Science.gov

Sample records for additional control points

  1. Low-boiling-point solvent additives can also enable morphological control in polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevapuram, Rakesh C.; Carr, John A.; Chen, Yuqing; Bose, Sayantan; Nalwa, Kanwar S.; Petrich, Jacob W.; Chaudhary, Sumit

    2013-11-02

    Processing organic photovoltaic (OPV) blend solutions with high-boiling-point solvent additives has recently been used for morphological control in bulk-heterojunction OPV cells. Here we show that even low-boiling-point solvents can be effective additives. When P3HT:PCBM OPV cells were processed with a low-boiling-point solvent tetrahydrafuran as an additive in parent solvent o-dichlorobenzene, charge extraction increased leading to fill factors as high as 69.5%, without low work-function cathodes, electrode buffer layers or thermal treatment. This was attributed to PCBM demixing from P3HT domains and better vertical phase separation, as indicated by photoluminescence lifetimes, hole mobilities, and shunt leakage currents. Dependence on solvent parameters and applicability beyond P3HT system was also investigated. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Floating Point Control Library

    2007-08-02

    Floating Point Control is a Library that allows for the manipulation of floating point unit exception masking funtions control exceptions in both the Streaming "Single Instruction, Multiple Data" Extension 2 (SSE2) unit and the floating point unit simultaneously. FPC also provides macros to set floating point rounding and precision control.

  3. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  4. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  5. ACCESS Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Egerman, Robert; Vallone, Phillip; Elias, Jason; Hejal, Reem; Camelo, Vanessa; Bronowicki, Allen; O'Connor, David; Partrick, Richard; Orzechowski, Pawel; Spitter, Connie; Lillie, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    ACCESS (Actively-Corrected Coronograph for Exoplanet System Studies) was one of four medium-class exoplanet concepts selected for the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study (ASMCS) program in 2008/2009. The ACCESS study evaluated four major coronograph concepts under a common space observatory. This paper describes the high precision pointing control system (PCS) baselined for this observatory.

  6. Pointing control for LDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Briggs, C.

    1988-01-01

    One important aspect of the LDR control problem is the possible excitations of structural modes due to random disturbances, mirror chopping, and slewing maneuvers. An analysis was performed to yield a first order estimate of the effects of such dynamic excitations. The analysis involved a study of slewing jitters, chopping jitters, disturbance responses, and pointing errors, making use of a simplified planar LDR model which describes the LDR dynamics on a plane perpendicular to the primary reflector. Briefly, the results indicate that the command slewing profile plays an important role in minimizing the resultant jitter, even to a level acceptable without any control action. An optimal profile should therefore be studied.

  7. Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, P.M.

    1984-02-24

    Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  8. Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ground control is required to georeferenced airborne and spaceborne images. The production of ortho-photogrammetric data requires ground control that is traditionally provided as Ground Control Points (GCPs) by GNSS measurements in the field. However, it can be difficult to acquire accurate ground control points due to required turn-around time, high costs or impossible access. CompassData, Inc. a specialist in ground control, has expanded its service to deliver Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points (RSGCPs®). TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X are two satellites with such high accuracy of their orbital positions and SAR data that RSGCPs® can be produced to a sub-meter quality depending on certain parameters and circumstances. The technology and required parameters are discussed in this paper as well as the resulting accuracies.

  9. 47 CFR 80.41 - Control points and dispatch points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provide the address or location of the control point where station records will be kept. (b) When the address or location of a control point where station records are kept is to be changed, the licensee...

  10. 47 CFR 80.41 - Control points and dispatch points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provide the address or location of the control point where station records will be kept. (b) When the address or location of a control point where station records are kept is to be changed, the licensee...

  11. 47 CFR 80.41 - Control points and dispatch points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... provide the address or location of the control point where station records will be kept. (b) When the address or location of a control point where station records are kept is to be changed, the licensee must request a modification of the station license. (c) Control points not collocated with station records...

  12. 47 CFR 80.41 - Control points and dispatch points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... provide the address or location of the control point where station records will be kept. (b) When the address or location of a control point where station records are kept is to be changed, the licensee must request a modification of the station license. (c) Control points not collocated with station records...

  13. 47 CFR 80.41 - Control points and dispatch points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... provide the address or location of the control point where station records will be kept. (b) When the address or location of a control point where station records are kept is to be changed, the licensee must request a modification of the station license. (c) Control points not collocated with station records...

  14. Remote temperature-set-point controller

    DOEpatents

    Burke, William F.; Winiecki, Alan L.

    1986-01-01

    An instrument for carrying out mechanical strain tests on metallic samples with the addition of an electrical system for varying the temperature with strain, the instrument including opposing arms and associated equipment for holding a sample and varying the mechanical strain on the sample through a plurality of cycles of increasing and decreasing strain within predetermined limits, circuitry for producing an output signal representative of the strain during the tests, apparatus including a set point and a coil about the sample for providing a controlled temperature in the sample, and circuitry interconnected between the strain output signal and set point for varying the temperature of the sample linearly with strain during the tests.

  15. Wavefront sensing, control, and pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Thomas; Sevaston, George; Agronin, Michael; Bely, Pierre; Colavita, Mark; Clampin, Mark; Harvey, James; Idell, Paul; Sandler, Dave; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-01-01

    A majority of future NASA astrophysics missions from orbiting interferometers to 16-m telescopes on the Moon have, as a common requirement, the need to bring light from a large entrance aperture to the focal plane in a way that preserves the spatial coherence properties of the starlight. Only by preserving the phase of the incoming wavefront, can many scientific observations be made, observations that range from measuring the red shift of quasi-stellar objects (QSO's) to detecting the IR emission of a planet in orbit around another star. New technologies for wavefront sensing, control, and pointing hold the key to advancing our observatories of the future from those already launched or currently under development. As the size of the optical system increases, either to increase the sensitivity or angular resolution of the instrument, traditional technologies for maintaining optical wavefront accuracy become prohibitively expensive or completely impractical. For space-based instruments, the low mass requirement and the large temperature excursions further challenge existing technologies. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is probably the last large space telescope to rely on passive means to keep its primary optics stable and the optical system aligned. One needs only look to the significant developments in wavefront sensing, control, and pointing that have occurred over the past several years to appreciate the potential of this technology for transforming the capability of future space observatories. Future developments in space-borne telescopes will be based in part on developments in ground-based systems. Telescopes with rigid primary mirrors much larger than 5 m in diameter are impractical because of gravity loading. New technologies are now being introduced, such as active optics, that address the scale problem and that allow very large telescopes to be built. One approach is a segmented design such as that being pioneered by the W.M. Keck telescope now under

  16. 47 CFR 22.325 - Control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Control points. 22.325 Section 22.325... Operational and Technical Requirements Operational Requirements § 22.325 Control points. Each station in the Public Mobile Services must have at least one control point and a person on duty who is responsible...

  17. 47 CFR 22.325 - Control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Control points. 22.325 Section 22.325... Operational and Technical Requirements Operational Requirements § 22.325 Control points. Each station in the Public Mobile Services must have at least one control point and a person on duty who is responsible...

  18. 47 CFR 22.325 - Control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Control points. 22.325 Section 22.325... Operational and Technical Requirements Operational Requirements § 22.325 Control points. Each station in the Public Mobile Services must have at least one control point and a person on duty who is responsible...

  19. 47 CFR 22.325 - Control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control points. 22.325 Section 22.325... Operational and Technical Requirements Operational Requirements § 22.325 Control points. Each station in the Public Mobile Services must have at least one control point and a person on duty who is responsible...

  20. 47 CFR 22.325 - Control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Control points. 22.325 Section 22.325... Operational and Technical Requirements Operational Requirements § 22.325 Control points. Each station in the Public Mobile Services must have at least one control point and a person on duty who is responsible...

  1. Pointing control for the International Comet Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, D. R.; Schumacher, L. L.

    1980-01-01

    The design of the pointing control system for the proposed International Comet Mission, intended to fly by Comet Halley and rendezvous with Comet Tempel-2 is presented. Following a review of mission objectives and the spacecraft configuration, design constraints on the pointing control system controlling the two-axis gimballed scan platform supporting the science instruments are discussed in relation to the scientific requirements of the mission. The primary design options considered for the pointing control system design for the baseline spacecraft are summarized, and the design selected, which employs a target-referenced, inertially stabilized control system, is described in detail. The four basic modes of operation of the pointing control subsystem (target acquisition, inertial hold, target track and slew) are discussed as they relate to operations at Halley and Tempel-2. It is pointed that the pointing control system design represents a significant advance in the state of the art of pointing controls for planetary missions.

  2. Controlling superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points.

    PubMed

    Seo, S; Park, E; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Kim, J N; Shim, J-H; Thompson, J D; Park, Tuson

    2015-01-01

    The heavy fermion compound CeRhIn5 is a rare example where a quantum critical point, hidden by a dome of superconductivity, has been explicitly revealed and found to have a local nature. The lack of additional examples of local types of quantum critical points associated with superconductivity, however, has made it difficult to unravel the role of quantum fluctuations in forming Cooper pairs. Here, we show the precise control of superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points in CeRhIn5. Slight tin-substitution for indium in CeRhIn5 shifts its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point from 2.3 GPa to 1.3 GPa and induces a residual impurity scattering 300 times larger than that of pure CeRhIn5, which should be sufficient to preclude superconductivity. Nevertheless, superconductivity occurs at the quantum critical point of the tin-doped metal. These results underline that fluctuations from the antiferromagnetic quantum criticality promote unconventional superconductivity in CeRhIn5. PMID:25737108

  3. 49 CFR 236.782 - Point, controlled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.782 Point, controlled. A location where signals and/or other functions of a traffic control system...

  4. 49 CFR 236.782 - Point, controlled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.782 Point, controlled. A location where signals and/or other functions of a traffic control system...

  5. 49 CFR 236.782 - Point, controlled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.782 Point, controlled. A location where signals and/or other functions of a traffic control system...

  6. Remote temperature-set-point controller

    DOEpatents

    Burke, W.F.; Winiecki, A.L.

    1984-10-17

    An instrument is described for carrying out mechanical strain tests on metallic samples with the addition of means for varying the temperature with strain. The instrument includes opposing arms and associated equipment for holding a sample and varying the mechanical strain on the sample through a plurality of cycles of increasing and decreasing strain within predetermined limits, circuitry for producing an output signal representative of the strain during the tests, apparatus including a a set point and a coil about the sample for providing a controlled temperature in the sample, and circuitry interconnected between the strain output signal and set point for varying the temperature of the sample linearly with strain during the tests.

  7. 49 CFR 236.782 - Point, controlled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Point, controlled. 236.782 Section 236.782 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Point, controlled. A location where signals and/or other functions of a traffic control system...

  8. Control of the Crystalline Morphology of Poly(l-lactide) by Addition of High-Melting-Point Poly(l-lactide) and Its Effect on the Distribution of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Peng, Ji-Kun; Shi, Yu-Dong; Chen, Yi-Fu; Zeng, Jian-Bing; Wang, Ming

    2016-08-01

    The key to fabricating conductive polymer/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites is controlling the distribution of CNTs in the polymer matrix. Here, an effective and simple approach for controlling the distribution of multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) is reported to largely improve the electrical conductivity of biodegradable poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) through crystalline morphology development by addition of high-melting-point PLLA (hPLLA) crystallites. hPLLA crystallites are efficient nucleating agents, increasing the crystallinity and crystallization rate of PLLA/MWCNT nanocomposites. Furthermore, the diameter of spherulites decreases from 9.7 to 1.0 μm with an increase in the concentration of hPLLA from 0.03 to 3.0 wt %. The electrical conductivity of PLLA/MWCNT nanocomposites with 0.3 wt % MWCNTs greatly increases from 1.89 × 10(-15) to 1.56 × 10(-8) S/cm with an increase in the matrix crystallinity from 2.4 to 46.8% on introducing trace amounts of hPLLA (0.07 wt %). The percolation threshold of PLLA/MWCNT nanocomposites is reduced from 0.51 to 0.21 wt % on addition of 0.07 wt % hPLLA. The high electrical conductivity and low percolation threshold of PLLA/MWCNT nanocomposites incorporated with hPLLA are related to the high crystallinity and crystalline morphologies of the PLLA matrix. Big spherulites lock a lot of MWCNTs at the intervals in the spherulites, which is harmful to the electrical conductivity. Small spherulites, with large surface areas, also need more MWCNTs to form conductive networks in the amorphous regions. Most MWCNTs that are bundled together to form conductive paths are found in samples with mid-sized spherulites of ∼6.7 μm. More interestingly, the high crystallinity and reconstructed MWCNT network also enhanced the Young modulus, elongation at break, and elastic modulus at high temperature of PLLA/MWCNT nanocomposites with small amounts of hPLLA. PMID:27379385

  9. Control point measurements on Mariner 9 pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements are given of the control points on the Mariner 9 pictures which were used in the computation of the June 1973 control net of Mars. The method of making the measurements is discussed along with the picture coordinate system and the removal of distortions. Table are presented of the 9804 measurements of 1645 points on 660 pictures.

  10. Learning the Critical Points for Addition in Matematika GASING

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siregar, Johannes Hamonangan; Wiyanti, Wiwik; Wakhyuningsih, Nur Safitri; Godjali, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We propose learning Matematika GASING to help students better understand the addition material. Matematika GASING is a way of learning mathematics in an easy, fun and enjoyable fashion. GASING is short for GAmpang, aSyIk, and menyenaNGkan (Bahasa Indonesia for easy, fun and enjoyable). It was originally developed by Prof. Yohanes Surya at the…

  11. Pressure Points: Preventing and Controlling Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Pressure Points: Preventing and Controlling Hypertension Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... diagnosed with high blood pressure." Aditional Information On Hypertension MedlinePlus: High blood pressure: http://www.nlm.nih. ...

  12. Strike Point Control on EAST Using an Isoflux Control Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhe; Xiao, Bingjia; Luo, Zhengping; L. Walker, M.; A. Humphreys, D.

    2015-09-01

    For the advanced tokamak, the particle deposition and thermal load on the divertor is a big challenge. By moving the strike points on divertor target plates, the position of particle deposition and thermal load can be shifted. We could adjust the Poloidal Field (PF) coil current to achieve the strike point position feedback control. Using isoflux control method, the strike point position can be controlled by controlling the X point position. On the basis of experimental data, we establish relational expressions between X point position and strike point position. Benchmark experiments are carried out to validate the correctness and robustness of the control methods. The strike point position is successfully controlled following our command in the EAST operation. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2012GB105000 and 2014GB103000)

  13. Combined dispersant fluid loss control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, J. L.; Zeiner, R. N.

    1985-12-31

    Water soluble polymer compositions containing polyacrylic acid and copolymer of itaconic acid and acrylamide are useful as combined dispersant and fluid loss control additives for aqueous drilling fluids, particularly fresh water, gypsum and seawater muds. An example is a polymer composition containing about 80% by weight polyacrylic acid and about 20% by weight copolymer of itaconic acid and acrylamide in its ammonium salt form.

  14. Shuttle infrared telescope facility pointing and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorell, K. R.; Barrows, W. F.; Matsumoto, Y. T.

    1981-01-01

    The Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is being designed as a 0.85 m cryogenically cooled telescope capable of a three order of magnitude improvement over currently available infrared instruments. The SIRTF requires that the image at the focal plane be stabilized to better than 0.25 arcsec with an absolute accuracy of 1.0 arcsec. Current pointing-mount performance simulations indicate that neither of these requirements can be met without additional stabilization. The SIRTF pointing and control system will utilize gyro outputs, star field position measurements from a focal plane fine guidance sensor, and a steerable secondary mirror to provide the necessary stabilization and pointing control. The charge coupled device fine guidance sensor tracks multiple stars simultaneously and, through the use of multistar processing algorithms in a high performance microcomputer, generates three-axis attitude errors and gyro-drift estimates to correct the pointing-mount gyros. A high-bandwidth feedforward loop, driven directly from the pointing-mount gyro package, controls the steering mirror in order to correct disturbances not compensated for by the pointing-mount control system. A prototype design for the SIRTF pointing and control system is described in detail. Performance analyses made using a digital simulation of the pointing and control system as well as experimental data obtained in laboratory and field test measurements are presented.

  15. Precision pointing and control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bantell, M. H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The problem and long term objectives for the precision pointing and control of flexible spacecraft are given. The four basic objectives are stated in terms of two principle tasks. Under Task 1, robust low order controllers, improved structural modeling methods for control applications and identification methods for structural dynamics are being developed. Under Task 2, a lab test experiment for verification of control laws and system identification algorithms is being developed. For Task 1, work has focused on robust low order controller design and some initial considerations for structural modeling in control applications. For Task 2, work has focused on experiment design and fabrication, along with sensor selection and initial digital controller implementation. Conclusions are given.

  16. Laboratory tests of sludge-control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Tatnall, R.E.

    1996-07-01

    Laboratory {open_quotes}jar{close_quotes} tests compared eleven different fuel oil and diesel fuel sludge-control additives. Factors studied included (1) ability to disperse and prevent buildup of sludge deposits on surfaces, (2) ability to protect steel from corrosion, (3) ability to inhibit growth and proliferation of bacteria, and (4) ability to disperse water. Results varied greatly, and it was found that many commercial products do not do what they claim. It is concluded that fuel retailers should not believe manufacturers` claims for their additive products, but rather should test such products themselves to be sure that the benefits of treatment are real. A simplified form of the procedure used here is proposed as one way for dealers to do such testing.

  17. Emission control devices, fuel additive, and fuel composition changes.

    PubMed Central

    Piver, W T

    1977-01-01

    Emission control devices are installed to meet the exhaust standards of the Clean Air Act for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, and it is necessary to know, from a public health point of view, how exhaust emissions may be affected by changes in fuel additives and fuel composition. Since these topics are concerned with developing technologies, the available literature on exhaust emission characteristics and the limited information on health effects, is reviewed. PMID:71235

  18. Emission control devices, fuel additive, and fuel composition changes.

    PubMed

    Piver, W T

    1977-08-01

    Emission control devices are installed to meet the exhaust standards of the Clean Air Act for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, and it is necessary to know, from a public health point of view, how exhaust emissions may be affected by changes in fuel additives and fuel composition. Since these topics are concerned with developing technologies, the available literature on exhaust emission characteristics and the limited information on health effects, is reviewed. PMID:71235

  19. Bifurcated method and apparatus for floating point addition with decreased latency time

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, Paul M.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  20. Implementation of hazard analysis critical control point in jameed production.

    PubMed

    Al-Saed, A K; Al-Groum, R M; Al-Dabbas, M M

    2012-06-01

    The average of standard plate count and coliforms, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella counts for three home-made jameed samples, a traditional fermented dairy product, before applying hazard analysis critical control point system were 2.1 × 10(3), 8.9 × 10(1), 4 × 10(1) and less than 10 cfu/g, respectively. The developed hazard analysis critical control point plan resulted in identifying ten critical control points in the flow chart of jameed production. The critical control points included fresh milk receiving, pasteurization, addition of starter, water and salt, straining, personnel hygiene, drying and packaging. After applying hazard analysis critical control point system, there was significant improvement in the microbiological quality of the home-made jameed. The standard plate count was reduced to 3.1 × 10(2) cfu/g whereas coliform and Staphylococcus aureus counts were less than 10 cfu/g and Salmonella was not detected. Sensory evaluation results of color and flavor of sauce prepared from jameed showed a significant increase in the average scores given after hazard analysis critical control point application. PMID:22701056

  1. 47 CFR 90.429 - Control point and dispatch point requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control point and dispatch point requirements... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.429 Control point and dispatch point requirements. (a) Control point required. Unless permitted to be operated on...

  2. 47 CFR 90.429 - Control point and dispatch point requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Control point and dispatch point requirements... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.429 Control point and dispatch point requirements. (a) Control point required. Unless permitted to be operated on...

  3. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  4. A low cost LST pointing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.; Nurre, G. S.; Seltzer, S. M.; Shelton, H. L.

    1975-01-01

    Vigorous efforts to reduce costs, coupled with changes in LST guidelines, took place in the Fall of 1974. These events made a new design of the LST and its Pointing and Attitude Control System possible. The major design changes are summarized as: an annular Support Systems Module; removal of image motion compensation; reaction wheels instead of CMG's; a magnetic torquer system to also perform the emergency and backup functions, eliminating the previously required mass expulsion system. Preliminary analysis indicates the Low Cost LST concept can meet the newly defined requirements and results in a significantly reduced development cost.

  5. Algebraic grid generation with control points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Choo, Yung K.; Smith, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The control-point form (CPF) formulation is an algebraically defined class of coordinate transformations by means of which the interior form of the coordinates can be manipulated in the local fashion, and any boundary can be either specified or manipulated in a similar manner. Currently, the most intense activity involving CPF is with such graphic interactive codes as TurboI and TurboT, for which detailed illustrative examples are given; these have furnished experience on whose basis future interactive strategies can be developed.

  6. MIT Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE): noncollocated payload pointing control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.

    1993-09-01

    The Middeck Active Control Experiment is a space shuttle flight experiment intended to demonstrate high authority active structural control in zero gravity conditions. The prediction of on-orbit closed-loop dynamics is based on analysis and ground testing. The MACE test article is representative of multiple payload platforms, and includes two 2-axis gimballing payloads connected by a flexible bus. The goal of active control is to maintain pointing accuracy of one payload, while the remaining payload is moving independently. Current control results on the ground test article are presented. Multiple input, multiple output controllers are designed based on high order measurement based models. Linear Quadratic Gaussian controllers yield reasonable performance. At high authority, however, these controllers destabilize the actual structure, due to parametric errors in the control design model. A robust control design procedure is required to yield high performance in the presence of these errors.

  7. Iron-control additives improve acidizing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.; Dill, W. ); Besler, M. )

    1989-07-24

    Iron sulfide and sulfur precipitation in sour wells can be controlled with iron-sequestering agents and sulfide modifiers. Oil production has been routinely increased in sour wells where precipitation of iron sulfide and elemental sulfur has been brought under control. Production increases have been especially noteworthy on wells that had a history of rapid production decline after acid stimulation. Twenty-fold production increases have been recorded. Key to the production increase has been to increase permeability with: Iron chelating agents that control precipitation of iron sulfide. A sulfide modifier that reduces precipitation of solids in the presence of excessive amounts of hydrogen sulfide and prevents precipitation of elemental sulfur.

  8. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  9. Silage Microbiology and Its Control through Additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ensiling is a method of preserving a moist crop. A moist crop can support the growth of a wide range of microorganisms, most of which will degrade the nutrient value to livestock. However, ensiling generally controls microbial activity by a combination of an anaerobic environment and a natural ferme...

  10. Optimal periodic control for spacecraft pointing and attitude determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittelkau, Mark E.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach to autonomous magnetic roll/yaw control of polar-orbiting, nadir-pointing momentum bias spacecraft is considered as the baseline attitude control system for the next Tiros series. It is shown that the roll/yaw dynamics with magnetic control are periodically time varying. An optimal periodic control law is then developed. The control design features a state estimator that estimates attitude, attitude rate, and environmental torque disturbances from Earth sensor and sun sensor measurements; no gyros are needed. The state estimator doubles as a dynamic attitude determination and prediction function. In addition to improved performance, the optimal controller allows a much smaller momentum bias than would otherwise be necessary. Simulation results are given.

  11. 49 CFR 236.403 - Signals at controlled point.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signals at controlled point. 236.403 Section 236.403 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Control Systems Standards § 236.403 Signals at controlled point. Signals at controlled point shall be...

  12. 49 CFR 236.403 - Signals at controlled point.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signals at controlled point. 236.403 Section 236.403 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Control Systems Standards § 236.403 Signals at controlled point. Signals at controlled point shall be...

  13. Microstructural Control of Additively Manufactured Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P. C.; Brice, D. A.; Samimi, P.; Ghamarian, I.; Fraser, H. L.

    2016-07-01

    In additively manufactured (AM) metallic materials, the fundamental interrelationships that exist between composition, processing, and microstructure govern these materials’ properties and potential improvements or reductions in performance. For example, by using AM, it is possible to achieve highly desirable microstructural features (e.g., highly refined precipitates) that could not otherwise be achieved by using conventional approaches. Simultaneously, opportunities exist to manage macro-level microstructural characteristics such as residual stress, porosity, and texture, the last of which might be desirable. To predictably realize optimal microstructures, it is necessary to establish a framework that integrates processing variables, alloy composition, and the resulting microstructure. Although such a framework is largely lacking for AM metallic materials, the basic scientific components of the framework exist in literature. This review considers these key components and presents them in a manner that highlights key interdependencies that would form an integrated framework to engineer microstructures using AM.

  14. Comparing Number Lines and Touch Points to Teach Addition Facts to Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cihak, David F.; Foust, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Three elementary students with autism were taught single-digit addition problem-solving skills using number and touch-point strategies. Prior to the study, all students were unable to correctly calculate single-digit addition problems. An alternating-treatments design was used to compare the acquisition performance of single-digit addition…

  15. Cytochrome c oxidase: evolution of control via nuclear subunit addition.

    PubMed

    Pierron, Denis; Wildman, Derek E; Hüttemann, Maik; Markondapatnaikuni, Gopi Chand; Aras, Siddhesh; Grossman, Lawrence I

    2012-04-01

    According to theory, present eukaryotic cells originated from a beneficial association between two free-living cells. Due to this endosymbiotic event the pre-eukaryotic cell gained access to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), which produces more than 15 times as much ATP as glycolysis. Because cellular ATP needs fluctuate and OXPHOS both requires and produces entities that can be toxic for eukaryotic cells such as ROS or NADH, we propose that the success of endosymbiosis has largely depended on the regulation of endosymbiont OXPHOS. Several studies have presented cytochrome c oxidase as a key regulator of OXPHOS; for example, COX is the only complex of mammalian OXPHOS with known tissue-specific isoforms of nuclear encoded subunits. We here discuss current knowledge about the origin of nuclear encoded subunits and the appearance of different isozymes promoted by tissue and cellular environments such as hypoxia. We also review evidence for recent selective pressure acting on COX among vertebrates, particularly in primate lineages, and discuss the unique pattern of co-evolution between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Finally, even though the addition of nuclear encoded subunits was a major event in eukaryotic COX evolution, this does not lead to emergence of a more efficient COX, as might be expected from an anthropocentric point of view, for the "higher" organism possessing large brains and muscles. The main function of these subunits appears to be "only" to control the activity of the mitochondrial subunits. We propose that this control function is an as yet under appreciated key point of evolution. Moreover, the importance of regulating energy supply may have caused the addition of subunits encoded by the nucleus in a process comparable to a "domestication scenario" such that the host tends to control more and more tightly the ancestral activity of COX performed by the mtDNA encoded subunits. PMID:21802404

  16. 47 CFR 11.16 - National Control Point Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false National Control Point Procedures. 11.16 Section 11.16 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.16 National Control Point Procedures. The National Control Point Procedures are...

  17. 47 CFR 11.16 - National Control Point Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false National Control Point Procedures. 11.16 Section 11.16 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.16 National Control Point Procedures. The National Control Point Procedures are...

  18. 47 CFR 11.16 - National Control Point Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false National Control Point Procedures. 11.16 Section 11.16 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.16 National Control Point Procedures. The National Control Point Procedures are...

  19. 47 CFR 11.16 - National Control Point Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false National Control Point Procedures. 11.16 Section 11.16 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.16 National Control Point Procedures. The National Control Point Procedures are...

  20. 47 CFR 11.16 - National Control Point Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false National Control Point Procedures. 11.16 Section 11.16 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.16 National Control Point Procedures. The National Control Point Procedures are...

  1. Model-based HSF using by target point control function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seongjin; Do, Munhoe; An, Yongbae; Choi, Jaeseung; Yang, Hyunjo; Yim, Donggyu

    2015-03-01

    As the technology node shrinks, ArF Immersion reaches the limitation of wafer patterning, furthermore weak point during the mask processing is generated easily. In order to make strong patterning result, the design house conducts lithography rule checking (LRC). Despite LRC processing, we found the weak point at the verification stage of optical proximity correction (OPC). It is called the hot spot point (HSP). In order to fix the HSP, many studies have been performed. One of the most general hot spot fixing (HSF) methods is that the modification bias which consists of "Line-Resizing" and "Space-Resizing". In addition to the general rule biasing method, resolution enhancement techniques (RET) which includes the inverse lithography technology (ILT) and model based assist feature (MBAF) have been adapted to remove the hot spot and to maximize the process window. If HSP is found during OPC verification stage, various HSF methods can be applied. However, HSF process added on regular OPC procedure makes OPC turn-around time (TAT) increased. In this paper, we introduce a new HSF method that is able to make OPC TAT shorter than the common HSF method. The new HSF method consists of two concepts. The first one is that OPC target point is controlled to fix HSP. Here, the target point should be moved to optimum position at where the edge placement error (EPE) can be 0 at critical points. Many parameters such as a model accuracy or an OPC recipe become the cause of larger EPE. The second one includes controlling of model offset error through target point adjustment. Figure 1 shows the case EPE is not 0. It means that the simulation contour was not targeted well after OPC process. On the other hand, Figure 2 shows the target point is moved -2.5nm by using target point control function. As a result, simulation contour is matched to the original layout. This function can be powerfully adapted to OPC procedure of memory and logic devices.

  2. Optimal periodic controller for formation flying on libration point orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Haijun; Zhao, Jun; Wu, Zhigang; Zhong, Wanxie

    2011-09-01

    An optimal periodic controller based on continuous low-thrust is proposed for the stabilization missions of spacecraft station-keeping and formation-keeping along periodic Libration point orbits of the Sun-Earth system. Additionally, a new numerical algorithm is proposed for solving the periodic Riccati differential equation in the design of the optimal periodic controller. Practical missions show that the optimal periodic controller (which is designed with the linear periodic time-varying equation of the relative dynamical model) overcomes the problems and limitations of the time-variant LQR controller. Furthermore, nonlinear numerical simulations are presented for the missions of a leader spacecraft station-keeping and three follower spacecraft formation-keeping. Numerical simulations show that the velocity increments for spacecraft control and relative position errors vary little with changes in the altitude of periodic orbits. In addition, the actual trajectories of the leader and the follower spacecraft track the periodic reference orbit with high accuracy under the perturbation of the eccentric nature of the Earth's orbit and the initial injection errors. In particular, the relative position errors obtained by the optimal periodic controller for spacecraft formation-keeping are all in the range of millimeters.

  3. MSFC Skylab attitude and pointing control system mission evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The results of detailed performance analyses of the attitude and pointing control system in-orbit hardware and software on Skylab are reported. Performance is compared with requirements, test results, and prelaunch predictions. A brief history of the altitude and pointing control system evolution leading to the launch configuration is presented. The report states that the attitude and pointing system satisfied all requirements.

  4. Pointing control design for autonomous space vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.D.

    1993-03-01

    This paper addresses the design of pointing control systems for autonomous space vehicles. The function of the pointing control system is to keep distant orbiting objects within the field-of-view of an on-board optical sensor. We outline the development of novel nonlinear control algorithms which exploit the availability of on- board sensors. Simulation results comparing the performance of the different pointing control implementations are presented.

  5. Poly(oxyalkylene) aminoether carbamates as deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Plavac, F.

    1987-09-22

    This patent describes deposit control additives to maintain cleanliness in internal combustion engines which are provided. The additives are hydrocarbyl-terminated poly(oxyalkylene) aminohydrocarbyloxyhydrocarbyl carbamates, also referred to as polyether aminoether carbamates.

  6. Control points within the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence of the temporal order of chromosomal DNA replication argues favorably for the view that the cell cycle is controlled by genes acting in sequence whose time of expression is determined by mitosis and the amount of nuclear DNA (2C vs 4C) in the cell. Gl and G2 appear to be carbohydrate dependent in that cells starved of either carbohydrate of phosphate fail to make these transitions. Cells deprived of nitrate, however, fail only at Gl to S transition indicating that the controls that operate in G1 differ from those that operate in G2. 46 references, 5 figures.

  7. The timing of control signals underlying fast point-to-point arm movements.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri, M; Feldman, A G

    2001-04-01

    It is known that proprioceptive feedback induces muscle activation when the facilitation of appropriate motoneurons exceeds their threshold. In the suprathreshold range, the muscle-reflex system produces torques depending on the position and velocity of the joint segment(s) that the muscle spans. The static component of the torque-position relationship is referred to as the invariant characteristic (IC). According to the equilibrium-point (EP) hypothesis, control systems produce movements by changing the activation thresholds and thus shifting the IC of the appropriate muscles in joint space. This control process upsets the balance between muscle and external torques at the initial limb configuration and, to regain the balance, the limb is forced to establish a new configuration or, if the movement is prevented, a new level of static torques. Taken together, the joint angles and the muscle torques generated at an equilibrium configuration define a single variable called the EP. Thus by shifting the IC, control systems reset the EP. Muscle activation and movement emerge following the EP resetting because of the natural physical tendency of the system to reach equilibrium. Empirical and simulation studies support the notion that the control IC shifts and the resulting EP shifts underlying fast point-to-point arm movements are gradual rather than step-like. However, controversies exist about the duration of these shifts. Some studies suggest that the IC shifts cease with the movement offset. Other studies propose that the IC shifts end early in comparison to the movement duration (approximately, at peak velocity). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the duration of the IC shifts underlying fast point-to-point arm movements. Subjects made fast (hand peak velocity about 1.3 m/s) planar arm movements toward different targets while grasping a handle. Hand forces applied to the handle and shoulder/elbow torques were, respectively, measured from a force sensor placed

  8. Strike Point Control for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Kolemen, E.; Gates, D. A.; Rowley, C. W.; Kasdin, N. J.; Kallman, J.; Gerhardt, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Mueller, D.

    2010-07-09

    This paper presents the first control algorithm for the inner and outer strike point position for a Spherical Torus (ST) fusion experiment and the performance analysis of the controller. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD) will be installed on NSTX which is believed to provide better pumping than lithium coatings on carbon PFCs. The shape of the plasma dictates the pumping rate of the lithium by channeling the plasma to LLD, where strike point location is the most important shape parameter. Simulations show that the density reduction depends on the proximity of strike point to LLD. Experiments were performed to study the dynamics of the strike point, design a new controller to change the location of the strike point to desired location and stabilize it. The most effective PF coils in changing inner and outer strike points were identified using equilibrium code. The PF coil inputs were changed in a step fashion between various set points and the step response of the strike point position was obtained. From the analysis of the step responses, PID controllers for the strike points were obtained and the controller was tuned experimentally for better performance. The strike controller was extended to include the outer-strike point on the inner plate to accommodate the desired low outer-strike points for the experiment with the aim of achieving "snowflake" divertor configuration in NSTX.

  9. Generalizations of fuzzy linguistic control points in geometric design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallehuddin, M. H.; Wahab, A. F.; Gobithaasan, R. U.

    2014-07-01

    Control points are geometric primitives that play an important role in designing the geometry curve and surface. When these control points are blended with some basis functions, there are several geometric models such as Bezier, B-spline and NURBS(Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline) will be produced. If the control points are defined by the theory of fuzzy sets, then fuzzy geometric models are produced. But the fuzzy geometric models can only solve the problem of uncertainty complex. This paper proposes a new definition of fuzzy control points with linguistic terms. When the fuzzy control points with linguistic terms are blended with basis functions, then a fuzzy linguistic geometric model is produced. This paper ends with some numerical examples illustrating linguistic control attributes of fuzzy geometric models.

  10. Adaptive Control for Buck Power Converter Using Fixed Point Inducting Control and Zero Average Dynamics Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos Velasco, Fredy Edimer; García, Nicolás Toro; Garcés Gómez, Yeison Alberto

    In this paper, the output voltage of a buck power converter is controlled by means of a quasi-sliding scheme. The Fixed Point Inducting Control (FPIC) technique is used for the control design, based on the Zero Average Dynamics (ZAD) strategy, including load estimation by means of the Least Mean Squares (LMS) method. The control scheme is tested in a Rapid Control Prototyping (RCP) system based on Digital Signal Processing (DSP) for dSPACE platform. The closed loop system shows adequate performance. The experimental and simulation results match. The main contribution of this paper is to introduce the load estimator by means of LMS, to make ZAD and FPIC control feasible in load variation conditions. In addition, comparison results for controlled buck converter with SMC, PID and ZAD-FPIC control techniques are shown.

  11. USE OF THE SDO POINTING CONTROLLERS FOR INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION MANEUVERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vess, Melissa F.; Starin, Scott R.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.

    2005-01-01

    During the science phase of the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, the three science instruments require periodic instrument calibration maneuvers with a frequency of up to once per month. The command sequences for these maneuvers vary in length from a handful of steps to over 200 steps, and individual steps vary in size from 5 arcsec per step to 22.5 degrees per step. Early in the calibration maneuver development, it was determined that the original attitude sensor complement could not meet the knowledge requirements for the instrument calibration maneuvers in the event of a sensor failure. Because the mission must be single fault tolerant, an attitude determination trade study was undertaken to determine the impact of adding an additional attitude sensor versus developing alternative, potentially complex, methods of performing the maneuvers in the event of a sensor failure. To limit the impact to the science data capture budget, these instrument calibration maneuvers must be performed as quickly as possible while maintaining the tight pointing and knowledge required to obtain valid data during the calibration. To this end, the decision was made to adapt a linear pointing controller by adjusting gains and adding an attitude limiter so that it would be able to slew quickly and still achieve steady pointing once on target. During the analysis of this controller, questions arose about the stability of the controller during slewing maneuvers due to the combination of the integral gain, attitude limit, and actuator saturation. Analysis was performed and a method for disabling the integral action while slewing was incorporated to ensure stability. A high fidelity simulation is used to simulate the various instrument calibration maneuvers.

  12. Experiment pointing control during space shuttle sortie missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicaise, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    The pointing and stability problems of the space shuttle sortie mission are examined from the standpoint of basic shuttle capability and the techniques that could be used for improving this capability to accommodate a maximum number of experiments. Augmentation of the basic shuttle control system is proposed to provide an acceptable pointing environment. A stabilized reference base is recommended as a general pointing instrument for certain earth observation and astronomy experiments. Simulation results are presented which were obtained by modeling the Skylab Experiment Pointing Control (EPC) system on a thruster controlled shuttle.

  13. Pointing Control System for a High Precision Flight Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    BENTLEY,ANTHONY E.; WILCOXEN,JEFFREY LEE

    2000-12-01

    A pointing control system is developed and tested for a flying gimbaled telescope. The two-axis pointing system is capable of sub-microradian pointing stability and high accuracy in the presence of large host vehicle jitter. The telescope also has high agility--it is capable of a 50-degree retarget (in both axes simultaneously) in less than 2 seconds. To achieve the design specifications, high-accuracy, high-resolution, two-speed resolvers were used, resulting in gimbal-angle measurements stable to 1.5 microradians. In addition, on-axis inertial angle displacement sensors were mounted on the telescope to provide host-vehicle jitter cancellation. The inertial angle sensors are accurate to about 100 nanoradians, but do not measure low frequency displacements below 2 Hz. The gimbal command signal includes host-vehicle attitude information, which is band-limited. This provides jitter data below 20 Hz, but includes a variable latency between 15 and 25 milliseconds. One of the most challenging aspects of this design was to combine the inertial-angle-sensor data with the less perfect information in the command signal to achieve maximum jitter reduction. The optimum blending of these two signals, along with the feedback compensation were designed using Quantitative Feedback Theory.

  14. IMPACT OF POINT SOURCE CONTROL STRATEGIES ON NO2 LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives final results of a study of the effect of two point source NOx control strategies in the Chicago Air Quality Control Region (AQCR): combustion modification and flue gas treatment. The study involved the dispersion modeling of essentially all point and area source...

  15. One of two rotodip feeders used to control addition of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    One of two rotodip feeders used to control addition of alum solution into the water - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. Onboard utilization of ground control points for image correction. Volume 3: Ground control point simulation software design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The software developed to simulate the ground control point navigation system is described. The Ground Control Point Simulation Program (GCPSIM) is designed as an analysis tool to predict the performance of the navigation system. The system consists of two star trackers, a global positioning system receiver, a gyro package, and a landmark tracker.

  17. A multiple pointing-mount control strategy for space platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    A new disturbance-adaptive control strategy for multiple pointing-mount space platforms is proposed and illustrated by consideration of a simplified 3-link dynamic model of a multiple pointing-mount space platform. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new platform control strategy. The simulation results also reveal a system 'destabilization phenomena' that can occur if the set of individual platform-mounted experiment controllers are 'too responsive.'

  18. Control of pyrite addition in coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Schmid, Bruce K.; Junkin, James E.

    1982-12-21

    Pyrite addition to a coal liquefaction process (22, 26) is controlled (118) in inverse proportion to the calcium content of the feed coal to maximize the C.sub.5 --900.degree. F. (482.degree. C.) liquid yield per unit weight of pyrite added (110). The pyrite addition is controlled in this manner so as to minimize the amount of pyrite used and thus reduce pyrite contribution to the slurry pumping load and disposal problems connected with pyrite produced slag.

  19. Point defect concentrations and solid solution hardening in NiAl with Fe additions

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, L.M.; Chang, Y.A.; Liu, C.T.

    1997-08-01

    The solid solution hardening behavior exhibited when Fe is added to NiAl is investigated. This is an interesting problem to consider since the ternary Fe additions may choose to occupy either the Ni or the Al sublattice, affecting the hardness at differing rates. Moreover, the addition of Fe may affect the concentrations of other point defects such as vacancies and Ni anti-sites. As a result, unusual effects ranging from rapid hardening to solid solution softening are observed. Alloys with varying amounts of Fe were prepared in Ni-rich (40 at. % Al) and stoichiometric (50 at. % Al) compositions. Vacancy concentrations were measured using lattice parameter and density measurements. The site occupancy of Fe was determined using ALCHEMI. Using these two techniques the site occupancies of all species could be uniquely determined. Significant differences in the defect concentrations as well as the hardening behavior were encountered between the Ni-rich and stoichiometric regimes.

  20. The Phobos geodetic control point network and rotation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, J.; Zubarev, A.; Nadezhdina, I.; Shishkina, L.; Rambaux, N.

    2014-11-01

    A new global control point network was derived for Phobos, based on SRC (Mars Express), Phobos-2, and Viking Orbiter image data. We derive 3-D Cartesian coordinates for 813 control points as well as improved pointing data for 202 SRC and Viking images in the Phobos-fixed coordinate system. The point accuracies vary from 4.5 m on the Phobos nearside, to up to 67.0 m on the farside, where we rely on Viking images (average point accuracy: 13.7 m). From tracking of the control points we detect a librational motion synchronous to the Phobos orbital period and measure libration amplitude of 1.09°, in agreement with predictions from shape information assuming a uniform interior. This suggests that the interior of Phobos is homogeneous - but small local mass anomalies, e.g., associated with crater Stickney, cannot be ruled out. Our new control point network has a higher number of data points and higher point accuracy than previous data products and will be an important basis for accurate shape models and maps.

  1. Disparities and Menthol Marketing: Additional Evidence in Support of Point of Sale Policies

    PubMed Central

    Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Harris, Jenine; Snider, Doneisha; Walsh, Heidi; Cyr, Julianne; Barnoya, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with point-of-sale tobacco marketing in St. Louis, an urban city in the United States. Using spatial analysis, descriptive statistics, and multilevel modeling, we examined point-of-sale data and the proportion of mentholated cigarette and total cigarette marketing from 342 individual tobacco retail stores within St. Louis census tracts characterized by the percent of black adults and children. Menthol and total tobacco product marketing was highest in areas with the highest percentages of black residents. When examining menthol marketing to children, we did not find as strong of a relationship, however results of multilevel modeling indicate that as the proportion of black children in a census tract increased, the proportion of menthol marketing near candy also increased. These results indicate the need for communities globally to counter this targeted marketing by taking policy action specifically through the enactment of marketing restrictions provided by the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act and the Framework Convention of Tobacco Control. PMID:24071922

  2. Disparities and menthol marketing: additional evidence in support of point of sale policies.

    PubMed

    Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Harris, Jenine; Snider, Doneisha; Walsh, Heidi; Cyr, Julianne; Barnoya, Joaquin

    2013-10-01

    This study examined factors associated with point-of-sale tobacco marketing in St. Louis, an urban city in the United States. Using spatial analysis, descriptive statistics, and multilevel modeling, we examined point-of-sale data and the proportion of mentholated cigarette and total cigarette marketing from 342 individual tobacco retail stores within St. Louis census tracts characterized by the percent of black adults and children. Menthol and total tobacco product marketing was highest in areas with the highest percentages of black residents. When examining menthol marketing to children, we did not find as strong of a relationship, however results of multilevel modeling indicate that as the proportion of black children in a census tract increased, the proportion of menthol marketing near candy also increased. These results indicate the need for communities globally to counter this targeted marketing by taking policy action specifically through the enactment of marketing restrictions provided by the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act and the Framework Convention of Tobacco Control. PMID:24071922

  3. High energy laser testbed for accurate beam pointing control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dojong; Kim, Jae Jun; Frist, Duane; Nagashima, Masaki; Agrawal, Brij

    2010-02-01

    Precision laser beam pointing is a key technology in High Energy Laser systems. In this paper, a laboratory High Energy Laser testbed developed at the Naval Postgraduate School is introduced. System identification is performed and a mathematical model is constructed to estimate system performance. New beam pointing control algorithms are designed based on this mathematical model. It is shown in both computer simulation and experiment that the adaptive filter algorithm can improve the pointing performance of the system.

  4. Flight performance of Skylab attitude and pointing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.; Kennel, H. F.; Rupp, C. C.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab attitude and pointing control system (APCS) requirements are briefly reviewed and the way in which they became altered during the prelaunch phase of development is noted. The actual flight mission (including mission alterations during flight) is described. The serious hardware failures that occurred, beginning during ascent through the atmosphere, also are described. The APCS's ability to overcome these failures and meet mission changes are presented. The large around-the-clock support effort on the ground is discussed. Salient design points and software flexibility that should afford pertinent experience for future spacecraft attitude and pointing control system designs are included.

  5. Annular suspension and pointing system with controlled DC electromagnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Josephine Lynn; Tam, Kwok Hung

    1993-01-01

    The Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS) developed by the Flight System division of Sperry Corporation is a six-degree of freedom payload pointing system designed for use with the space shuttle. This magnetic suspension and pointing system provides precise controlled pointing in six-degrees of freedom, isolation of payload-carrier disturbances, and end mount controlled pointing. Those are great advantages over the traditional mechanical joints for space applications. In this design, we first analyzed the assumed model of the single degree ASPS bearing actuator and obtained the plant dynamics equations. By linearizing the plant dynamics equations, we designed the cascade and feedback compensators such that a stable and satisfied result was obtained. The specified feedback compensator was computer simulated with the nonlinearized plant dynamics equations. The results indicated that an unstable output occurred. In other words, the designed feedback compensator failed. The failure of the design is due to the Taylor's series expansion not converging.

  6. Substrate-controlled Michael additions of chiral ketones to enones.

    PubMed

    Fàbregas, Mireia; Gómez-Palomino, Alejandro; Pellicena, Miquel; Reina, Daniel F; Romea, Pedro; Urpí, Fèlix; Font-Bardia, Mercè

    2014-12-01

    Substrate-controlled Michael additions of the titanium(IV) enolate of lactate-derived ketone 1 to acyclic α,β-unsaturated ketones in the presence of a Lewis acid (TiCl4 or SnCl4) provide the corresponding 2,4-anti-4,5-anti dicarbonyl compounds in good yields and excellent diastereomeric ratios. Likely, the nucleophilic species involved in such additions are bimetallic enolates that may add to enones through cyclic transition states. Finally, further studies indicate that a structurally related β-benzyloxy chiral ketone can also participate in such stereocontrolled conjugate additions. PMID:25423031

  7. A point-to-point link for data, trigger, clock and control over copper or fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazona, A.; Gnanvo, K.; Martoiu, S.; Muller, H.; Toledo, J.

    2014-06-01

    Upgrades of the LHC detectors target significantly higher event rates and higher bandwidth over point-to-point links. The Data, Trigger, Clock and Control (DTCC) is a new custom link protocol for data and control streams over different physical media, as copper or optical fibre. The DTCC link is implemented over 8b10b encoding. A version of the DTCC link over standard Category 6 cables is planned to be used with ALICE EMCal Calorimeters after its LS1 upgrade with a significant increase of the readout rate [1].

  8. The instrument pointing system: Precision attitude control in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Ralf; Woelker, Albrecht

    1990-06-01

    The Spacelab Instrument Pointing System (IPS) is a three axes gimbal system providing pointing and stabilization in the arcsec range to a variety of space experiments with a mass of up to 7000 kg. The IPS demonstrated its control performance during the maiden flight in July 1985, the Spacelab 2 mission on board the Space Shuttle Challenger. The most challenging problem for attitude control in space is the disturbance compensation in the presence of structural flexibilities. Kalman filtering based on optical sensor and gyro measurements as well as flexible mode attenuation and feedforward control were indispensable to achieve high precision. To further enhance the IPS pointing performance and versatility, a new, more autonomous computer and sensor concept has been conceived providing the capacity for a higher degree of automation as well as improved pointing and closed loop tracking control. The autonomy and control capacity of the enhanced IPS establish the basis to accommodate the IPS as long-term available tracking and pointing platform on the International Space Station Freedom (ISF).

  9. Ultrafast amplifier additive timing jitter characterization and control.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Alexis; D'Acremont, Quentin; Santarelli, Giorgio; Dilhaire, Stefan; Courjaud, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    We report on the characterization and long-term compensation of additive timing jitter introduced by a femtosecond ytterbium regenerative amplifier with a 100 kHz repetition rate. A balanced optical cross-correlation technique is used to generate a jitter error signal. This approach is well suited to characterize the additive timing jitter of Yb amplifiers seeded by narrow spectrum Yb oscillators. The balanced optical cross-correlator is in a noncollinear configuration allowing a background free coindence detection. This setup enables the measurement of additive timing jitter from the amplifier, with a noise floor of 300 as integrated from 10 Hz to 10 kHz. The measured additive timing jitter level is about 5 fs, integrated from 0.1 Hz to 10 kHz. The amplifier timing drift characterization and control are performed for more than an hour. PMID:26974074

  10. Digital controller design: Analysis of the annular suspension pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, B. C.

    1979-01-01

    The Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS) is a payload auxiliary pointing device of the Space Shuttle. The ASPS is comprised of two major subassemblies, a vernier and a coarse pointing subsystem. The experiment is attached to a mounting plate/rim combination which is suspended on magnetic bearing/actuators (MBA) strategically located about the rim. Fine pointing is achieved by gimballing the plate/rim within the MBA gaps. Control about the experiment line-of-sight is obtained through the use of a non-contacting rim drive and positioning torquer. All sensors used to close the servo loops on the vernier system are noncontacting elements. Therefore, the experiment is a free-flyer constrained only by the magnetic forces generated by the control loops.

  11. Kinks in subducted slabs: Petrological evidence points to additional hindrance to the exhumation of UHP rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, T.; Klemd, R.; Scherer, E. E.; Rondenay, S.; Gao, J.

    2012-12-01

    Sudden changes in the dip of subducted oceanic plates have been resolved by seismic imaging [1, 2]. Such kinking often coincides with the seismic disappearance of the low-velocity subducted oceanic crust, i.e., at a depth where eclogitization (dehydration) of the upper oceanic crust is nearly complete and the oceanic crust becomes almost seismically indistinguishable from mantle peridotite. We present petrological evidence for this phenomenon derived from oceanic blueschist- and eclogite-facies rocks from the Chinese Tianshan. The peak-metamorphic conditions of the samples range between 330 and 580°C at 1.5 to 2.3 GPa. Such a wide range of peak conditions for intercalated high- and ultrahigh-pressure rocks has also been reported from other Tianshan localities. These observations suggest that the rocks were derived from different depths within the subduction zone and later juxtaposed during exhumation within the subduction channel. Multi-point Lu-Hf isochrons from four high-pressure rocks yield consistent garnet-growth ages of around ~315 Ma, confirming that the eclogite-facies metamorphism of the Tianshan high-pressure rocks resulted from a single subduction event in the Late Carboniferous. These ages, in conjunction with the ~311 Ma cluster of 40Ar-39Ar and Rb-Sr white mica ages from the same localities imply rapid exhumation. Previously reported peak P-T estimates from UHP metasediments and eclogites all lie on a lower geothermal gradient—and thus on a colder P-T path at the slab-wedge interface—than that defined by the HP eclogites and meta-volcaniclastic rocks studied here. This suggests that the slab-subduction angle steepened sharply at approximately 90 km depth, just between the depths at which the HP and UHP rocks equilibrated. The increase in subduction angle may result from a greater slab pull resulting from eclogitization densification. An additional factor may be an ephemeral weakening of the slab as it undergoes eclogitization reactions [3, 4]. We

  12. Pointing and Scanning Control of Instruments Using Rotating Unbalanced Masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, John Y.

    1996-01-01

    Motions of telescopes, satellites, and other flight bodies have been controlled by various means in the past. For example, gimbal mounted devices can use electric motors to produce pointing and scanning motions. Reaction wheels, control moment gyros, and propellant-charged reaction jets are other technologies that have also been used. Each of these methods has its advantages, but all actuator systems used in a flight environment face the challenges of minimizing weight, reducing energy consumption, and maximizing reliability. Recently, Polites invented and patented the Rotating Unbalanced Mass (RUM) device as a means for generation scanning motion on flight experiments. RUM devices have been successfully used to generate various scanning motions. The basic principle: a RUM rotating at constant annular velocity exerts a cyclic centrifugal force on the instrument or main body, thus producing a periodic scanning motion. A system of RUM devices exerts no reaction forces on the main body, requires very little energy, and is very simple to construct and control. These are significant advantages over electric motors, reaction wheels, and control moment gyroscopes. Although the RUM device very easily produces scanning motion, an auxiliary control system may be required to maintain the proper orientation, or pointing of the main body. It has been suggested that RUM devices can be used to control pointing dynamics, as well as generate the desired periodic scanning motion. The idea is that the RUM velocity will not be constant, but will vary over the period of one RUM rotation. The thought is that the changing angular velocity produces a centrifugal force having time-varying magnitude and direction. The scope of the present research project is to further study the pointing control concept, and to implement a microcontroller program to control an experimental hardware system. This report is subdivided into three themes. The basic dynamic modeling and control principles are

  13. Digital pointing control. [for Space Shuttle Data Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.; Brown, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The digital pointing control system developed for the Space Shuttle Data Bus is discussed. The device, which interfaces with NASA standard sensor units, contains a front panel controller, a development system to load, inspect, print, and store the program and data, and a 'test jig' to provide closed-loop controller operation. The system is described with particular reference to the tracker-gyro interfaces, the control algorithms and compensation procedures, Kalman-estimation filtering, the proportional power output, and the discrete output capability. The results of simulation studies are presented and the development status is noted.

  14. Internal quality control in point-of-care testing: where's the evidence?

    PubMed

    Holt, Helen; Freedman, Danielle B

    2016-03-01

    ISO 22870 standards require protocols for performance of internal quality control for all point-of-care testing devices and training of users in its theory and practice. However, the unique setting of point-of-care testing (i.e. processes conducted by non-scientific users) means that laboratory internal quality control programmes do not easily translate to point-of-care testing. In addition, while the evidence base for internal quality control within the laboratory has been increasing, the equivalent literature surrounding point-of-care testing is very limited. This has led to wide variation in what is considered acceptable practice for internal quality control at the point of care. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that internal quality control is an area of deficiency in point-of-care testing. Internal quality control protocols used at point-of-care testing should be defined based on risk management. The protocol will therefore be dependent on analyser complexity and availability of inbuilt system checks, the risk associated with release of an incorrect patient result as well as frequency of use. The emphasis should be on designing an effective internal quality control protocol as opposed to the inherent tendency of introducing high-frequency quality control. Typically a simple pass or fail criterion is used for internal quality control in point-of-care testing based on whether internal quality control results fall within assigned ranges. While simply taught, such criteria can require broad internal quality control ranges to decrease the probability of false rejection (also reducing the probability of error detection). Customized internal quality control ranges, two-tier acceptance systems and assay-specific internal quality control can be used to improve error detection rates. PMID:26486440

  15. Effects of additional external weight on posture and movement adaptations to fatigue induced by a repetitive pointing task.

    PubMed

    Cantú, Hiram; Emery, Kim; Côté, Julie N

    2014-06-01

    Fatigue and additional weight are risk factors of injuries by falls. Posture and trunk movement changes occur with fatigue induced by a repetitive pointing task. These changes facilitate arm movement but they may also jeopardize postural stability. When equilibrium is challenged, e.g. with additional weight, strategies that represent less postural threat could develop with fatigue. Nineteen participants performed two sessions (without, with 20% body weight added load (Load)) of a repetitive pointing task until shoulder fatigue (8 on Borg CR-10). There was no difference in time to fatigue between the two sessions. Anterior deltoid, biceps and upper trapezius muscle activity significantly increased with fatigue. Peak medial-lateral center-of-pressure (CoP) velocity and the mean vertical position of the reaching shoulder were both significantly lower with fatigue, though these fatigue-induced decreases were smaller with the added load. Reach-to-reach variability in CoP displacement significantly increased with fatigue, and more so with the added load. With fatigue, significant contralateral shifts occurred at the reaching shoulder and elbow joints, and ranges of motion (RoM) significantly increased at most joints but not at the center-of-mass (CoM). Conversely, Load main effects were mostly seen in CoM dependent measures. Significantly increased variability in mean and range values was seen with fatigue and Load in most of our kinematic and CoP dependent measures, with the most notable effects on CoM dependent measures. Findings suggest that the postural control system adapts to combined perturbing factors of fatigue and added load, likely by using parallel control mechanisms. PMID:24786737

  16. Engineering to Control Noise, Loading, and Optimal Operating Points

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell R. Swartz

    2000-11-12

    Successful engineering of low-energy nuclear systems requires control of noise, loading, and optimum operating point (OOP) manifolds. The latter result from the biphasic system response of low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR)/cold fusion systems, and their ash production rate, to input electrical power. Knowledge of the optimal operating point manifold can improve the reproducibility and efficacy of these systems in several ways. Improved control of noise, loading, and peak production rates is available through the study, and use, of OOP manifolds. Engineering of systems toward the OOP-manifold drive-point peak may, with inclusion of geometric factors, permit more accurate uniform determinations of the calibrated activity of these materials/systems.

  17. Two Axis Pointing System (TAPS) attitude acquisition, determination, and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzolini, John D.; Mcglew, David E.

    1990-01-01

    The Two Axis Pointing System (TAPS) is a 2 axis gimbal system designed to provide fine pointing of Space Transportation System (STS) borne instruments. It features center-of-mass instrument mounting and will accommodate instruments of up to 1134 kg (2500 pounds) which fit within a 1.0 by 1.0 by 4.2 meter (40 by 40 by 166 inch) envelope. The TAPS system is controlled by a microcomputer based Control Electronics Assembly (CEA), a Power Distribution Unit (PDU), and a Servo Control Unit (SCU). A DRIRU-II inertial reference unit is used to provide incremental angles for attitude propagation. A Ball Brothers STRAP star tracker is used for attitude acquisition and update. The theory of the TAPS attitude determination and error computation for the Broad Band X-ray Telescope (BBXRT) are described. The attitude acquisition is based upon a 2 star geometric solution. The acquisition theory and quaternion algebra are presented. The attitude control combines classical position, integral and derivative (PID) control with techniques to compensate for coulomb friction (bias torque) and the cable harness crossing the gimbals (spring torque). Also presented is a technique for an adaptive bias torque compensation which adjusts to an ever changing frictional torque environment. The control stability margins are detailed, with the predicted pointing performance, based upon simulation studies. The TAPS user interface, which provides high level operations commands to facilitate science observations, is outlined.

  18. Triana Safehold: A New Gyroless, Sun-Pointing Attitude Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Morgenstern, Wendy; Garrick, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Triana is a single-string spacecraft to be placed in a halo orbit about the sun-earth Ll Lagrangian point. The Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) hardware includes four reaction wheels, ten thrusters, six coarse sun sensors, a star tracker, and a three-axis Inertial Measuring Unit (IMU). The ACS Safehold design features a gyroless sun-pointing control scheme using only sun sensors and wheels. With this minimum hardware approach, Safehold increases mission reliability in the event of a gyroscope anomaly. In place of the gyroscope rate measurements, Triana Safehold uses wheel tachometers to help provide a scaled estimation of the spacecraft body rate about the sun vector. Since Triana nominally performs momentum management every three months, its accumulated system momentum can reach a significant fraction of the wheel capacity. It is therefore a requirement for Safehold to maintain a sun-pointing attitude even when the spacecraft system momentum is reasonably large. The tachometer sun-line rate estimation enables the controller to bring the spacecraft close to its desired sun-pointing attitude even with reasonably high system momentum and wheel drags. This paper presents the design rationale behind this gyroless controller, stability analysis, and some time-domain simulation results showing performances with various initial conditions. Finally, suggestions for future improvements are briefly discussed.

  19. Galileo Spacecraft Scan Platform Celestial Pointing Cone Control Gain Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    In, C-H. C.; Hilbert, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    During September and October 1991, pictures of the Gaspra asteroid and neighboring stars were taken by the Galileo Optical Navigation (OPNAV) Team for the purpose of navigation the spacecraft for a successful Gaspra encounter. The star tracks in these pictures showed that the scan platform celestial pointing cone controller performed poorly in compensating for wobble-induced cone offsets.

  20. 49 CFR 236.404 - Signals at adjacent control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signals at adjacent control points. 236.404 Section 236.404 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR...

  1. 47 CFR 90.473 - Operation of internal transmitter control systems through licensed fixed control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of internal transmitter control... Transmitter Control Internal Transmitter Control Systems § 90.473 Operation of internal transmitter control systems through licensed fixed control points. An internal transmitter control system may be...

  2. Dynamic and control assessment of the Space Station Freedom payload pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, David T., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the proposed Space Station Freedom Payload Pointing System (PPS) was performed to assess its dynamic payload pointing capability in the dynamic environment of the Space Station Freedom (SSF). In addition, the stability and control the the SSF was examined to verify the capability of its control devices to accommodate the impact of PPS operations. An analysis of the PPS ability to provide continuous, accurate pointing was performed and compared to the program requirements specified in the 1988 Program Definition and Requirement Document (PDRD). Results indicated that the PPS was not able to perform within the program requirements during the worst case scenario of a shuttle hard docking maneuver to the port side SSF docking adapter. The PPS maintained marginal pointing accuracy during crew treadmill activity. The Space Station attitude control system easily accommodated all PPS operations simulated. The PPS caused a negligible impact on the SSF's control environment.

  3. Accuracy analysis of pointing control system of solar power station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, J. C.; Peebles, P. Z., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The first-phase effort concentrated on defining the minimum basic functions that the retrodirective array must perform, identifying circuits that are capable of satisfying the basic functions, and looking at some of the error sources in the system and how they affect accuracy. The initial effort also examined three methods for generating torques for mechanical antenna control, performed a rough analysis of the flexible body characteristics of the solar collector, and defined a control system configuration for mechanical pointing control of the array.

  4. H-point standard additions method for simultaneous determination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim in pharmaceutical formulations and biological fluids with simultaneous addition of two analytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givianrad, M. H.; Saber-Tehrani, M.; Aberoomand-Azar, P.; Mohagheghian, M.

    2011-03-01

    The applicability of H-point standard additions method (HPSAM) to the resolving of overlapping spectra corresponding to the sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim is verified by UV-vis spectrophotometry. The results show that the H-point standard additions method with simultaneous addition of both analytes is suitable for the simultaneous determination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim in aqueous media. The results of applying the H-point standard additions method showed that the two drugs could be determined simultaneously with the concentration ratios of sulfamethoxazole to trimethoprim varying from 1:18 to 16:1 in the mixed samples. Also, the limits of detections were 0.58 and 0.37 μmol L -1 for sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, respectively. In addition the means of the calculated RSD (%) were 1.63 and 2.01 for SMX and TMP, respectively in synthetic mixtures. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim in some synthetic, pharmaceutical formulation and biological fluid samples.

  5. Additional Evaluation of the Point-of-Contact Circulating Cathodic Antigen Assay for Schistosoma mansoni Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mwinzi, Pauline N. M.; Kittur, Nupur; Ochola, Elizabeth; Cooper, Philip J.; Campbell, Carl H.; King, Charles H.; Colley, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the urine-based point-of-contact cathodic circulating antigen test (POC-CCA) in Schistosoma mansoni-endemic settings in Africa indicate it has good sensitivity in detecting infections, but in areas of low prevalence, the POC-CCA can be positive for persons who are egg-negative by Kato-Katz stool assays. We examined the POC-CCA assay for: (a) batch-to-batch stability; (b) intra-reader and inter-reader variability; (c) day-to-day variability compared to Kato-Katz stool assays, and (d) to see if praziquantel (PZQ) treatment converted Kato-Katz-negative/POC-CCA positive individuals to POC-CCA negativity. We found essentially no batch-to-batch variation, negligible intra-reader variability (2%), and substantial agreement for inter-reader reliability. Some day-to-day variation was observed over 5 days of urine collection, but less than the variation in Kato-Katz stool assays over 3 days. To evaluate the effect of treatment on Kato-Katz(−)/POC-CCA(+) children, 149 children in an area of 10–15% prevalence who were Kato-Katz(−) based on 3 stool samples but POC-CCA(+) were enrolled. Seven days after treatment (PZQ 40 mg/kg) samples were again collected and tested. Almost half (47%) POC-CCA positive children turned negative. Those still POC-CCA positive received a second treatment, and 34% of them turned POC-CCA negative upon this second treatment. Most who remained POC-CCA positive shifted each time to a “lesser” POC-CCA “level of positivity.” The data suggest that most Kato-Katz-negative/POC-CCA positive individuals harbor low-intensity infections, and each treatment kills all or some of their adult worms. The data also suggest that when evaluated by a more sensitive assay, the effective cure rates for PZQ are significantly less than those inferred from fecal testing. These findings have public health significance for the mapping and monitoring of Schistosoma infections and in planning the transition from schistosomiasis morbidity control to

  6. Control of Lagrange point orbits using solar sail propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookless, John; McInnes, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Several missions have utilised halo orbits around the L1 and L2 Lagrange points of the Earth-Sun system. Due to the instability of these orbits, station-keeping techniques are required to prevent escape after orbit insertion. This paper considers using solar sail propulsion to provide station-keeping at quasi-periodic orbits around L1 and L2. Stable manifolds will be identified which provide near-Earth insertion to a quasi-periodic trajectory around the libration point. The possible control techniques investigated include solar sail area variation and solar sail pitch and yaw angle variation. Hill's equations are used to model the dynamics of the problem and optimal control laws are developed to minimise the control requirements. The constant thrust available using solar sails can be used to generate artificial libration points Sunwards of L1 or Earthwards of L2. A possible mission to position a science payload Sunward of L1 will be investigated. After insertion to a halo orbit at L1, gradual solar sail deployment can be performed to spiral Sunwards along the Sun-Earth axis. Insertion ΔV requirements and area variation control requirements will be examined. This mission could provide advance warning of Earthbound coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for magnetic storms.

  7. Astronaut Uses Manual Point Control During Astro-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Due to loss of data used for pointing and operating the ultraviolet telescopes, MSFC ground teams were forced to aim the telescopes with fine tuning by the flight crew. Pictured onboard the shuttle is astronaut Robert Parker using a Manual Pointing Controller (MPC) for the ASTRO-1 mission Instrument Pointing System (IPS).

  8. A multi-resolution fractal additive scheme for blind watermarking of 3D point data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmes, Mark; Wilder, Kathy; Fox, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    We present a fractal feature space for 3D point watermarking to make geospatial systems more secure. By exploiting the self similar nature of fractals, hidden information can be spatially embedded in point cloud data in an acceptable manner as described within this paper. Our method utilizes a blind scheme which provides automatic retrieval of the watermark payload without the need of the original cover data. Our method for locating similar patterns and encoding information in LiDAR point cloud data is accomplished through a look-up table or code book. The watermark is then merged into the point cloud data itself resulting in low distortion effects. With current advancements in computing technologies, such as GPGPUs, fractal processing is now applicable for processing of big data which is present in geospatial as well as other systems. This watermarking technique described within this paper can be important for systems where point data is handled by numerous aerial collectors including analysts use for systems such as a National LiDAR Data Layer.

  9. Dynamics and control simulation of the Spacelab Experiment Pointing Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, E. L.; Ward, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Computer simulations were developed to evaluate the performance of four Experiment Pointing Mounts (EPM) being considered for Spacelab experiments in the 1980-1990 time frame. The system modeled compromises a multibody system consisting of the shuttle, a mechanical isolation device, the EPM, celestial and inertial sensors, bearings, gimbal torque motors and associated nonlinearities, the experiment payload, and control and estimator algorithms. Each mount was subjected to a common disturbance (shuttle vernier thruster firing and man push off) and command (stellar pointing or solar raster scan) input. The fundamental limitation common to all mounts was found to be sensor noise. System dynamics and hardware nonlinearities have secondary effects on pointing performance for sufficiently high bandwidth.

  10. Digital approximation of continuous-data control systems by point-by-point state comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, B. C.; Singh, G.; Yackel, R.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a point-by-point state comparison method of approximating a continuous-data system by a sampled-data system. The problem is to attempt the matching of the states of the two systems at the sampling instants. A partial matching has to be conducted if the systems have more states than controls. A weighting matrix is used to regulate the partial matching and weights placed on each state. The digital approximation is affected by use of forward gain E(T) and feedback gain G(T) in the sampled-data system. It is shown that, in general, these gains can be approximated by truncated Taylor series expansions. An illustrative example is given using the one-axis dynamics of the Skylab satellite.

  11. PowerPoint Presentations: A Creative Addition to the Research Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Alan E.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that the requirement of a PowerPoint presentation as part of the research process would benefit students in the following ways: learning how to conduct research; starting their research project sooner; honing presentation and public speaking skills; improving cooperative and social skills; and enhancing technology skills. Outlines the…

  12. Change point detection in risk adjusted control charts.

    PubMed

    Assareh, Hassan; Smith, Ian; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2015-12-01

    Precise identification of the time when a change in a clinical process has occurred enables experts to identify a potential special cause more effectively. In this article, we develop change point estimation methods for a clinical dichotomous process in the presence of case mix. We apply Bayesian hierarchical models to formulate the change point where there exists a step change in the odds ratio and logit of risk of a Bernoulli process. Markov Chain Monte Carlo is used to obtain posterior distributions of the change point parameters including location and magnitude of changes and also corresponding probabilistic intervals and inferences. The performance of the Bayesian estimator is investigated through simulations and the result shows that precise estimates can be obtained when they are used in conjunction with the risk-adjusted CUSUM and EWMA control charts. In comparison with alternative EWMA and CUSUM estimators, more accurate and precise estimates are obtained by the Bayesian estimator. These superiorities enhance when probability quantification, flexibility and generaliability of the Bayesian change point detection model are also considered. The Deviance Information Criterion, as a model selection criterion in the Bayesian context, is applied to find the best change point model for a given dataset where there is no prior knowledge about the change type in the process. PMID:22025415

  13. Controlling systems that drift through a tipping point

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Ott, Edward

    2014-09-01

    Slow parameter drift is common in many systems (e.g., the amount of greenhouse gases in the terrestrial atmosphere is increasing). In such situations, the attractor on which the system trajectory lies can be destroyed, and the trajectory will then go to another attractor of the system. We consider the case where there are more than one of these possible final attractors, and we ask whether we can control the outcome (i.e., the attractor that ultimately captures the trajectory) using only small controlling perturbations. Specifically, we consider the problem of controlling a noisy system whose parameter slowly drifts through a saddle-node bifurcation taking place on a fractal boundary between the basins of multiple attractors. We show that, when the noise level is low, a small perturbation of size comparable to the noise amplitude applied at a single point in time can ensure that the system will evolve toward a target attracting state with high probability. For a range of noise levels, we find that the minimum size of perturbation required for control is much smaller within a time period that starts some time after the bifurcation, providing a “window of opportunity” for driving the system toward a desirable state. We refer to this procedure as tipping point control.

  14. [Critical of the additive model of the randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Boussageon, Rémy; Gueyffier, François; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Felden-Dominiak, Géraldine

    2008-01-01

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are currently the best way to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of drugs. Its methodology relies on the method of difference (John Stuart Mill), through which the observed difference between two groups (drug vs placebo) can be attributed to the pharmacological effect of the drug being tested. However, this additive model can be questioned in the event of statistical interactions between the pharmacological and the placebo effects. Evidence in different domains has shown that the placebo effect can influence the effect of the active principle. This article evaluates the methodological, clinical and epistemological consequences of this phenomenon. Topics treated include extrapolating results, accounting for heterogeneous results, demonstrating the existence of several factors in the placebo effect, the necessity to take these factors into account for given symptoms or pathologies, as well as the problem of the "specific" effect. PMID:18387273

  15. Characterization and Control of Powder Properties for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strondl, A.; Lyckfeldt, O.; Brodin, H.; Ackelid, U.

    2015-03-01

    Powder characterization and handling in powder metallurgy are important issues and the required powder properties will vary between different component manufacturing processes. By understanding and controlling these, the final material properties for different applications can be improved and become more reliable. In this study, the metal powders used in additive manufacturing (AM) in terms of electron beam melting and selective laser melting have been investigated regarding particle size and shape using dynamic image analysis. In parallel, powder flow characteristics have been evaluated with a powder rheometer. Correlations within the results have been found between particle shape and powder flow characteristics that could explain certain effects of the powder processing in the AM processes. The impact, however, in the processing performance as well as in ultimate material properties was found to be limited.

  16. Control of Microthrix parvicella by aluminium salts addition.

    PubMed

    Durban, N; Juzan, L; Krier, J; Gillot, S

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium and iron chloride were added to a biological nutrient removal pilot plant (1,500 population equivalent) treating urban wastewater to investigate the control of Microthrix parvicella bulking and foaming by metallic salts. Monitoring plant performance over two 6-month periods showed a slight impact on the removal efficiencies. Addition of metallic salts (Me; aluminium or aluminium + iron) at a concentration of 41 mmol Me(kg MLSS·d) (MLSS: mixed liquor suspended solids) over 70 days allowed a stabilization of the diluted sludge volume index (DSVI), whereas higher dosages (94 mmol Me(kg MLSS·d) over 35 days or 137 mmol Me(kg MLSS·d) over 14 days induced a significant improvement of the settling conditions. Microscopic observations showed a compaction of biological aggregates with an embedding of filamentous bacteria into the flocs that is not specific to M. parvicella as bacteria from phylum Chloroflexi are embedded too. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting M. parvicella further indicated a possible growth limitation in addition to the flocculation impact at the high dosages of metallic salts investigated. DSVI appeared to be correlated with the relative abundance of M. parvicella. PMID:26819398

  17. Control of asteroid retrieval trajectories to libration point orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Matteo; Sanchez, Joan Pau

    2016-09-01

    The fascinating idea of shepherding asteroids for science and resource utilization is being considered as a credible concept in a not too distant future. Past studies identified asteroids which could be efficiently injected into manifolds which wind onto periodic orbits around collinear Lagrangian points of the Sun-Earth system. However, the trajectories are unstable, and errors in the capture maneuver would lead to complete mission failure, with potential danger of collision with the Earth, if uncontrolled. This paper investigates the controllability of some asteroids along the transfers and the periodic orbits, assuming the use of a solar-electric low-thrust system shepherding the asteroid. Firstly, an analytical approach is introduced to estimate the stability of the trajectories from a dynamical point of view; then, a numerical control scheme based on a linear quadratic regulator is proposed, where the gains are optimized for each trajectory through a genetic algorithm. A stochastic simulation with a Monte Carlo approach is used to account for different perturbed initial conditions and the epistemic uncertainty on the asteroid mass. Results show that only a small subset of the considered combinations of trajectories/asteroids are reliably controllable, and therefore controllability must be taken into account in the selection of potential targets.

  18. Method for controlling a laser additive process using intrinsic illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Robert; Cai, Guoshuang; Azer, Magdi; Chen, Xiaobin; Liu, Yong; Harding, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    One form of additive manufacturing is to use a laser to generate a melt pool from powdered metal that is sprayed from a nozzle. The laser net-shape machining system builds the part a layer at a time by following a predetermined path. However, because the path may need to take many turns, maintaining a constant melt pool may not be easy. A straight section may require one speed and power while a sharp bend would over melt the metal at the same settings. This paper describes a process monitoring method that uses the intrinsic IR radiation from the melt pool along with a process model configured to establish target values for the parameters associated with the manufacture or repair. This model is based upon known properties of the metal being used as well as the properties of the laser beam. An adaptive control technique is then employed to control process parameters of the machining system based upon the real-time weld pool measurement. Since the system uses the heat radiant from the melt pool, other previously deposited metal does not confuse the system as only the melted material is seen by the camera.

  19. New Ganymede control point network and global shape model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubarev, A.; Nadezhdina, I.; Oberst, J.; Hussmann, H.; Stark, A.

    2015-11-01

    We computed a 3D control point network for Ganymede using combinations of 126 Voyager-1 and -2 and 87 Galileo images, benefiting from reconstructed trajectory data for the three spacecraft and a more complete Galileo image data base than was available for earlier studies. Using more than 3000 control point coordinates, we determine global shape parameters, including mean radius, spheroid- and ellipsoidal axes, and make tests for various equilibrium shape models, constrained by the most recent estimates for gravity field parameters. We confirm that Ganymede has a pronounced ellipsoidal shape, approximately aligned with the Jupiter-direction, in agreement with Ganymede being in tidal equilibrium. The point heights, suffering from large individual errors, do not reveal any large-scale topography below our typical error levels (97% <5 km). By analysis of data residuals we search for, but cannot detect Ganymede longitudinal forced librations. We conclude that libration amplitudes cannot be larger than 0.1° (corresponding to a lateral displacement of 4.6 km at the equator).

  20. Attitude control/momentum management and payload pointing in advanced space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Jayasuriya, Suhada

    1990-01-01

    The design and evaluation of an attitude control/momentum management system for highly asymmetric spacecraft configurations are presented. The preliminary development and application of a nonlinear control system design methodology for tracking control of uncertain systems, such as spacecraft payload pointing systems are also presented. Control issues relevant to both linear and nonlinear rigid-body spacecraft dynamics are addressed, whereas any structural flexibilities are not taken into consideration. Results from the first task indicate that certain commonly used simplifications in the equations of motions result in unstable attitude control systems, when used for highly asymmetric spacecraft configurations. An approach is suggested circumventing this problem. Additionally, even though preliminary results from the second task are encouraging, the proposed nonlinear control system design method requires further investigation prior to its application and use as an effective payload pointing system design technique.

  1. Fixed Point Transformations Based Iterative Control of a Polymerization Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tar, József K.; Rudas, Imre J.

    As a paradigm of strongly coupled non-linear multi-variable dynamic systems the mathematical model of the free-radical polymerization of methyl-metachrylate with azobis (isobutyro-nitrile) as an initiator and toluene as a solvent taking place in a jacketed Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is considered. In the adaptive control of this system only a single input variable is used as the control signal (the process input, i.e. dimensionless volumetric flow rate of the initiator), and a single output variable is observed (the process output, i.e. the number-average molecular weight of the polymer). Simulation examples illustrate that on the basis of a very rough and primitive model consisting of two scalar variables various fixed-point transformations based convergent iterations result in a novel, sophisticated adaptive control.

  2. Guaranteeing Pointing Performance of the SDO Sun-Pointing Controllers in Light of Nonlinear Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; Bourkland, Kristin L.

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission is the first Space Weather Research Network mission, part of NASA s Living With a Star program.1 This program seeks to understand the changing Sun and its effects on the Solar System, life, and society. To this end, the SDO spacecraft will carry three Sun-observing instruments to geosynchronous orbit: Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), led by Stanford University; Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), led by Lockheed Martin Space and Astrophysics Laboratory; and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE), led by the University of Colorado. Links describing the instruments in detail may be found through the SDO web site.2 The basic mission goals are to observe the Sun for a very high percentage of the 5-year mission (10-year goal) with long stretches of uninterrupted observations and with constant, high-data-rate transmission to a dedicated ground station. These goals guided the design of the spacecraft bus that will carry and service the three-instrument payload. At the time of this publication, the SDO spacecraft bus is well into the integration and testing phase at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). A three-axis stabilized attitude control system (ACS) is needed both to point at the Sun accurately and to keep the roll about the Sun vector correctly positioned. The ACS has four reaction wheel modes and 2 thruster actuated modes. More details about the ACS in general and the control modes in particular can be found in Refs. [3-6]. All four of SDO s wheel-actuated control modes involve Sun-pointing controllers, as might be expected from such a mission. Science mode, during which most science data is collected, uses specialized guide telescopes to point accurately at the Sun. Inertial mode has two sub-modes, one tracks a Sun-referenced target orientation, and another maintains an absolute (star-referenced) target orientation, that both employ a Kalman filter to process data from a digital Sun sensor and

  3. Automatic ground control point recognition with parallel associative memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Tahir, Raid; Toth, Charles K.; Schenck, Anton F.

    1990-01-01

    The basic principle of the associative memory is to match the unknown input pattern against a stored training set, and responding with the 'closest match' and the corresponding label. Generally, an associative memory system requires two preparatory steps: selecting attributes of the pattern class, and training the system by associating patterns with labels. Experimental results gained from using Parallel Associative Memory are presented. The primary concern is an automatic search for ground control points in aerial photographs. Synthetic patterns are tested followed by real data. The results are encouraging as a relatively high level of correct matches is reached.

  4. Automatic synthesis of quantum circuits for point addition on ordinary binary elliptic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budhathoki, Parshuram; Steinwandt, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    When designing quantum circuits for Shor's algorithm to solve the discrete logarithm problem, implementing the group arithmetic is a cost-critical task. We introduce a software tool for the automatic generation of addition circuits for ordinary binary elliptic curves, a prominent platform group for digital signatures. The resulting circuits reduce the number of -gates by a factor compared to the best previous construction, without increasing the number of qubits or -depth. The software also optimizes the (CNOT) depth for -linear operations by means of suitable graph colorings.

  5. Global shape estimates and GIS cartography of Io and Enceladus using new control point network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhdina, I.; Patraty, V.; Shishkina, L.; Zhukov, D.; Zubarev, A.; Karachevtseva, I.; Oberst, J.

    2012-04-01

    We have analyzed a total of 53 Galileo and Voyager images of Io and 54 Cassini images of Enceladus to derive new geodetic control point networks for the two satellites. In order to derive the network for Io we used a subset of 66 images from those used in previous control point network studies [1, 2]. Additionally we have carried out new point measurements. We used recently reconstructed Galileo spacecraft trajectory data, supplied by the spacecraft navigation team of JPL. A total of 1956 tie point measurements for Io and 4392 ones for Enceladus have been carried out, which were processed by performing photogrammetric bundle block adjustments. Measurements and block adjustments were performed by means of the «PHOTOMOD» software [3] which was especially adapted for this study to accommodate global networks of small bodies, such as Io and Enceladus. As a result, two catalogs with the Cartesian three-dimensional coordinates of 197 and 351 control points were obtained for Io and Enceladus, respectively. The control points for Io have a mean overall accuracy of 4985.7 m (RMS). The individual accuracy of the control points for Enceladus differ substantially over the surface (the range is from 0.1 to 36.0 km) because images lack coverage and resolutions. We also determine best-fit spheres, spheroids, and tri-axial ellipsoids. The centers of the models were found to be shifted from the coordinate system origin attesting to possible errors in the ephemeris of Io. Conclusion and Future work: A comparison of our results for Io with the most recent control point network analysis [2] has revealed that we managed to derive the same accuracy of the control points using a smaller number of images and measurements (This study: 1956 measurements, DLR study: 4392). This probably attests to the fact that the now available new navigation data are internally more consistent. At present an analysis of the data is in progress. We report that control point measurements and global network

  6. Accuracy assessment of minimum control points for UAV photography and georeferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarlatos, D.; Procopiou, E.; Stavrou, G.; Gregoriou, M.

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (AUAV) became popular among researchers across disciplines because they combine many advantages. One major application is monitoring and mapping. Their ability to fly beyond eye sight autonomously, collecting data over large areas whenever, wherever, makes them excellent platform for monitoring hazardous areas or disasters. In both cases rapid mapping is needed while human access isn't always a given. Indeed, current automatic processing of aerial photos using photogrammetry and computer vision algorithms allows for rapid orthophomap production and Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation, as tools for monitoring and damage assessment. In such cases, control point measurement using GPS is either impossible, or time consuming or costly. This work investigates accuracies that can be attained using few or none control points over areas of one square kilometer, in two test sites; a typical block and a corridor survey. On board GPS data logged during AUAV's flight are being used for direct georeferencing, while ground check points are being used for evaluation. In addition various control point layouts are being tested using bundle adjustment for accuracy evaluation. Results indicate that it is possible to use on board single frequency GPS for direct georeferencing in cases of disaster management or areas without easy access, or even over featureless areas. Due to large numbers of tie points in the bundle adjustment, horizontal accuracy can be fulfilled with a rather small number of control points, but vertical accuracy may not.

  7. The Galileo scan platform pointing control system - a modern control theoretic viewpoint.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevaston, G. E.; Macala, G. A.; Man, G. K.

    In this paper the authors review the current Galileo scan platform pointing control system, and discuss ways in which modern control concepts could contribute toward a better result. Moreover, the authors describe in detail a robust modern control system architecture and the associated design procedures.

  8. Pointing Control System Architecture for the Eclipse Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kia, Tooraj; Brugarolas, Paul B.; Alexander, James W.; Li, Diane G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the high performance pointing control system used to point the Eclipse telescope. Eclipse is a new mission under study at Jet Propulsion Laboratory for a proposal as a discovery mission. Eclipse is a space telescope for high-contrast optical astronomy. It will be used to investigate the planetary bodies and environments. The main objective of the Eclipse mission is to study planets around nearby stars. Eclipse is designed to reveal planets or dust structures by reducing the scattered and diffracted light within a few arcseconds of a star to a level three orders of magnitude lower than any instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Eclipse achieves this high contrast using a 1.8 meter diameter telescope, a coronagraphic system for control of diffracted light, and active wavefront correction using a Precision Deformable Mirror (DM) for the suppression of scattered light. The observatory will be launched into a Sun-synchronous 690 Km, 98.2(deg) Earth Orbit in 2012.

  9. Nonlinear Burn Control and Operating Point Optimization in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Mark; Schuster, Eugenio

    2013-10-01

    Control of the fusion power through regulation of the plasma density and temperature will be essential for achieving and maintaining desired operating points in fusion reactors and burning plasma experiments like ITER. In this work, a volume averaged model for the evolution of the density of energy, deuterium and tritium fuel ions, alpha-particles, and impurity ions is used to synthesize a multi-input multi-output nonlinear feedback controller for stabilizing and modulating the burn condition. Adaptive control techniques are used to account for uncertainty in model parameters, including particle confinement times and recycling rates. The control approach makes use of the different possible methods for altering the fusion power, including adjusting the temperature through auxiliary heating, modulating the density and isotopic mix through fueling, and altering the impurity density through impurity injection. Furthermore, a model-based optimization scheme is proposed to drive the system as close as possible to desired fusion power and temperature references. Constraints are considered in the optimization scheme to ensure that, for example, density and beta limits are avoided, and that optimal operation is achieved even when actuators reach saturation. Supported by the NSF CAREER award program (ECCS-0645086).

  10. Flight Performance of Skylab Attitude and Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.; Kennel, H. F.; Rupp, C. C.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    In 1967 a paper at the AIAA Guidance, Control and Flight Dynamics Conference in Huntsville, Ala. presented for the first time the prot)osed SKYLAB Attitude and Pointing Control System (APCS) The system requirements, Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) configuration, control philosophy, and operational modes were presented and the APCS described. The Initial mission and system design requirements changed during the period of time before the SKYLAB was launched. This paper will review the Initial and final APCS requirements and goals and their relationship. The actual flight mission (and Its alterations during the flight) and known achieved APCS performance will then be presented. SKYLAB was a tremendous success in furthering man's scientific knowledge; but perhaps SKYLAB will be remembered more for the anomalies and the efforts undertaken to solve them. On May 14, 1973, the unmanned SKYLAB Orbital Workshop (OWS) was launched from Cape Kennedy. Serious hardware failures began to occur during ascent through the atmosphere and their spectre continued to haunt both the astronauts and their ground based support team. Nor were these the only surprises affecting the design and operation of the APCS. Mission requirements for pointing to various stellar targets and to nadir for earth resources experiments were added after the hardware was designed. The chance appearance of comet Kohoutek during the SKYLAB operational life-time caused NASA to add comet observation to the mission requirements and to adjust the time when the third crew would man the SKYLAB. The development of new procedures and software for the opportunity to observe this visitor to our solar system is described.

  11. Pointing and spectral assignemnt design and control for MERTIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, I.; Säuberlich, T.; Lieder, M.; Rataj, M.; Driescher, H.; Helbert, J.; Hiesinger, H.

    2013-09-01

    The development of MERTIS, a miniaturized thermal infrared imaging spectrometer onboard of ESA's cornerstone mission BepiColombo to Mercury has been completed. Qualification of the design is followed by the calibration of the instrument showing up first results of the technology used. Based on subsequent viewing of different targets including on-board calibration sources the push-broom instrument will use a 2-dimensional bolometer detector to provide spatial and spectral information. Here repetition accuracy of pointing and spectral assignment is supported by the design of instrument components under the restriction of limited resources. Additionally a concept of verification after launch and cruise phase of the mission was developed. The article describes how this has been implemented and what the results under environment testing are.

  12. Multiple task point control of a redundant manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan; Lee, Jang M.

    1990-01-01

    The kinematic control of a redundant arm based on multiple tasks assigned to different locations of the manipulator is presented. This is equivalent to decomposing a redundant arm into two (or more) nonredundant local arms, the basearm and the forearm, at an intermediate arm location or task point called the elbow. A redundant arm is transformed into a serially cooperating dual-arm system, with the cooperation between the local arms being carried out at the elbow. Then, a manipulator end-effector motion specified by a given task is decomposed into motions of individual local arms as well as an end-effector free motion based on achieving maximum efficiency in task execution. To consider global optimization, elbow control is applied to reshaping and reorientation of a manipulability ellipsoid at the end effector during task execution. The resolved rate control of elbow in the end-effector null and free motion space is used to maximize arm homogeneity and to match the forearm motion space with the task space. Simulation results are shown.

  13. Sliding mode control of magnetic suspensions for precision pointing and tracking applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misovec, Kathleen M.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Johnson, Bruce G.; Hedrick, J. Karl

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed nonlinear control method, sliding mode control, is examined as a means of advancing the achievable performance of space-based precision pointing and tracking systems that use nonlinear magnetic actuators. Analytic results indicate that sliding mode control improves performance compared to linear control approaches. In order to realize these performance improvements, precise knowledge of the plant is required. Additionally, the interaction of an estimating scheme and the sliding mode controller has not been fully examined in the literature. Estimation schemes were designed for use with this sliding mode controller that do not seriously degrade system performance. The authors designed and built a laboratory testbed to determine the feasibility of utilizing sliding mode control in these types of applications. Using this testbed, experimental verification of the authors' analyses is ongoing.

  14. Developing control points for halal slaughtering of poultry.

    PubMed

    Shahdan, I A; Regenstein, J M; Shahabuddin, A S M; Rahman, M T

    2016-07-01

    Halal (permissible or lawful) poultry meat production must meet industry, economic, and production needs, and government health requirements without compromising the Islamic religious requirements derived from the Qur'an and the Hadiths (the actions and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him). Halal certification authorities may vary in their interpretation of these teachings, which leads to differences in halal slaughter requirements. The current study proposes 6 control points (CP) for halal poultry meat production based on the most commonly used halal production systems. CP 1 describes what is allowed and prohibited, such as blood and animal manure, and feed ingredients for halal poultry meat production. CP 2 describes the requirements for humane handling during lairage. CP 3 describes different methods for immobilizing poultry, when immobilization is used, such as water bath stunning. CP 4 describes the importance of intention, details of the halal slaughter, and the equipment permitted. CP 5 and CP 6 describe the requirements after the neck cut has been made such as the time needed before the carcasses can enter the scalding tank, and the potential for meat adulteration with fecal residues and blood. It is important to note that the proposed halal CP program is presented as a starting point for any individual halal certifying body to improve its practices. PMID:26994198

  15. End point control of an actinide precipitation reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Muske, K.R.; Palmer, M.J.

    1997-10-01

    The actinide precipitation reactors in the nuclear materials processing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used to remove actinides and other heavy metals from the effluent streams generated during the purification of plutonium. These effluent streams consist of hydrochloric acid solutions, ranging from one to five molar in concentration, in which actinides and other metals are dissolved. The actinides present are plutonium and americium. Typical actinide loadings range from one to five grams per liter. The most prevalent heavy metals are iron, chromium, and nickel that are due to stainless steel. Removal of these metals from solution is accomplished by hydroxide precipitation during the neutralization of the effluent. An end point control algorithm for the semi-batch actinide precipitation reactors at Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. The algorithm is based on an equilibrium solubility model of the chemical species in solution. This model is used to predict the amount of base hydroxide necessary to reach the end point of the actinide precipitation reaction. The model parameters are updated by on-line pH measurements.

  16. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of chromium(VI) and iron (III) by H-point standard addition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionova, E. V.; Bulygina, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    In this work the possibility of simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of chromium (VI) and iron (III) in alloys with help of the mixed organic reagent (diphenylcarbazide and 1,10-phenanthroline) is studied. We have applied H-point standard addition method to determine concentrations of chromium (VI) and iron (III) from the mixture. The pure signals of complexes of chromium (VI) with diphenylcarbazide and iron (III) with the 1,10-phenanthroline and their calibration plots are previously carried out. We established the possibility of simultaneous determination of chromium (VI) and iron (III) in the different concentration ranges by H-point standard addition method. Correctness of determination of concentration by means of the offered technique is proved by "added-found" method for a series of mixtures with different ratios of concentration of chromium (VI) and iron (III). It is founded that the error of determination of concentration doesn't exceed 33%.

  17. The Galileo scan platform pointing control system - A modern control theoretic viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevaston, G. E.; Macala, G. A.; Man, G. K.

    The current Galileo scan platform pointing control system (SPPCS) is described, and ways in which modern control concepts could serve to enhance it are considered. Of particular interest are: the multi-variable design model and overall control system architecture, command input filtering, feedback compensator and command input design, stability robustness constraint for both continuous time control systems and for sampled data control systems, and digital implementation of the control system. The proposed approach leads to the design of a system that is similar to current Galileo SPPCS configuration, but promises to be more systematic.

  18. Performance of supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle with additive gases at varying critical points for SFR application

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, W. S.; Jeong, Y. H.

    2012-07-01

    The supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle (S-CO{sub 2} cycle) has received attention as alternative to the energy conversion system for a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). The high cycle efficiency of S-CO{sub 2} cycle is attributed to significantly reduced compressor work. This is because the compressor operates like a pump in the vicinity of CO{sub 2} critical point. To make use of this feature, the minimum cycle operating range of S-CO{sub 2} cycle, which is the main compressor inlet condition, should be located close to the critical point of CO{sub 2}. This translated into that the critical point of CO{sub 2} is the limitation of the lowest cycle condition of S-CO{sub 2} cycles. To increase the flexibility and broaden the applicability of the cycle, changing the critical point of CO{sub 2} by mixing additive gases could be adopted. An increase in the efficiency of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle could be achieved by decreasing critical point of CO{sub 2}. In addition, increasing critical point of CO{sub 2} could be utilized to obtain improved cycle performances at ascending heat sink temperature of hot arid areas. Due to the rapid fluctuations of thermo-physical properties of gas mixtures near the critical point, an in-house cycle analysis code coupled to NIST property database was developed. Several gases were selected as potential additives through the screening process for thermal stability and chemical interaction with sodium. By using the developed cycle code, optimized cycles of each gas mixture were compared with the reference case of S-CO{sub 2} cycle. For decreased critical temperatures, CO{sub 2}-Xe and CO{sub 2}-Kr showed an increase in the total cycle efficiency. At increasing critical temperatures, the performance of CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}-cyclohexane is superior to S-CO{sub 2}cycle when the compressor inlet temperature is above the critical temperature of CO{sub 2}. (authors)

  19. Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, E.D. Jr.; Christiansen, R.L.; Lederhos, J.P.; Long, J.P.; Panchalingam, V.; Du, Y.; Sum, A.K.W.

    1997-06-17

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hindrance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

  20. Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, Jr., Earle Dendy; Christiansen, Richard Lee; Lederhos, Joseph P.; Long, Jin Ping; Panchalingam, Vaithilingam; Du, Yahe; Sum, Amadeu Kun Wan

    1997-01-01

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hinderance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

  1. Improving efficiency and color purity of poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) through addition of a high boiling-point solvent of 1-chloronaphthalene.

    PubMed

    Liang, Junfei; Yu, Lei; Sen Zhao; Ying, Lei; Liu, Feng; Yang, Wei; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong

    2016-07-15

    In this work, the β-phase of poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) was used as a probe to study the effects of the addition of a high boiling-point solvent of 1-chloronaphthalene on the nanostructures and electroluminescence of PFO films. Both absorption and photoluminescence spectra showed that the content of the β-phase in PFO film was obviously enhanced as a result of the addition of a small amount of 1-chloronaphthalene into the processing solvent of p-xylenes. Apparently rougher morphology associated with the effectively enhanced ordering of polymer chains across the entire film was observed for films processed from p-xylene solutions consisting of a certain amount of 1-chloronaphthalene, as revealed by atomic force microscopy and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements. In addition to the effects on the nanostructures of films, of particular interest is that the performance and color purity of polymer light-emitting devices can be noticeably enhanced upon the addition of 1-chloronaphthalene. These observations highlight the importance of controlling the nanostructures of the emissive layer, and demonstrate that the addition of a low volume ratio of high boiling-point additive can be a promising strategy to attain high-performance polymer light-emitting diodes. PMID:27250786

  2. Improving efficiency and color purity of poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) through addition of a high boiling-point solvent of 1-chloronaphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Junfei; Yu, Lei; Zhao, Sen; Ying, Lei; Liu, Feng; Yang, Wei; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the β-phase of poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) was used as a probe to study the effects of the addition of a high boiling-point solvent of 1-chloronaphthalene on the nanostructures and electroluminescence of PFO films. Both absorption and photoluminescence spectra showed that the content of the β-phase in PFO film was obviously enhanced as a result of the addition of a small amount of 1-chloronaphthalene into the processing solvent of p-xylenes. Apparently rougher morphology associated with the effectively enhanced ordering of polymer chains across the entire film was observed for films processed from p-xylene solutions consisting of a certain amount of 1-chloronaphthalene, as revealed by atomic force microscopy and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements. In addition to the effects on the nanostructures of films, of particular interest is that the performance and color purity of polymer light-emitting devices can be noticeably enhanced upon the addition of 1-chloronaphthalene. These observations highlight the importance of controlling the nanostructures of the emissive layer, and demonstrate that the addition of a low volume ratio of high boiling-point additive can be a promising strategy to attain high-performance polymer light-emitting diodes.

  3. Microstructure-controllable Laser Additive Manufacturing Process for Metal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Chuang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Chih; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, De-Yau; Liu, Sung-Ho; Tseng, Wen-Peng; Horng, Ji-Bin

    Controlling the cooling rate of alloy during solidification is the most commonly used method for varying the material microstructure. However, the cooling rate of selective laser melting (SLM) production is constrained by the optimal parameter settings for a dense product. This study proposes a method for forming metal products via the SLM process with electromagnetic vibrations. The electromagnetic vibrations change the solidification process for a given set of SLM parameters, allowing the microstructure to be varied via magnetic flux density. This proposed method can be used for creating microstructure-controllable bio-implant products with complex shapes.

  4. Future path and tangent point models in the visual control of locomotion in curve driving.

    PubMed

    Lappi, Otto

    2014-01-01

    Studying human behavior in the natural context of everyday visual tasks--including locomotor tasks such as driving--can reveal visual strategies or even suggest underlying visual mechanisms. This paper reviews empirical and theoretical work in the past 20 years (1994-2014) on the visual control of steering a vehicle along a winding path-one of the most comprehensively studied forms of visually guided locomotion in humans. The focus is on on-road studies of visual behavior and what they can reveal about the visual strategies in curve driving. Theoretical models and results from simulator studies are discussed where they have direct relevance to the interpretation of on-road data. For the past 20 years, the point of departure in studies of curve driving has been tangent point orientation, and tangent point models (models based on tracking the tangent point) have become established as the default account of how vision is used in curve negotiation. More recent studies have questioned the generality of the tangent point hypothesis, however, arguing that in addition to (or instead of) the tangent point, drivers target visual reference points on their future path. Ecological validity of real-world studies often comes at the cost of methodological challenges that make the data difficult to interpret in terms of underlying mechanisms, and the limitations of existing data and the complementary roles of real-world and laboratory studies are discussed. PMID:25761280

  5. Phase-lock roll control of inertially pointing spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crerie, Jeffrey Roger

    The spacecraft which houses the Stanford Relativity Gyroscope Experiment (GP-B) is designed to roll with a 10 minute period about its pointing axis. A precise measurement of roll phase is needed to demodulate the two relativity effects being measured by GP-B. Optimally, the spacecraft will be flown with no rotating machinery on board, so it is desired to control roll without the use of conventional rate gyros. A new technique has been devised to achieve highly accurate roll control without a rate gyro. This is done by employing one or more slit star sensors which rotate with the spacecraft, and correlate their output with a known reference to produce a measurement of roll offset. The technique developed to control roll phase and rate mimics those used in pseudorandom noise telecommunication. The algorithm regards the intensity pattern of the surrounding star field as pseudorandom noise which repeats every 360 degrees, and sets up a 'phase-locked' loop to align the pattern with a stored reference pattern. Single-axis simulations confirm that such a device, combined with a steady-state Kalman estimator, can control roll position to an accuracy of 20 arcsec RMS, and roll rate to an accuracy of 0.92 arcsec/sec RMS, even when the star sensor output and reference values are encoded with one bit and disturbance torques are very large. A hardware simulation was useful in demonstrating the capabilities of this simple, low-cost system and in determining the noise characteristics of the combined sensor and electronics. A laboratory-based hardware simulation was achieved by modeling the intensities of stars located within the relevant band on a NeXT graphics monitor and then animating this image at a rate governed by the plant dynamics model. This 'scrolling star field' is imaged onto a high-speed, high-sensitivity photodiode whose output undergoes a one-bit discretization before correlation with the stored reference. The correlation scheme, subsequent filtering, and updates

  6. Fluid loss control additives for oil well cementing compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Crema, S.C.; Kucera, C.H.; Konrad, G.; Hartmann, H.

    1993-07-20

    A cementing composition is described useful in cementing oil, gas and water wells comprising: (a) water; (b) hydraulic cement; and (c) a fluid loss additive in an amount effective to reduce fluid loss, to below 100 cc/30 min said fluid loss additive comprised of a blend of (i) a copolymer of acrylamide and vinyl imidazole, in a weight percent ratio of from about 95:5 to 5:95, acryamide to vinyl imidazole said copolymer having a molecular weight range of from about 10,000 to 3,000,000, and (ii) a copolymer of vinyl pyrrolidone and sodium salt of sulfonate in a weight percent ratio of 80:20 to 20:80; the ratio of copolymer (i) to copolymer (ii) being in the range of 20:80 to 80:20.

  7. Direct laser additive fabrication system with image feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Michelle L.; Hofmeister, William H.; Knorovsky, Gerald A.; MacCallum, Danny O.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Smugeresky, John E.

    2002-01-01

    A closed-loop, feedback-controlled direct laser fabrication system is disclosed. The feedback refers to the actual growth conditions obtained by real-time analysis of thermal radiation images. The resulting system can fabricate components with severalfold improvement in dimensional tolerances and surface finish.

  8. Fouling control in seawater by on-line acid addition

    SciTech Connect

    Salvago, G.; Taccani, G.; Polimeni, R.; Fumagalli, G.; Picenoni, D.

    1996-11-01

    An experimental plant was set up containing once-through test lines supplied with seawater. The pH level of the seawater was maintained at 6.3 by the acids addition. Heat exchange monitoring equipment and channels exposing different metal specimens were installed on each of the lines. Observation by microscope and EDS analyses were carried out both on the specimen surfaces and on the cross section of the fouling after fracturing in liquid N{sub 2}. The results obtained show that: fouling must not be confused with its effects or simply with its biological components; acidifying seawater can prevent the resistance to heat exchange from increasing without impeding its biological activity. Observation by microscope of the fouling cross sections showed that in untreated seawater the foulings on stainless steel were composed of a continuous compact layer, covered by disorderly clusters. These compact layers were found to contain high quantities of corrosion products of the metals. Elements typical of corrosion products of ferrous materials (Fe, Mn) were also found on Pt, copper alloys and plastic materials. The addition of HCl or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to the seawater, to bring it to pH 6.3, reduces the amount of fouling adhering to the surfaces, prevents the development of the continuous layer containing iron and prevents significant increases in heat exchange resistance. The addition of CO{sub 2} can encourage the development of incoherent fibrous material with high Si content and low Fe content which is of little impediment to heat exchange. The addition of lactic acid can encourage both the abnormal development of biomass and the formation of several, separate, layers on stainless steel surfaces.

  9. Rapid microbiological methods with hazard analysis critical control point.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, M W

    1997-01-01

    The proactive approach to ensuring food safety termed hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) was introduced in the 1960s by the Pillsbury Company, in collaboration with the U.S. Army Natick Laboratories and National Aeronautics and Space Administration, to help guarantee that astronauts would not be incapacitated by the trauma of foodborne illness during space flights. The approach has subsequently been adopted as the standard food safety management system world-wide and is seen as forming the basis for harmonization of food inspection regulations necessitated by trade agreements such as General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and North American Free Trade Agreement as the move toward globalization of trade in food products gains momentum. The new U.S. Department of Agriculture Mega-Reg requires mandatory introduction of HACCP, and the Food Safety Enhancement Program of Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, as well as the "due diligence" legislation of the European Union, is centered on HACCP principles. PMID:9419852

  10. Compensation for matrix effects in gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a single point standard addition.

    PubMed

    Garrido Frenich, Antonia; Martínez Vidal, José Luis; Fernández Moreno, José Luis; Romero-González, R

    2009-06-01

    One of the major problems in quantitative analysis of pesticide residues in food samples by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) is the enhancement or the suppression, of the target analyte signals in matrix extracts. Potentially positive samples, which had previously been identified by a rapid screening method, were quantified using standard addition to compensate matrix effects. As example we performed a systematic study on the application of the standard addition calibration (SAC) method for the determination of 12 pesticides (acephate, bromopropylate, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, diazinon, etrimfos, heptenophos, iprodione, methamidophos, procymidone, tetradifon, and triadimefon) in two matrices (cucumber and orange) in the range of initial concentrations of 10-200 microg kg(-1). The influence of some factors, such as the minimum number of standard additions used (single, two, three or four points calibration), as well as the known amount of analyte added to the sample, is evaluated in order to obtain reliable results. Accurate quantification is achieved when a single point SAC at 200 microg kg(-1) was used, obtaining for all the cases recoveries between 70 and 120%. The proposed analytical approach only needs two injections per sample (blank and spiked extracted sample) to determine the final concentration of pesticide in positive samples. PMID:19406413

  11. Chaos control in a chaotic system with only one stable equilibrium point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarino, Arturo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Pham, Thanh Viet

    2012-09-01

    The recent finding on the effect of a small bias in Sprott-like systems, i.e., the stabilization of the unstable equilibrium point through the addition of a small bias [1], paves the way to efficient methods for chaos control in such systems. In this work, we investigate the control of one of such systems both in the ideal case of absence of noise and in the presence of noise. We then propose an experimental setup for the experimental verification of the introduced method.

  12. Analysis of hygienic critical control points in boar semen production.

    PubMed

    Schulze, M; Ammon, C; Rüdiger, K; Jung, M; Grobbel, M

    2015-02-01

    The present study addresses the microbiological results of a quality control audit in artificial insemination (AI) boar studs in Germany and Austria. The raw and processed semen of 344 boars in 24 AI boar studs were analyzed. Bacteria were found in 26% (88 of 344) of the extended ejaculates and 66.7% (18 of 24) of the boar studs. The bacterial species found in the AI dose were not cultured from the respective raw semen in 95.5% (84 of 88) of the positive samples. These data, together with the fact that in most cases all the samples from one stud were contaminated with identical bacteria (species and resistance profile), indicate contamination during processing. Microbiological investigations of the equipment and the laboratory environment during semen processing in 21 AI boar studs revealed nine hygienic critical control points (HCCP), which were addressed after the first audit. On the basis of the analysis of the contamination rates of the ejaculate samples, improvements in the hygiene status were already present in the second audit (P = 0.0343, F-test). Significant differences were observed for heating cabinets (improvement, P = 0.0388) and manual operating elements (improvement, P = 0.0002). The odds ratio of finding contaminated ejaculates in the first and second audit was 1.68 (with the 95% confidence interval ranging from 1.04 to 2.69). Furthermore, an overall good hygienic status was shown for extenders, the inner face of dilution tank lids, dyes, and ultrapure water treatment plants. Among the nine HCCP considered, the most heavily contaminated samples, as assessed by the median scores throughout all the studs, were found in the sinks and/or drains. High numbers (>10(3) colony-forming units/cm(2)) of bacteria were found in the heating cabinets, ejaculate transfer, manual operating elements, and laboratory surfaces. In conclusion, the present study emphasizes the need for both training of the laboratory staff in monitoring HCCP in routine semen

  13. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control

    PubMed Central

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part’s porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented. PMID:26601041

  14. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    PubMed

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented. PMID:26601041

  15. Structural/control interaction (payload pointing and micro-g)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    A 203rd order simulation model was developed to evaluate the space station customer accommodation payload pointing and micro-g requirements. The simulation shows the pointing errors on the telescope are significantly smaller than at the base of the telescope. The pointing results could change when the parametric studies are performed. The results show the micro-g requirement is met with an active isolation system.

  16. Part height control of laser metal additive manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu-Herng

    Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) has been used to not only make but also repair damaged parts in a layer-by-layer fashion. Parts made in this manner may produce less waste than those made through conventional machining processes. However, a common issue of LMD involves controlling the deposition's layer thickness. Accuracy is important, and as it increases, both the time required to produce the part and the material wasted during the material removal process (e.g., milling, lathe) decrease. The deposition rate is affected by multiple parameters, such as the powder feed rate, laser input power, axis feed rate, material type, and part design, the values of each of which may change during the LMD process. Using a mathematical model to build a generic equation that predicts the deposition's layer thickness is difficult due to these complex parameters. In this thesis, we propose a simple method that utilizes a single device. This device uses a pyrometer to monitor the current build height, thereby allowing the layer thickness to be controlled during the LMD process. This method also helps the LMD system to build parts even with complex parameters and to increase material efficiency.

  17. Reconstructing 3D coastal cliffs from airborne oblique photographs without ground control points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewez, T. J. B.

    2014-05-01

    Coastal cliff collapse hazard assessment requires measuring cliff face topography at regular intervals. Terrestrial laser scanner techniques have proven useful so far but are expensive to use either through purchasing the equipment or through survey subcontracting. In addition, terrestrial laser surveys take time which is sometimes incompatible with the time during with the beach is accessible at low-tide. By comparison, structure from motion techniques (SFM) are much less costly to implement, and if airborne, acquisition of several kilometers of coastline can be done in a matter of minutes. In this paper, the potential of GPS-tagged oblique airborne photographs and SFM techniques is examined to reconstruct chalk cliff dense 3D point clouds without Ground Control Points (GCP). The focus is put on comparing the relative 3D point of views reconstructed by Visual SFM with their synchronous Solmeta Geotagger Pro2 GPS locations using robust estimators. With a set of 568 oblique photos, shot from the open door of an airplane with a triplet of synchronized Nikon D7000, GPS and SFM-determined view point coordinates converge to X: ±31.5 m; Y: ±39.7 m; Z: ±13.0 m (LE66). Uncertainty in GPS position affects the model scale, angular attitude of the reference frame (the shoreline ends up tilted by 2°) and absolute positioning. Ground Control Points cannot be avoided to orient such models.

  18. Effects of reduced pressure and additives on streamers in white oil in long point-plane gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dung, N. V.; Høidalen, H. K.; Linhjell, D.; Lundgaard, L. E.; Unge, M.

    2013-06-01

    Recent experiments show that modern dielectric liquids behave differently from traditional mineral oil, particularly with respect to breakdown voltages for lightning impulse. This paper describes an experimental investigation addressing underlying reasons for this. The influences of reduced pressure and additives on streamers in white oil were investigated under both positive and negative polarities using an 8 cm long point-plane gap. Reduced pressure significantly accelerates streamers, thus increasing stopping length and reducing both breakdown and acceleration voltages. With increasing applied voltage, different typical propagation modes of streamers were recorded for both polarities. A low ionization potential additive strongly affects positive streamers. It significantly changes streamer velocity and reduces the breakdown voltage but increases the acceleration voltage where breakdown streamer velocity increases drastically. Adding an electron scavenger influences streamers of both polarities, but it mainly increases the velocity of negative streamers and results in a reduction of both the breakdown and the acceleration voltages. The propagation mechanisms of streamers are also discussed.

  19. Condensate kicks pose additional problems for deep well control

    SciTech Connect

    Szczepanski, R.; Edmonds, B.; Yerlett, T.K.; Brown, N.P.; Hamilton, T.A.P.

    1996-06-17

    Modeling condensate and gas kicks in a deep North Sea well helps drillers understand what to expect after prompt kick detection in a straight-forward kick circulation program with competent choke handling. Concerns have been raised in the industry that as a condensate kick is taken and subsequently circulated out of the well, unexpected surface indications may be present. Blowouts, resulting from uncontrolled kicks, could be particularly hazardous for condensate fields as these are often high-pressure, high-temperature operations. A deeper understanding of the differences, and similarities, between gas and condensate kicks has resulted from an investigation by Infochem Computer Services Ltd., funded by the UK Health and Safety Executive (HSE). This study has led to an assessment of the practical significance of any differences for the personnel involved in well control.

  20. Two-point one-dimensional δ-{\\delta }^{\\prime } interactions: non-abelian addition law and decoupling limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadella, M.; Mateos-Guilarte, J.; Muñoz-Castañeda, J. M.; Nieto, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution to the study of one-dimensional point potentials, we prove that if we take the limit q\\to 0 on a potential of the type {v}0δ (y)+2{v}1{δ }\\prime (y)+{w}0δ (y-q)+2{w}1{δ }\\prime (y-q), we obtain a new point potential of the type {u}0δ (y)+2{u}1{δ }\\prime (y), when u 0 and u 1 are related to v 0, v 1, w 0 and w 1 by a law with the structure of a group. This is the Borel subgroup of {{SL}}2({{R}}). We also obtain the non-abelian addition law from the scattering data. The spectra of the Hamiltonian in the decoupling cases emerging in the study are also described in full. It is shown that for the {v}1=+/- 1, {w}1=+/- 1 values of the {δ }\\prime couplings the singular Kurasov matrices become equivalent to Dirichlet at one side of the point interaction and Robin boundary conditions at the other side.

  1. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    This project studies the rheology and airblast atomization of micronized coal slurries. Its major objectives are (1) to promote further understanding of the mechanisms and the roles of additives in airblast atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), and (2) to investigate the impacts of coal particle surface properties and interparticle forces on CWS rheology. We have found that the flow behavior index (n) of a suspension (or slurry) is determined by the relative importance of the interparticle van der Waals attraction and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The interparticle attraction, measured by the Hamaker constant scaled to the thermal energy at 25[degrees]C (A/kT), causes particle aggregation, which breaks down at high shear rates, and thus leads to slurry pseudoplastic behavior (n< 1). At a constant particle volume fraction and surface charge density (qualitatively measured by the zeta potential in deionized water), n decreases linearly as A/kT increases. The relative viscosity of the pseudoplastic suspension with respect to that of the suspending liquid is found to be independent of particle density and correlate well with the particle Peclet number which equals the particle diffusional relaxation time multiplied by shear rate. Specifically, the relative viscosities of the pseudoplastic glycerol/water coal slurry and the ethylene glycol/glycerol sand slurry, at same volume fractions as well as similar particle size distributions and liquid viscosities, as functions of the particle Peclet number fall along the same line.

  2. 21 CFR 120.8 - Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT (HACCP) SYSTEMS General Provisions § 120.8 Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan. (a) HACCP plan....

  3. Regiodivergent Addition of Phenols to Allylic Oxides: Control of 1,2 and 1,4-Additions for Cyclitol Synthesis**

    PubMed Central

    Moschitto, Matthew J.; Vaccarello, David N.; Lewis, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Control of 1,2- and 1,4-addition of substituted phenols to allylic oxides is achieved by intercepting palladium π-allyl complexes. The interconversion of palladium complexes results in the total synthesis of MK7607, cyathiformine B type, streptol, and a new cyclitol. PMID:25533617

  4. 47 CFR 90.471 - Points of operation in internal transmitter control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Transmitter Control Internal Transmitter Control Systems § 90.471 Points of operation in internal transmitter control systems. The... licensee for internal communications and transmitter control purposes. Operating positions in...

  5. A concatenated coded modulation scheme for error control (addition 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu

    1988-01-01

    A concatenated coded modulation scheme for error control in data communications is described. The scheme is achieved by concatenating a Reed-Solomon outer code and a bandwidth efficient block inner code for M-ary PSK modulation. Error performance of the scheme is analyzed for an AWGN channel. It is shown that extremely high reliability can be attained by using a simple M-ary PSK modulation inner code and a relatively powerful Reed-Solomon outer code. Furthermore, if an inner code of high effective rate is used, the bandwidth expansion required by the scheme due to coding will be greatly reduced. The proposed scheme is particularly effective for high-speed satellite communications for large file transfer where high reliability is required. This paper also presents a simple method for constructing block codes for M-ary PSK modulation. Some short M-ary PSK codes with good minimum squared Euclidean distance are constructed. These codes have trellis structure and hence can be decoded with a soft-decision Viterbi decoding algorithm. Furthermore, some of these codes are phase invariant under multiples of 45 deg rotation.

  6. Instrument Pointing Control System for the Stellar Interferometry Mission - Planet Quest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul B.; Kang, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the high precision Instrument Pointing Control System (PCS) for the Stellar Interferometry Mission (SIM) - Planet Quest. The PCS system provides front-end pointing, compensation for spacecraft motion, and feedforward stabilization, which are needed for proper interference. Optical interferometric measurements require very precise pointing (0.03 as, 1-(sigma) radial) for maximizing the interference pattern visibility. This requirement is achieved by fine pointing control of articulating pointing mirrors with feedback from angle tracking cameras. The overall pointing system design concept is presentcd. Functional requirements and an acquisition concept are given. Guide and Science pointing control loops are discussed. Simulation analyses demonstrate the feasibility of the design.

  7. Implementation of a near-optimal global set point control method in a DDC controller

    SciTech Connect

    Cascia, M.A.

    2000-07-01

    A near-optimal global set point control method that can be implemented in an energy management system's (EMS) DDC controller is described in this paper. Mathematical models are presented for the power consumption of electric chillers, hot water boilers, chilled and hot water pumps, and air handler fans, which allow the calculation of near-optimal chilled water, hot water, and coil discharge air set points to minimize power consumption, based on data collected by the EMS. Also optimized are the differential and static pressure set points for the variable speed pumps and fans. A pilot test of this control methodology was implemented for a cooling plant at a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility near Dallas, Texas. Data collected at this site showed good agreement between the actual power consumed by the chillers, chilled water pumps, and air handlers and that predicted by the models. An approximate model was developed to calculate real-time power savings in the DDC controller. A third-party energy accounting program was used to track savings due to the near-optimal control, and results show a monthly KWH reduction ranging from 3% to 14%.

  8. Effective variable switching point predictive current control for ac low-voltage drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolze, Peter; Karamanakos, Petros; Kennel, Ralph; Manias, Stefanos; Endisch, Christian

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an effective model predictive current control scheme for induction machines driven by a three-level neutral point clamped inverter, called variable switching point predictive current control. Despite the fact that direct, enumeration-based model predictive control (MPC) strategies are very popular in the field of power electronics due to their numerous advantages such as design simplicity and straightforward implementation procedure, they carry two major drawbacks. These are the increased computational effort and the high ripples on the controlled variables, resulting in a limited applicability of such methods. The high ripples occur because in direct MPC algorithms the actuating variable can only be changed at the beginning of a sampling interval. A possible remedy for this would be to change the applied control input within the sampling interval, and thus to apply it for a shorter time than one sample. However, since such a solution would lead to an additional overhead which is crucial especially for multilevel inverters, a heuristic preselection of the optimal control action is adopted to keep the computational complexity at bay. Experimental results are provided to verify the potential advantages of the proposed strategy.

  9. Expressed breast milk on a neonatal unit: a hazard analysis and critical control points approach.

    PubMed

    Cossey, Veerle; Jeurissen, Axel; Thelissen, Marie-José; Vanhole, Chris; Schuermans, Annette

    2011-12-01

    With the increasing use of human milk and growing evidence of the benefits of mother's milk for preterm and ill newborns, guidelines to ensure its quality and safety are an important part of daily practice in neonatal intensive care units. Operating procedures based on hazard analysis and critical control points can standardize the handling of mother's expressed milk, thereby improving nutrition and minimizing the risk of breast milk-induced infection in susceptible newborns. Because breast milk is not sterile, microorganisms can multiply when the milk is not handled properly. Additional exogenous contamination should be prevented. Strict hygiene and careful temperature and time control are important during the expression, collection, transport, storage, and feeding of maternal milk. In contrast to formula milk, no legal standards exist for the use of expressed maternal milk. The need for additional measures, such as bacteriological screening or heat treatment, remains unresolved. PMID:21640434

  10. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly accomplished by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. Using this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within +/- 0.5K. However, because of the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP has been carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor is placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir is cold-biased and is heated by a control heater. Tests results show that it is feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. Using this method, the heat source temperature can be maintained within a tight range for moderate and high powers. At low powers, however, temperature oscillations may occur due to interactions among the reservoir control heater power, the heat source mass, and the heat output from the heat source. In addition, the heat source temperature could temporarily deviate from its set point during fast thermal transients. The implication is that more sophisticated feedback control algorithms need to be implemented for LHP transient operation when the heat source temperature is used for feedback control.

  11. Formation Flying With Decentralized Control in Libration Point Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Carpenter, J. Russell; Wagner, Christoph

    2000-01-01

    A decentralized control framework is investigated for applicability of formation flying control in libration orbits. The decentralized approach, being non-hierarchical, processes only direct measurement data, in parallel with the other spacecraft. Control is accomplished via linearization about a reference libration orbit with standard control using a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) or the GSFC control algorithm. Both are linearized about the current state estimate as with the extended Kalman filter. Based on this preliminary work, the decentralized approach appears to be feasible for upcoming libration missions using distributed spacecraft.

  12. 49 CFR 236.303 - Control circuits for signals, selection through circuit controller operated by switch points or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-point frogs and derails shall be selected through circuit controller operated directly by switch points... switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the routes governed by such signal. Circuits shall be arranged... when each switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the route is in proper position....

  13. 49 CFR 236.303 - Control circuits for signals, selection through circuit controller operated by switch points or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-point frogs and derails shall be selected through circuit controller operated directly by switch points... switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the routes governed by such signal. Circuits shall be arranged... when each switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the route is in proper position....

  14. 49 CFR 236.303 - Control circuits for signals, selection through circuit controller operated by switch points or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-point frogs and derails shall be selected through circuit controller operated directly by switch points... switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the routes governed by such signal. Circuits shall be arranged... when each switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the route is in proper position....

  15. 49 CFR 236.303 - Control circuits for signals, selection through circuit controller operated by switch points or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-point frogs and derails shall be selected through circuit controller operated directly by switch points... switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the routes governed by such signal. Circuits shall be arranged... when each switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the route is in proper position....

  16. 49 CFR 236.303 - Control circuits for signals, selection through circuit controller operated by switch points or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-point frogs and derails shall be selected through circuit controller operated directly by switch points... switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the routes governed by such signal. Circuits shall be arranged... when each switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the route is in proper position....

  17. Maximum Power Point tracking charge controllers for telecom applications -- Analysis and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, R.H.

    1997-12-31

    Simple charge controllers connect photovoltaic modules directly to the battery bank resulting in a significant power loss if the battery bank voltage differs greatly from the PV Maximum Power Point (MPP) voltage. Recent modeling work at AES has shown that dc-dc converter type MPP tracking charge controllers can deliver more than 30% more energy from PV modules to the battery when the PV modules are cool and the battery state of charge is low--this is typically both the worst case condition (i.e., winter) and also the design condition that determines the PV array size. Economic modeling, based on typical telecom system installed costs shows benefits of more than $3/Wp for MPPT over conventional charge controllers in this application--a value that greatly exceeds the additional cost of the dc-dc converter.

  18. Pointing and control system design study for the space infrared telescope facility (SIRTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorell, K. R.; Aubrun, J. N.; Sridhar, B.; Cochran, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The design and performance of pointing and control systems for two space infrared telescope facility vehicles were examined. The need for active compensation of image jitter using the secondary mirror or other optical elements was determined. In addition, a control system to allow the telescope to perform small angle slews, and to accomplish large angle slews at the rate of 15 deg per minute was designed. Both the 98 deg and the 28 deg inclination orbits were examined, and spacecraft designs were developed for each. The results indicate that active optical compensation of line-of-sight errors is not necessary if the system is allowed to settle for roughly ten seconds after a slew maneuver. The results are contingent on the assumption of rigid body dynamics, and a single structural mode between spacecraft and telescope. Helium slosh for a half full 4000 liter tank was analyzed, and did not represent a major control problem.

  19. Anatomy of an experimental two-link flexible manipulator under end-point control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakley, Celia M.; Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The design and experimental implementation of an end-point controller for two-link flexible manipulators are presented. The end-point controller is based on linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) theory and is shown to exhibit significant improvements in trajectory tracking over a conventional controller design. To understand the behavior of the manipulator structure under end-point control, a strobe sequence illustrating the link deflections during a typical slew maneuver is included.

  20. Hierarchical random additive process and logarithmic scaling of generalized high order, two-point correlations in turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. I. A.; Marusic, I.; Meneveau, C.

    2016-06-01

    Townsend [Townsend, The Structure of Turbulent Shear Flow (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 1976)] hypothesized that the logarithmic region in high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded flows consists of space-filling, self-similar attached eddies. Invoking this hypothesis, we express streamwise velocity fluctuations in the inertial layer in high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded flows as a hierarchical random additive process (HRAP): uz+=∑i=1Nzai . Here u is the streamwise velocity fluctuation, + indicates normalization in wall units, z is the wall normal distance, and ai's are independently, identically distributed random additives, each of which is associated with an attached eddy in the wall-attached hierarchy. The number of random additives is Nz˜ln(δ /z ) where δ is the boundary layer thickness and ln is natural log. Due to its simplified structure, such a process leads to predictions of the scaling behaviors for various turbulence statistics in the logarithmic layer. Besides reproducing known logarithmic scaling of moments, structure functions, and correlation function [" close="]3/2 uz(x ) uz(x +r ) >, new logarithmic laws in two-point statistics such as uz4(x ) > 1 /2, 1/3, etc. can be derived using the HRAP formalism. Supporting empirical evidence for the logarithmic scaling in such statistics is found from the Melbourne High Reynolds Number Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel measurements. We also show that, at high Reynolds numbers, the above mentioned new logarithmic laws can be derived by assuming the arrival of an attached eddy at a generic point in the flow field to be a Poisson process [Woodcock and Marusic, Phys. Fluids 27, 015104 (2015), 10.1063/1.4905301]. Taken together, the results provide new evidence supporting the essential ingredients of the attached eddy hypothesis to describe streamwise velocity fluctuations of large, momentum transporting eddies in wall-bounded turbulence, while

  1. Metrology sensor characterization and pointing control for the Formation Interferometer Testbed (FIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, J.; Sirlin, S.; Wette, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the metrology pointing sensor of the Starlight ground instrument prototype is characterized and a siderostat pointing control loop is closed between two optical benches with a 10 meter separation.

  2. a Libration Model for Enceladus Based on Geodetic Control Point Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhdina, I. E.; Zubarev, A. E.; Brusnikin, E. S.; Oberst, J.

    2016-06-01

    A new global control point network was derived for Enceladus, based on Cassini and Voyager-2 image data. Cassini images were taken from 2005 to 2014, for Voyager we have only one flyby in the middle of 1981. We have derived 3D Cartesian coordinates for 1128 control points as well as improved pointing data for 12 Voyager and 193 Cassini images in the Enceladus-fixed coordinate system. The point accuracies vary from 55 m to 2900 m (average point accuracy - 221 m). From tracking of the control points we detect a librational motion described by a model which includes 3 different periods and amplitudes (Rambaux et al., 2011). We determine the amplitudes for each term. Our new control point network has a higher number of point measurements and a higher accuracy than previous data (Giese et al., 2014).

  3. Analytical optimal controls for the state constrained addition and removal of cryoprotective agents

    PubMed Central

    Chicone, Carmen C.; Critser, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Cryobiology is a field with enormous scientific, financial and even cultural impact. Successful cryopreservation of cells and tissues depends on the equilibration of these materials with high concentrations of permeating chemicals (CPAs) such as glycerol or 1,2 propylene glycol. Because cells and tissues are exposed to highly anisosmotic conditions, the resulting gradients cause large volume fluctuations that have been shown to damage cells and tissues. On the other hand, there is evidence that toxicity to these high levels of chemicals is time dependent, and therefore it is ideal to minimize exposure time as well. Because solute and solvent flux is governed by a system of ordinary differential equations, CPA addition and removal from cells is an ideal context for the application of optimal control theory. Recently, we presented a mathematical synthesis of the optimal controls for the ODE system commonly used in cryobiology in the absence of state constraints and showed that controls defined by this synthesis were optimal. Here we define the appropriate model, analytically extend the previous theory to one encompassing state constraints, and as an example apply this to the critical and clinically important cell type of human oocytes, where current methodologies are either difficult to implement or have very limited success rates. We show that an enormous increase in equilibration efficiency can be achieved under the new protocols when compared to classic protocols, potentially allowing a greatly increased survival rate for human oocytes, and pointing to a direction for the cryopreservation of many other cell types. PMID:22527943

  4. Decentralized Control of Centipede-like Multi-legged Robots with Passive Intersegment Joints Based on Follow-the-Contact-Point Gait Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Shinkichi; Niwa, Tomoya; Suzuki, Tatsuya

    This paper proposes a novel locomotion control, called Follow-the-Contact-Point (FCP) gait control, for a centipede-like multi-legged robot. The centipede-like multi-legged robot is composed by connecting segments, which have a trunk and a pair of legs, via a passive joint. This control method is motivated from behavioral knowledge of a centipede that each leg always contacts on the point which the anterior leg contacted. The FCP gait control realizes the walking behavior of centipede via decentralized event-driven control structure. In addition, merely by planning and allocating the contact point of legs of a head segment adequately, the robot can change the moving direction and also climb over an obstacle. We clarify the feasibility of the FCP gait control by showing the result of physical simulation of a 20-legged robot.

  5. Controlled-release fertilizer (CRF): a green fertilizer for controlling non-point contamination in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao-yun; Sun, Ke-jun; Wang, De-han; Liao, Zong-wen

    2005-01-01

    Fertilizers contribute greatly to high yields but also result in environmental non-point contamination, including the emission of greenhouse gas (N2O) and eutrophication of water bodies. How to solve this problem has become a serious challenge, especially for China as its high ecological pressure. Controlled-release fertilizer(CRF) has been developed to minimize the contamination while keeping high yield and has become a green fertilizer for agriculture. Several CRFs made with special coating technology were used for testing the fertilizer effects in yield and environment through pot experiment and field trial. The result indicated that the CRFs had higher N use efficiency, thus reducing N loss through leaching and volatilization while keeping higher yields. Comparing with imported standard CRFs, the test on CRFs showed similar fertilizer effect but with much lower cost. CRFs application is becoming a new approach for minimizing non-point contamination in agriculture. PMID:16295884

  6. Automatic control-point selection for image registration using disparity fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, Damon M.; Delaney, John K.; Ricciardi, Paola; Loew, Murray H.

    2012-02-01

    We present an algorithm for automatically selecting and matching control points for the purpose of registering images acquired using different imaging modalities. The modulus maxima of the wavelet transform were used to define a criterion for identifying control points. This criterion is capable of selecting points based on the size of features in the image. This technique can be tailored, by adjusting the scale of the filters in the modulus calculation, to the specific objects or structures known to occur in each image being registered. The control-point matching technique includes an iterative method for reducing the set of control-point pairs using the horizontal and vertical disparities between the matched pairs of points. Least-squares planes are fit to the horizontal and vertical disparity data, and control-point pairings are deleted based on their distances from those planes. The remaining points are used to recompute the planes. The process is iterated until the remaining points fall within a certain distance from the planes. Finally, a spatial transformation is performed on the template image to bring it into alignment with the reference image. The result of the control-point pair reduction is a more accurate alignment than what would have been produced using the initial control-point pairs. These techniques are applicable to medical images, but examples are given using images of paintings.

  7. Plasmon excitation in metal slab by fast point charge: The role of additional boundary conditions in quantum hydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; An, Sheng-Bai; Song, Yuan-Hong Wang, You-Nian; Kang, Naijing; Mišković, Z. L.

    2014-10-15

    We study the wake effect in the induced potential and the stopping power due to plasmon excitation in a metal slab by a point charge moving inside the slab. Nonlocal effects in the response of the electron gas in the metal are described by a quantum hydrodynamic model, where the equation of electronic motion contains both a quantum pressure term and a gradient correction from the Bohm quantum potential, resulting in a fourth-order differential equation for the perturbed electron density. Thus, besides using the condition that the normal component of the electron velocity should vanish at the impenetrable boundary of the metal, a consistent inclusion of the gradient correction is shown to introduce two possibilities for an additional boundary condition for the perturbed electron density. We show that using two different sets of boundary conditions only gives rise to differences in the wake potential at large distances behind the charged particle. On the other hand, the gradient correction in the quantum hydrodynamic model is seen to cause a reduction in the depth of the potential well closest to the particle, and a reduction of its stopping power. Even for a particle moving in the center of the slab, we observe nonlocal effects in the induced potential and the stopping power due to reduction of the slab thickness, which arise from the gradient correction in the quantum hydrodynamic model.

  8. A Study of a Two Stage Maximum Power Point Tracking Control of a Photovoltaic System under Partially Shaded Insolation Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kenji; Takano, Ichiro; Sawada, Yoshio

    A photovoltaic array shows relatively low output power density, and has a greatly drooping Current-Voltage (I-V) characteristic. Therefore, Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) control is used to maximize the output power of the array. Many papers have been reported in relation to MPPT. However, the Current-Power (I-P) curve sometimes shows multi-local maximum points mode under non-uniform insolation conditions. The operating point of the PV system tends to converge to a local maximum output point which is not the real maximal output point on the I-P curve. Some papers have been also reported, trying to avoid this difficulty. However most of those control systems become rather complicated. Then, the two stage MPPT control method is proposed in this paper to realize a relatively simple control system which can track the real maximum power point even under non-uniform insolation conditions. The feasibility of this control concept is confirmed for steady insolation as well as for rapidly changing insolation by simulation study using software PSIM and LabVIEW. In addition, simulated experiment confirms fundament al operation of the two stage MPPT control.

  9. Pointing and control system enabling technology for future automated space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlgren, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    Future automated space missions present challenging opportunities in the pointing-and-control technology disciplines. The enabling pointing-and-control system technologies for missions from 1985 to the year 2000 were identified and assessed. A generic mission set including Earth orbiter, planetary, and other missions which predominantly drive the pointing-and-control requirements was selected for detailed evaluation. Technology candidates identified were prioritized as planning options for future NASA-OAST advanced development programs. The primary technology thrusts in each candidate program were cited, and advanced development programs in pointing-and-control were recommended for the FY 80 to FY 87 period, based on these technology thrusts.

  10. 47 CFR 90.463 - Transmitter control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... transmitter or transmitters controlled are either radiating “RF” energy, or when the transmitter circuits have... meter may be employed to indicate the activation of both the local and the remote transmitter(s). (2) To... operator to determine when they are radiating “RF” energy or when the transmitter circuits have been...

  11. 47 CFR 90.463 - Transmitter control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... transmitter or transmitters controlled are either radiating “RF” energy, or when the transmitter circuits have... meter may be employed to indicate the activation of both the local and the remote transmitter(s). (2) To... operator to determine when they are radiating “RF” energy or when the transmitter circuits have been...

  12. 47 CFR 90.463 - Transmitter control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... transmitter or transmitters controlled are either radiating “RF” energy, or when the transmitter circuits have... meter may be employed to indicate the activation of both the local and the remote transmitter(s). (2) To... operator to determine when they are radiating “RF” energy or when the transmitter circuits have been...

  13. 47 CFR 90.463 - Transmitter control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... transmitter or transmitters controlled are either radiating “RF” energy, or when the transmitter circuits have... meter may be employed to indicate the activation of both the local and the remote transmitter(s). (2) To... operator to determine when they are radiating “RF” energy or when the transmitter circuits have been...

  14. 47 CFR 90.463 - Transmitter control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... transmitter or transmitters controlled are either radiating “RF” energy, or when the transmitter circuits have... meter may be employed to indicate the activation of both the local and the remote transmitter(s). (2) To... operator to determine when they are radiating “RF” energy or when the transmitter circuits have been...

  15. Ubiquitous points of control over regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fan; Barbi, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Posttranslational modification by ubiquitin tagging is crucial for regulating the stability, activity and cellular localization of many target proteins involved in processes including DNA repair, cell cycle progression, protein quality control, and signal transduction. It has long been appreciated that ubiquitin-mediated events are important for certain signaling pathways leading to leukocyte activation and the stimulation of effector function. Now it is clear that the activities of molecules and pathways central to immune regulation are also modified and controlled by ubiquitin tagging. Among the mechanisms of immune control, regulatory T cells (or Tregs) are themselves particularly sensitive to such regulation. E3 ligases and deubiquitinases both influence Tregs through their effects on the signaling pathways pertinent to these cells or through the direct, posttranslational regulation of Foxp3. In this review, we will summarize and discuss several examples of ubiquitin-mediated control over multiple aspects of Treg biology including the generation, function and phenotypic fidelity of these cells. Fully explored and exploited, these potential opportunities for Treg modulation may lead to novel immunotherapies for both positive and negative fine-tuning of immune restraint. PMID:24777637

  16. Pointing Control System Design and Performance Evaluation for TPF Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Kuo-Chia; Blaurock, Carl; Mosier, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) program aims to detect and characterize extra-solar Earth-like planets. The coronagraph telescope is one of the four mission concepts being studied. In order to reject the star flux and detect the planet flux in the visible light range, the coronagraph telescope must achieve a rejection ratio on the order of a billion to one. Dynamic jitter, introduced by environmental and on-board mechanical disturbances, degrades the optical performance, as characterized primarily by contrast ratio. The feasibility of using passive vibration isolation combined with active attitude and line-of- sight control systems to stabilize the spacecraft and the optical components to the requisite level is being studied. The telescope is also required to slew between targets. The slew mode control law must be designed to balance the need for efficient large-angle maneuvers while simultaneously avoiding the excitation of flexible modes in order to minimize settling time.

  17. Ubiquitous Points of Control over Regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fan; Barbi, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Posttranslational modification by ubiquitin tagging is crucial for regulating the stability, activity and cellular localization of many target proteins and processes including DNA repair, cell cycle progression, protein quality control and signal transduction. It has long been appreciated that ubiquitin-mediated events are important for certain signaling pathways leading to leukocyte activation and the stimulation of effector function. It is now clear that the activities of molecules and pathways central to immune regulation are also modified and regulated through ubiquitin. Among the mechanisms of immune control, regulatory T cells (or Tregs) are themselves particularly sensitive to such regulation. E3 ligases and deubiquitinases both influence Tregs through their effects on signaling pathways pertinent for these cells or through the direct, posttranslational regulation of Foxp3. In this review we will summarize and discuss several examples of ubiquitin-mediated control over multiple aspects of biology of Tregs including their generation, function and phenotypic fidelity. Fully explored and exploited, these potential opportunities for Treg modulation may lead to novel immunotherapies for both positive and negative fine-tuning of immune restraint. PMID:24777637

  18. Experimental observation of saddle points over the quantum control landscape of a two-spin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiuyang; Pelczer, István; Riviello, Gregory; Wu, Re-Bing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-04-01

    The growing successes in performing quantum control experiments motivated the development of control landscape analysis as a basis to explain these findings. When a quantum system is controlled by an electromagnetic field, the observable as a functional of the control field forms a landscape. Theoretical analyses have predicted the existence of critical points over the landscapes, including saddle points with indefinite Hessians. This paper presents a systematic experimental study of quantum control landscape saddle points. Nuclear magnetic resonance control experiments are performed on a coupled two-spin system in a 13C-labeled chloroform (13CHCl3) sample. We address the saddles with a combined theoretical and experimental approach, measure the Hessian at each identified saddle point, and study how their presence can influence the search effort utilizing a gradient algorithm to seek an optimal control outcome. The results have significance beyond spin systems, as landscape saddles are expected to be present for the control of broad classes of quantum systems.

  19. Implementation of control point form of algebraic grid-generation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Miller, David P.; Reno, Charles J.

    1991-01-01

    The control point form (CPF) provides explicit control of physical grid shape and grid spacing through the movement of the control points. The control point array, called a control net, is a space grid type arrangement of locations in physical space with an index for each direction. As an algebraic method CPF is efficient and works well with interactive computer graphics. A family of menu-driven, interactive grid-generation computer codes (TURBO) is being developed by using CPF. Key features of TurboI (a TURBO member) are discussed and typical results are presented. TurboI runs on any IRIS 4D series workstation.

  20. Configuration trade-offs for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility pointing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pue, A. J.; Strohbehn, K.; Hunt, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Conceptual pointing control system designs for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) are examined in terms of fine guidance pointing and large-angle slewing accuracies. In particular, basic trade-offs between body pointing only and body pointing plus image motion compensation (IMC) are considered using a steady-state linear covariance analysis to compute rms pointing errors. It is shown that body pointing can provide good performance during nominal fine pointing but limits the telescope capability to rapidly slew and acquire targets. Overall, body pointing plus IMC would offer superior performance but must be judged against the difficulties posed by the attitude sensor noise and the higher cost and complexity of IMC. It is recommended that improved sensor designs be pursued while slewing performance be enhanced by a combination of an appropriate command profile and control compensation.

  1. Uncertainty Analysis of non-point source pollution control facilities design techniques in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Okjeong, L.; Gyeong, C. B.; Park, M. W.; Kim, S.

    2015-12-01

    The design of non-point sources control facilities in Korea is divided largely by the stormwater capture ratio, the stormwater load capture ratio, and the pollutant reduction efficiency of the facility. The stormwater capture ratio is given by a design formula as a function of the water quality treatment capacity, the greater the capacity, the more the amount of stormwater intercepted by the facility. The stormwater load capture ratio is defined as the ratio of the load entering the facility of the total pollutant load generated in the target catchment, and is given as a design formula represented by a function of the stormwater capture ratio. In order to estimate the stormwater capture ratio and load capture ratio, a lot of quantitative analysis of hydrologic processes acted in pollutant emission is required, but these formulas have been applied without any verification. Since systematic monitoring programs were insufficient, verification of these formulas was fundamentally impossible. However, recently the Korean ministry of Environment has conducted an long-term systematic monitoring project, and thus the verification of the formulas became possible. In this presentation, the stormwater capture ratio and load capture ratio are re-estimated using actual TP data obtained from long-term monitoring program at Noksan industrial complex located in Busan, Korea. Through the re-estimated process, the uncertainty included in the design process that has been applied until now will be shown in a quantitative extent. In addition, each uncertainty included in the stormwater capture ratio estimation and in the stormwater load capture ratio estimation will be expressed to quantify the relative impact on the overall non-point pollutant control facilities design process. Finally, the SWMM-Matlab interlocking module for model parameters estimation will be introduced. Acknowledgement This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "The Eco Innovation Project : Non-point

  2. 21 CFR 120.8 - Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) plan. 120.8 Section 120.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT (HACCP) SYSTEMS... the critical control points; (4) List the procedures, and the frequency with which they are to...

  3. 21 CFR 120.8 - Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) plan. 120.8 Section 120.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT (HACCP) SYSTEMS... the critical control points; (4) List the procedures, and the frequency with which they are to...

  4. Control of node crossing points in Saturnian gravity-assist tours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strange, N.

    2003-01-01

    In the Saturnian system, the control of the node crossing point is important to avoid debris in Saturn's ring plane and to target flybys of moons other than Titan. This paper describes how to use Titan gravity assists to control the spacecraft's node crossing point.

  5. 21 CFR 120.8 - Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan. 120.8 Section 120.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT (HACCP)...

  6. 47 CFR 80.76 - Requirements for land station control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for land station control points... Requirements-Land Stations § 80.76 Requirements for land station control points. Each coast or fixed station subject to this part must have the following facilities: (a) Except for marine utility stations, a...

  7. Parameter Space of Fixed Points of the Damped Driven Pendulum Susceptible to Control of Chaos Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmore, Andrew; Trail, Collin; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard J.

    2003-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated the experimental control of chaos in a Modified Taylor-Couette system with hourglass geometry( Richard J. Wiener et al), Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2340 (1999).. Identifying fixed points susceptible to algorithms for the control of chaos is key. We seek to learn about this process in the accessible numerical model of the damped, driven pendulum. Following Baker(Gregory L. Baker, Am. J. Phys. 63), 832 (1995)., we seek points susceptible to the OGY(E. Ott, C. Grebogi, and J. A. Yorke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64), 1196 (1990). algorithm. We automate the search for fixed points that are candidates for control. We present comparisons of the space of candidate fixed points with the bifurcation diagrams and Poincare sections of the system. We demonstrate control at fixed points which do not appear on the attractor. We also show that the control algorithm may be employed to shift the system between non-communicating branches of the attractor.

  8. Robust optimal sun-pointing control of a large solar power satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shunan; Zhang, Kaiming; Peng, Haijun; Wu, Zhigang; Radice, Gianmarco

    2016-10-01

    The robust optimal sun-pointing control strategy for a large geostationary solar power satellite (SPS) is addressed in this paper. The SPS is considered as a huge rigid body, and the sun-pointing dynamics are firstly proposed in the state space representation. The perturbation effects caused by gravity gradient, solar radiation pressure and microwave reaction are investigated. To perform sun-pointing maneuvers, a periodically time-varying robust optimal LQR controller is designed to assess the pointing accuracy and the control inputs. It should be noted that, to reduce the pointing errors, the disturbance rejection technique is combined into the proposed LQR controller. A recursive algorithm is then proposed to solve the optimal LQR control gain. Simulation results are finally provided to illustrate the performance of the proposed closed-loop system.

  9. Quality Assurance and Quality Control in Point-of-Care Testing.

    PubMed

    Newman, Ashleigh W; Behling-Kelly, Erica

    2016-03-01

    With advancements in the standard of care in veterinary medicine and instrument technology, performing in-house laboratory work on a variety of point-of-care instruments, ranging from glucometers to benchtop chemistry analyzers, has become increasingly commonplace. However, the ability of an instrument to perform a test does not guarantee that those results are accurate. Ensuring that your in-clinic laboratory is providing reliable data requires a comprehensive plan that encompasses both common sense practices aimed at preventing errors at each stage of the testing process, as well as standard operating procedures to validate and monitor analyzer performance. These 2 arms of the plan are known as quality assurance and quality control. Although these concepts are typically out of the comfort zone for veterinarians, just as the thought of business management may deter some veterinarians from practice ownership, it is not beyond the capabilities of veterinarians to learn, understand, and incorporate them into their practice. The objectives of this article are to convey the importance of quality assurance and quality control, walk you through the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology guidelines on this topic, and provide direction to additional resources for further education on this topic, all with the focus on point-of-care testing in the in-clinic laboratory. PMID:27451043

  10. The point of no return: A fundamental limit on the ability to control thought and action.

    PubMed

    Logan, Gordon D

    2015-01-01

    Bartlett (1958. Thinking. New York: Basic Books) described the point of no return as a point of irrevocable commitment to action, which was preceded by a period of gradually increasing commitment. As such, the point of no return reflects a fundamental limit on the ability to control thought and action. I review the literature on the point of no return, taking three perspectives. First, I consider the point of no return from the perspective of the controlled act, as a locus in the architecture and anatomy of the underlying processes. I review experiments from the stop-signal paradigm that suggest that the point of no return is located late in the response system. Then I consider the point of no return from the perspective of the act of control that tries to change the controlled act before it becomes irrevocable. From this perspective, the point of no return is a point in time that provides enough "lead time" for the act of control to take effect. I review experiments that measure the response time to the stop signal as the lead time required for response inhibition in the stop-signal paradigm. Finally, I consider the point of no return in hierarchically controlled tasks, in which there may be many points of no return at different levels of the hierarchy. I review experiments on skilled typing that suggest different points of no return for the commands that determine what is typed and the countermands that inhibit typing, with increasing commitment to action the lower the level in the hierarchy. I end by considering the point of no return in perception and thought as well as action. PMID:25633089

  11. Design of a new high-performance pointing controller for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    A new form of high-performance, disturbance-adaptive pointing controller for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is proposed. This new controller is all linear (constant gains) and can maintain accurate 'pointing' of the HST in the face of persistent randomly triggered uncertain, unmeasurable 'flapping' motions of the large attached solar array panels. Similar disturbances associated with antennas and other flexible appendages can also be accommodated. The effectiveness and practicality of the proposed new controller is demonstrated by a detailed design and simulation testing of one such controller for a planar-motion, fully nonlinear model of HST. The simulation results show a high degree of disturbance isolation and pointing stability.

  12. Pointing and figure control system for a space-based far-IR segmented telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    A pointing and figure control system for two space-based far-IR telescopes, the 10-20 m Large Deployable Reflector and the 3.6 m Submillimeter Intermediate Mission, is described. The figure maintenance control system is designed to counter the optical elements translational and rotational changes induced by long-term thermal drifts that the support structure may experience. The pointing system applies optical truss to telescope pointing; a laser metrology system is used to transfer pointing informaton from an external fine guidance sensor to the telescope optical boresight, defined by the primary mirror, secondary mirror, and focal plane assembly.

  13. Use of hazard analysis critical control point and alternative treatments in the production of apple cider.

    PubMed

    Senkel, I A; Henderson, R A; Jolbitado, B; Meng, J

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the practices of Maryland cider producers and determine whether implementing hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) would reduce the microbial contamination of cider. Cider producers (n = 11) were surveyed to determine existing manufacturing practices and sanitation. A training program was then conducted to inform operators of safety issues, including contamination with Escherichia coli O157:H7, and teach HACCP concepts and principles, sanitation procedures, and good manufacturing practice (GMP). Although all operators used a control strategy from one of the model HACCP plans provided, only one developed a written HACCP plan. None developed specific GMP, sanitation standard operating procedures, or sanitation monitoring records. Six operators changed or added production controls, including the exclusion of windfall apples, sanitizing apples chemically and by hot dip, and cider treatment with UV light or pasteurization. Facility inspections indicated improved sanitation and hazard control but identified ongoing problems. Microbiological evaluation of bottled cider before and after training, in-line apples, pomace, cider, and inoculated apples was conducted. E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, or Staphylococcus aureus were not found in samples of in-line apple, pomace, and cider, or bottled cider. Generic E. coli was not isolated on in-coming apples but was found in 4 of 32 (13%) in-line samples and 3 of 17 (18%) bottled fresh cider samples, suggesting that E. coli was introduced during in-plant processing. To produce pathogen-free cider, operators must strictly conform to GMP and sanitation procedures in addition to HACCP controls. Controls aimed at preventing or eliminating pathogens on source apples are critical but alone may not be sufficient for product safety. PMID:10419272

  14. Methodological demonstration of laser beam pointing control for space gravitational wave detection missions

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yu-Hui; Liu, He-Shan; Luo, Zi-Ren; Li, Yu-Qiong; Jin, Gang

    2014-07-15

    In space laser interferometer gravitational wave (G.W.) detection missions, the stability of the laser beam pointing direction has to be kept at 10 nrad/√Hz. Otherwise, the beam pointing jitter noise will dominate the noise budget and make the detection of G.W. impossible. Disturbed by the residue non-conservative forces, the fluctuation of the laser beam pointing direction could be a few μrad/√Hz at frequencies from 0.1 mHz to 10 Hz. Therefore, the laser beam pointing control system is an essential requirement for those space G.W. detection missions. An on-ground test of such beam pointing control system is performed, where the Differential Wave-front Sensing technique is used to sense the beams pointing jitter. An active controlled steering mirror is employed to adjust the beam pointing direction to compensate the jitter. The experimental result shows that the pointing control system can be used for very large dynamic range up to 5 μrad. At the interested frequencies of space G.W. detection missions, between 1 mHz and 1 Hz, beam pointing stability of 6 nrad/√Hz is achieved.

  15. Solar array pointing control for the International Space Station electrical power subsystem to optimize power delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.C.

    1998-07-01

    Precise orientation control of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS) photovoltaic (PV) solar arrays is required for a number of reasons, including the optimization of power delivery to ISS system loads and payloads. To maximize power generation and delivery in general, the PV arrays are pointed directly at the sun with some allowance for inaccuracies in determination of where to point and in the actuation of pointing the PV arrays. Control of PV array orientation in this sun pointing mode is performed automatically by onboard hardware and software. During certain conditions, maximum power cannot be generated in automatic sun tracking mode due to shadowing of the PV arrays cast by other ISS structures, primarily adjacent PV arrays. In order to maximize the power generated, the PV arrays must be pointed away from the ideal sun pointing targets to reduce the amount of shadowing. The amount of off-pointing to maximize power is a function of many parameters such as the physical configuration of the ISS structures during the assembly timeframe, the solar beta angle and vehicle attitude. Thus the off-pointing cannot be controlled automatically and must be determined by ground operators. This paper presents an overview of ISS PV array orientation control, PV array power performance under shadowed and off-pointing conditions, and a methodology to maximize power under those same conditions.

  16. Wireless power charging using point of load controlled high frequency power converters

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John M.; Campbell, Steven L.; Chambon, Paul H.; Seiber, Larry E.; White, Clifford P.

    2015-10-13

    An apparatus for wirelessly charging a battery of an electric vehicle is provided with a point of load control. The apparatus includes a base unit for generating a direct current (DC) voltage. The base unit is regulated by a power level controller. One or more point of load converters can be connected to the base unit by a conductor, with each point of load converter comprising a control signal generator that transmits a signal to the power level controller. The output power level of the DC voltage provided by the base unit is controlled by power level controller such that the power level is sufficient to power all active load converters when commanded to do so by any of the active controllers, without generating excessive power that may be otherwise wasted.

  17. Conceptual design of pointing control systems for space station gimballed payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Robert O.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual design of the control system for Payload Pointing Systems (PPS) is developed using classic Proportional-Integral-Derivatives (PID) techniques. The major source of system pointing error is due to the disturbance-rich environment of the space station in the form of gimbal baseplate motions. These baseplate vibrations are characterized using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) techniques. Both time domain and frequency domain dynamic models are developed to assess control system performance. Three basic methods exist for the improvement of PPS pointing performance: increase control system bandwidth, add Image Motion Compensation, and/or reduce (or change) the baseplate disturbance environment.

  18. Proper use of sludge-control additives in residential heating oil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tatnall, R.E.

    1995-04-01

    Discussed are various aspects of heating oil `sludge`: How it forms, typical problems it causes, how sludge-control additives work, what should be expected of them, and what happens in a contaminated system when such additives are used. Test results from laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that performance of commercially available additives varies greatly. The concept of `end-of-the-line` treatment is described and compared with bulk fuel treatment. A procedure is described whereby a retailer can test additives himself, and thus determine just what those additives will or will not do for his business. Finally, the economics of an effective treatment program are outlined.

  19. A Non-Linear Approach to Spacecraft Trajectory Control in the Vicinity of a Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    An expanding interest in mission design strategies that exploit libration point regions demands the continued development of enhanced, efficient, control algorithms for station-keeping and formation maintenance. This paper discusses the development of a non-linear, station-keeping, control algorithm for trajectories in the vicinity of a libration point. The control law guarantees exponential convergence, based on a Lyaponov analysis. Controller performance is evaluated using FreeFlyer(R) and MATLAB(R) for a spacecraft stationed near the L2 libration point in the Earth-Moon system, tracking a pre-defined reference trajectory. Evaluation metrics are fuel usage and tracking accuracy. Simulation results are compared with a linear-based controller for a spacecraft tracking the same reference trajectory. Although the analysis is framed in the context of station-keeping, the control algorithm is equally applicable to a formation flying problem with an appropriate definition of the reference trajectory.

  20. Onboard utilization of ground control points for image correction. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Operation of a navigation system, centered around image correction, was simulated and the system performance was analyzed. Onboard utilization of ground control points for image correction is summarized. Simulation results, and recommendations for future mission requirements are presented.

  1. Characterization of the alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a key control point in lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wakarchuk, Warren; Schur, Melissa J; St Michael, Frank; Li, Jinjuan; Eichler, Eva; Whitfield, Dennis

    2004-06-01

    The biosynthesis of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) in Neisseria meningitidis has a control point that regulates the extension of the alpha-chain on heptose (I) of the LOS. The gene that encodes the protein responsible for this control had been identified elsewhere, but the enzyme encoded by the gene was not characterized. We have now shown that this same control mechanism operates in the related species, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, using a gene knockout and subsequent characterization of the LOS species produced. We also cloned and expressed the enzyme from both of these pathogens. Using a synthetic acceptor substrate, we have shown unequivocally that the enzyme is an alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase. Experiments with both the core oligosaccharide and the synthetic acceptors suggests that the addition of the alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosamine moiety on the heptose (II) residue precedes the addition of the ethanolamine phosphate at the O3 position on this heptose (II), and that in the absence of the alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosamine moiety leads to the addition of an extra ethanolamine phosphate on the heptose (II) residue. Our data do not support the hypothesis that ethanolamine phosphate at O3 of heptose (II) is added and is then required for the addition of the N-acetylglucosamine at O2 by the LgtK enzyme. This enzyme represents a control point in the biosynthesis of the LOS of this pathogen and is a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15044393

  2. The Feasibility of the Disturbance Accommodating Controller for Precision Antenna Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gresham, L. L.; Lansing, F. L.; Guiar, C. N.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a pointing (position loop) controller for the NASA-JPL Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas using the Disturbance Accommodating Control (DAC) theory. A model that includes state dependent disturbances was developed, and an example demonstrating the noise estimator is presented as an initial phase in the controller design. The goal is to improve pointing accuracy by the removal of the systematic errors caused by the antenna misalignment as well as sensor noise and random wind and thermal disturbances. Preliminary simulation results show that the DAC technique is successful in both cancelling the imposed errors and maintaining an optimal control policy.

  3. Highly Diastereoselective Chelation-controlled Additions to α-Silyloxy Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Gretchen R.; Koz, Gamze

    2011-01-01

    The polar Felkin-Anh, Cornforth, and Cram-chelation models predict that the addition of organometallic reagents to silyl–protected α–hydroxy ketones proceeds via a non-chelation pathway to give anti-diol addition products. This prediction has held true for the vast majority of additions reported in the literature and few methods for chelation-controlled additions of organometallic reagents to silyl–protected α–hydroxy ketones have been introduced. Herein, we present a general and highly diastereoselective method for the addition of dialkylzincs and (E)-di-, (E)-tri- and (Z)-disubstituted vinylzinc reagents to α-silyloxy ketones using alkyl zinc halide Lewis acids, RZnX, to give chelation-controlled products (dr ≥18:1). The compatibility of organozinc reagents with other functional groups makes this method potentially very useful in complex molecule synthesis. PMID:21534530

  4. Control of a pointing, acquisition, and tracking subsystem for intersatellite laser links ISL2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, R.; Kuel, U.; Hettlage, E.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the dynamical requirements determined for a CO2 lasercom system can be met with the fine pointing assembly (FPA) and the coarse pointing assembly (CPA) described here. The implemented control loops and the corresponding control logic provide the PAT subsystem with a high bandwidth and a short transition time from the acquisition to the tracking mode. It is demonstrated that the maximum angular rate of the LOS in connection with the maximum slew rate of the CPA and the magnification factor of the telescope determine the area around the singular point which the FPA must be able to cover.

  5. Simulation of flexible appendage interactions with Mariner Venus/Mercury attitude control and science platform pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    A new computer subroutine, which solves the attitude equations of motion for any vehicle idealized as a topological tree of hinge-connected rigid bodies, is used to simulate and analyze science instrument pointing control interaction with a flexible Mariner Venus/Mercury (MVM) spacecraft. The subroutine's user options include linearized or partially linearized hinge-connected models whose computational advantages are demonstrated for the MVM problem. Results of the pointing control/flexible vehicle interaction simulations, including imaging experiment pointing accuracy predictions and implications for MVM science sequence planning, are described in detail.

  6. Costs and water quality effects of controlling point and nonpoint pollution sources

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C.M.; Broomfield, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Costs and water quality effects of controlling point and nonpoint pollution sources are compared for the DuPage River basin in northern Illinois. Costs are estimated for effluent standards for municipal wastewater treatment plants and for the alternative, controlling runoff from nonpoint sources such as streets, agricultural lands, and forests. A dynamic water-quality/hydrology simulation model is used to determine water quality effects of various treatment plant standards and nonpoint-source controls. Costs and water quality data are combined, and the point-source and nonpoint-source plans are compared on a cost-effectiveness basis. Nonpoint-source controls are found to be more cost-effective than stricter control of pollutants from point sources.

  7. Effects of Heat and Momentum Addition Inside and Outside the Compound Sonic Point of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Webb, G. M.; McKenzie, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    We consider the effect of heat and momentum addition to the solar wind for a model including the effects of Alfven waves and plasma pressure (proton plus electron pressure). The mass flux per unit area in 1D flow maximizes when the flow speed equals the compound sound speed, including the effects of the Alfven wave pressure. We discuss the analogue of the Laval nozzle for the solar wind flow, and the dependence of the effective nozzle area as a function of radial distance, and the relationship of the nozzle area to the momentum equation and the Mach number of the flow. An analysis is carried out of the effects of heat and momentum addition to the wind, using a thin slice approximation, which leads to Rankine Hugoniot relations for weak deflagrations and detonations (i.e. the combustion Hugoniot). The linearized Hugoniot is used to analyze the effects of small momentum and energy addition to the wind in the thin slice approximation. We obtain the fully nonlinear Rankine Hugoniot equation solutions. The analysis also holds in the presence of Alfven waves, in which the wave energy exchange equation yields the wave action flux conservation law when their contribution to the compound sound speed is taken into account. The effective polytropic index γgamma and flow speed relative to the compound flow speed ahead of the slice play crucial roles in determining whether local acceleration or deceleration results. Some results are at first sight unexpected since γgamma for Alfven waves ranges from -1/2 (in sub-Alfvenic flow) to 3/2 in super-Alfvenic flow.

  8. Acupuncture-Point Stimulation for Postoperative Pain Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian-Liang; Tan, Jing-Yu; Molassiotis, Alex; Suen, Lorna K. P.; Shi, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Acupuncture-point stimulation (APS) in postoperative pain control compared with sham/placebo acupuncture or standard treatments (usual care or no treatment). Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Meta-analysis results indicated that APS interventions improved VAS scores significantly and also reduced total morphine consumption. No serious APS-related adverse effects (AEs) were reported. There is Level I evidence for the effectiveness of body points plaster therapy and Level II evidence for body points electroacupuncture (EA), body points acupressure, body points APS for abdominal surgery patients, auricular points seed embedding, manual auricular acupuncture, and auricular EA. We obtained Level III evidence for body points APS in patients who underwent cardiac surgery and cesarean section and for auricular-point stimulation in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that APS is an effective postoperative pain therapy in surgical patients, although the evidence does support the conclusion that APS can reduce analgesic requirements without AEs. The best level of evidence was not adequate in most subgroups. Some limitations of this study may have affected the results, possibly leading to an overestimation of APS effects. PMID:26568767

  9. Acupuncture-Point Stimulation for Postoperative Pain Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Liang; Tan, Jing-Yu; Molassiotis, Alex; Suen, Lorna K P; Shi, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Acupuncture-point stimulation (APS) in postoperative pain control compared with sham/placebo acupuncture or standard treatments (usual care or no treatment). Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Meta-analysis results indicated that APS interventions improved VAS scores significantly and also reduced total morphine consumption. No serious APS-related adverse effects (AEs) were reported. There is Level I evidence for the effectiveness of body points plaster therapy and Level II evidence for body points electroacupuncture (EA), body points acupressure, body points APS for abdominal surgery patients, auricular points seed embedding, manual auricular acupuncture, and auricular EA. We obtained Level III evidence for body points APS in patients who underwent cardiac surgery and cesarean section and for auricular-point stimulation in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that APS is an effective postoperative pain therapy in surgical patients, although the evidence does support the conclusion that APS can reduce analgesic requirements without AEs. The best level of evidence was not adequate in most subgroups. Some limitations of this study may have affected the results, possibly leading to an overestimation of APS effects. PMID:26568767

  10. Performance improvement of PI controllers through dynamic set-point weighting.

    PubMed

    Mudi, Rajani K; Dey, Chanchal

    2011-04-01

    Responses of high-order systems under Ziegler-Nichols tuned PI controllers (ZNPIs) are characterized by excessive oscillation with a large overshoot. Although, a fixed set-point weighting based PI controller (FSWPI) may decrease the overshoot considerably, it fails to reduce the oscillation in the set-point response. Moreover, both FSWPI and ZNPI exhibit equally poor load regulation. Keeping in mind an overall improved performance, we propose an online dynamic set-point weighting technique for ZNPIs. The dynamic set-point weighting factor (β(d)) is heuristically derived from the instantaneous process trend. Performance of the proposed dynamic set-point weighting based PI controller (DSWPI) for various second- and third-order processes including a pH process shows a significant improvement during both the set-point and load disturbance responses over other methods. Stability and robustness of the proposed DSWPI are addressed. Effectiveness of the DSWPI is demonstrated through the real-time implementation on a practical DC position control system. PMID:21176898

  11. Antagonistic control of a dual-input mammalian gene switch by food additives

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingqi; Ye, Haifeng; Hamri, Ghislaine Charpin-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of mammalian trigger-inducible transgene-control devices that are able to programme complex cellular behaviour. Fruit-based benzoate derivatives licensed as food additives, such as flavours (e.g. vanillate) and preservatives (e.g. benzoate), are a particularly attractive class of trigger compounds for orthogonal mammalian transgene control devices because of their innocuousness, physiological compatibility and simple oral administration. Capitalizing on the genetic componentry of the soil bacterium Comamonas testosteroni, which has evolved to catabolize a variety of aromatic compounds, we have designed different mammalian gene expression systems that could be induced and repressed by the food additives benzoate and vanillate. When implanting designer cells engineered for gene switch-driven expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) into mice, blood SEAP levels of treated animals directly correlated with a benzoate-enriched drinking programme. Additionally, the benzoate-/vanillate-responsive device was compatible with other transgene control systems and could be assembled into higher-order control networks providing expression dynamics reminiscent of a lap-timing stopwatch. Designer gene switches using licensed food additives as trigger compounds to achieve antagonistic dual-input expression profiles and provide novel control topologies and regulation dynamics may advance future gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:25030908

  12. CMG-induced LST dynamics. [application of control moment gyroscope to pointing and control systems of large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    The application of control moment gyroscopes to the pointing and control system of the large space telescope is discussed. The parameter plane analysis technique is used to present the nonlinearity representing the control moment gyroscope gimbal bearing friction. The technique affords both analytic and graphic portrayal of the effects of variations is selected system parameters. Diagrams of the systems involved in the tests are presented.

  13. Control of terahertz emission in photoconductive antennas through an additional optical continuous wave.

    PubMed

    Bockelt, A; Palací, J; Vidal, B

    2013-08-15

    The manipulation of the operating conditions of photoconductive antennas by means of an additional continuous wave (CW) is reported. It is used to control a fiber-based terahertz (THz) time-domain-spectroscopy system at telecom wavelengths. The injection of an optical CW into the transmitter allows the control of the THz amplitude without causing major degradation to the system performance. This, for instance, can be exploited to perform modulation of the THz signal. PMID:24104665

  14. Reducing Pointing Errors During Cassini Reaction Control System Orbit Trim Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2013-01-01

    The effect of altering a gain parameter in the Cassini reaction control system (RCS) delta-V controller on the maneuver execution errors during orbit trim maneuvers (OTMs) is explored. Cassini consists of two reaction control thruster branches (A & B) each with eight thrusters. Currently, the B-branch is operational while the A-branch serves as a back-up. The four Z-thrusters control the X and Y-axes, while the four Y-thrusters control the Z-axis. During an OTM, the Z-thrusters fire to maintain the X and Y-axes pointing within an attitude control dead-zone (-10 to 10 milliradians). The errors do not remain at zero due to pointing error sources such as spacecraft center of mass offset from the geometric center of the Z-facing thrusters, and variability in the thruster forces due to the thruster hardware differences. The delta-V reaction control system (RCS) controller ensures that the attitude error remains within this dead-zone. Gain parameters within the RCS delta-V controller affect the maneuver execution errors. Different parameter values are used to explore effect on these errors. It is found that pointing error decreases and magnitude error increases rapidly for gain parameters 10 times greater than the current parameter values used in the flight software.

  15. Dual-mode disturbance-accommodating pointing controller for Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addington, Stewart I.; Johnson, C. D.

    1995-03-01

    Cyclic thermal expansions and mechanical stiction effects in the solar arrays on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are triggering repeated occurrences of damped, relaxation-type flex-body vibrations of the solar arrays. Those solar array vibrations are, in turn, causing unwanted deviations of the telescope from its specified pointing direction. In this paper we propose two strategies one can adopt in designing a telescope-pointing controller to cope with the aforementioned disturbances: 1) a total isolation (TI) control strategy whereby the HST controller torques are designed to adaptively counteract and cancel out the persistent disturbing torques that are causing the unwanted telescope motions and 2) an array damping (AD) control strategy whereby the HST controller torques are used to actively augment the natural dampening of the solar array vibrations and the attendant telescope motions, between triggerings of the stiction-related flex-body relaxation oscillations. Using the principles of disturbance accommodation control theory, a dual-mode controller for a generic, planar-motion (single-axis) model of the HST is proposed. This controller incorporates both the TI and AD modes of disturbance accommodation. Simulation studies of the closed-loop system using generic parameter values clearly indicate, qualitatively, the enhanced pointing performance such a controller can achieve.

  16. Acquisition Tracking and Pointing Control of the Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Marcello; Agrawal, Brij N.

    This spacecraft consists of two large gimbaled telescopes, that are optically coupled and used to redirect a laser beam from a ground-based or spacecraft based source to a distant point on the earth or in space. The attitude control system consists of reaction wheels, star trackers and gyros. The optical control system consists of two fast steering mirrors and two optical tracker sensors. The very tight pointing and jitter requirements, together with the multi-body nature of the spacecraft, make the acquisition, tracking and pointing control very challenging. The control techniques developed in this research can be applied to imaging spacecrafts and spacecrafts with optical communications. numerical simulations. The simulations were performed to analyze two different control approaches proposed for the tracking and pointing of the Bifocal Relay Mirror spacecraft during operational phase. In the first control option considered, feed forward and feedback control are used for the spacecraft attitude control, while independent feedback is used by the optical subsystem in order to compensate the pointing error of the spacecraft. In the second control approach, the spacecraft and optical control systems are integrated. In case of uncertainty in target position and use of realistic sensors, using star tracker and rate gyros with Kalman Filter, the integrated control provides better performance. dynamics and control simulator of the Spacecraft Research and Design Center of Naval Postgraduate School. The attitude of this spherical air bearing based test-bed was controlled by three reaction wheels, while its attitude and angular velocity were sensed by an optical attitude sensor and three rate gyros, respectively. The three axes simulator platform included as payload a fully functional model of the transmitter section of the Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft, consisting in one telescope with fast steering mirror and one optical tracker sensor. Two preliminary experiments have

  17. Great lakes eutrophication: the effect of point source control of total phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Chapra, S C; Robertson, A

    1977-06-24

    A mathematical model of the Great Lakes total phosphorus budgets indicates that a 1 milligram per liter effluent restriction for point sources would result in significant improvement in the trophic status of most of the system. However, because large areas of their drainage basins are devoted to agriculture or are urbanized, western Lake Erie, lower Green Bay, and Saginaw Bay may require non-point source controls to effect significant improvements in their trophic status. PMID:17776924

  18. The Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance system operating in the coarse track pointing control mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittlesey, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Fine Guidance System has set new standards in pointing control capability for earth orbiting spacecraft. Two precision pointing control modes are implemented in the Fine Guidance System; one being a Coarse Track Mode which employs a pseudo-quadrature detector approach and the second being a Fine Mode which uses a two axis interferometer implementation. The Coarse Track Mode was designed to maintain FGS pointing error to within 20 milli-arc seconds (rms) when guiding on a 14.5 Mv star. The Fine Mode was designed to maintain FGS pointing error to less than 3 milli-arc seconds (rms). This paper addresses the HST FGS operating in the Coarse Track Mode. An overview of the implementation, the operation, and both the predicted and observed on orbit performance is presented. The discussion includes a review of the Fine Guidance System hardware which uses two beam steering Star Selector servos, four photon counting photomultiplier tube detectors, as well as a 24 bit microprocessor, which executes the control system firmware. Unanticipated spacecraft operational characteristics are discussed as they impact pointing performance. These include the influence of spherically aberrated star images as well as the mechanical shocks induced in the spacecraft during and following orbital day/night terminator crossings. Computer modeling of the Coarse Track Mode verifies the observed on orbit performance trends in the presence of these optical and mechanical disturbances. It is concluded that the coarse track pointing control function is performing as designed and is providing a robust pointing control capability for the Hubble Space Telescope.

  19. An Improvement of Pose Measurement Method Using Global Control Points Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Changku; Sun, Pengfei; Wang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade pose measurement technologies have gained an increasing interest in the computer vision. The vision-based pose measurement method has been widely applied in complex environments. However, the pose measurement error is a problem in the measurement applications. It grows rapidly with increasing measurement range. In order to meet the demand of high accuracy in large measurement range, a measurement error reduction solution to the vision-based pose measurement method, called Global Control Point Calibration (GCPC), is proposed. GCPC is an optimized process of existing visual pose measurement methods. The core of GCPC is to divide the measurement error into two types: the control point error and the control space error. Then by creating the global control points as well as performing error calibration of object pose, the two errors are processed. The control point error can be eliminated and the control space error is minimized. GCPC is experimented on the moving target in the camera’s field of view. The results show that the RMS error is 0.175° in yaw angle, 0.189° in pitch angle, and 0.159° in roll angle, which demonstrate that GCPC works effectively and stably. PMID:26207825

  20. 40 CFR 52.1163 - Additional control measures for East Boston.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Boston. 52.1163 Section 52.1163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Additional control measures for East Boston. (a) On or before December 31, 1975, the Governor, the Mayor of the City of Boston, the Chairman of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, the Chairman...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1163 - Additional control measures for East Boston.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Boston. 52.1163 Section 52.1163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Additional control measures for East Boston. (a) On or before December 31, 1975, the Governor, the Mayor of the City of Boston, the Chairman of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, the Chairman...

  2. 40 CFR 52.1163 - Additional control measures for East Boston.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Boston. 52.1163 Section 52.1163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Additional control measures for East Boston. (a) On or before December 31, 1975, the Governor, the Mayor of the City of Boston, the Chairman of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, the Chairman...

  3. 40 CFR 52.1163 - Additional control measures for East Boston.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Boston. 52.1163 Section 52.1163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Additional control measures for East Boston. (a) On or before December 31, 1975, the Governor, the Mayor of the City of Boston, the Chairman of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, the Chairman...

  4. Chill water additive controls transfer of Salmonella and Campylobacter by improved chlorine efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In earlier work, we showed that a proprietary additive (T-128) maintains chlorine activity in the presence of organic material such as broiler parts. T-128 improves the efficacy of chlorine to control transfer of Campylobacter and Salmonella from inoculated wings to un-inoculated wings during immer...

  5. Single supplier single retailer inventory model controlled by the reorder and shipping points with sharing information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wen-Tsung; Hsiao, Yu-Cheng

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated the integrated stochastic inventory problem for a two-stage supply chain consisting of a single retailer and a single supplier. By using batch shipment policy, the expected total cost can be significantly reduced. An equally sized batch shipment model, controlled by both the reorder and shipping points, with sharing information by enterprise resource planning and radio frequency identification is constructed. The problem is solved optimally by the proposed algorithm that determines the economic lot size, the optimal batch sizes and number of batches. A numerical example is included to illustrate the algorithmic procedures and to prove that the model controlled both by the reorder and shipping points is superior to the classic model controlled only by the reorder point.

  6. A spectral identification technique for adaptive attitude control and pointing of the Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teuber, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The Space Telescope is a 2.4 m class aperture optical telescope having near-diffraction-limited performance. It will be placed into earth orbit by 1980 via the Space Shuttle. The problem considered is how to achieve negligible degradation of the astronomy imaging capability (to 0.005 arc second) due to smearing by pointing motions during observations. Initially, pointing instability sources were identified and a linear stability was used to assess the magnitude of elastic body modes and to design control system compensation regions necessary for subsequent adaptive control. A spectral identification technique for this adaptive attitude control and pointing has been investigated that will alleviate requirements for comprehensive dynamic ground testing. Typical all-digital simulation results describing motions of the telescope line of sight are presented.

  7. Precision Pointing Control System (PPCS) system design and analysis. [for gimbaled experiment platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frew, A. M.; Eisenhut, D. F.; Farrenkopf, R. L.; Gates, R. F.; Iwens, R. P.; Kirby, D. K.; Mann, R. J.; Spencer, D. J.; Tsou, H. S.; Zaremba, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    The precision pointing control system (PPCS) is an integrated system for precision attitude determination and orientation of gimbaled experiment platforms. The PPCS concept configures the system to perform orientation of up to six independent gimbaled experiment platforms to design goal accuracy of 0.001 degrees, and to operate in conjunction with a three-axis stabilized earth-oriented spacecraft in orbits ranging from low altitude (200-2500 n.m., sun synchronous) to 24 hour geosynchronous, with a design goal life of 3 to 5 years. The system comprises two complementary functions: (1) attitude determination where the attitude of a defined set of body-fixed reference axes is determined relative to a known set of reference axes fixed in inertial space; and (2) pointing control where gimbal orientation is controlled, open-loop (without use of payload error/feedback) with respect to a defined set of body-fixed reference axes to produce pointing to a desired target.

  8. Control of Spacecraft Formations Around the Libration Points Using Electric Motors with One Bit of Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpelloni, Edoardo; Maggiore, Manfredi; Damaren, Christopher J.

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates a formation control problem for two space vehicles in the vicinity of the L 2 libration point of the Sun-Earth/Moon system. The objective is to accurately regulate the relative position vector between the vehicles to a desired configuration, under tight tolerances. It is shown that the formation control problem is solvable using six constant thrust electric actuators requiring only one bit of resolution, and bounded switching frequency. The proposed control law is hybrid, and it coordinates the sequence of on-off switches of the thrusters so as to achieve the control objective and, at the same time, avoid high-frequency switching.

  9. Modular Skeletal Evolution in Sticklebacks Is Controlled by Additive and Clustered Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Craig T.; Glazer, Andrew M.; Summers, Brian R.; Blackman, Benjamin K.; Norman, Andrew R.; Shapiro, Michael D.; Cole, Bonnie L.; Peichel, Catherine L.; Schluter, Dolph; Kingsley, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of evolutionary change remains a long-standing goal in biology. In vertebrates, skeletal evolution has contributed greatly to adaptation in body form and function in response to changing ecological variables like diet and predation. Here we use genome-wide linkage mapping in threespine stickleback fish to investigate the genetic architecture of evolved changes in many armor and trophic traits. We identify >100 quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the pattern of serially repeating skeletal elements, including gill rakers, teeth, branchial bones, jaws, median fin spines, and vertebrae. We use this large collection of QTL to address long-standing questions about the anatomical specificity, genetic dominance, and genomic clustering of loci controlling skeletal differences in evolving populations. We find that most QTL (76%) that influence serially repeating skeletal elements have anatomically regional effects. In addition, most QTL (71%) have at least partially additive effects, regardless of whether the QTL controls evolved loss or gain of skeletal elements. Finally, many QTL with high LOD scores cluster on chromosomes 4, 20, and 21. These results identify a modular system that can control highly specific aspects of skeletal form. Because of the general additivity and genomic clustering of major QTL, concerted changes in both protective armor and trophic traits may occur when sticklebacks inherit either marine or freshwater alleles at linked or possible “supergene” regions of the stickleback genome. Further study of these regions will help identify the molecular basis of both modular and coordinated changes in the vertebrate skeleton. PMID:24652999

  10. Modular skeletal evolution in sticklebacks is controlled by additive and clustered quantitative trait Loci.

    PubMed

    Miller, Craig T; Glazer, Andrew M; Summers, Brian R; Blackman, Benjamin K; Norman, Andrew R; Shapiro, Michael D; Cole, Bonnie L; Peichel, Catherine L; Schluter, Dolph; Kingsley, David M

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of evolutionary change remains a long-standing goal in biology. In vertebrates, skeletal evolution has contributed greatly to adaptation in body form and function in response to changing ecological variables like diet and predation. Here we use genome-wide linkage mapping in threespine stickleback fish to investigate the genetic architecture of evolved changes in many armor and trophic traits. We identify >100 quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the pattern of serially repeating skeletal elements, including gill rakers, teeth, branchial bones, jaws, median fin spines, and vertebrae. We use this large collection of QTL to address long-standing questions about the anatomical specificity, genetic dominance, and genomic clustering of loci controlling skeletal differences in evolving populations. We find that most QTL (76%) that influence serially repeating skeletal elements have anatomically regional effects. In addition, most QTL (71%) have at least partially additive effects, regardless of whether the QTL controls evolved loss or gain of skeletal elements. Finally, many QTL with high LOD scores cluster on chromosomes 4, 20, and 21. These results identify a modular system that can control highly specific aspects of skeletal form. Because of the general additivity and genomic clustering of major QTL, concerted changes in both protective armor and trophic traits may occur when sticklebacks inherit either marine or freshwater alleles at linked or possible "supergene" regions of the stickleback genome. Further study of these regions will help identify the molecular basis of both modular and coordinated changes in the vertebrate skeleton. PMID:24652999

  11. A Simple and Inexpensive Device for Slow, Controlled Addition of a Solution to a Reaction Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osvath, Peter

    1995-07-01

    A number of reactions require the slow and controlled addition of a solution containing one reagent to another. Attempting to control the flow rate over a number of hours using a conventional constant pressure addition funnel is a frustrating exercise; commercially available constant volume addition funnels are expensive and must be adjusted by trial and error each time a reaction is carried out. The use of an (expensive) peristaltic pump or syringe pump overcomes these problems but can introduce other complications. We have recently had occasion to carry out the synthesis of thioether macrocycles and cages requiring the slow and controlled addition of DMF solutions of (offensively odoriferous) thiols or (air-sensitive) thiolates to a reactant solution under nitrogen(1), Although the use of a syringe pump was called for, there are obvious difficulties associated with purging the solution and assembling such an apparatus under nitrogen, and we report a simple and inexpensive solution. A Male Luer Lock tip (recovered from a broken syringe) was sweated onto the flattened tip of a pressure-equalizing addition funnel and a syringe needle was attached. Judicious selection of needle length, bore size, and reactant volume can be used to control the addition time simply and reproducibly. With a 250-mL funnel, the flow rate changes by <25% from the beginning to the end of the addition. (In fact, a reduction in the rate of addition may even be advantageous as the reaction proceeds, the reagent in the receiving flask is consumed, its concentration drops, and the rate of reaction will decrease). A piece of fine Teflon tubing of appropriate length attached to the needle can be used to reduce the flow rate even further, but this is only necessary for very slow rates of addition. For example, the time of addition of 200 mL, of an ethanolic solution could be varied from approximately 5 minutes (150mm/17 gauge) to approximately 5 h (200mm/22 gauge), and once the addition time for a

  12. Classical and adaptive control algorithms for the solar array pointing system of the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ianculescu, G. D.; Klop, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Classical and adaptive control algorithms for the solar array pointing system of the Space Station Freedom are designed using a continuous rigid body model of the solar array gimbal assembly containing both linear and nonlinear dynamics due to various friction components. The robustness of the design solution is examined by performing a series of sensitivity analysis studies. Adaptive control strategies are examined in order to compensate for the unfavorable effect of static nonlinearities, such as dead-zone uncertainties.

  13. Design and Implementation of a Digital Controller for a Vibration Isolation and Vernier Pointing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, Daniel J.; Britcher, Colin P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the recommissioning of the Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS), originally developed in the mid 1970's for pointing and vibration isolation of space experiments. The hardware was developed for NASA Langley Research Center by Sperry Flight Systems (now Honeywell Satellite Systems), was delivered to NASA in 1983. Recently, the hardware was loaned to Old Dominion University (ODU). The ASPS includes coarse gimbal assemblies and a Vernier Pointing Assembly (VPA) that utilize magnetic suspension to provide noncontacting vibration isolation and vernier pointing of the payload. The VPA is the main focus of this research. At ODU, the system has been modified such that it can now be operated in a l-g environment without a gravity offload. Suspension of the annular iron rotor in five degrees-of-freedom has been achieved with the use of modern switching power amplifiers and a digital controller implemented on a 486-class PC.

  14. Radiation acquisition and RBF neural network analysis on BOF end-point control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Wen, Hong-yuan; Zhou, Mu-chun; Chen, Yan-ru

    2008-12-01

    There are some problems in Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) steelmaking end-point control technology at present. A new BOF end-point control model was designed, which was based on the character of carbon oxygen reaction in Basic Oxygen Furnace steelmaking process. The image capture and transformation system was established by Video for Windows (VFW) library function, which is a video software development package promoted by Microsoft Corporation. In this paper, the Radial Basic Function (RBF) neural network model was established by using the real-time acquisition information. The input parameters can acquire easily online and the output parameter is the end-point time, which can compare with the actual value conveniently. The experience results show that the predication result is ideal and the experiment results show the model can work well in the steelmaking adverse environment.

  15. Design Considerations for Miniaturized Control Moment Gyroscopes for Rapid Retargeting and Precision Pointing of Small Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patankar, Kunal; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design as well as characterization of a practical control moment gyroscope (CMG) based attitude control system (ACS) for small satellites in the 15-20 kilogram mass range performing rapid retargeting and precision pointing maneuvers. The paper focuses on the approach taken in the design of miniaturized CMGs while considering the constraints imposed by the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components as well as the size of the satellite. It is shown that a hybrid mode is more suitable for COTS based moment exchange actuators; a mode that uses the torque amplification of CMGs for rapid retargeting and direct torque capabilities of the flywheel motors for precision pointing. A simulation is provided to demonstrate on-orbit slew and pointing performance.

  16. Effect of Confinement on the Bubble Points of Hydrocarbons in Controlled-Pore Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Sheng; Lutkenhaus, Jodie; Nasrabadi, Hadi; Hadi Nasrabadi Team

    2015-03-01

    Phase behavior in shale remains a challenging problem in the petroleum industry due to many complexities. One complexity is the strong surface-fluid interactions in shale nano-scale pores. These interactions can lead to a heterogeneous distribution of molecules, which conventional bulk-phase thermodynamics fails to describe. Herein, we report a study on the bubble points of various hydrocarbons confined in nanoporous controlled-pore glasses of 4.3 to 38.1 nm pore diameter. Differential scanning calorimetry is used to measure the temperature at which the gas phase begins to form (i.e. bubble point). Besides pore diameter, the relative hydrocarbon loading in the controlled-pore glass is evaluated. The findings suggest that the bubble point is dramatically affected by pore diameter.

  17. Acute Alcohol Consumption Impairs Controlled but Not Automatic Processes in a Psychophysical Pointing Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Kevin; Timney, Brian; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the effects of alcohol consumption on controlled and automatic cognitive processes. Such studies have shown that alcohol impairs performance on tasks requiring conscious, intentional control, while leaving automatic performance relatively intact. Here, we sought to extend these findings to aspects of visuomotor control by investigating the effects of alcohol in a visuomotor pointing paradigm that allowed us to separate the influence of controlled and automatic processes. Six male participants were assigned to an experimental “correction” condition in which they were instructed to point at a visual target as quickly and accurately as possible. On a small percentage of trials, the target “jumped” to a new location. On these trials, the participants’ task was to amend their movement such that they pointed to the new target location. A second group of 6 participants were assigned to a “countermanding” condition, in which they were instructed to terminate their movements upon detection of target “jumps”. In both the correction and countermanding conditions, participants served as their own controls, taking part in alcohol and no-alcohol conditions on separate days. Alcohol had no effect on participants’ ability to correct movements “in flight”, but impaired the ability to withhold such automatic corrections. Our data support the notion that alcohol selectively impairs controlled processes in the visuomotor domain. PMID:23861934

  18. Development of an Adaptively Controlled Telescope with Star-Pattern Recognition Pointing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sick, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a 32-cm f/5 Newtonian telescope intended for use by amateur astronomers in producing scientifically useful observations through high-accuracy computer control. The telescope is designed to achieve a 10-arcsecond pointing accuracy through the use of a star-pattern recognition algorithm. This star-pattern recognition pointing algorithm allows pointing errors such as tube flexure and mount misalignment to be intuitively identified and corrected without the need for calibrating positional encoders. This star-pattern recognition algorithm is based on comparing the shapes of visible patterns of six stars in any given field of view to a pre-compiled catalog of star-patterns that is generated by a software package called Star Field Simulator. A second-generation algorithm is presented in this paper that features an empirical image appearance prediction system, which adds photometric measurements to the star-pattern recognition. This allows the effects of unresolvable clusters of stars, and the presence of non-stellar objects to be included in the star-pattern recognition process through the prediction of an object's pixel brightness and point spread function. Testing with pointing camera images has shown that star appearance on a CCD can be predicted with high accuracy. The telescope hardware features a unique fiberglass and metal composite construction technique for precision component placement. An innovative placement of the autoguiding camera at the Newtonian prime focus through an on-axis tracking platform is also featured. The telescope is controlled with real-time software, on a laptop computer, using modified Firewire video cameras to provide pointing and tracking data. To test the accuracy of the control algorithms and simulate the effects of errors from environmental and mechanical sources, a software application was written. Results from this and other tests have shown that this telescope can operate within the preset

  19. POINTS-OF-CONTACT (ATMOSPHERIC PROTECTION BRANCH, AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atmospheric Protection Branch's (APB's) Points-of-Contact page lists APB's research areas along with the name, phone number and e-mail address of the responsible person. APB is part of NRMRL's Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division in Research Triangle Park, NC. The ...

  20. POINTS-OF-CONTACT (AIR POLLUTION TECHNOLOGY BRANCH, AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air Pollution Technology Branch's (APTB) Point-of-Contact page lists APTB research areas along with the name, telephone number, and e-mail address for each responsible person. APTB's research areas include NOx Control, Hazardous Waste Incineration, Municipal Waste Combustion,...

  1. Geometric correction of satellite data using curvilinear features and virtual control points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Algazi, V. R.; Ford, G. E.; Meyer, D. I.

    1979-01-01

    A simple, yet effective procedure for the geometric correction of partial Landsat scenes is described. The procedure is based on the acquisition of actual and virtual control points from the line printer output of enhanced curvilinear features. The accuracy of this method compares favorably with that of the conventional approach in which an interactive image display system is employed.

  2. Public Data Set: Control and Automation of the Pegasus Multi-point Thomson Scattering System

    DOE Data Explorer

    Bodner, Grant M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000324979172); Bongard, Michael W. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Fonck, Raymond J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Reusch, Joshua A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000284249422); Rodriguez Sanchez, Cuauhtemoc [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000334712586); Schlossberg, David J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000287139448)

    2016-08-12

    This public data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in G.M. Bodner et al., 'Control and Automation of the Pegasus Multi-point Thomson Scattering System,' Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 11E523 (2016).

  3. LST data management and mission operations concept. [pointing control optimization for maximum data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R.; Hudson, F.; Murphy, L.

    1977-01-01

    A candidate design concept for an LST ground facility is described. The design objectives were to use NASA institutional hardware, software and facilities wherever practical, and to maximize efficiency of telescope use. The pointing control performance requirements of LST are summarized, and the major data interfaces of the candidate ground system are diagrammed.

  4. Hierarchical tailoring of strut architecture to control permeability of additive manufactured titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Jones, D; Yue, S; Lee, P D; Jones, J R; Sutcliffe, C J; Jones, E

    2013-10-01

    Porous titanium implants are a common choice for bone augmentation. Implants for spinal fusion and repair of non-union fractures must encourage blood flow after implantation so that there is sufficient cell migration, nutrient and growth factor transport to stimulate bone ingrowth. Additive manufacturing techniques allow a large number of pore network designs. This study investigates how the design factors offered by selective laser melting technique can be used to alter the implant architecture on multiple length scales to control and even tailor the flow. Permeability is a convenient parameter that characterises flow, correlating to structure openness (interconnectivity and pore window size), tortuosity and hence flow shear rates. Using experimentally validated computational simulations, we demonstrate how additive manufacturing can be used to tailor implant properties by controlling surface roughness at a microstructual level (microns), and by altering the strut ordering and density at a mesoscopic level (millimetre). PMID:23910314

  5. Controlling a toxic shock of pentachlorophenol (PCP) to anaerobic digestion using activated carbon addition.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yeyuan; De Araujo, Cecilia; Sze, Chun Chau; Stuckey, David C

    2015-04-01

    Several powdered and granular activated carbons (PACs and GACs) were tested for adsorption of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in bench-scale anaerobic digestion reactors to control the toxicity of PCP to acetoclastic methanogenesis. Results showed that the adsorption capacities of PAC were reduced by 21-54%, depending on the PAC addition time, in the presence of the methanogenic sludge compared to the controls without sludge. As a preventive measure, PAC at a low dose of 20% (mass ratio to the VSS) added 24 h prior to, or simultaneously with, the addition of PCP could completely eliminate the toxic effects of PCP. At the same dose, PAC also enabled methanogenesis to recover immediately after the sludge had been exposed to PCP for 24h. GAC was not effective in enabling the recovery of methanogenesis due to its slow adsorption kinetics; however, at a dose of 80% it could partially ameliorate the toxic shock of PCP. PMID:25665874

  6. How to control the scaling of CaCO3: a "fingerprinting technique" to classify additives.

    PubMed

    Verch, Andreas; Gebauer, Denis; Antonietti, Markus; Cölfen, Helmut

    2011-10-01

    A titration set-up coupling ion selective electrodes with pH adjustment was used to analyze the effects of additives present during precipitation of calcium carbonate. Besides industrially well-established antiscalants (sodium triphosphate, citrate, polyacrylate and poly(aspartic acid)), also functional polymers being active in morphosynthesis (polystyrene sulfonate and poly(styrene-alt-maleic acid)) were analyzed. Interestingly each additive acts in its specific way, suggesting the notation "fingerprinting" for a complex interplay of up to five "solution modes" of influencing CaCO(3) precipitation and crystallisation. The results provide new insights into the modes of additive controlled crystallisation, and in the long run, the insights may facilitate the design of precipitation systems that yield complex and tailor-made crystals. PMID:21860865

  7. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) have been used for thermal control of several NASA and commercial orbiting spacecraft. The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its compensation chamber (CC). Most LHPs use the CC temperature for feedback control of its operating temperature. There exists a thermal resistance between the heat source to be cooled by the LHP and the LHP's CC. Even if the CC set point temperature is controlled precisely, the heat source temperature will still vary with its heat output. For most applications, controlling the heat source temperature is of most interest. A logical question to ask is: "Can the heat source temperature be used for feedback control of the LHP operation?" A test program has been implemented to answer the above question. Objective is to investigate the LHP performance using the CC temperature and the heat source temperature for feedback control

  8. Assessment of autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia using point process models of human heart beat dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2009-07-01

    Tracking the autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) from electrocardiogram and respiratory measurements is an important problem in cardiovascular control. We propose a point process adaptive filter algorithm based on an inverse Gaussian model to track heart beat intervals that incorporates respiratory measurements as a covariate and provides an analytic form for computing a dynamic estimate of RSA gain. We use Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests and autocorrelation function analyses to assess model goodness-of-fit. We illustrate the properties of the new dynamic estimate of RSA in the analysis of simulated heart beat data and actual heart beat data recorded from subjects in a four-state postural study of heart beat dynamics: control, sympathetic blockade, parasympathetic blockade, and combined sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade. In addition to giving an accurate description of the heart beat data, our adaptive filter algorithm confirms established findings pointing at a vagally mediated RSA and provides a new dynamic RSA estimate that can be used to track cardiovascular control between and within a broad range of postural, pharmacological, and age conditions. Our paradigm suggests a possible framework for designing a device for ambulatory monitoring and assessment of autonomic control in both laboratory research and clinical practice. PMID:19272971

  9. Evaluation of the Leap Motion Controller as a New Contact-Free Pointing Device

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Daniel; Weichert, Frank; Rinkenauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a Fitts' law-based analysis of the user's performance in selection tasks with the Leap Motion Controller compared with a standard mouse device. The Leap Motion Controller (LMC) is a new contact-free input system for gesture-based human-computer interaction with declared sub-millimeter accuracy. Up to this point, there has hardly been any systematic evaluation of this new system available. With an error rate of 7.8 % for the LMC and 2.8% for the mouse device, movement times twice as large as for a mouse device and high overall effort ratings, the Leap Motion Controller's performance as an input device for everyday generic computer pointing tasks is rather limited, at least with regard to the selection recognition provided by the LMC. PMID:25609043

  10. Stimulus control and generalization of point-loss punishment with humans.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, J; Crosbie, J; Williams, D C; Saunders, K J

    2000-01-01

    Two experiments demonstrated stimulus control and generalization of conditioned punishment with humans. In both studies, responses first were reinforced with points exchangeable for money on a variable-interval schedule in the presence of one line length (S(D)). Next, a second line length was introduced, and point loss followed every response in the presence of that line (S(D)p). In the final training condition, points were deducted at session end. Response rate was lower in the presence of the S(D)p despite equal rates of points for money in the presence of both stimuli. In generalization testing for Experiment 1, the two lines were included in a 10-line continuum; S(D)p fell in the middle and the trained SD was at one end. Lines were presented randomly, and point delivery and loss contingencies were as in training but with points available in the presence of all lines. For all subjects, response rates were lowest around S(D)p and increased towards the SD end of the continuum. Because testing included only one or two lines beyond S(D), this pattern did not rule out S(D) generalization. Thus, in Experiment 2, stimuli beyond S(D) were added to generalization tests. Response rates did not decrease as a function of distance from S(D), clarifying the demonstration of punishment generalization. PMID:10866351

  11. Using Fast-Steering Mirror Control to Reduce Instrument Pointing Errors Caused by Spacecraft Jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antol, Jeffery; Holtz, Ted M.; Cuda, Vince; Johnson, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    The scope of this study was to investigate the benefit of using feedback control of a Fast Steering Mirror (FSM) to reduce instrument pointing errors. Initially, the study identified FSM control technologies and categorized them according to their use, range of applicability, and physical requirements. Candidate payloads were then evaluated according to their relevance in use of fast steering minor control technologies. This leads to the mission and instrument selection which served as the candidate mission for numerical modeling. A standard SmallSat was designed in order to accommodate the payload requirements (weight, size, power, etc.). This included sizing the SmallSat bus, sizing the solar array, choosing appropriate antennas, and identifying an attitude control system (ACS). A feedback control system for the FSM compensation was then designed, and the instrument pointing error and SmallSat jitter environment for open-loop and closed-loop FSM control were evaluated for typical SmallSat disturbances. The results were then compared to determine the effectiveness of the FSM feedback control system.

  12. Fuzzy logic based feedback control system for laser beam pointing stabilization.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjeet; Patel, Kiran; Govindarajan, J; Kumar, Ajai

    2010-09-20

    This paper reports a fuzzy logic based feedback control system for beam pointing stabilization of a high-power nanosecond Nd:YAG laser operating at 30 Hz. This is achieved by generating the correcting signal for each consequent pulse from the error in the pointing position of the previous laser pulse. We have successfully achieved a reduction of beam position fluctuation from ±60 to ±5.0 μrad without the focusing optics and ±0.9 μrad with focusing optics. PMID:20856289

  13. Initial experiments on the end-point control of a flexible one-link robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Schmitz, E.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with initial experiments regarding a specific unsolved control problem which appeared to be central to advances in the art of robotics. This problem involves the control of a flexible member (one link of a robot system). The position of the end-effector, called the end point or tip, is controlled by measuring that position and using the measurement as a basis for applying control torque to the other end of the flexible member, as for instance, the robot's elbow joint. A description is presented of the features of the first experimental arm which has been made, and an outline is provided of the general strategy for controlling it using its tip sensor and shoulder torquer.

  14. Steering quantum dynamics via bang-bang control: Implementing optimal fixed-point quantum search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhole, Gaurav; Anjusha, V. S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    A robust control over quantum dynamics is of paramount importance for quantum technologies. Many of the existing control techniques are based on smooth Hamiltonian modulations involving repeated calculations of basic unitaries resulting in time complexities scaling rapidly with the length of the control sequence. Here we show that bang-bang controls need one-time calculation of basic unitaries and hence scale much more efficiently. By employing a global optimization routine such as the genetic algorithm, it is possible to synthesize not only highly intricate unitaries, but also certain nonunitary operations. We demonstrate the unitary control through the implementation of the optimal fixed-point quantum search algorithm in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system. Moreover, by combining the bang-bang pulses with the crusher gradients, we also demonstrate nonunitary transformations of thermal equilibrium states into effective pure states in three- as well as five-qubit NMR systems.

  15. PointCom: semi-autonomous UGV control with intuitive interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Mitchell M.; Perlin, Victor E.; Iagnemma, Karl D.; Lupa, Robert M.; Rohde, Steven M.; Overholt, James; Fiorani, Graham

    2008-04-01

    Unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) will play an important role in the nation's next-generation ground force. Advances in sensing, control, and computing have enabled a new generation of technologies that bridge the gap between manual UGV teleoperation and full autonomy. In this paper, we present current research on a unique command and control system for UGVs named PointCom (Point-and-Go Command). PointCom is a semi-autonomous command system for one or multiple UGVs. The system, when complete, will be easy to operate and will enable significant reduction in operator workload by utilizing an intuitive image-based control framework for UGV navigation and allowing a single operator to command multiple UGVs. The project leverages new image processing algorithms for monocular visual servoing and odometry to yield a unique, high-performance fused navigation system. Human Computer Interface (HCI) techniques from the entertainment software industry are being used to develop video-game style interfaces that require little training and build upon the navigation capabilities. By combining an advanced navigation system with an intuitive interface, a semi-autonomous control and navigation system is being created that is robust, user friendly, and less burdensome than many current generation systems. mand).

  16. Geometric Calibration of ZIYUAN-3 Three-Line Cameras Combining Ground Control Points and Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jinshan; Yuan, Xiuxiao; Gong, Jianya

    2016-06-01

    Due to the large biases between the laboratory-calibrated values of the orientation parameters and their in-orbit true values, the initial direct georeferencing accuracy of the Ziyuan-3 (ZY-3) three-line camera (TLC) images can only reach the kilometre level. In this paper, a point-based geometric calibration model of the ZY-3 TLCs is firstly established by using the collinearity constraint, and then a line-based geometric calibration model is established by using the coplanarity constraint. With the help of both the point-based and the line-based models, a feasible in-orbit geometric calibration approach for the ZY-3 TLCs combining ground control points (GCPs) and ground control lines (GCLs) is presented. Experimental results show that like GCPs, GCLs can also provide effective ground control information for the geometric calibration of the ZY-3 TLCs. The calibration accuracy of the look angles of charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors achieved by using the presented approach reached up to about 1.0''. After the geometric calibration, the direct georeferencing accuracy of the ZY-3 TLC images without ground controls was significantly improved from the kilometre level to better than 11 m in planimetry and 9 m in height. A more satisfactory georeferencing accuracy of better than 3.5 m in planimetry and 3.0 m in height was achieved after the block adjustment with four GCPs.

  17. Design of set-point weighting PIλ + Dμ controller for vertical magnetic flux controller in Damavand tokamak.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, H; Fatehi, A

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a simple method is presented for tuning weighted PI(λ) + D(μ) controller parameters based on the pole placement controller of pseudo-second-order fractional systems. One of the advantages of this controller is capability of reducing the disturbance effects and improving response to input, simultaneously. In the following sections, the performance of this controller is evaluated experimentally to control the vertical magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak. For this work, at first a fractional order model is identified using output-error technique in time domain. For various practical experiments, having desired time responses for magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak, is vital. To approach this, at first the desired closed loop reference models are obtained based on generalized characteristic ratio assignment method in fractional order systems. After that, for the identified model, a set-point weighting PI(λ) + D(μ) controller is designed and simulated. Finally, this controller is implemented on digital signal processor control system of the plant to fast/slow control of magnetic flux. The practical results show appropriate performance of this controller. PMID:25554294

  18. Galactosyltransferase 4 is a major control point for glycan branching in N-linked glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Andrew G.; Hayes, Jerrard M.; Bezak, Tania; Głuchowska, Sonia A.; Cosgrave, Eoin F. J.; Struwe, Weston B.; Stroop, Corné J. M.; Kok, Han; van de Laar, Teun; Rudd, Pauline M.; Tipton, Keith F.; Davey, Gavin P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein N-glycosylation is a common post-translational modification that produces a complex array of branched glycan structures. The levels of branching, or antennarity, give rise to differential biological activities for single glycoproteins. However, the precise mechanism controlling the glycan branching and glycosylation network is unknown. Here, we constructed quantitative mathematical models of N-linked glycosylation that predicted new control points for glycan branching. Galactosyltransferase, which acts on N-acetylglucosamine residues, was unexpectedly found to control metabolic flux through the glycosylation pathway and the level of final antennarity of nascent protein produced in the Golgi network. To further investigate the biological consequences of glycan branching in nascent proteins, we glycoengineered a series of mammalian cells overexpressing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). We identified a mechanism in which galactosyltransferase 4 isoform regulated N-glycan branching on the nascent protein, subsequently controlling biological activity in an in vivo model of hCG activity. We found that galactosyltransferase 4 is a major control point for glycan branching decisions taken in the Golgi of the cell, which might ultimately control the biological activity of nascent glycoprotein. PMID:25271059

  19. Compliance and control characteristics of an additive manufactured-flexure stage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents a compliance and positioning control characteristics of additive manufactured-nanopositioning system consisted of the flexure mechanism and voice coil motor (VCM). The double compound notch type flexure stage was designed to utilize the elastic deformation of two symmetrical four-bar mechanisms to provide a millimeter-level working range. Additive manufacturing (AM) process, stereolithography, was used to fabricate the flexure stage. The AM stage was inspected by using 3D X-ray computerized tomography scanner: air-voids and shape irregularity. The compliance, open-loop resonance peak, and damping ratio of the AM stage were measured 0.317 mm/N, 80 Hz, and 0.19, respectively. The AM stage was proportional-integral-derivative positioning feedback-controlled and the capacitive type sensor was used to measure the displacement. As a result, the AM flexure mechanism was successfully 25 nm positioning controlled within 500 μm range. The resonance peak was found approximately at 280 Hz in closed-loop. This research showed that the AM flexure mechanism and the VCM can provide millimeter range with high precision and can be a good alternative to an expensive metal-based flexure mechanism and piezoelectric transducer.

  20. Multiple small RNAs act additively to integrate sensory information and control quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Kimberly C.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2007-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a cell–cell communication mechanism that bacteria use to collectively regulate gene expression and, at a higher level, to coordinate group behavior. In the bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, sensory information from three independent quorum-sensing systems converges on the shared response regulator LuxO. When LuxO is phosphorylated, it activates the expression of a putative repressor that destabilizes the mRNA encoding the master quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator LuxR. In the closely related species Vibrio cholerae, this repressor was revealed to be the RNA chaperone Hfq together with four small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) called Qrr1–4 (quorum regulatory RNA). Here, we identify five Qrr sRNAs that control quorum sensing in V. harveyi. Mutational analysis reveals that only four of the five Qrrs are required for destabilization of the luxR mRNA. Surprisingly, unlike in V. cholerae where the sRNAs act redundantly, in V. harveyi, the Qrr sRNAs function additively to control quorum sensing. This latter mechanism produces a gradient of LuxR that, in turn, enables differential regulation of quorum-sensing target genes. Other regulators appear to be involved in control of V. harveyi qrr expression, allowing the integration of additional sensory information into the regulation of quorum-sensing gene expression. PMID:17234887

  1. Compliance and control characteristics of an additive manufactured-flexure stage.

    PubMed

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a compliance and positioning control characteristics of additive manufactured-nanopositioning system consisted of the flexure mechanism and voice coil motor (VCM). The double compound notch type flexure stage was designed to utilize the elastic deformation of two symmetrical four-bar mechanisms to provide a millimeter-level working range. Additive manufacturing (AM) process, stereolithography, was used to fabricate the flexure stage. The AM stage was inspected by using 3D X-ray computerized tomography scanner: air-voids and shape irregularity. The compliance, open-loop resonance peak, and damping ratio of the AM stage were measured 0.317 mm/N, 80 Hz, and 0.19, respectively. The AM stage was proportional-integral-derivative positioning feedback-controlled and the capacitive type sensor was used to measure the displacement. As a result, the AM flexure mechanism was successfully 25 nm positioning controlled within 500 μm range. The resonance peak was found approximately at 280 Hz in closed-loop. This research showed that the AM flexure mechanism and the VCM can provide millimeter range with high precision and can be a good alternative to an expensive metal-based flexure mechanism and piezoelectric transducer. PMID:25933897

  2. Compliance and control characteristics of an additive manufactured-flexure stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a compliance and positioning control characteristics of additive manufactured-nanopositioning system consisted of the flexure mechanism and voice coil motor (VCM). The double compound notch type flexure stage was designed to utilize the elastic deformation of two symmetrical four-bar mechanisms to provide a millimeter-level working range. Additive manufacturing (AM) process, stereolithography, was used to fabricate the flexure stage. The AM stage was inspected by using 3D X-ray computerized tomography scanner: air-voids and shape irregularity. The compliance, open-loop resonance peak, and damping ratio of the AM stage were measured 0.317 mm/N, 80 Hz, and 0.19, respectively. The AM stage was proportional-integral-derivative positioning feedback-controlled and the capacitive type sensor was used to measure the displacement. As a result, the AM flexure mechanism was successfully 25 nm positioning controlled within 500 μm range. The resonance peak was found approximately at 280 Hz in closed-loop. This research showed that the AM flexure mechanism and the VCM can provide millimeter range with high precision and can be a good alternative to an expensive metal-based flexure mechanism and piezoelectric transducer.

  3. Entanglement, quantum phase transition and fixed-point bifurcation in the N-atom Jaynes Cummings model with an additional symmetry breaking term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagas, E. A.; Furuya, K.

    2008-08-01

    In the present work we analyze the quantum phase transition (QPT) in the N-atom Jaynes-Cummings model (NJCM) with an additional symmetry breaking interaction term in the Hamiltonian. We show that depending on the type of symmetry breaking term added the transition order can change or not and also the fixed point associated to the classical analogue of the Hamiltonian can bifurcate or not. We present two examples of symmetry broken Hamiltonians and discuss based on them, the interconnection between the transition order, appearance of bifurcation and the behavior of the entanglement.

  4. Multiplicative noise effects on electroconvection in controlling additive noise by a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    We report multiplicative noise-induced threshold shift of electroconvection (EC) in the presence of a magnetic field H . Controlling the thermal fluctuation (i.e., additive noise) of the rodlike molecules of nematic liquid crystals by H , the EC threshold is examined at various noise levels [characterized by their intensity and cutoff frequency (fc) ]. For a sufficiently strong H (i.e., ignorable additive noise), a modified noise sensitivity characterizing the shift problem is in good agreement with experimental results for colored as well as white noise (fc→∞ ) ; until now, there was a large deviation for (sufficiently) colored noises. The present study shows that H provides us with ideal conditions for studying the corresponding Carr-Helfrich theory considering pure multiplicative noise.

  5. Multiplicative noise effects on electroconvection in controlling additive noise by a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    We report multiplicative noise-induced threshold shift of electroconvection (EC) in the presence of a magnetic field H. Controlling the thermal fluctuation (i.e., additive noise) of the rodlike molecules of nematic liquid crystals by H, the EC threshold is examined at various noise levels [characterized by their intensity and cutoff frequency (f(c))]. For a sufficiently strong H (i.e., ignorable additive noise), a modified noise sensitivity characterizing the shift problem is in good agreement with experimental results for colored as well as white noise (f(c)→∞); until now, there was a large deviation for (sufficiently) colored noises. The present study shows that H provides us with ideal conditions for studying the corresponding Carr-Helfrich theory considering pure multiplicative noise. PMID:26764708

  6. Model reference adaptive control for the azimuth-pointing system of a balloon-borne stabilized platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, Philip M.; Tomizuka, Masayoshi; Chingcuanco, Alfredo O.; Meinhold, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    A balloon-born stabilized platform has been developed for the remotely operated altitude-azimuth pointing of a millimeter wave telescope system. This paper presents a development and implementation of model reference adaptive control (MRAC) for the azimuth-pointing system of the stabilized platform. The primary goal of the controller is to achieve pointing rms better than 0.1 deg. Simulation results indicate that MRAC can achieve pointing rms better than 0.1 deg. Ground test results show pointing rms better than 0.03 deg. Data from the first flight at the National Scientific Balloon Facility (NSBF) Palestine, Texas show pointing rms better than 0.02 deg.

  7. Realworld maximum power point tracking simulation of PV system based on Fuzzy Logic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Ahmed M.; El-arini, Mahdi M. M.; Ghitas, Ahmed; Fathy, Ahmed

    2012-12-01

    In the recent years, the solar energy becomes one of the most important alternative sources of electric energy, so it is important to improve the efficiency and reliability of the photovoltaic (PV) systems. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) plays an important role in photovoltaic power systems because it maximize the power output from a PV system for a given set of conditions, and therefore maximize their array efficiency. This paper presents a maximum power point tracker (MPPT) using Fuzzy Logic theory for a PV system. The work is focused on the well known Perturb and Observe (P&O) algorithm and is compared to a designed fuzzy logic controller (FLC). The simulation work dealing with MPPT controller; a DC/DC Ćuk converter feeding a load is achieved. The results showed that the proposed Fuzzy Logic MPPT in the PV system is valid.

  8. "The real point is control": the reception of Barbara McClintock's controlling elements.

    PubMed

    Comfort, N C

    1999-01-01

    In the standard narrative of her life, Barbara McClintock discovered genetic transposition in the 1940s but no one believed her. She was ignored until molecular biologists of the 1970s "rediscovered" transposition and vindicated her heretical discovery. New archival documents, as well as interviews and close reading of published papers, belie this narrative. Transposition was accepted immediately by both maize and bacterial geneticists. Maize geneticists confirmed it repeatedly in the early 1950s and by the late 1950s it was considered a classic discovery. But for McClintock, movable elements were part of an elaborate system of genetic control that she hypothesized to explain development and differentiation. This theory was highly speculative and was not widely accepted, even by those who had discovered transposition independently. When Jacob and Monod presented their alternative model for gene regulation, the operon, her controller argument was discarded as incorrect. Transposition, however, was soon discovered in microorganisms and by the late 1970s was recognized as a phenomenon of biomedical importance. For McClintock, the award of the 1983 Nobel Prize to her for the discovery of movable genetic elements, long treated as a legitimation, may well have been bittersweet. This new look at McClintock's experiments and theory has implications for the intellectual history of biology, the social history of American genetics, and McClintock's role in the historiography of women in science. PMID:11623812

  9. Design and tuning of standard additive model based fuzzy PID controllers for multivariable process systems.

    PubMed

    Harinath, Eranda; Mann, George K I

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes a design and two-level tuning method for fuzzy proportional-integral derivative (FPID) controllers for a multivariable process where the fuzzy inference uses the inference of standard additive model. The proposed method can be used for any n x n multi-input-multi-output process and guarantees closed-loop stability. In the two-level tuning scheme, the tuning follows two steps: low-level tuning followed by high-level tuning. The low-level tuning adjusts apparent linear gains, whereas the high-level tuning changes the nonlinearity in the normalized fuzzy output. In this paper, two types of FPID configurations are considered, and their performances are evaluated by using a real-time multizone temperature control problem having a 3 x 3 process system. PMID:18558531

  10. Iterative reconstruction of volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy plans using control point basis vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiere, Joseph C.; Kapulsky, Alexander; Ndlovu, Alois

    2014-03-01

    Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy is an innovative technique currently utilized to efficiently deliver complex treatments. Dose rate, speed of rotation, and field shape are continuously varied as the radiation source rotates about the patient. Patient specific quality assurance is performed to verify that the delivered dose distribution is consistent with the plan formulated in a treatment planning system. The purpose of this work is to present novel methodology using a Gafchromic EBT3 film image of a patient plan in a cylindrical phantom and calculating the delivered MU per control point. Images of two dimensional plan dose matrices and film scans are analyzed using MATLAB with the imaging toolbox. Dose profiles in a ring corresponding to the film position are extracted from the plan matrices for comparison with the corresponding measured film dose. The plan is made up of a series of individual static Control Points. If we consider these Control Points a set of basis vectors, then variations in the plan can be represented as the weighted sum of the basis. The weighing coefficients representing the actual delivered MU can be determined by any available optimization tool, such as downhill simplex or non-linear programming. In essence we reconstruct an image of the delivered dose. Clinical quality assurance is performed with this technique by computing a patient plan with the measured monitor units and standard plan evaluation tools such as Dose Volume Histograms. Testing of the algorithm with known changes in the reference images indicated a correlation coefficient greater than 0.99.

  11. Control of flow around a circular cylinder by bleed near the separation points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xu-Dong; Feng, Li-Hao

    2015-12-01

    The flow around a circular cylinder under bleed control is experimentally investigated in a water tunnel. The bleed jets are issued from the narrow slots directed from the front stagnation point to the positions near the upper and lower separation points. The Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter are Re = 400, 780, and 1470, while the widths of the bleed slot are selected as w/D = 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2. The bleed jet interacts with the boundary layer, postponing the separation point to be near the downstream edge of the slot. It further modifies the wake shear layer, which moves away from the centerline. Thus, the recirculation bubble downstream of the circular cylinder is enlarged and the near wake width are increased, resulting in an increased vortex formation length and a decreased vortex shedding frequency. Such changes of the flow field increase with the bleed width. The vortex dynamics is also analyzed, showing that the wake pattern could be modified by the bleed control. The wake vortex is converted into a bistable mode at w/D = 0.1 and 0.2, Re = 780 and 1470, where the symmetric and asymmetric modes are both observed, while all the control cases at Re = 400 still show the asymmetric mode.

  12. Critical control points of complementary food preparation and handling in eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed Central

    Ehiri, J. E.; Azubuike, M. C.; Ubbaonu, C. N.; Anyanwu, E. C.; Ibe, K. M.; Ogbonna, M. O.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate microbial contamination and critical control points (CCPs) in the preparation and handling of complementary foods in 120 households in Imo state, Nigeria. METHODS: The Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) approach was used to investigate processes and procedures that contributed to microbial contamination, growth and survival, and to identify points where controls could be applied to prevent or eliminate these microbiological hazards or reduce them to acceptable levels. Food samples were collected and tested microbiologically at different stages of preparation and handling. FINDINGS: During cooking, all foods attained temperatures capable of destroying vegetative forms of food-borne pathogens. However, the risk of contamination increased by storage of food at ambient temperature, by using insufficiently high temperatures to reheat the food, and by adding contaminated ingredients such as dried ground crayfish and soybean powder at stages where no further heat treatment was applied. The purchasing of contaminated raw foodstuffs and ingredients, particularly raw akamu, from vendors in open markets is also a CCP. CONCLUSION: Although an unsafe environment poses many hazards for children's food, the hygienic quality of prepared food can be assured if basic food safety principles are observed. When many factors contribute to food contamination, identification of CCPs becomes particularly important and can facilitate appropriate targeting of resources and prevention efforts. PMID:11417038

  13. Testing of an End-Point Control Unit Designed to Enable Precision Control of Manipulator-Coupled Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C.; Ghosh, Dave; Tobbe, Patrick A.; Weathers, John M.; Manouchehri, Davoud; Lindsay, Thomas S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an end-point control concept designed to enable precision telerobotic control of manipulator-coupled spacecraft. The concept employs a hardware unit (end-point control unit EPCU) that is positioned between the end-effector of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System and the payload. Features of the unit are active compliance (control of the displacement between the end-effector and the payload), to allow precision control of payload motions, and inertial load relief, to prevent the transmission of loads between the end-effector and the payload. This paper presents the concept and studies the active compliance feature using a simulation and hardware. Results of the simulation show the effectiveness of the EPCU in smoothing the motion of the payload. Results are presented from initial, limited tests of a laboratory hardware unit on a robotic arm testbed at the l Space Flight Center. Tracking performance of the arm in a constant speed automated retraction and extension maneuver of a heavy payload with and without the unit active is compared for the design speed and higher speeds. Simultaneous load reduction and tracking performance are demonstrated using the EPCU.

  14. Dithering Digital Ripple Correlation Control for Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, C; Pilawa-Podgurski, RCN

    2015-08-01

    This study demonstrates a new method for rapid and precise maximum power point tracking in photovoltaic (PV) applications using dithered PWM control. Constraints imposed by efficiency, cost, and component size limit the available PWM resolution of a power converter, and may in turn limit the MPP tracking efficiency of the PV system. In these scenarios, PWM dithering can be used to improve average PWM resolution. In this study, we present a control technique that uses ripple correlation control (RCC) on the dithering ripple, thereby achieving simultaneous fast tracking speed and high tracking accuracy. Moreover, the proposed method solves some of the practical challenges that have to date limited the effectiveness of RCC in solar PV applications. We present a theoretical derivation of the principles behind dithering digital ripple correlation control, as well as experimental results that show excellent tracking speed and accuracy with basic hardware requirements.

  15. Rapid torque-limited line-of-sight pointing of SCOLE (Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment) configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    The design concept of a control for rapid torque-limited slewing of a rigid-mast version of the NASA SCOLE configuration is presented and demonstrated by means of numerical simulation. The time-optimal control problem for the system is decomposed into separate single-axis problems, expanding analytically the implicit nonlinear transcendental expression for the SCOLE line-of-sight error, and the final Euler attitude angles and slew angles are determined. The simulation results are presented in tables and graphs, and it is found that bang-bang or bang-pause-bang slew maneuvers with control moment applied to the Shuttle and control force applied to the reflector, and with a 5-deg/s slew-rate limit, produce the best pointing accuracy and the shortest slew times, although the specified line-of-sight error of 0.02 deg cannot be achieved using such open-loop single-axis maneuvers.

  16. Formulation and bioavailability of controlled release salbutamol sulphate tablets using natural additives.

    PubMed

    Nouh, A T; Abd El-Gawad, A H; Guda, T K

    2010-04-01

    Salbutamol sulphate granules and physical mixtures were prepared using mastic with various natural additives. The prepared granules and physical mixtures were examined using IR and DSC. The obtained results indicate that there is no interaction between salbutamol sulphate and the formulation ingredients used. The physical properties and release behavior of the formulated tablets prepared from granules and physical mixtures were evaluated and showed good physical properties. The rate of drug release from tablets prepared from granules was found to be lower than that prepared from physical mixtures at fixed mastic concentration and the same additive. The rate of drug release decreased with increased mastic concentration in formulated tablets. Pectin and sodium alginate allowed the best controlled release rate of the drug. On the basis of the results obtained from the controlled release studies, selected sulbutamol formulations were subjected to an in vivo comparison with commercial sulbutamol tablets. The pharmacokinetic parameters AUC(0-24), C(max), and T(max) of sulbutamol from the selected formulation were determined after administration of a single oral dose of 8 mg and compared statistically using an ANOVA test. There was no significant difference in the AUC(0-24). On the other hand, there was a significant difference in the C(max) and T(max) between the commercial and the formulated tablets. These results demonstrate that the formulated tablets extended the time of the drug effect. PMID:22491165

  17. Low fluid leakoff cementing compositions and filtration control additive for cement

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, G.T.

    1993-07-20

    A cementing composition is described, for cementing oil or gas wells penetrating subterranean formations, capable of forming a fluid slurry when mixed with water comprising: dry hydraulic cement; and a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh. In a process for cementing a casing in an oil or gas well penetrating a subterranean formation wherein a cement slurry, formed by mixing water and hydraulic cement, is pumped down the well to flow upwardly between the casing and the subterranean formation, the improvement is described comprising: utilizing as a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, and utilizing finely ground peanut hulls wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh.

  18. Point-and-Click Cursor Control With an Intracortical Neural Interface System by Humans With Tetraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Phil; Simeral, John D.; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Donoghue, John P.; Friehs, Gerhard M.; Black, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a point-and-click intracortical neural interface system (NIS) that enables humans with tetraplegia to volitionally move a 2-D computer cursor in any desired direction on a computer screen, hold it still, and click on the area of interest. This direct brain–computer interface extracts both discrete (click) and continuous (cursor velocity) signals from a single small population of neurons in human motor cortex. A key component of this system is a multi-state probabilistic decoding algorithm that simultaneously decodes neural spiking activity of a small population of neurons and outputs either a click signal or the velocity of the cursor. The algorithm combines a linear classifier, which determines whether the user is intending to click or move the cursor, with a Kalman filter that translates the neural population activity into cursor velocity. We present a paradigm for training the multi-state decoding algorithm using neural activity observed during imagined actions. Two human participants with tetraplegia (paralysis of the four limbs) performed a closed-loop radial target acquisition task using the point-and-click NIS over multiple sessions. We quantified point-and-click performance using various human-computer interaction measurements for pointing devices. We found that participants could control the cursor motion and click on specified targets with a small error rate (<3% in one participant). This study suggests that signals from a small ensemble of motor cortical neurons (~40) can be used for natural point-and-click 2-D cursor control of a personal computer. PMID:21278024

  19. Two-axis Beam Steering Mirror Control system for Precision Pointing and Tracking Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ulander, K

    2006-02-08

    Precision pointing and tracking of laser beams is critical in numerous military and industrial applications. This is particularly true for systems requiring atmospheric beam propagation. Such systems are plagued by environmental influences which cause the optical signal to break up and wander. Example applications include laser communications, precision targeting, active imaging, chemical remote sensing, and laser vibrometry. The goal of this project is to build a beam steering system using a two-axis mirror to maintain precise pointing control. Ultimately, position control to 0.08% accuracy (40 {micro}rad) with a bandwidth of 200 Hz is desired. The work described encompasses evaluation of the instrumentation system and the subsequent design and implementation of an analog electronic controller for a two-axis mirror used to steer the beam. The controller operates over a wide temperature range, through multiple mirror resonances, and is independent of specific mirrors. The design was built and successfully fielded in a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory free-space optics experiment. All measurements and performance parameters are derived from measurements made on actual hardware that was built and field tested. In some cases, specific design details have been omitted that involve proprietary information pertaining to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory patent positions and claims. These omissions in no way impact the general validity of the work or concepts presented in this thesis.

  20. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures, 2. Part A: Shape and orientation control using point actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The equations of planar motion for a flexible beam in orbit which includes the effects of gravity gradient torques and control torques from point actuators located along the beam was developed. Two classes of theorems are applied to the linearized form of these equations to establish necessary conditions for controlability for preselected actuator configurations. The feedback gains are selected: (1) based on the decoupling of the original coordinates and to obtain proper damping, and (2) by applying the linear regulator problem to the individual model coordinates separately. The linear control laws obtained using both techniques were evaluated by numerical integration of the nonlinear system equations. Numerical examples considering pitch and various number of modes with different combination of actuator numbers and locations are presented. The independent model control concept used earlier with a discretized model of the thin beam in orbit was reviewed for the case where the number of actuators is less than the number of modes. Results indicate that although the system is controllable it is not stable about the nominal (local vertical) orientation when the control is based on modal decoupling. An alternate control law not based on modal decoupling ensures stability of all the modes.

  1. A Tuneable Switch for Controlling Environmental Degradation of Bioplastics: Addition of Isothiazolinone to Polyhydroxyalkanoates

    PubMed Central

    Woolnough, Catherine Anne; Yee, Lachlan Hartley; Charlton, Timothy Stuart; Foster, Leslie John Ray

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the environmental degradation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and polyhydroxyvalerate (P(HB-co-HV)) bioplastics would expand the range of their potential applications. Combining PHB and P(HB-co-HV) films with the anti-fouling agent 4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (DCOI, <10% w/w) restricted microbial colonisation in soil, but did not significantly affect melting temperature or the tensile strength of films. DCOI films showed reduced biofouling and postponed the onset of weight loss by up to 100 days, a 10-fold increase compared to unmodified films where the microbial coverage was significant. In addition, the rate of PHA-DCOI weight loss, post-onset, reduced by about 150%; in contrast a recorded weight loss of only 0.05% per day for P(HB-co-HV) with a 10% DCOI loading was observed. This is in stark contrast to the unmodified PHB film, where a recorded weight loss of only 0.75% per day was made. The ‘switch’ that initiates film weight loss, and its subsequent reduced rate, depended on the DCOI loading to control biofouling. The control of biofouling and environmental degradation for these DCOI modified bioplastics increases their potential use in biodegradable applications. PMID:24146779

  2. The food additive vanillic acid controls transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice

    PubMed Central

    Gitzinger, Marc; Kemmer, Christian; Fluri, David A.; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Trigger-inducible transcription-control devices that reversibly fine-tune transgene expression in response to molecular cues have significantly advanced the rational reprogramming of mammalian cells. When designed for use in future gene- and cell-based therapies the trigger molecules have to be carefully chosen in order to provide maximum specificity, minimal side-effects and optimal pharmacokinetics in a mammalian organism. Capitalizing on control components that enable Caulobacter crescentus to metabolize vanillic acid originating from lignin degradation that occurs in its oligotrophic freshwater habitat, we have designed synthetic devices that specifically adjust transgene expression in mammalian cells when exposed to vanillic acid. Even in mice transgene expression was robust, precise and tunable in response to vanillic acid. As a licensed food additive that is regularly consumed by humans via flavoured convenience food and specific fresh vegetable and fruits, vanillic acid can be considered as a safe trigger molecule that could be used for diet-controlled transgene expression in future gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:22187155

  3. Pointing control system for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Hans J.; Eisentraeger, Peter; Wandner, Karl; Nordmann, Rainer; Schoenhoff, Ulrich

    1998-05-01

    SOFIA, the successor of NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory KAO, is at present under development as a joint program of NASA and the German Space Agency DLR. SOFIA consists of a 2.5 m class IR telescope operated in a Boeing 747SP airplane at altitudes above 41,000 ft. The environment conditions of the telescope during operations in the open port of the aircraft are very harsh and not comparable with those of earthbound telescopes or space telescopes. The narrowness of the port, the disturbances by aircraft vibrations, aero- acoustic loads and wind, the low air pressure and temperatures, the airworthiness regulations, and the specified pointing accuracy of 0.2 arcsec are challenges for the telescope design, which need peculiar decisions. The SOFIA telescope concept takes up some essential features of the KAO telescope, but also acknowledges the technological progress and the increased mirror size. The optimal use of modern design and analysis methods- 'end-to-end- simulations', which combine the behavior of the optical, the structural, mechanical, and the control system and subdue it to the disturbances in the aircraft environment. The paper presents the principles design features of the proposed pointing control system for SOFIA and the latest result of the pointing simulations.

  4. Formation Flying Satellite Control Around the L2 Sun-Earth Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Nicholas H.; Folta, David; Carpenter, Russell; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a linear control algorithm for formations in the vicinity of the L2 sun-Earth libration point. The development of a simplified extended Kalman filter is included as well. Simulations are created for the analysis of the stationkeeping and various formation maneuvers of the Stellar Imager mission. The simulations provide tracking error, estimation error, and control effort results. For formation maneuvering, the formation spacecraft track to within 4 meters of their desired position and within 1.5 millimeters per second of their desired zero velocity. The filter, with few exceptions, keeps the estimation errors within their three-sigma values. Without noise, the controller performs extremely well, with the formation spacecraft tracking to within several micrometers. Each spacecraft uses around 1 to 2 grams of propellant per maneuver, depending on the circumstances.

  5. Libration point orbit rendezvous using PWPF modulated terminal sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yijun; Tang, Guojian

    2013-12-01

    The near-range rendezvous problem of two libration point orbit spacecraft in the Earth-Moon system is studied using the terminal sliding mode control which enables a time-fixed process with the flight time prescribed a priori. The underlying dynamics are the full nonlinear equations of motion for a complete Solar System model. For practical purposes, two means of pulse-width pulse-frequency (PWPF) modulation are employed to realize the theoretical continuous control with a series of thrust pulses. Extensive simulations with major errors taken into account show that the sliding mode controller can successfully guide the chaser to a given staging node with the final position and velocity errors, on average, lower than 20 m and 1 mm/s, respectively. Compared with the glideslope guidance previously studied, the proposed approach outperforms the former by saving approximately 50-60% of total delta-v.

  6. Additional Analgesia for Central Venous Catheter Insertion: A Placebo Controlled Randomized Trial of Dexmedetomidine and Fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Samantaray, Aloka; Hanumantha Rao, Mangu; Sahu, Chitta Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to show that a single preprocedural dose of either dexmedetomidine or fentanyl reduces procedural pain and discomfort and provides clinically acceptable sedation. In this prospective, double-blind study, sixty patients scheduled for elective surgery and requiring planned central venous catheter insertion were randomized to receive dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg), fentanyl (1 μg/kg), or 0.9% normal saline intravenously over ten minutes followed by local anesthetic field infiltration before attempting central venous catheterization. The primary outcome measures are assessment and analysis of pain, discomfort, and sedation level before, during, and after the central venous catheter insertion at five time points. The median (IQR) pain score is worst for normal saline group at local anaesthetic injection [6 (4–6.7)] which was significantly attenuated by addition of fentanyl [3 (2–4)] and dexmedetomidine [4 (3–5)] in the immediate postprocedural period (P = 0.001). However, the procedure related discomfort was significantly lower in dexmedetomidine group compared to fentanyl group in the first 10 min of procedure after local anaesthetic Injection (P = 0.001). Fentanyl is more analgesically efficient for central venous catheter insertion along with local anaesthetic injection. However, dexmedetomidine has the potential to be superior to fentanyl and placebo in terms of providing comfort to the patients during the procedure. PMID:27200187

  7. Additional Analgesia for Central Venous Catheter Insertion: A Placebo Controlled Randomized Trial of Dexmedetomidine and Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Aloka; Hanumantha Rao, Mangu; Sahu, Chitta Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to show that a single preprocedural dose of either dexmedetomidine or fentanyl reduces procedural pain and discomfort and provides clinically acceptable sedation. In this prospective, double-blind study, sixty patients scheduled for elective surgery and requiring planned central venous catheter insertion were randomized to receive dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg), fentanyl (1 μg/kg), or 0.9% normal saline intravenously over ten minutes followed by local anesthetic field infiltration before attempting central venous catheterization. The primary outcome measures are assessment and analysis of pain, discomfort, and sedation level before, during, and after the central venous catheter insertion at five time points. The median (IQR) pain score is worst for normal saline group at local anaesthetic injection [6 (4-6.7)] which was significantly attenuated by addition of fentanyl [3 (2-4)] and dexmedetomidine [4 (3-5)] in the immediate postprocedural period (P = 0.001). However, the procedure related discomfort was significantly lower in dexmedetomidine group compared to fentanyl group in the first 10 min of procedure after local anaesthetic Injection (P = 0.001). Fentanyl is more analgesically efficient for central venous catheter insertion along with local anaesthetic injection. However, dexmedetomidine has the potential to be superior to fentanyl and placebo in terms of providing comfort to the patients during the procedure. PMID:27200187

  8. A new approach for automatic matching of ground control points in urban areas from heterogeneous images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Chao; Liu, Dingsheng; Zhao, Lingjun

    2008-12-01

    This paper discusses a new method for the automatic matching of ground control points (GCPs) between satellite remote sensing Image and digital raster graphic (DRG) in urban areas. The key of this method is to automatically extract tie point pairs according to geographic characters from such heterogeneous images. Since there are big differences between such heterogeneous images respect to texture and corner features, more detail analyzations are performed to find similarities and differences between high resolution remote sensing Image and (DRG). Furthermore a new algorithms based on the fuzzy-c means (FCM) method is proposed to extract linear feature in remote sensing Image. Based on linear feature, crossings and corners extracted from these features are chosen as GCPs. On the other hand, similar method was used to find same features from DRGs. Finally, Hausdorff Distance was adopted to pick matching GCPs from above two GCP groups. Experiences shown the method can extract GCPs from such images with a reasonable RMS error.

  9. Magnetic-field control of quantum critical points of valence transition.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinji; Tsuruta, Atsushi; Miyake, Kazumasa; Flouquet, Jacques

    2008-06-13

    We study the mechanism of how critical end points of first-order valence transitions are controlled by a magnetic field. We show that the critical temperature is suppressed to be a quantum critical point (QCP) by a magnetic field, and unexpectedly, the QCP exhibits nonmonotonic field dependence in the ground-state phase diagram, giving rise to the emergence of metamagnetism even in the intermediate valence-crossover regime. The driving force of the field-induced QCP is clarified to be cooperative phenomena of the Zeeman and Kondo effects, which create a distinct energy scale from the Kondo temperature. This mechanism explains the peculiar magnetic response in CeIrIn(5) and the metamagnetic transition in YbXCu(4) for X=In as well as the sharp contrast between X=Ag and Cd. PMID:18643524

  10. An advanced tracker design for pointing and control of space vehicles using the charge injection device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C.; Kollodge, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of charge transfer devices (CTD) in pointing and control of space vehicles is examined, with emphasis on the use of charge injection devices (CID). The selection of CTD type and CID operation, including CID signal and noise analysis and signal improvement, are discussed. Star tracking operational advantages of the CTD are pointed out, and the tracking optical concept is discussed and graphically depicted. The position interpolation procedure and the effects of rate of stellar motion on position interpolation are considered, and error analysis is examined. Finally, the breadboard and test program are discussed in detail, coarse and fine acquisition, test for star, track pattern, test procedure and results. An overall accuracy performance of approximately 0.02 pixels or approximately 0.8 arcsec for the test equipment and tracker was obtained.

  11. Silica nanoparticle addition to control the calcium-leaching in cement-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitero, J. J.; Sáez de Ibarra, Y.; Erkizia, E.; Campillo, I.

    2006-05-01

    The calcium leaching of the cement hydrated matrix is of vital importance for constructions like water containers, dams, bridges, etc which have to be in contact with water during their lifetime. The aim of this work is the study of the reduction of such a negative phenomenon by the addition of silica nanoparticles. Several characterisation techniques such as 29Si MAS NMR, X-ray diffraction, mercury intrusion porosimetry and EDX-microanalysis have been used to evaluate the effect of the nanoparticles in the cement matrix nanostructure and in their impact on the evolution of the Ca leaching throughout time. Subsequent analysis of the results indicates that silica nanoparticles can reduce the Ca-leaching both decreasing the amount of portlandite in the matrix and controlling the degradation rate of the C-S-H gel.

  12. Additive controlled synthesis of gold nanorods (GNRs) for two-photon luminescence imaging of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Yong, Ken-Tye; Roy, Indrajit; Hu, Rui; Ding, Hong; Zhao, Lingling; Swihart, Mark T.; He, Guang S.; Cui, Yiping; Prasad, Paras N.

    2010-07-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) with a longitudinal surface plasmon resonance peak that is tunable from 600 to 1100 nm have been fabricated in a cetyl trimethylammoniumbromide (CTAB) micellar medium using hydrochloric acid and silver nitrate as additives to control their shape and size. By manipulating the concentrations of silver nitrate and hydrochloric acid, the aspect ratio of the GNRs was reliably and reproducibly tuned from 2.5 to 8. The GNRs were first coated with polyelectrolyte multilayers and then bioconjugated to transferrin (Tf) to target pancreatic cancer cells. Two-photon imaging excited from the bioconjugated GNRs demonstrated receptor-mediated uptake of the bioconjugates into Panc-1 cells, overexpressing the transferrin receptor (TfR). The bioconjugated GNR formulation exhibited very low toxicity, suggesting that it is biocompatible and potentially suitable for targeted two-photon bioimaging.

  13. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. L.; Hurley, M. F.; Kvryan, A.; Williams, G.; Scully, J. R.; Birbilis, N.

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes.

  14. Quality control of laser- and powder bed-based Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berumen, Sebastian; Bechmann, Florian; Lindner, Stefan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Craeghs, Tom

    The quality of metal components manufactured by laser- and powder bed-based additive manufacturing technologies has continuously been improved over the last years. However, to establish this production technology in industries with very high quality standards the accessibility of prevalent quality management methods to all steps of the process chain needs still to be enhanced. This publication describes which tools are and will be available to fulfil those requirements from the perspective of a laser machine manufacturer. Generally five aspects of the part building process are covered by separate Quality Management (QM) modules: the powder quality, the temperature management, the process gas atmosphere, the melt pool behaviour and the documentation module. This paper sets the focus on melt pool analysis and control.

  15. Catalytic enantioselective addition of organoboron reagents to fluoroketones controlled by electrostatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyunga; Silverio, Daniel L.; Torker, Sebastian; Robbins, Daniel W.; Haeffner, Fredrik; van der Mei, Farid W.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2016-08-01

    Organofluorine compounds are central to modern chemistry, and broadly applicable transformations that generate them efficiently and enantioselectively are in much demand. Here we introduce efficient catalytic methods for the addition of allyl and allenyl organoboron reagents to fluorine-substituted ketones. These reactions are facilitated by readily and inexpensively available catalysts and deliver versatile and otherwise difficult-to-access tertiary homoallylic alcohols in up to 98% yield and >99:1 enantiomeric ratio. Utility is highlighted by a concise enantioselective approach to the synthesis of the antiparasitic drug fluralaner (Bravecto, presently sold as the racemate). Different forms of ammonium–organofluorine interactions play a key role in the control of enantioselectivity. The greater understanding of various non-bonding interactions afforded by these studies should facilitate the future development of transformations that involve fluoroorganic entities.

  16. Stereo- and Temporally Controlled Coordination Polymerization Triggered by Alternating Addition of a Lewis Acid and Base.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Cui, Dongmei; Tang, Tao

    2016-09-19

    Significant progress has been made with regard to temporally controlled radical and ring-opening polymerizations, for example, by means of chemical reagents, light, and voltage, whereas quantitative switch coordination polymerization is still challenging. Herein, we report the temporally and stereocontrolled 3,4-polymerization of isoprene through allosterically regulating the active metal center by alternating addition of Lewis basic pyridine to "poison" the Lewis acidic active metal species through acid-base interactions and Lewis acidic Al(i) Bu3 to release the original active species through pyridine abstraction. This process is quick, quantitative, and can be repeated multiple times while maintaining high 3,4-selectivity. Moreover, this strategy is also effective for the switch copolymerization of isoprene and styrene with dual 3,4- and syndiotactic selectivity. Tuning the switch cycles and intervals enables the isolation of various copolymers with different distributions of 3,4-polyisoprene and syndiotactic polystyrene sequences. PMID:27539866

  17. Catalytic enantioselective addition of organoboron reagents to fluoroketones controlled by electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, KyungA; Silverio, Daniel L; Torker, Sebastian; Robbins, Daniel W; Haeffner, Fredrik; van der Mei, Farid W; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2016-08-01

    Organofluorine compounds are central to modern chemistry, and broadly applicable transformations that generate them efficiently and enantioselectively are in much demand. Here we introduce efficient catalytic methods for the addition of allyl and allenyl organoboron reagents to fluorine-substituted ketones. These reactions are facilitated by readily and inexpensively available catalysts and deliver versatile and otherwise difficult-to-access tertiary homoallylic alcohols in up to 98% yield and >99:1 enantiomeric ratio. Utility is highlighted by a concise enantioselective approach to the synthesis of the antiparasitic drug fluralaner (Bravecto, presently sold as the racemate). Different forms of ammonium-organofluorine interactions play a key role in the control of enantioselectivity. The greater understanding of various non-bonding interactions afforded by these studies should facilitate the future development of transformations that involve fluoroorganic entities. PMID:27442282

  18. [The different point of view about the sanitary control of importation of psychotropic substances in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Sebastião, Patrícia Cristina Antunes; Lucchese, Geraldo

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to analyze the process of importation, that is a part of the sanitary control of psychotropic substances, made by Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency's ports, airports and borders. For this work, psychotropic substances are defined as active pharmaceutical raw materials present in the list B1 of Portaria nº 344/98; which need Anvisa's permission to be imported. For this purpose we used semistructured interviews with key informers and participant observation. The information were collected and systematized through the content analysis, thematic modality. The results show a very complex control which involves an intense bureaucratic process. The main identified critical points of the process were: the information system precariousness; the absence of human resources; deficiency of laboratorial support and infra-structure at customs. Anvisa's web page and the specific law are strong points of the process, but still needing improvements. We understood that despite of the progress made, there are many things to do for giving the country an efficient health control system to the importation of these substances. PMID:21120327

  19. The replication origin decision point is a mitogen-independent, 2-aminopurine-sensitive, G1-phase event that precedes restriction point control.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J R; Gilbert, D M

    1997-01-01

    At a distinct point during G1 phase (the origin decision point [ODP]), Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell nuclei experience a transition (origin choice) that is required for specific recognition of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) origin locus by Xenopus egg extracts. We have investigated the relationship between the ODP and progression of CHO cells through G1 phase. Selection of the DHFR origin at the ODP was rapidly inhibited by treatment of early G1-phase cells with the protein kinase inhibitor 2-aminopurine (2-AP). Inhibition of the ODP required administration of 2-AP at least 3 h prior to phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) and the restriction point (R point). Cells deprived of either serum or isoleucine from metaphase throughout early G1 phase acquired the capacity to replicate in Xenopus egg extract (replication licensing) and subsequently passed through the ODP on the same schedule as cells cultured in complete growth medium. After growth arrest at the R point with hypophosphorylated Rb protein, serum- or isoleucine-deprived cells experienced a gradual loss of replication licensing. However, recognition of the DHFR origin by Xenopus egg cytosol remained stable in growth-arrested cells until the point at which all nuclei had lost the capacity to initiate replication. These results provide evidence that the ODP requires a mitogen-independent protein kinase that is activated after replication licensing and prior to R-point control. PMID:9234688

  20. Growth control of nonionic reverse micelles by surfactant and solvent molecular architecture and water addition.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Shrestha, Rekha Goswami; Aramaki, Kenji

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a facile route to the shape, size, and structure control of reversed micelles by surfactant and solvent molecular architecture and water addition. Nonionic reverse micellar size is found to increase with increase in hydrophilic headgroup size of surfactant, whose scheme is understood in terms of decrease in the critical packing parameter (cpp). On the other hand, an opposite trend is observed with increase in lipophilicity of the surfactant. This is caused by the repulsive excluded volume interactions, which increases with the volume of lipophilic moiety of surfactant; as a result, the micelle interface tends to become more curved and micelles shrink. Solvent molecular structure has played a crucial role; increasing hydrocarbon chain length of alkanes favored one dimensional micellar growth. We note that long chain oil has a poor penetration tendency to lipophilic tail of surfactant and decreases the cpp. Solvent polarity is also crucial; globular micelles are formed in short chain oil cyclohexane. We note that decreasing chain length of oil mimic the decrease in the headgroup size of surfactant; rod-to-sphere type transition in the micellar structure. Addition of trace water favors micellar growth; maximum dimension and micellar cross section increases with increase in water concentration. The sizes of the water incorporated reverse micelles (or w/o microemulsion) are much bigger than the empty micelles. Micellar structure was confirmed by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and supported by rheology. PMID:21770115

  1. 41 CFR 101-26.606 - Supply support available from the inventory control points of the military departments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from the inventory control points of the military departments. 101-26.606 Section 101-26.606 Public... § 101-26.606 Supply support available from the inventory control points of the military departments. Federal civil agencies may obtain items of supply which are procured and managed by the inventory...

  2. 75 FR 39969 - Liquor Control Ordinance for the Manchester Band of Pomo Indians of the Manchester-Point Arena...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ...This notice publishes the Liquor Control Ordinance of the Manchester Band of Pomo Indians of the Manchester-Point Arena Rancheria. The Ordinance regulates and controls the possession, sale and consumption of liquor within the Manchester-Point Arena Rancheria tribal land. The tribal land is located on trust land and this Ordinance allows for the possession and sale of alcoholic beverages. This......

  3. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Carmena, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain’s behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user’s motor intention during CLDA—a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to

  4. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering.

    PubMed

    Shanechi, Maryam M; Orsborn, Amy L; Carmena, Jose M

    2016-04-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain's behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user's motor intention during CLDA-a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to parameter

  5. Datum maintenance of the main Egyptian geodetic control networks by utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabah, Mostafa; Elmewafey, Mahmoud; Farahan, Magda H.

    2016-06-01

    A geodetic control network is the wire-frame or the skeleton on which continuous and consistent mapping, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and surveys are based. Traditionally, geodetic control points are established as permanent physical monuments placed in the ground and precisely marked, located, and documented. With the development of satellite surveying methods and their availability and high degree of accuracy, a geodetic control network could be established by using GNSS and referred to an international terrestrial reference frame used as a three-dimensional geocentric reference system for a country. Based on this concept, in 1992, the Egypt Survey Authority (ESA) established two networks, namely High Accuracy Reference Network (HARN) and the National Agricultural Cadastral Network (NACN). To transfer the International Terrestrial Reference Frame to the HARN, the HARN was connected with four IGS stations. The processing results were 1:10,000,000 (Order A) for HARN and 1:1,000,000 (Order B) for NACN relative network accuracy standard between stations defined in ITRF1994 Epoch1996. Since 1996, ESA did not perform any updating or maintaining works for these networks. To see how non-performing maintenance degrading the values of the HARN and NACN, the available HARN and NACN stations in the Nile Delta were observed. The Processing of the tested part was done by CSRS-PPP Service based on utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" and Trimble Business Center "TBC". The study shows the feasibility of Precise Point Positioning in updating the absolute positioning of the HARN network and its role in updating the reference frame (ITRF). The study also confirmed the necessity of the absent role of datum maintenance of Egypt networks.

  6. The hazard analysis and critical control point system in food safety.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system is a preventive method of ensuring food safety. Its objectives are the identification of consumer safety hazards that can occur in the production line and the establishment of a control process to guarantee a safer product for the consumer; it is based on the identification of potential hazards to food safety and on measures aimed at preventing these hazards. HACCP is the system of choice in the management of food safety. The principles of HACCP are applicable to all phases of food production, including basic husbandry practices, food preparation and handling, food processing, food service, distribution systems, and consumer handling and use. The HACCP system is involved in every aspect of food safety production (according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization [FAO] and the International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods [ICMSF]). The most basic concept underlying the HACCP system is that of prevention rather than inspection. The control of processes and conditions comprises the critical control point (CCP) element. HACCP is simply a methodical, flexible, and systematic application of the appropriate science and technology for planning, controlling, and documenting the safe production of foods. The successful application of HACCP requires the full commitment and involvement of management and the workforce, using a multidisciplinary approach that should include, as appropriate, expertise in agronomy, veterinary health, microbiology, public health, food technology, environmental health, chemistry, engineering, and so on according to the particular situation. Application of the HACCP system is compatible with the implementation of total quality management (TQM) systems such as the ISO 9000 series. PMID:15156035

  7. The CERN antiproton source: Controls aspects of the additional collector ring and fast sampling devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chohan, V.

    1990-08-01

    The upgrade of the CERN antiproton source, meant to gain an order of magnitude in antiproton flux, required the construction of an additional ring to complement the existing antiproton accumulator (AA) and an entire rebuild of the target zone. The AA also needed major modifications to handle the increased flux and perform purely as an accumulator, preceded by collection in the collector ring (AC). The upgrade, known as the ACOL (antiproton collector) project, was approved under strict time and budgetary constraints and the existing AA control system, based on the Proton Synchrotron (PS) Divisional norms of CAMAC and Norsk-Data computers, had to be extended in the light of this. The limited (9 months) installation period for the whole upgrade meant that substantial preparatory and planning activities had to be carried out during the normal running of the AA. Advantage was taken of the upgrade to improve and consolidate the AA. Some aspects of the control system related to this upgrade are discussed together with the integration of new applications and instrumentation. The overall machine installation and running-in was carried out within the defined milestones and the project has now achieved the physics design goals.

  8. [Incorporation of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point system (HACCP) in food legislation].

    PubMed

    Castellanos Rey, Liliana C; Villamil Jiménez, Luis C; Romero Prada, Jaime R

    2004-01-01

    The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point system (HACCP), recommended by different international organizations as the Codex Alimentarius Commission, the World Trade Organization (WTO), the International Office of Epizootics (OIE) and the International Convention for Vegetables Protection (ICPV) amongst others, contributes to ensuring the innocuity of food along the agro-alimentary chain and requires of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) for its implementation, GMP's which are legislated in most countries. Since 1997, Colombia has set rules and legislation for application of HACCP system in agreement with international standards. This paper discusses the potential and difficulties of the legislation enforcement and suggests some policy implications towards food safety. PMID:15656068

  9. School food safety program based on hazard analysis and critical control point principles. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-12-15

    This final rule implements a legislative provision which requires school food authorities participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) or the School Breakfast Program (SBP) to develop a school food safety program for the preparation and service of school meals served to children. The school food safety program must be based on the hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) system established by the Secretary of Agriculture. The food safety program will enable schools to take systematic action to prevent or minimize the risk of foodborne illness among children participating in the NSLP and SBP. PMID:20169679

  10. Evolution of Motor Control: From Reflexes and Motor Programs to the Equilibrium-Point Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Latash, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    This brief review analyzes the evolution of motor control theories along two lines that emphasize active (motor programs) and reactive (reflexes) features of voluntary movements. It suggests that the only contemporary hypothesis that integrates both approaches in a fruitful way is the equilibrium-point hypothesis. Physical, physiological, and behavioral foundations of the EP-hypothesis are considered as well as relations between the EP-hypothesis and the recent developments of the notion of motor synergies. The paper ends with a brief review of the criticisms of the EP-hypothesis and challenges that the hypothesis faces at this time. PMID:19823595

  11. Application of hazard analysis and critical control point system in the dairy industry.

    PubMed

    Kassem, M; Salem, E; Ahwal, A M; Saddik, M; Gomaa, N F

    2002-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the hygiene quality of some packaged milk (pasteurized or sterilized) and dairy products before and after application of a hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) system at a milk and dairy products company in Cairo, Egypt. The steps taken to put HACCP in place are described and the process was monitored to assess its impact. Assessment of the hygiene quality of the milk and dairy products before and after HACCP showed an improvement in quality and an overall improvement in the conditions at the company. PMID:15330567

  12. Formation Flying Satellite Control Around the L2 Sun-Earth Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Nicholas H.; Folta, David; Carpenter, Russell; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A growing interest in formation flying satellites demands development and analysis of control and estimation algorithms for station-keeping and formation maneuvering. This paper discusses the development of a discrete linear-quadratic-regulator control algorithm for formations in the vicinity of the L2 sun-earth libration point. The development of an appropriate Kalman filter is included as well. Simulations are created for the analysis of the station-keeping and various formation maneuvers of the Stellar Imager mission. The simulations provide tracking error, estimation error, and control effort results. From the control effort, useful design parameters such as delta V and propellant mass are determined. For formation maneuvering, the formation spacecraft track to within 4 meters of their desired position and within 1.5 millimeters per second of their desired zero velocity. The filter, with few exceptions, keeps the estimation errors within their three-sigma values. Without noise, the controller performs extremely well, with the formation spacecraft tracking to within several micrometers. Each spacecraft uses around 1 to 2 grams of propellant per maneuver, depending on the circumstances.

  13. Formation Flying Satellite Control Around the L2 Sun-Earth Libration Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Nicholas H.

    2001-12-01

    A growing interest in formation flying satellites demands development and analysis of control and estimation algorithms for station-keeping and formation maneuvering. This thesis discusses the development of a discrete linear-quadratic- regulator control algorithm for formations in the vicinity of the L2 sun-earth libration point. The development of an appropriate Kalman filter is included as well. Simulations are created for the analysis of the station-keeping and various formation maneuvers of the Stellar Imager mission. The simulations provide tracking error, estimation error, and control effort results. From the control effort, useful design parameters such as AV and propellant mass are determined. For formation maneuvering, the drone spacecraft track to within 4 meters of their desired position and within 1.3 millimeters per second of their desired zero velocity. The filter, with few exceptions, keeps the estimation errors within their three-sigma values. Without noise, the controller performs extremely well, with the drones tracking to within several micrometers. Bach drone uses around 1 to 2 grams of propellant per maneuver, depending on the circumstances.

  14. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser pointing, wavefront control, and phasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, K. L.; Stappaerts, E. A.; Homoelle, D. C.; Henesian, M. A.; Bliss, E. S.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2009-02-01

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing and overall wavefront quality. One quad of the NIF beams, 4 beam pairs, will be utilized for these experiments and hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations indicate that for the fast ignition experiments, these beams will be required to deliver 50%(4.0 kJ) of their total energy(7.96 kJ) within a 40 μm diameter spot at the end of a fast ignition cone target. This requirement implies a stringent pointing and overall phase conjugation error budget on the adaptive optics system used to correct these beam lines. The overall encircled energy requirement is more readily met by phasing of the beams in pairs but still requires high Strehl ratios, Sr, and RMS tip/tilt errors of approximately one μrad. To accomplish this task we have designed an interferometric adaptive optics system capable of beam pointing, high Strehl ratio and beam phasing with a single pixilated MEMS deformable mirror and interferometric wave-front sensor. We present the design of a testbed used to evaluate the performance of this wave-front sensor below along with simulations of its expected performance level.

  15. Interferometric adaptive optics for high power laser pointing, wave-front control and phasing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Homoelle, D C; Henesian, M A; Bliss, E S; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-01-21

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing and overall wavefront quality. One quad of the NIF beams, 4 beam pairs, will be utilized for these experiments and hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations indicate that for the fast ignition experiments, these beams will be required to deliver 50% (4.0 kJ) of their total energy (7.96 kJ) within a 40 {micro}m diameter spot at the end of a fast ignition cone target. This requirement implies a stringent pointing and overall phase conjugation error budget on the adaptive optics system used to correct these beam lines. The overall encircled energy requirement is more readily met by phasing of the beams in pairs but still requires high Strehl ratios, Sr, and rms tip/tilt errors of approximately one {micro}rad. To accomplish this task we have designed an interferometric adaptive optics system capable of beam pointing, high Strehl ratio and beam phasing with a single pixilated MEMS deformable mirror and interferometric wave-front sensor. We present the design of a testbed used to evaluate the performance of this wave-front sensor below along with simulations of its expected performance level.

  16. A Unified Point Process Probabilistic Framework to Assess Heartbeat Dynamics and Autonomic Cardiovascular Control

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Purdon, Patrick L.; Brown, Emery N.; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, time-varying inhomogeneous point process models have been introduced for assessment of instantaneous heartbeat dynamics as well as specific cardiovascular control mechanisms and hemodynamics. Assessment of the model’s statistics is established through the Wiener-Volterra theory and a multivariate autoregressive (AR) structure. A variety of instantaneous cardiovascular metrics, such as heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), and baroreceptor-cardiac reflex (baroreflex) sensitivity (BRS), are derived within a parametric framework and instantaneously updated with adaptive and local maximum likelihood estimation algorithms. Inclusion of second-order non-linearities, with subsequent bispectral quantification in the frequency domain, further allows for definition of instantaneous metrics of non-linearity. We here present a comprehensive review of the devised methods as applied to experimental recordings from healthy subjects during propofol anesthesia. Collective results reveal interesting dynamic trends across the different pharmacological interventions operated within each anesthesia session, confirming the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory elicited interactions, and pointing at our mathematical approach as a promising monitoring tool for an accurate, non-invasive assessment in clinical practice. We also discuss the limitations and other alternative modeling strategies of our point process approach. PMID:22375120

  17. Pinhole/coronograph pointing control system integration and noise reduction analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, M.

    1981-01-01

    The Pinhole Occulter Facility (P/OF) is a Space Shuttle based experiment for the production of solar coronographics and hard X-ray images. The system is basically pinhole camera utilizing a deployable 50-m flexible boom for separating the pinholes and coronograph shields from the recording devices located in the Shuttle bay. At the distal end of the boom from the Shuttle is a 25 kg mask containing pinholes and coronograph shields. At the proximal end the detectors are located and mounted, along with the deployable boom, to the ASPS gimbal pointing system (AGS). The mask must be pointed at the Sun with a high degree of pointing stability and accuracy to align the axes of the detectors with the pinholes and shields. Failure to do so will result in a blurring of the images on the detectors and a loss of resolution. Being a Shuttle based experiment, the system will be subjected to the disturbances of the Shuttle. The worst of these is thruster firing for orbit correction; the Shuttle uses a bang-bang thruster control system to maintain orbit to within preset limits. Other disturbances include man motion, motion induced by other systems, and gravity gradient torques.

  18. A unified point process probabilistic framework to assess heartbeat dynamics and autonomic cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, time-varying inhomogeneous point process models have been introduced for assessment of instantaneous heartbeat dynamics as well as specific cardiovascular control mechanisms and hemodynamics. Assessment of the model's statistics is established through the Wiener-Volterra theory and a multivariate autoregressive (AR) structure. A variety of instantaneous cardiovascular metrics, such as heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), and baroreceptor-cardiac reflex (baroreflex) sensitivity (BRS), are derived within a parametric framework and instantaneously updated with adaptive and local maximum likelihood estimation algorithms. Inclusion of second-order non-linearities, with subsequent bispectral quantification in the frequency domain, further allows for definition of instantaneous metrics of non-linearity. We here present a comprehensive review of the devised methods as applied to experimental recordings from healthy subjects during propofol anesthesia. Collective results reveal interesting dynamic trends across the different pharmacological interventions operated within each anesthesia session, confirming the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory elicited interactions, and pointing at our mathematical approach as a promising monitoring tool for an accurate, non-invasive assessment in clinical practice. We also discuss the limitations and other alternative modeling strategies of our point process approach. PMID:22375120

  19. Critical Point Facility (CPE) Group in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPE) group in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  20. Critical Point Facility (CPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  1. Selection and allocation of manual traffic control points and personnel during emergencies.

    PubMed

    Parr, Scott A; Wolshon, Brian; Dixit, Vinayak

    2015-01-01

    Manual traffic control is an intersection control strategy in which law enforcement officers allocate intersection right-of-way to turning movements. Many emergency traffic management plans call for manual traffic control in response to oversaturated roadway conditions. This is because it is thought to more effectively move traffic during temporary surges in demand. The goal of this research was to evaluate the current state-of-the-practice used by the Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) in selecting intersections for manual traffic control and allocating police personnel to them during emergencies. This research uses the emergency traffic management plans developed by the ACE for nine counties in the Maryland Eastern Shore region. This area encompassing 14,318 intersections of which 74 were selected for manual traffic control during emergencies. This work sought to quantify the correlations that exist between intersection attributes and the ACE' decision to allocate officers to control them. The research findings suggest that US routes, State routes, and emergency evacuation routes are statistically significant in determining the need for police control at intersections. Also significant are intersection on contraflow corridors and intersections near grade separated interchanges. The model also determined that intersections isolated from evacuation routes and county exits were more likely to be selected for manual control, indicating that rural areas may rely on manual traffic control in the absence of multilane highway and freeways. This research also found that intersections involving evacuation routes, contraflow corridors, and grade separated interchanges may warrant additional police personnel (two or more officers) for manual traffic control. PMID:25902295

  2. Ethylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase operates as a metabolic control point in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1.

    PubMed

    Good, Nathan M; Martinez-Gomez, N Cecilia; Beck, David A C; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2015-02-15

    The metabolism of one- and two-carbon compounds by the methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 involves high carbon flux through the ethylmalonyl coenzyme A (ethylmalonyl-CoA) pathway (EMC pathway). During growth on ethylamine, the EMC pathway operates as a linear pathway carrying the full assimilatory flux to produce glyoxylate, malate, and succinate. Assimilatory carbon enters the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway directly as acetyl-CoA, bypassing pathways for formaldehyde oxidation/assimilation and the regulatory mechanisms controlling them, making ethylamine growth a useful condition to study the regulation of the EMC pathway. Wild-type M. extorquens cells were grown at steady state on a limiting concentration of succinate, and the growth substrate was then switched to ethylamine, a condition where the cell must make a sudden switch from utilizing the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to using the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway for assimilation, which has been an effective strategy for identifying metabolic control points. A 9-h lag in growth was observed, during which butyryl-CoA, a degradation product of ethylmalonyl-CoA, accumulated, suggesting a metabolic imbalance. Ethylmalonyl-CoA mutase activity increased to a level sufficient for the observed growth rate at 9 h, which correlated with an upregulation of RNA transcripts for ecm and a decrease in the levels of ethylmalonyl-CoA. When the wild-type strain overexpressing ecm was tested with the same substrate switchover experiment, ethylmalonyl-CoA did not accumulate, growth resumed earlier, and, after a transient period of slow growth, the culture grew at a higher rate than that of the control. These findings demonstrate that ethylmalonyl-CoA mutase is a metabolic control point in the EMC pathway, expanding our understanding of its regulation. PMID:25448820

  3. Benefits of Aldosterone Receptor Antagonism in Chronic Kidney Disease (BARACK D) trial–a multi-centre, prospective, randomised, open, blinded end-point, 36-month study of 2,616 patients within primary care with stage 3b chronic kidney disease to compare the efficacy of spironolactone 25 mg once daily in addition to routine care on mortality and cardiovascular outcomes versus routine care alone: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and increasing in prevalence. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and death in CKD, though of a different phenotype to the general CVD population. Few therapies have proved effective in modifying the increased CVD risk or rate of renal decline in CKD. There are accumulating data that aldosterone receptor antagonists (ARA) may offer cardio-protection and delay renal impairment in patients with the CV phenotype in CKD. The use of ARA in CKD has therefore been increasingly advocated. However, no large study of ARA with renal or CVD outcomes is underway. Methods The study is a prospective randomised open blinded endpoint (PROBE) trial set in primary care where patients will mainly be identified by their GPs or from existing CKD lists. They will be invited if they have been formally diagnosed with CKD stage 3b or there is evidence of stage 3b CKD from blood results (eGFR 30–44 mL/min/1.73 m2) and fulfil the other inclusion/exclusion criteria. Patients will be randomised to either spironolactone 25 mg once daily in addition to routine care or routine care alone and followed-up for 36 months. Discussion BARACK D is a PROBE trial to determine the effect of ARA on mortality and cardiovascular outcomes (onset or progression of CVD) in patients with stage 3b CKD. Trial registration EudraCT: 2012-002672-13 ISRTN: ISRCTN44522369 PMID:24886488

  4. Realization of tin freezing point using a loop heat pipe-based hydraulic temperature control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Wukchul; Gam, Kee Sool; Kim, Yong-Gyoo

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the freezing point of tin (Sn FP) was realized by inside nucleation where the supercooling of tin and the reheating of the sample after the nucleation were achieved without extracting the cell from an isothermal apparatus. To this end, a novel hydraulic temperature control technique, which was based on the thermo-hydraulic characteristics of a pressure-controlled loop heat pipe (LHP), was employed to provide a slow cooling of the sample for deep supercooling and fast reheating after nucleation to minimize the amount of initial freeze of the sample. The required temperature controls were achieved by the active pressure control of a control gas inside the compensation chamber of the pressure-controlled LHP, and slow cooling at  -0.05 K min-1 for the deep supercooling of tin and fast heating at 2 K min-1 for reheating the sample after nucleation was attained. Based on this hydraulic temperature control technique, the nucleation of tin was realized at supercooling of around 19 K, and a satisfactorily fast reheating of the sample to the plateau-producing temperature (i.e. 0.5 K below the Sn FP) was achieved without any temperature overshoots of the isothermal region. The inside-nucleated Sn FP showed many desirable features compared to the Sn FP realized by the conventional outside nucleation method. The longer freezing plateaus and the better immersion characteristics of the Sn FP were obtained by inside nucleation, and the measured freezing temperature of the inside-nucleated Sn FP was as much as 0.37 mK higher than the outside-nucleated Sn FP with an expanded uncertainty of 0.19 mK. Details on the experiment are provided and explanations for the observed differences are discussed.

  5. Acupuncture point injection treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea: a randomised, double blind, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Wade, C; Wang, L; Zhao, W J; Cardini, F; Kronenberg, F; Gui, S Q; Ying, Z; Zhao, N Q; Chao, M T; Yu, J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if injection of vitamin K3 in an acupuncture point is optimal for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea, when compared with 2 other injection treatments. Setting A Menstrual Disorder Centre at a public hospital in Shanghai, China. Participants Chinese women aged 14–25 years with severe primary dysmenorrhoea for at least 6 months not relieved by any other treatment were recruited. Exclusion criteria were the use of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices or anticoagulant drugs, pregnancy, history of abdominal surgery, participation in other therapies for pain and diagnosis of secondary dysmenorrhoea. Eighty patients with primary dysmenorrhoea, as defined on a 4-grade scale, completed the study. Two patients withdrew after randomisation. Interventions A double-blind, double-dummy, randomised controlled trial compared vitamin K3 acupuncture point injection to saline acupuncture point injection and vitamin K3 deep muscle injection. Patients in each group received 3 injections at a single treatment visit. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was the difference in subjective perception of pain as measured by an 11 unit Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Secondary measurements were Cox Pain Intensity and Duration scales and the consumption of analgesic tablets before and after treatment and during 6 following cycles. Results Patients in all 3 groups experienced pain relief from the injection treatments. Differences in NRS measured mean pain scores between the 2 active control groups were less than 1 unit (−0.71, CI −1.37 to −0.05) and not significant, but the differences in average scores between the treatment hypothesised to be optimal and both active control groups (1.11, CI 0.45 to 1.78) and (1.82, CI 1.45 to 2.49) were statistically significant in adjusted mixed-effects models. Menstrual distress and use of analgesics were diminished for 6 months post-treatment. Conclusions Acupuncture point injection of

  6. Track and mode controller (TMC): a software executive for a high-altitude pointing and tracking experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michnovicz, Michael R.

    1997-06-01

    A real-time executive has been implemented to control a high altitude pointing and tracking experiment. The track and mode controller (TMC) implements a table driven design, in which the track mode logic for a tracking mission is defined within a state transition diagram (STD). THe STD is implemented as a state transition table in the TMC software. Status Events trigger the state transitions in the STD. Each state, as it is entered, causes a number of processes to be activated within the system. As these processes propagate through the system, the status of key processes are monitored by the TMC, allowing further transitions within the STD. This architecture is implemented in real-time, using the vxWorks operating system. VxWorks message queues allow communication of status events from the Event Monitor task to the STD task. Process commands are propagated to the rest of the system processors by means of the SCRAMNet shared memory network. The system mode logic contained in the STD will autonomously sequence in acquisition, tracking and pointing system through an entire engagement sequence, starting with target detection and ending with aimpoint maintenance. Simulation results and lab test results will be presented to verify the mode controller. In addition to implementing the system mode logic with the STD, the TMC can process prerecorded time sequences of commands required during startup operations. It can also process single commands from the system operator. In this paper, the author presents (1) an overview, in which he describes the TMC architecture, the relationship of an end-to-end simulation to the flight software and the laboratory testing environment, (2) implementation details, including information on the vxWorks message queues and the SCRAMNet shared memory network, (3) simulation results and lab test results which verify the mode controller, and (4) plans for the future, specifically as to how this executive will expedite transition to a fully

  7. Testing to fulfill HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points) requirements: principles and examples.

    PubMed

    Gardner, I A

    1997-12-01

    On-farm HACCP (hazard analysis critical control points) monitoring requires cost-effective, yet accurate and reproducible tests that can determine the status of cows, milk, and the dairy environment. Tests need to be field-validated, and their limitations need to be established so that appropriate screening strategies can be initiated and test results can be rationally interpreted. For infections and residues of low prevalence, tests or testing strategies that are highly specific help to minimize false-positive results and excessive costs to the dairy industry. The determination of the numbers of samples to be tested in HACCP monitoring programs depends on the specific purpose of the test and the likely prevalence of the agent or residue at the critical control point. The absence of positive samples from a herd test should not be interpreted as freedom from a particular agent or residue unless the entire herd has been tested with a test that is 100% sensitive. The current lack of field-validated tests for most of the chemical and infectious agents of concern makes it difficult to ensure that the stated goals of HACCP programs are consistently achieved. PMID:9436129

  8. Research on the modeling of the missile's disturbance motion and the initial control point optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jie; Zhu, Dalin; Tang, Shengjing

    2012-11-01

    The initial trajectory design of the missile is an important part of the overall design, but often a tedious calculation and analysis process due to the large dimension nonlinear differential equations and the traditional statistical analysis methods. To improve the traditional design methods, a robust optimization concept and method are introduced in this paper to deal with the determination of the initial control point. First, the Gaussian Radial Basis Network is adopted to establish the approximate model of the missile's disturbance motion based on the disturbance motion and disturbance factors analysis. Then, a direct analytical relationship between the disturbance input and statistical results is deduced on the basis of Gaussian Radial Basis Network model. Subsequently, a robust optimization model is established aiming at the initial control point design problem and the niche Pareto genetic algorithm for multi-objective optimization is adopted to solve this optimization model. An integral design example is give at last and the simulation results have verified the validity of this method.

  9. The shape of Mars before global surveyor: Results from reanalysis of the Viking control point network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, Wolfgang; Oberst, Jürgen

    1999-06-01

    Three-dimensional coordinates of 3739 globally distributed control points derived from photogrammetric analysis of Viking Orbiter image data are studied with respect to the shape and large-scale morphology of Mars. Spheres, spheroids, spherical functions, and a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of 50 km grid spacing are fitted to the data. Prominent topographic features in the terrain model include the Tharsis volcanoes, Olympus Mons, Alba Patera and prominent mare and highland regions as well as the major impact basins. While the global dichotomy is clearly visible in our data, our model does not reveal any distinct signature associated with the presumed dichotomy boundary at this global scale. Rather, it suggests a smooth topographic transition from southern to northern hemisphere. This model is unique among existing topographic data sets for Mars, as it combines global coverage, a spatial resolution sufficient to resolve regional topography, and absolute elevation data more accurate than in previous control point network analyses. Formal errors and a comparison with the first released topographic profiles obtained by Mars Global Surveyor's Laser Altimeter (MOLA) suggest that 70% and 90% of the DTM grid elements represent the topography of the planet to better than 1000 m and 2000 m, respectively.

  10. Depression Treatment for Impoverished Mothers by Point-of-Care Providers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Segre, Lisa S.; Brock, Rebecca L.; O’Hara, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Depression in low-income, ethnic-minority women of childbearing age is prevalent and compromises infant and child development. Yet numerous barriers prevent treatment delivery. Listening Visits (LV), an empirically supported intervention developed for delivery by British home-visiting nurses, could address this unmet mental health need. This randomized controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of LV delivered at a woman’s usual point-of-care, including home-visits or an ob-gyn office. Method Listening Visits were delivered to depressed pregnant women or mothers of young children by their point-of-care provider (e.g., home visitor or physician’s assistant), all of whom had low levels of prior counseling experience. Three quarters of the study’s participants were low-income. Of those who reported ethnicity, all identified themselves as minorities. Participants from four study sites (N = 66) were randomized in a 2:1 ratio, to LV or a wait-list control group (WLC). Assessments, conducted at baseline and 8 weeks, evaluated depression, quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Results Depressive severity, depressive symptoms, and quality of life significantly improved among LV recipients as compared to women receiving standard social/health services. Women valued LV as evidenced by their high attendance rates and treatment satisfaction ratings. Conclusions In a stepped model of depression care, LV can provide an accessible, acceptable, and effective first-line treatment option for at-risk women who otherwise are unlikely to receive treatment. PMID:25486371

  11. Additional follow-up telephone counselling and initial smoking relapse: a longitudinal, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin; Zuo, Fang; Liu, Qinghui; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Changxi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Smoking cessation services can help smokers to quit; however, many smoking relapse cases occur over time. Initial relapse prevention should play an important role in achieving the goal of long-term smoking cessation. Several studies have focused on the effect of extended telephone support in relapse prevention, but the conclusions remain conflicting. Design and setting From October 2008 to August 2013, a longitudinal, controlled study was performed in a large general hospital of Beijing. Participants The smokers who sought treatment at our smoking cessation clinic were non-randomised and divided into 2 groups: face-to-face individual counselling group (FC group), and face-to-face individual counselling plus telephone follow-up counselling group (FCF group). No pharmacotherapy was offered. Outcomes The timing of initial smoking relapse was compared between FC and FCF groups. Predictors of initial relapse were investigated during the first 180 days, using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Of 547 eligible male smokers who volunteered to participate, 457 participants (117 in FC group and 340 in FCF group) achieved at least 24 h abstinence. The majority of the lapse episodes occurred during the first 2 weeks after the quit date. Smokers who did not receive the follow-up telephone counselling (FC group) tended to relapse to smoking earlier than those smokers who received the additional follow-up telephone counselling (FCF group), and the log-rank test was statistically significant (p=0.003). A Cox regression model showed that, in the FCF group, being married, and having a lower Fagerström test score, normal body mass index and doctor-diagnosed tobacco-related chronic diseases, were significantly independent protective predictors of smoking relapse. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that additional follow-up telephone counselling might be an effective strategy in preventing relapse. Further research is still

  12. Analysis of Time to Event Outcomes in Randomized Controlled Trials by Generalized Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Unruh, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Randomized Controlled Trials almost invariably utilize the hazard ratio calculated with a Cox proportional hazard model as a treatment efficacy measure. Despite the widespread adoption of HRs, these provide a limited understanding of the treatment effect and may even provide a biased estimate when the assumption of proportional hazards in the Cox model is not verified by the trial data. Additional treatment effect measures on the survival probability or the time scale may be used to supplement HRs but a framework for the simultaneous generation of these measures is lacking. Methods By splitting follow-up time at the nodes of a Gauss Lobatto numerical quadrature rule, techniques for Poisson Generalized Additive Models (PGAM) can be adopted for flexible hazard modeling. Straightforward simulation post-estimation transforms PGAM estimates for the log hazard into estimates of the survival function. These in turn were used to calculate relative and absolute risks or even differences in restricted mean survival time between treatment arms. We illustrate our approach with extensive simulations and in two trials: IPASS (in which the proportionality of hazards was violated) and HEMO a long duration study conducted under evolving standards of care on a heterogeneous patient population. Findings PGAM can generate estimates of the survival function and the hazard ratio that are essentially identical to those obtained by Kaplan Meier curve analysis and the Cox model. PGAMs can simultaneously provide multiple measures of treatment efficacy after a single data pass. Furthermore, supported unadjusted (overall treatment effect) but also subgroup and adjusted analyses, while incorporating multiple time scales and accounting for non-proportional hazards in survival data. Conclusions By augmenting the HR conventionally reported, PGAMs have the potential to support the inferential goals of multiple stakeholders involved in the evaluation and appraisal of clinical trial

  13. Whole-lake nitrate addition for control of methylmercury in mercury-contaminated Onondaga Lake, NY.

    PubMed

    Matthews, David A; Babcock, David B; Nolan, John G; Prestigiacomo, Anthony R; Effler, Steven W; Driscoll, Charles T; Todorova, Svetoslava G; Kuhr, Kenneth M

    2013-08-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) strongly bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs resulting in exposure to humans and wildlife through consumption of fish. Production of MeHg is promoted by anaerobic conditions and the supply of inorganic Hg (Hg(2+)), sulfate (SO4(2-)), and labile organic carbon. The anaerobic sediments of stratified lakes are particularly active zones for methylation of Hg(2+) and can be an important source of MeHg to the water column during summer anoxia and fall turnover. Nitrate (NO3(-)) addition has recently been proposed as a novel approach for the control of MeHg accumulation in the hypolimnia of Hg-contaminated lakes. In 2011, a whole-lake NO3(-) addition pilot test was conducted in Hg-contaminated Onondaga Lake, NY with the objective of limiting release of MeHg from the pelagic sediments to the hypolimnion through maintenance of NO3(-)-N concentrations >1mgN/L. A liquid calcium-nitrate solution was added to the hypolimnion as a neutrally buoyant plume approximately three times per week during the summer stratification interval. Maximum hypolimnetic concentrations of MeHg and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) decreased 94% and 95% from 2009 levels, suggesting increased sorption to Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides in surficial sediments as the regulating mechanism. Increased MeHg concentrations in the upper waters during fall turnover, which had been a generally recurring pattern, did not occur in 2011, resulting in decreased exposure of aquatic organisms to MeHg. Over the 1992-2011 interval, the hypolimnetic NO3(-) supply explained 85% and 95% of the interannual variations in hypolimnetic accumulations of SRP and MeHg, respectively. PMID:23683521

  14. Additional Saturday rehabilitation improves functional independence and quality of life and reduces length of stay: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many inpatients receive little or no rehabilitation on weekends. Our aim was to determine what effect providing additional Saturday rehabilitation during inpatient rehabilitation had on functional independence, quality of life and length of stay compared to 5 days per week of rehabilitation. Methods This was a multicenter, single-blind (assessors) randomized controlled trial with concealed allocation and 12-month follow-up conducted in two publically funded metropolitan inpatient rehabilitation facilities in Melbourne, Australia. Patients were eligible if they were adults (aged ≥18 years) admitted for rehabilitation for any orthopedic, neurological or other disabling conditions excluding those admitted for slow stream rehabilitation/geriatric evaluation and management. Participants were randomly allocated to usual care Monday to Friday rehabilitation (control) or to Monday to Saturday rehabilitation (intervention). The additional Saturday rehabilitation comprised physiotherapy and occupational therapy. The primary outcomes were functional independence (functional independence measure (FIM); measured on an 18 to 126 point scale), health-related quality of life (EQ-5D utility index; measured on a 0 to 1 scale, and EQ-5D visual analog scale; measured on a 0 to 100 scale), and patient length of stay. Outcome measures were assessed on admission, discharge (primary endpoint), and at 6 and 12 months post discharge. Results We randomly assigned 996 adults (mean (SD) age 74 (13) years) to Monday to Saturday rehabilitation (n = 496) or usual care Monday to Friday rehabilitation (n = 500). Relative to admission scores, intervention group participants had higher functional independence (mean difference (MD) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5 to 4.1, P = 0.01) and health-related quality of life (MD 0.04, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.07, P = 0.009) on discharge and may have had a shorter length of stay by 2 days (95% CI 0 to 4, P = 0.1) when compared to

  15. Measuring the distance from saddle points and driving to locate them over quantum control landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiuyang; Riviello, Gregory; Wu, Re-Bing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-11-01

    Optimal control of quantum phenomena involves the introduction of a cost functional J to characterize the degree of achieving a physical objective by a chosen shaped electromagnetic field. The cost functional dependence upon the control forms a control landscape. Two theoretically important canonical cases are the landscapes associated with seeking to achieve either a physical observable or a unitary transformation. Upon satisfaction of particular assumptions, both landscapes are analytically known to be trap-free, yet possess saddle points at precise suboptimal J values. The presence of saddles on the landscapes can influence the effort needed to find an optimal field. As a foundation to future algorithm development and analyzes, we define metrics that identify the ‘distance’ from a given saddle based on the sufficient and necessary conditions for the existence of the saddles. Algorithms are introduced utilizing the metrics to find a control such that the dynamics arrive at a targeted saddle. The saddle distance metric and saddle-seeking methodology is tested numerically in several model systems.

  16. Initial experiments in end-point control of a flexible, two-link manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Mark David

    1992-11-01

    A two-link, flexible manipulator has been designed and constructed to study en-point vibration and control problems. The manipulator has two activated rotary joints and operates in the horizontal plane. It has been designed for minimal join flexibility and very flexible links. Further, the links have been designed so that the first natural frequencies of each link are very close. The manipulator vibratory characteristics have been quantified through a series of frequency response and modal analysis tests using external excitation sources as well as internal excitation supplied by the manipulator joint actuators. By performing tests for various manipulator postures, the vibratory responses of the manipulator links are shown to become uncoupled as the elbow angle approaches 90 degrees. Further, the internal excitation tests have shown that some vibratory modes cannot be excited by the rotary joint actuators. An analytical model of the manipulator has been developed using Kane's equations with Bernoulli-Euler assumed modes. Because the modal analysis has shown that the manipulator vibratory response varies with the elbow joint angle, assumed modes of the individual links are used to model flexibility effects rather than manipulator assumed modes. Unfortunately, no experimental results suitable for confirming the analytical model are available yet. A PID baseline controller of the manipulator is presented with experimental results. Recommendations for improving the PID controller are presented. Alternate controller schemes are presented and discussed.

  17. A modular planar robotic manipulandum with end-point torque control.

    PubMed

    Howard, Ian S; Ingram, James N; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2009-07-30

    Robotic manipulanda are extensively used in investigation of the motor control of human arm movements. They permit the application of translational forces to the arm based on its state and can be used to probe issues ranging from mechanisms of neural control to biomechanics. However, most current designs are optimized for studying either motor learning or stiffness. Even fewer include end-point torque control which is important for the simulation of objects and the study of tool use. Here we describe a modular, general purpose, two-dimensional planar manipulandum (vBOT) primarily optimized for dynamic learning paradigms. It employs a carbon fibre arm arranged as a parallelogram which is driven by motors via timing pulleys. The design minimizes the intrinsic dynamics of the manipulandum without active compensation. A novel variant of the design (WristBOT) can apply torques at the handle using an add-on cable drive mechanism. In a second variant (StiffBOT) a more rigid arm can be substituted and zero backlash belts can be used, making the StiffBOT more suitable for the study of stiffness. The three variants can be used with custom built display rigs, mounting, and air tables. We investigated the performance of the vBOT and its variants in terms of effective end-point mass, viscosity and stiffness. Finally we present an object manipulation task using the WristBOT. This demonstrates that subjects can perceive the orientation of the principal axis of an object based on haptic feedback arising from its rotational dynamics. PMID:19450621

  18. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge

    PubMed Central

    Liu, R. L.; Hurley, M. F.; Kvryan, A.; Williams, G.; Scully, J. R.; Birbilis, N.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes. PMID:27350286

  19. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge.

    PubMed

    Liu, R L; Hurley, M F; Kvryan, A; Williams, G; Scully, J R; Birbilis, N

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes. PMID:27350286

  20. Control point analysis comparison for 3 different treatment planning and delivery complexity levels using a commercial 3-dimensional diode array.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Ady; Gaede, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the use of "Control Point Analysis" (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) to analyze and compare delivered volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for 3 different treatment planning complexity levels. A total of 30 patients were chosen and fully anonymized for the purpose of this study. Overall, 10 lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), 10 head-and-neck (H&N), and 10 prostate VMAT plans were generated on Pinnacle(3) and delivered on a Varian linear accelerator (LINAC). The delivered dose was measured using ArcCHECK (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL). Each plan was analyzed using "Sun Nuclear Corporation (SNC) Patient 6" and "Control Point Analysis." Gamma passing percentage was used to assess the differences between the measured and planned dose distributions and to assess the role of various control point binning combinations. Of the different sites considered, the prostate cases reported the highest gamma passing percentages calculated with "SNC Patient 6" (97.5% to 99.2% for the 3%, 3mm) and "Control Point Analysis" (95.4% to 98.3% for the 3%, 3mm). The mean percentage of passing control point sectors for the prostate cases increased from 51.8 ± 7.8% for individual control points to 70.6 ± 10.5% for 5 control points binned together to 87.8 ± 11.0% for 10 control points binned together (2%, 2-mm passing criteria). Overall, there was an increasing trend in the percentage of sectors passing gamma analysis with an increase in the number of control points binned together in a sector for both the gamma passing criteria (2%, 2mm and 3%, 3mm). Although many plans passed the clinical quality assurance criteria, plans involving the delivery of high Monitor Unit (MU)/control point (SBRT) and plans involving high degree of modulation (H&N) showed less delivery accuracy per control point compared with plans with low MU/control point and low degree of modulation (prostate). PMID:24480374

  1. Control Point Analysis comparison for 3 different treatment planning and delivery complexity levels using a commercial 3-dimensional diode array

    SciTech Connect

    Abdellatif, Ady; Gaede, Stewart

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the use of “Control Point Analysis” (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) to analyze and compare delivered volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for 3 different treatment planning complexity levels. A total of 30 patients were chosen and fully anonymized for the purpose of this study. Overall, 10 lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), 10 head-and-neck (H and N), and 10 prostate VMAT plans were generated on Pinnacle{sup 3} and delivered on a Varian linear accelerator (LINAC). The delivered dose was measured using ArcCHECK (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL). Each plan was analyzed using “Sun Nuclear Corporation (SNC) Patient 6” and “Control Point Analysis.” Gamma passing percentage was used to assess the differences between the measured and planned dose distributions and to assess the role of various control point binning combinations. Of the different sites considered, the prostate cases reported the highest gamma passing percentages calculated with “SNC Patient 6” (97.5% to 99.2% for the 3%, 3 mm) and “Control Point Analysis” (95.4% to 98.3% for the 3%, 3 mm). The mean percentage of passing control point sectors for the prostate cases increased from 51.8 ± 7.8% for individual control points to 70.6 ± 10.5% for 5 control points binned together to 87.8 ± 11.0% for 10 control points binned together (2%, 2-mm passing criteria). Overall, there was an increasing trend in the percentage of sectors passing gamma analysis with an increase in the number of control points binned together in a sector for both the gamma passing criteria (2%, 2 mm and 3%, 3 mm). Although many plans passed the clinical quality assurance criteria, plans involving the delivery of high Monitor Unit (MU)/control point (SBRT) and plans involving high degree of modulation (H and N) showed less delivery accuracy per control point compared with plans with low MU/control point and low degree of modulation (prostate)

  2. Hubble, bubble, toil and trouble: A reduced-order model based saga of the Hubble Space Telescope. [pointing control performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark; Robertson, L. R.; Lee, Yung Jae; Mohl, James; Garzella, Rebecca

    1993-01-01

    Low-order control of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to improve pointing performance in the presence of flexible solar array disturbances is demonstarted in this paper. Our controller is a disturbance accommodating controller (DAC) based on a reduced-order model (ROM) controller with a disturbance estimator and a residual mode filter (RMF). We achieve the performance goals with a very low-order multichannel controller as compared to the various Solar Array Gain Augmentation (SAGA) schemes used at present.

  3. H-point standard addition method for simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of Co(II) and Ni(II) by 1-(2-pyridylazo)2-naphthol in micellar media.

    PubMed

    Afkhami, Abbas; Bahram, Morteza

    2004-01-01

    A very simple and selective spectrophotometric method for simultaneous determination of Co(II) and Ni(II) by 1-(2-pyridylazo) 2-naphthol (PAN), in micellar media, using H-point standard addition method (HPSAM) is described. The ligand and its metal complexes (Co(II)-PAN and Ni(II)-PAN) were made water-soluble by the neutral surfactant Triton X-100, and therefore, no extraction with organic solvents was required. Formation of both the complexes was complete within 10 min at pH 9 (adjusted by ammonia buffer). The linear range was 0.10-2.00 microg ml(-1) for Co(II) and 0.05-1.50 microg ml(-1) for Ni(II). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for the simultaneous determination of 0.50 microg ml(-1) each of Co(II) and Ni(II) was 2.32 and 3.13%, respectively. Interference effects of common anions and cations were studied and the method was applied to simultaneous determination of Co(II) and Ni(II) in alloy samples. The method was compared with derivative spectrophotometric method. PMID:14670476

  4. Kinetic spectrophotometric determination of Fe(II) in the presence of Fe(III) by H-point standard addition method in mixed micellar medium.

    PubMed

    Hasani, Masoumeh; Rezaei, Alireza; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2007-11-01

    The H-point standard addition method was applied to kinetic data for simultaneous determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) or selective determination of Fe(II) in the presence of Fe(III). The method is based on the difference in the rate of complex formation between iron in two different oxidation states and methylthymol blue (MTB) at pH 3.5 in mixed cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and Triton X-100 micellar medium. Fe(II) can be determined in the range 0.25-2.5 microg ml(-1) with satisfactory accuracy and precision in the presence of excess Fe(III) and other metal ions that rapidly form complexes with MTB under working condition. The proposed method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) or selective determination of Fe(II) in the presence of Fe(III) in spiked real environmental and synthetic samples with complex composition. PMID:17329160

  5. Kinetic spectrophotometric H-point standard addition method for the simultaneous determination of diloxanide furoate and metronidazole in binary mixtures and biological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Mahmoud Mohamed; Nejem, R.'afat Mahmoud; Shanab, Alaa Mohamed Abu; Shaat, Nahed Talab

    2013-10-01

    Simple, reliable, and sensitive kinetic spectrophotometric method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of diloxanide furoate and metronidazole using H-point standard addition method (HPSAM). The method is based on the oxidation rate difference of diloxanide and metronidazole by potassium permanganate in basic medium. A green color has been developed and measured at 610 nm. Different experimental parameters were carefully optimized. The limiting logarithmic and the initial-rate methods were adopted for the construction of the calibration curve of each individual reaction with potassium permanganate. Under the optimum conditions, Beer's law was obeyed in the range of 1.0-20.0 and 5.0-25.0 μg ml-1 for diloxanide furoate and metronidazole, respectively. The detection limits were 0.22 μg ml-1 for diloxanide furoate and 0.83 μg ml-1 for metronidazole. Correlation coefficients of the regression equations were greater than 0.9970 in all cases. The precision of the method was satisfactory; the maximum value of relative standard deviation did not exceed 1.06% (n = 5). The accuracy, expressed as recovery was between 99.4% and 101.4% with relative error of 0.12 and 0.14 for diloxanide furoate and metronidazole, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the simultaneous determination of both drugs in pharmaceutical dosage forms and human urine samples and compared with alternative HPLC method.

  6. e-VLBI Access Point (eAXP) - a centralized control and EGAE configuration / management application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruszczyk, Chester Whitney, Alan

    Setting up experiments to utilize Experiment Guided Adaptive Endpoint (EGAE) and e-VLBI is presently a complex and time intensive process requiring scientific, Mark5 and networking knowledge. There is no central access to point to configure and manage all of these aspects of an experiment. The e-VLBI Access Point (eAXP) is a centralized control plane management tool that offers a GUI interface to augment the command line interface presently being used to set up and conduct experiments. eAXP contains three major toolsets: one to set up and execute an experiment using real-time or non-real time modes; the second to configure and manage EGAE; and a third to view statistics of the experiments. Initially the overall system architecture for eAXP is presented, followed by details of the Experiment Profiler toolset including screen shots of the system presently being tested. This will be followed by how eAXP will support real-time modes interfacing to the Dynamic Resource Allocation over GMPLS Optical Network (DRAGON) resource management project.

  7. Thermoplastic fusion bonding using a pressure-assisted boiling point control system.

    PubMed

    Park, Taehyun; Song, In-Hyouk; Park, Daniel S; You, Byoung Hee; Murphy, Michael C

    2012-08-21

    A novel thermoplastic fusion bonding method using a pressure-assisted boiling point (PABP) control system was developed to apply precise temperatures and pressures during bonding. Hot embossed polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) components containing microchannels were sealed using the PABP system. Very low aspect ratio structures (AR = 1/100, 10 μm in depth and 1000 μm in width) were successfully sealed without collapse or deformation. The integrity and strength of the bonds on the sealed PMMA devices were evaluated using leakage and rupture tests; no leaks were detected and failure during the rupture tests occurred at pressures greater than 496 kPa. The PABP system was used to seal 3D shaped flexible PMMA devices successfully. PMID:22728966

  8. Prediction of the operating point of dendrites growing under coupled thermosolutal control at high growth velocity.

    PubMed

    Mullis, A M

    2011-06-01

    We use a phase-field model for the growth of dendrites in dilute binary alloys under coupled thermosolutal control to explore the dependence of the dendrite tip velocity and radius of curvature upon undercooling, Lewis number (ratio of thermal to solutal diffusivity), alloy concentration, and equilibrium partition coefficient. Constructed in the quantitatively valid thin-interface limit, the model uses advanced numerical techniques such as mesh adaptivity, multigrid, and implicit time stepping to solve the nonisothermal alloy solidification problem for material parameters that are realistic for metals. From the velocity and curvature data we estimate the dendrite operating point parameter σ*. We find that σ* is nonconstant and, over a wide parameter space, displays first a local minimum followed by a local maximum as the undercooling is increased. This behavior is contrasted with a similar type of behavior to that predicted by simple marginal stability models to occur in the radius of curvature, on the assumption of constant σ*. PMID:21797374

  9. Assessment of potential jaw-tracking advantage using control point sequences of VMAT planning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-in; Park, Jong Min; Park, So-Yeon; Choi, Chang Heon; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the potential jaw-tracking advantage using control point sequences of volume volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning. VMAT plans for patients with prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancers were converted into new static arc (SA) plans. The SA plan consisted of a series of static fields at each control point of the VMAT plan. All other machine parameters of the SA plan were perfectly identical to those of the original VMAT plan. The jaw-tracking static arc (JTSA) plans were generated with fields that closed the jaws of each SA field into the multileaf collimators (MLCs) aperture. The dosimetric advantages of JTSA over SA were evaluated in terms of a dose-volume histogram (DVH) of organ at risk (OAR) after renormalizing both plans to make the same target coverage. Both plans were delivered to the MatriXX-based COMPASS system for 3D volume dose verification. The average jaw size reduction of the JTSA along the X direction was 3.1 ± 0.9 cm for prostate patients and 6.9 ± 1.9 cm for H&N patients. For prostate patients, the organs far from the target showed larger sparing (3.7%-8.1% on average) in JTSA than the organs adjacent to the target (1.1%-1.5%). For the H&N plans, the mean dose reductions for all organs ranged from 4.3% to 11.9%. The dose reductions were more significant in the dose regions of D80, D90, and D95 than the dose regions of D5, D10, and D20 for all patients. Likewise, the deliverability and reproducibility of jaw-tracking plan were validated. The measured dosimetric advantage of JTSA over SA coincided with the calculated one above. PMID:24710450

  10. Investigatingthe Effect of Pressure on Third Liver Point on Primary Dysmenorrhea: a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kafaei Atrian, Mahboobeh; Abbaszadeh, Fatemeh; Sarvieh, Malihe; Sarafraz, Nahid; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary dysmenorrhea (PD) is a term used to describe uterine muscle spasms which occurs during the days of menstruation. Objectives To determine the effect of acupressure on third liver point on primary dysmenorrhea. Patients and Methods Female students living in dormitories of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in Iran who had PD were studied for three menstrual cycles between March till June 2012. Individuals with depression score higher than 19 according to the Beck-21 Depression scale were excluded. In the first cycle, pain intensity was assessed without intervention, and 67 samples with a pain score greater than 4 according to the visual analogue scale (VAS) were selected. Then they were randomized into third liver point (liv3) and control (placebo) groups using randomized block design with 1:1 allocation ratio based on pain intensity. In the second and third cycles, pressure was applied by the research unit intermittently for 16 minutes (2 minutes pressure, 2 minutes resting) with the starting of blood flow. Primary outcome of this study was the pain intensity which was compared between first and third cycles. Someone who divided groups, samples and data analyzer was blinded. Results In the treatment group 27 samples and in the control group 32 samples were analyzed. Friedman test showed significant differences in pain intensity before and after the intervention within both groups (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the groups according to the ordinal regression test in 3 cycles (P > 0.05). Conclusions The pressure on the LIV3 applied in this investigation was effective in reducing primary dysmenorrheal pain. So using this method is recommended to reduce PD. PMID:24616798

  11. A feasibility study regarding the addition of a fifth control to a rotorcraft in-flight simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Simon; Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1992-01-01

    The addition of a large movable horizontal tail surface to the control system of a rotorcraft in-flight simulator being developed from a Sikorsky UH-60A Black Hawk Helicopter is evaluated. The capabilities of the control surface as a trim control and as an active control are explored. The helicopter dynamics are modeled using the Generic Helicopter simulation program developed by Sikorsky Aircraft. The effect of the horizontal tail on the helicopter trim envelope is examined by plotting trim maps of the aircraft attitude and controls as a function of the flight speed and horizontal tail incidence. The control power of the tail surface relative to that of the other controls is examined by comparing control derivatives extracted from the simulation program over the flight speed envelope. The horizontal tail's contribution as an active control is evaluated using an explicit model following control synthesis involving a linear model of the helicopter in steady, level flight at a flight speed of eighty knots. The horizontal tail is found to provide additional control flexibility in the longitudinal axis. As a trim control, it provides effective control of the trim pitch attitude at mid to high forward speeds. As an active control, the horizontal tail provides useful pitching moment generating capabilities at mid to high forward speeds.

  12. Sfm_georef: Automating image measurement of ground control points for SfM-based projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mike R.

    2016-04-01

    Deriving accurate DEM and orthomosaic image products from UAV surveys generally involves the use of multiple ground control points (GCPs). Here, we demonstrate the automated collection of GCP image measurements for SfM-MVS processed projects, using sfm_georef software (James & Robson, 2012; http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/staff/jamesm/software/sfm_georef.htm). Sfm_georef was originally written to provide geo-referencing procedures for SfM-MVS projects. It has now been upgraded with a 3-D patch-based matching routine suitable for automating GCP image measurement in both aerial and ground-based (oblique) projects, with the aim of reducing the time required for accurate geo-referencing. Sfm_georef is compatible with a range of SfM-MVS software and imports the relevant files that describe the image network, including camera models and tie points. 3-D survey measurements of ground control are then provided, either for natural features or artificial targets distributed over the project area. Automated GCP image measurement is manually initiated through identifying a GCP position in an image by mouse click; the GCP is then represented by a square planar patch in 3-D, textured from the image and oriented parallel to the local topographic surface (as defined by the 3-D positions of nearby tie points). Other images are then automatically examined by projecting the patch into the images (to account for differences in viewing geometry) and carrying out a sub-pixel normalised cross-correlation search in the local area. With two or more observations of a GCP, its 3-D co-ordinates are then derived by ray intersection. With the 3-D positions of three or more GCPs identified, an initial geo-referencing transform can be derived to relate the SfM-MVS co-ordinate system to that of the GCPs. Then, if GCPs are symmetric and identical, image texture from one representative GCP can be used to search automatically for all others throughout the image set. Finally, the GCP observations can be

  13. Review and evaluation of literature on testing of chemical additives for scale control in geothermal fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    A selected group of reported tests of chemical additives in actual geothermal fluids are reviewed and evaluated to summarize the status of chemical scale-control testing and identify information and testing needs. The task distinguishes between scale control in the cooling system of a flash plant and elsewhere in the utilization system due to the essentially different operating environments involved. Additives for non-cooling geothermal fluids are discussed by scale type: silica, carbonate, and sulfide.

  14. A study of attitude control concepts for precision-pointing non-rigid spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Attitude control concepts for use onboard structurally nonrigid spacecraft that must be pointed with great precision are examined. The task of determining the eigenproperties of a system of linear time-invariant equations (in terms of hybrid coordinates) representing the attitude motion of a flexible spacecraft is discussed. Literal characteristics are developed for the associated eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system. A method is presented for determining the poles and zeros of the transfer function describing the attitude dynamics of a flexible spacecraft characterized by hybrid coordinate equations. Alterations are made to linear regulator and observer theory to accommodate modeling errors. The results show that a model error vector, which evolves from an error system, can be added to a reduced system model, estimated by an observer, and used by the control law to render the system less sensitive to uncertain magnitudes and phase relations of truncated modes and external disturbance effects. A hybrid coordinate formulation using the provided assumed mode shapes, rather than incorporating the usual finite element approach is provided.

  15. A new method to obtain uniform distribution of ground control points based on regional statistical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; An, Wei; Deng, Xinpu

    2015-10-01

    The Ground Control Points (GCPs) is an important source of fundamental data in geometric correction for remote sensing imagery. The quantity, accuracy and distribution of GCPs are three factors which may affect the accuracy of geometric correction. It is generally required that the distribution of GCP should be uniform, so they can fully control the accuracy of mapping regions. In this paper, we establish an objective standard of evaluating the uniformity of the GCPs' distribution based on regional statistical information (RSI), and get an optimal distribution of GCPs. This sampling method is called RSIS for short in this work. The Amounts of GCPs in different regions by equally partitioning the image in regions in different manners are counted which forms a vector called RSI vector in this work. The uniformity of GCPs' distribution can be evaluated by a mathematical quantity of the RSI vector. An optimal distribution of GCPs is obtained by searching the RSI vector with the minimum mathematical quantity. In this paper, the simulation annealing is employed to search the optimal distribution of GCPs that have the minimum mathematical quantity of the RSI vector. Experiments are carried out to test the method proposed in this paper, and sampling designs compared are simple random sampling and universal kriging model-based sampling. The experiments indicate that this method is highly recommended as new GCPs sampling design method for geometric correction of remotely sensed imagery.

  16. 40 CFR 82.18 - Availability of production in addition to baseline production allowances for class II controlled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....20 in order to produce with the additional production allowances. (2) Trade from a Party—Information... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of production in addition to baseline production allowances for class II controlled substances. 82.18 Section 82.18...

  17. [Powdered infant formulae preparation guide for hospitals based on Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) principles].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Leguás, H; Rodríguez Garrido, V; Lorite Cuenca, R; Pérez-Portabella, C; Redecillas Ferreiro, S; Campins Martí, M

    2009-06-01

    This guide for the preparation of powdered infant formulae in hospital environments is a collaborative work between several hospital services and is based on national and European regulations, international experts meetings and the recommendations of scientific societies. This guide also uses the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point principles proposed by Codex Alimentarius and emphasises effective verifying measures, microbiological controls of the process and the corrective actions when monitoring indicates that a critical control point is not under control. It is a dynamic guide and specifies the evaluation procedures that allow it to be constantly adapted. PMID:19427820

  18. Development and implementation of hazard analysis and critical control point plans by several U.S. feed manufacturers.

    PubMed

    Herrman, Timothy J; Langemeier, Michael R; Frederking, Matt

    2007-12-01

    The commitment to consumer food safety, global trade, and proposed new regulations by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine has led to increased adoption of hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) by the U.S. feed industry. A project supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Integrated Food Safety Initiate titled "Development and Implementation of a Voluntary HACCP Program for the US Feed Industry" enabled faculty from three land grant universities to assist individuals from 14 feed companies that collectively manufacture 15 million metric tons of feed in 100 facilities to develop HACCP plans. The process flow in these plans averaged 20 steps, and the most detailed plan included 60 process steps. Chemical hazards were more commonly identified in HACCP plans (average of four hazards per plan) than were biological hazards (average of one per plan). The most prevalent chemical hazards were cross-contamination of type A medicated articles and type B medicated feeds, aflatoxin, and wrong ingredient inclusion in feed. The most common biological hazard was mammalian protein contamination of feed ingredients and finished feed for cattle. An assessment of time and costs associated with developing HACCP plans revealed that approximately 29% of the companies needed additional personnel or additional equipment to implement a HACCP plan, and on average 268 additional person hours were needed to develop and implement a HACCP plan. Plan design, compliance monitoring, and record keeping were the three most time-consuming activities needed for developing and implementing a HACCP plan. The average cost of additional equipment needed to implement a HACCP plan was $250. PMID:18095436

  19. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  20. Initial experiments on the end-point control of a 2-DOF long-reach elastic manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Eric; Ramey, Madison

    1992-03-01

    To support the study of dynamics and control for long-reach, space-based manipulators, an experimental planar manipulator has been developed. The arm has a 15 ft reach with flexible links at the shoulder and elbow joints. The arm's equations of motion are derived with the aid of TREETOPS, a multibody dynamics analysis program. The resulting model is validated against experimental data. To serve as a base line for future work, two classically designed controllers have been implemented. One relies on sensors collocated with the joint actuators, while the other uses an end-point sensor measuring Cartesian displacements. Comparison of the controllers' experimental closed-loop responses demonstrate the performance improvements achievable using end-point position feedback; most notable is the more than two fold increase in control bandwidth. Experimental and simulation results also demonstrate the end-point controller's improved `Cartesian impedance.'

  1. Ground Control Point - Wireless System Network for UAV-based environmental monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Aguilar, Abraham

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have seen widespread civil applications including usage for survey and monitoring services in areas such as agriculture, construction and civil engineering, private surveillance and reconnaissance services and cultural heritage management. Most aerial monitoring services require the integration of information acquired during the flight (such as imagery) with ground-based information (such as GPS information or others) for improved ground truth validation. For example, to obtain an accurate 3D and Digital Elevation Model based on aerial imagery, it is necessary to include ground-based information of coordinate points, which are normally acquired with surveying methods based on Global Position Systems (GPS). However, GPS surveys are very time consuming and especially for longer time series of monitoring data repeated GPS surveys are necessary. In order to improve speed of data collection and integration, this work presents an autonomous system based on Waspmote technologies build on single nodes interlinked in a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) star-topology for ground based information collection and later integration with surveying data obtained by UAV. Nodes are designed to be visible from the air, to resist extreme weather conditions with low-power consumption. Besides, nodes are equipped with GPS as well as Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), accelerometer, temperature and soil moisture sensors and thus provide significant advantages in a broad range of applications for environmental monitoring. For our purpose, the WSN transmits the environmental data with 3G/GPRS to a database on a regular time basis. This project provides a detailed case study and implementation of a Ground Control Point System Network for UAV-based vegetation monitoring of dry mountain grassland in the Matsch valley, Italy.

  2. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in

  3. Control of point defects and space charge in electroluminescent ZnS:Mn thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. S.; Davidson, M. R.; Holloway, P. H.

    2002-12-01

    The mechanisms leading to improved brightness, efficiency, and stability of alternating-current thin-film electroluminescent (ACTFEL) ZnS:Mn phosphors have been studied. Previously we have shown that ex situ codoping of the sputter deposited ZnS:Mn active layer with K and Cl results in a 53% improvement in brightness, a 62% improvement in efficiency, and better 100 h accelerated aging stability. In this work, we demonstrate that these improvements result from a 75% increase in excitation efficiency for conduction electrons, combined with a small decrease in both light outcoupling and nonradiative recombination. Electrical properties data were used to determine that there is a reduced amount of static space charge in the codoped films, resulting in a larger average field, increased excitation efficiency, and increased charge multiplication. The reduced space charge is attributed to the addition of charge compensating zinc vacancy-chlorine complexes and isolated chlorine point defects, which are acceptor and donor defects, respectively, and a reduction of zinc vacancy deep hole traps. It is postulated that higher average fields results in sufficient electron multiplication or donor ionization such that current for EL excitation is limited by the phosphor resistance rather than capacitance or density of interface states. The possibility of using these mechanisms to increase the efficiency of other ACTFEL phosphors is discussed.

  4. Control of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in contaminated alfalfa silage: Effects of silage additives.

    PubMed

    Ogunade, I M; Kim, D H; Jiang, Y; Weinberg, Z G; Jeong, K C; Adesogan, A T

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to examine if adding microbial inoculants or propionic acid to alfalfa silages contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 would inhibit the growth of the pathogen during or after ensiling. Alfalfa forage was harvested at the early bloom stage, wilted to a dry matter concentration of 54%, chopped to 19-mm lengths, and ensiled after treatment with one of the following: (1) distilled water (control); (2) 1×10(5) cfu/g of E. coli O157:H7 (EC); (3) EC and 1×10(6) cfu/g of Lactobacillus plantarum (EC+LP); (4) EC and 1×10(6) cfu/g of Lactobacillus buchneri (EC+LB); and (5) EC and 2.2g/kg of propionic acid (EC+PA). Each treatment was ensiled in quadruplicate in laboratory silos for 0, 3, 7, 16, and 100d and analyzed for EC counts, pH, and organic acids. In addition, samples from d 100 were analyzed for chemical composition, ammonia-N, counts of yeasts and molds, and aerobic stability. Escherichia coli O157:H7 was detected in all silages until d 7, but by d 16 it was not detected in those treated with EC+LB and EC+LP, though it was still detected in EC and EC+PA silages. However, by d 100, the pathogen was not detected in any silage. The rate of pH decrease to 5.0 was fastest for the EC+LP silage (7d), followed by the EC+LB silage (16d). Nevertheless, all silages had attained a pH of or less than 5.0 by d 100. The rapid decrease in pH in EC+LP and EC+LB silages was observed due to higher lactate and acetate concentrations, respectively, relative to the other silages during the early fermentation phase (d 3-16). Propionic acid was only detected in the EC+PA silage. Yeast counts were lowest in EC+LB and EC+PA silages. Subsamples of all d-100 silages were reinoculated with 1×10(5) cfu/g of EC immediately after silo opening. When the pathogen was subsequently enumerated after 168h of aerobic exposure, it was not detected in silages treated with EC+PA, EC+LB, or EC+LP, which all had pH values less than 5.0. Whereas the EC silage had a pH value of 5

  5. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-31

    This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved

  6. Addition of Titanium Oxide Inclusions into Liquid Steel to Control Nonmetallic Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiviö, Miia; Holappa, Lauri

    2012-04-01

    Titanium oxide inclusions in steel are well known to inhibit grain growth and act as nucleation sites for acicular ferrite because of absorbing manganese from the surrounding steel resulting in a manganese depleted zone around the inclusion. In this article, the inclusions resulting from TiO2 additions to low-alloyed C-Mn-Cr steel were studied. Different types of TiO2 containing materials were added to liquid steel before or during casting to get small titanium-oxide-rich inclusions in steel. The main goals were to find out what happens to TiO2 in liquid steel after addition and during cooling and to study further what type of inclusions are formed in the steel as a result of the TiO2 addition. Based on the thermodynamic calculations and the results of scanning electron microscope (SEM)-energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and SEM-electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis, TiO2 is first reduced to Ti3O5 in liquid steel at high temperatures and then to Ti2O3 during cooling at around 1573 K (1300 °C). Both reactions liberate oxygen, which reacts with Ti, Mn, and Al forming complex Ti2O3-rich inclusions. The results also show that TiO2 additions result in more TiOx + MnO inclusions compared with experiments with Ti addition and that the absolute amount of manganese present in the inclusions is much higher in experiments with TiO2 addition than in experiments with Ti additions.

  7. 40 CFR 63.1583 - What are the emission points and control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant? 63.1583 Section 63.1583 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Publicly Owned Treatment Works Industrial Potw Treatment Plant Description and Requirements § 63.1583 What are the emission points and control requirements for an industrial POTW...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1583 - What are the emission points and control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant? 63.1583 Section 63.1583 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Publicly Owned Treatment Works Industrial Potw Treatment Plant Description and Requirements § 63.1583 What are the emission points and control requirements for an industrial POTW...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1583 - What are the emission points and control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant? 63.1583 Section 63.1583 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Publicly Owned Treatment Works Industrial Potw Treatment Plant Description and Requirements § 63.1583 What are the emission points and control requirements for an industrial POTW...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1583 - What are the emission points and control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant? 63.1583 Section 63.1583 Protection of... Pollutants: Publicly Owned Treatment Works Industrial Potw Treatment Plant Description and Requirements § 63.1583 What are the emission points and control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant?...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1583 - What are the emission points and control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant? 63.1583 Section 63.1583 Protection of... Pollutants: Publicly Owned Treatment Works Industrial Potw Treatment Plant Description and Requirements § 63.1583 What are the emission points and control requirements for an industrial POTW treatment plant?...

  12. Nonlinear Generator Control Based on Equilibrium Point Analysis for Standard One-Machine Infinite-Bus System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Fujimoto, Koji; Kawamoto, Shunji

    The aim of this letter is to show that the unstable equilibrium point of the Japanese standard one-machine infinite-bus system model is eliminated by adding a simple nonlinear complementary control input to the AVR, and then the critical clearing time of the system can be more enhanced in comparison with the PSS by introducing the proposed nonlinear generator control.

  13. A Non-Linear Approach to Spacecraft Formation Control in the Vicinity of a Collinear Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An expanding interest in mission design strategies that exploit libration point regions, demands the continued development of enhanced, efficient, control algorithms for station-keeping and formation maintenance. Linear control strategies have been developed for station-keeping. However, their region of stability is bounded by the assumptions required for linearizing the governing equations of motion. For example, reference [I] discusses the development of a linear control design for maintaining a halo orbit about the Earth-Moon L2 libration point. Trial runs indicated the trajectory was unstable for starting points exceeding 45,000 km from the L2 point. Also, there was significant growth in the control effort required to maintain the orbit as the nominal radius increased. This result is a consequence of the increased influence of the system non-linearities, as the trajectory deviated from the linearization point, L2. As an alternative, this paper presents the development of a non-linear control strategy, based on a Hamiltonian formulation of the equations of motion. The control strategy is applied to the problem of formation maintenance, rather than simple station

  14. Point-of-care testing for sexually transmitted infections: recent advances and implications for disease control

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joseph D.; Bien, Cedric H.; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) remain a major global public health issue, with more than 448 million incident bacterial infections each year. We review recent advances in STI point-of-care (POC) testing and implications for STI prevention and control. Recent findings Accurate immunochromatographic assays to detect HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis antibodies have made home or supervised self-testing possible. Several studies have demonstrated feasibility and excellent test characteristics for HIV, HCV and syphilis POC tests. Rapid oral HIV tests are now available for purchase at retail sites across the United States. Combined HIV and syphilis tests using a single finger prick blood sample are under evaluation. Summary Oral POC STI tests with comparable performance to blood-based POC tests are available for self-testing. POC tests can expand screening, improve syndromic management and reduce loss to follow up. POC STI tests have the potential to facilitate prompt treatment and partner services. POC STI tests create opportunities for new social and financial models of community-based testing services. Increasing equity and access to testing will create challenges in linkage to care, quality assurance, partner services and surveillance. These important developments warrant research to understand appropriate contexts for implementation. PMID:23242343

  15. Application of a constructed wetland for non-point source pollution control.

    PubMed

    Kao, C M; Wang, J Y; Lee, H Y; Wen, C K

    2001-01-01

    In Taiwan, non-point source (NPS) pollution is one of the major causes of impairment of surface waters. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using constructed wetlands on NPS pollutant removal and water quality improvements. A field-scale constructed wetland system was built inside the campus of National Sun Yat-Sen University (located in southern Taiwan) to remove (1) NPS pollutants due to the stormwater runoff, and (2) part of the untreated wastewater from school drains. The constructed wetland was 40 m (L) x 30 m (W) x 1 m (D), which received approximately 85 m3 per day of untreated wastewater from school drainage pipes. The plants grown on the wetland included floating (Pistia stratiotes L.) and emergent (Phragmites communis L.) species. One major storm event and baseline water quality samples were analyzed during the monitoring period. Analytical results indicate that the constructed wetland removed a significant amount of NPS pollutants and wastewater constituents. More than 88% of nitrogen, 81% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 85% of heavy metals, and 60% of the total suspended solids (TSS) caused by the storm runoff were removed by the wetland system before discharging. Results from this study may be applied to the design of constructed wetlands for NPS pollution control and water quality improvement. PMID:11804154

  16. Heliocentric trajectory analysis of Sun-pointing smart dust with electrochromic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengali, Giovanni; Quarta, Alessandro A.

    2016-02-01

    A smart dust is a micro spacecraft, with a characteristic side length on the order of a few millimeters, whose surface is coated with electrochromic material. Its orbital dynamics is controlled by exploiting the differential force due to the solar radiation pressure, which is obtained by modulating the reflectivity coefficient of the electrochromic material within a range of admissible values. A significant thrust level can be reached due to the high values of area-to-mass ratio of such a spacecraft configuration. Assuming that the smart dust is designed to achieve a passive Sun-pointing attitude, the propulsive acceleration due to the solar radiation pressure lies along the Sun-spacecraft direction. The aim of this paper is to study the smart dust heliocentric dynamics in order to find a closed form, analytical solution of its trajectory when the reflectivity coefficient of the electrochromic material can assume two values only. The problem is addressed by introducing a suitable transformation that regularizes the spacecraft motion and translates the smart-dust dynamics into that of a linear harmonic oscillator with unitary frequency, whose forcing input is a boxcar function. The solution is found using the Laplace transform method, and afterwards the problem is generalized by accounting for the degradation of the electrochromic material due to its exposition to the solar radiation. Three spacecraft configurations, corresponding to low, medium and high performance smart dusts, are finally used to quantify the potentialities of these advanced devices in an interplanetary mission scenario.

  17. Transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation at Jiaji points reduce abdominal pain after colonoscopy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanqing; Wu, Weilan; Yao, Yusheng; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Qiuyan; Qiu, Liangcheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) at Jiaji acupuncture points has therapeutic potential for relieving viscera pain and opioid-related side effects. This prospective, randomized, triple-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was to investigate the efficacy of TEAS on abdominal pain after colonoscopy. Methods: Consecutive outpatients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II underwent selective colonoscopy were randomly assigned into two groups for either TEAS or sham pretreatment. The primary outcomes were the incidence of abdominal pain after colonoscopy. The secondary outcomes included the incidence of abdominal distension, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), duration of PACU stay, and patient’s satisfaction and acceptance. Results: Among the 229 patients analyzed, fewer occurrence of post-procedural abdominal pain (11.4% vs 25.2%, P = 0.007) and distension (1.8% vs 7.8%, P = 0.032) were observed in TEAS group, when compared with the sham group. The duration of PACU stay was significant shortened in TEAS group (P < 0.001). Meanwhile, patients’ satisfaction score to medical service was higher (P < 0.001), and their acceptance to colonoscopy was improved (P = 0.011). Conclusion: Pretreatment with TEAS can reduce post-procedural discomfort, provide more efficient medical resources utilization, and improved patient’s satisfaction and colonoscopy acceptance. PMID:26131193

  18. The development of an UAV borne direct georeferenced photogrammetric platform for Ground Control Point free applications.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Tsai, Meng-Lun; Chu, Chien-Hsun

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate applications such as environment detection or disaster monitoring, the development of rapid low cost systems for collecting near real time spatial information is very critical. Rapid spatial information collection has become an emerging trend for remote sensing and mapping applications. In this study, a fixed-wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-based spatial information acquisition platform that can operate in Ground Control Point (GCP) free environments is developed and evaluated. The proposed UAV based photogrammetric platform has a Direct Georeferencing (DG) module that includes a low cost Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Inertial Navigation System (INS)/Global Positioning System (GPS) integrated system. The DG module is able to provide GPS single frequency carrier phase measurements for differential processing to obtain sufficient positioning accuracy. All necessary calibration procedures are implemented. Ultimately, a flight test is performed to verify the positioning accuracy in DG mode without using GCPs. The preliminary results of positioning accuracy in DG mode illustrate that horizontal positioning accuracies in the x and y axes are around 5 m at 300 m flight height above the ground. The positioning accuracy of the z axis is below 10 m. Therefore, the proposed platform is relatively safe and inexpensive for collecting critical spatial information for urgent response such as disaster relief and assessment applications where GCPs are not available. PMID:23012538

  19. The Development of an UAV Borne Direct Georeferenced Photogrammetric Platform for Ground Control Point Free Applications

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Tsai, Meng-Lun; Chu, Chien-Hsun

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate applications such as environment detection or disaster monitoring, the development of rapid low cost systems for collecting near real time spatial information is very critical. Rapid spatial information collection has become an emerging trend for remote sensing and mapping applications. In this study, a fixed-wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-based spatial information acquisition platform that can operate in Ground Control Point (GCP) free environments is developed and evaluated. The proposed UAV based photogrammetric platform has a Direct Georeferencing (DG) module that includes a low cost Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Inertial Navigation System (INS)/Global Positioning System (GPS) integrated system. The DG module is able to provide GPS single frequency carrier phase measurements for differential processing to obtain sufficient positioning accuracy. All necessary calibration procedures are implemented. Ultimately, a flight test is performed to verify the positioning accuracy in DG mode without using GCPs. The preliminary results of positioning accuracy in DG mode illustrate that horizontal positioning accuracies in the x and y axes are around 5 m at 300 m flight height above the ground. The positioning accuracy of the z axis is below 10 m. Therefore, the proposed platform is relatively safe and inexpensive for collecting critical spatial information for urgent response such as disaster relief and assessment applications where GCPs are not available. PMID:23012538

  20. Control of asymmetry in the radical addition approach to chiral amine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Friestad, Gregory K

    2014-01-01

    The state-of-the-science in asymmetric free radical additions to imino compounds is presented, beginning with an overview of methods involving stereocontrol by various chiral auxiliary approaches. Chiral N-acylhydrazones are discussed with respect to their use as radical acceptors for Mn-mediated intermolecular additions, from design to scope surveys to applications to biologically active targets. A variety of aldehydes and ketones serve as viable precursors for the chiral hydrazones, and a variety of alkyl iodides may be employed as radical precursors, as discussed in a critical review of the functional group compatibility of the reaction. Applications to amino acid and alkaloid synthesis are presented to illustrate the synthetic potential of these versatile stereocontrolled carbon-carbon bond construction reactions. Asymmetric catalysis is discussed, from seminal work on the stereocontrol of radical addition to imino compounds by non-covalent interactions with stoichiometric amounts of catalysts, to more recent examples demonstrating catalyst turnover. PMID:24085561

  1. Control of Asymmetry in the Radical Addition Approach to Chiral Amine Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Friestad, Gregory K.

    2014-01-01

    The state-of-the-science in asymmetric free radical additions to imino compounds is presented, beginning with an overview of methods involving stereocontrol by various chiral auxiliary approaches. Chiral N-acylhydrazones are discussed with respect to their use as radical acceptors for Mn-mediated intermolecular additions, from design to scope surveys to applications to biologically active targets. A variety of aldehydes and ketones serve as viable precursors for the chiral hydrazones, and a variety of alkyl iodides may be employed as radical precursors, as discussed in a critical review of the functional group compatibility of the reaction. Applications to amino acid and alkaloid synthesis are presented to illustrate the synthetic potential of these versatile stereocontrolled carbon–carbon bond construction reactions. Asymmetric catalysis is discussed, from seminal work on the stereocontrol of radical addition to imino compounds by non-covalent interactions with stoichiometric amounts of catalysts, to more recent examples demonstrating catalyst turnover. PMID:24085561

  2. A Maximum Power Point Tracking Control Method of a Photovoltaic Power Generator with Consideration of Dynamic Characteristics of Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takashi; Yoshida, Toshiya; Ohniwa, Katsumi

    This paper discusses a new control strategy for photovoltaic power generation systems with consideration of dynamic characteristics of the photovoltaic cells. The controller estimates internal currents of an equivalent circuit for the cells. This estimated, or the virtual current and the actual voltage of the cells are fed to a conventional Maximum-Power-Point-Tracking (MPPT) controller. Consequently, this MPPT controller still tracks the optimum point even though it is so designed that the seeking speed of the operating point is extremely high. This system may suit for applications, which are installed in rapidly changeable insolation and temperature-conditions e.g. automobiles, trains, and airplanes. The proposed method is verified by experiment with a combination of this estimating function and the modified Boehringer's MPPT algorithm.

  3. A Non-Linear Approach to Spacecraft Formation Control in the Vicinity of a Collinear Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An expanding interest in mission design strategies that exploit libration point regions demands the continued development of enhanced, efficient, control algorithms for station-keeping and formation maintenance. This paper discusses the development of a non-linear, formation maintenance, control algorithm for trajectories in the vicinity of a libration point. However, the formulation holds for any trajectory governed by the equations of motion for the restricted three body problem. The control law guarantees exponential convergence, based on a Lyaponov analysis. FreeFlyer and MATLAB provide the simulation environment for controller performance evaluation. The simulation, modeled after the MAXIM Pathfinder mission, maintains the relative position of a "follower" spacecraft with respect to a "leader" spacecraft, stationed near the L2 libration point in the Sun-Earth system. Evaluation metrics are fuel usage and tracking accuracy.

  4. LONG-TERM DEMONSTRATION OF SORBENT ENHANCEMENT ADDITIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Jason D. Laumb; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John P. Kay; Christopher L. Martin; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Nicholas B. Lentz; Alexander Azenkeng; Kevin C. Galbreath; Lucinda L. Hamre

    2011-05-27

    Long-term demonstration tests of advanced sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) technologies have been completed at five coal-fired power plants. The targeted removal rate was 90% from baseline conditions at all five stations. The plants included Hawthorn Unit 5, Mill Creek Unit 4, San Miguel Unit 1, Centralia Unit 2, and Hoot Lake Unit 2. The materials tested included powdered activated carbon, treated carbon, scrubber additives, and SEAs. In only one case (San Miguel) was >90% removal not attainable. The reemission of mercury from the scrubber at this facility prevented >90% capture.

  5. Infection control in implantation of cardiac implantable electronic devices: current evidence, controversial points, and unresolved issues.

    PubMed

    Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Sideris, Skevos; Dilaveris, Polychronis; Gatzoulis, Konstantinos; Goudevenos, John A

    2016-04-01

    A significant increase in the implantation of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is evident over the past years, while there is evidence for a disproportionate increase in CIED-related infections. The cumulative probability of device infection seems to be higher in implantable cardioverter defibrillator and in cardiac resynchronization therapy patients compared with permanent pacemaker patients. Given that more than a half of CIED infections are possibly related to the operative procedure, there is a need for effective periprocedural infection control. However, many of the current recommendations are empirical and not evidence-based, while questions, unresolved issues, and conflicting evidence arise. The perioperative systemic use of antibiotics confers significant benefit in prevention of CIED infections. However, there are no conclusive data regarding the specific value of each agent in different clinical settings, the value of post-operative antibiotic treatment as well as the optimal duration of therapy. The merit of local pocket irrigation with antibiotic and/or antiseptic agents remains unproved. Of note, recent evidence indicates that the application of antibacterial envelopes into the device pocket markedly decreases the infection risk. In addition, limited reports on strict integrated infection control protocols show a dramatic reduction in infection rates in this setting and therefore deserve further attention. Finally, the relative impact of particular factors on the infection risk, including the type of the CIED, patients' individual characteristics and comorbidities, should be further examined since it may facilitate the development of tailored prophylactic interventions for each patient. PMID:26516219

  6. Decreased Antibiotic Prescription in an Italian Pediatric Population With Nonspecific and Persistent Upper Respiratory Tract Infections by Use of a Point-of-Care White Blood Cell Count, in Addition to Antibiotic Delayed Prescription Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, Luigi; Limauro, Raffaele; Sassi, Roberto; Boccazzi, Antonio; del Gaizo, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test, in delayed antibiotic strategy, if the usages of a point-of-care leukocyte count would significantly decrease the prescription rate of antibiotics for children with nonspecific upper respiratory tract infections. A prospective clinical trial was performed in 23 primary care pediatric doctors’ offices on children with nonspecific upper respiratory tract infection with fever for at least 48 hours. The children were randomized into 2 groups: one using a point-of-care white blood cell (WBC) count as guidance and the other prescribing antibiotics to all children, according to delayed antibiotics prescription strategy. A total of 792 patients participated. In the WBC group (n = 437), 56 patients had WBC >15 000/mm3 and received antibiotics. At follow-up, an additional 44 children received antibiotics. In the control group (n = 355), antibiotics were prescribed to all children. The reduction of antibiotic usage was 77% between the groups. The decrease in antibiotic usage gave no influence on recovery, complications, or other medical outcome. PMID:27335990

  7. Innovative point focus solar concentrator: Volume 5, Electronic controls and electrical interface; Phase 1 topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1986-03-07

    This report discusses the following electronic equipment for the solar collector: LEC-1700 electrical control system; LEC-1700 controller; hand-held remote control unit; communications interface controller; RS-232C to CIC interface card; audio interface card; communications interface controller backplane; wiring harness; and ac power controller.

  8. A vision-based end-point control for a two-link flexible manipulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obergfell, Klaus

    1991-01-01

    The measurement and control of the end-effector position of a large two-link flexible manipulator are investigated. The system implementation is described and an initial algorithm for static end-point positioning is discussed. Most existing robots are controlled through independent joint controllers, while the end-effector position is estimated from the joint positions using a kinematic relation. End-point position feedback can be used to compensate for uncertainty and structural deflections. Such feedback is especially important for flexible robots. Computer vision is utilized to obtain end-point position measurements. A look-and-move control structure alleviates the disadvantages of the slow and variable computer vision sampling frequency. This control structure consists of an inner joint-based loop and an outer vision-based loop. A static positioning algorithm was implemented and experimentally verified. This algorithm utilizes the manipulator Jacobian to transform a tip position error to a joint error. The joint error is then used to give a new reference input to the joint controller. The convergence of the algorithm is demonstrated experimentally under payload variation. A Landmark Tracking System (Dickerson, et al 1990) is used for vision-based end-point measurements. This system was modified and tested. A real-time control system was implemented on a PC and interfaced with the vision system and the robot.

  9. Space infrared telescope pointing control system. Infrared telescope tracking in the presence of target motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Schneider, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    The use of charge-coupled-devices, or CCD's, has been documented by a number of sources as an effective means of providing a measurement of spacecraft attitude with respect to the stars. A method exists of defocussing and interpolation of the resulting shape of a star image over a small subsection of a large CCD array. This yields an increase in the accuracy of the device by better than an order of magnitude over the case when the star image is focussed upon a single CCD pixel. This research examines the effect that image motion has upon the overall precision of this star sensor when applied to an orbiting infrared observatory. While CCD's collect energy within the visible spectrum of light, the targets of scientific interest may well have no appreciable visible emissions. Image motion has the effect of smearing the image of the star in the direction of motion during a particular sampling interval. The presence of image motion is incorporated into a Kalman filter for the system, and it is shown that the addition of a gyro command term is adequate to compensate for the effect of image motion in the measurement. The updated gyro model is included in this analysis, but has natural frequencies faster than the projected star tracker sample rate for dim stars. The system state equations are reduced by modelling gyro drift as a white noise process. There exists a tradeoff in selected star tracker sample time between the CCD, which has improved noise characteristics as sample time increases, and the gyro, which will potentially drift further between long attitude updates. A sample time which minimizes pointing estimation error exists for the random drift gyro model as well as for a random walk gyro model.

  10. Metal-ceramic microstructures in the Fe-Mn-O system -- Morphology control by impurity addition

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, R.; Uestuendag, E.; Sass, S.L.; Dieckmann, R.

    1995-10-01

    The influence of the addition of impurities and changes in the oxygen partial pressure on the formation of metal-ceramic microstructures by partial reduction of ternary or higher ceramic oxides was experimentally investigated in the model system Fe-Mn-O at constant temperature and total pressure. Electron microscopy studies were performed for microstructural characterization, phase identification and chemical analysis. It was observed that the addition of dopants such as BaO, CaO, MgO, SrO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} or ZrO{sub 2} to the initial, polycrystalline oxide solid solution (Fe{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub x}){sub 1{minus}{Delta}}O strongly influences the location and rate of metal precipitation during reduction. Experimental observations are discussed based on solubility limits and the segregation of dopants.

  11. Controlled laboratory challenge demonstrates substantial additive genetic variation in resistance to Streptococcus iniae in Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is an etiologic agent of streptococcal disease in tilapia and is one of several Streptococcus spp. that negatively impact worldwide tilapia production. Methods for the prevention and control of S. iniae include vaccines, management strategies, and antibiotics. An alternative and ...

  12. Grain-size control in Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb with yttrium additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, P. B.; Patankar, S. N.; (Sam) Froes, F. H.; Baburaj, E. G.; Genç, A.; Ovecoglu, L.

    2002-08-01

    A gas-atomized (GA) prealloyed powder of the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb intermetallic and 1.6 wt pct Y were mechanically alloyed (MA) and hot isostatically pressed (hipped) to produce a fully dense nanocrystalline material. Mechanical alloying of the as-blended powder for 16 hours resulted in the formation of a disordered fcc phase. Hipping of the alloy powder produced a single-phase nanocrystalline TiAl intermetallic, containing a distribution of 20 to 35-nm-sized Al2Y4O9 particles. The formation of oxide particles occurred by the chemical combination of Al and Y with oxygen, which entered as a contaminant during milling. Oxide particles increased the hardness of the intermetallic compound and minimized grain growth even at 0.8 T m , where T m is the melting point of the compound.

  13. PCB bioavailability control in Lumbriculus variegatus through different modes of activated carbon addition to sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Xueli Sun; Upal Ghosh

    2007-07-01

    PCB bioavailability to a freshwater oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) was studied using sediments from a PCB-impacted river that was treated with different modes of granular activated carbon (GAC) addition. The GAC used was bituminous coal-based type TOP. For sediment treated with 2.6% GAC and mixed for 2 min prior to L. variegatus addition, the reduction in total PCB biouptake was 70% for 75-300 {mu}m size carbon, and 92% for the 45-180 {mu}m size carbon. For the case where the GAC was placed as a thin layer on top of the sediments without mixing, the reduction in total PCB uptake was 70%. PCB biouptake kinetics study using treated and untreated sediment showed that the maximum PCB uptake in tissue was achieved at 28 days and decreased after that time. Although the absolute uptake of PCB changed over time, the percent reduction in total PCB uptake upon GAC amendment remained constant after the first few days. Our results indicated that PCB bioavailability was reduced upon the addition and little or no mixing of GAC into sediments. PCB aqueous equilibrium concentration and desorption rates were greatly reduced after GAC amendment, indicating reductions in the two primary mechanisms of PCB bioavailability in sediments: chemical activity and chemical accessibility. 29 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Using epidemiology to regulate food additives: saccharin case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Cordle, F; Miller, S A

    1984-01-01

    The increasing use of nonnutritive sweeteners and the widely publicized 1969 ban on cyclamate led to additional investigations in rodents of the carcinogenic potential of saccharin. Preliminary results of a long-term feeding study indicated formation of bladder tumors in rodents, and collective experimental evidence has demonstrated that high doses of the synthetic sweetener saccharin can cause bladder cancer in rodents. Based on the results of that and other rodent studies indicating an increased risk of bladder cancer associated with saccharin, the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration announced the agency's intention to propose a ban on saccharin. This intention was made known in April 1977 under the Delaney Clause of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The clause essentially states that no additive shall be deemed safe if it is found to induce cancer in man or animals, or if it is found, after tests appropriate for the evaluation of the safety of food additives, to induce cancer in man or animals. Also in 1977, a group of epidemiologists began to assess the available epidemiologic information to determine the potential human risk. This report describes the assessment of several human epidemiologic studies available then and the results of more recent epidemiologic studies. PMID:6431484

  15. Additive manufacturing of scaffolds with dexamethasone controlled release for enhanced bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro F; Puga, Ana M; Díaz-Gomez, Luis; Concheiro, Angel; Busch, Dirk H; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2015-12-30

    The adoption of additive manufacturing in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) strategies greatly relies on the development of novel 3D printable materials with advanced properties. In this work we have developed a material for bone TERM applications with tunable bioerosion rate and dexamethasone release profile which can be further employed in fused deposition modelling (the most common and accessible 3D printing technology in the market). The developed material consisted of a blend of poly-ϵ-caprolactone (PCL) and poloxamine (Tetronic®) and was processed into a ready-to-use filament form by means of a simplified melt-based methodology, therefore eliminating the utilization of solvents. 3D scaffolds composed of various blend formulations were additively manufactured and analyzed revealing blend ratio-specific degradation rates and dexamethasone release profiles. Furthermore, in vitro culture studies revealed a similar blend ratio-specific trend concerning the osteoinductive activity of the fabricated scaffolds when these were seeded and cultured with human mesenchymal stem cells. The developed material enables to specifically address different regenerative requirements found in various tissue defects. The versatility of such strategy is further increased by the ability of additive manufacturing to accurately fabricate implants matching any given defect geometry. PMID:26520408

  16. Carbon monoxide exposures from propane-powered floor burnishers following addition of emissions controls

    SciTech Connect

    Demer, F.R.

    1998-11-01

    Previous published work by this author suggests that propane-powered floor burnisher use represents a potentially serious health hazard from carbon monoxide exposures, particularly for susceptible individuals. This earlier study was repeated using burnishers retrofitted with emission controls consisting of self-aspirating catalytic mufflers and computerized air/fuel monitors and alarms. Real-time carbon monoxide detectors with data-logging capabilities were placed on the burnishers in the breathing zones of operators during burnisher use. Carbon monoxide levels were recorded every 30 seconds. Ventilation and physical characteristics of the spaces of burnisher use were characterized, as were burnisher maintenance practices. Thirteen burnishing events were monitored under conditions comparable to previously published monitoring. All carbon monoxide exposures were well below even the most conservative recommended limits from the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. Potential failures of the emission controls were also identified and included air filter blockage, spark plug malfunction, and faulty alarm function design.

  17. HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) to guarantee safe water reuse and drinking water production--a case study.

    PubMed

    Dewettinck, T; Van Houtte, E; Geenens, D; Van Hege, K; Verstraete, W

    2001-01-01

    To obtain a sustainable water catchment in the dune area of the Flemish west coast, the integration of treated domestic wastewater in the existing potable water production process is planned. The hygienic hazards associated with the introduction of treated domestic wastewater into the water cycle are well recognised. Therefore, the concept of HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) was used to guarantee hygienically safe drinking water production. Taking into account the literature data on the removal efficiencies of the proposed advanced treatment steps with regard to enteric viruses and protozoa and after setting high quality limits based on the recent progress in quantitative risk assessment, the critical control points (CCPs) and points of attention (POAs) were identified. Based on the HACCP analysis a specific monitoring strategy was developed which focused on the control of these CCPs and POAs. PMID:11464766

  18. Application of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) to the handling of expressed breast milk on a neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Hunter, P R

    1991-02-01

    Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) is a powerful procedure for ensuring quality and safety and has gained widespread use in industry. This paper describes the basic method which is a four-stage process including process analysis, hazard identification, identification of critical control points and devising effective control options. Suggestions as to how the method can be adapted to the control of hospital infection are made. A HACCP analysis, on the supply of expressed human breast milk to babies on a Special Care Baby Unit, is presented. Although only the mother's own milk was given to babies on the unit, several potential hazards were identified and suggestions have been made for their control. PMID:1674260

  19. Integrated quality control: implementation and validation of instrument function checks and procedural controls for a cartridge-based point-of-care system for critical care analysis.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Paul; Mansouri, Sohrab

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the process used to develop and validate an integrated quality-control system for a cartridge-based, point-of-care system for critical care analysis is outlined. Application of risk management principles has resulted in a quality control system using a combination of statistical quality control with onboard reference solutions and failure pattern recognition used to flag common failure modes during the analytical phase of the testing process. A combination of traditional external quality control, integrated quality control to monitor ongoing instrument functionality, operator training, and other laboratory-implemented monitors is most effective in controlling known failure modes during the testing process. PMID:23331731

  20. From lab to industrial: PZT nanoparticles synthesis and process control for application in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsien-Lin

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) nanoparticles hold many promising current and future applications, such as PZT ink for 3-D printing or seeds for PZT thick films. One common method is hydrothermal growth, in which temperature, duration time, or mineralizer concentrations are optimized to produce PZT nanoparticles with desired morphology, controlled size and size distribution. A modified hydrothermal process is used to fabricate PZT nanoparticles. The novelty is to employ a high ramping rate (e.g., 20 deg C/min) to generate abrupt supersaturation so as to promote burst nucleation of PZT nanoparticles as well as a fast cooling rate (e.g., 5 deg C/min) with a controlled termination of crystal growth. As a result, PZT nanoparticles with a size distribution ranging from 200 nm to 800 nm are obtained with cubic morphology and good crystallinity. The identification of nanoparticles is confirmed through use of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). XRD patterns are used to compare sample variations in their microstructures such as lattice parameter. A cubic morphology and particle size are also examined via SEM images. The hydrothermal process is further modified with excess lead (from 20% wt. to 80% wt.) to significantly reduce amorphous phase and agglomeration of the PZT nanoparticles. With a modified process, the particle size still remains within the 200 nm to 800 nm. Also, the crystal structures (microstructure) of the samples show little variations. Finally, a semi-continuous hydrothermal manufacturing process was developed to substantially reduce the fabrication time and maintained the same high quality as the nanoparticles prepared in an earlier stage. In this semi-continuous process, a furnace is maintained at the process temperature (200 deg C), whereas autoclaves containing PZT sol are placed in and out of the furnace to control the ramp-up and cooling rates. This setup eliminates an extremely time-consuming step of cooling down the furnace, thus saving tremendous amount of

  1. Formalin treatments pass new tests. Additional notes on the control of ecto-parasitic protozoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1940-01-01

    After the completion of the eхреriments reported recently, in which the efficacy of formalin in controlling infections of Gostia mecatrix was demonstrated, the author was afforded an opportunity to test the value of formalin solutions in combatting established mixed infections of (Gyrodactylus, Tricbodina, Cyclochaeta) and a stalked protozoan on rainbow trout fingerlings. This opportunity was provided through the courtesy and cooperation of Clarence F. Pautzke, Chief Biologist for the Washington State Game Department, and Lee Walters, Superintendent of the Washington State Hatchery at Seward Park, Seattle.

  2. Mental health problems in adolescents with cochlear implants: peer problems persist after controlling for additional handicaps

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Maria; Burger, Thorsten; Illg, Angelika; Kunze, Silke; Giourgas, Alexandros; Braun, Ludwig; Kröger, Stefanie; Nickisch, Andreas; Rasp, Gerhard; Becker, Andreas; Keilmann, Annerose

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present multi-center study were to investigate the extent of mental health problems in adolescents with a hearing loss and cochlear implants (CIs) in comparison to normal hearing (NH) peers and to investigate possible relations between the extent of mental health problems of young CI users and hearing variables, such as age at implantation, or functional gain of CI. The survey included 140 adolescents with CI (mean age = 14.7, SD = 1.5 years) and 140 NH adolescents (mean age = 14.8, SD = 1.4 years), their parents and teachers. Participants were matched by age, gender and social background. Within the CI group, 35 adolescents were identified as “risk cases” due to possible and manifest additional handicaps, and 11 adolescents were non-classifiable. Mental health problems were assessed with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) in the versions “Self,” “Parent,” and “Teacher.” The CI group showed significantly more “Peer Problems” than the NH group. When the CI group was split into a “risk-group” (35 “risk cases” and 11 non-classifiable persons) and a “non-risk group” (n = 94), increased peer problems were perceived in both CI subgroups by adolescents themselves. However, no further differences between the CI non-risk group and the NH group were observed in any rater. The CI risk-group showed significantly more hyperactivity compared to the NH group and more hyperactivity and conduct problems compared to the CI non-risk group. Cluster analyses confirmed that there were significantly more adolescents with high problems in the CI risk-group compared to the CI non-risk group and the NH group. Adolescents with CI, who were able to understand speech in noise had significantly less difficulties compared to constricted CI users. Parents, teachers, and clinicians should be aware that CI users with additionally special needs may have mental health problems. However, peer problems were also experienced by CI

  3. Sodium Bicarbonate Prevents Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Addition to Theophylline: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Huber, Wolfgang; Huber, Toni; Baum, Stephan; Franzen, Michael; Schmidt, Christian; Stadlbauer, Thomas; Beitz, Analena; Schmid, Roland M; Schmid, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we investigated whether hydration with sodium bicarbonate is superior to hydration with saline in addition to theophylline (both groups) in the prophylaxis of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). It was a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study in a university hospital on 2 general intensive care units (63% of investigations) and normal wards.After approval of the local ethics committee and informed consent 152 patients with screening serum creatinine ≥1.1 mg/dL and/or at least 1 additional risk factor for CIN undergoing intravascular contrast media (CM) exposure were randomized to receive a total of 9 mL/kg bicarbonate 154 mmol/L (group B; n = 74) or saline 0.9% (group S; n = 78) hydration within 7 h in addition to intravenous application of 200 mg theophylline. Serum creatinine was determined immediately before, 24 and 48 h after CM exposure. As primary endpoint we investigated the incidence of CIN (increase of serum creatinine ≥0.5 mg/dL and/or ≥25% within 48 h of CM).Both groups were comparable regarding baseline characteristics. Incidence of CIN was significantly less frequent with bicarbonate compared to sodium hydration (1/74 [1.4%] vs 7/78 [9.0%]; P = 0.035). Time course of serum creatinine was more favorable in group B with decreases in serum creatinine after 24 h (-0.084 mg/dL [95% confidence interval: -0.035 to -0.133 mg/dL]; P = 0.008) and 48 h (-0.093 mg/dL (-0.025 to -0.161 mg/dL); P = 0.007) compared to baseline which were not observed in group S.In patients at increased risk of CIN receiving prophylactic theophylline, hydration with sodium bicarbonate reduces contrast-induced renal impairment compared to hydration with saline. PMID:27227933

  4. Control strategies against Campylobacter at the poultry production level: biosecurity measures, feed additives and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Meunier, M; Guyard-Nicodème, M; Dory, D; Chemaly, M

    2016-05-01

    Campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent bacterial foodborne gastroenteritis affecting humans in the European Union, and ranks second in the United States only behind salmonellosis. In Europe, there are about nine million cases of campylobacteriosis every year, making the disease a major public health issue. Human cases are mainly caused by the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. The main source of contamination is handling or consumption of poultry meat. Poultry constitutes the main reservoir of Campylobacter, substantial quantities of which are found in the intestines following rapid, intense colonization. Reducing Campylobacter levels in the poultry chain would decrease the incidence of human campylobacteriosis. As primary production is a crucial step in Campylobacter poultry contamination, controlling the infection at this level could impact the following links along the food chain (slaughter, retail and consumption). This review describes the control strategies implemented during the past few decades in primary poultry production, including the most recent studies. In fact, the implementation of biosecurity and hygiene measures is described, as well as the immune strategy with passive immunization and vaccination trials and the nutritional strategy with the administration of organic and fatty acids, essential oil and plant-derived compound, probiotics, bacteriocins and bacteriophages. PMID:26541243

  5. 40 CFR 82.18 - Availability of production in addition to baseline production allowances for class II controlled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Availability of production in addition to baseline production allowances for class II controlled substances. 82.18 Section 82.18 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and...

  6. 40 CFR 82.18 - Availability of production in addition to baseline production allowances for class II controlled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Availability of production in addition to baseline production allowances for class II controlled substances. 82.18 Section 82.18 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and...

  7. 78 FR 74218 - Imposition of Additional Sanctions on Syria Under the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Imposition of Additional Sanctions on Syria Under the Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and Warfare.... ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: On August 2, 2013, a determination was made that the Government of Syria used... Notice 8460. That determination resulted in sanctions against the Government of Syria. Section 307(b)...

  8. Neuromuscular control of the point to point and oscillatory movements of a sagittal arm with the actor-critic reinforcement learning method.

    PubMed

    Golkhou, Vahid; Parnianpour, Mohamad; Lucas, Caro

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we have used a single link system with a pair of muscles that are excited with alpha and gamma signals to achieve both point to point and oscillatory movements with variable amplitude and frequency.The system is highly nonlinear in all its physical and physiological attributes. The major physiological characteristics of this system are simultaneous activation of a pair of nonlinear muscle-like-actuators for control purposes, existence of nonlinear spindle-like sensors and Golgi tendon organ-like sensor, actions of gravity and external loading. Transmission delays are included in the afferent and efferent neural paths to account for a more accurate representation of the reflex loops.A reinforcement learning method with an actor-critic (AC) architecture instead of middle and low level of central nervous system (CNS), is used to track a desired trajectory. The actor in this structure is a two layer feedforward neural network and the critic is a model of the cerebellum. The critic is trained by state-action-reward-state-action (SARSA) method. The critic will train the actor by supervisory learning based on the prior experiences. Simulation studies of oscillatory movements based on the proposed algorithm demonstrate excellent tracking capability and after 280 epochs the RMS error for position and velocity profiles were 0.02, 0.04 rad and rad/s, respectively. PMID:16154874

  9. The coarse pointing assembly for SILEX program or how to achieve outstanding pointing accuracy with simple hardware associated with consistent control laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buvat, Daniel; Muller, Gerard; Peyrot, Patrick

    1991-06-01

    Attention is given to the coarse pointing assembly (CPA) for the SILEX program, designed on the basis of 10 years of MATRA experience in very accurate drive mechanisms successfully conducted by the SPOT 1 and 2 flights as well as EURECA IOC. The basic key design feature of the mechanism is a 1200-step stepper motor driven in microstepping with harmonic defects compensation. This allows very low torque noise associated with a high accuracy (0.01 deg). The direct drive principle avoids backlash and permits a linear control of the output shaft of each drive. The only parts susceptible to possible wear are the ball bearings, which have a design margin of greater than 1000 for 10 yr of service life. In order to meet the dynamic performances required by SILEX, a closed loop active damping system is added to each drive unit. Two accelerometers used in a differential way sense the hinge microvibrations and an active damping loop reduces their Q factor down to a few dB. All CPA electrical parts (including motor, optical encoder, and accelerometer) are redundant to avoid single point of failure.

  10. Powder Layer Preparation Using Vibration-controlled Capillary Steel Nozzles for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stichel, Thomas; Laumer, Tobias; Baumüller, Tobias; Amend, Philipp; Roth, Stephan

    In this report, the dry delivery of polyamide 12 powders by vibrating capillary steel nozzles is investigated and discussed regarding its potential for powder layer preparation in Laser Beam Melting. Therefore, a setup including a steel nozzle assembled on a piezoelectric actuator is presented, which enables the precise control over very small powder quantities by vibration excitation. An analysis reveals that the mass flow through the nozzle can be adjusted by the vibration modes in a certain range depending on the nozzle's specifications, whereas the vibration modes themselves show a complicated behaviour. Using a positioning system in combination with the vibrating nozzle, single-layer patterns consisting of polyamide 12 are produced and characterized regarding surface homogeneity and selectivity using a laser stripe sensor.

  11. Summary of Previous Chamber or Controlled Anthrax Studies and Recommendations for Possible Additional Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2010-12-29

    This report and an associated Excel file(a) summarizes the investigations and results of previous chamber and controlled studies(b) to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing and/or transporting, extracting, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis (BA) or related simulants. This report and the Excel are the joint work of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate. The report was originally released as PNNL-SA-69338, Rev. 0 in November 2009 with limited distribution, but was subsequently cleared for release with unlimited distribution in this Rev. 1. Only minor changes were made to Rev. 0 to yield Rev. 1. A more substantial update (including summarizing data from other studies and more condensed summary tables of data) is underway

  12. The effect of additional design parameters on the LQR based design of a control/structural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, Peter M.; Xu, Jianke

    1990-01-01

    A multiobjective cost function that includes a form of the standard LQR regulator cost and its partial variation with respect to the additional design parameters is presented in connection with the design of an orbiting control/structural system. Simple models of uniform solid and tubular beams are demonstrated with two typical additional payload masses, i.e., symmetrically distributed and asymmetrically distributed, with respect to the center of the beam. By regarding the transient response of pitch angle and free-free beam deformations in the orbital plane, the optimal outer diameter of the beam and all feedback control can be determined by numerical analysis with this multicriterial approach. It is concluded that the multicriteria design approach should give better results from both the structural designer's and the control designer's standpoints.

  13. Foreword: Additive Manufacturing: Interrelationships of Fabrication, Constitutive Relationships Targeting Performance, and Feedback to Process Control

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carpenter, John S.; Beese, Allison M.; Bourell, David L.; Hamilton, Reginald F.; Mishra, Rajiv; Sears, James

    2015-06-26

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers distinct advantages over conventional manufacturing processes including the capability to both build and repair complex part shapes; to integrate and consolidate parts and thus overcome joining concerns; and to locally tailor material compositions as well as properties. Moreover, a variety of fields such as aerospace, military, automotive, and biomedical are employing this manufacturing technique as a way to decrease costs, increase manufacturing agility, and explore novel geometry/functionalities. In order to increase acceptance of AM as a viable processing method, pathways for qualifying both the material and the process need to be developed and, perhaps, standardized. Thismore » symposium was designed to serve as a venue for the international AM community—including government, academia, and industry—to define the fundamental interrelationships between feedstock, processing, microstructure, shape, mechanical behavior/materials properties, and function/performance. Eventually, insight into the connections between processing, microstructure, property, and performance will be achieved through experimental observations, theoretical advances, and computational modeling of physical processes. Finally, once this insight matures, AM will be able to move from the realm of making parts to making qualified materials that are certified for use with minimal need for post-fabrication characterization.« less

  14. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    This project studies the rheology and airblast atomization of micronized coal slurries. Its major objectives are (1) to promote further understanding of the mechanisms and the roles of additives in airblast atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), and (2) to investigate the impacts of coal particle surface properties and interparticle forces on CWS rheology. We have found that the flow behavior index (n) of a suspension (or slurry) is determined by the relative importance of the interparticle van der Waals attraction and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The interparticle attraction, measured by the Hamaker constant scaled to the thermal energy at 25{degrees}C (A/kT), causes particle aggregation, which breaks down at high shear rates, and thus leads to slurry pseudoplastic behavior (n< 1). At a constant particle volume fraction and surface charge density (qualitatively measured by the zeta potential in deionized water), n decreases linearly as A/kT increases. The relative viscosity of the pseudoplastic suspension with respect to that of the suspending liquid is found to be independent of particle density and correlate well with the particle Peclet number which equals the particle diffusional relaxation time multiplied by shear rate. Specifically, the relative viscosities of the pseudoplastic glycerol/water coal slurry and the ethylene glycol/glycerol sand slurry, at same volume fractions as well as similar particle size distributions and liquid viscosities, as functions of the particle Peclet number fall along the same line.

  15. Foreword: Additive Manufacturing: Interrelationships of Fabrication, Constitutive Relationships Targeting Performance, and Feedback to Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, John S.; Beese, Allison M.; Bourell, David L.; Hamilton, Reginald F.; Mishra, Rajiv; Sears, James

    2015-06-26

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers distinct advantages over conventional manufacturing processes including the capability to both build and repair complex part shapes; to integrate and consolidate parts and thus overcome joining concerns; and to locally tailor material compositions as well as properties. Moreover, a variety of fields such as aerospace, military, automotive, and biomedical are employing this manufacturing technique as a way to decrease costs, increase manufacturing agility, and explore novel geometry/functionalities. In order to increase acceptance of AM as a viable processing method, pathways for qualifying both the material and the process need to be developed and, perhaps, standardized. This symposium was designed to serve as a venue for the international AM community—including government, academia, and industry—to define the fundamental interrelationships between feedstock, processing, microstructure, shape, mechanical behavior/materials properties, and function/performance. Eventually, insight into the connections between processing, microstructure, property, and performance will be achieved through experimental observations, theoretical advances, and computational modeling of physical processes. Finally, once this insight matures, AM will be able to move from the realm of making parts to making qualified materials that are certified for use with minimal need for post-fabrication characterization.

  16. The application of the hazard analysis and control points (HACCP) in an ice cream production plant.

    PubMed

    El-Tawila, M M

    1998-01-01

    The HACCP system is applied in the present study as a preventive food safety approach to control some hazards appearing in one of the ice cream production plants in Egypt. The problem comprised the presence of bacteriological and some chemical contamination in most of the company products. Before applying the HACCP system, the samples examination showed high total mesophilic plat count in 50% of the samples and high coliform count in all samples compared to the level recommended in the Egyptian standards. The highest staphylococcal count (negative for coagulase test) obtained was that of chocolate (1.3 x 10(4) CFU/g) followed by mango ice cream (l.0 x 10(4) CFU/g). Faecal coliform was only positive in mango ice cream. Additionally, the levels of lead, iron and copper have been determined. Copper was higher than the recommended level in all samples and ranged between 0.46 ppm in pistachio ice cream and 2.48 ppm in chocolate ice cream. Most of the CCPs in the ice cream production were mainly due to improper handling and practices throughout the processing steps and also related to the lack of food hygiene knowledge of the workers. The application of HACCP system has successfully reduced the bacteriological hazards in all samples. After applying the corrective actions, the highest total aerobic plate count (8.0 x 10(4)) was that of Swiss chocolate ice cream which corresponds to 50% of the recommended level by the Egyptian standards. Coliform count was less than 10 in all samples except mango ice cream (43 MPN). A significant decrease in staphylococcal count, faecal coliform and trace metal contamination was also recorded in all samples. PMID:17219921

  17. Controlling Phase Separation of Tough Interpenetrating Polymer Networks via Addition of Amphiphilic Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Brian; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Robertson, Megan

    Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) offer a unique way to combine the mechanical properties of two thermoset systems. Often used to create a material that possesses both high toughness and tensile properties, here we use polydicyclopentadiene, cured via ring opening metathesis polymerization, to contribute high toughness and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A cured via anhydride chemistry to contribute high tensile strength and modulus. As the uncompatibilized system reacts in the presence of one another, mesoscopic phase separation occurs and dictates the overall efficacy of combining mechanical properties. To control phase separation and drive the system towards more mechanically robust nanostructed IPNs, amphiphilic block copolymers of polybutadiene- b-polyethylene oxide, where one block possesses strong affinity to polyDCPD and the other the DGEBA, were added to the system. Here we present a systematic study of the influence of block copolymer composition in the overall blend on degree of phase separation and morphology using a combination of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The resultant mechanical properties are then explored in an effort to link mechanical properties to blend morphology.

  18. Controlling Phase Separation of Interpenetrating Polymer Networks by Addition of Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Brian; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Robertson, Megan

    2015-03-01

    Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) offer a unique way to produce mechanically superior thermoset blends relative to the neat components. In this study, IPNs were prepared consisting of polydicyclopentadiene (polyDCPD), contributing high fracture toughness, and an epoxy resin (the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A cured with nadic methyl anhydride), contributing high tensile strength and modulus. In the absence of compatibilization, the simultaneous curing of the networks leads to a macroscopically phase separated blend that exhibits poor mechanical behavior. To control phase separation and drive the system towards more mechanically robust nanostructured IPNs, block copolymers were designed to compatibilize this system, where one block possesses affinity to polyDCPD (polynorbornene in this study) and the other block possesses affinity to DGEBA (poly(ɛ-caprolactone) in this study). The influence of the block copolymer composition on the degree of phase separation and interfacial adhesion in the IPN was studied using a combination of small-angle scattering and imaging techniques. The resultant mechanical properties were explored and structure-property relationships were developed in this blend system.

  19. Synthesis of fine-pointing control systems for large, flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of designing attitude control systems for large space structures (LSS). The difficulties in control systems design, which arise because of special dynamic characteristics of LSS, are described, and methods for overcoming them using two types of controllers are presented. The first type of controller considered is a model-based compensator (MBC), and the second is the 'dissipative' controller which employs output feedback. Based on the numerical and analytical results obtained, the MBC can offer good performance under normal conditions, while the dissipative controller offers more robustness but perhaps reduced performance in situations involving large uncertainties.

  20. Angle-of-Attack-Modulated Terminal Point Control for Neptune Aerocapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Eric M.

    2004-01-01

    An aerocapture guidance algorithm based on a calculus of variations approach is developed, using angle of attack as the primary control variable. Bank angle is used as a secondary control to alleviate angle of attack extremes and to control inclination. The guidance equations are derived in detail. The controller has very small onboard computational requirements and is robust to atmospheric and aerodynamic dispersions. The algorithm is applied to aerocapture at Neptune. Three versions of the controller are considered with varying angle of attack authority. The three versions of the controller are evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations with expected dispersions.

  1. Resilience of Greek Youth at an Educational Transition Point: The Role of Locus of Control and Coping Strategies as Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leontopoulou, Sophia

    2006-01-01

    Variable--and person--focused approaches were applied to study the resilient outcomes of 326 Greek male and female 1st year university students at a major educational transition point. Results indicated that resilience was related to both cognitive and behavioural psychosocial resources in late adolescence. Locus of control emerged as an important…

  2. Advanced magnetic suspensions for vibration isolation and fast-attitude control of space-based generic pointing mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosley, Robert W.; Trivedi, Anil N.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced magnetic suspension for vibration isolation and fast-attitude control of space-based generic pointing mounts (GPM) is presented in the form of viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: design criteria for GPM; GPM system features; GPM performance characteristics; GPM functional block diagram; and other applications for generic magnetic suspension technologies.

  3. Recommendations for dealing with waste contaminated with Ebola virus: a Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points approach

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Kelly L; Elrahman, Samira Abd; Bell, Diana J; Brainard, Julii; Dervisevic, Samir; Fedha, Tsimbiri P; Few, Roger; Howard, Guy; Lake, Iain; Maes, Peter; Matofari, Joseph; Minnigh, Harvey; Mohamedani, Ahmed A; Montgomery, Maggie; Morter, Sarah; Muchiri, Edward; Mudau, Lutendo S; Mutua, Benedict M; Ndambuki, Julius M; Pond, Katherine; Sobsey, Mark D; van der Es, Mike; Zeitoun, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess, within communities experiencing Ebola virus outbreaks, the risks associated with the disposal of human waste and to generate recommendations for mitigating such risks. Methods A team with expertise in the Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points framework identified waste products from the care of individuals with Ebola virus disease and constructed, tested and confirmed flow diagrams showing the creation of such products. After listing potential hazards associated with each step in each flow diagram, the team conducted a hazard analysis, determined critical control points and made recommendations to mitigate the transmission risks at each control point. Findings The collection, transportation, cleaning and shared use of blood-soiled fomites and the shared use of latrines contaminated with blood or bloodied faeces appeared to be associated with particularly high levels of risk of Ebola virus transmission. More moderate levels of risk were associated with the collection and transportation of material contaminated with bodily fluids other than blood, shared use of latrines soiled with such fluids, the cleaning and shared use of fomites soiled with such fluids, and the contamination of the environment during the collection and transportation of blood-contaminated waste. Conclusion The risk of the waste-related transmission of Ebola virus could be reduced by the use of full personal protective equipment, appropriate hand hygiene and an appropriate disinfectant after careful cleaning. Use of the Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points framework could facilitate rapid responses to outbreaks of emerging infectious disease. PMID:27274594

  4. Addition of Lidocaine Injection Immediately before Physiotherapy for Frozen Shoulder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Wang, Tao-Liang; Lin, Yi-Jia; Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Tsai, Chun-Mei; Huang, Kuang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The intraarticular injection of lidocaine immediately before a physiotherapy session may relieve pain during the stretching and mobilization of the affected joint in patients with a frozen shoulder, thus enhancing the treatment effect. To compare the effects of intraarticular injection of lidocaine plus physiotherapy to that of physiotherapy alone in the treatment of a frozen shoulder, a prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted in the rehabilitation department of a private teaching hospital. Patients with a frozen shoulder were randomized into the physiotherapy group or the lidocaine injection plus physiotherapy (INJPT) group. The subjects in the INJPT group underwent injection of 3 ml of 1% lidocaine into the affected shoulder 10 to 20 minutes before each physiotherapy session. In each group, the treatment lasted 3 months. The primary outcome measures were the active and passive range of motion of the affected shoulder. The secondary outcome measures were the results of the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). The outcome measures were evaluated before treatment and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 months after the start of treatment. The group comparisons showed significantly greater improvement in the INJPT group, mainly in active and passive shoulder range of motion in flexion and external rotation and improvements in pain and disability (P < 0.05); however, no significant group difference was seen in the SF-36 results. The intraarticular injection of lidocaine immediately before a physiotherapy session might be superior to physiotherapy alone in the treatment of a frozen shoulder. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01817348 PMID:25714415

  5. Precise control of polymer coated nanopores by nanoparticle additives: Insights from computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari Nasrabad, Afshin; Jasnow, David; Zilman, Anton; Coalson, Rob D.

    2016-08-01

    Polymer-nanoparticle composites are a promising new class of materials for creation of controllable nano-patterned surfaces and nanopores. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations augmented with analytical theory to study the structural transitions of surface grafted polymer layers (brushes) induced by infiltration of nanoparticles that are attracted to the polymers in the layer. We systematically compare two different polymer brush geometries: one where the polymer chains are grafted to a planar surface and the other where the chains are grafted to the inside of a cylindrical nanochannel. We perform a comprehensive study of the effects of the material parameters such as the polymer chain length, chain grafting density, nanoparticle size, strength of attraction between nanoparticles and polymer monomers, and, in the case of the cylindrically grafted brush, the radius of the cylinder. We find a very general behavioral motif for all geometries and parameter values: the height of the polymer brush is non-monotonic in the nanoparticle concentration in solution. As the nanoparticle concentration increases, the brush height first decreases and after passing through a minimum value begins to increase, resulting in the swelling of the nanoparticle infused brush. These morphological features may be useful for devising tunable "smart" nano-devices whose effective dimensions can be reversibly and precisely adjusted by changing the nanoparticle concentration in solution. The results of approximate Self-Consistent Field Theory (SCFT) calculations, applicable in the regime of strong brush stretching, are compared to the simulation results. The SCFT calculations are found to be qualitatively, even semi-quantitatively, accurate when applied within their intended regime of validity, and provide a useful and efficient tool for modeling such materials.

  6. Vegetal Encroachment on Point Bar Deposits as a Control on Width Variation in Meandering Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, G.; Eke, E.; Asahi, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Nelson, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Most meandering rivers have vegetated floodplains. As this vegetation encroaches on point bars, it helps stabilize the sediment there. The river can then undergo slow migration and channel deformation, all the while maintaining channel coherence. Yet streams that appear to have the same degree of meandering can nevertheless show marked variation in channel width, as measured from vegetation line to vegetation line. The top image shows a reach of a tributatary of the Ob River, Russia, and the bottom image shows a reach of the Trinity River, Texas. In both cases, the flow is from right to left. In the case of the Ob tributary, the point bars are completely vegetated, and streamwise variation in width is rather muted. In the case of the Trinity River, the point bars are not completely vegetated, and streamwise variation in width is rather strong. Here we present two numerical models of migrating, meandering rivers in which channel width is self-specified in terms of the dynamics of bank erosion and deposition. In one of these models, bank vegetation is assumed to immediately encroach on newly-created point bar deposits. This mode of encroachment is shown to strongly contain the channel, so muting width variation. In the other model, newly-created point bar deposits remain bare for a period of time before vegetation is allowed to stabilize them. This results in less effective containment of the channel and stronger streamwise width variation.

  7. Ring Walking/Oxidative Addition Reactions for the Controlled Synthesis of Conjugated Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Guillermo C

    2012-04-03

    Power conversion efficiencies of plastic solar cells depend strongly on the molecular weight characteristics of the semiconducting polymers used for their fabrication. The synthesis of these materials typically relies on transition metal mediated catalytic reactions. In many instances, the ideal structures cannot be attained because of deficiencies in these reactions, particularly when it comes to being able to achieve high number average molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions. Another important conjugated polymer structure of interest is one in which a single functional group is attached at the end group of the chain. Such systems would be ideal for modifying surface properties at interfaces and for labeling biomolecular probes used in fluorescent biosensors. To respond to the challenges above, our efforts have centered on the design of homogenous transition metal complexes that are easy to prepare and effective in carrying out living, or quasi-living, condensative chain polymerization reactions. The key mechanistic challenge for the success of this reaction is to force the insertion of one monomer unit at a time via a process that involves migration of the transition metal-containing fragment to one terminus of the polymer chain. Chain growth characteristics are therefore favored when the metal does not dissociate from the newly formed reductive elimination product. We have proposed that dissociation is disfavored by the formation of a -complex, in which the metal can sample various locations of the electronically delocalized framework, a process that we term ring-walking , and find the functionality where oxidative addition takes place. Success has been achieved in the nickel-mediated cross coupling reaction of Grignard reagents with aromatic halides by using bromo[1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane]phenylnickel. This reagent can yield poly(thiophene)s (one of the most widely used type of polymer in plastic solar cells) with excellent

  8. SU-E-T-199: How Number of Control Points Influences the Dynamic IMRT Plan Quality and Deliverability

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S; Manigandan, D; Chander, S; Subramani, V; Julka, P; Rath, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of number of control points on plan quality and deliverability. Methods: Five previously treated patients of carcinoma of rectum were selected. Planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) i.e. bladder and bowel were contoured. Dynamic IMRT plans (6MV, 7-fields, 45Gy/25 fractions and prescribed at 95% isodose) were created in Eclipse (Varian medical system, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system (TPS) for Varian CL2300C/D linear-accelerator. Base plan was calculated with 166 control points, variable mode (Eclipse Default). For generating other plans, all parameters were kept constant, only number of control points (Fixed mode) was varied as follows: 100, 166 and 200. Then, plan quality was analyzed in terms of maximum and mean dose received by the PTV and OARs. For plan deliverability, TPS calculated fluence was verified with I’matriXX (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) array and compared with TPS dose-plane using gamma index criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement (DTA). Total number of monitor units (MU) required to deliver a plan was also noted. Results: The maximum variation for the PTV maximum with respect to eclipse default control point (166) was 0.28% (0.14Gy). Similarly, PTV mean varied only up to 0.22 %( 0.11Gy). Bladder maximum and bladder mean varied up to 0.51% (0.24Gy) and 0.16% (0.06Gy). The variation for the bowel maximum and bowel mean was also only 0.39% (0.19Gy) and 0.33% (0.04Gy). Total MU was within 0.32 % (4MU). Average gamma pass rate using different control points for five patients are 98.75±0.33%, 99.37±0.09%, 99.29±0.12%, 98.14±0.13% and 99.25±0.14% respectively. Conclusion: Slight variation (<1%) in PTV and OARs maximum and mean doses was observed with varying number of control points. Monitor unit was also not varied much. Reducing number of control points did not showed any comprise in plan deliverability in terms of gamma index pass rate.

  9. [Spatial discharge characteristics and total load control of non-point source pollutants based on the catchment scale].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia-Hui; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Qing-Zhong; Wang, Bo; Yao, Rui-Hua; Zhang, Hui-Yuan; Huang, Feng

    2011-09-01

    Agricultural non-point source pollution is one of the major causes of water quality deterioration. Based on the analysis of the spatial discharge characteristics and intensity of major pollutants from the agricultural pollution source, the establishment of spatial management subzones for controlling agricultural non-point pollution and a design of a plan for total load control of pollutants from each subzone is an important way to improve the efficiency of control measures. In this paper the Four Lake basin in Hubei Province is adopted as the research case region and a systematic research of the control countermeasures of agricultural non-point pollution based on the catchment scale is carried out. The results shows that in the Four Lake basin, the COD, total nitrogen, total phosphorus and ammonia nitrogen load of the water environment are mainly caused by agricultural non-point pollution. These four kinds of non-point source pollutants respectively account for 67.6%, 82.2%, 84.7% and 50.9% of the total pollutant discharge amount in the basin. The analysis of the spatial discharge characteristics of non-point source pollutants in the Four Lake basin shows that the major contributor source regions of non-point source pollutant in the basin are the four counties, including Honghu, Jianli, Qianjiang and Shayang where the aquatic and livestock production are relatively developed. According to the spatial discharge characteristics of the pollutants and the evaluation of the discharge intensity of pollutants, the Four Lake basin is divided into three agricultural non-point pollution management subzones, which including Changhu upstream aquatic and livestock production pollution control subzone, Four-lake trunk canal rural non-point source pollution control subzone and Honghu aquatic production pollution control subzone. Specific pollution control measures are put forward for each subzone. With a comprehensive consideration of the water quality amelioration and the

  10. Design and evaluation of an optical fine-pointing control system for telescopes utilizing a digital star sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Romanczyk, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    One of the most significant problems associated with the development of large orbiting astronomical telescopes is that of maintaining the very precise pointing accuracy required. A proposed solution to this problem utilizes dual-level pointing control. The primary control system maintains the telescope structure attitude stabilized within the field of view to the desired accuracy. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of optically stabilizing the star images to the desired accuracy a regulating system has been designed and evaluated. The control system utilizes a digital star sensor and an optical star image motion compensator, both of which have been developed for this application. These components have been analyzed mathematically, analytical models have been developed, and hardware has been built and tested.

  11. One-dimensional discrete LQR control of compression of the human chest impulsively loaded by fast moving point mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejnik, Paweł; Awrejcewicz, Jan

    2011-05-01

    This paper uncovers some interesting extension of an optimal discrete control methodology partially included in Proceedings and presented at the international conference on "Dynamical Systems Theory and Applications". There has been applied a scheme for realisation of active control strategy with numerically estimated linear optimal quadratic index of performance in reduction of impact-induced deformation of human chest loaded by a point mass at the central point of upper-torso body. We focused on application of one active element attached between torso's upper back (looking from posterior direction) and a fixed support. As the practical result we provide values of quality and reaction matrices, some useful deformation and energy dissipation time-characteristics and the resulting shape of control force time-characteristics that would be the demanding one for a hypothetical real implementation.

  12. Point-to-Point Multicast Communications Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, Gregory T.; Nakano, Russell; Delagi, Bruce A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a protocol to support point-to-point interprocessor communications with multicast. Dynamic, cut-through routing with local flow control is used to provide a high-throughput, low-latency communications path between processors. In addition multicast transmissions are available, in which copies of a packet are sent to multiple destinations using common resources as much as possible. Special packet terminators and selective buffering are introduced to avoid a deadlock during multicasts. A simulated implementation of the protocol is also described.

  13. Simultaneous control of acid gases and PAHs using a spray dryer combined with a fabric filter using different additives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen Shu; Wey, Ming Yen; Lin, Chiou Liang

    2002-04-26

    The purpose of this research was to simultaneously evaluate the removal efficiency of acid gases and PAHs from the flue gas emitted by a laboratory incinerator. This flue gas contained dust, acid gases, organics and heavy metals. A spray dryer combined with a fabric filter was used as the air pollution control device (APCD) in this study. The operating conditions investigated included different feedstock additives (polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and NaCl) and spray dryer additives (SiO2, CaCl2 and NaHCO3). The removal efficiency for SO2 could be enhanced by adding inorganic additives, such as SiO2, CaCl2 and NaHCO3. The presence of PVC in the incinerator feedstock also increased the removal efficiency of SO2in the spray dryer. The improved removal of PAHs could be attributed to the addition of feedstock additives (PVC and NaCl) and spray dryer additives (SiO2, CaCl2 and NaHCO3). PMID:11900910

  14. Station-keeping of real Earth-Moon libration point orbits using discrete-time sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yijun; Gómez, Gerard; Masdemont, Josep J.; Tang, Guojian

    2014-10-01

    In this work, station-keeping of real Earth-Moon libration point orbits is studied using discrete-time sliding mode control (DSMC). For comparison, a discrete linear quadratic regulator (DLQR) controller is also considered. The libration orbits are termed “real” in the sense that they are obtained in a complete Solar System model, taking into account all the gravitational forces of the planets, the Moon, and the Sun. This is a key point for any station-keeping study, that the use of far from real orbits as nominal ones increases unnecessarily the station-keeping cost. The resulting controlled system, linearised with respect to some nominal orbit, takes a discrete-time form suitable for applying impulsive maneuvers. The DSMC controller is designed by the reaching law with the parameters chosen in an adaptive way. A method for designing the sliding surface is proposed. In order to assess and compare the performance of the two controllers, simulations are done for six libration point orbits around the L2 point (three halo orbits and three Lissajous ones) during a time span of 10 years. Several practical constraints are also considered in the simulations. Extensive Monte Carlo results show that the proposed DSMC approach is able to maintain the spacecraft within a close vicinity of the nominal orbits with a maneuver cost less than 2 m/s per year, and it outperforms the DLQR approach in terms of the position controllability. Some comparison with previous results obtained by other authors with different procedures is also given.

  15. Maximum Principle of Optimal Control of the Primitive Equations of the Ocean with Two Point Boundary State Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Tachim Medjo, Theodore

    2010-08-15

    We study in this article the Pontryagin's maximum principle for a class of control problems associated with the primitive equations (PEs) of the ocean with two point boundary state constraint. These optimal problems involve a two point boundary state constraint similar to that considered in Wang, Nonlinear Anal. 51, 509-536, 2002 for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The main difference between this work and Wang, Nonlinear Anal. 51, 509-536, 2002 is that the nonlinearity in the PEs is stronger than in the three-dimensional NS systems.

  16. Identification of gram-negative bacteria from critical control points of raw and pasteurized cow milk consumed at Gondar town and its suburbs, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    -negative staining bacterial species in raw milk that may be attributed to the sub-optimal sanitary conditions in the production and processing of milk in the Gondar town region. These results highlighted the need to maintain appropriate sanitary and hygienic measures at each critical point in order to safeguard consumers from foodborne pathogens. Further studies are recommended to identify additional critical control points, and to assess zoonotic risk factors to consumers. PMID:23131015

  17. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A.; Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors' unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight

  18. Effect of operating-point-control strategy on the annual energy production of degraded photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, H. M.

    1982-09-01

    A new computer simulation of the annual operation of degraded flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) arrays is used to evaluate the need for maximum-power-point tracking in real PV systems. The simulations are based on single-glitch I-V curve shapes rather than particular array degradations, making the data reported applicable to any system whose likely failure modes are predictable and result in single-glitch I-V curves. The simulations show that with a reasonable array wiring strategy, effective maintenance, periodic I-V curve tracing, and avoidance of frequent and serious array shadowing, there is no reason that considerations of degradation should force the adoption of maximum-power-point-tracking power conditioning on a PV system that would otherwise operate economically at fixed voltage.

  19. Hardware description ADSP-21020 40-bit floating point DSP as designed in a remotely controlled digital CW Doppler radar

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, R.E.; Robinson, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    A continuous wave Doppler radar system has been designed which is portable, easily deployed, and remotely controlled. The heart of this system is a DSP/control board using Analog Devices ADSP-21020 40-bit floating point digital signal processor (DSP) microprocessor. Two 18-bit audio A/D converters provide digital input to the DSP/controller board for near real time target detection. Program memory for the DSP is dual ported with an Intel 87C51 microcontroller allowing DSP code to be up-loaded or down-loaded from a central controlling computer. The 87C51 provides overall system control for the remote radar and includes a time-of-day/day-of-year real time clock, system identification (ID) switches, and input/output (I/O) expansion by an Intel 82C55 I/O expander. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Determination of end point of primary drying in freeze-drying process control.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sajal M; Doen, Takayuki; Pikal, Michael J

    2010-03-01

    Freeze-drying is a relatively expensive process requiring long processing time, and hence one of the key objectives during freeze-drying process development is to minimize the primary drying time, which is the longest of the three steps in freeze-drying. However, increasing the shelf temperature into secondary drying before all of the ice is removed from the product will likely cause collapse or eutectic melt. Thus, from product quality as well as process economics standpoint, it is very critical to detect the end of primary drying. Experiments were conducted with 5% mannitol and 5% sucrose as model systems. The apparent end point of primary drying was determined by comparative pressure measurement (i.e., Pirani vs. MKS Baratron), dew point, Lyotrack (gas plasma spectroscopy), water concentration from tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, condenser pressure, pressure rise test (manometric temperature measurement or variations of this method), and product thermocouples. Vials were pulled out from the drying chamber using a sample thief during late primary and early secondary drying to determine percent residual moisture either gravimetrically or by Karl Fischer, and the cake structure was determined visually for melt-back, collapse, and retention of cake structure at the apparent end point of primary drying (i.e., onset, midpoint, and offset). By far, the Pirani is the best choice of the methods tested for evaluation of the end point of primary drying. Also, it is a batch technique, which is cheap, steam sterilizable, and easy to install without requiring any modification to the existing dryer. PMID:20058107

  1. Paramagnetic point defects in amorphous thin films of SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}: Updates and additions

    SciTech Connect

    Poindexter, E.H.; Warren, W.L.

    1995-07-01

    Recent research on point defects in thin films of silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, and silicon oxynitride on Si is presented and reviewed. In SiO{sub 2}, it now clear that no one type of E{prime} are proposed. Molecular orbital theory and easy passivation of E{prime} by H{sub 2} suggest that released H might depassivate interface P{sub b} sites. A charged E{prime}{sub {delta}} center has been seen in Cl-free SIMOX (separation by implantation of oxygen) and thermal oxide films, and it is reassigned to an electron delocalized over four O{sub 3}{triple_bond}Si units around a fifth Si. In Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, a new model for the amphoteric charging of {sm_bullet}Si{triple_bond}N{sub 3} moieties is based on local shifts in defect energy with respect to the Fermi level, arising from nonuniform composition; it does not assume negative U electron correlation. A new defect NN{sub 2}{sup 0} has been identified, with dangling orbital on a two-coordinated N atom bonded to another N. Silicon oxynitride defects are briefly presented.

  2. Control-volume distributed multi-point flux approximation coupled with a lower-dimensional fracture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, R.; Edwards, M. G.; Lamine, S.; Huisman, B. A. H.; Pal, M.

    2015-03-01

    A cell-centered control-volume distributed multi-point flux approximation (CVD-MPFA) finite-volume formulation is presented for discrete fracture-matrix simulations. The grid is aligned with the fractures and barriers which are then modeled as lower-dimensional interfaces located between the matrix cells in the physical domain. The nD pressure equation is solved in the matrix domain coupled with an (n - 1)D pressure equation solved in the fractures. The CVD-MPFA formulation naturally handles fractures with anisotropic permeabilities on unstructured grids. Matrix-fracture fluxes are expressed in terms of matrix and fracture pressures, and must be added to the lower-dimensional flow equation (called the transfer function). An additional transmission condition is used between matrix cells adjacent to low permeable fractures to link the velocity and pressure jump across the fractures. Numerical tests serve to assess the convergence and accuracy of the lower-dimensional fracture model for highly anisotropic fractures having different apertures and permeability tensors. A transport equation for tracer flow is coupled via the Darcy flux for single and intersecting fractures. The lower-dimensional approach for intersecting fractures avoids the more restrictive CFL condition corresponding to the equi-dimensional approximation with explicit time discretization. Lower-dimensional fracture model results are compared with hybrid-grid and equi-dimensional model results. Fractures and barriers are efficiently modeled by lower-dimensional interfaces which yield comparable results to those of the equi-dimensional model. Highly conductive fractures are modeled as lower-dimensional entities without the use of locally refined grids that are required by the equi-dimensional model, while pressure continuity across fractures is built into the model, without depending on the extra degrees of freedom which must be added locally by the hybrid-grid method. The lower-dimensional fracture

  3. Multi-Scale Matching for the Automatic Location of Control Points in Large Scale Aerial Images Using Terrestrial Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berveglieri, A.; Tommaselli, A. M. G.

    2014-03-01

    A technique to automatically locate Ground Control Points (GCPs) in large aerial images is presented considering the availability of low accuracy direct georeferencing data. The approach is based on image chips of GCPs extracted from vertical terrestrial images. A strategy combining image matching techniques was implemented to select correct matches. These matches were used to define a 2D transformation with which the GCP is projected close to its correct position, reducing the search space in the aerial image. Area-based matching with some refinements is used to locate GCPs with sub-pixel precision. Experiments were performed with multi-scale images and assessed with a bundle block adjustment simulating an indirect sensor orientation. The accuracy analysis was accomplished based on discrepancies obtained from GCPs and check points. The results were better than interactive measurements and a planimetric accuracy of 1/5 of the Ground Sample Distance (GSD) for the check points was achieved.

  4. Minimum Energy type of Air Conditioning Controlby Switching Equilibrium Point of Control Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahata, Akihiko; Uchida, Kenko; Taira, Utaro

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm realizing minimum energy control for air conditioning. In the air conditioning system, control inputs are valve-open-value of cooler, heater and humidifier, and controlled variables are indoor temperature and humidity. That is, this system has three inputs and two outputs. The main step of the minimum energy algorithm is to switch two of the three actuators, depending on setpoints, for minimizing consumption energy. We apply this algorithm to a real plant, and show validity of the algorithm.

  5. Evaluation of Control Points in Youngstock and Adult Dairy Cow Management to Control Transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete a series of prospective controlled on-farm trials to critically evaluate the efficacy and cost-benefit of commonly recommended management practices for reducing the transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) in youngstock in infected herds....

  6. Paleogeographic controls of coal accumulation, Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation and Star Point Sandstone, Wasatch Plateau, Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Blanchard, L.F.; Sanchez, J.D.; Marley, W.E.; Muldoon, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Considers the paleogeographic controls affecting the accumulation of coals in delta-barrier-island complexes. Progradation, lateral shifting, and abandonment of these complexes created four major landward-thinning tongues.-from Authors

  7. POINTS-OF-CONTACT (INDOOR ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT BRANCH, AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of research conducted by the Indoor Environment Management Branch (IEMB) of NRMRL's Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division in Research Triangle Park, NC, can provide practical methods that architects, design engineers, builders, manufacturers, suppliers and the gen...

  8. LiveWire interactive boundary extraction algorithm based on Haar wavelet transform and control point set direction search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Jun; Tian, Jinwen

    2015-12-01

    Based on deep analysis of the LiveWire interactive boundary extraction algorithm, a new algorithm focusing on improving the speed of LiveWire algorithm is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the Haar wavelet transform is carried on the input image, and the boundary is extracted on the low resolution image obtained by the wavelet transform of the input image. Secondly, calculating LiveWire shortest path is based on the control point set direction search by utilizing the spatial relationship between the two control points users provide in real time. Thirdly, the search order of the adjacent points of the starting node is set in advance. An ordinary queue instead of a priority queue is taken as the storage pool of the points when optimizing their shortest path value, thus reducing the complexity of the algorithm from O[n2] to O[n]. Finally, A region iterative backward projection method based on neighborhood pixel polling has been used to convert dual-pixel boundary of the reconstructed image to single-pixel boundary after Haar wavelet inverse transform. The algorithm proposed in this paper combines the advantage of the Haar wavelet transform and the advantage of the optimal path searching method based on control point set direction search. The former has fast speed of image decomposition and reconstruction and is more consistent with the texture features of the image and the latter can reduce the time complexity of the original algorithm. So that the algorithm can improve the speed in interactive boundary extraction as well as reflect the boundary information of the image more comprehensively. All methods mentioned above have a big role in improving the execution efficiency and the robustness of the algorithm.

  9. Neuroscience education in addition to trigger point dry needling for the management of patients with mechanical chronic low back pain: A preliminary clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Téllez-García, Mario; de-la-Llave-Rincón, Ana I; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Palacios-Ceña, Maria; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine the short-term effects of trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) alone or combined with neuroscience education on pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical low back pain (LBP). Twelve patients with LBP were randomly assigned to receive either TrP-DN (TrP-DN) or TrP-DN plus neuroscience education (TrP-DN + EDU). Pain intensity (Numerical Pain Rating Scale, 0-10), disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire-RMQ-, Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index-ODI), kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-TSK), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, transverse process of L3 vertebra, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscle were collected at baseline and 1-week after the intervention. Patients treated with TrP-DN + EDU experienced a significantly greater reduction of kinesiophobia (P = 0.008) and greater increases in PPT over the transverse process of L3 (P = 0.049) than those patients treated only with TrP-DN. Both groups experienced similar decreases in pain, ODI and RMQ, and similar increases in PPT over the C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior after the intervention (all, P > 0.05). The results suggest that TrP-DN was effective for improving pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical LBP at short-term. The inclusion of a neuroscience educational program resulted in a greater improvement in kinesiophobia. PMID:26118519

  10. To the point: reviews in medical education-taking control of the hidden curriculum.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Alice W; Nuthalapaty, Francis S; Casey, Petra M; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph M; Cullimore, Amie J; Dalrymple, John L; Dugoff, Lorraine; Espey, Eve L; Hammoud, Maya M; Hueppchen, Nancy A; Katz, Nadine T; Peskin, Edward G

    2010-10-01

    This article, the ninth in the "To the Point" series that is prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, discusses the role of the "hidden curriculum" in shaping the professional identity of doctors in training. The characteristics that distinguish the formal curriculum and hidden curriculum are defined. Specific examples of hidden curricula in clinical environments and the positive and negative impacts that may result are highlighted. Techniques to evaluate clinical training environments and to identify the hidden curriculum are provided and are followed by methods to promote its positive messages and lessen its negative ones. PMID:20541735

  11. A double-loop structure in the adaptive generalized predictive control algorithm for control of robot end-point contact force.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shuhuan; Zhu, Jinghai; Li, Xiaoli; Chen, Shengyong

    2014-09-01

    Robot force control is an essential issue in robotic intelligence. There is much high uncertainty when robot end-effector contacts with the environment. Because of the environment stiffness effects on the system of the robot end-effector contact with environment, the adaptive generalized predictive control algorithm based on quantitative feedback theory is designed for robot end-point contact force system. The controller of the internal loop is designed on the foundation of QFT to control the uncertainty of the system. An adaptive GPC algorithm is used to design external loop controller to improve the performance and the robustness of the system. Two closed loops used in the design approach realize the system׳s performance and improve the robustness. The simulation results show that the algorithm of the robot end-effector contacting force control system is effective. PMID:24973336

  12. Active control on high-order coherence and statistic characterization on random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources.

    PubMed

    Hong, Peilong; Li, Liming; Liu, Jianji; Zhang, Guoquan

    2016-01-01

    Young's double-slit or two-beam interference is of fundamental importance to understand various interference effects, in which the stationary phase difference between two beams plays the key role in the first-order coherence. Different from the case of first-order coherence, in the high-order optical coherence the statistic behavior of the optical phase will play the key role. In this article, by employing a fundamental interfering configuration with two classical point sources, we showed that the high- order optical coherence between two classical point sources can be actively designed by controlling the statistic behavior of the relative phase difference between two point sources. Synchronous position Nth-order subwavelength interference with an effective wavelength of λ/M was demonstrated, in which λ is the wavelength of point sources and M is an integer not larger than N. Interestingly, we found that the synchronous position Nth-order interference fringe fingerprints the statistic trace of random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources, therefore, it provides an effective way to characterize the statistic properties of phase fluctuation for incoherent light sources. PMID:27021589

  13. Active control on high-order coherence and statistic characterization on random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Peilong; Li, Liming; Liu, Jianji; Zhang, Guoquan

    2016-03-01

    Young’s double-slit or two-beam interference is of fundamental importance to understand various interference effects, in which the stationary phase difference between two beams plays the key role in the first-order coherence. Different from the case of first-order coherence, in the high-order optical coherence the statistic behavior of the optical phase will play the key role. In this article, by employing a fundamental interfering configuration with two classical point sources, we showed that the high- order optical coherence between two classical point sources can be actively designed by controlling the statistic behavior of the relative phase difference between two point sources. Synchronous position Nth-order subwavelength interference with an effective wavelength of λ/M was demonstrated, in which λ is the wavelength of point sources and M is an integer not larger than N. Interestingly, we found that the synchronous position Nth-order interference fringe fingerprints the statistic trace of random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources, therefore, it provides an effective way to characterize the statistic properties of phase fluctuation for incoherent light sources.

  14. Active control on high-order coherence and statistic characterization on random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Peilong; Li, Liming; Liu, Jianji; Zhang, Guoquan

    2016-01-01

    Young’s double-slit or two-beam interference is of fundamental importance to understand various interference effects, in which the stationary phase difference between two beams plays the key role in the first-order coherence. Different from the case of first-order coherence, in the high-order optical coherence the statistic behavior of the optical phase will play the key role. In this article, by employing a fundamental interfering configuration with two classical point sources, we showed that the high- order optical coherence between two classical point sources can be actively designed by controlling the statistic behavior of the relative phase difference between two point sources. Synchronous position Nth-order subwavelength interference with an effective wavelength of λ/M was demonstrated, in which λ is the wavelength of point sources and M is an integer not larger than N. Interestingly, we found that the synchronous position Nth-order interference fringe fingerprints the statistic trace of random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources, therefore, it provides an effective way to characterize the statistic properties of phase fluctuation for incoherent light sources. PMID:27021589

  15. Kinesio Taping Does Not Provide Additional Benefits in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain Who Receive Exercise and Manual Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Added, Marco Aurélio Nemitalla; Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; de Freitas, Diego Galace; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; Monteiro, Renan Lima; Salomão, Evelyn Cassia; de Medeiros, Flávia Cordeiro; Costa, Lucíola da Cunha Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Background Many clinical practice guidelines endorse both manual therapy and exercise as effective treatment options for patients with low back pain. To optimize the effects of the treatments recommended by the guidelines, a new intervention known as Kinesio Taping is being widely used in these patients. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain when added to a physical therapy program consisting of exercise and manual therapy. Methods One hundred forty-eight patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain were randomly allocated to receive 10 (twice weekly) sessions of physical therapy, consisting of exercise and manual therapy, or the same treatment with the addition of Kinesio Taping applied to the lower back. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and disability (5 weeks after randomization) and the secondary outcomes were pain intensity, disability (3 months and 6 months after randomization), global perceived effect, and satisfaction with care (5 weeks after treatment). Data were collected by a blinded assessor. Results No between-group differences were observed in the primary outcomes of pain intensity (mean difference, -0.01 points; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.88, 0.85) or disability (mean difference, 1.14 points; 95% CI: -0.85, 3.13) at 5 weeks' follow-up. In addition, no between-group differences were observed for any of the other outcomes evaluated, except for disability 6 months after randomization (mean difference, 2.01 points; 95% CI: 0.03, 4.00) in favor of the control group. Conclusion Patients who received a physical therapy program consisting of exercise and manual therapy did not get additional benefit from the use of Kinesio Taping. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. Prospectively registered May 28, 2013 at www.ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01866332). J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):506-513. Epub 6 Jun 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016

  16. Design of state-feedback controllers including sensitivity reduction, with applications to precision pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadass, Z.

    1974-01-01

    The design procedure of feedback controllers was described and the considerations for the selection of the design parameters were given. The frequency domain properties of single-input single-output systems using state feedback controllers are analyzed, and desirable phase and gain margin properties are demonstrated. Special consideration is given to the design of controllers for tracking systems, especially those designed to track polynomial commands. As an example, a controller was designed for a tracking telescope with a polynomial tracking requirement and some special features such as actuator saturation and multiple measurements, one of which is sampled. The resulting system has a tracking performance comparing favorably with a much more complicated digital aided tracker. The parameter sensitivity reduction was treated by considering the variable parameters as random variables. A performance index is defined as a weighted sum of the state and control convariances that sum from both the random system disturbances and the parameter uncertainties, and is minimized numerically by adjusting a set of free parameters.

  17. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Pointing Control System Performance During Transfer Orbit and Initial On-Orbit Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quast, Peter; Tung, Frank; West, Mark; Wider, John

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO, formerly AXAF) is the third of the four NASA great observatories. It was launched from Kennedy Space Flight Center on 23 July 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia and was successfully inserted in a 330 x 72,000 km orbit by the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS). Through a series of five Integral Propulsion System burns, CXO was placed in a 10,000 x 139,000 km orbit. After initial on-orbit checkout, Chandra's first light images were unveiled to the public on 26 August, 1999. The CXO Pointing Control and Aspect Determination (PCAD) subsystem is designed to perform attitude control and determination functions in support of transfer orbit operations and on-orbit science mission. After a brief description of the PCAD subsystem, the paper highlights the PCAD activities during the transfer orbit and initial on-orbit operations. These activities include: CXO/IUS separation, attitude and gyro bias estimation with earth sensor and sun sensor, attitude control and disturbance torque estimation for delta-v burns, momentum build-up due to gravity gradient and solar pressure, momentum unloading with thrusters, attitude initialization with star measurements, gyro alignment calibration, maneuvering and transition to normal pointing, and PCAD pointing and stability performance.

  18. Design and Integration of an All-Magnetic Attitude Control System for FASTSAT-HSV01's Multiple Pointing Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeKock, Brandon; Sanders, Devon; Vanzwieten, Tannen; Capo-Lugo, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    The FASTSAT-HSV01 spacecraft is a microsatellite with magnetic torque rods as it sole attitude control actuator. FASTSAT s multiple payloads and mission functions require the Attitude Control System (ACS) to maintain Local Vertical Local Horizontal (LVLH)-referenced attitudes without spin-stabilization, while the pointing errors for some attitudes be significantly smaller than the previous best-demonstrated for this type of control system. The mission requires the ACS to hold multiple stable, unstable, and non-equilibrium attitudes, as well as eject a 3U CubeSat from an onboard P-POD and recover from the ensuing tumble. This paper describes the Attitude Control System, the reasons for design choices, how the ACS integrates with the rest of the spacecraft, and gives recommendations for potential future applications of the work.

  19. Precision Pointing Control to and Accurate Target Estimation of a Non-Cooperative Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanEepoel, John; Thienel, Julie; Sanner, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, NASA began investigating a robotic servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Such a mission would not only require estimates of the HST attitude and rates in order to achieve capture by the proposed Hubble Robotic Vehicle (HRV), but also precision control to achieve the desired rate and maintain the orientation to successfully dock with HST. To generalize the situation, HST is the target vehicle and HRV is the chaser. This work presents a nonlinear approach for estimating the body rates of a non-cooperative target vehicle, and coupling this estimation to a control scheme. Non-cooperative in this context relates to the target vehicle no longer having the ability to maintain attitude control or transmit attitude knowledge.

  20. Improvement of a geodetic triangulation through control points established by means of satellite or precision traversing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, N. K.

    1972-01-01

    Whether any significant increment to accuracy could be transferred from a super-control continental net (continental satellite net or super-transcontinental traverse) to the fundamental geodetic net (first-order triangulation) is discussed. This objective was accomplished by evaluating the positional accuracy improvement for a triangulation station, which is near the middle of the investigated geodetic triangulation net, by using various station constraints over its geodetic position. This investigation on a 1858 kilometer long triangulation chain shows that the super-control net can provide a useful constraint to the investigated geodetic triangulation net, and thus can improve it only when the accuracy of super-control net is at least 1 part in 500,000.

  1. Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-12-21

    The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships. 3 figs.

  2. Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-12-21

    The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships.

  3. Voltage and Reactive Power Control by Parallel Calculation Management using Multi-Point TS and CGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Hidenori; Michihata, Masashi; Mizutani, Yoshibumi; Hoshino, Hiroshi

    This paper presents a new approach to optimal voltage and reactive power control based on a genetic algorithm (GA) and a tabu search (TS). To reduce time to calculate the control procedure, the parallel computation using Linux is executed. In order to obtain more effective and optimum parallel computation, the characteristic of the parallel processing algorithm used in the proposed method is to effectively utilize the Master operation of ordinary GA parallel processing. In other words, using the waiting time for transmission from the Slave to execute TS as Master. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by practical 118-bus system.

  4. Impact of solvent additive on exciton dissociation in P3HT : EP-PDI blend film via controlling morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Yu; Xu, Wei-Long; Zheng, Fei; Liu, Jian-Qiang; Hao, Xiao-Tao

    2016-06-01

    Suitable solvent additives provide an effective means to control the morphology of polymer blend films. In this work, we systematically investigate the impact of the solvent additive chloronaphthalene (CN) on the morphology of P3HT : EP-PDI blends. The optimum volume fraction of solvent additive CN was found to be 0.5 vol% by atom force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. UV–visible absorption spectroscopy and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction indicate that the crystallinity of both the P3HT and EP-PDI domains significantly decreased in the blends with 0.5 vol% CN. Grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering results show that the size of the small EP-PDI aggregation decreases from 44–22 nm with the addition of CN. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurement reveals that the decreased EP-PDI domains give rise to increased donor–acceptor interfacial areas, which not only facilitate the exciton dissociation, but suppresses the formation of the EP-PDI intermolecular state.

  5. Stability of ZnO quantum dots tuned by controlled addition of ethylene glycol during their growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Lizandra M.; Baldissera, Paulo V.; Bechtold, Ivan H.

    2016-07-01

    ZnO quantum dots were prepared via a sol–gel route from zinc acetate and sodium hydroxide. The influence of ethylene glycol addition during the first stages of reaction (1–5 min) as a stabilizer, as well as the influence of its concentration in 2-propanol were investigated. The optimization led to particles with enough stability and homogeneity around 3.7 nm of diameter to allow for quantum confinement effect. Spectroscopic UV–vis absorption measurements allowed to explore the underlying mechanism of nucleation and growth and to have the control of it. The emission of the ZnO nanoparticles was explored under experimental perturbations with addition of small amounts of water to investigate the interplay between surface defects and the excitonic effect. The results suggest that the water interferes directly on the defects first and later on the excitonic recombination. Their morphology was determined with transmission electron microscopy.

  6. The influence of deposit control additives on nitrogen oxides emissions from spark ignition engines (case study: Tehran).

    PubMed

    Bidhendi, Gholamreza Nabi; Zand, Ali Daryabeigi; Tabrizi, Alireza Mikaeili; Pezeshk, Hamid; Baghvand, Akbar

    2007-04-15

    In the present research, the influence of a deposit control additive on NOx emissions from two types of gasoline engine vehicles i.e., Peykan (base on Hillman) and Pride (South Korea Kia motors) was studied. Exhaust NOx emissions were measured in to stages, before decarbonization process and after that. Statistical analysis was conducted on the measurement results. Results showed that NOx emissions from Peykans increased 0.28% and NOx emissions from Pride automobiles decreased 6.18% on average, due to the elimination of engine deposits. The observed variations were not statistically and practically significant. The results indicated that making use of detergent additives is not an effective way to reduce the exhaust NOx emissions from gasoline engine vehicles. PMID:19069943

  7. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in common shoulder disorders by physical therapy: A randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN75722066

    PubMed Central

    Bron, Carel; Wensing, Michel; Franssen, Jo LM; Oostendorp, Rob AB

    2007-01-01

    Background Shoulder disorders are a common health problem in western societies. Several treatment protocols have been developed for the clinical management of persons with shoulder pain. However available evidence does not support any protocol as being superior over others. Systematic reviews provide some evidence that certain physical therapy interventions (i.e. supervised exercises and mobilisation) are effective in particular shoulder disorders (i.e. rotator cuff disorders, mixed shoulder disorders and adhesive capsulitis), but there is an ongoing need for high quality trials of physical therapy interventions. Usually, physical therapy consists of active exercises intended to strengthen the shoulder muscles as stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint or perform mobilisations to improve restricted mobility of the glenohumeral or adjacent joints (shoulder girdle). It is generally accepted that a-traumatic shoulder problems are the result of impingement of the subacromial structures, such as the bursa or rotator cuff tendons. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in shoulder muscles may also lead to a complex of symptoms that are often seen in patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement or rotator cuff tendinopathy. Little is known about the treatment of MTrPs in patients with shoulder disorders. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether physical therapy modalities to inactivate MTrPs can reduce symptoms and improve shoulder function in daily activities in a population of chronic a-traumatic shoulder patients when compared to a wait-and-see strategy. In addition we investigate the recurrence rate during a one-year-follow-up period. Methods/Design This paper presents the design for a randomized controlled trial to be conducted between September 2007 – September 2008, evaluating the effectiveness of a physical therapy treatment for non-traumatic shoulder complaints. One hundred subjects are included in this study. All subjects have unilateral shoulder

  8. Assessment Of ASTER GDEM And SRTM Performance By Comparing With Survey Control Points And Icesat/GLAS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarihani, A. A.; Callow, J. N.

    2011-12-01

    Topographic data plays a critical role in water resources modeling with determining watershed hydrologic characteristics from raster-based digital elevation models (DEM). Raster-based DEMs have been widely used to derive topographic attributes used in hydraulic and hydrologic modeling such as slope, stream network, basins boundary and area. Accurate models of floodplain topography are essential for having accurate output of hydrologic models. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) provides near-global topographic coverage of the Earth's surface with unprecedented consistency and accuracy with the resolution of 1-3 arc sec. A new Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) from optical stereo data acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) was recently released with the resolution of 1 arc sec. This study the performance of the ASTER GDEM and SRTM DEMs is assessed by comparing with ground-based survey control points and point data from ICESat/GLAS (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite/Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) for a 7x7degree area in Queensland Australia. This area contains large and remote river basins, where these datasets provide an invaluable resource from which river floodplain inundation can be measured and modelled. Our study focuses on both data and datum issues, which are required to provide a realistic assessment of the achievable relative and absolute ground topographic accuracies. We assessed ground-based survey control points' with ICESat satellite altimetry points and in turn assessed accuracy of the ASTER GDEM and SRTM DEMs over the study area. ICESat provides globally-distributed elevation data of high accuracy (2.47.3 m horizontal error and 0.040.13 m (per degree of incidence angle) vertical error)We applied the GLA14 elevation products (Land/Canopy elevations) for the Laser 3a observation period and Release 31 to compare with 5000 ground survey control points in study area.Our ICESat-control

  9. Effect of kaolin addition on the performance of controlled low-strength material using industrial waste incineration bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Naganathan, Sivakumar; Razak, Hashim Abdul; Hamid, Siti Nadzriah Abdul

    2010-09-01

    Incineration of industrial waste produces large quantities of bottom ash which are normally sent to secured landfill, but is not a sustainable solution. Use of bottom ash in engineering applications will contribute to sustainability and generate revenue. One way of using the industrial waste incineration bottom ash is in controlled low-strength material (CLSM). Use of bottom ash in CLSM has problems related to bleeding and excessive strength development and so an additive has to be used to control bleeding and strength development. The main objective of this research is to study the effect of kaolin addition on the performance of CLSM made using industrial waste incineration bottom ash. CLSM mixes were made with bottom ash, cement, and refined kaolin. Various tests were performed on the CLSM in fresh and hardened states including compressive strength, water absorption, California bearing ratio (CBR) and the tests for concentration of leachable substances on the bleed and leachate. The compressive strength of CLSM tested ranged from 0.11 to 9.86 MPa. CBR values ranged from 6 to 46, and water absorption values from 12 to 36%. It was shown that the addition of kaolin delayed the initial setting time of CLSM mixtures, reduced bleeding, lowered the compressive strength, and increased the values of water absorption, sorption, and initial surface absorption. The CLSM tested did not have corrosivity. It was shown that the hardened CLSM was non hazardous, and the addition of kaolin increased the concentration of heavy metals and salts in the bleed and leachate. PMID:20852000

  10. New Research on Multitasking Points to Role of Self-Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    For a generation of children immersed in technology, emerging research suggests that while the temptation to multitask may be pervasive, the ability to control it could be the real bellwether of academic success. The pervasiveness of technology and social media, coupled with a fear of missing out on something important, has led students to pay…

  11. Access Point Analysis: What Do Adolescents in South Africa Say about Tobacco Control Programmes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swart, Dehran; Panday, Saadhna; Reddy, S Priscilla; Bergstrom, Erik; de Vries, Hein

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores adolescent preferences for the setting, timing, delivery format, provider and key elements of tobacco control programmes. The need for programme sensitivity towards urban/rural, gender and ethnic subgroups is also discussed. Schools were purposively selected from the Southern Cape-Karoo Region, South Africa. Twelve prevention…

  12. Critical points in control of salmonella and camplobacter from farm to plate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ultimate reason for controlling pathogenic bacteria in poultry is to reduce the risk of human illness associated with poultry products. Salmonella usually appears when broiler flocks are 2-3 weeks old, with intestinal incidence peaking at 3 or 4 weeks and declining thereafter even as environmen...

  13. Survey on advances in orbital dynamics and control for libration point orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Liang, Yuying; Ren, Kewei

    2016-04-01

    Libration point orbits (LPOs) have drawn a lot of interest because of their great significance in deep space exploration. This paper summarizes the past developments and then presents the current state-of-art of LPOs including the dynamical structure of phase space, the transfer trajectories and homoclinic/heterclinic connections of LPOs, the station-keeping strategies, and some constellation deployments employing LPOs. Subsequently addressed are the applications of the LPO theory into the fields of lunar transfers, solar sail equilibria and formation flying. Finally, future research directions on LPOs are described from the aspects of the existence proof of Halo orbits, orbital design for the potential missions motivated by LPOs, and so on.

  14. Selection for increased desiccation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster: Additive genetic control and correlated responses for other stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, A.A.; Parsons, P.A. )

    1989-08-01

    Previously we found that Drosophila melanogaster lines selected for increased desiccation resistance have lowered metabolic rate and behavioral activity levels, and show correlated responses for resistance to starvation and a toxic ethanol level. These results were consistent with a prediction that increased resistance to many environmental stresses may be genetically correlated because of a reduction in metabolic energy expenditure. Here we present experiments on the genetic basis of the selection response and extend the study of correlated responses to other stresses. The response to selection was not sex-specific and involved X-linked and autosomal genes acting additively. Activity differences contributed little to differences in desiccation resistance between selected and control lines. Selected lines had lower metabolic rates than controls in darkness when activity was inhibited. Adults from selected lines showed increased resistance to a heat shock, {sup 60}Co-gamma-radiation, and acute ethanol and acetic acid stress. The desiccation, ethanol and starvation resistance of isofemale lines set up from the F2s of a cross between one of the selected and one of the control lines were correlated. Selected and control lines did not differ in ether-extractable lipid content or in resistance to acetone, ether or a cold shock.

  15. Chloride ion addition for controlling shapes and properties of silver nanorods capped by polyvinyl alcohol synthesized using polyol method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junaidi, Yunus, Muhammad; Triyana, Kuwat; Harsojo, Suharyadi, Edi

    2016-04-01

    We report our investigation on the effect of chloride ions on controlling the shapes and properties of silver nanorods (AgNRs) synthesized using a polyol method. In this study, we used polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a capping agent and sodium chloride (NaCl) as a salt precursor and performed at the oil bath temperature of 140°C. The chloride ions originating from the NaCl serve to control the growth of the silver nanorods. Furthermore, the synthesized silver nanorods were characterized using SEM and XRD. The results showed that besides being able to control the growth of AgCl atoms, the chloride ions were also able to control the growth of multi-twinned-particles into the single crystalline of silver nanorods by micrometer-length. At an appropriate concentration of NaCl, the diameter of silver nanorods decreased significantly compared to that of without chloride ion addition. This technique may be useful since a particular diameter of silver nanorods affects a particular application in the future.

  16. Design of set-point weighting PI{sup λ} + D{sup μ} controller for vertical magnetic flux controller in Damavand tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rasouli, H.; Fatehi, A.

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, a simple method is presented for tuning weighted PI{sup λ} + D{sup μ} controller parameters based on the pole placement controller of pseudo-second-order fractional systems. One of the advantages of this controller is capability of reducing the disturbance effects and improving response to input, simultaneously. In the following sections, the performance of this controller is evaluated experimentally to control the vertical magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak. For this work, at first a fractional order model is identified using output-error technique in time domain. For various practical experiments, having desired time responses for magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak, is vital. To approach this, at first the desired closed loop reference models are obtained based on generalized characteristic ratio assignment method in fractional order systems. After that, for the identified model, a set-point weighting PI{sup λ} + D{sup μ} controller is designed and simulated. Finally, this controller is implemented on digital signal processor control system of the plant to fast/slow control of magnetic flux. The practical results show appropriate performance of this controller.

  17. Statistical process control in the hybrid microelectronics manufacturing industry: A Navy view point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azu, Charles C., Jr.

    1993-04-01

    The U.S. Navy is concerned with receiving high quality hybrid microelectronic circuits. The Navy recognizes that in order to obtain high quality circuits a manufacturer must have an effective statistical process control (SPC) program implemented. The implementation of effective SPC programs is an objective of the military hybrid microelectronics industry. Often the smaller sized manufacturers in the industry have little SPC implementation, while the larger manufacturers have practices originally developed for the control of other product lines outside the hybrid technology area. The industry recognizes that SPC programs will result in high quality hybrid microcircuits which the U.S. Navy requires. In the past, the goal of the industry had not been to put in effective process control methods, but to merely meet the government military standards on the quality of the hybrids they produce. This practice, at best, resulted in a 'hit or miss' situation when it comes to hybrid microcircuit assemblies meeting military standards. The U.S. Navy through its MicroCIM program has been challenging and working with the industry in the area of SPC practice methods. The major limitations so far have been a lack of available sensors for the real-time collection of effective SPC data on the factory floor. This paper will discuss the Navy's efforts in bringing about effective SPC programs in the military hybrid manufacturing industry.

  18. Public Support for Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act Point-of-Sale Provisions: Results of a National Study

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Sherry L.; Ennett, Susan; McNaughton Reyes, Heath Luz; Scott, John C.; Ribisl, Kurt M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed public and smoker support for enacted and potential point-of-sale (POS) tobacco-control policies under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. Methods. We surveyed a US nationally representative sample of 17 507 respondents (6595 smokers) in January through February 2013, and used linear regression to calculate weighted point estimates and identify factors associated with support for POS policies among adults and smokers. Results. Overall, nonsmokers were more supportive than were smokers. Regardless of smoking status, African Americans, Hispanics, women, and those of older ages were more supportive than White, male, and younger respondents, respectively. Policy support varied by provision. More than 80% of respondents supported minors’ access restrictions and more than 45% supported graphic warnings. Support was lowest for plain packaging (23%), black-and-white advertising (26%), and a ban on menthol cigarettes (36%). Conclusions. Public support for marketing and POS provisions is low relative to other areas of tobacco control. Tobacco-control advocates and the Food and Drug Administration should build on existing levels of public support to promote and maintain evidence-based, but controversial, policy changes in the retail environment. PMID:26270303

  19. Enzyme Sequestration as a Tuning Point in Controlling Response Dynamics of Signalling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, Julien F.; Soyer, Orkun S.

    2016-01-01

    Signalling networks result from combinatorial interactions among many enzymes and scaffolding proteins. These complex systems generate response dynamics that are often essential for correct decision-making in cells. Uncovering biochemical design principles that underpin such response dynamics is a prerequisite to understand evolved signalling networks and to design synthetic ones. Here, we use in silico evolution to explore the possible biochemical design space for signalling networks displaying ultrasensitive and adaptive response dynamics. By running evolutionary simulations mimicking different biochemical scenarios, we find that enzyme sequestration emerges as a key mechanism for enabling such dynamics. Inspired by these findings, and to test the role of sequestration, we design a generic, minimalist model of a signalling cycle, featuring two enzymes and a single scaffolding protein. We show that this simple system is capable of displaying both ultrasensitive and adaptive response dynamics. Furthermore, we find that tuning the concentration or kinetics of the sequestering protein can shift system dynamics between these two response types. These empirical results suggest that enzyme sequestration through scaffolding proteins is exploited by evolution to generate diverse response dynamics in signalling networks and could provide an engineering point in synthetic biology applications. PMID:27163612

  20. Loop Heat Pipe Transient Behavior Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control with Thermoelectric Converter on Reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly done by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. With this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within 0.5K or better. However, because the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if the LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP was carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor was placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir was cold-biased and was heated by a control heater. Test results show that it was feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. In particular, when a thermoelectric converter was used as the reservoir control heater, the heat source temperature could be maintained within a tight range using a proportional-integral-derivative or on/off control algorithm. Moreover, because the TEC could provide both heating and cooling to the reservoir, temperature oscillations during fast transients such as loop startup could be eliminated or substantially reduced when compared to using an electrical heater as the control heater.