. With a clinical diagnosis of left congenital inguinal hernia the patient was taken up for explorative laparotomy where a transperitoneal band was noted adherent to the left testis. Biopsy revealed normal splenic tissue. Postoperatively the boy was imaged and a diagnosis of splenogonadal fusion was made. This article illustrates the imaging features of this rare anomaly.

  8. A surprising content of congenital hernia: complete splenogonadal fusion band

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Prakash Manikka; Reddy, Ajit Kumar; Nutakki, Aditya

    2014-01-01

    Splenogonadal fusion is a rare congenital anomaly. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with a left inguinoscrotal swelling. With a clinical diagnosis of left congenital inguinal hernia the patient was taken up for explorative laparotomy where a transperitoneal band was noted adherent to the left testis. Biopsy revealed normal splenic tissue. Postoperatively the boy was imaged and a diagnosis of splenogonadal fusion was made. This article illustrates the imaging features of this rare anomaly. PMID:24671325

  9. Spitz nevus arising upon a congenital glomuvenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Arica, Deniz A; Arica, Ibrahim E; Yayli, Savas; Cobanoglu, Umit; Akay, Bengu N; Anadolu, Rana; Bahadir, Sevgi

    2013-01-01

    There are several reports of the collision of vascular and pigmentary anomalies (e.g., phakomatosis pigmentovascularis) and the association between congenital melanocytic nevi and infantile hemangiomas. We report a case of Spitz nevus arising in skin overlying a congenital plaque-like glomuvenous malformation (GVM). This is the first report of a Spitz nevus arising in direct contiguity to a GVM.

  10. Congenital medium sternal cleft with partial ectopia cordis repair.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Paulo Rego; Antunes, Sónia; Couto, Alexandra; Santos, Gonçalo Cassiano; Leal, Luis Gagp; Magalhães, Manuel Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Congenital sternal malformation is a rare anomaly often diagnosed as an asymptomatic condition at birth. The authors report a clinical case of a full-term female neonate with congenital sternal cleft and partial ectopia cordis. Successful surgical repair was accomplished at 6 days of age. When surgery is performed shortly after birth, the procedure is easier and better results are achieved.

  11. [Congenital dislocation of the knee: report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Ochoa Gómez, L; Sánchez Gimeno, J; García Barrecheguren, E; Marulanda Del Valle, K; Almonte Adón, K; Guerrero Laleona, C

    2015-01-01

    Congenital dislocation of the knee is a rare disease. The diagnosis is made at birth by clinical findings, and confirmed radiologically. It has been associated with various etiologies from intrauterine fetal malpositions to genetic disorders. The prognosis depends on early treatment and whether there are other congenital anomalies. We report two new cases of congenital dislocation of the knee, observed in our hospital during the period of a month, diagnosed immediately after birth, and both with a good clinical outcome.

  12. [Associated brachial cleft anomalies in the cat eye syndrome].

    PubMed

    Avior, Galit; Derowe, Ari; Fliss, Dan M; Leicear-Trejo, Leonor; Braverman, Itzhak

    2007-02-01

    The cat eye syndrome is a congenital malformation usually associated with anal atresia, ocular coloboma, downward slanting eyes, microphthalmia, hypertelorism, strabismus, preauricular tags or fistulas, congenital heart defect particularly septal defect, urinary tract abnormalities, skeletal anomalies and frequently mental and physical retardation. A small supernumerary chromosome (smaller than chromosome 21) is present, frequently has 2 centromeres, is bisatellited and represents an inv dup 22 (q11). A two years old female presented to our department with an association of cat eye syndrome with preauricular tags and a first branchial arch anomaly. This article discusses the surgical management and the association between the cat eye syndrome and first branchial cleft anomaly.

  13. Moebius syndrome with Taussig-Bing anomaly.

    PubMed

    Islam, M I; Chowdhury, A S; Hasan, M T

    2014-01-01

    We report a 6 years old male child, presented with difficulty in swallowing, crying and smiling from early infancy and recurrent episodes of cyanosis on exertion for about 2 years. He had facial dysmorphism, clubbing and polydactyly and right sided lower motor neuron type of facial nerve palsy. On examination and relevant investigations findings were consistent with Moebius syndrome and Taussig-Bing anomaly. Moebius syndrome comprises of congenital facial nerve palsy with or without palsy of the other cranial nerves and the associated organ system malformations. Taussig-Bing anomaly is a rare congenital heart malformation consisting of a transposed aorta, a large pulmonary artery which arises primarily from the right ventricle and ventricular septal defect. Simultaneous occurrence of Moebius syndrome and Taussig-Bing anomaly has not yet been reported in the past.

  14. Reconstruction of a congenitally absent flexor pollicis longus in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Shamsian, Negin; Exton, Rebecca; Shibu, MM

    2010-01-01

    Congenital absence of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) is an unusual finding that is frequently associated with thumb hypoplasia. Isolated FPL absence is the rarest of the congenital thumb anomalies. The present article describes a patient with a congenitally absent FPL, and discusses the chosen method of reconstruction. PMID:22131842

  15. Co-occurrence of congenital hydronephrosis and FOXL2-associated blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES).

    PubMed

    Gulati, Reena; Verdin, Hannah; Halanaik, Dhanapathi; Bhat, B Vishnu; De Baere, Elfride

    2014-10-01

    Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES) is an autosomal dominantly inherited congenital malformation of the eyelids. Diagnostic criteria include blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus and telecanthus. Type І BPES has additional features of premature ovarian failure and female infertility, while type ІІ occurs isolated. We report a two-year old male child with typical features of BPES and bilateral congenital hydronephrosis. The child, first-born to non-consanguineous parents, presented to us with hypertension. Congenital hydronephrosis and reduced renal function were confirmed by renal dynamic scan. Pyeloplasty and stent placement were performed with subsequent resolution of hypertension. On follow up, growth and development are appropriate for age. His father has similar but less severe features of BPES. Sequencing of the FOXL2 gene revealed a heterozygous FOXL2 mutation c.672_701dup, which is a recurrent 30-bp duplication leading to expansion of the polyalanine tract (p.Ala225_Ala234dup), in both father and son. Additional atypical clinical features have been reported previously in BPES patients with this mutation. However, this is the first report of a renal congenital anomaly in a BPES patient with this or other mutations. Although a pleiotropic effect of the FOXL2 mutation cannot be excluded, the co-occurrence of congenital hydronephrosis and BPES may represent two different entities.

  16. [Congenital torticollis].

    PubMed

    Wicart, P

    2012-03-01

    Congenital torticollis is a very common postural deformity, characterized by a more or less severe retraction of sternocleidomastoid muscle. Any treatment, else that "good sense" counsels given to the parents, is indicated. The evolution is spontaneously favorable in the majority of cases before the age of one year old. The elimination of differential diagnosis (vertebral and/or neurological malformations, ocular, tumor) is the key-point. Screening of congenital hip dislocation is mandatory because the physiopathology is the same in both diseases. A remaining torticolis after 18 months of age may be an indication to sternocleidomastoid muscle lengthening.

  17. [Congenital epulis].

    PubMed

    Braga-Tavares, H; Santos, H; M-Pinto, I; Ramos, M; de Sousa, P

    2009-01-01

    Congenital epulis or gingival granular cell tumor is an uncommon benign tumor, usually diagnosed at birth as a pediculated maxilar gingival mass. Although some cases of spontaneous regression have been described, most of the lesions are surgically removed with excelent prognosis and cosmetic final result. The authors describe a case report as well as a short revision on this pathology.

  18. Tracheomalacia - congenital

    MedlinePlus

    ... are floppy. Because the windpipe is the main airway, breathing difficulties begin soon after birth. Congenital tracheomalacia is very uncommon. Symptoms Symptoms can range from mild to severe, and may include: Breathing noises that may change with position and improve during ...

  19. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  20. Congenital amusias.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap."

  1. Abnormal facial appearance and delayed diagnosis of congenital hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Crysdale, W S

    1978-08-01

    Congenital hearing loss occurs in association with cranio-facial anomalies. Lay people and health professionals as well frequently regard individuals with cranio-facial anomalies as "stupid" or of lower than normal intelligence because of their odd appearance. Two case reports illustrate that this erroneous assumption will result in the delayed detection of significant hearing loss.

  2. Echocardiographic assessment of Ebstein's anomaly.

    PubMed

    Booker, Oscar J; Nanda, Navin C

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a complex congenital lesion which primarily involves the tricuspid valve. The tricuspid leaflets are tethered to varying degrees to the right ventricular free wall and the ventricular septum often resulting in significant tricuspid regurgitation and a small functioning right ventricular chamber. Although the septal leaflet originates normally at the right atrioventricular junction, the proximal portion is often completely tethered to the ventricular septum resulting in a misconception and erroneous statements in many publications that its attachment is apically displaced. Although two-dimensional echocardiography represents the primary modality for the diagnosis of this anomaly, three-dimensional echocardiography provides incremental value in characterizing the extent and severity of tethering of individual tricuspid valve leaflets. This information is useful in surgical decision making whether to repair or replace the tricuspid valve.

  3. Klippel-Feil syndrome associated with congenital cervical dislocation: report of an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Masayuki; Wada, Kyosuke; Koyama, Takashi; Kohno, Hiroaki; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Hida, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome is an uncommon congenital anomaly that is characterized by abnormal fusion of the cervical vertebrae and occasionally accompanied by various anomalies of other bones and internal organs. We report the autopsy case of a 5-year-old girl with this syndrome ssociated with congenital cervical dislocation, with special reference to the pathological findings of the vertebral column and spinal cord. Principal anomalies of the cranio-spinal axis were as follows: partial defect of the clivus, scoliosis, hypoplasia of the whole cervical vertebrae, anterior dislocation of C7 with S-shaped deformity of the spinal canal, fusion of the spinous processes of the cervical and thoracic vertebrae, fusion of the vertebral bodies of C6 and C7 with collapse of C7, and spina bifida occulta of L5 and S1. In addition to these skeletal anomalies, subarachnoid vascular malformation in the medulla oblongata, a bronchogenic cyst in the posterior mediastinum, anomalous lobation of the lungs, and the mobile cecum were found at autopsy. The cervical cord showed an increase of the antero-posterior diameter, multifocal spongy changes of the white matter, and partial branching or duplication of the central canal. The brain showed features of anoxic encephalopathy. The partial defect of the clivus, C7 dislocation, and various lesions of the medulla oblongata and cervical cord were interpreted as integral components of, or lesions closely associated with, Klippel-Feil syndrome.

  4. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  5. Ebstein anomaly review: what's now, what's next?

    PubMed

    Dearani, Joseph A; Mora, Bassem N; Nelson, Timothy J; Haile, Dawit T; O'Leary, Patrick W

    2015-10-01

    Ebstein anomaly accounts for 1% of all congenital heart disease. It is a right ventricular myopathy with failure of tricuspid valve delamination and highly variable tricuspid valve morphology that usually results in severe regurgitation. It is the only congenital heart lesion that has a range of clinical presentations, from the severely symptomatic neonate to an asymptomatic adult. Neonatal operation has high operative mortality, whereas operation performed beyond infancy and into adulthood has low operative mortality. Late survival and quality of life for hospital survivors are excellent for the majority of patients in all age brackets. Atrial tachyarrhythmias are the most common late complication. There have been more techniques of tricuspid repair reported in the literature than any other congenital or acquired cardiac lesion. This is largely due to the infinite anatomic variability encountered with this anomaly. The cone reconstruction of Ebstein anomaly can achieve near anatomic restoration of the tricuspid valve anatomy. Early and intermediate results with these repairs are promising. Reduced right ventricular function continues to be a challenge for some patients, as is the need for reoperation for recurrent tricuspid regurgitation. The purpose of this article is to outline the current standard of care for diagnosis and treatment of Ebstein anomaly and describe innovative strategies to address poor right ventricular function and associated right-sided heart failure.

  6. Congenital sternal foramen in a stillborn Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Shahrzad; Bakhtiary, Mohsen Khosravi; Goodarzi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Congenital sternal foramen is an anomaly whose occurrence is rare in human but is especially unusual in animals. This defect was formed when fusion of multiple ossification centers was incomplete. It may be associated with other lesions in body organs especially cardiac anomalies. In the present study, we report a very rare case of congenital sternal foramen in a Holstein calf. The oval defect was like a gunshot wound and located at the lower third of the sternum. Apparently, the rest of skeleton system seems normal. The awareness of the anomaly is important for better diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

  7. Congenital sternal foramen in a stillborn Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Shahrzad; Bakhtiary, Mohsen Khosravi; Goodarzi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Congenital sternal foramen is an anomaly whose occurrence is rare in human but is especially unusual in animals. This defect was formed when fusion of multiple ossification centers was incomplete. It may be associated with other lesions in body organs especially cardiac anomalies. In the present study, we report a very rare case of congenital sternal foramen in a Holstein calf. The oval defect was like a gunshot wound and located at the lower third of the sternum. Apparently, the rest of skeleton system seems normal. The awareness of the anomaly is important for better diagnosis and treatment of diseases. PMID:23569841

  8. [Congenital defects and incapacity].

    PubMed

    Jouve de la Barreda, Nicolás

    2009-01-01

    As a whole the congenital defects constitute an important section of the medical attention affecting near 3% of the population. A 15% of spontaneous abortions take place of which the greater frequency corresponds to the chromosome anomalies (25%) and the monogenic mutations (20%) and in a lesser extent to the effects of teratogenic agents. Between the genetic causes determining the congenital defects the mutations that affect genes acting in the early stages of development occupy a main place. These alterations can affect to homeotic genes or monogenic systems that act during the critical phases of the organogenesis. It seems evident that an alteration in the expression of a necessary gene for the appearance of a morphogenetic change constitutes the angular stone to understand resurging of a malformation or discapacity. In the last years has been demonstrated the importance of the teratogenic or environmental agents on the delicate internal physiological balance during the critical stages of the development. In this context must be included the inductive environmental factors inducing epigenetic modifications in the early stage of the development of the embryos produced by fertilization in vitro.

  9. Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft: Can It Be Treated in Newborn?

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Roya; Sahebpour, Alireza Alam; Ghasemi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital midline cervical cleft (CMCC) is a rare developmental anomaly of the anterior neck, mostly found in Caucasian females. Most authors consider it within the spectrum of branchial arch developmental abnormalities. There have been about 100 reported cases in the literature. However, there is no agreement on the age of surgery in this anomaly. Case Presentation In this report we present our experience of managing this anomaly in the early neonatal period in two neonates. One of them had concomitantly congenital heart disease. Conclusion It is important to recognize this rare congenital anomaly in neonate. Although the exact time of surgery for CMCC is not mentioned, based on our results the earliest time of intervention is recommended since then the operating result will be excellent. PMID:23431110

  10. [Congenital ranula].

    PubMed

    Marques, Maria Inês; Morais, Sofia; Coutinho, Sílvia; de Castro, Ochoa; Rei, Ana Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a case of congenital ranula diagnosed by a routine prenatal ultrasonography at 21 weeks of gestation. The fetal kariotype was normal. Follow-up ultrasound scans revealed no changes in the size or the position of the cyst. Fetal growth was normal as was the amniotic fluid volume. Surgical treatment was performed 3 days after a normal vaginal delivery, with excellent results.

  11. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure.

  12. [Congenital aniridia].

    PubMed

    Chiruţa, Daria; Stan, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Aniridia is a rare congenital, hereditary, bilateral disease which is associated with various systemic and ocular defects. We present the case of a 61 year old patient who was admitted in the hospital of ophthalmology Cluj Napoca, for the symptoms caused by the ocular defects associated with aniridia. In this case, aniridia is autosomal dominant transmitted with incomplete penetrance and it is not accompanied by any systemic defects. The disease also affects three of her sons and two nephews of the patient.

  13. Fetal Aortic Arch Anomalies: Key Sonographic Views for Their Differential Diagnosis and Clinical Implications Using the Cardiovascular System Sonographic Evaluation Protocol.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Coral; Gámez, Francisco; Pérez, Ricardo; Álvarez, Teresa; De León-Luis, Juan

    2016-02-01

    Aortic arch anomalies are present in 1% to 2% of the general population and are commonly associated with congenital heart disease, chromosomal defects, and tracheaesophageal compression in postnatal life. The sonographically based detection of aortic arch anomalies lies in the 3-vessel and trachea view. Although highly sensitive, this view alone does not allow identification of the aortic arch branching pattern, which prevents an accurate diagnosis. The systematic addition of a subclavian artery view as part of a standardized procedure may be useful in the differential diagnosis of these conditions. We describe the sonographic assessment of fetal aortic arch anomalies by combining 2 fetal transverse views: the 3-vessel and trachea view and the subclavian artery view, which are included in the cardiovascular system sonographic evaluation protocol. We also review the sonographic findings and the clinical implications of fetal aortic arch anomalies.

  14. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is part of the new 15q24 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, Hilde; Backx, Liesbeth; Pijkels, Elly; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The recurrent microdeletion 15q24 syndrome is rare with only 5 cases reported thus far. Here we describe an additional patient with this deletion, presenting with many features common to this syndrome, including developmental delay, loose connective tissue, digital and genital anomalies and a distinct facial gestalt. Interestingly, in addition, this patient has a large congenital diaphragmatic hernia, as was described in one other patient with a 15q24 microdeletion, indicating that this feature might be part of the syndrome. Chromosome 15q24 has a highly polymorphic architecture that is prone to genomic rearrangements underlying this novel microdeletion syndrome.

  15. [Pediatric cardiology and congenital heart disease: from fetus to adult].

    PubMed

    Subirana, M Teresa; Oliver, José M; Sáez, José M; Zunzunegui, José L

    2012-01-01

    This article contains a review of some of the most important publications on congenital heart disease and pediatric cardiology that appeared in 2010 and up until September 2011. Of particular interest were studies on demographic changes reported in this patient population and on the need to manage the patients' transition from the pediatric to the adult cardiology department. This transition has given rise to the appearance of new areas of interest: for example, pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease, and the effect of genetic factors on the etiology and transmission of particular anomalies. In addition, this review considers some publications on fetal cardiology from the perspective of early diagnosis and, if possible, treatment. There follows a discussion on new contributions to Eisenmenger's syndrome and arrhythmias, as well as on imaging techniques, interventional catheterization and heart transplantation. Finally, there is an overview of the new version of clinical practice guidelines on the management of adult patients with congenital heart disease and of recently published guidelines on pregnancy in women with heart disease, both produced by the European Society of Cardiology.

  16. [Congenital Esophageal Atresia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we describe the esophageal atresia in terms of current surgical management on the basis of our experience and literatures. Traditionally, infants with esophageal atresia have presented shortly after birth because of an inability to pass an orogastric tube, respiratory distress, or an inability to tolerate feeding. And also, an isolated trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) usually cases coughing, recurrent pneumonia, or choking during feedings. To ignore these symptoms is to risk a delayed diagnosis. The condition may be associated with other major congenital anomalies such as those seen in the vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal/radial (VACTER) association, or it may be an isolated defect. Therapeutic strategies for esophageal atresia are a prevention of pulmonary complication by TEF closing and an early establishment of enteral alimentation. We promptly repair healthy infants without performing a gastrostomy and delay repair in infants with high-risk factors such as associated severe cardiac anomaly and respiratory insufficiency. Esophageal atresia has been classically approached through a thoracotomy. The disadvantages of such a thoracotomy have been recognized for a long time, for example winged scapula, elevation of fixation of shoulder, asymmetry of the chest wall, rib fusion, scoliosis, and breast and pectoral muscle maldevelopment. To avoid such disadvantages, thoracoscopic repair was recently reported.

  17. Delineation of a de novo 7q21.3q31.1 Deletion by CGH-SNP Arrays in a Girl with Multiple Congenital Anomalies Including Severe Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Jacobo, L.; Córdova-Fletes, C.; Ortiz-López, R.; Rivas, F.; Saucedo-Carrasco, C.; Rojas-Martínez, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present a female patient with a constitutional de novo deletion in 7q21.3q31.1 as determined by G-banding and CGH-SNP arrays. She exhibited, among other features, psychomotor retardation, congenital severe bilateral glaucoma, a cleft palate, and heart defect. Microarray assay disclosed a deleted 12.5-Mb region roughly 88 kb downstream the ectrodactyly critical region; thus, the patient's final karyotype was 46,XX.arr 7q21.3q31.1(96,742,140-109,246,085)×1 dn. This girl represents the fourth patient described so far with congenital glaucoma and a deletion encompassing or overlapping the 7q21.3q31.1 region, and confirms the presence of a locus or loci related to such a clinical feature. According to our results, the proneness to ocular defects secondary to 7q intermediate deletions could be caused by co-deletion of TAC1, HBP1, and a small cluster of cytochrome P450 genes (subfamily 3A). This conclusion is supported by their functional roles and expression locations as well as because TAC1 is related to the functional pathway of the MYOC gene whose mutations are linked to glaucoma. Moreover, given that this girl is clinically reminiscent of several phenotypes related to diverse deletions within 7q21q32, our results and observations offer a general overview of the gene content of deletions/phenotypes overlapping 7q21.3q31.1 and confirm that loci distal to DLX genes including the CUX1 gene and potential regulatory elements downstream from DLX5 are unrelated to ectrodactyly. PMID:24167464

  18. Perioperative and Anesthetic Considerations in Ebstein's Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ross, Faith J; Latham, Gregory J; Richards, Michael; Geiduschek, Jeremy; Thompson, Douglas; Joffe, Denise

    2016-03-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a complex and heterogeneous form of congenital heart disease characterized by malformation and apical displacement of the tricuspid valve leaflets. Patients may present at any time from the neonatal period to adulthood with symptoms ranging from cardiac failure and cyanosis to paroxysmal arrhythmias. Depending on the timing of presentation, various surgical options are available for the management of symptomatic patients. This review will discuss the perioperative and anesthetic management of patients with Ebstein's anomaly with reference to the more common surgical approaches.

  19. Classification of congenital nasal deformities: a proposal to amend the existing classification.

    PubMed

    Fijałkowska, Marta; Antoszewski, Bogusław

    2017-03-01

    Congenital nasal anomalies are rare malformations with a broad spectrum of defects. The only existing classification strictly relating to nasal anomalies was presented by Losee et al. (Plast Reconstr Surg 113(2):676-689, 2004). The aim of this paper is to propose some suggestions, based on our current knowledge and experience gained by treating our patients in the clinic, in creating a specification of patients with congenital nasal anomalies. All patients with congenital nose defects treated in our health center were selected for this study. The research was retrospective and included years from 1995 to 2015. Nasal anomaly associated with cleft lip and palate was excluded. Patients were classified into four categories of congenital nasal anomalies, according to Losee et al.

  20. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Ashleigh A; Garg, Vidu

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are the most common type of birth defect and result in significant mortality worldwide. The etiology for the majority of these anomalies remains unknown but genetic factors are being recognized as playing an increasingly important role. Advances in our molecular understanding of normal heart development have led to the identification of numerous genes necessary for cardiac morphogenesis. This work has aided the discovery of an increasing number of monogenic causes of human cardiovascular malformations. More recently, studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms and submicroscopic copy number abnormalities as having a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart disease. This review discusses these discoveries and summarizes our increasing understanding of the genetic basis of congenital heart disease. PMID:21532774

  1. Gauge anomalies, gravitational anomalies, and superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    The structure of gauge and gravitational anomalies will be reviewed. The impact of these anomalies on the construction, consistency, and application of the new superstring theories will be discussed. 25 refs.

  2. [Congenitally corrected transposition of the great vessels in adulthood. The value of noninvasive study methods].

    PubMed

    Weidmann, B; Hänseler, T; Jansen, W; Geppert, R; Mathas, B; Tauchert, M

    1994-08-26

    A 57-year-old man with a cough and increasing exertional dyspnoea for the past 6 weeks was found on examination to have a loud systolic murmur and cardiomegaly with pulmonary congestion. Echocardiography revealed congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (cTGA: atrioventricular and ventriculoarterial discordance): a morphologically right ventricle with a tricuspid valve on the left, a morphologically left ventricle with bicuspid a-v valve on the right, the aorta arising ventrally from the left-sided (morphologically right) ventricle. The tricuspid valve showed an Ebstein-like anomaly with obvious regurgitation. Transoesophageal and contrast echocardiography defined valvar anatomy, attachment of the great arteries and cardiac chambers to the venous and arterial circulations, as well as absence of a left to right shunt. Angiography revealed a coronary anatomy typical for cTGA. The exertional dyspnoea responded to diuretics and low doses of ACE inhibitor. Follow-up monitoring of the valvar regurgitation and appropriate endocarditis prophylaxis were recommended. As the haemodynamics in cTGA is normal, in the absence of additional anomalies, it is a congenital cardiac defect which can, though rarely, present first in adulthood. Life expectancy depends on the nature of any additional defects and the degree of commonly associated tricuspid valve regurgitation. As this case demonstrates, echocardiography can largely define the anomalies.

  3. Early prenatal disruption; a foetus with features of severe limb body wall sequence, body stalk anomaly and amniotic bands.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, S; Oudesluijs, G G; Schoonderwaldt, E M; Van Bever, Y

    2014-01-01

    Disruption in early pregnancy can cause severe and multiple congenital anomalies in a foetus. Three sequences, Limb-body wall complex (LBWC), amniotic band sequence (ABS) and body-stalk anomaly (BSA) are thought to be caused by disruption. This case report describes a foetus with severe multiple congenital anomalies, that fit the diagnoses of all three sequences, which might advocate these syndromes are a spectrum of one sequence.

  4. Ebstein Anomaly With QRS Fragmentation on Electrocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Prakash; Ang, Jonathan Ross; Gitler, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital disorder that involves the tricuspid valve and the right ventricle. It is associated with interatrial communication, which allows for paradoxical embolization causing unilateral blindness. Abnormal conduction through the atrialized right ventricle leads to QRS fragmentation on electrocardiogram. Its presence suggests a more severe abnormality and a higher risk of arrhythmia. The QRS fragmentation disappears after corrective surgery with resection of the atrialized right ventricle. PMID:28203575

  5. Ebstein Anomaly With QRS Fragmentation on Electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Prakash; Ang, Jonathan Ross; Gitler, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital disorder that involves the tricuspid valve and the right ventricle. It is associated with interatrial communication, which allows for paradoxical embolization causing unilateral blindness. Abnormal conduction through the atrialized right ventricle leads to QRS fragmentation on electrocardiogram. Its presence suggests a more severe abnormality and a higher risk of arrhythmia. The QRS fragmentation disappears after corrective surgery with resection of the atrialized right ventricle.

  6. The elliptic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janin, G.; Bond, V. R.

    1980-01-01

    An independent variable different from the time for elliptic orbit integration is used. Such a time transformation provides an analytical step-size regulation along the orbit. An intermediate anomaly (an anomaly intermediate between the eccentric and the true anomaly) is suggested for optimum performances. A particular case of an intermediate anomaly (the elliptic anomaly) is defined, and its relation with the other anomalies is developed.

  7. Ebstein Anomaly in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rusdi, Lusiani; Azizi, Syahrir; Suwita, Christopher; Karina, Astrid; Nasution, Sally A

    2016-10-01

    A 27-year-old primiparous woman with 28 weeks gestational age was admitted to our hospital with worsening shortness of breath. She was diagnosed with Ebstein's anomaly three years ago, but preferred to be left untreated. The patient was not cyanotic and her vital signs were stable. Her ECG showed incomplete RBBB and prolonged PR-interval. Blood tests revealed mild anemia. Observation of two-dimensional echo with color flow Doppler study showed Ebstein's anomaly with PFO as additional defects, EF of 57%, LV and LA dilatation, RV atrialization, severe TR, and moderate PH with RVSP of 44.3 mmHg. The patient then underwent elective sectio caesaria at 30 weeks of gestational age; both the mother and her baby were alive and were in good conditions.

  8. Congenital glaucoma in cutis marmorata teleangiectatica congenita.

    PubMed

    Mayatepek, E; Krastel, H; Völcker, H E; Pfau, B; Almasan, K

    1991-01-01

    A case of congenital glaucoma in cutis marmorata teleangiectatica congenita (CMTC, van Lohuizen syndrome) is described. The cutaneous anomaly and heterochromia iridium were noticed at birth. Brown discoloration of one iris was due to iris anterior layer dysplasia, resulting in unilateral glaucoma. Two trabeculotomies were performed until persistent normalization of intraocular pressure could be achieved. The possibility of a genetic basis and hereditary condition of CMTC and its association with congenital glaucoma is discussed. Patients with CMTC should regularly undergo ophthalmological follow-up to rule out development of glaucoma.

  9. Congenital malformations of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Shraddha S; Parmar, Hemant A; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Mukherji, Suresh K

    2011-08-01

    Congenital ear or temporal bone malformations are a diagnostic challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Newer imaging techniques can detect subtle changes in middle ear and cochlear anatomy. This information is invaluable with increasing use of hearing restoration surgeries and/or cochlear implants in such patients. This article discusses the embryogenesis, classification system, and salient imaging findings of congenital outer, middle ear, and inner ear anomalies in children. Both high-resolution computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the temporal bones are described.

  10. Congenital Absence of the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, Francesco; Balzano, Silverio; Nardella, Michele; Strizzi, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Mario; Bozzini, Vincenzo; Catapano, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    1999-01-15

    We report three cases of congenital absence of an internal carotid artery (ICA), diagnosed incidentally by digital subtraction angiography. The analysis of the cases is based on the classification of segmental ICA agenesis proposed by Lasjaunias and Berenstein. Usually the patients with this rare vascular anomaly are asymptomatic; some may have symptoms related to cerebrovascular insufficiency, compression by enlarged intracranial collateral vessels, or complications associated with cerebral aneurysms. Diagnosis of congenital absence of ICA is made by skull base computed tomography (CT) scan, CT and magnetic resonance angiography, and conventional or digital subtraction angiography.

  11. Diabetic Ketoacidosis with Ebstein's Anomaly in an Adult.

    PubMed

    Patra, Soumya; Beeresha P, Nagamani A C; B, Ramesh; C N, Manjunath

    2016-03-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a rare form of congenital malformation of the heart, characterized by apical displacement of the septal and posterior tricuspid valve leaflets, leading to atrialisation of the right ventricle with a variable degree of malformation and displacement of the anterior leaflet. It may not be detected until late in adolescence or adulthood. The clinical manifestations of Ebstein's anomaly vary greatly. We are reporting a case of 35-year male who presented with generalized fatigue, palpitation and effort intolerance. Laboratory investigations confirmed the diagnosis of diabetes ketosis. Transthoracic echocardiography showed severe Ebstein's anomaly with severe tricuspid regurgitation, no residual atrial septal defect, but with severe right ventricular dysfunction. Though only few studies showed the high prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism in young adult patients with complex congenital heart disease, but Epstein's anomaly with diabetes ketosis was nowhere mentioned.

  12. Congenital midline cervical cleft: clinical approach to a congenital anterior neck defect.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Bedeschi, Maria Francesca; Cantarella, Giovanna; Colombo, Lorenzo; Agosti, Viola; Amodeo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Monica; Mazzola, Isabella; Mosca, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Numerous malformations can affect the anterior part of the neck presenting at birth as a real diagnostic challenge for the pediatrician or the primary care physician who initially evaluate the baby. Congenital midline cervical cleft represents a rare defect of the midline neck, which is sometimes wrongly diagnosed as a thyroglossal duct anomaly, dermoid cyst, branchial cleft anomaly or "birthmark". A prompt clinical diagnosis and surgical treatment during early infancy are essential to ensure both functional and aesthetic outcome. We report a case of a female neonate with a midline cervical cleft diagnosed immediately after birth. The main features of other congenital anomalies of the anterior neck are also discussed referring to their embryologic origin.

  13. Uhl's Anomaly: A Rare Case of Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rakesh; Datta, Rajarshi; Saha, Manjari; Sarkar, Nirmalendu

    2016-01-01

    Uhl's anomaly is a rare congenital heart disease characterized by partial or complete absence of the right ventricular myocardium and high early mortality rates. We describe a case of Uhl's anomaly in a 27-year-old young male patient presenting with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. In this article, we review the literature associated with this condition and highlight a rare presentation of a rare disease. This report adds to our current knowledge of this exceedingly rare disorder.

  14. A rare case of renal hydatidosis in a child with congenital solitary kidney.

    PubMed

    Tirnea, Livius; Minciu, Radu; Olariu, Tudor Rares; Dumitrascu, Victor; Neghina, Adriana Maria; Neghina, Raul

    2014-08-01

    Hydatid cyst of a solitary congenital kidney is a rare entity because of the small percentage of cases with renal hydatidosis and the reduced number of cases with this renal anomaly. We report a case presenting this extremely rare combination and having a favorable outcome. The diagnosis was confirmed based on an association of imagistic techniques and positive serology. The case was managed using a minimal invasive surgical technique (PAIR) that reduced the operative risks. Additionally, an antihelminthic agent (albendazole) was administered. To our knowledge, this is the first case with such comorbidity and treated through percutaneous approach.

  15. Congenital right pulmonary artery agenesis with atrial septal defect and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Orun, Utku Arman; Yilmaz, Osman; Bilici, Meki; Karademir, Selmin; Uner, Cigdem; Senocak, Filiz; Dogan, Vehbi

    2012-01-01

    Unilateral pulmonary artery agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly caused by a backward displacement of the conical artery of the truncus arteriosus. It is commonly associated with additional cardiovascular abnormalities. A 7-year-old girl was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of shortness of breath upon exertion. Chest radiography revealed a hypoplastic right lung. Absence of the right pulmonary artery with atrial septal defect and pulmonary hypertension was demonstrated by echocardiography, computed tomography, and cardiac catheterization. Bosentan is effectively used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  16. Bilateral congenital adrenal agenesis: a rare disease entity and not a result of poor autopsy technique.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Colleen; Pertile, Mark; Goodwin, Tess; Bittinger, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Congenital adrenal agenesis is an extremely rare condition wherein the adrenal glands fail to develop. The absence of adrenal tissue results in the complete absence of hormones produced in the adrenal cortex (cortisol, aldosterone) and medulla (catecholamines), and is not compatible with postnatal life without artificial hormone replacement therapy. To date, 9 cases of adrenal agenesis have been reported, many of which are associated with additional congenital anomalies. Most cases were not detected on antenatal imaging and were detected incidentally at postmortem examination. We present a case of adrenal agenesis, detected incidentally at postmortem examination after termination of pregnancy for suspected fetal hydrops, and review the heterogeneous phenotype of this condition with associated abnormalities and molecular genetics. This case reinforces the role of the perinatal autopsy to investigate cause of perinatal mortality, allowing correlation of pathology with antenatal imaging findings and clinical details.

  17. Macular colobomas in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Margolis, S; Scher, B M; Carr, R E

    1977-01-01

    Two siblings with Leber's congenital amaurosis had the unusual association of bilateral macular colobomas. In addition to the colobomas, the patients also had deafmutism, severe myopia, large corneas, and an unusual discrete area of peripapillary tapetoretinal sheen. Electrodiagnostic evaluation of patients with congenitally poor visual ascuity and a central retinal defect differentiated a localized loss of funciton from a degeneration involving the entire retina.

  18. Congenital Lumbar Hernia: A 15-Year Experience at a Single Tertiary Centre

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, K. N.; Dhiman, Ankur; Rattan, Ananta

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Congenital lumbar hernia is an uncommon anomaly with only few cases reported in the English literature. This study was done to study the incidence, age at presentation, sex, associated anomalies, surgical management, and postoperative morbidity and mortality of congenital lumbar hernia in pediatric patients. Methods. Retrospective analysis of all patients of CLH over a period of 15 years (January 2000 to December 2015) was analyzed. Results. A total of 14 patients were encountered in this series. All presented within first 2 years of age. 12 were males and 2 were females. All of them presented with swelling in lumbar region. 13 were unilateral and 1 was bilateral. Left sided hernia was observed in 2 cases only. Lumbocostovertebral syndrome was found in all the patients in addition to other rare anomalies. All cases were managed with open surgical repair. Wound infection was seen in 2 cases. There was no mortality in our series. Conclusion. CLH is very rare among hernias. Surgery should be carried out within 1 year of age. For a defect of <5 cm, primary repair is done. For a defect of >5 cm, meshplasty should be considered. Prognosis is excellent. PMID:27994626

  19. Craniofacial anomalies associated with hypospadias. Description of a hospital based population in South America

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Escobar, Rebeca; Zarante, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Hypospadias is a congenital abnormality of the penis, in which there is incomplete development of the distal urethra. There are numerous reports showing an increase of prevalence of hypospadias. Association of craniofacial malformations in patients diagnosed with hypospadias is rare. The aim of this study is to describe the association between hypospadias and craniofacial congenital anomalies. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the Latin-American collaborative study of congenital malformations (ECLAMC) data was performed between January 1982 and December 2011. We included children diagnosed with associated hypospadias and among them we selected those that were associated with any craniofacial congenital anomaly. Results: Global prevalence was 11.3 per 10.000 newborns. In this population a total of 809 patients with 1117 associated anomalies were identified. On average there were 1.7 anomalies per patient. Facial anomalies were present in 13.2%. The most commonly major facial anomaly associated to hypospadias was cleft lip/palate with 52 cases. We identified that 18% have an association with other anomalies, and found an association between craniofacial anomalies and hypospadias in 0.59 cases/10.000 newborns. Discussion: Hypospadias is the most common congenital anomaly affecting the genitals. Its association with other anomalies is rare. It has been reported that other malformations occur in 29.3% of the cases with hypospadias. The more proximal the meatus, the higher the risk for having another associated anomaly. Conclusion: Associated hypospadias are rare, and it is important to identify the concurrent occurrence of craniofacial anomalies to better treat patients that might need a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27564292

  20. Congenital rubella with agenesis of the inferior cerebellar vermis and total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Cluver, C; Meyer, R; Odendaal, H; Geerts, L

    2013-08-01

    Congenital rubella infection has been associated with a number of abnormalities including cardiac, central nervous system and placental complications. We present a case with multiple fetal abnormalities detected on prenatal ultrasound, and confirmed postnatally, that included a single umbilical artery, severe tricuspid regurgitation, micrognathia and agenesis of the inferior cerebellar vermis. Postnatal echocardiography additionally revealed unobstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage (TAPVD) into the coronary sinus. Placental examination showed signs of placentitis, and polymerase chain reaction on neonatal serum was positive for rubella. Following a multidisciplinary team review, it was decided to provide only supportive care, and the infant died at 6 months of age owing to a respiratory tract infection. To our knowledge, TAPVD and agenesis of the inferior cerebellar vermis have not been reported previously in association with congenital rubella infection. This case illustrates how congenital infection may present in atypical ways and stresses the importance of considering congenital infection in the differential diagnosis of fetal anomalies when multiple features are present.

  1. Chiral anomalies and differential geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zumino, B.

    1983-10-01

    Some properties of chiral anomalies are described from a geometric point of view. Topics include chiral anomalies and differential forms, transformation properties of the anomalies, identification and use of the anomalies, and normalization of the anomalies. 22 references. (WHK)

  2. Congenital Portosystemic Shunt: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Timpanaro, Tiziana; Passanisi, Stefano; Sauna, Alessandra; Trombatore, Claudia; Pennisi, Monica; Petrillo, Giuseppe; Smilari, Pierluigi; Greco, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Congenital portosystemic venous malformations are rare abnormalities in which the portal blood drains into a systemic vein and which are characterized by extreme clinical variability. Case Presentations. The authors present two case reports of a congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (Type II). In the first patient, apparently nonspecific symptoms, such as headache and fatigue, proved to be secondary to hypoglycemic episodes related to the presence of a portosystemic shunt, later confirmed on imaging. During portal vein angiography, endovascular embolization of the portocaval fistula achieved occlusion of the anomalous venous tract. In the second patient, affected by Down's syndrome, the diagnosis of a portosystemic malformation was made by routine ultrasonography, performed to rule out concurrent congenital anomalies. Because of the absence of symptoms, we chose to observe this patient. Conclusions. These two case reports demonstrate the clinical heterogeneity of this malformation and the need for a multidisciplinary approach. As part of a proper workup, clinical evaluation must always be followed by radiographic diagnosis. PMID:25709849

  3. Uniparental disomy in congenital disorders: A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Lindor, N.M.; Karnes, P.S.; Michels, V.V.

    1995-08-28

    Whole chromosome uniparental disomy (UPD) for several different chromosomes has been described in individuals with phenotypes that encompass a broad range of abnormalities. We prospectively searched for UPD in 25 cytogenetically normal individuals who had one or more of the following features: nonsyndromic multiple congenital anomalies, short stature, mental retardation, or dysmorphic findings. Using highly polymorphic microsatellite repeats, biparental inheritance of at least one locus on every chromosome was found in every individual and uniparental inheritance was not detected at any locus. If UPD does exist in this clinical setting, its frequency is less than 13.7% (95% confidence interval). Our data indicate that additional studies will be required to determine the true incidence of UPD in this population. 41 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Congenitally absent lumbar pedicle: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Wortzman, G.; Steinhardt, M.I.

    1984-09-01

    Three patients who had a diagnosis of congenitally absent lumbar pedicle underwent CT examination. Findings showed that each patient had an aberrant hypoplastic pedicle plus a retroisthmic defect in their ipsilateral lamina rather than an absent pedicle. Axial CT was the diagnostic modality of choice; reformated images were of little value. The differential diagnosis to be considered from the findings of plain film radiography includes pediculate thinning, neoplastic disease, neurofibroma, mesodermal dysplasia associated with neurofibromatosis, and vascular anomalies.

  5. Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Transesophageal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Sreedhar, Rupa

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum of congenital heart disease (CHD) seen in the adult varies widely. Malformations range from mild anomalies requiring no intervention to extremely complex pathologies characterized by the presence of multiple coexistent defects. Echocardiography represents the primary noninvasive imaging modality in the assessment of these lesions. The transesophageal approach expands the applications of echocardiography by allowing the acquisition of anatomic and functional information that may not be obtainable by transthoracic imaging. PMID:28074821

  6. Treatment of Common Congenital Hand Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Takashi; Pushman, Allison G.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Recognize the clinical features associated with five common congenital hand conditions. 2. Describe the indications and appropriate timing for various surgical procedures used to treat congenital hand anomalies. 3. Identify the pearls and pitfalls of these surgical treatments in order to avoid complications. 4. Understand the expected post-operative outcomes associated with these surgical procedures. Summary This article will provide an introduction to congenital hand differences by focusing on practical surgical strategies for treating five commonly encountered conditions including syndactyly, constriction ring syndrome, duplicated thumb, hypoplastic thumb and trigger thumb. The accompanying videos will demonstrate common and reliable surgical techniques for syndactyly release, duplicated thumb reconstruction and pollicization for hypoplastic thumb. PMID:20811188

  7. Congenital diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lentze, M

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in knowledge on the genetic origin of diseases within the gastrointestinal tract the number of congenital diseases, which already manifest during childhood have drastically increased. Due to the large application of molecular genetics the number is steadily increasing. To make the access to these rare diseases fast and efficient the data base of the National Library of Medicine (Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man - OMIN) is a very helpful online tool, with which all these disease entities can be found easily (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim). Detailed tables are given to find most of the congenitally inherited disease, which affect the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of congenital diarrheas with disturbances of digestion, hydrolysis, absorption and secretion is described in detail: lactose intolerance, sucrose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, fructose malabsorption, trehalase and enterokinase deficiency, congenital chloride and sodium diarrhea, congenital hypomagnesaemia, primary bile acid malabsorption, acrodermatitis enteropathica and Menke's syndrome. Also described in detail are diseases with structural anomalies of the intestine like microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy and IPEX syndrome. The diagnosis in the disturbances of carbohydrate hydrolysis or absorption can be established by H2-breath tests after appropriate sugar challenge. Treatment consists of elimination of the responsible sugar from the diet. The diagnosis of the congenital secretory diarrheas is established by investigation of electrolytes in blood and stool. Substitution of high doses of the responsible mineral can improve the clinical outcome. In acrodermatitis enteropathica low serum zinc level together with the typical skin lesions guide to the diagnosis. High doses of oral zinc aspartate can cure the symptoms of the disease. The diagnosis of structural congenital lesions of the intestine can be established by histology and

  8. Prenatal Diagnosis of Uhl Anomaly with Autopsy Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Saji; Bharati, Sarasa; Cherian, Kottureth Mammen; Bharati, Saroja

    2015-01-01

    Uhl anomaly is a rare form of congenital hypoplasia of the right ventricular myocardium. Here, we report, a rare finding in fetal cardiac ultrasound in a 33-year-old woman who presented at 20 weeks' of gestation. A diagnosis of Uhl anomaly was made. An autopsy was performed at 23weeks gestation after obtaining permission for medicolegal termination of pregnancy. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis. Diagnosing Uhl anomaly in fetal life is essential since mortality and survival mainly depend on the severity of right ventricle dysfunction related to, the either partial or complete absence of the myocardium. Hence, surviving cases need to be followed up carefully and counselled accordingly. PMID:26929879

  9. Ebstein's Anomaly, Left Ventricular Noncompaction, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Michael; Warner, Luke; Collins, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a congenital disorder characterized by apical displacement of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve. Ebstein's anomaly may be seen in association with other cardiac conditions, including patent foramen ovale, atrial septal defect, and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). LVNC is characterized by increased trabeculation within the left ventricular apex. Echocardiography is often used to diagnose LVNC; however, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers superior characterization of the myocardium. We report a case of sudden cardiac death in a patient with Ebstein's anomaly with unrecognized LVNC noted on post mortem examination with screening documenting the presence of LVNC in one of the patient's twin sons. PMID:26240764

  10. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  11. Congenital Renal Fusion and Ectopia in the Trauma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ditchek, Jordan J.; Kiffin, Chauniqua; Carrillo, Eddy H.

    2016-01-01

    We present two separate cases of young male patients with congenital kidney anomalies (horseshoe and crossed fused renal ectopia) identified following blunt abdominal trauma. Despite being rare, ectopic and fusion anomalies of the kidneys are occasionally noted in a trauma patient during imaging or upon exploration of the abdomen. Incidental renal findings may influence the management of traumatic injuries to preserve and protect the patient's renal function. Renal anomalies may be asymptomatic or present with hematuria, flank or abdominal pain, hypotension, or shock, even following minor blunt trauma or low velocity impact. It is important for the trauma clinician to recognize that this group of congenital anomalies may contribute to unusual symptoms such as gross hematuria after minor trauma, are readily identifiable during CT imaging, and may affect operative management. These patients should be informed of their anatomical findings and encouraged to return for long-term follow-up. PMID:27895945

  12. Congenital giant right atrium in an elderly woman.

    PubMed

    Santra, Gouranga; Paul, Rudrajit; Das, Shubhabrata; Datta, Arnab; Pradhan, Sourav; Sarkar, R N

    2014-07-01

    Enlargement of right atrium is usually secondary to pulmonary hypertension due to valvular heart diseases or obstructive pulmonary disorders, atrial septal defect, tricuspid atresia or stenosis, pulmonary stenosis, primary pulmonary hypertension, Ebstein's anomaly. Congenital enlargement of right atrium is rare and it commonly presents in children. Our patient presented with congenital giant right atrium at 65 years of age, other cardiac diseases being excluded. Patient developed tricuspid regurgitation, but pulmonary hypertension was absent till the date. Congenital giant right atrium has rarely been reported from India.

  13. Multiple Complex Congenital Malformations in a Rabbit Kit (Oryctolagus cuniculi)

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jennifer L; Peng, Xuwen; Baccon, Jennifer; Cooper, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    Congenital malformations may occur during early embryogenesis in cases of genetic abnormalities or various environmental factors. Affected subjects most often have only one or 2 abnormalities; subjects rarely have several unrelated congenital defects. Here we describe a case of a stillborn New Zealand white rabbit with multiple complex congenital malformations, including synophthalmia, holoprosencephaly, gastroschisis, and a supernumerary hindlimb, among other anomalies. There was no historical exposure to teratogens or other known environmental causes. Although not confirmed, this case was most likely a rare spontaneous genetic event. PMID:24209970

  14. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  15. Acute Anterior Myocardial Infarction Accompanied by Acute Inferior Myocardial Infarction: A Very Rare Coronary Artery Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Alsancak, Y; Sezenöz, B; Duran, M; Unlu, S; Turkoglu, S; Yalcın, R

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery anomalies are rare and mostly silent in clinical practice. First manifestation of this congenital abnormality can be devastating as syncope, acute coronary syndrome, and sudden cardiac death. Herein we report a case with coronary artery anomaly complicated with ST segment myocardial infarction in both inferior and anterior walls simultaneously diagnosed during primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

  16. Pulmonary agenesis and pulmonary sling anomaly in an infant with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takci, S; Yigit, S; Haliloglu, M; Boduroglu, K; Kiper, N

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly presenting with normal karyotype in most of the cases. Rarely pulmonary agenesis is associated with chromosomal abnormalities and other genetic disorders such as Oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum, VACTERL association and velo-cardio-facial syndrome. This report presents a patient with pulmonary agenesis, pulmonary sling anomaly and Down syndrome.

  17. A rare case of cardiac anomaly: prenatally diagnosed ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Yalçın; Hallıoğlu, Olgu; Basut, Nursel; Demetgül, Hasan; Esin Kibar, A

    2015-06-01

    Ectopia cordis is a rare congenital malformation in which the heart is located partially or totally outside the thoracic cavity. The estimated prevalence of ectopia cordis is 5.5-7.9 per million births and it comprises 0.1% of congenital heart diseases. Ectopia cordis is associated with other congenital heart diseases and various tissue and organ disorders. Common cardiac anomalies associated with ectopia cordis include ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, pulmonary stenosis, right ventricular diverticulum, double right ventricular outflow tract and tetralogy of Fallot. Extracardiac anomalies associated with ectopia cordis reported in the literature include omphalocele, gastrochisis, cleft lip and palate, scollosis and central nervous system malformations. Here we report a newborn with ectopia cordis who was diagnosed prenatally.

  18. A rare case of cardiac anomaly: prenatally diagnosed ectopia cordis

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Yalçın; Hallıoğlu, Olgu; Basut, Nursel; Demetgül, Hasan; Esin Kibar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Ectopia cordis is a rare congenital malformation in which the heart is located partially or totally outside the thoracic cavity. The estimated prevalence of ectopia cordis is 5.5–7.9 per million births and it comprises 0.1% of congenital heart diseases. Ectopia cordis is associated with other congenital heart diseases and various tissue and organ disorders. Common cardiac anomalies associated with ectopia cordis include ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, pulmonary stenosis, right ventricular diverticulum, double right ventricular outflow tract and tetralogy of Fallot. Extracardiac anomalies associated with ectopia cordis reported in the literature include omphalocele, gastrochisis, cleft lip and palate, scollosis and central nervous system malformations. Here we report a newborn with ectopia cordis who was diagnosed prenatally. PMID:26265899

  19. Congenital myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Irene; Scoto, Mariacristina; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Robb, Stephanie A.; Maggi, Lorenzo; Gowda, Vasantha; Cullup, Thomas; Yau, Michael; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the natural history of congenital myopathies (CMs) due to different genotypes. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study based on case-note review of 125 patients affected by CM, followed at a single pediatric neuromuscular center, between 1984 and 2012. Results: Genetic characterization was achieved in 99 of 125 cases (79.2%), with RYR1 most frequently implicated (44/125). Neonatal/infantile onset was observed in 76%. At birth, 30.4% required respiratory support, and 25.2% nasogastric feeding. Twelve percent died, mainly within the first year, associated with mutations in ACTA1, MTM1, or KLHL40. All RYR1-mutated cases survived and did not require long-term ventilator support including those with severe neonatal onset; however, recessive cases were more likely to require gastrostomy insertion (p = 0.0028) compared with dominant cases. Independent ambulation was achieved in 74.1% of all patients; 62.9% were late walkers. Among ambulant patients, 9% eventually became wheelchair-dependent. Scoliosis of variable severity was reported in 40%, with 1/3 of (both ambulant and nonambulant) patients requiring surgery. Bulbar involvement was present in 46.4% and required gastrostomy placement in 28.8% (at a mean age of 2.7 years). Respiratory impairment of variable severity was a feature in 64.1%; approximately half of these patients required nocturnal noninvasive ventilation due to respiratory failure (at a mean age of 8.5 years). Conclusions: We describe the long-term outcome of a large cohort of patients with CMs. While overall course is stable, we demonstrate a wide clinical spectrum with motor deterioration in a subset of cases. Severity in the neonatal/infantile period is critical for survival, with clear genotype-phenotype correlations that may inform future counseling. PMID:25428687

  20. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-03-22

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD.

  1. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  2. Lymphatic Anomalies Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Lymphatic Malformation; Generalized Lymphatic Anomaly (GLA); Central Conducting Lymphatic Anomaly; CLOVES Syndrome; Gorham-Stout Disease ("Disappearing Bone Disease"); Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome; Kaposiform Lymphangiomatosis; Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma/Tufted Angioma; Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome; Lymphangiomatosis

  3. Surgical management of Ebstein's anomaly.

    PubMed

    Stulak, John M; Dearani, Joseph A; Danielson, Gordon K

    2007-01-01

    Ebstein's malformation is a congenital anomaly of the tricuspid valve and right ventricle. Surgical repair of Ebstein's anomaly improves functional class and exercise tolerance, eliminates right-to-left intracardiac shunting (if present), and reduces the incidence of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. As a result, quality of life and survival are improved. Because of the variable degree of malformation present, repair is predicated on favorable anatomic factors, most importantly the arrangement of the anterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve. When anatomic derangements threaten a durable tricuspid valve repair, valve replacement with protection of the conduction tissue and right coronary artery should be performed. The vast majority of patients can undergo a biventricular repair. The application of the bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis is reserved for patients with poor right ventricular function. Freedom from reoperation after tricuspid valve repair is similar when compared with valve replacement. In the current era, overall early mortality after surgical repair in children and adults has fallen to less than 3% in experienced centers. Surgical treatment of the symptomatic neonate remains a significant challenge, with approaches that include either a biventricular or single ventricle algorithm.

  4. First report of a de novo 18q11.2 microdeletion including GATA6 associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bui, Peter H; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Wong, Derek; Perens, Gregory; Dipple, Katrina M; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 have been previously reported in many patients. Most cases involve the more distal regions of the long arm (18q21.1->qter). However, proximal interstitial deletions involving 18q11.2 are extremely rare. Here we report on a 14-month-old female with a 4.7 Mb (19,667,062-24,401,876 hg19) de novo interstitial deletion within chromosomal band 18q11.2, which includes GATA6 and 24 other RefSeq genes. The clinical features of our patient include complex congenital heart defects, a double outlet right ventricle, a subaortic ventricular septal defect, D-malposed great arteries, an atrial septal defect, a dysplastic aortic valve and patent ductus arteriosus. In addition, she had renal anomalies-a duplicated collecting system on the left and mild right hydronephrosis. These heart and renal defects are not reported in other patients with 18q proximal interstitial deletions. Heterozygous point mutations in GATA6, encoding for a zinc finger transcription factor, have been shown to cause congenital heart defects. Given the well-established biological role of GATA6 in cardiac development, a deletion of GATA6 is very likely responsible for our patient's complex congenital heart defects. This is the smallest and most proximal 18q11.2 deletion involving GATA6 that is associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal anomalies.

  5. Spacecraft Environmental Anomalies Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    engineering solutions for mitigating the effects of environmental anomalies have been developed. Among the causes o, spacecraft anomalies are surface...have been discovered after years of investig!:tion, and engineering solutions for mitigating the effccts of environmental anomalies have been developed...23 * 6.4.3 Fauth Tolerant Solutions .............................................................................. 23 6.4.4. Methods

  6. South Atlantic Anomaly

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  The South Atlantic Anomaly     View larger GIF image The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) . Even before the cover opened, the Multi-angle Imaging ... Atlantic Anomaly location:  Atlantic Ocean Global Images First Light Images region:  Before the ...

  7. Epidemiology of congenital abnormalities in West Africa: Results of a descriptive study in teaching hospitals in Abidjan: Cote d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Kouame, Bertin Dibi; N’guetta-Brou, Isabelle Ama; Kouame, Guy Serge Yapo; Sounkere, Moufidath; Koffi, Maxime; Yaokreh, Jean Baptiste; Odehouri-Koudou, Thierry; Tembely, Samba; Dieth, Gaudens Atafi; Ouattara, Ossenou; Dick, Ruffin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Congenital abnormalities constitute one of the major causes of infant mortality, particularly in developing countries. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of congenital anomalies in Cote d’Ivoire. Materials and Methods: It was a multicentric study of three academic hospitals and the Heart Institute of Abidjan over 10 years. The epidemiologic Data concerned the Parturients, the annual frequency of congenital abnormalities. Distribution of the congenital abnormalities according to the organs, overall mortality and lethality of congenital abnormalities were evaluated. Results: Over 10 years, 1.632 newborns with 1.725 congenital anomalies were recorded. Frequency was 172.5 congenital anomalies per annum. Parturients were less than 35 years in 33% of cases, multigravida in 20%, multiparous in 18% and had a low socio economic status in 96% of cases. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomalies was performed in 1.5%. Congenital anomalies were orthopedic in 34%, neurological in 17%, gastrointestinal in 15%, facial in 11.5%, parietal in 13%, urogenital in 9% and cardiac in 0.5% of cases. The overall mortality rate of congenital anomalies was 52% and gastroschisis was the most lethal disease with 100% mortality. Conclusion: This descriptive study reveals the low socio economic status of Parturients with congenital anomalies and their poor prenatal diagnosis. These factors explain the very high mortality of congenital anomalies due to a delay management in our country in which medical expenses were borne by parents and where technical platforms remain obsoletes for good resuscitation and neonatal surgery. PMID:25659551

  8. Congenital psoriasis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia S; Rahil, Anudeep K

    2008-01-01

    While childhood psoriasis is fairly common, congenital psoriasis appears to be rare and has not been well characterized. We present a patient with histologically confirmed congenital psoriasis. By reviewing the literature, we aim to both define this disease and compare it to infantile and childhood psoriasis. Electronic searches found articles reporting patients with biopsy-proven congenital psoriasis. We recorded clinical features, such as family history, anatomic involvement, and disease severity. We compared these data with previous descriptions of infantile and childhood psoriasis. We included nine patients with congenital psoriasis in our analysis. No patient had a first-degree family history of psoriasis. While the face, scalp, chest, and trunk were frequently involved, the buttocks generally were spared. Several patients had persistent disease despite therapy. In this series, congenital psoriasis differed from infantile and childhood psoriasis in several respects. Specifically, congenital psoriasis was associated with a lower prevalence of relevant family history, which could increase over time, and a different pattern of anatomic involvement, which may reflect exposure to age-associated environmental factors. Although several patients with congenital psoriasis had severe disease, this likely represents publication bias. Additional reports of congenital psoriasis with extended follow-up are needed to better characterize this condition.

  9. Congenital lacrimal fistula: A major review.

    PubMed

    Chaung, Jia Quan; Sundar, Gangadhara; Ali, Mohammad Javed

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and summarize the etiopathogenesis, symptomatology, systemic associations, management, complications and clinical outcomes of congenital lacrimal fistulae. The authors performed an electronic database (PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library) search of all articles published in English on congenital lacrimal fistulae. Congenital subsets of patients from series of mixed lacrimal fistulae were included in the review. These articles were reviewed along with their relevant cross-references. Data reviewed included demographics, presentations, investigations, management, complications and outcomes. The prevalence of congenital lacrimal fistulae is reported to be around 1 in 2000 live births. They are frequently unilateral, although familial cases tend to be bilateral. Lacrimal and systemic anomalies have been associated with lacrimal fistulae. Exact etiopathogenesis is unknown but mostly believed to be an accessory out budding from the lacrimal drainage system during embryogenesis. Treatment is indicated when significant epiphora or discharge is present and is mostly achieved by various fistulectomy techniques with or without a dacryocystorhinostomy. Congenital lacrimal fistulae are a distinct clinical entity with unique features. Surgical management can be challenging and successful outcomes are usually achieved with widely accepted protocols.

  10. Sources of Near Side Lunar Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Nicola C.; Hood, Lon L.; Halekas, J. S.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Binder, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    Lunar Prospector magnetometer data has been used to identify a number of nearside magnetic anomalies. Some of the features identified appear to correlate with impact ejecta, supporting a basin ejecta origin to the nearside anomalies. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Ebstein Anomaly With Right Atrial Clot

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prakash; Singhal, Gaurav; Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Pandey, Umeshwar; Thakur, Ramesh; Varma, Chandra Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a rare congenital malformation of the tricuspid valve (TV), often associated with other cardiac malformations, especially atrial septal defect/patent foramen ovale (PFO) which is present in 80-90% of patients and predisposes to paradoxical embolization. We describe the case of a 17-year-old female, who presented with worsening exertional dyspnea, fatigue and pedal edema and atrial fibrillation (AF). Transthoracic echocardiography showed EA with severely dilated right atrium (RA), small functional right ventricle (RV), low velocity flow across TV with spontaneous echo contrast and giant clot in RA. Fortunately for the patient, contrast and transesophageal echocardiography revealed an intact interatrial septum with no PFO preventing any paradoxical embolism from large clot in RA, more so in the background of AF. Important differential diagnosis of congenitally unguarded TV orifice was ruled out due to presence of septal and anterior leaflets of TV and associated chordae. PMID:28197250

  12. Ebstein Anomaly With Right Atrial Clot.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prakash; Singhal, Gaurav; Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Pandey, Umeshwar; Thakur, Ramesh; Varma, Chandra Mohan

    2015-10-01

    Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a rare congenital malformation of the tricuspid valve (TV), often associated with other cardiac malformations, especially atrial septal defect/patent foramen ovale (PFO) which is present in 80-90% of patients and predisposes to paradoxical embolization. We describe the case of a 17-year-old female, who presented with worsening exertional dyspnea, fatigue and pedal edema and atrial fibrillation (AF). Transthoracic echocardiography showed EA with severely dilated right atrium (RA), small functional right ventricle (RV), low velocity flow across TV with spontaneous echo contrast and giant clot in RA. Fortunately for the patient, contrast and transesophageal echocardiography revealed an intact interatrial septum with no PFO preventing any paradoxical embolism from large clot in RA, more so in the background of AF. Important differential diagnosis of congenitally unguarded TV orifice was ruled out due to presence of septal and anterior leaflets of TV and associated chordae.

  13. Concomitant slide tracheoplasty and cardiac operation for congenital tracheal stenosis associated with VACTERL.

    PubMed

    Wu, En-Ting; Wang, Ching-Chia; Lin, Ming-Tai; Huang, Pei-Ming; Chen, Shyh-Jye; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Hwang, Haw-Kwei; Chen, Ming-Ren; Huang, Shu-Chien

    2013-10-01

    The association of congenital tracheal stenosis and tracheoesophageal (TE) fistula is rare. Here, we report 2 patients with tracheobronchial stenosis (complete cartilage ring) involving the lower trachea and right bronchus. Both patients had associated VACTERL (vertebral anomalies, anal atresia, cardiovascular anomalies, TE, renal, and limb defects) congenital cardiac defects and tracheal diverticula after repair of the TE fistula in type C esophageal atresia. The stenotic segment began at the orifice of the TE fistula, which became diverticula after the TE fistula was repaired. Concomitant repair of congenital cardiac defects and a slide tracheoplasty with elimination of the diverticula were performed successfully.

  14. Congenital solitary kidney with multiple renal arteries: case report using MDCT angiography.

    PubMed

    Matusz, Petru; Miclăuş, Graţian Dragoslav; Banciu, Christian Dragoş; Sas, Ioan; Joseph, Shamfa C; Pirtea, Laurenţiu Cornel; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    A congenital solitary kidney with multiple renal arteries is a rare congenital abnormality that can occur in the presence of multiple other anomalies. We describe an atypical case of a right congenital solitary kidney with three renal arteries (RA) one main RA and two additional renal arteries in a 75-year-old woman with uterine didelphys. The main RA had an intraluminal diameter larger than the diameter of the additional renal arteries (AdRAs) at the origin (0.53 cm for the main RA; 0.49 cm and 0.32 cm for the two AdRAs). Both the AdRAs had a greater length than the main RA (3.51 cm for the main RA; 3.70 cm and 4.77 cm for the two AdRAs). The calculated volume of the kidney was 283 cm³, while the volume of the renal parenchyma was 258 cm³. Knowledge of this variant is extremely important in clinical practice as it has been found to be associated with proteinuria, hypertension and renal insufficiency.

  15. Clinical features and teratogenic mechanisms of congenital absence of digits.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Toshihiko

    2007-08-01

    To have a better understanding of classification of congenital hand anomalies, clinical features and teratogenic mechanisms of congenital absence of digits including ulnar and radial deficiencies, cleft hand, symbrachydactyly and constriction band were reviewed. There seemed to be four different teratogenic mechanisms of congenital absence of digits. Ulnar and radial deficiencies have the same clinical features and the cause of these deficiencies is closely related to a deficit of mesenchymal cells in the limb-bud due to impairment before the formation of the limb-bud. Cleft hand, central polydactyly and osseous syndactyly were induced by the same treatment at the same developmental stage in rats. Roentgenograms of the clinical cases and skeletal changes of the anomalies in rats appear to demonstrate that cleft hand formation proceeds from osseous syndactylies and central polydactylies. The teratogenic mechanism of a cleft hand seemed to be failure of induction of digital rays in the hand plate. The sequence of anomalies from brachysyndactyly, or the atypical cleft hand, to the congenital amputation, can be regarded as equivalent to the category of transverse deficiency that is bony dysplasia of the hand. Congenital constriction ring syndrome appears after the formation of the digital rays.

  16. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies de Novo Mutations in GATA6 Associated with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lan; Bennett, James T.; Wynn, Julia; Carvill, Gemma L.; Cheung, Yee Him; Shen, Yufeng; Mychaliska, George B.; Azarow, Kenneth S.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.; Chung, Dai H.; Potoka, Douglas; Warner, Brad W.; Bucher, Brian; Lim, Foong-Yen; Pietsch, John; Stolar, Charles; Aspelund, Gudrun; Arkovitz, Marc S.; Mefford, Heather; Chung, Wendy K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common birth defect affecting 1 in 3,000 births. It is characterized by herniation of abdominal viscera through an incompletely formed diaphragm. Although chromosomal anomalies and mutations in several genes have been implicated, the cause for most patients is unknown. Methods We used whole exome sequencing in two families with CDH and congenital heart disease, and identified mutations in GATA6 in both. Results In the first family, we identified a de novo missense mutation (c.1366C>T, p.R456C) in a sporadic CDH patient with tetralogy of Fallot. In the second, a nonsense mutation (c.712G>T, p.G238*) was identified in two siblings with CDH and a large ventricular septal defect. The G238* mutation was inherited from their mother, who was clinically affected with congenital absence of the pericardium, patent ductus arteriosus, and intestinal malrotation. Deep sequencing of blood and saliva derived DNA from the mother suggested somatic mosaicism as an explanation for her milder phenotype, with only approximately 15% mutant alleles. To determine the frequency of GATA6 mutations in CDH, we sequenced the gene in 378 patients with CDH. We identified one additional de novo mutation (c.1071delG, p.V358Cfs34*). Conclusions Mutations in GATA6 have been previously associated with pancreatic agenesis and congenital heart disease. We conclude that, in addition to the heart and the pancreas, GATA6 is involved in development of two additional organs, the diaphragm and the pericardium. In addition we have shown that de novo mutations can contribute to the development of CDH, a common birth defect. PMID:24385578

  17. Cataracts in Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Veena; Noble, A. Gwendolyn; Latkany, Paul; Troia, Robert N.; Jalbrzikowski, Jessica; Kasza, Kristen; Karrison, Ted; Cezar, Simone; Sautter, Mari; Greenwald, Mark J.; Mieler, William; Mets, Marilyn B.; Alam, Ambereen; Boyer, Kenneth; Swisher, Charles N.; Roizen, Nancy; Rabiah, Peter; Del Monte, Monte A.; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence and natural history of cataracts in children with congenital toxoplasmosis. Methods Children referred to the National Collaborative Chicago-based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study (NCCCTS) between 1981 and 2005 were examined by ophthalmologists at predetermined times according to a specific protocol. The clinical course and treatment of patients who developed cataracts was reviewed. Results In the first year of life, 134 of 173 children examined were treated with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and Leucovorin, while the remaining 39 were not treated. Cataracts occurred in 27 eyes of 20 patients (11.6%, 95% confidence interval [7.2%, 17.3%]). Fourteen cataracts were present at birth, and 13 developed postnatally. Locations of the cataracts included anterior polar (3 eyes), anterior subcapsular (6), nuclear (5), posterior subcapsular (7), and unknown (6). Thirteen cataracts were partial, 9 total, and 5 with unknown complexity. Twelve cataracts remained stable, 12 progressed, and progression was not known for 3. Five of 27 eyes had cataract surgery, with 2 of these developing glaucoma. Sixteen eyes of 11 patients had retinal detachment and cataract. All eyes with cataracts had additional ocular lesions. Conclusions In the NCCCTS cohort, 11.6% of patients were diagnosed with cataracts. There was considerable variability in the presentation, morphology, and progression of the cataracts. Associated intraocular pathology was an important cause of morbidity. PMID:18086432

  18. Congenital interruption of the ampullary portion of the fallopian tube.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Michael H; Burney, Richard; Lathi, Ruth

    2006-06-01

    We present a rare case of a congenital isolated missing segment of the fallopian tube, including hysterosalpingographic and laparoscopic images. We conclude that when this occurs without concomitant müllerian anomalies, the mechanism of development would not be expected to be associated with an increase in renal abnormalities.

  19. Congenital Syndromes and Mildly Handicapped Students: Implications for Special Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra M.

    1989-01-01

    Many learning disabilities or cases of mild retardation are due to medically diagnosable, congenital syndromes, such as fetal alcohol syndrome, sex chromosome abnormalities, multiple anomaly syndromes, phenylketonuria, and Tourette Syndrome. These syndromes are discussed, and suggestions are given for special education management. (Author/JDD)

  20. PHACE syndrome and congenitally absent thyroid gland at MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Mamlouk, Mark D; Yu, John-Paul J; Asch, Sarah; Mathes, Erin F

    2016-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder characterized by posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, and abnormalities of the eye. Thyroid disorders associated with PHACE syndrome have been described, although there are limited reports of this rare occurrence. We report a case of PHACE syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism in an infant, for which absent thyroid gland was diagnosed at magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Basic imaging in congenital heart disease. 3rd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Swischuk, L.E.; Sapire, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The book retains its previous format with chapters on embryology, plain film interpretation, classification of pulmonary vascular patterns, cardiac malpositions and vascular anomalies, and illustrative cases. The book is organized with an abundance of illustrative figures, diagrams, and image reproductions. These include plain chest radiographs, angiograms, echocardiograms, and MR images. The authors present the pathophysiology and imaging of congenital heart lesions.

  2. Congenital duodenal obstruction due to a preduodenal portal vein.

    PubMed

    Pathak, D; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2006-05-01

    Only about 80 cases of pre-duodenal portal vein (PDPV), a rare congenital anomaly of portal vein development that was first described by Knight in 1921, have been reported till date.[1] We report a neonate with duodenal obstruction caused by PDPV and briefly review the available literature.

  3. [Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart defects in adults].

    PubMed

    Bastarrika Alemañ, G; Gavira Gómez, J J; Zudaire Díaz-Tejeiro, B; Castaño Rodríguez, S; Romero Ibarra, C; Sáenz de Buruaga, J D

    2007-01-01

    The study of congenital cardiopathies (CC) is one of the most clearly established indications of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). Different sequences, including anatomic, functional, flow (phase contrast), and 3D angiographic sequences, enable the diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up of these conditions. CMRI allows the anatomy, function, and alterations of flow in these cardiopathies to be evaluated in a single examination. Three-dimensional MR angiography enables the study of the great vessels and the anomalies associated to congenital heart defects in adults. This article describes an examination protocol and provides examples of MR images of the most common CC in adults: atrial septal defect, interventricular communication, atrioventricular canal, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, bicuspid aortic valve, subaortic stenosis, aortic coarctation, and Ebstein's anomaly.

  4. Congenital scoliosis in non-identical twins: case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Dean; Bogar, William

    2014-01-01

    Congenital scoliosis due to vertebral anomalies may occur in less than 0.1% of the population. Several different theories have been put forth in the literature to account for the etiology of congenital scoliosis and the vertebral anomalies which contribute to its development. The study of scoliosis in twins has contributed to the understanding of causative factors including genetics, environment and in utero events during embryologic development. Case reports of fraternal (non-identical) juvenile male twins with congenital scoliosis associated with differing congenital vertebral anomalies are presented. Both children were asymptomatic at the time of the initial consultation and showed no signs of neurologic compromise. Rapidly progressive, severe genetic scoliosis requires prudent observation and referral to a pediatric orthopedic surgeon to determine appropriate options for care and to screen for potentially life threatening disorders. Chiropractors may be seen as gatekeepers for scoliosis and a thorough understanding of appropriate standards of care is required. PMID:25202158

  5. Ebstein's Anomaly: Genetics, Clinical Manifestations, and Management.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2016-11-19

    Ebstein's anomaly is uncommon. Genetic bases of this congenital heart defect may be related to the mutations in myosin heavy chain 7 and NKX2.5, among others. Asymptomatic patients with Ebstein's anomaly can be conservatively treated and kept under close follow-up, whereas surgical operation is indicated for those patients with evidence of right heart dilation and progressively impaired ventricular systolic function. A biventricular repair consisting of the reconstruction of a competent monocuspid tricuspid valve, right ventriculorrhaphy, subtotal atrial septal defect closure, and aggressive reduction atrioplasty is suitable for most patients, and 1.5-ventricular repair (bidirectional Glenn shunt) is indicated for patients with poor right ventricular function; by contrast, heart transplantation is used in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction.

  6. Congenital web of the common bile duct in association with cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Papaziogas, Basilios; Lazaridis, Charalampos; Pavlidis, Theodoros; Galanis, Ioannis; Paraskevas, George; Papaziogas, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Congenital web formations are extremely rare anomalies of the extrahepatic biliary tree. The age at presentation and the clinical symptomatology of these anomalies depend on the grade of the biliary obstruction. We report a case of a common bile duct septum in association with cholelithiasis in a 30-year-old woman. The diagnosis was made on preoperative magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and confirmed with intraoperative cholangiography. Because all known causes of acquired web formation were excluded, a congenital origin of the web was assumed. The patient was treated with a hepaticoduodenostomy above the level of the septum. The embryological aspects of this rare anomaly are described.

  7. Nolen-Schiffer anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, S.C.; Wiringa, R.B.

    1995-08-01

    The Argonne v{sub 18} potential contains a detailed treatment of the pp, pn and nn electromagnetic potential, including Coulomb, vacuum polarization, Darwin Foldy and magnetic moment terms, all with suitable form factors and was fit to pp and pn data using the appropriate nuclear masses. In addition, it contains a nuclear charge-symmetry breaking (CSB) term adjusted to reproduce the difference in the experimental pp and nn scattering lengths. We have used these potential terms to compute differences in the binding energies of mirror isospin-1/2 nuclei (Nolen-Schiffer [NS] anomaly). Variational Monte Carlo calculations for the {sup 3}He-{sup 3}H system and cluster variational Monte Carlo for the {sup 15}O-{sup 15}N and {sup 17}F-{sup 17}O systems were made. In the first case, the best variational wave function for the A = 3 nuclei was used. However, because our {sup 16}O wave function does not reproduce accurately the {sup 16}O rms radius, to which the NS anomaly is very sensitive, we adjusted the A = 15 and A = 17 wave functions to reproduce the experimental density profiles. Our computed energy differences for these three systems are 0.757 {plus_minus} .001, 3.544 {plus_minus} .018 and 3.458 {plus_minus} .040 MeV respectively, which are to be compared with the experimental differences of 0.764, 3.537, and 3.544 MeV. Most of the theoretical uncertainties are due to uncertainties in the experimental rms radii. The nuclear CSB potential contributes 0.066, 0.188, and 0.090 MeV to these totals. We also attempted calculations for A = 39 and A = 41. However, in these cases, the experimental uncertainties in the rms radius make it impossible to extract useful information about the contribution of the nuclear CSB potential.

  8. FastStats: Birth Defects or Congenital Anomalies

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Unintentional Injuries All Injuries Assault or Homicide Suicide and Self-Inflicted Injury Life Stages and Populations Age Groups Adolescent Health Child Health Infant Health Older Persons' Health ...

  9. [Congenital Anomalies Detected at Birth in Newborns of Adolescent Women].

    PubMed

    dos Reis, Leandro Valim; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Guazzelli, Cristina Aparecida Falbo; Cernach, Mirlene Cecilia Soares Pinho; Torloni, Maria Regina; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: Analisar a prevalência das anomalias congénitas, detetadas no nascimento, entre filhos de gestantes adolescentes, enfatizando os tipos mais comuns e a época do diagnóstico. Material e Métodos: Estudo retrospetivo do tipo censo, no qual foram analisados todos recém-nascidos, vivos ou mortos, com peso superior a 500 g, de mulheres que tiveram o parto no Hospital São Paulo num período de seis anos. Os produtos da conceção portadores de anomalias foram identificados no período pré-natal ou através do exame físico pós-natal, segundo os critérios do Estudo Colaborativo Latino-Americano das Malformações Congênitas. Os resultados são apresentados de forma descritiva através de valores absolutos e relativos, calcula-se a prevalência das anomalias e comparam-se os diferentes grupos recorrendo a testes não paramétricos. Resultados: Foram analisadas 6 257 gestações, das quais 577 resultaram em recém-nascidos com alguma anomalia congénita identificada no nascimento (prevalência de 9,2%). Do total de gestações, 907 eram de adolescentes (idade inferior a 20 anos), para as quais se verificou uma prevalência de anomalias nos recém-nascidos de 9,9%. Comparando os recém-nascidos de adolescentes com os das mulheres com idade superior a 20 anos, apenas se encontrou diferença estatisticamente significativa para a prevalência dos defeitos do tubo neural (p = 0,027). Discussão: Observamos uma alta taxa de partos em adolescentes, acima das taxas dos países desenvolvidos. Observamos também alta frequência de anomalias congénitas em recém-nascidos, provavelmente por sermos um serviço terciário de referência. A elevada prevalência dos defeitos do tubo neural entre grávidas jovens pode ser explicada pela não suplementação pré-concecional de ácido fólico em gravidezes não planeadas, como é característico nas adolescentes.Conclusão: A prevalência e momento do diagnóstico das anomalias congénitas em recém-nascidos apresentam comportamentos semelhantes entre grávidas com idade inferior ou superior a 20 anos, exceto para os defeitos do tubo neural, de maior prevalência nos recém-nascidos das grávidas adolescentes.

  10. Congenital chylothorax in newborn with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Lomauri, Kh

    2014-11-01

    Neonatal chylothorax results from the accumulation of chyle in the pleural space and may be either congenital or an acquired condition. Congenital chylothorax is most likely due to abnormal development or obstruction of the lymphatic system. It is often associated with hydrops fetalis. It can be idiopathic or may be associated with various chromosomal anomalies including Trisomy 21, Turner syndrome, Noonan syndrome, and other genetic abnormalities. Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia and generalized lymphangiomatosis have also been reported to be associated with congenital chylothorax. Several case reports indicate that congenital chylothorax can recur in subsequent offspring, suggesting a possible underlying genetic etiology. It is important to identify infants with chylothorax, as there are specific issues that need to be addressed in the management of these patients. We present a case of newborn with trysomy 21 (trisomy 21 was diagnosed antenatally by amniocentesis with support of Association "Perinatology"), who developed moderate Respiratory Distress Syndrome, chest X-ray and US reveal pleural effusion on right side rapid intervention was made before deterioration, requiring intensive life-saving measures. In the neonate, chylous effusion is not a common cause of pleural effusions. It is characterized as an exudate because of the high protein and lipid content once the infant is fed. The fluid will be clear/yellow to slightly cloudy in the unfed state and will quickly become milky following feeding, as chylomicrons appear in the fluid. Lymphocytes predominate in the differential cell count of chyle. The volume of fluid output can be high, and management can be challenging. We review the common manifestations of congenital chylotoraxes and emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and intervention in preventing devastating outcomes from this condition.

  11. A case of Klippel-Feil syndrome with congenital enlarged Eustachian tube.

    PubMed

    Jovankovičová, A; Jakubíková, J; Durovčíková, D

    2012-04-01

    The Klippel-Feil syndrome is a congenital anomaly characterized by fusion of the cervical vertebrae. It is often associated with serious congenital anomalies of the nervous, cardiovascular and urogenital systems. One of the anomalies which have not been thoroughly investigated to date are that accompanying Klippel-Feil syndrome and enlarged Eustachian tube. We report a case of type III Klippel-Feil syndrome with associated rib anomalies such as hypoplastic and bifid ribs, scoliosis and elevated scapula (Sprengel's disease). The patient also presented hemifacial microsomia and central facial palsy of the lower right side of the face, urogenital and cardiovascular anomaly, congenital anorectal atresia and right-sided congenital aural atresia with microtia. Computer tomography of temporal bone showed abnormal extension of the right Eustachian tube with anomalies of the middle and inner ear on this particular side. In this case report we discuss the associated anomalies of the patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome. The aim of this case report is to draw attention to very rare case of patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome and enlarged pharyngotympanic tube.

  12. Congenital duodenal obstruction with preduodenal portal vein and situs inversus totalis: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ram Mohan; Mukherjee, Partha Pratik; Mukhopadhyay, B; Mandal, Kartik Chandra

    2013-06-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is a rare congenital anomaly that causes high intestinal obstruction. The authors report two interesting cases of preduodenal portal vein that were diagnosed as having congenital duodenal obstruction. As there is a high potential for surgical risk, this anomaly is of special interest to the surgeon and should be kept in mind. Here, we discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis and management along with a review of the literature.

  13. Pictorial review of coronary anomalies in Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Sangita; Aeron, Gunjan; Vojta, Christopher N

    2015-01-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) classically consists of four characteristic features-right ventricular outflow obstruction, right ventricular hypertrophy, ventricular septal defect and an overriding aorta. In addition there are multiple other associated cardiac anomalies, including coronary artery anomalies. In this review, the role of CT angiography and the spectrum of coronary anomalies will be discussed along with importance of such anomalies in the context of surgery.

  14. Congenital defects of sheep.

    PubMed

    Dennis, S M

    1993-03-01

    With increasing incrimination of viruses, plants, and drugs as causes of ovine congenital defects, concerted efforts are required to identify environmental teratogens. Expanding knowledge of congenital defects requires studying as many defective lambs as possible; recording and documenting; detailed diagnostic examinations; genetic analyses and chromosomal examinations, whenever possible; and field investigations. Adopting standardized classification, terminology, and diagnostic procedures should improve descriptions, diagnoses, and interdisciplinary exchange of information. That, in turn, should improve our knowledge of and diagnosis of congenital defects of sheep in the future. Finally, veterinary clinicians and diagnosticians are encouraged to take an interest in congenital defects and teratology.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital hypothyroidism congenital hypothyroidism Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  16. Genetics of Nonsyndromic Congenital Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Egilmez, Oguz Kadir; Kalcioglu, M. Tayyar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hearing impairment affects nearly 1 in every 1000 live births and is the most frequent birth defect in developed societies. Hereditary types of hearing loss account for more than 50% of all congenital sensorineural hearing loss cases and are caused by genetic mutations. HL can be either nonsyndromic, which is restricted to the inner ear, or syndromic, a part of multiple anomalies affecting the body. Nonsyndromic HL can be categorised by mode of inheritance, such as autosomal dominant (called DFNA), autosomal recessive (DFNB), mitochondrial, and X-linked (DFN). To date, 125 deafness loci have been reported in the literature: 58 DFNA loci, 63 DFNB loci, and 4 X-linked loci. Mutations in genes that control the adhesion of hair cells, intracellular transport, neurotransmitter release, ionic hemeostasis, and cytoskeleton of hair cells can lead to malfunctions of the cochlea and inner ear. In recent years, with the increase in studies about genes involved in congenital hearing loss, genetic counselling and treatment options have emerged and increased in availability. This paper presents an overview of the currently known genes associated with nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and mutations in the inner ear. PMID:26989561

  17. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-01-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed. PMID:27499184

  18. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  19. Competing Orders and Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-08

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation "laws" could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the 't Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  20. Congenital amusia in childhood: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Marie-Andrée; Moreau, Patricia; McNally-Gagnon, Andréane; Mignault Goulet, Geneviève; Peretz, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    Here we describe the first documented case of congenital amusia in childhood. AS is a 10-year-old girl who was referred to us by her choir director for persisting difficulties in singing. We tested her with the child version of the Montreal Battery for the Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) which confirmed AS's severe problems with melodic and rhythmic discrimination and memory for melodies. The disorder appears to be limited to music since her audiometry as well as her intellectual and language skills are normal. Furthermore, the musical disorder is associated to a severe deficit in detecting small pitch changes. The electrical brain responses point to an anomaly in the early stages of auditory processing, such as reflected by an abnormal mismatch negativity (MMN) response to small pitch changes. In singing, AS makes more pitch than time errors. Thus, despite frequent and regular musical practice, AS's profile is similar to the adult form of congenital amusia.

  1. Multifocal Congenital Hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Robl, Renata; Carvalho, Vânia Oliveira; Abagge, Kerstin Taniguchi; Uber, Marjorie; Lichtvan, Leniza Costa Lima; Werner, Betina; Mehrdad Nadji, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Congenital hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a rare mesenchymal tumor with less aggressive behavior and a more favorable prognosis than similar tumors in adults. Multifocal presentation is even less common than isolated HPC and hence its clinical and histologic recognition may be challenging. A newborn infant with multifocal congenital HPC causing severe deformity but with a favorable outcome after chemotherapy and surgical removal is reported.

  2. Congenital heat disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Silverman, N.H.; Kersting-Somerhoff, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The book covers the tomographic anatomy of the normal and congenitally malformed heart and tomographic imaging of the normal heat. It then compares echocardiographic evaluation and the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of individual congenital cardiac malformations.

  3. Thymus transplantation in complete DiGeorge anomaly.

    PubMed

    Markert, M Louise; Devlin, Blythe H; Chinn, Ivan K; McCarthy, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    Complete DiGeorge anomaly is characterized by athymia, congenital heart disease, and hypoparathyroidism. This congenital disease is fatal by age 2 years unless immune reconstitution is successful. There are multiple underlying syndromes associated with complete DiGeorge anomaly including 22q11 hemizygosity in approximately 50%, CHARGE association in approximately 25%, and diabetic embryopathy in approximately 15%. Approximately one-third of patients present with rash and lymphadenopathy associated with oligoclonal "host" T cells. This condition resembles Omenn syndrome. Immunosuppression is necessary to control the oligoclonal T cells. The results of thymus transplantation are reported for a series of 50 patients, of whom 36 survive. The survivors develop naïve T cells and a diverse T cell repertoire.

  4. [Congenital ranula in a newborn].

    PubMed

    Bernhard, M K; Hückel, D; Hamala, D

    2007-05-01

    Ranulas are cystic lesions in the floor of the mouth. They are either retention cysts of the excretory duct of the sublingual gland or pseudocysts formed by excretory duct rupture followed by extravasation and accumulation of mucus in the surrounding tissue. We report the case of a premature newborn with a congenital ranula in the floor of mouth. The ranula caused no discomfort or complications, so that immediate intervention was not necessary. The cyst resolved completely by the age of 4 months. Complications in newborns especially include airway obstruction and feeding difficulties. Surgical treatment options are needle aspiration, excision of the ranula, marsupialization, cryosurgery, and--in addition to excision of the cyst--removal of the ipsilateral sublingual gland. Sclerotherapy has shown good results as well. As many congenital cysts resolve or rupture spontaneously, they should be observed for potential resolution for several months in uncomplicated cases.

  5. Vascular anomalies in children.

    PubMed

    Weibel, L

    2011-11-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided in two major categories: tumours (such as infantile hemangiomas) and malformations. Hemangiomas are common benign neoplasms that undergo a proliferative phase followed by stabilization and eventual spontaneous involution, whereas vascular malformations are rare structural anomalies representing morphogenetic errors of developing blood vessels and lymphatics. It is important to properly diagnose vascular anomalies early in childhood because of their distinct differences in morbidity, prognosis and need for a multidisciplinary management. We discuss a number of characteristic clinical features as clues for early diagnosis and identification of associated syndromes.

  6. Adrenal glands in patients with cogenital renal anomalies: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, P.J.; Robbins, G.L.; Ellis, D.A.; Spirt, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    The CT appearance of the adrenal glands was investigated in 30 patients with congenital renal anomalies. The ipsilateral adrenal was clearly identified in 83% of these patients; in all of them, the adrenal was a paraspinal disk-shaped organ, which appeared linear on CT. Conversely, the adrenals retained their normal shape in a control group of 20 patients with acquired renal atrophy or prior simple nephrectomy.

  7. Prevalence of inner ear anomalies among cochlear implant candidates

    PubMed Central

    Aldhafeeri, Ahmad M.; Alsanosi, Abdulrahman A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of inner ear anomalies and the frequency of different anomaly types among cochlear implant recipients. Methods: This study included a retrospective chart review of all patients who received cochlear implants between January 2009 and January 2013 in King Abdulaziz University Hospital cochlear implant program in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All subjects underwent thin-cut CT of the temporal bone and MRI. The collected data included age, gender, and CT and MRI findings regarding temporal bone anomalies. Patients with any identified congenital inner ear anomalies were included in the study. Results: In total, 316 patients’ cases were reviewed. Inner ear malformations were identified in 24 patients, which represented a prevalence of 7.5%. Among these 24 patients, 8 (33.3%) presented with a large vestibular aqueduct (LVA), 8 (33.3%) semicircular canal (SCC) dysplasia, 7 (29.1%) classical Mondini deformity, and one (4.1%) cochlear hypoplasia. Conclusion: The prevalence of inner ear anomalies among cochlear implant recipients was 7.5%. This result is consistent with findings worldwide. The most common anomalies were LVA and SCC hypoplasia; by contrast, in other regions, the most common anomaly is either the Mondini deformity, or LVA. PMID:27652360

  8. Four Decades of Hyperfine Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Martin G. H.; Mårtensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    Isotopic differences in the distribution of nuclear charge and magnetization give rise to "hyperfine structure anomalies" which were observed already in the 1950s. More recently, the distribution of nuclear magnetization has been found to complicate the interpretation of the measured hyperfine splittings in highly charged hydrogen-like ions. In this paper, results of numerical calculations for a few hydrogen-like systems (133Cs, 165Ho, 185,187Re and 209Bi) of current experimental interest are presented in terms of moments of the nuclear charge and magnetization distribution, thereby displaying directly the sensitivity and emphasizing the need for a better understanding of nuclear wavefunctions. In addition, we also present results of many-body perturbation theory calculations for Cs hyperfine anomalies, in connection with experiments planned at ISOLDE.

  9. Congenital deformity of the distal extremities in three dogs

    PubMed Central

    Di Dona, F.; Valle, G. Della; Meomartino, L.; Lamagna, F.; Fatone, G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital limb deformities are very rare conditions and the knowledge about etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment is still poor. Moreover, many defects are still not reported in veterinary literature. This report documents clinical and radiographic findings in three dogs with congenital deformity involving the distal extremities. Case 1 was affected with bilateral aphalangia of the pedes, case 2 presented a combination of brachydactyly and syndactyly, whereas in case 3 a unilateral ectrodactyly was observed. To the authors’ knowledge, brachydactyly, as well as aphalangia, are very uncommon anomalies and have been rarely documented. Moreover, association between syndactyly and brachydactyly has still not been reported. PMID:27928521

  10. Congenital hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Tomohiro; Park, Susam; Niu, Atushi; Hasegawa, Hiromi

    2014-12-01

    Congenital hypertrophy of a single intrinsic muscle of the foot is rare, and as far as we know, only six cases have been reported. We describe a case of congenital anomaly that showed hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot; the affected muscles were all the intrinsic muscles of the foot except the extensor digitorum brevis or extensor hallucis. Other tissues such as adipose tissue, nervous tissue, or osseous tissue showed no abnormalities. To reduce the volume of the foot we removed parts of the enlarged muscles.

  11. Clinical features of polyhydramnios associated with fetal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kikue; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Miyachi, Keiko; Sunagawa, Sorahiro; Takagi, Kimiyo

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical features of pregnancy complicated by polyhydramnios associated with fetal anomalies. Sixty-nine patients with a singleton pregnancy complicated by polyhydramnios were retrospectively analyzed. Based on prenatal ultrasonographic findings, 13 cases were considered to have idiopathic polyhydramnios and the remaining 56 cases were associated with fetal anomalies. Between these two groups, no significant difference was found in the gestational weeks when polyhydramnios developed. However, significant difference was noted in the maximum amniotic fluid index (AFI) values during the pregnancy period; 25.4 +/- 2.7 cm in the former, and 30.6 +/- 8.9 cm in the latter (P = 0.0004). In all of 13 cases with idiopathic polyhydramnios, AFI values remained less than 30 cm until delivery. Twenty-two patients (39%) with fetal anomalies required a prenatal treatment such as amnioreduction and tocolysis, whereas only one patient (7.7%) with idiopathic polyhydramnios needed tocolysis therapy (P = 0.03). There was a significant risk of premature delivery with fetal anomalies (35.6 +/- 3.9 weeks' gestation vs. 38.8 +/- 1.5 weeks' gestation, P = 0.004) because of refractory polyhydramnios, rupture of membranes, non-reassuring fetal status, and intrauterine fetal death, and although most infants with idiopathic polyhydramnios were appropriate-for-dates, many of the infants with congenital anomalies were small-for-dates. Significant risk of fetal anomalies should be considered in pregnant women with severe polyhydramnios (AFI > or = 30 cm), an increased trend of amniotic fluid during the pregnancy period, polyhydramnios requiring a prenatal treatment, or fetal growth restriction. On the other hand, based on our experience, a fetus without these conditions seems to have a low risk of congenital anomalies even if polyhydramnios is noted.

  12. Dual diaphragmatic anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Arjun; Thomas, Abin Varghese

    2016-01-01

    Although diaphragmatic anomalies such as an eventration and hiatus hernia are commonly encountered in incidental chest X-ray imaging, the presence of concomitant multiple anomalies is extremely rare. This is all the more true in adults. Herein, we present the case of a 75-year-old female, while undergoing a routine chest X-ray imaging, was found to have eventration of right hemidiaphragm along with a hiatus hernia as well. PMID:27625457

  13. Ultrasound diagnosis of bilateral cataracts in a fetus with possible cerebro-ocular congential muscular dystrophy during the routine second trimester anomaly scan.

    PubMed

    Drought, Alexandra; Wimalasundera, Ruwan; Holder, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The finding of bilateral congenital cataracts in the fetus is rare. We report bilateral congenital cataracts detected during the routine second trimester anomaly scan, which subsequently were found to be associated with other congenital anomalies and the parents opted for a termination of pregnancy. At post-mortem, Muscle-Eye Brain disease or Walker-Warburg Syndrome was considered likely, which are autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy disorders associated with cerebral, cerebellar, muscle and eye anomalies. On ultrasound, bilateral cataracts appear as echogenic, solid areas within the fetal orbits. The examination of the fetal face and orbits plays an important role in confirming fetal well-being antenatally. We propose that it should become a routine part of the structural survey of fetal anatomy during the obstetric anomaly scan. This is especially important in pregnancies previously affected by fetal cataracts or pregnancies at risk of rare genetic syndromes.

  14. [Ebstein's anomaly: diagnosis and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Malvindi, Pietro Giorgio; Viola, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a rare congenital heart disorder secondary to a malformation of the tricuspid valve and right ventricle. The heterogeneous spectrum of presentation of its structural anomalies and associated cardiomyopathy accounts for a widely varied clinical and hemodynamic manifestation of the pathology and its impact on timing of diagnosis and prognosis. Neonatal Ebstein's anomaly is characterized by reduced survival, while an average risk of mortality per year of 1% to 1.4% has been reported in infancy and adulthood. Medical management and a careful clinical and echocardiographic follow-up are advisable for all asymptomatic patients and those with minimal abnormalities. Surgical correction is recommended in presence of progressive dilation of the right atrium and right ventricle, development of right ventricular dysfunction, occurrence of supraventricular or ventricular arrhythmias or episodes of paradoxical embolization, reduced exercise capacity, or significant desaturation. Prosthetic valve replacement or repair of the tricuspid valve are both common strategies in the correction of tricuspid regurgitation. During the last three decades, important contributions in the development of repair techniques were driven from the experience of Danielson, Carpentier and da Silva, with satisfactory results in terms of safety and durability at long-term follow-up.

  15. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus*

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion. PMID:24474093

  16. Genetics of congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Park, S; Chatterjee, V

    2005-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is the most common neonatal metabolic disorder and results in severe neurodevelopmental impairment and infertility if untreated. Congenital hypothyroidism is usually sporadic but up to 2% of thyroid dysgenesis is familial, and congenital hypothyroidism caused by organification defects is often recessively inherited. The candidate genes associated with this genetically heterogeneous disorder form two main groups: those causing thyroid gland dysgenesis and those causing dyshormonogenesis. Genes associated with thyroid gland dysgenesis include the TSH receptor in non-syndromic congenital hypothyroidism, and Gsα and the thyroid transcription factors (TTF-1, TTF-2, and Pax-8), associated with different complex syndromes that include congenital hypothyroidism. Among those causing dyshormonogenesis, the thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin genes were initially described, and more recently PDS (Pendred syndrome), NIS (sodium iodide symporter), and THOX2 (thyroid oxidase 2) gene defects. There is also early evidence for a third group of congenital hypothyroid conditions associated with iodothyronine transporter defects associated with severe neurological sequelae. This review focuses on the genetic aspects of primary congenital hypothyroidism. PMID:15863666

  17. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  18. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and Microtia in a Newborn with Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) Exposure: Phenocopy for Fryns Syndrome or Broad Spectrum of Teratogenic Effects?

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Melissa A.; Zayed, Hatem; Slavotinek, Anne M.; Rutledge, Joe C.

    2009-01-01

    A newborn female infant born to a woman on immunosuppressive medications including mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for a renal graft secondary to lupus nephritis presented with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and additional findings of microtia, esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula, cleft palate, congenital heart defect, digital anomalies, and dysmorphic facial features. Pulmonary hypoplasia resulted in death at day two of life. She was presumed to have Fryns syndrome based on diagnostic criteria established for this recessive disorder with prominent features including CDH, facial anomalies, and nail hypoplasia. In retrospect, this infant's findings are more likely the result of teratogenic exposure to MMF, as more recent data have emerged linking aural atresia, digital anomalies, and dysmorphic features to this drug. To date, this is the only human report of CDH in an infant with prenatal exposure to MMF, although the manufacturer's package insert alludes to animal studies with a broad spectrum of malformations, including CDH. Thus, a teratogenic exposure can mimic a known Mendelian genetic syndrome, and caution is urged in presuming a genetic etiology for infants with potential teratogenic exposure to relatively new drugs with limited published animal data. PMID:19449404

  19. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia and microtia in a newborn with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) exposure: phenocopy for Fryns syndrome or broad spectrum of teratogenic effects?

    PubMed

    Parisi, Melissa A; Zayed, Hatem; Slavotinek, Anne M; Rutledge, Joe C

    2009-06-01

    A newborn female infant born to a woman on immunosuppressive medications including mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for a renal graft secondary to lupus nephritis presented with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and additional findings of microtia, esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula, cleft palate, congenital heart defect, digital anomalies, and dysmorphic facial features. Pulmonary hypoplasia resulted in death at day 2 of life. She was presumed to have Fryns syndrome based on diagnostic criteria established for this recessive disorder with prominent features including CDH, facial anomalies, and nail hypoplasia. In retrospect, this infant's findings are more likely the result of teratogenic exposure to MMF, as more recent data have emerged linking aural atresia, digital anomalies, and dysmorphic features to this drug. To date, this is the only human report of CDH in an infant with prenatal exposure to MMF, although the manufacturer's package insert alludes to animal studies with a broad spectrum of malformations, including CDH. Thus, a teratogenic exposure can mimic a known Mendelian genetic syndrome, and caution is urged in presuming a genetic etiology for infants with potential teratogenic exposure to relatively new drugs with limited published animal data.

  20. [Ebstein's anomaly revealed by fetal-placental anasarca. Original case study].

    PubMed

    Hadraoui, Hanaa El; Barkat, Amina

    2016-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a congenital heart defect rarely revealed by fetal-placental anasarca. Our study reports an original case of Ebstein's anomaly diagnosed during fetal-placental anasarca assessment, revealed by antenatal ultrasound, objectifying hydramnios, ascites and pericardial effusion. Echocardiography allowed the identification of Ebstein's disease with significant tricuspid insufficiency, mitral regurgitation (grade 3) and patent ductus arteriosus. The closure of the ductus arteriosus associated with the decrease of pulmonary resistance using optimal ventilation allowed hemodynamic improvement and patient survival.

  1. A boy with an unusual association of ventral midline anomalies including a trunk-like umbilicus.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, Hilde; Mariën, Paul; De Smedt, Maryse; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2004-10-01

    We report a boy with a rare association of congenital anomalies including facial dysmorphism with a very large fontanel and cleft palate, thoracic deformity, right-sided aortic arch, hypoplastic genitals, abdominal wall hypoplasia and a very rare umbilical abnormality, previously unreported. All anomalies are positioned on the midline suggesting a midline ventral developmental field defect. Different diagnoses were considered in this patient, including the pentalogy of Cantrell and Donnai-Barrow syndrome. However, none can account for all the abnormalities seen.

  2. [Patient with Ebstein anomaly treated by Carpentier's technique tricuspid valve repair--a case report].

    PubMed

    Urbanowicz, Tomasz; Katarzyński, Sławomir; Jemielity, Marek

    2010-02-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a congenital tricuspid valve and right ventricle malformation characterised by posterior and/or septal leaflet deformation that are malpositioned. The target of surgical intervention is to restore tricuspid valve function with right ventricle preservation but also to decrease the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. We present a case of a 56-year-old female patient with type C Ebstein anomaly. She underwent successful procedure of tricuspid valve repair with biodegradable ring.

  3. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... A congenital pigmented or melanocytic nevus is a dark-colored, often hairy, patch of skin. It is ... rare. Symptoms A nevus will appear as a dark-colored patch with any of the following: Brown ...

  4. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... defect - heartbeat Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) - series References Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend ... ASD) Coarctation of the aorta Ellis-van Creveld syndrome Fetal alcohol syndrome Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Marfan ...

  5. Congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, B.; Sheikh, Z.; Cibils, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital complete heart block in utero has become diagnosed more frequently with the clinical use of fetal echocardiography. The fetus with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic or may develop congestive heart failure. Congenital complete heart block is more frequently seen in infants of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus, both clinically manifested and subclinical systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antibodies (SS-A and SS-B antibodies). At birth, the neonate with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic and may not require a pacemaker to increase the heart rate. The indications for a pacemaker in neonates with complete heart block have been discussed. Both in-utero and neonatal management of congenital complete heart block are discussed to manage congestive heart failure in a fetus. Four patients with congenital complete heart block are presented covering a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management both in the fetal and neonatal period. Images Figure 1 PMID:8961692

  6. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be high. There may be signs of malnutrition. A urinalysis reveals fat and large amounts of ... The disorder often leads to infection, malnutrition, and kidney failure. ... die within the first year. Congenital nephrotic syndrome ...

  7. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright ©1996 - 2016 C.H.I.N. All rights reserved TX4-390-685 Original site design and HTML by Panoptic Communications

  8. [Congenital heart defects in adulthood : Supraventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Hebe, J

    2016-06-01

    Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) based on congenital substrates, such as accessory pathways or dual atrioventricular nodal properties, occur with an increased probability linked to specific congenital heart defects (CHDs). In the literature, the association of Ebstein's anomaly with accessory pathways and with Mahaim fibers is most prominent. Compared with patients with otherwise normal hearts, the clinical relevance of SVT is typically more severe and therefore antiarrhythmia treatment is a necessity in many cases. Diagnostics, pharmaceutical treatment, and interventional therapy of SVT in patients with CHD are often demanding owing to anatomical, hemodynamic, and electro-anatomical peculiarities. The use of antiarrhythmic medication is often limited because of intolerable side effects and a lack of reliability in suppressing arrhythmia relapses in the long term. Within the last 15-20 years catheter ablation has thus become established as the first-choice treatment for SVT, even in patients with CHD. However, rates of success, recurrence, and risks are still inferior to those observed in patients with a normally functioning heart owing to the co-existence of vascular and cardiac anomalies, surgically created alterations, an unusual electro-anatomy, and lower tolerance to hemodynamic changes. Successful treatment in patients with CHDs and SVT requires a deep understanding and knowledge of all the disciplines discussed above and should only be practiced in dedicated centers, as patient numbers are small and therefore experience is limited.

  9. A rare presentation of a child with osteogenesis imperfecta and congenital laryngomalacia for herniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Roshith; Dave, Nandini; Padvi, Amit; Garasia, Madhu

    2011-01-01

    Sometimes anaesthesiologists come across rare congenital anomalies in their practice. The inherent complications associated with the disorder necessitate tailor-made approaches for providing anaesthesia to even seemingly simple surgical interventions. Here, we share our experience of anaesthesia management of an infant with congenital laryngomalacia and recently diagnosed osteogenesis imperfecta type 1 who had presented to us with an acute abdomen for a semi-emergency herniotomy. PMID:22174477

  10. Right ventricular performance in congenital heart disease: a physiologic and pathophysiologic perspective.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, William E

    2012-05-01

    Underappreciated is the fact that the right ventricle is often the primary determinant of long-term morbidity and mortality in patients with congenital heart disease. Right ventricular performance in these patients depends on a unique set of physiologic and pathophysiologic factors that are rarely considered in acquired heart disease. This article explores this unique physiology and pathophysiology in the hope that it will enhance understanding of a wide variety of congenital cardiac anomalies.

  11. A Triad of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia, Meckel's Diverticulum, and Heterotopic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Mandhan, Parkash; Al Saied, Amer; Ali, Mansour J.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a common developmental anomaly encountered by paediatric surgeons. It is known to be associated with extradiaphragmatic malformations, which include cardiac, renal, genital, and chromosomal abnormalities. Herein, we report a newborn born with concurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia, Meckel's diverticulum, and heterotopic pancreatic tissue. This is the first case report of such a triad with description of possible mechanisms of the development. PMID:24804135

  12. Astrometric solar system anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, John D

    2009-01-01

    There are at least four unexplained anomalies connected with astrometric data. perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital energy per unit mass. next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm yr{sup -1}. The other two anomalies are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth anomaly is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is produent to suspect that all four anomalies have mundane explanations, or that one or more anomalies are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.

  13. Ultrasound, Echocardiography, MRI, and Genetic Analysis of a Fetus with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and Partial 11q Trisomy

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Perea, Yolanda; García-Díaz, Lutgardo; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a serious birth defect with a significant mortality and morbidity. The current and constant progress in ultrasound techniques has led to the improvement of the prenatal diagnosis of this malformation. CDH is a developmental defect whose etiology is heterogeneous and takes place when the pleuroperitoneal folds and septum transversum fail to converge and fuse. Survival depends on the extent of pulmonary hypoplasia and the disease may be potentially worsened by the presence of added congenital defects. 40% of CDH cases are associated with at least one additional anomaly. The ultrasound diagnosis is established with essential signs: loss of uniform echogenicity of lungs and marked mediastinal shift. We report the case of a fetus with isolated CDH diagnosed at 21 weeks of gestation by ultrasound and confirmed by RMI, whose genetic analysis of amniotic fluid cells identified a de novo partial trisomy of the long arm of chromosome 11. Different genetic causes have been associated with CDH. Moreover, it is expectable that the use of new techniques for prenatal diagnosis will reveal novel CNVs associated with CDH and will help us to estimate the recurrence risk for this defect as well as for other associated anomalies. PMID:28352483

  14. Congenital muscular torticollis: evaluation and classification.

    PubMed

    Tatli, Burak; Aydinli, Nur; Caliskan, Mine; Ozmen, Meral; Bilir, Feride; Acar, Gonul

    2006-01-01

    In this investigation of congenital muscular torticollis, 311 infants treated consecutively for congenital torticollis over an 8-year period (1995-2003) at the Pediatric Neurology Clinic of Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Turkey were reviewed retrospectively. The clinical presentation, associated abnormalities, treatment, and outcomes of the overall group and of subgroups divided according to an ultrasonography-based classification were evaluated. All patients were evaluated using a standard approach: cervical ultrasonography was performed, and the patients were divided into two subgroups. Each group was scanned for other anomalies, and outcomes were compared. The mean age at diagnosis was 2.3 months; patients included in this study were 138 males and 173 females. Two clinical subgroups, comprised of sternomastoid tumors 85% and postural torticollis 15%, were identified. Passive range of motion was the initial treatment recommended for all of the patients. Follow-up data were available for all 311 patients; 95% experienced total resolution and 5% experienced subtotal resolution. We conclude that the majority of children with congenital muscular torticollis experience total resolution of symptoms. The success rate of conservative treatment is primarily dependent on the patients' age at the initiation of exercises and ultrasonographic findings.

  15. Clinical presentation and management of congenital ptosis

    PubMed Central

    Marenco, Marco; Macchi, Ilaria; Macchi, Iacopo; Galassi, Emilio; Massaro-Giordano, Mina; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Congenital ptosis is a rare condition characterized by lower positioning of the upper eyelid that is present at birth and is a clinical condition that is persistent if not treated. It may be unilateral or bilateral and may be associated with other ocular disorders or systemic conditions, including Marcus Gunn, Horner, and Duane syndromes. It is a benign condition but causes functional, cosmetic, and psychological problems in children. However, not all patients need to undergo surgery, and usually only patients at risk of amblyopia need a prompt surgical correction, while in other cases, surgery can be postponed. The grade of ptosis, the eyelid function, and the amblyopic risk are the parameters that affect the ophthalmologist’s decision on timing of surgery and the surgical technique to be used. In fact, there are several types of surgical techniques to correct a congenital ptosis, although very often more than one is needed to obtain an acceptable result. This paper reviews the causes of congenital ptosis and associated diseases. Particular emphasis is given to surgical management and different procedures available to correct the upper eyelid anomaly and avoid permanent damage to visual function. PMID:28280295

  16. 46,XY Disorders of Sex Development and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: A Case with Dysmorphic Facies, Truncus Arteriosus, Bifid Thymus, Gut Malrotation, Rhizomelia, and Adactyly

    PubMed Central

    Esplin, Edward D.; Chaib, Hassan; Haney, Michael; Martin, Brock; Homeyer, Margaret; Urban, Alexander E.; Bernstein, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The association of 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD) with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is rare, but has been previously described with and without other congenital anomalies. Literature review identified five cases of 46,XY DSD associated with CDH and other congenital anomalies. These five cases share characteristics including CDH, 46,XY karyotype with external female appearing or ambiguous genitalia, cardiac anomalies, and decreased life span. The present case had novel features including truncus arteriosus, bifid thymus, gut malrotation, and limb anomalies consisting of rhizomelia and adactyly. With this case report, we present a review of the literature of cases of 46,XY DSD and CDH in association with multiple congenital abnormalities. This case may represent a unique syndrome of 46,XY DSD and diaphragmatic hernia or a more severe presentation of a syndrome represented in the previously reported cases. PMID:25898814

  17. An unusual ultrasonographic manifestation of a fetal Ebstein anomaly.

    PubMed

    Cha, Min-Young; Won, Hye-Sung; Lee, Mi-Young; Woo, Kyung-Hee; Shim, Jae-Yoon

    2014-11-01

    An Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital heart defect defined by an inferior displacement of the septal and posterior leaflets of the tricuspid valve from the tricuspid annulus. This anomaly shows various ultrasonographic manifestations, thus making the prenatal diagnosis sometimes difficult. We here report a rare case of an Ebstein anomaly which was prenatally suspected as the absence of the tricuspid valve with functional pulmonary atresia because of non-visible tricuspid leaflets on an echocardiograph at 24 weeks of gestation. An emergency cesarean section was performed at 35 weeks of gestation as fetal hydrops were seen on a follow-up scan. Postnatal surgery confirmed Ebstein anomaly type-D which demonstrates an almost complete atrialization of the right ventricle with the exception of a small and infundibular component. Because of its rarity, prenatal findings of a type-D Ebstein anomaly have not been reported previously. We suggest from this first such case report that this anomaly should be considered as a possible diagnosis when the tricuspid leaflets are not well visualized.

  18. Abdominal Problems in Children with Congenital Cardiovascular Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Güney, Lütfi Hakan; Araz, Coşkun; Beyazpınar, Deniz Sarp; Arda, İrfan Serdar; Arslan, Esra Elif; Hiçsönmez, Akgün

    2015-01-01

    in Group I, and paralytic ileus in Group II. Seven of the Group I patients and 22 of the Group II patients died. The patients who died in both groups had more than three congenital cardiovascular abnormalities in the same patient, and 80% of these patients had been operated for congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. Conclusion: The gastrointestinal system is involved in important complications experienced by patients with congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. The mortality rate was higher in operated patients due to gastrointestinal complications. Gastrointestinal complications are more frequent in patients with cyanotic anomalies. The presence of more than one congenital cardiovascular abnormality in a patient increased the mortality rate. PMID:26185717

  19. Magnetic anomalies. [Magsat studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.

    1983-01-01

    The implications and accuracy of anomaly maps produced using Magsat data on the scalar and vector magnetic field of the earth are discussed. Comparisons have been made between the satellite maps and aeromagnetic survey maps, showing smoother data from the satellite maps and larger anomalies in the aircraft data. The maps are being applied to characterize the structure and tectonics of the underlying regions. Investigations are still needed regarding the directions of magnetization within the crust and to generate further correlations between anomaly features and large scale geological structures. Furthermore, an increased data base is recommended for the Pacific Ocean basin in order to develop a better starting model for Pacific tectonic movements. The Pacific basin was large farther backwards in time and subduction zones surround the basin, thereby causing difficulties for describing the complex break-up scenario for Gondwanaland.

  20. [Rare renal anomalies in childhood].

    PubMed

    Arambasić, Jadranka; Puseljić, Silvija; Angebrandt, Snjezana; Puseljić, Ivo

    2003-01-01

    Three patients with megacalycosis, a rare ren anomaly which includes dilatation of all ren calices, are presented. The symptoms of acute uroinfection were present in all three patients. The patients underwent clinical observation, laboratory testing, and renal ultrasound. Ultrasound revealed unilateral hydronephrosis in all three patients. Additional examinations included static and dynamic renal scintigraphy, voiding cystourethrography, and intravenous urography which pointed to unilateral megacalycosis. The symptoms of acute uroinfection were probably triggered by urinary stasis in dilated calices. Surgical intervention is not indicated in megacalycosis. The increasing incidence of uroinfection, urolithiasis and hematuria imposed the need of continuous follow-up in these patients.

  1. Preconception care for women with diabetes and prevention of major congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Kitzmiller, John L; Wallerstein, Robert; Correa, Adolfo; Kwan, Saiyin

    2010-10-01

    This article provides an overview of the rationale for diabetes preconception care interventions for women with diabetes and the efficacy in reducing the excess occurrence of major congenital malformations. The problems with broad use of individualized preconception care are considered. In addition, suggestions are made for the implementation of more comprehensive interventions in the community and usual diabetes care settings, to address the multiple ongoing challenges in the prevention of structural anomalies associated with preexisting diabetes. Based on the published evidence, successful preconception care can be considered to include: achievement of individualized target standardized glycosylated hemoglobin levels, adequate nutrition, and minimizing hypoglycemia before and after discontinuing effective contraception and during the transition to early prenatal care.

  2. Current Concepts in the Management of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Infants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vasanth H S

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic approach to congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) has shifted from one of immediate repair to management of pulmonary hypertension, physiologic stabilization, and delayed surgical repair. Lung hypoplasia, remodeled pulmonary vasculature, and ventricular dysfunction all contribute to the high morbidity and mortality associated with CDH. In addition, genetic syndromes associated with CDH can increase the incidence of serious anomalies and hence impact survival. Prenatal and postnatal management of infants with CDH is challenging in the best of circumstances and need multidisciplinary teams for optimal outcomes. However, advances using ultrasound and fetal MRI can predict prognosis and survival and plan for postnatal management. Survival rates for patients with CDH have increased for the past decade with better management at resuscitation; implementation of gentle ventilation strategies; and medical management of pulmonary hypertension, physiologic stabilization, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. However, follow-up of these infants for long-term morbidities is essential for optimal outcomes after discharge.

  3. Congenital tetraplegia, respiratory insufficiency, and hypoplasia of medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Bode, H; Bubl, R; Rutishauser, M; Nars, P W

    1994-03-01

    A term infant with normal delivery presented with congenital tetraplegia and respiratory insufficiency just after birth. Magnetic resonance tomography on days 8 and 72 of life revealed an extreme thinning of the lower medulla oblongata. Endoscopy confirmed this and demonstrated the presence of vascular anomalies around the lesion which were not detectable by angiography. It is presumed that this is a malformation of the lower medulla oblongata.

  4. Reconstruction of congenital and acquired auricular scaphal deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kontis, Theda C; Papel, Ira D

    2003-01-01

    Although complications from piercing of the helical rim are unusual, infections in this area after piercing can produce devastating changes in the cartilaginous framework. Scaphal height is also reduced in certain congenital pinna anomalies. We developed a method of scaphal reconstruction that uses a composite graft harvested from the ipsilateral conchal bowl. The conchal bowl defect is repaired with an ipsilateral full-thickness graft of postauricular skin. This technique restores scaphal height and helical contour with minimal donor site morbidity.

  5. Congenital dystrophic medial rectus muscles

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    We report two patients, one with congenital dystrophic medial rectus muscles and one with absence of the medial rectus muscles; in addition, one of them had absence of the lateral rectus muscles. While absence of the superior oblique and superior rectus has been more commonly reported in literature, especially with craniofacial syndromes, our patients were nonsyndromic. Considering the risk of anterior segment ischemia, correction of the large-angle exotropia was performed by horizontal rectus muscle surgery where possible, along with transfer of the superior oblique tendon to the superior part of the normal medial rectus muscle insertion area to create a tethering effect with a good outcome. PMID:28300745

  6. Prophylactic arrhythmia surgery in association with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Deal, Barbara J

    2016-07-01

    Certain congenital heart anomalies make patients more susceptible to arrhythmia development throughout their lives. This poses the question whether prophylactic arrhythmia surgery should be incorporated into reparative open heart procedures for congenital heart disease. There is currently no consensus on what constitutes a standard prophylactic procedure, owing to the questions that remain regarding lesions to be performed; energy sources to use; proximity of energy source or incisions to coronary arteries, sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node; circumstances for right atrial, left atrial, or biatrial appendectomy; and whether to perform a right, left, or biatrial maze procedure. These considerations are important because prophylactic arrhythmia procedures are performed without knowing if the patient will actually develop an arrhythmia in his or her lifetime. By reviewing and summarizing the literature, congenital heart disease patients who are at risk for developing atrial arrhythmias can be identified and lesion sets can be suggested in an effort to standardize experimental protocols for prophylactic arrhythmia surgery.

  7. Iris mammillations in two female siblings with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Peyman, Mohammadreza; Ong, Ming Jew; Iqbal, Tajunisah; Subrayan, Visvaraja

    2010-12-29

    Iris mammillations are dark brown, smooth, mound- or dome-shaped protuberances that are typically found on the anterior iris surface and are presumed to be congenital in origin. This congenital anomaly is usually unilateral and can be hereditary or sporadic. Lisch nodules in neurofibromatosis, tapioca melanoma of the iris, inflammatory iris granulomata and Cogan-Reese syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis. In this case report, the authors present a case of a bilateral iris mammillations in two siblings with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). To our knowledge, this is the first case where bilateral iris mammilations have been found to be associated with a systemic condition. Iris mammillations can be considered as one of the clinical signs in CAH in view of the pathogenesis discussed. Detailed ocular examination in CAH may reveal an increased incidence.

  8. Prophylactic arrhythmia surgery in association with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Deal, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Certain congenital heart anomalies make patients more susceptible to arrhythmia development throughout their lives. This poses the question whether prophylactic arrhythmia surgery should be incorporated into reparative open heart procedures for congenital heart disease. There is currently no consensus on what constitutes a standard prophylactic procedure, owing to the questions that remain regarding lesions to be performed; energy sources to use; proximity of energy source or incisions to coronary arteries, sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node; circumstances for right atrial, left atrial, or biatrial appendectomy; and whether to perform a right, left, or biatrial maze procedure. These considerations are important because prophylactic arrhythmia procedures are performed without knowing if the patient will actually develop an arrhythmia in his or her lifetime. By reviewing and summarizing the literature, congenital heart disease patients who are at risk for developing atrial arrhythmias can be identified and lesion sets can be suggested in an effort to standardize experimental protocols for prophylactic arrhythmia surgery. PMID:27709096

  9. Left-sided gallbladder associated with congenital liver cyst

    PubMed Central

    Colovic, N.; Barisic, G.; Atkinson, H. D. E.; Krivokapic, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Background. A left-sided gallbladder is a rare congenital anomaly defined as a gallbladder attached to the lower surface of the left lateral segment of the liver, i.e. to the left of the interlobar fissure and round ligament. Case outlines. In two women aged 42 and 70 years a left-sided gallbladder was associated with a congenital cyst of the liver. In the first patient, the ectopic gallbladder was an incidental finding at operation for a symptomatic liver cyst; as the gallbladder was normal it was not removed. The second patient underwent operation for chronic calculous cholecystitis, when the left-sided gallbladder and congenital liver cyst were found. An operative cholangiogram was normal, the cystic duct joining the common bile duct from the right side. The gallbladder was removed, and the cyst was de-roofed. Both patients had an uneventful recovery and remain symptom-free at 12 and 9 years respectively. Discussion. To the best of our knowledge, the association of these two congenital anomalies has not been described previously. PMID:18333268

  10. Congenital malformations in experimental diabetic pregnancy: aetiology and antioxidative treatment. Minireview based on a doctoral thesis.

    PubMed

    Simán, M

    1997-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus in pregnancy causes congenital malformations in the offspring. The aim of this work was to characterize biochemical and morphologic anomalies in the conceptus of an animal model of diabetic pregnancy. In addition, a preventive treatment against diabetes-induced dysmorphogenesis was developed. Congenital cataract was often found in the offspring of diabetic rats. The fetal lenses had increased water accumulation, sorbitol concentration and aldose reductase activity compared to control lenses. The results suggest that the cataracts form via osmotic attraction of water due to sorbitol accumulation in the fetal lens. Another set of malformations, with possible neural crest cell origin, occurred frequently in offspring of diabetic rats. These included low set ears, micrognathia, hypoplasia of the thymus, thyroid and parathyroid glands, as well as anomalies of the heart and great vessels. Furthermore, diabetes caused intrauterine death and resorptions more frequently in the late part of gestation. When the pregnant diabetic rats were treated with the antioxidants butylated hydroxytoluene, vitamin E or vitamin C, the occurrence of gross malformations was reduced from approximately 25% to less than 8%, and late resorptions from 17% to 7%. This suggests that an abnormal handling of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is involved in diabetes-induced dysmorphogenesis in vivo. Indeed, an increased concentration of lipid peroxides, indicating damage caused by ROS, was found in fetuses of diabetes rats. In addition, embryos of diabetic rats had low concentrations of the antioxidant vitamin E compared to control embryos. These biochemical alterations were normalized by vitamin E treatment of the pregnant diabetic rats. The antioxidants are likely to have prevented ROS injury in the embryos of the diabetic rats, in particular in the neural crest cells, thereby normalizing embryonic development. These results provide a rationale for developing new anti

  11. Headache in a Patient with Complex Congenital Heart Disease: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Waheed; Miteff, Ferdi; Collins, Nicholas

    2015-11-01

    Headache in adult patients with congenital heart disease may be a manifestation of the underlying cardiac condition or more common alternative causes of headache. In patients with pre-existing congenital heart disease, consideration of potentially uncommon aetiologies of headache is important. We report an uncommon case of headache in a patient with complex congenital heart disease characterised by Ebstein's anomaly with previous surgical repair complicated by idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This case illustrates the importance of understanding the implications of headache with reference to the underlying cardiac disease as well as specific issues related to a relatively young cohort of patients.

  12. Perpetual dilemma: Pleural or parenchymal/congenital or acquired solitary cystic lesion with fluid level.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Deepak; Jha, Onkar; Sharma, Rahul Kumar; Saxena, Rajat

    2017-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformations (CCAMs) are rare congenital, nonhereditary developmental anomalies of the lung with unknown etiology. CCAM is predominantly a disorder of infancy with the majority of the cases being diagnosed within the first 2 years of life. When CCAM presents in adults, it represents a diagnostic dilemma and requires careful evaluation. We here report a case of large solitary congenital pulmonary cystic adenomatoid malformation with infection and hemorrhage, which was diagnosed as encysted hydropneumothorax on computerized tomography scans but turned out to be infected pulmonary cystic adenomatoid malformation after surgical excision.

  13. Perpetual dilemma: Pleural or parenchymal/congenital or acquired solitary cystic lesion with fluid level

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Deepak; Jha, Onkar; Sharma, Rahul Kumar; Saxena, Rajat

    2017-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformations (CCAMs) are rare congenital, nonhereditary developmental anomalies of the lung with unknown etiology. CCAM is predominantly a disorder of infancy with the majority of the cases being diagnosed within the first 2 years of life. When CCAM presents in adults, it represents a diagnostic dilemma and requires careful evaluation. We here report a case of large solitary congenital pulmonary cystic adenomatoid malformation with infection and hemorrhage, which was diagnosed as encysted hydropneumothorax on computerized tomography scans but turned out to be infected pulmonary cystic adenomatoid malformation after surgical excision. PMID:28144070

  14. Leber's congenital amaurosis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Castro-Gago, M; Pintos-Martínez, E; Beiras-Iglesias, A; Maroto, S; Campos, Y; Arenas, J; Eirís-Puñal, J

    1996-03-01

    We report the case histories of two 6-month-old girls, both with young, nonconsanguineous parents, referred to us for suspected blindness. In both cases, Leber's congenital amaurosis was diagnosed. Due to persistently high lactic acid levels in blood, muscle biopsies were taken. Analysis of biopsies revealed that both patients had low levels of complex IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain; one patient additionally had low levels of complex III. Microscopic and ultrastructural alterations of muscle, typically observed in mitochondrial disorders, were observed only in the second patient. These observations raise the possibility that at least some cases of Leber's congenital amaurosis may be due to alterations in the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  15. Congenital muscular torticollis: experience of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Das, B K; Matin, A; Hassan, G Z; Hossain, M Z; Zaman, M A

    2010-10-01

    Congenital Muscular Torticollis (CMT) is a postural deformity of head and neck detected at birth or shortly after birth, primarily resulting from unilateral shortening of Sternocleidomastoid Muscle (SCM). In neonates and infants, patient may cure conservatively by physiotherapy but surgery is the treatment of choice for children and adolescents. There are various techniques of surgery. Here we show our experience regarding management of congenital muscular torticollis. In the present retrospective case series, fourteen patients of congenital muscular torticollis were treated. The cases were enrolled between Nov' 2005 to Oct' 2007 in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Gonosasthaya Somaj Vittik Medical College Hospital, Dhaka and different private clinics of Dhaka city of Bangladesh. Neonates and infants were treated conservatively with physiotherapy and others treated surgically by transection of both sternal and clavicular head of SCM under general anesthesia. Operated patients were released on following post operative day with advised to do physiotherapy. Patients age range from 7 days to 15 years of which ten were female and four male. SCM was shortened in all cases (8 on right side and 6 on left side). Eleven were female and three male. Of 14 patients, 2 neonates, 7 infants and 5 were more than 1 year age. There was no associated anomaly. Out of 9 neonates and infants 8 cured conservatively with physiotherapy and another one significantly improved. Six were treated surgically including one failed physiotherapy. Post operative period was uneventful and there was no complication. Results were evaluated clinically and comments of peers. Most of the patient of congenital muscular torticollis can be treated conservatively during infancy. Division of both sternal and clavicular head of SCM is easy and safe surgical technique for the treatment of CMT of older children and adolescents.

  16. [Evaluation of congenital heart disease in adults].

    PubMed

    Oliver Ruiz, José María; Mateos García, Marta; Bret Zurita, Montserrat

    2003-06-01

    Improvements in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of congenital heart disease during infancy and childhood have resulted in an outstanding increase in the prevalence of these entities during adulthood. Congenital heart disease in the adult represents a new diagnostic challenge to the consultant cardiologist, unfamiliar with the anatomical and functional complexities of cardiac malformations. Assessment of adult congenital heart disease with imaging techniques can be as accurate as in children. However, these techniques cannot substitute for a detailed clinical assessment. Physical examination, electrocardiography and chest x-rays remain the three main pillars of bedside diagnosis. Transthoracic echocardiography is undoubtedly the imaging technique which provides most information, and in many situations no additional studies are needed. Nevertheless, ultrasound imaging properties in adults are not as favorable as in children, and prior surgical procedures further impair image quality. Despite recent advances in ultrasound technologies such as harmonic or contrast imaging, other diagnostic procedures are sometimes required. Fortunately, transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging are easily performed in the adult, and do not require anaesthetic support, in contrast to pediatric patients. These techniques, together with nuclear cardiology and cardiac catheterization, complete the second tier of diagnostic techniques for congenital heart disease. To avoid unnecessary repetition of diagnostic procedures, the attending cardiologist should choose the sequence of diagnostic techniques carefully; although the information this yields is often redundant, it is also frequently complementary. This article aims to compare the diagnostic utility of different imaging techniques in adult patients with congenital heart disease, both with and without prior surgical repair.

  17. Supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult with anomalies of aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Acrisio Sales; Alencar, Polyanna; Santos, Alana Neiva; Lobo, Roberto Augusto de Mesquita; de Mesquita, Fernando Antônio; Guimarães, Aloyra Guedis

    2013-01-01

    The supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare congenital heart defect being very uncommon in adults. We present a case of supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult associated with anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation, which was submitted to aortic valve replacement and arterioplasty of the ascending aorta with a good postoperative course. PMID:24598962

  18. [STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF MINERAL FERTILIZERS ON THE NEONATAL MORBIDITY RATE IN INFANTS WITH CONGENITAL MALFORMATIONS (CM) IN THE BELGOROD REGION].

    PubMed

    Verzilina, I N; Chumosov, M I; Evdokimov, V I

    2015-01-01

    Results of the performed study showed that the use of mineral fertilizers for crops increases the risk of morbidity in neonates with congenital malformations (CM). P-elevated levels of relative environmental risk is established for: anomalies of the musculoskeletal system, multiple congenital malformations, the CM as a whole. Maximum environmental risk in the conditions of high load offertilizers on farmland is established for congenital abnormalities of the development of reproductive system in newborn infants (RR = 2,76).

  19. Congenital Malformations of the Inner Ear: Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Piromchai, Patorn; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Thanawirattananit, Panida; Yimtae, Kwanchanok

    2015-08-01

    Patients with craniofacial anomalies often present to doctors due to their noticeable disfigurement and are routinely assessed by otolaryngologists for hearing evaluation. However, small percentage of craniofacial anomaly patients may present with delayed speech though they may not have initial obvious external deformation. The objective of case series is to identify the congenital inner ear malformation. The series of clinical presentation, physical examination, investigations, treatments and follow-up results were demonstrated followed by the discussion.

  20. Improving the geological interpretation of magnetic and gravity satellite anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W. (Principal Investigator); Vonfrese, R. R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Current limitations in the quantitative interpretation of satellite-elevation geopotential field data and magnetic anomaly data were investigated along with techniques to overcome them. A major result was the preparation of an improved scalar magnetic anomaly map of South America and adjacent marine areas directly from the original MAGSAT data. In addition, comparisons of South American and Euro-African data show a strong correlation of anomalies along the Atlantic rifted margins of the continents.

  1. Genetics of Congenital Cataract.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Lembo, Andrea; Serafino, Massimiliano; Nucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a type of cataract that presents at birth or during early childhood, and it is one of the most easily treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of 1-6 cases per 10,000 live births. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases may have a genetic cause, and such cases are quite heterogeneous. Although congenital nuclear cataract can be caused by multiple factors, genetic mutation remains the most common cause. All three types of Mendelian inheritance have been reported for cataract; however, autosomal dominant transmission seems to be the most frequent. The transparency and high refractive index of the lens are achieved by the precise architecture of fiber cells and homeostasis of the lens proteins in terms of their concentrations, stabilities, and supramolecular organization. Research on hereditary congenital cataract has led to the identification of several classes of candidate genes that encode proteins such crystallins, lens-specific connexins, aquaporin, cytoskeletal structural proteins, and developmental regulators. In this review, we highlight the identified genetic mutations that account for congenital nuclear cataract.

  2. Whole exome sequence analysis of Peters anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Weh, Eric; Reis, Linda M.; Happ, Hannah C.; Levin, Alex V.; Wheeler, Patricia G.; David, Karen L.; Carney, Erin; Angle, Brad; Hauser, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Peters anomaly is a rare form of anterior segment ocular dysgenesis, which can also be associated with additional systemic defects. At this time, the majority of cases of Peters anomaly lack a genetic diagnosis. We performed whole exome sequencing of 27 patients with syndromic or isolated Peters anomaly to search for pathogenic mutations in currently known ocular genes. Among the eight previously recognized Peters anomaly genes, we identified a de novo missense mutation in PAX6, c.155G>A, p.(Cys52Tyr), in one patient. Analysis of 691 additional genes currently associated with a different ocular phenotype identified a heterozygous splicing mutation c.1025+2T>A in TFAP2A, a de novo heterozygous nonsense mutation c.715C>T, p.(Gln239*) in HCCS, a hemizygous mutation c.385G>A, p.(Glu129Lys) in NDP, a hemizygous mutation c.3446C>T, p.(Pro1149Leu) in FLNA, and compound heterozygous mutations c.1422T>A, p.(Tyr474*) and c.2544G>A, p.(Met848Ile) in SLC4A11; all mutations, except for the FLNA and SLC4A11 c.2544G>A alleles, are novel. This is the frst study to use whole exome sequencing to discern the genetic etiology of a large cohort of patients with syndromic or isolated Peters anomaly. We report five new genes associated with this condition and suggest screening of TFAP2A and FLNA in patients with Peters anomaly and relevant syndromic features and HCCS, NDP and SLC4A11 in patients with isolated Peters anomaly. PMID:25182519

  3. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease. Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease 05/ ... in the journal Nature, about the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. This NHLBI- ...

  4. Types of Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease. Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease 05/ ... in the journal Nature, about the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. This NHLBI- ...

  5. Environmental aspects of congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Yu, Xin; Shen, Jianxiong

    2015-04-01

    Growing evidence has proved that many aspects of our lifestyle and the environment contribute to the development of congenital disease. Congenital spinal deformities are due to anomalous development of the vertebrae including failure of formation and segmentation during embryogenesis. The causes of congenital scoliosis have not been fully identified. A variety of factors are implicated in the development of vertebral abnormalities. Previous studies have demonstrated that both genetics and environmental factors are implicated in the development of vertebral abnormalities. However, no specific cause for congenital scoliosis has been identified. In our review, we focus on the environmental factors for the development of congenital scoliosis. Various maternal exposures during pregnancy including hypoxia, alcohol use, vitamin deficiency, valproic acid, boric acid, and hyperthermia have been observed to be associated with the occurrence of congenital scoliosis. This review describes the major environmental contributors of congenital scoliosis with an emphasis on treatment aspects associated with environmental disposition in congenital scoliosis.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hyperinsulinism

    MedlinePlus

    ... of infancy Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (UK) Merck Manual Consumer Version: Hypoglycemia Orphanet: Congenital isolated ... Diseases Congenital Hyperinsulinism International The Children's Hyperinsulinism Fund (UK) GeneReviews (1 link) Familial Hyperinsulinism ClinicalTrials.gov (1 ...

  7. Congenital heart disease in spondylothoracic dysostosis: two familial cases.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J M; Cook, A; Fagg, N L; MacLachlan, N A; Sharland, G K

    1995-01-01

    Two familial cases of spondylothoracic dysostosis are reported. Both cases had severe congenital heart disease in addition to the skeletal malformations which are characteristic of the condition. Images PMID:7473656

  8. Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, K; Takei, Y; Sears, M L; Peterson, W S; Carr, R E; Jampol, L M

    1977-01-01

    An early stage of Leber's congenital amaurosis, characterized by white spots or lines in the fundus, occurred in two children. Light microscopic examination of eyes obtained from one child, a 16-month-old Japanese girl, revealed subretinal deposits corresponding to the white spots and lines in the fundus deposits. Light and electron microscopic examination of the eye showed distinctive changes in the outer retinal layers and choroid, while the inner retinal layers were nearly normal. Characteristic early lesions of congenital amaurosis appeared to be produced by deposits consisting of loose outer segments and apical processes of the pigmental epithelial cell and macrophages. Undifferentiation in the nuclei of the photoreceptor cell, the inner segment, the pigment epithelial cell, and the choriocapillaris were likely characteristics of the early changes of congenital amaurosis.

  9. Familial ebstein anomaly, left ventricular hypertrabeculation, and ventricular septal defect associated with a MYH7 mutation.

    PubMed

    Bettinelli, Audra L; Mulder, Theodorus J; Funke, Birgit H; Lafferty, Katherine A; Longo, Sherri A; Niyazov, Dmitriy M

    2013-12-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital heart defect that most often occurs sporadically within a kindred. Familial cases, although reported, are uncommon. At this time, the genetic etiology of Ebstein anomaly is not fully elucidated. Here, we describe clinical and molecular investigations of a rare case of familial Ebstein anomaly in association with a likely pathogenic mutation of the MYH7 gene. The severity of presentation varies, and Ebstein anomaly can be observed in association with such other heart defects as ventricular septal defect and left ventricular (LV) hypertrabeculation, as seen in our family of study. In our family of study, the 31-year-old father and four of his children have been diagnosed with Ebstein anomaly. Genetic testing revealed that the father was heterozygous for the Glu1220del variant detected in exon 27 of the MYH7 gene. The MYH7 gene encodes the β-myosin heavy chain and is expressed in cardiac muscle. DNA sequencing of three of his affected children confirmed that they carried the same variant while the fourth affected child was not available for testing. This is the first report of familial Ebstein anomaly associated with the Glu1220del mutation of the MYH7 gene. The mutation segregates with disease in a family with autosomal dominant transmission of congenital heart defects including Ebstein anomaly and other associated cardiovascular defects including LV hypertrabeculation and ventricular septal defect.

  10. Hawking radiation and covariant anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2008-01-15

    Generalizing the method of Wilczek and collaborators we provide a derivation of Hawking radiation from charged black holes using only covariant gauge and gravitational anomalies. The reliability and universality of the anomaly cancellation approach to Hawking radiation is also discussed.

  11. Congenital Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) destruction can be secondary to intrinsic disorders of the RBC or to extrinsic causes. In the congenital hemolytic anemias, intrinsic RBC enzyme, RBC membrane, and hemoglobin disorders result in hemolysis. The typical clinical presentation is a patient with pallor, anemia, jaundice, and often splenomegaly. The laboratory features include anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and reticulocytosis. For some congenital hemolytic anemias, splenectomy is curative. However, in other diseases, avoidance of drugs and toxins is the best therapy. Supportive care with transfusions are also mainstays of therapy. Chronic hemolysis often results in the formation of gallstones, and cholecystectomy is often indicated.

  12. Congenital brain infections.

    PubMed

    Arbelaez, Andres; Restrepo, Feliza; Davila, Jorge; Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-06-01

    Pediatric congenital intracranial infections are a group of different and important entities that constitute a small percentage of all pediatric infections. The causal factors and clinical presentations are different in children compared with adults. They require early recognition because delay diagnosis and initiation of treatment may have catastrophic consequences. Despite improvements in prenatal screening, vaccine safety, and antibiotics, infections of the central nervous system remain an important cause of neurological disabilities worldwide. This article reviews the most common congenital infections and their imaging findings.

  13. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  14. Congenital Toxoplasmosis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Marissa Martinez

    2015-01-01

    Acute infection of toxoplasmosis during pregnancy is detrimental to the developing fetus. In the United States, approximately 1 in 10,000 live births are affected by congenital toxoplasmosis. Although multifactorial in etiology, maternal infection is primarily attributed to the consumption of contaminated meat or water. Infection and transmission to the fetus may result in devastating neurologic impairment. Screening methods for all pregnant women should be implemented in routine prenatal care. This article will highlight the inherent dangers of congenital toxoplasmosis, while including general care of the fetus for prevention of transmission, medical management, and long-term outcomes.

  15. [Pathogenesis and genetics of vascular anomalies].

    PubMed

    Vikkula, M

    2006-01-01

    Vascular anomalies, divided into vascular tumors and vascular malformations, are localized defects of angiogenesis. Hemangiomas appear soon after birth, grow quickly, and then spontaneously, but slowly, disappear. In contrast, vascular malformations are congenital defects of vascular development that grow proportionately with the child. Most vascular anomalies are considered non-hereditary. However, due to detailed analysis inherited forms have been observed, which has led to identify mutations in three genes causing familial vascular malformations: in the angiopoietin receptor TIE2 in mucocutaneous venous malformations (VMCM), in glomulin in glomuvenous malformations (GVM) and in RASA1 in the newly recognized phenotype capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM). Identification of the causative genes has permitted more precise diagnosis and differential diagnosis, evaluation of phenotypic variability among patients with a proven mutation, study of used treatments in more homogeneous patient groups, and elucidation of the etiopathogenic mechanisms behind vascular malformations. Further studies are needed to unravel the role of genetic variations in the various vascular malformations and to unravel the precise molecular mechanisms that lead to development of these vascular lesions. This should provide development of new-targeted therapies.

  16. [Horseshoe kidney: not a simple fusion anomaly].

    PubMed

    Caccetta, Francesco; Caroppo, Maurizio; Musio, Fernando; Mudoni, Anna; Accogli, Antonella; Zacheo, Maria Dolores; Burzo, Domenica; Bramato, Daniele; Carluccio, Giancamillo; Nuzzo, Vitale

    2015-01-01

    The horseshoe kidney is a congenital anatomical defect of the kidney that occurs in 0,25% of the population and is generally characterized by the fusion of the lower poles of the two kidneys through an isthmus and to which may be associated with urogenital and renal vascular anomalies. Asymptomatic in 1/3 of the cases and, most of time, accidentally discovered during a radiological examination, promotes nephrolithiasis, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux and pyelonephritis. We report two cases of patients with kidney horseshoe, characterized by the abrupt onset of a septic state with oligo-anuric acute renal failure, electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities, rapid decay of the general conditions, with detection of nephrolithiasis, hydronephrosis and acute pyelonephritis and whose clinical management resulted in a significant and synergistic nefro-urology involvment. The kidney horseshoe not represent so only a simple fusion anomaly but rather an important anatomical condition that, once diagnosed, it would be worthy of a careful clinical, radiological and laboratory surveillance, in order to prevent the potential complications that may be also particularly severe.

  17. Congenital Corneal Anesthesia and Neurotrophic Keratitis: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mantelli, Flavio; Nardella, Chiara; Tiberi, Eloisa; Sacchetti, Marta; Bruscolini, Alice; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophic keratitis (NK) is a rare degenerative disease of the cornea caused by an impairment of corneal sensory innervation, characterized by decreased or absent corneal sensitivity resulting in epithelial keratopathy, ulceration, and perforation. The aetiopathogenesis of corneal sensory innervation impairment in children recognizes the same range of causes as adults, although they are much less frequent in the pediatric population. Some extremely rare congenital diseases could be considered in the aetiopathogenesis of NK in children. Congenital corneal anesthesia is an extremely rare condition that carries considerable diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Typically the onset is up to 3 years of age and the cornea may be affected in isolation or the sensory deficit may exist as a component of a congenital syndrome, or it may be associated with systemic somatic anomalies. Accurate diagnosis and recognition of risk factors is important for lessening long-term sequelae of this condition. Treatment should include frequent topical lubrication and bandage corneal or scleral contact lenses. Surgery may be needed in refractory cases. The purpose of this review is to summarize and update data available on congenital causes and treatment of corneal hypo/anesthesia and, in turn, on congenital NK. PMID:26451380

  18. PGM3 mutations cause a congenital disorder of glycosylation with severe immunodeficiency and skeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Backe, Paul H; Sorte, Hanne S; Mørkrid, Lars; Chokshi, Niti Y; Erichsen, Hans Christian; Gambin, Tomasz; Elgstøen, Katja B P; Bjørås, Magnar; Wlodarski, Marcin W; Krüger, Marcus; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Patel, Ankita; Raymond, Kimiyo M; Sasa, Ghadir S; Krance, Robert A; Martinez, Caridad A; Abraham, Shirley M; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Hall, Patricia; Forbes, Lisa R; Merckoll, Else; Westvik, Jostein; Nishimura, Gen; Rustad, Cecilie F; Abrahamsen, Tore G; Rønnestad, Arild; Osnes, Liv T; Egeland, Torstein; Rødningen, Olaug K; Beck, Christine R; Boerwinkle, Eric A; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Orange, Jordan S; Lausch, Ekkehart; Hanson, I Celine

    2014-07-03

    Human phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3) catalyzes the conversion of N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc)-6-phosphate into GlcNAc-1-phosphate during the synthesis of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-GlcNAc, a sugar nucleotide critical to multiple glycosylation pathways. We identified three unrelated children with recurrent infections, congenital leukopenia including neutropenia, B and T cell lymphopenia, and progression to bone marrow failure. Whole-exome sequencing demonstrated deleterious mutations in PGM3 in all three subjects, delineating their disease to be due to an unsuspected congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG). Functional studies of the disease-associated PGM3 variants in E. coli cells demonstrated reduced PGM3 activity for all mutants tested. Two of the three children had skeletal anomalies resembling Desbuquois dysplasia: short stature, brachydactyly, dysmorphic facial features, and intellectual disability. However, these additional features were absent in the third child, showing the clinical variability of the disease. Two children received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation of cord blood and bone marrow from matched related donors; both had successful engraftment and correction of neutropenia and lymphopenia. We define PGM3-CDG as a treatable immunodeficiency, document the power of whole-exome sequencing in gene discoveries for rare disorders, and illustrate the utility of genomic analyses in studying combined and variable phenotypes.

  19. Creating chiral anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradlyn, Barry; Cano, Jennifer; Wang, Zhijun; Hirschberger, Max; Ong, N. Phuan; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    Materials with intrinsic Weyl points should present exotic magnetotransport phenomena due to spectral flow between Weyl nodes of opposite chirality - the so-called ``chiral anomaly''. However, to date, the most definitive transport data showing the presence of a chiral anomaly comes from Dirac (not Weyl) materials. These semimetals develop Weyl fermions only in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field, when the four-fold degeneracy is lifted. In this talk we examine Berry phase effects on transport due to the emergence of these field-induced Weyl point and (in some cases) line nodes. We pay particular attention to the differences between intrinsic and field-induced Weyl fermions, from the point of view of kinetic theory. Finally, we apply our analysis to a particular material relevant to current experiments performed at Princeton.

  20. Scrotal ultrasound findings in previously congenital and acquired unilateral undescended testes and their contralateral normally descended testis.

    PubMed

    van Brakel, J; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S M P F; van Casteren, N J; Hazebroek, F W; Dohle, G R

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to report on different anomalies found by physical examination and scrotal ultrasound in men with previously unilateral congenital undescended testes (UDT; N = 50), acquired UDT (N = 49), their contralateral normally descended testis (CNDT) and control testes (N = 53). Acquired UDT significantly more often had a testicular volume being <15 mL than congenital UDT (88% vs. 68%). In the congenital group, significant differences were found between UDT and CNDT for soft consistency (UDT 36% vs. CNDT 14%), epididymal diameter (UDT 7.6 mm vs. CNDT 8.9 mm), testicular volume (UDT 9.8 mL vs. CNDT 13.8 mL), and inhomogeneous parenchyma (UDT 38% vs. CNDT 14%). In the acquired group, significant differences were found between UDT and CNDT for epididymal diameter (UDT 7.5 mm vs. CNDT 8 mm), testicular volume (UDT 9.3 mL vs. CNDT 14.1 mL), testicular volume <15 mL (UDT 88% vs. CNDT 59%), and inhomogeneous parenchyma (UDT 27% vs. CNDT 6%). The following parameters of congenital UDT, acquired UDT, congenital CNDT, and/or acquired CNDT significantly differed compared with controls: soft testicular consistency (congenital UDT 36%, acquired UDT 20%, congenital CNDT 14%, acquired CNDT 12% vs. controls 0%), epididymal diameter (congenital UDT 7.6 mm, acquired UDT 7.5 mm, acquired CNDT 8 mm vs. controls 9.2 mm), testicular volume (congenital UDT 9.8 mL, acquired UDT 9.3 mL, congenital CNDT 13.8 mL, acquired CNDT 14.1 mL vs. control testes 15.8 mL), testicular volume <15 mL (congenital UDT 68%, acquired UDT 88%, congenital CNDT 66% vs. controls 43%), inhomogeneous parenchyma (congenital UDT 38%, acquired UDT 27%, congenital CNDT 14% vs. controls 0%), and testicular microlithiasis (congenital CNDT 24% vs. control testes 8%). Few differences between congenital and acquired unilateral UDT and congenital and acquired CNDT support the hypothesis of a spectrum of maldescended testes containing congenital and acquired UDT instead of them being

  1. Vaginal and uterine anomalies in the pediatric and adolescent patient.

    PubMed

    Spence, J E

    1998-02-01

    Congenital malformations of the vagina, cervix, and uterus, although rare, may have profound implications for the young gynecological patient. These anomalies are often detected in the adolescent period. For proper management, the physician requires a thorough understanding of normal embryology and sexual differentiation. Although clinical experience helps the gynecologist appreciate the disturbed anatomic configurations, each and every individual who presents with a defect must be thoroughly evaluated because genital tract aberrations do not necessarily follow any defined and consistent pattern. Other anomalies often coexist, particularly related to the renal tract, so a thorough assessment is warranted. Genital malformations can be particularly disturbing to the patient and her family because they not only have reproductive implications but also significant psychological and sexual overtones that need to be addressed and dealt with in a sensitive and reassuring manner. This report is meant to provide an overview of the various abnormalities encountered and guide the clinician by providing an approach to management. A more indepth discussion is best found in the classic textbooks (Rock JA: Surgery for anomalies of the müllerian ducts. In: Te Linde's Operative Gynecology (8th ed). Edited by J Rock, J. Thompson. Philadelphia, Lippincott-Raven, 1997; Edmonds DK: Sexual development anomalies and their reconstruction: upper and lower tracts. In: Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Edited by J Sanfilippo, D Muram, P Lee, J Dewhurst. Philadelphia, W.B. Saunders, 1994; Jones HW Jr: Reconstruction of congenital uterovaginal anomalies. In: Female Reproductive Surgery. Edited by J Rock, A Murphy, HW Jones Jr. Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, 1992).

  2. Common CTA features of Ebstein anomaly in a middle-aged woman with a heart murmur and dyspnea on exertion.

    PubMed

    Zikria, Joseph F; Dillon, Evan H; Epstein, Neal F

    2012-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare and complex congenital heart defect that may present with a variety of clinical symptoms. This article presents the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with a history of a heart murmur and progressively worsening dyspnea on exertion. We describe the imaging features and protocol used for visualizing the congenital defect on a 256-channel multidetector CT scanner.

  3. Coronary artery anomalies overview: The normal and the abnormal

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Adriana DM; Sammut, Eva; Nair, Arjun; Rajani, Ronak; Bonamini, Rodolfo; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive and concise overview of coronary embryology and normal coronary anatomy, describe common variants of normal and summarize typical patterns of anomalous coronary artery anatomy. Extensive iconography supports the text, with particular attention to images obtained in vivo using non-invasive imaging. We have divided this article into three groups, according to their frequency in the general population: Normal, normal variant and anomaly. Although congenital coronary artery anomalies are relatively uncommon, they are the second most common cause of sudden cardiac death among young athletes and therefore warrant detailed review. Based on the functional relevance of each abnormality, coronary artery anomalies can be classified as anomalies with obligatory ischemia, without ischemia or with exceptional ischemia. The clinical symptoms may include chest pain, dyspnea, palpitations, syncope, cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia, myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. Moreover, it is important to also identify variants and anomalies without clinical relevance in their own right as complications during surgery or angioplasty can occur. PMID:27358682

  4. /sup 201/Tl scintigraphy after surgical repair of hemodynamically significant primary coronary artery anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Rajfer, S.I.; Oetgen, W.J.; Weeks, K.D. Jr.; Kaminski, R.J.; Rocchini, A.P.

    1982-06-01

    Nine patients with hemodynamically significant congenital coronary artery anomalies underwent surgical repair at our institution during the period 1960 to 1979. Four received diagnoses of anomalous left coronary artery arising from the pulmonary artery, while five patients had coronary artery fistulae. Stress /sup 201/Tl scintigraphy was performed on these patients 0.5 to 18 years after surgical correction as a means of assessing the adequacy of myocardial perfusion. No perfusion defects were visualized on any of the thallium studies. The surgical procedure used did not appear to influence the results of /sup 201/Tl stress imaging. Thus, these nine patients with surgically corrected primary coronary artery anomalies had no evidence of ischemia as assessed by stress thallium scintigraphy. Serial preoperative and postoperative thallium studies are now indicated to determine the role of this procedure in the management of hemodynamically significant congenital coronary artery anomalies.

  5. Immunohistochemical study of congenital gingival granular cell tumor (congenital epulis).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Fujita, S; Satoh, H; Okabe, H

    1990-11-01

    The congenital gingival granular cell tumor (CGGT) or congenital epulis is a rare lesion of unknown origin found only in newborn infants. The tumor consists mainly of large eosinophilic granular cells arranged in solid nests that are separated by thin fibrovascular areas. In addition, there are some spindle-shaped cells and medium-sized polygonal cells (so-called interstitial cells) among the neoplastic granular cells. Three CGGTs were investigated with a panel of poly- and monoclonal antibodies, using immunoperoxidase methods on formalin fixed paraffin embedded sections. Neoplastic granular cells of these three cases show cytoplasmic staining for neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and vimentin. However, all other reactions were negative. Our results suggest that the lesion may be derived from uncommitted nerve-related mesenchymal cells. On the other hand, interstitial cells show strong S-100 protein-, cytokeratin-, vimentin-, and NSE-immunostainings, and these cells are consistent with neuroendocrine nature. The presence of a biphasic cell population with granular cells and interstitial cells must be considered the main immunohistochemical feature.

  6. When lithium hurts: a look at Ebstein anomaly.

    PubMed

    Osiro, Stephen; Tiwari, Kevin J; Mathenge, Njambi; Rodriguez, Jonier R; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2013-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a congenital defect of the tricuspid valve (TV) and the right ventricle (RV) in which the attachments of the septal and posterior valve leaflets are apically displaced. The latter creates 3 morphologic components inside the right heart, namely the right atrium proper, the atrialized RV, and the functional RV. This rare anomaly accounts for <1.5% of all congenital heart diseases. The current opinion among authors is that it is a genetically heterogeneous condition caused by failure of delamination of the TV leaflets from the underlying myocardium and the interventricular septum. Its characteristic electrocardiographic findings include tall, broad, right atrial P waves, prolonged PR intervals, and deep Q waves in the right precordial leads. Echocardiography is currently the best technique for diagnosing this anomaly, although cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is also gaining traction as an alternative modality. The management strategies for EA correlate with the age of the patient, severity of the heart disease, and/or associated cardiac abnormalities. TV repair, rather than valve replacement, is preferred because of its favorable long-term prognosis. Nevertheless, a large, randomized study is still needed to compare the different valve repair techniques used in patients with EA.

  7. Pathogenesis of Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Laurence M.; Ballieux, Fanny; Vikkula, Miikka

    2010-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are localized defects of vascular development. Most of them occur sporadically, i.e. there is no familial history of lesions, yet in a few cases clear inheritance is observed. These inherited forms are often characterized by multifocal lesions that are mainly small in size and increase in number with patient’s age. On the basis of these inherited forms, molecular genetic studies have unraveled a number of inherited mutations giving direct insight into the pathophysiological cause and the molecular pathways that are implicated. Genetic defects have been identified for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), inherited cutaneomucosal venous malformation (VMCM), glomuvenous malformation (GVM), capillary malformation - arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM), cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) and some isolated and syndromic forms of primary lymphedema. We focus on these disorders, the implicated mutated genes and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. We also call attention to the concept of Knudson’s double-hit mechanism to explain incomplete penetrance and the large clinical variation in expressivity of inherited vascular anomalies. This variability renders the making of correct diagnosis of the rare inherited forms difficult. Yet, the identification of the pathophysiological causes and pathways involved in them has had an unprecedented impact on our thinking of their etiopathogenesis, and has opened the doors towards a more refined classification of vascular anomalies. It has also made it possible to develop animal models that can be tested for specific molecular therapies, aimed at alleviating the dysfunctions caused by the aberrant genes and proteins. PMID:21095468

  8. Z_{2} and Chiral Anomalies in Topological Dirac Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Burkov, Anton A; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-09-23

    We demonstrate that topological Dirac semimetals, which possess two Dirac nodes, separated in momentum space along a rotation axis and protected by rotational symmetry, exhibit an additional quantum anomaly, distinct from the chiral anomaly. This anomaly, which we call the Z_{2} anomaly, is a consequence of the fact that the Dirac nodes in topological Dirac semimetals carry a Z_{2} topological charge. The Z_{2} anomaly refers to nonconservation of this charge in the presence of external fields due to quantum effects and has observable consequences due to its interplay with the chiral anomaly. We discuss possible implications of this for the interpretation of magnetotransport experiments on topological Dirac semimetals. We also provide a possible explanation for the magnetic field dependent angular narrowing of the negative longitudinal magnetoresistance, observed in a recent experiment on Na_{3}Bi.

  9. Continental and oceanic magnetic anomalies: Enhancement through GRM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    In contrast to the POGO and MAGSAT satellites, the Geopotential Research Mission (GRM) satellite system will orbit at a minimum elevation to provide significantly better resolved lithospheric magnetic anomalies for more detailed and improved geologic analysis. In addition, GRM will measure corresponding gravity anomalies to enhance our understanding of the gravity field for vast regions of the Earth which are largely inaccessible to more conventional surface mapping. Crustal studies will greatly benefit from the dual data sets as modeling has shown that lithospheric sources of long wavelength magnetic anomalies frequently involve density variations which may produce detectable gravity anomalies at satellite elevations. Furthermore, GRM will provide an important replication of lithospheric magnetic anomalies as an aid to identifying and extracting these anomalies from satellite magnetic measurements. The potential benefits to the study of the origin and characterization of the continents and oceans, that may result from the increased GRM resolution are examined.

  10. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... my congenital heart … Read More Let's Talk About Love... BY Kelly DiMaggio Being in love and in a relationship is one of the ... are born they have … Read More Learning to Love the Scar BY Clare Almand I wrote about ...

  11. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  12. Multiple hereditary ocular anomalies in a herd of cattle.

    PubMed

    Kaswan, R L; Collins, L G; Blue, J L; Martin, C L

    1987-07-01

    A Brahman x Santa Gertrudis herd of cows bred to a Hereford bull was evaluated because of a 3-year history of several calves born with congenital blindness. Multiple congenital ocular anomalies in 2 calves included microphthalmos, microcornea, microcoria, heterochromia iridis, microlentia, cataracts, retinal dysplasia, retinal detachment, anterior segment dysgenesis, acorea, and proliferation of the anterior neuroectoderm. On the basis of the lack of environmental factors and persistence of an intermittent problem when breeding to a single bull, a genetic defect was diagnosed as the probable cause. Dominant inheritance with varied expressivity may have best explained the lack of obvious signs in the bull, with emergence of various anterior and posterior segment defects in offspring from unrelated cows.

  13. Surgery for congenital aortic stenosis in children with left ventricular noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Miao, Qi; Liu, Xingrong; Li, Xiaofeng

    2013-07-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is an uncommon genetic disorder of endocardial morphogenesis, which carries a high mortality from heart failure or sudden cardiac death. This condition is often first diagnosed in adults, but it has also been described in children with other cardiac anomalies. We discuss the management of a 10-year-old female with congenital aortic stenosis associated with LVNC.

  14. Congenital intrathoracic kidney in a patient undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Darwazah, Ahmad K; Yosri, Ahmad

    2011-03-01

    Intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital anomaly. It appears as a posterior mediastinal mass on chest X-ray. Most cases are asymptomatic and are discovered accidentally. We present a 48-year-old male patient with intrathoracic kidney discovered during routine investigation for coronary artery bypass surgery.

  15. Case Report: Chronic Recurrent Unilateral Pulmonary Infection: Result of Congenital Unilateral Agenesis of Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Abu Saleh, Walid K.; Ramchandani, Mahesh; Scheinin, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral agenesis of the pulmonary artery (UAPA) is a rare congenital anomaly. This report describes a 52-year-old female who gave a long history of chronic, recurrent, left-sided pulmonary infections related to UAPA. For many years, she was managed medically but the infection continued to recur. She eventually underwent left pneumonectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:27127564

  16. Case Report: Chronic Recurrent Unilateral Pulmonary Infection: Result of Congenital Unilateral Agenesis of Pulmonary Artery.

    PubMed

    Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Abu Saleh, Walid K; Ramchandani, Mahesh; Scheinin, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral agenesis of the pulmonary artery (UAPA) is a rare congenital anomaly. This report describes a 52-year-old female who gave a long history of chronic, recurrent, left-sided pulmonary infections related to UAPA. For many years, she was managed medically but the infection continued to recur. She eventually underwent left pneumonectomy and made a good recovery.

  17. Congenital abnormalities of the vertebral column in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Proks, Pavel; Stehlik, Ladislav; Paninarova, Michaela; Irova, Katarina; Hauptman, Karel; Jekl, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral column pathologies requiring surgical intervention have been described in pet ferrets, however little information is available on the normal vertebral formula and congenital variants in this species. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe vertebral formulas and prevalence of congenital vertebral anomalies in a sample of pet ferrets. Radiographs of 172 pet ferrets (96 males and 76 females) were included in this retrospective study. In 143 ferrets (83.14%), five different formulas of the vertebral column were recorded with normal morphology of vertebrae (rib attachment included) but with a variable number of thoracic (Th), lumbar (L), and sacral (S) vertebrae. The number of cervical (C) vertebrae was constant in all examined animals. Observed vertebral formulas were C7/Th14/L6/S3 (51.74%), C7/Th14/L6/S4 (22.10%), C7/Th14/L7/S3 (6.98%), C7/Th15/L6/S3 (1.74%), and C7/Th15/L6/S4 (0.58%). Formula C7/Th14/L6/S4 was significantly more common in males than in females (P < 0.05). Congenital spinal abnormalities were found in 29 ferrets (16.86%), mostly localized in the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral regions. The cervical region was affected in only one case. Transitional vertebrae represented the most common congenital abnormalities (26 ferrets) in the thoracolumbar (13 ferrets) and lumbosacral regions (10 ferrets) or simultaneously in both regions (three ferrets). Other vertebral anomalies included block (two ferrets) and wedge vertebra (one ferret). Spina bifida was not detected. Findings from the current study indicated that vertebral formulas may vary in ferrets and congenital abnormalities are common. This should be taken into consideration for surgical planning.

  18. Coincidence of congenital agenesis of left lung and common atrium: a very rare case.

    PubMed

    Nabati, Maryam; Bagheri, Babak; Habibi, Valiolla

    2013-05-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is characterized by undeveloped pulmonary vessels, bronchi as well as lung parenchyma and is a rare congenital anomaly with unknown etiology. It is usually diagnosed during childhood. Nearly, one third of these patients have concomitant congenital heart diseases. While more than 50% of these patients die before the age of 5 years, some other patients may be asymptomatic throughout their life. On the other hand, common atrium, another rare congenital anomaly, is characterized by complete absence of the atrial septum and is usually accompanied by atrioventricular valve malformations. An 18-year-old male presented with concomitant pulmonary agenesis and common atrium and had not undergone surgery due to high risk for mortality.

  19. Cochlear implantation in congenital cochlear abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, R L; Lokman, S

    2005-08-01

    Many children have benefited from cochlear implant device including those with congenital malformation of the inner ear. The results reported in children with malformed cochlea are very encouraging. We describe 2 cases of Mondini's malformation with severe sensorineural hearing loss. Cochlear implantation was performed and both of them underwent post-implantation speech rehabilitation. Post-implantation, both of them were noted to respond to external sound. But the second case developed facial twitching a few months after the device was switched on. It is important to evaluate the severity of the inner ear deformity and the other associated anomalies in pre-implantation radiological assessment in order to identify the problem that may complicate the surgery and subsequent patient management.

  20. Congenital heart defects in two siblings in an Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome family.

    PubMed

    Akkus, Mehmet Necdet; Argin, Atilla

    2010-04-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by anomalies of the anterior segment of the eye, face, teeth, and umbilicus. Many other extraocular findings, including congenital heart defects, have been reported in association with this syndrome. It has been suggested by some investigators that the coexistence of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and congenital heart defects is not a chance event but it represents a distinct entity. We report a family in which four members in three generations have typical ocular features of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. Two of them, who are siblings, also have congenital heart defects. The congenital heart defect was bicuspid aortic valve anomaly with severe stenosis and mild regurgitation in one sibling and ostium secundum atrial septal defect in the other. To our knowledge, the combination of congenital heart defects with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome in siblings has not been reported previously. Our observation further strengthens the notion that Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome associated with congenital heart defects is not a chance event.