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Sample records for additional corotation torque

  1. Linear corotation torques in non-barotropic disks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, David

    2014-02-20

    A fully analytic expression for the linear corotation torque to first order in eccentricity for planets in non-barotropic protoplanetary disks is derived, taking into account the effect of disk entropy gradients. This torque formula is applicable to both the co-orbital, corotation torques and the non-co-orbital, corotation torques—for planets in orbits with non-zero eccentricity—in disks where the thermal diffusivity and viscosity are sufficient to maintain the linearity of these interactions. While the co-orbital, corotation torque is important for migration of planets in Type I migration, the non-co-orbital, corotation torque plays an important role in the eccentricity evolution of giant planets that have opened gaps in the disk. The presence of an entropy gradient in the disk can significantly modify the corotation torque in both these cases.

  2. Dynamical corotation torques on low-mass planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, S.-J.

    2014-11-01

    We study torques on migrating low-mass planets in locally isothermal discs. Previous work on low-mass planets generally kept the planet on a fixed orbit, after which the torque on the planet was measured. In addition to these static torques, when the planet is allowed to migrate it experiences dynamical torques, which are proportional to the migration rate and whose sign depends on the background vortensity gradient. We show that in discs a few times more massive than the minimum-mass solar nebula, these dynamical torques can have a profound impact on planet migration. Inward migration can be slowed down significantly, and if static torques lead to outward migration, dynamical torques can take over, taking the planet beyond zero-torque lines set by saturation of the corotation torque in a runaway fashion. This means that the region in non-isothermal discs, where outward migration is possible, can be larger than what would be concluded from static torques alone.

  3. Corotation torques in the solar nebula - The cutoff function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, William R.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of high-order corotation resonances in a disk of finite thickness is examined. The torque exerted at an mth-order resonance is determined by employing a vertically averaged disturbing function, and the ratio of this torque to that exerted on a cold, two-dimensional disk is identified as the so-called torque cutoff function. This function is then used to calculate contributions from the corotation torques to eccentricity variations of a perturber's orbit assumed orbiting in the disk.

  4. Halting Migration: Numerical Calculations of Corotation Torques in the Weakly Nonlinear Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffell, Paul C.

    2015-06-01

    Planets in their formative years can migrate due to the influence of gravitational torques in the protoplanetary disk they inhabit. For low-mass planets in an isothermal disk, it is known that there is a strong negative torque on the planet due to its linear perturbation to the disk, causing fast inward migration. The current investigation demonstrates that in these same isothermal disks, for intermediate-mass planets, there is a strong positive nonlinear corotation torque due to the effects of gas being pulled through a gap on horseshoe orbits. For intermediate-mass planets, this positive torque can partially or completely cancel the linear (Type I) torque, leading to slower or outward migration, even in an isothermal disk. The effect is most significant for super-Earth and sub-Jovian planets, during the transition from a low-mass linear perturber to a nonlinear gap-opening planet, when the planet has opened a so-called “partial gap,” though the precise values of these transition masses depend sensitively on the disk model (density profile, viscosity, and disk aspect ratio). In this study, numerical calculations of planet-disk interactions calculate these torques explicitly, and scalings are empirically constructed for migration rates in this weakly nonlinear regime. These results find outward migration is possible for planets with masses in the range 20-100 {M}\\oplus , though this range depends on the disk model considered. In the disk models where torque reversal occurs, the critical planet-to-star mass ratio for torque reversal was found to have the robust scaling {q}{crit}\\propto \\sqrt{α }{(h/r)}3, where α is the dimensionless viscosity parameter and h/r is the disk aspect ratio.

  5. Revisiting CoRoT RR Lyrae stars: detection of period doubling and temporal variation of additional frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, R.; Benkő, J. M.; Paparó, M.; Chapellier, E.; Poretti, E.; Baglin, A.; Weiss, W. W.; Kolenberg, K.; Guggenberger, E.; Le Borgne, J.-F.

    2014-10-01

    Context. High-precision, space-based photometric missions like CoRoT and Kepler have revealed new and surprising phenomena in classical variable stars. Such discoveries were the period doubling in RR Lyrae stars and the frequent occurrence of additional periodicities some of which can be explained by radial overtone modes, but others are discordant with the radial eigenfrequency spectrum. Aims: We search for signs of period doubling in CoRoT RR Lyrae stars. The occurrence of this dynamical effect in modulated RR Lyrae stars might help us to gain more information about the mysterious Blazhko effect. The temporal variability of the additional frequencies in representatives of all subtypes of RR Lyrae stars is also investigated. Methods: We preprocess CoRoT light curves by applying trend and jump correction and outlier removal. Standard Fourier technique is used to analyze the frequency content of our targets and follow the time-dependent phenomena. Results: The most comprehensive collection of CoRoT RR Lyrae stars, including new discoveries is presented and analyzed. We found alternating maxima and in some cases half-integer frequencies in four CoRoT Blazhko RR Lyrae stars, as clear signs of the presence of period doubling. This reinforces that period doubling is an important ingredient for understanding the Blazhko effect - a premise we derived previously from the Kepler RR Lyrae sample. As expected, period doubling is detectable only for short time intervals in most modulated RRab stars. Our results show that the temporal variability of the additional frequencies in all RR Lyrae subtypes is ubiquitous. The ephemeral nature and the highly variable amplitude of these variations suggest a complex underlying dynamics of and an intricate interplay between radial and possibly nonradial modes in RR Lyrae stars. The omnipresence of additional modes in all types of RR Lyrae - except in non-modulated RRab stars - implies that asteroseismology of these objects should be

  6. Investigation of possible causes of the additional torque on the yacht's rudder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubomir, Soukup; Jaroslav, Stigler; Abdellah, Kharicha

    2016-03-01

    The present article deals with investigation of possible causes of the additional torque on the yacht's rudder. One of the most important aspect for design of yachts are the symmetric conditions of all parts, which are located under water level and concentricity of the ship's screw, rudder and keel relative to the hull. These symmetric and concentricity conditions have a major impact on the resulting dynamic properties of the ships. They have either substantial impact on the overall efficiency of installed engine and ship's screw. As the result of poorly designed above mentioned parts, there can be an unsolicited additional torque on the yacht's rudder and higher consumption of the fuel. Last but not least of these problems leads to poor controllability and discomfort within steering. This article is focused on the investigation of possible causes of the additional torque on the yacht's rudder.

  7. Observações no âmbito dos "additional programs" do satélite COROT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janot Pacheco, E.

    2003-08-01

    O satélite Fraco-europeu COROT fará fotometria de altissima precisão (pretende-se atingir uma parte em um milhão), grande campo (3x3 graus) e por longos períodos, de duas regiões pré-determinadas do céu, com 10 graus de raio. Suas finalidades básicas serão estudos em sismologia estelar e a procura de exoplanetas. A comunidade astronômica brasileira participará dessa missão espacial, com direitos iguais aos dos parceiros europeus. Isso se deve a que o satélite utilizará a estação de recepção de dados de Natal (INPE), 5 a 6 brasileiros participarão das equipes de software e cientistas do país atuarão na fase de pré-lançamento. Apresentamos nesta comunicação sugestões para a preparação de propostas de observações com COROT, no âmbito dos Programas Adicionais, que contemplam outros projetos que não de sismologia ou exoplanetas. As últimas definições técnicas e decisões tomadas na 4th Corot Week de junho último serão igualmente apresentadas, em particular quanto às regiões de observação escolhidas e quanto aos procedimentos a seguir para se propor observações.

  8. Enhancing current-induced torques by abutting additional spin polarizer layer to nonmagnetic metal layer.

    PubMed

    Go, Gyungchoon; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Young Keun

    2017-04-04

    Recently, the switching of a perpendicularly magnetized ferromagnet (FM) by injecting an in-plane current into an attached non-magnet (NM) has become of emerging technological interest. This magnetization switching is attributed to the spin-orbit torque (SOT) originating from the strong spin-orbit coupling of the NM layer. However, the switching efficiency of the NM/FM structure itself may be insufficient for practical use, as for example, in spin transfer torque (STT)-based magnetic random access memory (MRAM) devices. Here we investigate spin torque in an NM/FM structure with an additional spin polarizer (SP) layer abutted to the NM layer. In addition to the SOT contribution, a spin-polarized current from the SP layer creates an extra spin chemical potential difference at the NM/FM interface and gives rise to a STT on the FM layer. We show that, using typical parameters including device width, thickness, spin diffusion length, and the spin Hall angle, the spin torque from the SP layer can be much larger than that from the spin Hall effect (SHE) of the NM.

  9. Enhancing current-induced torques by abutting additional spin polarizer layer to nonmagnetic metal layer

    PubMed Central

    Go, Gyungchoon; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Young Keun

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the switching of a perpendicularly magnetized ferromagnet (FM) by injecting an in-plane current into an attached non-magnet (NM) has become of emerging technological interest. This magnetization switching is attributed to the spin-orbit torque (SOT) originating from the strong spin-orbit coupling of the NM layer. However, the switching efficiency of the NM/FM structure itself may be insufficient for practical use, as for example, in spin transfer torque (STT)-based magnetic random access memory (MRAM) devices. Here we investigate spin torque in an NM/FM structure with an additional spin polarizer (SP) layer abutted to the NM layer. In addition to the SOT contribution, a spin-polarized current from the SP layer creates an extra spin chemical potential difference at the NM/FM interface and gives rise to a STT on the FM layer. We show that, using typical parameters including device width, thickness, spin diffusion length, and the spin Hall angle, the spin torque from the SP layer can be much larger than that from the spin Hall effect (SHE) of the NM. PMID:28374805

  10. Monitoring a high-amplitude δ Scuti star for 152 days: discovery of 12 additional modes and modulation effects in the light curve of CoRoT 101155310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Weiss, W. W.; Bognár, Zs.; Moya, A.; Niemczura, E.; Suárez, J. C.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Baudin, F.; Benkő, J. M.; Debosscher, J.; Garrido, R.; Mantegazza, L.; Paparó, M.

    2011-04-01

    Aims: The detection of small-amplitude nonradial modes in high-amplitude δ Sct (HADS) variables has been very elusive until at least five of them were detected in the light curve of V974 Oph obtained from ground-based observations. The combination of radial and nonradial modes has a high asteroseismic potential, thanks to the strong constraints we can put in the modelling. The continuous monitoring of ASAS 192647-0030.0 ≡ CoRoT 101155310 (P = 0.1258 d, V = 13.4) ensured from space by the CoRoT (COnvection, ROtation and planetary Transits) mission constitutes a unique opportunity to exploit such potential. Methods: The 22270 CoRoT measurements were performed in the chromatic mode. They span 152 d and cover 1208 consecutive cycles. After the correction for one jump and the long-term drift, the level of the noise turned out to be 29 μmag. The phase shifts and amplitude ratios of the coloured CoRoT data, the HARPS spectra, and the period-luminosity relation were used to determine a self-consistent physical model. In turn, it allowed us to model the oscillation spectrum, also giving feedback on the internal structure of the star. Results: In addition to the fundamental radial mode f1 = 7.949 d-1 with harmonics up to 10f1, we detected 12 independent terms. Linear combinations were also found and the light curve was solved by means of 61 frequencies (smallest amplitude 0.10 mmag). The newest result is the detection of a periodic modulation of the f1 mode (triplets at ± 0.193 d-1 centred on f1 and 2f1), discussed as a rotational effect or as an extension of the Blazhko effect to HADS stars. The physical model suggests that CoRoT 101155310 is an evolved star, with a slight subsolar metallic abundance, close to the terminal age main sequence. All the 12 additional terms are identified with mixed modes in the predicted overstable region. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with the participation of ESA's RSSD and Science

  11. Displaceable Gear Torque Controlled Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a displaceable gear to limit torque transfer to a fastener at a precisely controlled torque limit. A biasing assembly biases a first gear into engagement with a second gear for torque transfer between the first and second gear. The biasing assembly includes a pressurized cylinder controlled at a constant pressure that corresponds to a torque limit. A calibrated gage and valve is used to set the desired torque limit. One or more coiled output linkages connect the first gear with the fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. The torque limit is adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  12. Pressurized fluid torque driver control and method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a displaceable gear to limit torque transfer to a fastener at a precisely controlled torque limit. A biasing assembly biases a first gear into engagement with a second gear for torque transfer between the first and second gear. The biasing assembly includes a pressurized cylinder controlled at a constant pressure that corresponds to a torque limit. A calibrated gage and valve is used to set the desired torque limit. One or more coiled output linkages connect the first gear with the fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. The torque limit is adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  13. Pressurized fluid torque driver control and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a displaceable gear to limit torque transfer to a fastener at a precisely controlled torque limit. A biasing assembly biases a first gear into engagement with a second gear for torque transfer between the first and second gear. The biasing assembly includes a pressurized cylinder controlled at a constant pressure that corresponds to a torque limit. A calibrated gage and valve is used to set the desired torque limit. One or more coiled output linkages connect the first gear with the fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. The torque limit is adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  14. COROT: asteroseismology and planet finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglin, A.; Auvergne, M.; Barge, P.; Buey, J.-T.; Catala, C.; Michel, E.; Weiss, W.; COROT Team

    2002-01-01

    The COROT project, developed in the framework of the CNES small satellite program with a wide European cooperation, will be launched in 2004. It is dedicated to seismology and detection of telluric planets. It will perform relative broad band photometry in visible light, during very long (150 days) observing runs in the same direction. Both programs are working simultaneously on the same region of the sky. The seismology program aims at mapping the H-R diagram and study in details approximately 50 targets brighter than 9th magnitude. Another 50 will also be observed with a lower accuracy. The exoplanet program will search for telluric planets slightly larger than the Earth, in the habitable zone and closer.

  15. Stellar classification of CoRoT targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, C.; Meunier, J.-C.; Moutou, C.; Deleuil, M.; Ysard, N.; Baudin, F.; Deeg, H.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The CoRoT mission was the first dedicated to the search for exoplanets from space. The CoRoT exoplanet channel observed about 163 600 targets to detect transiting planetary companions. In addition to the search for exoplanets, the extremely precise photometric time series provided by CoRoT for this vast number of stars is an invaluable resource for stellar studies. Because CoRoT targets are faint (11 ≤ r ≤ 16) and close to the galactic plane, only a small subsample has been observed spectroscopically. Consequently, the stellar classification of CoRoT targets required the design of a classification method suited for the needs and time frame of the mission. Aims: We describe the latest classification scheme used to derive the spectral type of CoRoT targets, which is based on broadband multi-colour photometry. We assess the accuracy of this spectral classification for the first time. Methods: We validated the method on simulated data. This allows the quantification of the effect of different sources of uncertainty on the spectral type. Using galaxy population synthesis models, we produced a synthetic catalogue that has the same properties as the CoRoT targets. In this way, we are able to predict typical errors depending on the estimated luminosity class and spectral type. We also compared our results with independent estimates of the spectral type. Cross-checking those results allows us to identify the systematics of the method and to characterise the stellar populations observed by CoRoT. Results: We find that the classification method performs better for stars that were observed during the mission-dedicated photometric ground-based campaigns.The luminosity class is wrong for less than 7% of the targets. Generally, the effective temperature of stars classified as early type (O, B, and A) is overestimated. Conversely, the temperature of stars classified as later type tends to be underestimated. This is mainly due to the adverse effect of interstellar

  16. Planets and Stellar Activity: Hide and Seek in the CoRoT-7 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, R. D.; Cameron, A. C.; Queloz, D.; Barros, S. C. C.; Deleuil, M.; Fares, R.; Gillon, M.; Hatzes, A.; Lanza, A. F.; Lovis, C.; Moutou, C.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Santerne, A.; Ségransan, D.; Unruh, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the transiting Super-Earth CoRoT-7b, several investigations have been made of the number and precise masses of planets present in the system, but they all yield different results, owing to the star's high level of activity. Radial velocity (RV) variations induced by stellar activity therefore need to be modelled and removed to allow a reliable detection of all planets in the system. We re-observed CoRoT-7 in January 2012 with both HARPS and the CoRoT satellite, so that we now have the benefit of simultaneous RV and photometric data. We fitted the off-transit variations in the CoRoT lightcurve using a harmonic decomposition similar to that implemented in Queloz et al. (2009). This fit was then used to model the stellar RV contribution, according to the methods described by Aigrain et al. (2011). This model was incorporated into a Monte Carlo Markov Chain in order to make a precise determination of the orbits of CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c. We also assess the evidence for the presence of one or two additional planetary companions.

  17. Torque control for electric motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Method for adjusting electric-motor torque output to accomodate various loads utilizes phase-lock loop to control relay connected to starting circuit. As load is imposed, motor slows down, and phase lock is lost. Phase-lock signal triggers relay to power starting coil and generate additional torque. Once phase lock is recoverd, relay restores starting circuit to its normal operating mode.

  18. MHD Simulations: Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiengarten, T.; Kleimann, J.; Fichtner, H.; Kissmann, R.

    2014-09-01

    Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) form in the solar wind when parcels of fast-speed wind interact with slow-speed wind due to the rotation of the Sun. The resulting buildup of pressure generates disturbances that, with increasing time (or distance from the Sun), may develop into a so-called forward-reverse shock pair. During solar-quiet times CIRs can be the dominant force shaping large-scale structures in the heliosphere. Studying CIRs is therefore important because the associated shocks are capable of e.g. accelerating energetic particles or deflecting cosmic rays. The global structure of CIRs can be modeled with an MHD approach that gives the plasma quantities needed to model the transport of particles in the heliosphere with e.g. stochastic differential equations. Here, we show results from 3D-MHD simulations with our code CRONOS for a) analytic boundary conditions where results can be compared to those obtained with a different code and b) boundary conditions derived with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model from observational data (WSO), which are compared to spacecraft observations.

  19. WARM SPITZER PHOTOMETRY OF THE TRANSITING EXOPLANETS CoRoT-1 AND CoRoT-2 AT SECONDARY ECLIPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Deming, Drake; Knutson, Heather; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P.; Lewis, Nikole K.

    2011-01-10

    We measure secondary eclipses of the hot giant exoplanets CoRoT-1 at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, and CoRoT-2 at 3.6 {mu}m, both using Warm Spitzer. We find that the Warm Spitzer mission is working very well for exoplanet science. For consistency of our analysis we also re-analyze archival cryogenic Spitzer data for secondary eclipses of CoRoT-2 at 4.5 and 8 {mu}m. We compare the total data for both planets, including optical eclipse measurements by the CoRoT mission, and ground-based eclipse measurements at 2 {mu}m, to existing models. Both planets exhibit stronger eclipses at 4.5 than at 3.6 {mu}m, which is often indicative of an atmospheric temperature inversion. The spectrum of CoRoT-1 is best reproduced by a 2460 K blackbody, due either to a high altitude layer that strongly absorbs stellar irradiance, or an isothermal region in the planetary atmosphere. The spectrum of CoRoT-2 is unusual because the 8 {mu}m contrast is anomalously low. Non-inverted atmospheres could potentially produce the CoRoT-2 spectrum if the planet exhibits line emission from CO at 4.5 {mu}m, caused by tidal-induced mass loss. However, the viability of that hypothesis is questionable because the emitting region cannot be more than about 30% larger than the planet's transit radius, based on the ingress and egress times at eclipse. An alternative possibility to account for the spectrum of CoRoT-2 is an additional opacity source that acts strongly at wavelengths less than 5 {mu}m, heating the upper atmosphere while allowing the deeper atmosphere seen at 8 {mu}m to remain cooler. We obtain a similar result as Gillon et al. for the phase of the secondary eclipse of CoRoT-2, implying an eccentric orbit with e cos({omega}) = -0.0030 {+-} 0.0004.

  20. MHD simulations: Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiengarten, T.; Kleimann, J.; Fichtner, H.; Kühl, P.; Heber, B.; Kissmann, R.

    2013-12-01

    Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) form in the solar wind when parcels of fast-speed wind interact with slow-speed wind due to the rotation of the Sun. The resulting buildup of pressure generates disturbances that, with increasing time (or distance from the Sun), may develop into a so-called forward-reverse shock-pair. During solar-quiet times CIRs can be the dominant force shaping large-scale structures in the heliosphere. Studying CIRs is therefore important because the associated shocks are capable of e.g. accelerating energetic particles or deflecting cosmic rays. The global structure of CIRs can be modeled with an MHD approach that gives the plasma quantities needed to model the transport of particles in the heliosphere (with e.g. stochastic differential equations (SDEs)). Our MHD code CRONOS employs a semi-discrete finite volume scheme with adaptive time-stepping Runge-Kutta integration. The solenoidality of the magnetic field is ensured via constrained transport and the code supports Cartesian, Cylindrical and Spherical coordinates (including coordinate singularities) with the option for non-equidistant grids. The code runs in parallel (MPI) and supports the HDF5 output data format. Here, we show results from 3D-MHD simulations with our code CRONOS for a) analytic boundary conditions where results can be compared to those obtained with a different code and b) boundary conditions derived with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model from observational data (WSO), which are compared to spacecraft observations. Comparison with Pizzo (1982) for analytic boundary conditions Comparison with STEREO A for Carrington Rotation 2060

  1. CoRoT archive as a treasury of variable stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benko, Jozsef M.; Paparo, Margit

    2015-08-01

    The CoRoT satellite supported the scientific community by a huge data base of variable stars. The investigation of RR Lyrae stars (radially pulsating classical variable stars of high amplitude), especially benefit the continuous space data, due to long periodicity. The CoRoT RR Lyrae stars were intensively discussed in numerous papers in the last few years, but the latest runs have not been checked for finding RR Lyrae stars up to now. We found eight new RR Lyrae stars that we investigated for the lately localized characteristics of Blazhko RR Lyrae stars: the period doubling and additional modes. We present the preliminary results here.

  2. Hex ball torque test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, B. A.; Foster, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    A series of torque tests were performed on four flight-type hex ball universal joints in order to characterize and determine the actual load-carrying capability of this device. The universal joint is a part of manual actuation rods for scientific instruments within the Hubble Space Telescope. It was found that the hex ball will bind slightly during the initial load application. This binding did not affect the function of the universal joint, and the units would wear-in after a few additional loading cycles. The torsional yield load was approximately 50 ft-lb, and was consistent among the four test specimens. Also, the torque required to cause complete failure exceeded 80 ft-lb. It is concluded that the hex ball universal joint is suitable for its intended applications.

  3. Gravitational torques imply molecular gas inflow towards the nucleus of M 51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querejeta, M.; Meidt, S. E.; Schinnerer, E.; García-Burillo, S.; Dobbs, C. L.; Colombo, D.; Dumas, G.; Hughes, A.; Kramer, C.; Leroy, A. K.; Pety, J.; Schuster, K. F.; Thompson, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    The transport of gas towards the centre of galaxies is critical for black hole feeding and, indirectly, it can control active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We have quantified the molecular gas inflow in the central R< 1 kpc of M 51 to be 1 M⊙/yr, using a new gravitational torque map and the molecular gas traced by the Plateau de Bure Interferometer Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey (PAWS). The nuclear stellar bar is responsible for this gas inflow. We also used torque profiles to estimate the location of dynamical resonances, and the results suggest a corotation for the bar CRbar ~ 20'', and a corotation for the spiral CRsp ~ 100''. We demonstrate how important it is to correct 3.6 μm images for dust emission when gravitational torques are to be computed, and we examine further sources of uncertainty. Our observational measurement of gas inflow can be compared with nuclear molecular outflow rates and provide useful constraints for numerical simulations.

  4. Corotation of an intermittent solar wind source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    The measured electron content of the solar wind in mid-1970 exhibited a region of relatively high electron density that reappeared at intervals of about 27.8 days. It is shown that the repeating event cannot be reconciled with the concept of a long-enduring steady flow, even though the recurrence period is close to the rotation period of the sun. This evidence of transients is inferred from the short duration of each appearance of the interval of higher density; each should last for roughly one corotation interval if it is caused by a steady stream. The radio path was approximately 0.8 AU long, and the corotation interval exceeded 3 days. Other aspects of the content data patterns support the view that such transient events are common in the solar wind. The mid-1970 repeating event is an unusually good example of the intermittent character of flow regions in the solar wind that fluctuate on a time scale of days but endure as identifiable regions for many months. A sputtering corotating source of thin solar plasma streams could explain this series of events; it could also be explained in terms of a stream that is steady in density and speed but undulating north-south so that it passes into and out of the 0.8 AU radio path in a matter of a day or less.

  5. Spectral characterization and differential rotation study of active CoRoT stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, E.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-05-01

    The CoRoT space telescope observed nearly 160 000 light curves. Among the most outstanding is that of the young, active planet host star CoRoT-2A. In addition to deep planetary transits, the light curve of CoRoT-2A shows strong rotational variability and a superimposed beating pattern. To study the stars that produce such an intriguing pattern of photometric variability, we identified a sample of eight stars with rotation periods between 0.8 and 11 days and photometric variability amplitudes of up to 7.5%, showing a similar CoRoT light curve. We also obtained high-resolution follow-up spectroscopy with TNG/SARG and carried out a spectral analysis with SME and MOOG. We find that the color dependence of the light curves is consistent with rotational modulation due to starspots and that latitudinal differential rotation provides a viable explanation for the light curves, although starspot evolution is also expected to play an important role. Our MOOG and SME spectral analyses provide consistent results, showing that the targets are dwarf stars with spectral types between F and mid-K. Detectable Li i absorption in four of the targets confirms a low age of 100-400 Myr also deduced from gyrochronology. Our study indicates that the photometric beating phenomenon is likely attributable to differential rotation in fast-rotating stars with outer convection zones.

  6. Torque converter and assembly utilizing same

    SciTech Connect

    Pitassi, V.E.; Fernandez, A.

    1989-12-26

    This patent describes a torque converter for converting a first torque to a second torque. It comprises: a housing; an input shaft having the first torque; a driving sun gear rotatable about a first axis, the input shaft being coupled to the sun gear; a driven carrier including a shaft portion rotatable about the first axis; a first planetary shaft mounted on the driven carrier coaxillay with a second axis parallel to the first axis; a first planetary gear meshing with and driven by the sun gear and mounted on the first planetary shaft so that the first planetary gear is rotatable about the second axis; a first mass eccentric to the second axis and coupled to the first planetary gear for rotation together about the second axis; first and second unidirectional clutches connected to the shaft portion of the driven carrier and operating in opposite directions; an output torque shaft, one if the first and second unidirectional clutches being coupled to the output torque shaft to transmit the second torque thereto in a pulsating fashion and to permit continuous rotation of the output torque shaft and the other one of the first and second unidirectional clutches being connected to the housing to transmit an algebraic addition of the first and second torques together.

  7. Evidence for Corotating Convection in Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Southwood, D. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2006-05-01

    Saturn's magnetic field exhibits a high degree of azimuthal symmetry, yet the field and plasma signatures of the magnetosphere are modulated at a period close to that of planetary rotation. How, then, is a clear periodicity imposed on the magnetic field and plasma of the planetary magnetosphere? In this talk, Cassini magnetometer data are used to develop a scenario for the dynamics of the Saturn magnetosphere. The proposal is that mass transport, accomplished in the inner magnetosphere by interchange motion, feeds into the outer magnetosphere where ballooning driven by centrifugal stress leads to outward transport, field reconnection and plasma loss in a favored local time sector; flux is transported inward in other regions. The model is closely related to the concept of corotating convection proposed by Dessler, Hill, and co-workers for Jupiter. The proposed mechanism can be consistent with aspects of the empirical camshaft model introduced by Espinosa et al., 2003 to explain Pioneer and Voyager magnetometer data. Anomalous transport here proposed could originate from a localized ionospheric conductivity anomaly. The resulting cyclic stress modulates the current in the current sheet and can account for its north-south excursions. The convection patterns proposed also imply that corotating, field-aligned currents would be a basic feature of the Saturn system.

  8. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  9. High torque miniature rotary actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbandian, Ruben

    2005-07-01

    This paper summarizes the design and the development of a miniature rotary actuator (36 mm diameter by 100 mm length) used in spacecraft mechanisms requiring high torques and/or ultra-fine step resolution. This actuator lends itself to applications requiring high torque but with strict volume limitations which challenge the use of conventional rotary actuators. The design challenge was to develop a lightweight (less than 500 grams), very compact, high bandwidth, low power, thermally stable rotary actuator capable of producing torques in excess of 50 N.m and step resolutions as fine as 0.003 degrees. To achieve a relatively high torsional stiffness in excess of 1000 Nm/radian, the design utilizes a combination of harmonic drive and multistage planetary gearing. The unique design feature of this actuator that contributes to its light weight and extremely precise motion capability is a redundant stepper motor driving the output through a multistage reducing gearbox. The rotary actuator is powered by a high reliability space-rated stepper motor designed and constructed by Moog, Inc. The motor is a three-phase stepper motor of 15 degree step angle, producing twenty-four full steps per revolution. Since micro-stepping is not used in the design, and un-powered holding torque is exhibited at every commanded step, the rotary actuator is capable of reacting to torques as high as 35 Nm by holding position with the power off. The output is driven through a gear transmission having a total train ratio of 5120:1, resulting in a resolution of 0.003 degrees output rotation per motor step. The modular design of the multi-stage output transmission makes possible the addition of designs having different output parameters, such as lower torque and higher output speed capability. Some examples of an actuator family based on this growth capability will be presented in the paper.

  10. Improved variability classification of CoRoT targets with Giraffe spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarro, L. M.; Debosscher, J.; Neiner, C.; Bello-García, A.; González-Marcos, A.; Prendes-Gero, B.; Ordieres, J.; León, G.; Aerts, C.; de Batz, B.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: We present an improved method for automated stellar variability classification, using fundamental parameters derived from high resolution spectra, with the goal to improve the variability classification obtained using information derived from CoRoT light curves only. Although we focus on Giraffe spectra and CoRoT light curves in this work, the methods are much more widely applicable. Methods: In order to improve the variability classification obtained from the photometric time series, only rough estimates of the stellar physical parameters (Teff and log (g)) are needed because most variability types that overlap in the space of time series parameters, are well separated in the space of physical parameters (e.g. γ Dor/SPB or δ Sct/β Cep). In this work, several state-of-the-art machine learning techniques are combined to estimate these fundamental parameters from high resolution Giraffe spectra. Next, these parameters are used in a multi-stage Gaussian-Mixture classifier to perform an improved supervised variability classification of CoRoT light curves. The variability classifier can be used independently of the regression module that estimates the physical parameters, so that non-spectroscopic estimates derived e.g. from photometric colour indices can be used instead. Results: Teff and log (g) are derived from Giraffe spectra, for 6832 CoRoT targets. The use of those parameters in addition to information extracted from the CoRoT light curves, significantly improves the results of our previous automated stellar variability classification. Several new pulsating stars are identified with high confidence levels, including hot pulsators such as SPB and β Cep, and several γ Dor-δ Sct hybrids. From our samples of new γ Dor and δ Sct stars, we find strong indications that the instability domains for both types of pulsators are larger than previously thought. The CoRoT space mission, launched on 27 December 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with

  11. Assuring the Legacy of the CoRoT Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, H. J.; Klagyivik, P.; Alonso, R.; Hoyer, S.

    2015-09-01

    For the long-lasting impact of CoRoT's planet findings, precise knowledge of the times of their transits is of vital importance for any future observing campaigns. Here we give the motivation and first results of a systematic revisit of the transits of most CoRoT planets to refine their ephemeris. As secondary objectives, more precise planet characterisations, from period or transit shape variations on/and from use of a well-defined passband may be obtained.

  12. Corotation Lag in Jupiter's Magnetosphere: Comparison of Observation and Theory.

    PubMed

    Hill, T W

    1980-01-18

    Voyager 1 plasma flow data are compared with a recent theory that predicted measurable departures from rigid corotation in Jupiter's magnetosphere as a consequence of rapid plasma production and weak atmosphere-magnetosphere coupling. The comparison indicates that the theory can account for the observed corotation lag, provided that the plasma mass production rate during the Voyager 1 encounter was rather larger than expected, namely approximately 10(30) atomic mass units per second.

  13. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  14. van der Waals torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Sirvent, Raul; Schatz, George

    2014-03-01

    The theory of generalized van der Waals forces by Lifshtz when applied to optically anisotropic media predicts the existence of a torque. In this work we present a theoretical calculation of the van der Waals torque for two systems. First we consider two isotropic parallel plates where the anisotropy is induced using an external magnetic field. The anisotropy will in turn induce a torque. As a case study we consider III-IV semiconductors such as InSb that can support magneto plasmons. The calculations of the torque are done in the Voigt configuration, that occurs when the magnetic field is parallel to the surface of the slabs. The change in the dielectric function as the magnetic field increases has the effect of decreasing the van der Waals force and increasing the torque. Thus, the external magnetic field is used to tune both the force and torque. The second example we present is the use of the torque in the non retarded regime to align arrays of nano particle slabs. The torque is calculated within Barash and Ginzburg formalism in the nonretarded limit, and is quantified by the introduction of a Hamaker torque constant. Calculations are conducted between anisotropic slabs of materials including BaTiO3 and arrays of Ag nano particles. Depending on the shape and arrangement of the Ag nano particles the effective dielectric function of the array can be tuned as to make it more or less anisotropic. We show how this torque can be used in self assembly of arrays of nano particles. ref. R. Esquivel-Sirvent, G. C. Schatz, Phys. Chem C, 117, 5492 (2013). partial support from DGAPA-UNAM.

  15. Potentiation increases peak twitch torque by enhancing rates of torque development and relaxation.

    PubMed

    Froyd, Christian; Beltrami, Fernando Gabe; Jensen, Jørgen; Noakes, Timothy David

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the extent to which potentiation changes in response to an isometric maximal voluntary contraction. Eleven physically active subjects participated in two separate studies. Single stimulus of electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve was used to measure torque at rest in unpotentiated quadriceps muscles (study 1 and 2), and potentiated quadriceps muscles torque in a 10 min period after a 5 s isometric maximal voluntary contraction of the quadriceps muscles (study 1). Additionally, potentiated quadriceps muscles torque was measured every min after a further 10 maximal voluntary contractions repeated every min (study 2). Electrical stimulation repeated several times without previous maximal voluntary contraction showed similar peak twitch torque. Peak twitch torque 4 s after a 5 s maximal voluntary contraction increased by 45±13% (study 1) and by 56±10% (study 2), the rate of torque development by 53±13% and 82±29%, and the rate of relaxation by 50±17% and 59±22%, respectively, but potentiation was lost already two min after a 5 s maximal voluntary contraction. There was a tendency for peak twitch torque to increase for the first five repeated maximal voluntary contractions, suggesting increased potentiation with additional maximal voluntary contractions. Correlations for peak twitch torque vs the rate of torque development and for the rate of relaxation were r(2)= 0.94 and r(2)=0.97. The correlation between peak twitch torque, the rate of torque development and the rate of relaxation suggests that potentiation is due to instantaneous changes in skeletal muscle contractility and relaxation.

  16. The potential role of NGC 205 in generating Andromeda's vast thin corotating plane of satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Garry W.; Coppin, Paul; Gentile, Gianfranco; Diaferio, Antonaldo

    2016-11-01

    The Andromeda galaxy is observed to have a system of two large dwarf ellipticals and ˜13 smaller satellite galaxies that are currently corotating in a thin plane, in addition to 2 counter-rotating satellite galaxies. We explored the consistency of those observations with a scenario where the majority of the corotating satellite galaxies originated from a subhalo group, where NGC 205 was the host and the satellite galaxies occupied dark matter sub-subhaloes. We ran N-body simulations of a close encounter between NGC 205 and M31. In the simulations, NGC 205 was surrounded by massless particles to statistically sample the distribution of the sub-subhaloes expected in a subhalo that has a mass similar to NGC 205. We made Monte Carlo samplings and found that, using a set of reference parameters, the probability of producing a thinner distribution of sub-subhaloes than the observed NGC 205 + 15 smaller satellites (thus including the two counter-rotators, but excluding M32) increased from <10-8 for the initial distribution to ˜10-2 at pericentre. The probability of the simulated sub-subhaloes occupying the locations of the observed corotating satellites in the line-of-sight velocity versus projected on-sky distance plane is at most 2 × 10-3 for 11 out of 13 satellites. Increasing the mass of M31 and the extent of the initial distribution of sub-subhaloes gives a maximum probability of 4 × 10-3 for all 13 corotating satellites, but the probability of producing the thinness would drop to ˜10-3.

  17. Uncovering the planets and stellar activity of CoRoT-7 using only radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, J. P.; Haywood, R. D.; Brewer, B. J.; Figueira, P.; Oshagh, M.; Santerne, A.; Santos, N. C.

    2016-04-01

    Stellar activity can induce signals in the radial velocities of stars, complicating the detection of orbiting low-mass planets. We present a method to determine the number of planetary signals present in radial-velocity datasets of active stars, using only radial-velocity observations. Instead of considering separate fits with different number of planets, we use a birth-death Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to infer the posterior distribution for the number of planets in a single run. In a natural way, the marginal distributions for the orbital parameters of all planets are also inferred. This method is applied to HARPS data of CoRoT-7. We confidently recover the orbits of both CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c although the data show evidence for the presence of additional signals. All data and software presented in this article are available online at http://https://github.com/j-faria/exoBD-CoRoT7

  18. Torque-wrench extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Torque-wrench extension makes it easy to install and remove fasteners that are beyond reach of typical wrenches or are located in narrow spaces that prevent full travel of wrench handle. At same time, tool reads applied torque accurately. Wrench drive system, for torques up to 125 inch-pounds, uses 2 standard drive-socket extensions in aluminum frame. Extensions are connected to bevel gear that turns another bevel gear. Gears produce 1:1 turn ratio through 90 degree translation of axis of rotation. Output bevel has short extension that is used to attach 1/4-inch drive socket.

  19. Dynamic Torque Calibration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agronin, Michael L.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed dynamic torque calibration unit (DTCU) measures torque in rotary actuator components such as motors, bearings, gear trains, and flex couplings. Unique because designed specifically for testing components under low rates. Measures torque in device under test during controlled steady rotation or oscillation. Rotor oriented vertically, supported by upper angular-contact bearing and lower radial-contact bearing that floats axially to prevent thermal expansion from loading bearings. High-load capacity air bearing available to replace ball bearings when higher load capacity or reduction in rate noise required.

  20. Displaceable Spur Gear Torque Controlled Driver and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a laterally displaceable gear support member to carry an output spur gear. A biasing assembly biases the output spur gear into engagement with a pinion to which is applied an input torque greater than a desired output torque limit for a threaded fastener such as a nut or screw. A coiled output linkage connects the output spur gear with a fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. A gauged selector mechanism is provided to laterally displace multiple driven members for fasteners arranged in differing configurations. The torque limit is selectably adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  1. Displaceable spur gear torque controlled driver and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a laterally displaceable gear support member to carry an output spur gear. A biasing assembly biases the output spur gear into engagement with a pinion to which is applied an input torque greater than a desired output torque limit for a threaded fastener such as a nut or screw. A coiled output linkage connects the output spur gear with a fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. A gauged selector mechanism is provided to laterally displace multiple driver members for fasteners arranged in differing configurations. The torque limit is selectably adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  2. Displaceable spur gear torque controlled driver and method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a laterally displaceable gear support member to carry an output spur gear. A biasing assembly biases the output spur gear into engagement with a pinion to which is applied an input torque greater than a desired output torque limit for a threaded fastener such as a nut or screw. A coiled output linkage connects the output spur gear with a fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. A gauged selector mechanism is provided to laterally displace multiple driver members for fasteners arranged in differing configurations. The torque limit is selectably adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  3. Simulating binary inspirals in a corotating spherical coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Travis Marshall

    The gravitational waves produced by the inspiral and merger of two black holes are expected to be the first detected by the newly constructed gravitational wave observatories. Accurate theoretical models that describe the generation and shape of these gravitational waves need to be constructed. These theoretical waveforms will aid in the detection of astrophysical wave sources, and will allow us to test general relativity in the strong field regime. Numerical relativity is the leading candidate for constructing accurate waveforms, and in this thesis we develop methods to help advance the field. In particular we use a corotating spherical coordinate system to simulate the evolution of a compact binary system as it produces gravitational radiation. We combine this method with both the Weak Radiation Reaction and Hydro-without- Hydro approximations to produce stable dynamical evolutions. We also utilize Nordström's conformally flat theory of gravitation as a relativistic laboratory during the development process. Additionally we perform semi-analytic calculations to determine the approximate way in which binaries decay in Nordström's theory. We find an excellent agreement between our semi-analytic calculations and the orbital evolutions produced by the code, and thus conclude that these methods form a solid basis for simulating binary inspirals and the gravitational waves they produce in general relativity.

  4. Propeller torque load and propeller shaft torque response correlation during ice-propeller interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polić, Dražen; Ehlers, Sören; Æsøy, Vilmar

    2017-01-01

    Ships use propulsion machinery systems to create directional thrust. Sailing in ice-covered waters involves the breaking of ice pieces and their submergence as the ship hull advances. Sometimes, submerged ice pieces interact with the propeller and cause irregular fluctuations of the torque load. As a result, the propeller and engine dynamics become imbalanced, and energy propagates through the propulsion machinery system until equilibrium is reached. In such imbalanced situations, the measured propeller shaft torque response is not equal to the propeller torque. Therefore, in this work, the overall system response is simulated under the ice-related torque load using the Bond graph model. The energy difference between the propeller and propeller shaft is estimated and related to their corresponding mechanical energy. Additionally, the mechanical energy is distributed among modes. Based on the distribution, kinetic and potential energy are important for the correlation between propeller torque and propeller shaft response.

  5. Propeller torque load and propeller shaft torque response correlation during ice-propeller interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polić, Dražen; Ehlers, Sören; Æsøy, Vilmar

    2017-03-01

    Ships use propulsion machinery systems to create directional thrust. Sailing in ice-covered waters involves the breaking of ice pieces and their submergence as the ship hull advances. Sometimes, submerged ice pieces interact with the propeller and cause irregular fluctuations of the torque load. As a result, the propeller and engine dynamics become imbalanced, and energy propagates through the propulsion machinery system until equilibrium is reached. In such imbalanced situations, the measured propeller shaft torque response is not equal to the propeller torque. Therefore, in this work, the overall system response is simulated under the ice-related torque load using the Bond graph model. The energy difference between the propeller and propeller shaft is estimated and related to their corresponding mechanical energy. Additionally, the mechanical energy is distributed among modes. Based on the distribution, kinetic and potential energy are important for the correlation between propeller torque and propeller shaft response.

  6. CoRoT: Harvest of the exoplanet program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutou, Claire; Deleuil, Magali; Guillot, Tristan; Baglin, Annie; Bordé, Pascal; Bouchy, Francois; Cabrera, Juan; Csizmadia, Szilárd; Deeg, Hans J.

    2013-11-01

    One of the objectives of the CoRoT mission is the search for transiting extrasolar planets using high-precision photometry, and the accurate characterization of their fundamental parameters. The CoRoT satellite consecutively observes crowded stellar fields since February 2007, in high-cadence precise photometry; periodic eclipses are detected and analyzed in the stellar light curves. Then complementary observations using ground-based facilities allows establishing the nature of the transiting body and its mass. CoRoT has acquired more than 163,000 light curves and detected about 500 planet candidates. A fraction of them (5%) are confirmed planets whose masses are independently measured. Main highlights of the CoRoT discoveries are: (i) the variety of internal structures in close-in giant planets, (ii) the characterization of the first known transiting rocky planet, CoRoT-7b, and (iii) multiple constraints on the formation, evolution, role of tides in planetary systems.

  7. Fabricated torque shaft

    SciTech Connect

    Mashey, Thomas Charles

    2002-01-01

    A fabricated torque shaft is provided that features a bolt-together design to allow vane schedule revisions with minimal hardware cost. The bolt-together design further facilitates on-site vane schedule revisions with parts that are comparatively small. The fabricated torque shaft also accommodates stage schedules that are different one from another in non-linear inter-relationships as well as non-linear schedules for a particular stage of vanes.

  8. Transmission of torque at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ian; Oğuz, Erdal C.; Speck, Thomas; Bartlett, Paul; Löwen, Hartmut; Royall, C. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In macroscopic mechanical devices, torque is transmitted through gearwheels and clutches. In the construction of devices at the nanoscale, torque and its transmission through soft materials will be a key component. However, this regime is dominated by thermal fluctuations leading to dissipation. Here we demonstrate the principle of torque transmission for a disc-like colloidal assembly exhibiting clutch-like behaviour, driven by 27 particles in optical traps. These are translated on a circular path to form a rotating boundary that transmits torque to additional particles confined to the interior. We investigate this transmission and find that it is determined by solid-like or fluid-like behaviour of the device and a stick-slip mechanism reminiscent of macroscopic gearwheels slipping. The transmission behaviour is predominantly governed by the rotation rate of the boundary and the density of the confined system. We determine the efficiency of our device and thus optimize conditions to maximize power output.

  9. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXI. CoRoT-19b: a low density planet orbiting an old inactive F9V-star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, E. W.; Díaz, R. F.; Gazzano, J.-C.; Mazeh, T.; Rouan, D.; Gibson, N.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Aigrain, S.; Alonso, R.; Almenara, J. M.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barge, P.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Bruntt, H.; Cabrera, J.; Carone, L.; Carpano, S.; Cavarroc, C.; Deeg, H. J.; Deleuil, M.; Dreizler, S.; Dvorak, R.; Erikson, A.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Fridlund, M.; Gandolfi, D.; Gillon, M.; Guillot, T.; Hatzes, A.; Havel, M.; Hébrard, G.; Jehin, E.; Jorda, L.; Lammer, H.; Léger, A.; Moutou, C.; Nortmann, L.; Ollivier, M.; Ofir, A.; Pasternacki, Th.; Pätzold, M.; Parviainen, H.; Queloz, D.; Rauer, H.; Samuel, B.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.; Tal-Or, L.; Tingley, B.; Weingrill, J.; Wuchterl, G.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. These measurements indicate that planets of similar mass can have very different radii. For low-density planets, it is generally assumed that they are inflated owing to their proximity to the host-star. To determine the causes of this inflation, it is necessary to obtain a statistically significant sample of planets with precisely measured masses and radii. Aims: The CoRoT space mission allows us to achieve a very high photometric accuracy. By combining CoRoT data with high-precision radial velocity measurements, we derive precise planetary radii and masses. We report the discovery of CoRoT-19b, a gas-giant planet transiting an old, inactive F9V-type star with a period of four days. Methods: After excluding alternative physical configurations mimicking a planetary transit signal, we determine the radius and mass of the planet by combining CoRoT photometry with high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the echelle spectrographs SOPHIE, HARPS, FIES, and SANDIFORD. To improve the precision of its ephemeris and the epoch, we observed additional transits with the TRAPPIST and Euler telescopes. Using HARPS spectra obtained during the transit, we then determine the projected angle between the spin of the star and the orbit of the planet. Results: We find that the host star of CoRoT-19b is an inactive F9V-type star close to the end of its main-sequence life. The host star has a mass M∗ = 1.21 ± 0.05 M⊙ and radius R∗ = 1.65 ± 0.04 R⊙. The planet has a mass of MP = 1.11 ± 0.06 MJup and radius of RP = 1.29 ± 0.03 RJup. The resulting bulk density is only ρ = 0.71 ± 0.06 g cm-3, which is much lower than that for Jupiter. Conclusions: The exoplanet CoRoT-19b is an example of a giant planet of almost the same mass as Jupiter but a ≈30% larger radius. The CoRoT space mission, launched on

  10. Laser-induced torques in metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freimuth, Frank; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We study laser-induced torques in bcc Fe, hcp Co, and L 10 FePt based on first-principles electronic structure calculations and the Keldysh nonequilibrium formalism. We find that the torques have two contributions, one from the inverse Faraday effect (IFE) and one from the optical spin-transfer torque (OSTT). Depending on the ferromagnet at hand and on the quasiparticle broadening the two contributions may be of similar magnitude, or one contribution may dominate over the other. Additionally, we determine the nonequilibrium spin polarization in order to investigate its relation to the torque. We find the torques and the perpendicular component of the nonequilibrium spin polarization to be odd in the helicity of the laser light, while the spin polarization that is induced parallel to the magnetization is helicity independent. The parallel component of the nonequilibrium spin polarization is orders of magnitude larger than the perpendicular component. In the case of hcp Co we find good agreement between the calculated laser-induced torque and a recent experiment.

  11. Knudsen torque on heated micro beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qi; Liang, Tengfei; Ye, Wenjing

    2014-12-09

    Thermally induced mechanical loading has been shown to have significant effects on micro/nano objects immersed in a gas with a non-uniform temperature field. While the majority of existing studies and related applications focus on forces, we investigate the torque, and thus the rotational motion, produced by such a mechanism. Using the asymptotic analysis in the near continuum regime, the Knudsen torque acting on an asymmetrically located uniformly heated microbeam in a cold enclosure is investigated. The existence of a non-zero net torque is demonstrated. In addition, it has been found that by manipulating the system configuration, the rotational direction of the torque can be changed. Two types of rotational motion of the microbeam have been identified: the pendulum motion of a rectangular beam, and the unidirectional rotation of a cylindrical beam. A rotational frequency of 4 rpm can be achieved for the cylindrical beam with a diameter of 3μm at Kn = 0.005. Illustrated by the simulations using the direct simulation of Monte Carlo, the Knudsen torque can be much increased in the transition regime, demonstrating the potential of Knudsen torque serving as a rotation engine for micro/nano objects.

  12. Torque multiplier subsea tool

    SciTech Connect

    Leicht, F. M.; Baugh, B. F.; Palany, H. C.

    1985-10-22

    A torque multiplier subsea tool for setting a seal between a casing hanger and a subsea wellhead includes a mandrel having a sun gear with axial elongate teeth. An outer barrel is disposed around the mandrel forming an annulus therebetween. A planetary gear assembly is disposed in the annulus between the barrel and the sun gear to transmit to the barrel a torque which is higher in magnitude than that applied to the mandrel. A connector body disposed around the mandrel, below the planetary gear assembly, includes radially movable dogs for engaging the casing hanger. The barrel engages the sealing assembly and transmits the increased torque thereto to advance the sealing assembly downwards and to set the seal. The mandrel advances downwards with the sealing assembly and releases the dogs from the casing hanger. An emergency release mechanism is provided to advance the mandrel downwards to release the dogs in the event such downward movement is prevented during normal seal setting operation.

  13. Negative Optical Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Ng, Jack; Ding, Kun; Fung, Kin Hung; Lin, Zhifang; Chan, C. T.

    2014-09-01

    Light carries angular momentum, and as such it can exert torques on material objects. Applications of these opto-mechanical effects were limited initially due to their smallness in magnitude, but later becomes powerful and versatile after the invention of laser. Novel and practical approaches for harvesting light for particle rotation have since been demonstrated, where the structure is always subjected to a positive optical torque along a certain axis if the incident angular momentum has a positive projection on the same axis. We report here an interesting phenomenon of ``negative optical torque'', meaning that incoming photons carrying angular momentum rotate an object in the opposite sense. Surprisingly this can be realized quite straightforwardly in simple planar structures. Field retardation is a necessary condition and discrete rotational symmetry of material object plays an important role. The optimal conditions are explored and explained.

  14. Negative optical torque.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Ng, Jack; Ding, Kun; Fung, Kin Hung; Lin, Zhifang; Chan, C T

    2014-09-17

    Light carries angular momentum, and as such it can exert torques on material objects. Applications of these opto-mechanical effects were limited initially due to their smallness in magnitude, but later becomes powerful and versatile after the invention of laser. Novel and practical approaches for harvesting light for particle rotation have since been demonstrated, where the structure is always subjected to a positive optical torque along a certain axis if the incident angular momentum has a positive projection on the same axis. We report here an interesting phenomenon of "negative optical torque", meaning that incoming photons carrying angular momentum rotate an object in the opposite sense. Surprisingly this can be realized quite straightforwardly in simple planar structures. Field retardation is a necessary condition and discrete rotational symmetry of material object plays an important role. The optimal conditions are explored and explained.

  15. Ironless armature torque motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Four iron-less armature torque motors, four Hall device position sensor assemblies, and two test fixtures were fabricated. The design approach utilized samarium cobalt permanent magnets, a large airgap, and a three-phase winding in a stationary ironless armature. Hall devices were employed to sense rotor position. An ironless armature torque motor having an outer diameter of 4.25 inches was developed to produce a torque constant of 65 ounce-inches per ampere with a resistance of 20.5 ohms. The total weight, including structural elements, was 1.58 pounds. Test results indicated that all specifications were met except for generated voltage waveform. It is recommended that investigations be made concerning the generated voltage waveform to determine if it may be improved.

  16. Asteroseismology of OB stars with CoRoT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degroote, P.; Aerts, C.; Samadi, R.; Miglio, A.; Briquet, M.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Baudin, F.; Catala, C.; Michel, E.

    2010-12-01

    The CoRoT satellite is revolutionizing the photometric study of massive O-type and B-type stars. During its long runs, CoRoT observed the entire main sequence B star domain, from typical hot β Cep stars, via cooler hybrid p- and g-mode pulsators to the SPB stars near the edge of the instability strip. CoRoT lowers the sensitivity barrier from the typical mmag-precision reached from the ground, to the μmag-level reached from space. Within the wealth of detected and identified pulsation modes, relations have been found in the form of multiplets, combination of frequencies, and frequency- and period spacings. This wealth of observational evidence is finally providing strong constraints to test current models of the internal structure and pulsations of hot stars. Aside from the expected opacity driven modes with infinite lifetime, other unexpected types of variability are detected in massive stars, such as modes of stochastic nature. The simultaneous observation of all these light curve characteristics implies a challenge for both observational asteroseismology and stellar modelling. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with participation of ESA's RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain.

  17. Decrease of the Atmospheric Co-Rotation with Height

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Membrado, M.; Pacheco, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    Considering our atmosphere as a steady viscous gaseous envelope that co-rotates with the Earth, we obtain a solution for the form in which this induced rotational effect decreases as a function of the distances to the centre of the Earth and to the rotation axis. (Contains 1 figure.)

  18. Methodology for Determining Limit Torques for Threaded Fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hissam, Andy

    2011-01-01

    In aerospace design, where minimizing weight is always a priority, achieving the full capacity from fasteners is essential. To do so, the initial bolt preload must be maximized. The benefits of high preload are well documented and include improved fatigue resistance, a stiffer joint, and resistance to loosening. But many factors like elastic interactions and embedment tend to lower the initial preload placed on the bolt. These factors provide additional motivation to maximize the initial preload. But, to maximize bolt preload, you must determine what torque to apply. Determining this torque is greatly complicated by the large preload scatter generally seen with torque control. This paper presents a detailed methodology for generating limit torques for threaded fasteners. This methodology accounts for the large scatter in preload found with torque control, and therefore, addresses the statistical nature of the problem. It also addresses prevailing torque, a feature common in aerospace fasteners. Although prevailing torque provides a desired locking feature, it can also increase preload scatter. In addition, it can limit the amount of preload that can be generated due to the torsion it creates in the bolt. This paper discusses the complications of prevailing torque and how best to handle it. A wide range of torque-tension bolt testing was conducted in support of this research. The results from this research will benefit the design engineer as well as analyst involved in the design of bolted joints, leading to better, more optimized structural designs.

  19. Reassessing the radial-velocity evidence for planets around CoRoT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pont, Frédéric; Aigrain, Suzanne; Zucker, Shay

    2011-03-01

    CoRoT-7 is an 11 th magnitude K-star whose light curve shows transits with a depth of 0.3 mmag and a period of 0.854 d, superimposed on variability at the 1 per cent level, due to the modulation of evolving active regions with the star's 23-d rotation period. In this paper, we revisit the published HARPS radial-velocity (RV) measurements of the object, which were previously used to estimate the companion mass, but have been the subject of ongoing debate. We build a realistic model of the star's activity during the HARPS observations, by fitting simultaneously the linewidth (as measured by the width of the cross-correlation function) and the line bisector, and use it to evaluate the contribution of activity to the RV variations. The data show clear evidence of errors above the level of the formal uncertainties, which are accounted for neither by activity nor by any plausible planet model and which increase rapidly with a decreasing signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the spectra. We cite evidence of similar systematics in mid-S/N spectra of other targets obtained with HARPS and other high-precision RV spectrographs, and discuss possible sources. Allowing for these, we re-evaluate the semi-amplitude of the CoRoT-7b signal, finding Kb= 1.6 ± 1.3 m s-1, a tentative detection with a much reduced significance (1.2σ) compared to previous estimates. We also argue that the combined presence of activity and additional errors precludes a meaningful search for additional low-mass companions, despite previous claims to the contrary. Taken at face value, our analysis points to a lower density for CoRoT-7b, the 1σ mass range spanning 1-4 M ⊕ and allowing for a wide range of bulk compositions. In particular, an ice-rich composition is compatible with the RV constraints. More generally, this study highlights the importance of a realistic treatment of both activity and uncertainties, particularly in the medium S/N regime, which applies to most small planet candidates from CoRoT and

  20. Torque, Cognitive Ability, and Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1985-01-01

    West African Hausan Children (N=110) aged 5-6 were administered a torque test and relationshps between the torque task and visual spatial tasks were analyzed. Findings supported the assumption that educational experience related to circling accounts for decrease in torque, or that the educational experiences have potential influence on cortical…

  1. Floating-Pinion Torque Splitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melles, Harold W.

    1994-01-01

    Designed-in looseness at right locations helps to distribute torques more evenly. Gear-drive mechanism helps to apportion torques nearly equally along two parallel drive paths from input bevel gear to output bull gear. Mechanism of this type used as part of redundant drive train between engine and rotor of helicopter. Weighs less than comparably rated prior torque-splitting mechanisms.

  2. Torque-Splitting Gear Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kish, J.

    1991-01-01

    Geared drive train transmits torque from input shaft in equal parts along two paths in parallel, then combines torques in single output shaft. Scheme reduces load on teeth of meshing gears while furnishing redundancy to protect against failures. Such splitting and recombination of torques common in design of turbine engines.

  3. Mechanistic modeling of modular co-rotating twin-screw extruders.

    PubMed

    Eitzlmayr, Andreas; Koscher, Gerold; Reynolds, Gavin; Huang, Zhenyu; Booth, Jonathan; Shering, Philip; Khinast, Johannes

    2014-10-20

    In this study, we present a one-dimensional (1D) model of the metering zone of a modular, co-rotating twin-screw extruder for pharmaceutical hot melt extrusion (HME). The model accounts for filling ratio, pressure, melt temperature in screw channels and gaps, driving power, torque and the residence time distribution (RTD). It requires two empirical parameters for each screw element to be determined experimentally or numerically using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The required Nusselt correlation for the heat transfer to the barrel was determined from experimental data. We present results for a fluid with a constant viscosity in comparison to literature data obtained from CFD simulations. Moreover, we show how to incorporate the rheology of a typical, non-Newtonian polymer melt, and present results in comparison to measurements. For both cases, we achieved excellent agreement. Furthermore, we present results for the RTD, based on experimental data from the literature, and found good agreement with simulations, in which the entire HME process was approximated with the metering model, assuming a constant viscosity for the polymer melt.

  4. Torque equilibrium attitudes for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Roger C.

    1993-01-01

    -up in the controllers would be due to electro-mechanical losses within the device. However, the atmospheric torques are proportional to the density of the atmosphere and the density varies with the orbital position, time of day, time of year, and the solar cycle. In addition, there are unmodeled disturbances and uncertainties in the mass and inertias. Therefore, there is no constant attitude that will completely balance the environmental torques and the dynamic TEA cannot be solved in closed form. The objective of this research was to determine a method to calculate a dynamic TEA such that the rate of momentum build-up in the controllers would be minimized and to implement this method in the MATRIX(x) simulation software by Integrated Systems, Inc.

  5. Torque equilibrium attitudes for the Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Roger C.

    1993-11-01

    -up in the controllers would be due to electro-mechanical losses within the device. However, the atmospheric torques are proportional to the density of the atmosphere and the density varies with the orbital position, time of day, time of year, and the solar cycle. In addition, there are unmodeled disturbances and uncertainties in the mass and inertias. Therefore, there is no constant attitude that will completely balance the environmental torques and the dynamic TEA cannot be solved in closed form. The objective of this research was to determine a method to calculate a dynamic TEA such that the rate of momentum build-up in the controllers would be minimized and to implement this method in the MATRIX(x) simulation software by Integrated Systems, Inc.

  6. Feasibility study for convertible engine torque converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility study has shown that a dump/fill type torque converter has excellent potential for the convertible fan/shaft engine. The torque converter space requirement permits internal housing within the normal flow path of a turbofan engine at acceptable engine weight. The unit permits operating the engine in the turboshaft mode by decoupling the fan. To convert to turbofan mode, the torque converter overdrive capability bring the fan speed up to the power turbine speed to permit engagement of a mechanical lockup device when the shaft speed are synchronized. The conversion to turbofan mode can be made without drop of power turbine speed in less than 10 sec. Total thrust delivered to the aircraft by the proprotor, fan, and engine during tansient can be controlled to prevent loss of air speed or altitude. Heat rejection to the oil is low, and additional oil cooling capacity is not required. The turbofan engine aerodynamic design is basically uncompromised by convertibility and allows proper fan design for quiet and efficient cruise operation. Although the results of the feasibility study are exceedingly encouraging, it must be noted that they are based on extrapolation of limited existing data on torque converters. A component test program with three trial torque converter designs and concurrent computer modeling for fluid flow, stress, and dynamics, updated with test results from each unit, is recommended.

  7. Effect of antagonist muscle fatigue on knee extension torque.

    PubMed

    Beltman, J G M; Sargeant, A J; Ball, D; Maganaris, C N; de Haan, A

    2003-09-01

    The effect of hamstring fatigue on knee extension torque was examined at different knee angles for seven male subjects. Before and after a dynamic flexion fatigue protocol (180 degrees s(-1), until dynamic torque had declined by 50%), maximal voluntary contraction extension torque was measured at four knee flexion angles (90 degrees, 70 degrees, 50 degrees and 30 degrees ). Maximal torque generating capacity and voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle were determined using electrical stimulation. Average rectified EMG of the biceps femoris was determined. Mean dynamic flexion torque declined by 48+/-11%. Extensor maximal voluntary contraction torque, maximal torque generating capacity, voluntary activation and average rectified EMG at the four knee angles were unaffected by the hamstring fatigue protocol. Only at 50 degrees knee angle was voluntary activation significantly lower (15.7%) after fatigue ( P<0.05). In addition, average rectified EMG before fatigue was not significantly influenced by knee angle. It was concluded that a fatigued hamstring muscle did not increase the maximal voluntary contraction extension torque and knee angle did not change coactivation. Three possible mechanisms may explain the results: a potential difference in recruited fibre populations in antagonist activity compared with the fibres which were fatigued in the protocol, a smaller loss in isometric torque generating capacity of the hamstring muscle than was expected from the dynamic measurements and/or a reduction in voluntary activation.

  8. Noncontact Measurements Of Torques In Shafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzbart, Aaron

    1991-01-01

    Additional information extracted from eddy-current proximeter. Positioned over rotating shaft, measures both displacement of and torsion in shaft. Torque applied to shaft calculable from output of proximeter. Possible to extract torsion information from existing tape-recorded proximeter data.

  9. Accuracy of dental torque wrenches.

    PubMed

    Wood, James S; Marlow, Nicole M; Cayouette, Monica J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the actual torque of 2 manual wrench systems to their stated (target) torque. New spring- (Nobel Biocare USA, LLC) and friction-style (Zimmer Dental, Inc.) manual dental torque wrenches, as well as spring torque wrenches that had undergone sterilization and clinical use, were tested. A calibrated torque gauge was used to compare actual torque to target torque values of 15 and 35 N/cm. Data were statistically analyzed via mixed-effects regression model with Bonferroni correction. At a target torque of 15 N/cm, the mean torque of new spring wrenches (13.97 N/cm; SE, 0.07 N/cm) was significantly different from that of used spring wrenches (14.94 N/cm; SE, 0.06 N/cm; P < 0.0001). However, the mean torques of new spring and new friction wrenches (14.10 N/cm; SE, 0.07 N/cm; P = 0.21) were not significantly different. For torque measurements calibrated at 35 N/cm, the mean torque of new spring wrenches (35.29 N/cm; SE, 0.10 N/cm) was significantly different (P < 0.0001) from the means of new friction wrenches (36.20 N/cm; SE, 0.08 N/cm) and used spring wrenches (36.45 N/cm; SE, 0.08 N/cm). Discrepancies in torque could impact the clinical success of screw-retained dental implants. It is recommended that torque wrenches be checked regularly to ensure that they are performing to target values.

  10. THE MASS OF CoRoT-7b

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzes, Artie P.; Wuchterl, Guenther; Fridlund, Malcolm; Gandolfi, Davide; Nachmani, Gil; Mazeh, Tsevi; Valencia, Diana; Hebrard, Guillaume; Borde, Pascal; Carone, Ludmila; Paetzold, Martin; Udry, Stephane; Bouchy, Francois; Deleuil, Magali; Moutou, Claire; Barge, Pierre; Deeg, Hans; Tingley, Brandon; Dvorak, Rudolf; Ferraz-Mello, Sylvio E-mail: malcolm.fridlund@esa.int; and others

    2011-12-10

    The mass of CoRoT-7b, the first transiting super-Earth exoplanet, is still a subject of debate. A wide range of masses have been reported in the literature ranging from as high as 8 M{sub Circled-Plus} to as low as 2.3 M{sub Circled-Plus }. This range in mass is largely due to the activity level of the star that contributes a significant amount of radial velocity (RV) 'jitter' and how the various methods correct this jitter. Although most mass determinations give a density consistent with a rocky planet, the lower value permits a bulk composition that can be up to 50% water. We present an analysis of the CoRoT-7b RV measurements that uses very few and simple assumptions in treating the activity signal. By analyzing those RV data for which multiple measurements were made in a given night, we remove the activity related RV contribution without any a priori model. We argue that the contribution of activity to the final RV curve is negligible and that the K-amplitude due to the planet is well constrained. This yields a mass of 7.42 {+-} 1.21 M{sub Circled-Plus} and a mean density of {rho} = 10.4 {+-} 1.8 gm cm{sup -3}. CoRoT-7b is similar in mass and radius to the second rocky planet to be discovered, Kepler-10b, and within the errors they have identical bulk densities-they are virtual twins. These bulk densities lie close to the density-radius relationship for terrestrial planets similar to what is seen for Mercury. CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b may have an internal structure more like Mercury than the Earth.

  11. Structure and Dynamics of the Sub-corotating Region of Saturn's Magnetosphere: Cassini Magnetic Field Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of the azimuthal magnetic field component, BΦ, enable the study of the sub-corotating magnetosphere, the associated global current system, the ionospheric Pedersen current, IP, and a comparison with the Cowley-Vasyliunas model. The study is strongly dependent on Cassini's highly elliptical orbits that restrict useful observations to specific orbits and parts of orbits to avoid weak azimuthal fields associated with the magnetopause or other magnetospheric currents. An example is the selection of thirteen identical orbits near 22 +/- 2 hours Local Time and restriction of the data to 4 to 10 Saturn radii. Inferred IP profiles between 10° and 25° ionospheric co-latitude, θi , when averaged, are similar in shape to model predictions with a peak value of 5 million amperes. However, the individual profiles vary significantly, the result of dynamics associated with large-scale motions of the magnetospheric field. The Cowley-Vasyliunas model also relates IP(θi) to magnetospheric rotation rates, ΩS, equivalent to the SKR period, and the sub-corotation rate, ω, and provides a means of estimating ω / ΩS in the night-side magnetosphere as compared to the dayside rotation rates obtained from azimuthal plasma velocity measurements, VΦ. Other carefully- selected orbits extend these results to different ranges in θi and Local Times and provide further values of important magnetospheric parameters and allow additional testing of the model.

  12. Corotating pressure waves without streams in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    Voyager 1 and 2 magnetic field and plasma data are presented which demonstrate the existence of large scale, corotating, non-linear pressure waves between 2 AU and 4 AU that are not accompanied by fast streams. The pressure waves are presumed to be generated by corotating streams near the Sun. For two of the three pressure waves that are discussed, the absence of a stream is probably a real, physical effect, viz., a consequence of deceleration of the stream by the associated compression wave. For the third pressure wave, the apparent absence of a stream may be a geometrical effect; it is likely that the stream was at latitudes just above those of the spacecraft, while the associated shocks and compression wave extended over a broader range of latitudes so that they could be observed by the spacecraft. It is suggested that the development of large-scale non-linear pressure waves at the expense of the kinetic energy of streams produces a qualitative change in the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. Within a few AU the quasi-stationary solar wind structure is determined by corotating streams whose structure is determined by the boundary conditions near the Sun.

  13. Pulsations in the late-type Be star HD 50 209 detected by CoRoT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diago, P. D.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Auvergne, M.; Fabregat, J.; Hubert, A.-M.; Floquet, M.; Frémat, Y.; Garrido, R.; Andrade, L.; de Batz, B.; Emilio, M.; Espinosa Lara, F.; Huat, A.-L.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Leroy, B.; Martayan, C.; Neiner, C.; Semaan, T.; Suso, J.; Catala, C.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Michel, E.; Samadi, R.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The presence of pulsations in late-type Be stars is still a matter of controversy. It constitutes an important issue to establish the relationship between non-radial pulsations and the mass-loss mechanism in Be stars. Aims: To contribute to this discussion, we analyse the photometric time series of the B8IVe star HD 50 209 observed by the CoRoT mission in the seismology field. Methods: We use standard Fourier techniques and linear and non-linear least squares fitting methods to analyse the CoRoT light curve. In addition, we applied detailed modelling of high-resolution spectra to obtain the fundamental physical parameters of the star. Results: We have found four frequencies which correspond to gravity modes with azimuthal order m=0,-1,-2,-3 with the same pulsational frequency in the co-rotating frame. We also found a rotational period with a frequency of 0.679 cd-1 (7.754 μHz). Conclusions: HD 50 209 is a pulsating Be star as expected from its position in the HR diagram, close to the SPB instability strip. Based on observations made with the CoRoT satellite, with FEROS at the 2.2 m telescope of the La Silla Observatory under the ESO Large Programme LP178.D-0361 and with Narval at the Télescope Bernard Lyot of the Pic du Midi Observatory. Current address: Valencian International University (VIU), José Pradas Gallen s/n, 12006 Castellón, Spain. Current address: Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot; CEA, IRFU, SAp, centre de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France.

  14. Prevailing Torque Locking Feature in Threaded Fasteners Using Anaerobic Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Alan; Hess, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results from tests to assess the use of anaerobic adhesive for providing a prevailing torque locking feature in threaded fasteners. Test procedures are developed and tests are performed on three fastener materials, four anaerobic adhesives, and both unseated assembly conditions. Five to ten samples are tested for each combination. Tests for initial use, reuse without additional adhesive, and reuse with additional adhesive are performed for all samples. A 48-hour cure time was used for all initial use and reuse tests. Test data are presented as removal torque versus removal angle with the specification required prevailing torque range added for performance assessment. Percent specification pass rates for the all combinations of fastener material, adhesive, and assembly condition are tabulated and reveal use of anaerobic adhesive as a prevailing torque locking feature is viable. Although not every possible fastener material and anaerobic adhesive combination provides prevailing torque values within specification, any combination can be assessed using the test procedures presented. Reuse without additional anaerobic adhesive generally provides some prevailing torque, and in some cases within specification. Reuse with additional adhesive often provides comparable removal torque data as in initial use.

  15. Perspective: Interface generation of spin-orbit torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklenar, Joseph; Zhang, Wei; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Jiang, Wanjun; Saglam, Hilal; Pearson, John E.; Ketterson, John B.; Hoffmann, Axel

    2016-11-01

    Most of the modern spintronics developments rely on the manipulation of magnetization states via electric currents, which started with the discovery of spin transfer torque effects 20 years ago. By now, it has been realized that spin-orbit coupling provides a particularly efficient pathway for generating spin torques from charge currents. At the same time, spin-orbit effects can be enhanced at interfaces, which opens up novel device concepts. Here, we discuss two examples of such interfacial spin-orbit torques, namely, systems with inherently two-dimensional materials and metallic bilayers with strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling at their interfaces. We show how ferromagnetic resonance excited by spin-orbit torques can provide information about the underlying mechanisms. In addition, this article provides a brief overview of recent developments with respect to interfacial spin-orbit torques and an outlook of still open questions.

  16. Single-interface Casimir torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Tiago A.; Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2016-10-01

    A different type of Casimir-type interaction is theoretically predicted: a single-interface torque at a junction of an anisotropic material and a vacuum or another material system. The torque acts to reorient the polarizable microscopic units of the involved materials near the interface, and thus to change the internal structure of the materials. The single-interface torque depends on the zero-point energy of the interface localized and extended modes. Our theory demonstrates that the single-interface torque is essential to understand the Casimir physics of material systems with anisotropic elements and may influence the orientation of the director of nematic liquid crystals.

  17. Torque feedback transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, B.L.

    1987-01-20

    This patent describes an infinitely variable transmission of inline configuration for interconnecting a primer mover with a load for clutch free operation in a range of speed including hydraulic neutral comprising: a. planetary gear train means having a ring gear, planetary gears supported by a planetary gear carrier, and a sun gear, the sun gear being connected mechanically to the load, output shaft means for joining the sun gear to the load; b. variable torque feedback means comprising (i) a variable displacement hydraulic motor whose rotor shaft is in line with the output shaft means and drivingly connected to the prime mover and the planetary gear carrier during the full range of operation of the transmission, and (ii) a fixed displacement hydraulic pump connected hydraulically to the motor, the rotor shaft of the pump being connected mechanically to the ring gear and being axially displaced from the output shaft means; c. means for adjusting the displacement volume within the hydraulic motor for controlling the torque feedback in the transmission to provide infinitely variable coupling between the prime mover and the load over the full range of the transmission including hydraulic neutral; d. a speed reducer between the primer mover and the motor rotor shaft and a speed multiplier between the sun gear and the load; and e. mechanical transmission assembly means between the speed multiplier and the load in line with the motor rotor shaft and the output shaft means for providing selection of drive, reverse, park, and neutral.

  18. Planetary Torque in 3D Isentropic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Masset, Frédéric; Lega, Elena; Velasco, David

    2017-03-01

    Planetary migration is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) problem, because Earth-size planetary cores are deeply embedded in protoplanetary disks. Simulations of these 3D disks remain challenging due to the steep resolution requirements. Using two different hydrodynamics codes, FARGO3D and PEnGUIn, we simulate disk–planet interaction for a one to five Earth-mass planet embedded in an isentropic disk. We measure the torque on the planet and ensure that the measurements are converged both in resolution and between the two codes. We find that the torque is independent of the smoothing length of the planet’s potential (r s), and that it has a weak dependence on the adiabatic index of the gaseous disk (γ). The torque values correspond to an inward migration rate qualitatively similar to previous linear calculations. We perform additional simulations with explicit radiative transfer using FARGOCA, and again find agreement between 3D simulations and existing torque formulae. We also present the flow pattern around the planets that show active flow is present within the planet’s Hill sphere, and meridional vortices are shed downstream. The vertical flow speed near the planet is faster for a smaller r s or γ, up to supersonic speeds for the smallest r s and γ in our study.

  19. Modelling grain alignment by radiative torques and hydrogen formation torques in reflection nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A.; Andersson, B.-G.

    2015-04-01

    Reflection nebulae - dense cores - illuminated by surrounding stars offer a unique opportunity to directly test our quantitative model of grain alignment based on radiative torques (RATs) and to explore new effects arising from additional torques. In this paper, we first perform detailed modelling of grain alignment by RATs for the IC 63 reflection nebula illuminated both by a nearby γ Cas star and the diffuse interstellar radiation field. We calculate linear polarization pλ of background stars by radiatively aligned grains and explore the variation of fractional polarization (pλ/AV) with visual extinction AV across the cloud. Our results show that the variation of pV/AV versus AV from the dayside of IC 63 to its centre can be represented by a power law (p_V/A_V∝ A_V^{η }) with different slopes depending on AV. We find a shallow slope η ˜ -0.1 for AV < 3 and a very steep slope η ˜ -2 for AV > 4. We then consider the effects of additional torques due to H2 formation and model grain alignment by joint action of RATs and H2 torques. We find that pV/AV tends to increase with an increasing magnitude of H2 torques. In particular, the theoretical predictions obtained for pV/AV and peak wavelength λmax in this case show an improved agreement with the observational data. Our results reinforce the predictive power of the RAT alignment mechanism in a broad range of environmental conditions and show the effect of pinwheel torques in environments with efficient H2 formation. Physical parameters involved in H2 formation may be constrained using detailed modelling of grain alignment combined with observational data. In addition, we discuss implications of our modelling for interpreting latest observational data by Planck and other ground-based instruments.

  20. Performance of the COROT CCD for high-accuracy photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, P.; Lapeyrere, V.; Buey, J.-T.; Parisot, J.; Schmidt, R.; Leruyet, B.; Tiphène, D.; Gilard, O.; Rolland, G.

    2004-01-01

    The focal plane of the COROT instrument is made of four CCDs, two dedicated to asteroseismology and two dedicated to the detection of telluric planets. The detectors are provided by E2V (4280 series), each having 2k×4k pixels. They work in AIMO and frame transfer mode, at a working temperature of -40°C. As the COROT photometer will have to detect fluctuations expressed in ppm (part per million), a specific calibration of the whole photometric chain has to be achieved. Moreover, we have ten CCDs available and therefore need to calibrate them in order to select four CCDs for the flight focal plane. A specific test bench is dedicated to the calibration of these CCDs, and five have already been tested. The main characteristics of interest are: - cosmetics (black and white pixels or columns): zero white pixels, less than 6 black columns; - pixel response non uniformity (PRNU) versus wavelength: 1% rms at 650 nm. - gain versus temperature: -900 ppm K-1 relative fluctuation - absolute quantum efficiency: 95% max at 650 nm; - quantum efficiency versus temperature: 2000 ppm K-1 relative fluctuation at 650 nm; - full well capacity: 85 to 100 ke-; - dark current at -40°C: <0.5e- pixel-1 sec-1. Comparing the measured characteristics to those provided by E2V, we first check that CCDs meet specifications. Then, when all CCDs are tested, we will select the best CCDs for each scientific program (asteroseismology or planet finding). Specific tools have been developed to compare the performances of the detectors using the images acquired on the test bench and the shapes of the PSF for the two scientific programs. The detectors have also been tested under irradiation; the results strongly depend on the specific orbit of COROT (irradiation dose and related particles) and have to be compared to the global performances of the instrument.

  1. Comparison of different passive knee extension torque-angle assessments.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sandro R; Vaz, João R; Bruno, Paula M; Valamatos, Maria J; Mil-Homens, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have used isokinetic dynamometry to assess joint torques and angles during passive extension of the knee, often without reporting upon methodological errors and reliability outcomes. In addition, the reliability of the techniques used to measure passive knee extension torque-angle and the extent to which reliability may be affected by the position of the subjects is also unclear. Therefore, we conducted an analysis of the intra- and inter-session reliability of two methods of assessing passive knee extension: (A) a 2D kinematic analysis coupled to a custom-made device that enabled the direct measurement of resistance to stretch and (B) an isokinetic dynamometer used in two testing positions (with the non-tested thigh either flexed at 45° or in the neutral position). The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) of torque, the slope of the torque-angle curve, and the parameters of the mathematical model that were fit to the torque-angle data for the above conditions were measured in sixteen healthy male subjects (age: 21.4 ± 2.1 yr; BMI: 22.6 ± 3.3 kg m(-2); tibial length: 37.4 ± 3.4 cm). The results found were: (1) methods A and B led to distinctly different torque-angle responses; (2) passive torque-angle relationship and stretch tolerance were influenced by the position of the non-tested thigh; and (3) ICCs obtained for torque were higher than for the slope and for the mathematical parameters that were fit to the torque-angle curve. In conclusion, the measurement method that is used and the positioning of subjects can influence the passive knee extension torque-angle outcome.

  2. SPITZER INFRARED OBSERVATIONS AND INDEPENDENT VALIDATION OF THE TRANSITING SUPER-EARTH CoRoT-7 b

    SciTech Connect

    Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Charbonneau, David; Pont, Frederic; Knutson, Heather A.; Mazeh, Tsevi; Aigrain, Suzanne; Fridlund, Malcolm; Guillot, Tristan; Rauer, Heike

    2012-01-20

    The detection and characterization of the first transiting super-Earth, CoRoT-7 b, has required an unprecedented effort in terms of telescope time and analysis. Although the star does display a radial-velocity signal at the period of the planet, this has been difficult to disentangle from the intrinsic stellar variability and pinning down the velocity amplitude has been very challenging. As a result, the precise value of the mass of the planet-and even the extent to which it can be considered to be confirmed-has been debated in the recent literature, with six mass measurements published so far based on the same spectroscopic observations, ranging from about 2 to 8 Earth masses. Here we report on an independent validation of the planet discovery using one of the fundamental properties of a transit signal: its achromaticity. We observed four transits of CoRoT-7 b at 4.5 {mu}m and 8.0 {mu}m with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope in order to determine whether the depth of the transit signal in the near-infrared is consistent with that observed in the CoRoT bandpass, as expected for a planet. We detected the transit and found an average depth of 0.426 {+-} 0.115 mmag at 4.5 {mu}m, which is in good agreement with the depth of 0.350 {+-} 0.011 mmag (ignoring limb darkening) found by CoRoT. The observations at 8.0 {mu}m did not yield a significant detection. The 4.5 {mu}m observations place important constraints on the kinds of astrophysical false positives that could mimic the signal. Combining this with additional constraints reported earlier, we performed an exhaustive exploration of possible blend scenarios for CoRoT-7 b using the BLENDER technique. We are able to rule out the vast majority of false positives, and the remaining ones are found to be much less likely than a true transiting planet. We thus validate CoRoT-7 b as a bona fide planet with a very high degree of confidence, independently of any radial-velocity information

  3. Spitzer Infrared Observations and Independent Validation of the Transiting Super-Earth CoRoT-7 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Pont, Frederic; Knutson, Heather A.; Charbonneau, David; Mazeh, Tsevi; Aigrain, Suzanne; Fridlund, Malcolm; Henze, Christopher E.; Guillot, Tristan; Rauer, Heike

    2012-01-01

    The detection and characterization of the first transiting super-Earth, CoRoT-7 b, has required an unprecedented effort in terms of telescope time and analysis. Although the star does display a radial-velocity signal at the period of the planet, this has been difficult to disentangle from the intrinsic stellar variability and pinning down the velocity amplitude has been very challenging. As a result, the precise value of the mass of the planet—and even the extent to which it can be considered to be confirmed—has been debated in the recent literature, with six mass measurements published so far based on the same spectroscopic observations, ranging from about 2 to 8 Earth masses. Here we report on an independent validation of the planet discovery using one of the fundamental properties of a transit signal: its achromaticity. We observed four transits of CoRoT-7 b at 4.5 μm and 8.0 μm with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope in order to determine whether the depth of the transit signal in the near-infrared is consistent with that observed in the CoRoT bandpass, as expected for a planet. We detected the transit and found an average depth of 0.426 ± 0.115 mmag at 4.5 μm, which is in good agreement with the depth of 0.350 ± 0.011 mmag (ignoring limb darkening) found by CoRoT. The observations at 8.0 μm did not yield a significant detection. The 4.5 μm observations place important constraints on the kinds of astrophysical false positives that could mimic the signal. Combining this with additional constraints reported earlier, we performed an exhaustive exploration of possible blend scenarios for CoRoT-7 b using the BLENDER technique. We are able to rule out the vast majority of false positives, and the remaining ones are found to be much less likely than a true transiting planet. We thus validate CoRoT-7 b as a bona fide planet with a very high degree of confidence, independently of any radial-velocity information. Our Spitzer

  4. Accurate torque-speed performance prediction for brushless dc motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gipper, Patrick D.

    Desirable characteristics of the brushless dc motor (BLDCM) have resulted in their application for electrohydrostatic (EH) and electromechanical (EM) actuation systems. But to effectively apply the BLDCM requires accurate prediction of performance. The minimum necessary performance characteristics are motor torque versus speed, peak and average supply current and efficiency. BLDCM nonlinear simulation software specifically adapted for torque-speed prediction is presented. The capability of the software to quickly and accurately predict performance has been verified on fractional to integral HP motor sizes, and is presented. Additionally, the capability of torque-speed prediction with commutation angle advance is demonstrated.

  5. Migration of accreting planets in radiative discs from dynamical torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierens, A.; Raymond, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of hydrodynamical simulations of the orbital evolution of planets undergoing runaway gas accretion in radiative discs. We consider accreting disc models with constant mass flux through the disc, and where radiative cooling balances the effect of viscous heating and stellar irradiation. We assume that 20-30 M⊕ giant planet cores are formed in the region where viscous heating dominates and migrate outward under the action of a strong entropy-related corotation torque. In the case where gas accretion is neglected and for an α viscous stress parameter α = 2 × 10-3, we find evidence for strong dynamical torques in accreting discs with accretion rates {dot{M}}≳ 7× 10^{-8} M_{⊙} yr{}^{-1}. Their main effect is to increase outward migration rates by a factor of ˜2 typically. In the presence of gas accretion, however, runaway outward migration is observed with the planet passing through the zero-torque radius and the transition between the viscous heating and stellar heating dominated regimes. The ability for an accreting planet to enter a fast migration regime is found to depend strongly on the planet growth rate, but can occur for values of the mass flux through the disc of {dot{M}}≳ 5× 10^{-8} M_{⊙} yr{}^{-1}. We find that an episode of runaway outward migration can cause an accreting planet formed in the 5-10 au region to temporarily orbit at star-planet separations as large as ˜60-70 au. However, increase in the amplitude of the Lindblad torque associated with planet growth plus change in the streamline topology near the planet systematically cause the direction of migration to be reversed. Subsequent evolution corresponds to the planet migrating inward rapidly until it becomes massive enough to open a gap in the disc and migrate in the type II regime. Our results indicate that a planet can reach large orbital distances under the combined effect of dynamical torques and gas accretion, but an alternative mechanism is required to

  6. Departure from corotation of the Io plasma torus - Local plasma production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pontius, D. H., Jr.; Hill, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    The departure of the Jovian magnetosphere from rigid corotation is adequately explained by outward plasma transport at distances where L is greater than approximately 10. The departure of 5% observed in the Io plasma torus, however, is too large to be accounted for simply by plasma transport. Local plasma production is proposed as the main factor determining the corotation lag in the torus. The outward pick-up current provided by ionization of neutral atoms is calculated and related to the current produced in the ionosphere by the corotation lag. This leads to an expression giving the corotation lag of the torus as a function of radial distance. Charge transfer is found to be an important process, allowing the majority of the torus mass to be ejected from the magnetosphere in a neutral state. Thus, the mass loading rate is found to be several times that inferred from examination of the corotation lag associated with outward plasma transport.

  7. Power spectral signatures of interplanetary corotating and transient flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Burlaga, L. F.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the time behavior of the galactic cosmic ray intensity have concluded that long term decreases in the intensity are generally associated with systems of interplanetary flows that contain flare generated shock waves, magnetic clouds and other transient phenomena. The magnetic field power spectral signatures of such flow systems are compared to power spectra obtained during times when the solar wind is dominated by stable corotating streams that do not usually produce long-lived reduction in the cosmic ray intensity. The spectral signatures of these two types of regimes (transient and corotating) are distinct. However, the distinguishing features are not the same throughout the heliosphere. In data collected beyond 1 AU the primary differences are in the power spectra of the magnitude of the magnetic field rather than in the power in the field components. Consequently, decreases in cosmic ray intensity are very likely due to magnetic mirror forces and gradient drifts rather than to small angle scattering due to cyclotron wave-particle interactions.

  8. On the Dramatic Spin-up/Spin-Down Torque Reversals in Accreting Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert W.; Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Finger, Mark H.; Koh, Danny T.; Prince, Thomas A.; Rubin, Bradley C.; Scott, D. Mathew; Vaughan, Brian A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    Dramatic torque reversals between spin-up and spin-down have been observed in half of the persistent X-ray pulsars monitored by the Burst and Transient Space Experiment (BATSE) all-sky monitor on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Theoretical models developed to explain early pulsar timing data can explain spin-down torques via a disk-magnetosphere interaction if the star nearly corotates with the inner accretion disk. To produce the observed BATSE torque reversals, however, these equilibrium models require the disk to alternate between two mass accretion rates, with M+/- producing accretion torques of similar magnitude but always of opposite sign. Moreover, in at least one pulsar (GX 1+4) undergoing secular spin-down, the neutron star spins down faster during brief (approximately 20 day) hard X-ray flares-this is opposite the correlation expected from standard theory, assuming that BATSE pulsed flux increases with mass accretion rate. The 10 day to 10 yr intervals between torque reversals in these systems are much longer than any characteristic magnetic or viscous timescale near the inner disk boundary and are more suggestive of a global disk phenomenon. We discuss possible explanations of the observed torque behavior. Despite the preferred sense of rotation defined by the binary orbit, the BATSE observations are surprisingly consistent with an earlier suggestion for GX 1+4: the disks in these systems somehow alternate between episodes of prograde and retrograde rotation. We are unaware of any mechanism that could produce a stable retrograde disk in a binary undergoing Roche lobe overflow, but such flip-flop behavior does occur in numerical simulations of wind-fed systems. One possibility is that the disks in some of these binaries are fed by an X-ray-excited wind.

  9. Quick torque coupling

    DOEpatents

    Luft, Peter A.

    2009-05-12

    A coupling for mechanically connecting modular tubular struts of a positioning apparatus or space frame, comprising a pair of toothed rings (10, 12) attached to separate strut members (16), the teeth (18, 20) of the primary rings (10, 12) mechanically interlocking in both an axial and circumferential manner, and a third part comprising a sliding, toothed collar (14) the teeth (22) of which interlock the teeth (18, 20) of the primary rings (10, 12), preventing them from disengaging, and completely locking the assembly together. A secondary mechanism provides a nesting force for the collar, and/or retains it. The coupling is self-contained and requires no external tools for installation, and can be assembled with gloved hands in demanding environments. No gauging or measured torque is required for assembly. The assembly can easily be visually inspected to determine a "go" or "no-go" status. The coupling is compact and relatively light-weight. Because of it's triply interlocking teeth, the connection is rigid. The connection does not primarily rely on clamps, springs or friction based fasteners, and is therefore reliable in fail-safe applications.

  10. Deformable micro torque swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Omori, Toshihiro; Imai, Yohsuke

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the deformation of a ciliate swimming freely in a fluid otherwise at rest. The cell body was modeled as a capsule with a hyper elastic membrane enclosing Newtonian fluid. Thrust forces due to the ciliary beat were modeled as torques distributed above the cell body. Effects of the membrane elasticity, the aspect ratio of cell's reference shape and the density difference between the cell and the surrounding fluid were investigated. The results showed that the cell deformed like heart shape when Capillary number (Ca) was sufficiently large, and the swimming velocity decreased as Ca was increased. The gravity effect on the membrane tension suggested that the upwards and downwards swimming velocities of Paramecium might be reglated by the calcium ion channels distributed locally around the anterior end. Moreover, the gravity induced deformation made a cell directed vertically downwards, which resulted in a positive geotaxis like behavior with physical origin. These results are important to understand physiology of ciliate's biological responses to mechanical stimuli.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CoRoT observation log (N2-4.4) (CoRoT 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    COROT Team

    2014-03-01

    CoRoT, a space astronomy mission, has measured photometric micro-variability of stars from minutes to months (up to 150 days) with a high duty cycle (more than 90%). The mission was led by CNES in association with four French laboratories and 7 participating countries and agencies (Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, Spain, and the ESA Science Programme). The satellite was composed of a PROTEUS platform (the 3rd in the series) and a unique instrument: a stellar rapid photometer. It was launched on December 27th 2006 by a Soyuz Rocket, from Bakonour. The mission has lasted almost 6 years (the nominal 3-year duration and a 3-year extension) and has observed more than 160 000 stars. It stopped sending data on November 2nd 2012. Two regions of the sky were accessible for long period of time: circles of 10 degrees centered on the equator around alpha=06:50 and alpha=18:50. They were called the CoRoT eyes: the "anticenter" and the "center eye" (as they are approximately in these directions). Each pointing covers 1.4x2.8 square degrees within one of those CoRoT eyes. The original scientific objectives were focussed on the study of stellar pulsations (asteroseismology) to probe the internal structure of stars, and the detection of small exoplanets through their "transiting in front of their host star, and the measurement of their size. This lead to introduce two modes of observations, working simultaneously: - The "bright star" mode dedicated to very precise seismology of a small sample of bright and closeby stars - The "faint star" mode, observing a very large number of stars at the same time, to detect transits, which are rare events, as they imply the alignment of the star, the planet and the observer. The large amount of data gathered in this mode turned out to be extremely fruitful for many topics of stellar physics. Beyond these two initial objectives, CoRoT data revealed stellar variability associated with various other phenomena: granulation, rotational modulation

  12. Zero torque gear head wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R.; Norman, R. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A gear head wrench particularly suited for use in applying torque to bolts without transferring torsional stress to bolt-receiving structures is introduced. The wrench is characterized by a coupling including a socket, for connecting a bolt head with a torque multiplying gear train, provided within a housing having an annulus concentrically related to the socket and adapted to be coupled with a spacer interposed between the bolt head and the juxtaposed surface of the bolt-receiving structure for applying a balancing counter-torque to the spacer as torque is applied to the bolt head whereby the bolt-receiving structure is substantially isolated from torsional stress. As a result of the foregoing, the operator of the wrench is substantially isolated from any forces which may be imposed.

  13. F Ring Core Stability: Corotation Resonance Plus Antiresonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Marouf, Essam; French, Richard; Jacobson, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The decades-or-longer stability of the narrow F Ring core in a sea of orbital chaos appears to be due to an unusual combination of traditional corotation resonance and a novel kind of “antiresonance”. At a series of specific locations in the F Ring region, apse precession between synodic encounters with Prometheus allows semimajor axis perturbations to promptly cancel before significant orbital period changes can occur (Cuzzi et al. 2014, Icarus 232, 157-175). This cancellation fails for particles that encounter Prometheus when it is near its apoapse, especially during periods of antialignment of its apse with that of the F Ring. At these times, the strength of the semimajor axis perturbation is large (tens of km) and highly nonsinusoidal in encounter longitude, making it impossible to cancel promptly on a subsequent encounter and leading to chaotic orbital diffusion. Only particles that consistently encounter Prometheus away from its apoapse can use antiresonance to maintain stable orbits, implying that the true mean motion nF of the stable core must be defined by a corotational resonance of the form nF = nP-κP/m, where (nP, κP) are Prometheus’ mean motion and epicycle frequency. To test this hypothesis we used the fact that Cassini RSS occultations only sporadically detect a “massive” F Ring core, composed of several-cm-and-larger particles. We regressed the inertial longitudes of 24 Cassini RSS (and VGR) detections and 43 nondetections to a common epoch, using a comb of candidate nP, and then folded them modulo the anticipated m-number of the corotational resonance (Prometheus m=110 outer CER), to see if clustering appears. We find the “true F Ring core” is actually arranged in a series of short longitudinal arcs separated by nearly empty longitudes, orbiting at a well determined semimajor axis of 140222.4km (from 2005-2012 at least). Small particles seen by imaging and stellar occultations spread quickly in azimuth and obscure this clumpy

  14. F Ring Core Stability: Corotation Resonance Plus Antiresonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Marouf, Essam; French, Richard; Jacobson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The decades-or-longer stability of the narrow F Ring core in a sea of orbital chaos appears to be due to an unusual combination of traditional corotation resonance and a novel kind of "antiresonance". At a series of specific locations in the F Ring region, apse precession between synodic encounters with Prometheus allows semimajor axis perturbations to promptly cancel before significant orbital period changes can occur. This cancellation fails for particles that encounter Prometheus when it is near its apoapse, especially during periods of antialignment of its apse with that of the F Ring. At these times, the strength of the semimajor axis perturbation is large (tens of km) and highly nonsinusoidal in encounter longitude, making it impossible to cancel promptly on a subsequent encounter and leading to chaotic orbital diffusion. Only particles that consistently encounter Prometheus away from its apoapse can use antiresonance to maintain stable orbits, implying that the true mean motion nF of the stable core must be defined by a corotational resonance of the form nF = nP(-kappa)P/m, where (nP, kappaP) are Prometheus' mean motion and epicycle frequency. To test this hypothesis we used the fact that Cassini RSS occultations only sporadically detect a "massive" F Ring core, composed of several-cm-and-larger particles. We regressed the inertial longitudes of 24 Cassini RSS (and VGR) detections and 43 nondetections to a common epoch, using a comb of candidate nP, and then folded them modulo the anticipated m-number of the corotational resonance (Prometheus m = 110 outer CER), to see if clustering appears. We find the "true F Ring core" is actually arranged in a series of short longitudinal arcs separated by nearly empty longitudes, orbiting at a well determined semimajor axis of 140222.4 km (from 2005-2012 at least). Small particles seen by imaging and stellar occultations spread quickly in azimuth and obscure this clumpy structure. Small chaotic variations in the mean

  15. Torque Simulator for Rotating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    New torque brake simulates varying levels of friction in bearings of rotating body. Rolling-tail torque brake uses magnetic force to produce friction between rotating part and stationary part. Simulator electronics produce positive or negative feedback signal, depending on direction of rotation. New system allows for first time in-depth study of effects of tail-fin spin rates on pitch-, yaw-, and roll-control characteristics.

  16. Torque-Summing Brushless Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidya, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Torque channels function cooperatively but electrically independent for reliability. Brushless, electronically-commutated dc motor sums electromagnetic torques on four channels and applies them to single shaft. Motor operates with any combination of channels and continues if one or more of channels fail electrically. Motor employs single stator and rotor and mechanically simple; however, each of channels electrically isolated from other so that failure of one does not adversely affect others.

  17. Charge-Induced Spin Torque in Anomalous Hall Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Kentaro; Kurebayashi, Daichi

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate that spin-orbit coupled electrons in a magnetically doped system exert a spin torque on the local magnetization, without a flowing current, when the chemical potential is modulated in a magnetic field. The spin torque is proportional to the anomalous Hall conductivity, and its effective field strength may overcome the Zeeman field. Using this effect, the direction of the local magnetization is switched by gate control in a thin film. This charge-induced spin torque is essentially an equilibrium effect, in contrast to the conventional current-induced spin-orbit torque, and, thus, devices using this operating principle possibly have higher efficiency than the conventional ones. In addition to a comprehensive phenomenological derivation, we present a physical understanding based on a model of a Dirac-Weyl semimetal, possibly realized in a magnetically doped topological insulator. The effect might be realized also in nanoscale transition materials, complex oxide ferromagnets, and dilute magnetic semiconductors.

  18. 14 CFR 27.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine torque. 27.361 Section 27.361... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.361 Engine torque. (a) For turbine engines, the limit torque may not be less than the highest of— (1) The mean torque for...

  19. 14 CFR 27.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine torque. 27.361 Section 27.361... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.361 Engine torque. (a) For turbine engines, the limit torque may not be less than the highest of— (1) The mean torque for...

  20. 14 CFR 27.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine torque. 27.361 Section 27.361... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.361 Engine torque. (a) For turbine engines, the limit torque may not be less than the highest of— (1) The mean torque for...

  1. 14 CFR 27.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine torque. 27.361 Section 27.361... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.361 Engine torque. (a) For turbine engines, the limit torque may not be less than the highest of— (1) The mean torque for...

  2. 14 CFR 27.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine torque. 27.361 Section 27.361... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.361 Engine torque. (a) For turbine engines, the limit torque may not be less than the highest of— (1) The mean torque for...

  3. Variable magnetic circuit torque sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarquand, G.; Lemarquand, V.

    1991-11-01

    This paper presents an original torque sensor structure using the properties of magnetic circuits, including permanent magnets. The torque is measured through the torsion of the transmitting shaft. The torsion is proportional to the torque. Considering two points of the shaft on the same line in absence of torque, the information is given by the twisting angle in the presence of a torque. A rotating magnetic circuit yields an angle representative signal. This circuit is deformed by the shaft torsion. The reluctance varies and so does the magnet operating point. The induction is measured in an airgap by a statoric galvanomagnetic device. The magnetic field source is an axial permanent magnet ring. Two iron-toothed rings, fixed to the driving and driven part of the shaft, respectively, and separated by an airgap make up the variable part of the magnetic circuit. The teeth get out of line whenever a torque is applied. The galvanomagnetic device measures an uniform induction and so delivers a modulation free signal, i.e., rotation independent. Because of the periodic toothed structure, the induction varies periodically with the twisting angle. The sense of the variation is the same over half a period or half a pitch. The variation form depends on the teeth design. Operating interval is to be chosen equal to or smaller than the half pitch.

  4. GAUDI: A Preparatory Archive for the COROT Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, E.; Catala, C.; Garrido, R.; Poretti, E.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Gutiérrez, R.; González, R.; Mantegazza, L.; Neiner, C.; Fremat, Y.; Charpinet, S.; Weiss, W.; Amado, P. J.; Rainer, M.; Tsymbal, V.; Lyashko, D.; Ballereau, D.; Bouret, J. C.; Hua, T.; Katz, D.; Lignières, F.; Lüftinger, T.; Mittermayer, P.; Nesvacil, N.; Soubiran, C.; van't Veer-Menneret, C.; Goupil, M. J.; Costa, V.; Rolland, A.; Antonello, E.; Bossi, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Rodrigo, C.; Aerts, C.; Butler, C. J.; Guenther, E.; Hatzes, A.

    2005-01-01

    The GAUDI database (Ground-based Asteroseismology Uniform Database Interface) is a preparatory archive for the COROT (Convection, Rotation, and Planetary Transits) mission developed at the Laboratorio de Astrofísica Espacial y Física Fundamental (Laboratory for Space Astrophysics and Theoretical Physics, Spain). Its intention is to make the ground-based observations obtained in preparation of the asteroseismology program available in a simple and efficient way. It contains spectroscopic and photometric data together with inferred physical parameters for more than 1500 objects gathered since 1998 January 1998 in 6 years of observational campaigns. In this paper, the main functions and characteristics of the system are described. Based on observations collected at La Silla (ESO proposals 67.D-0169, 69.D-0166, and 70.D-0110), Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (proposal 6-20-068), Observatoire de Haute-Provence, the South African Astronomical Observatory, Tautenburg Observatory, and Sierra Nevada Observatory.

  5. Spin-orbit torques and anisotropic magnetization damping in skyrmion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hals, Kjetil M. D.; Brataas, Arne

    2014-02-01

    The length scale of the magnetization gradients in chiral magnets is determined by the relativistic Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Thus, even conventional spin-transfer torques are controlled by the relativistic spin-orbit coupling in these systems, and additional relativistic corrections to the current-induced torques and magnetization damping become important for a complete understanding of the current-driven magnetization dynamics. We theoretically study the effects of reactive and dissipative homogeneous spin-orbit torques and anisotropic damping on the current-driven skyrmion dynamics in cubic chiral magnets. Our results demonstrate that spin-orbit torques play a significant role in the current-induced skyrmion velocity. The dissipative spin-orbit torque generates a relativistic Magnus force on the skyrmions, whereas the reactive spin-orbit torque yields a correction to both the drift velocity along the current direction and the transverse velocity associated with the Magnus force. The spin-orbit torque corrections to the velocity scale linearly with the skyrmion size, which is inversely proportional to the spin-orbit coupling. Consequently, the reactive spin-orbit torque correction can be the same order of magnitude as the nonrelativistic contribution. More importantly, the dissipative spin-orbit torque can be the dominant force that causes a deflected motion of the skyrmions if the torque exhibits a linear or quadratic relationship with the spin-orbit coupling. In addition, we demonstrate that the skyrmion velocity is determined by anisotropic magnetization damping parameters governed by the skyrmion size.

  6. Helicopter anti-torque system using fuselage strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Henry L. (Inventor); Wilson, John C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The improvement of the helicopter torque control system is discussed. At low to medium forward speeds helicopter performance is limited by the effectiveness of the means for counteracting main rotor torque and controlling sideslip airloads. These problems may be overcome by mounting strakes on the aft fuselage section. For single rotor helicopters whose main rotor rotates counter-clockwise as viewed from above, one of the strakes would be mounted in the upper lefthand quadrant and the second in the lower left hand quadrant. The strakes alter the air flow around the fuselage by separating the flow so as to produce lateral airloads on the tail boom which oppose main-rotor torque. The upper strake operates in a right crosswind to oppose main rotor torque, and the lower strake has effect in left crosswinds. The novelty of this invention resides in the simple and economical manner in which the helicopter tail boom may be modified by the addition of strakes in order to increase torque control, and reduce the need for supplemental mechanical means of torque control.

  7. Split torque transmission load sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, T. L.; Rashidi, M.; Kish, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Split torque transmissions are attractive alternatives to conventional planetary designs for helicopter transmissions. The split torque designs can offer lighter weight and fewer parts but have not been used extensively for lack of experience, especially with obtaining proper load sharing. Two split torque designs that use different load sharing methods have been studied. Precise indexing and alignment of the geartrain to produce acceptable load sharing has been demonstrated. An elastomeric torque splitter that has large torsional compliance and damping produces even better load sharing while reducing dynamic transmission error and noise. However, the elastomeric torque splitter as now configured is not capable over the full range of operating conditions of a fielded system. A thrust balancing load sharing device was evaluated. Friction forces that oppose the motion of the balance mechanism are significant. A static analysis suggests increasing the helix angle of the input pinion of the thrust balancing design. Also, dynamic analysis of this design predicts good load sharing and significant torsional response to accumulative pitch errors of the gears.

  8. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. VII. The ``hot-Jupiter''-type planet CoRoT-5b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauer, H.; Queloz, D.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Deleuil, M.; Alonso, R.; Aigrain, S.; Almenara, J. M.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barge, P.; Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Bruntt, H.; Cabrera, J.; Carone, L.; Carpano, S.; de La Reza, R.; Deeg, H. J.; Dvorak, R.; Erikson, A.; Fridlund, M.; Gandolfi, D.; Gillon, M.; Guillot, T.; Guenther, E.; Hatzes, A.; Hébrard, G.; Kabath, P.; Jorda, L.; Lammer, H.; Léger, A.; Llebaria, A.; Magain, P.; Mazeh, T.; Moutou, C.; Ollivier, M.; Pätzold, M.; Pont, F.; Rabus, M.; Renner, S.; Rouan, D.; Shporer, A.; Samuel, B.; Schneider, J.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Wuchterl, G.

    2009-10-01

    Aims: The CoRoT space mission continues to photometrically monitor about 12 000 stars in its field-of-view for a series of target fields to search for transiting extrasolar planets ever since 2007. Deep transit signals can be detected quickly in the “alarm-mode” in parallel to the ongoing target field monitoring. CoRoT's first planets have been detected in this mode. Methods: The CoRoT raw lightcurves are filtered for orbital residuals, outliers, and low-frequency stellar signals. The phase folded lightcurve is used to fit the transit signal and derive the main planetary parameters. Radial velocity follow-up observations were initiated to secure the detection and to derive the planet mass. Results: We report the detection of CoRoT-5b, detected during observations of the LRa01 field, the first long-duration field in the galactic anti-center direction. CoRoT-5b is a “hot Jupiter-type” planet with a radius of 1.388+0.046-0.047 R_Jup, a mass of 0.467+0.047-0.024 M_Jup, and therefore, a mean density of 0.217+0.031-0.025 g cm-3. The planet orbits an F9V star of 14.0 mag in 4.0378962 ± 0.0000019 days at an orbital distance of 0.04947+0.00026-0.00029 AU. Observations made with SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (07B.PNP.MOUT), France, and HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (072.C-0488(E), 082.C-0312(A)), and partly based on observations made at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, was developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain.

  9. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXV. CoRoT-27b: a massive and dense planet on a short-period orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, H.; Gandolfi, D.; Deleuil, M.; Moutou, C.; Deeg, H. J.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Samuel, B.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Pasternacki, T.; Wuchterl, G.; Havel, M.; Fridlund, M.; Angus, R.; Tingley, B.; Grziwa, S.; Korth, J.; Aigrain, S.; Almenara, J. M.; Alonso, R.; Baglin, A.; Barros, S. C. C.; Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Cabrera, J.; Díaz, R. F.; Dvorak, R.; Erikson, A.; Guillot, T.; Hatzes, A.; Hébrard, G.; Mazeh, T.; Montagnier, G.; Ofir, A.; Ollivier, M.; Pätzold, M.; Rauer, H.; Rouan, D.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.

    2014-02-01

    Aims: We report the discovery of a massive and dense transiting planet CoRoT-27b on a 3.58-day orbit around a 4.2 Gyr-old G2 star. The planet candidate was identified from the CoRoT photometry, and was confirmed as a planet with ground-based spectroscopy. Methods: The confirmation of the planet candidate is based on radial velocity observations combined with imaging to rule out blends. The characterisation of the planet and its host star was carried out using a Bayesian approach where all the data (CoRoT photometry, radial velocities, and spectroscopic characterisation of the star) are used jointly. The Bayesian analysis included a study whether the assumption of white normally distributed noise holds for the CoRoT photometry and whether the use of a non-normal noise distribution offers advantages in parameter estimation and model selection. Results: CoRoT-27b has a mass of 10.39 ± 0.55MJup, a radius of 1.01 ± 0.04RJup, a mean density of 12.6-1.67+1.92g cm-3, and an effective temperature of 1500 ± 130 K. The planet orbits around its host star, a 4.2 Gyr-old G2-star with a mass M⋆ = 1.06M⊙ and a radius R⋆ = 1.05R⊙, on a 0.048 ± 0.007 AU orbit of 3.58 days. The radial velocity observations allow us to exclude highly eccentric orbits, namely, e < 0.065 with 99% confidence. Given its high mass and density, theoretical modelling of CoRoT-27b is demanding. We identify two solutions with heavy element mass fractions of 0.11 ± 0.08M⊕ and 0.07 ± 0.06M⊕, but even solutions void of heavy elements cannot be excluded. We carry out a secondary eclipse search from the CoRoT photometry using a method based on Bayesian model selection, but conclude that the noise level is too high to detect eclipses shallower than 9% of the transit depth. Using a non-normal noise model was shown not to affect the parameter estimation results, but led to significant improvement in the sensitivity of the model selection process. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006

  10. Temporal Spectral Analysis of Be stars observed with CoRoT satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilio, Marcelo; Janot Pacheco, Eduardo; Andrade, Laerte

    . Nevertheless, to measure frequencies with great accuracy in stars requires both high photometric precision and high time-frequency resolution. The CoRoT (Convection, Rotation and planetary Transits) satellite opens for the first time in history the possibility of fulfilling this goal. CoRoT is an experiment of astronomy dedicated to seismology and the detection of extrasolar planet transits. It was launched on December 2006 in an inertial polar orbit at an altitude of 897 mathrm{km}. The instrument is fed by a phi=27 textrm{cm} telescope. Its scientific program is three-fold consisting of: (1) The seismology core program (SISMO), which concerns the seismic study of ˜10 bright (6additional program (AP), which concerns the study of a few hundreds faint (11.5CoRoT ID 102761769 observed by CoRoT satellite. We found two close frequencies related to the .CoRoT ID 102761769 star. They are 2.465 c d(-1) (28.5 mathrm{mu Hz}) and 2.441 c d(-1) (28.2 mathrm{mu Hz}). The precision to which those frequencies were found is 0.018 c d(-1) (0.2 mathrm{mu Hz}). The projected stellar rotation was estimated to be 120 km s(-1) from the Fourier transform of spectral lines. If CoRoT-ID 102761769 is a typical Galactic Be star it rotates near the critical velocity. The critical rotation frequency of a typical B5-6 star is about 3.5 c d(-1) (40.5 mathrm{mu Hz}), which implies that the above frequencies are really caused by stellar pulsations rather than star's rotation. HD 171219 frequencies 1.113, 1.130, 1.146 c * d(-1) form a triplet with the

  11. GROUND-BASED DETECTIONS OF THERMAL EMISSION FROM CoRoT-1b AND WASP-12b

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Ming; Swain, Mark R.; Monnier, John D.; Barman, Travis; Hinkley, Sasha

    2012-01-10

    We report a new detection of the H-band thermal emission of CoRoT-1b and two confirmation detections of the Ks-band thermal emission of WASP-12b at secondary eclipses. The H-band measurement of CoRoT-1b shows an eclipse depth of 0.145% {+-} 0.049% with a 3{sigma} percentile between 0.033% and 0.235%. This depth is consistent with the previous conclusions that the planet has an isothermal region with inefficient heat transport from day side to night side, and has a dayside thermal inversion layer at high altitude. The two Ks-band detections of WASP-12b show a joint eclipse depth of 0.299% {+-} 0.065%. This result agrees with the measurement of Croll and collaborators, providing independent confirmation of their measurement. The repeatability of the WASP-12b measurements also validates our data analysis method. Our measurements, in addition to a number of previous results made with other telescopes, demonstrate that ground-based observations are becoming widely available for characterization of atmospheres of hot Jupiters.

  12. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  13. Turbine Windage Torque Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    Rotordynamics : Mr. B. Rowan Mr. J. Hodges Development Laboratory: Mr. D. Butman Mr. C. Brown iii TABLE OF CONTEATS PAGE Introduction 1 Task I - Design...Analysis 2 Drive System and Mounting 2 Torquemeter Selection 10 Rotordynamic Analysis 11 Task II - Hardware Preparation 22 Task III - Testing 40 Facility...Two additional critical speeds appear in the test system with the addition of the torquemeter. A detailed discussion of the system rotordynamics is

  14. CoRoT 223992193: Investigating the variability in a low-mass, pre-main sequence eclipsing binary with evidence of a circumbinary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, E.; Aigrain, S.; Terquem, C.; Bouvier, J.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Gandolfi, D.; Stauffer, J.; Cody, A.; Venuti, L.; Almeida, P. Viana; Micela, G.; Favata, F.; Deeg, H. J.

    2017-02-01

    CoRoT 223992193 is the only known low-mass, pre-main sequence eclipsing binary that shows evidence of a circumbinary disk. The system displays complex photometric and spectroscopic variability over a range of timescales and wavelengths. Using two optical CoRoT runs from 2008 and 2011/2012 (spanning 23 and 39 days), along with infrared Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 μm observations (spanning 21 and 29 days, and simultaneous with the second CoRoT run), we model the out-of-eclipse light curves, finding that the large scale structure in both CoRoT light curves is consistent with the constructive and destructive interference of starspot signals at two slightly different periods. Using the vsini of both stars, we interpret this as the two stars having slightly different rotation periods: the primary is consistent with synchronisation and the secondary rotates slightly supersynchronously. Comparison of the raw 2011/2012 light curve data to the residuals of our spot model in colour-magnitude space indicates additional contributions consistent with a combination of variable dust emission and obscuration. There appears to be a tentative correlation between this additional variability and the binary orbital phase, with the system displaying increases in its infrared flux around primary and secondary eclipse. We also identify short-duration flux dips preceding secondary eclipse in all three CoRoT and Spitzer bands. We construct a model of the inner regions of the binary and propose that these dips could be caused by partial occultation of the central binary by the accretion stream onto the primary star. Analysis of 15 Hα profiles obtained with the FLAMES instrument on the Very Large Telescope reveal an emission profile associated with each star. The majority of this is consistent with chromospheric emission but additional higher velocity emission is also seen, which could be due to prominences. However, half of the secondary star's emission profiles display full widths at 10% intensity

  15. Condition Monitoring of a Motor-Operated Valve Using Estimated Motor Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Jangbom; Kang, Shinchul; Park, Sungkeun; Hong, Sungyull; Lim, Chanwoo

    This paper is concerned with the development of data analysis methods to be used in on-line monitoring and diagnosis of Motor-Operated Valves (MOVs) effectively and accurately. The technique to be utilized includes the electrical measurements and signal processing to estimate electric torque of induction motors, which are attached to most of MOV systems. The estimated torque of an induction motor is compared with the directly measured torque using a torque cell in various loading conditions including the degraded voltage conditions to validate the estimating scheme. The accuracy of the estimating scheme is presented. The advantages of the estimated torque signatures are reviewed over the currently used ones such as the current signature and the power signature in several respects: accuracy, sensitivity, resolution and so on. Additionally, the estimated torque methods are suggested as a good way to monitor the conditions of MOVs with higher accuracy.

  16. Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices in the f-plane shallow water system

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Norihiko

    2015-12-15

    Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices is investigated numerically in a rotating shallow water system in order to focus on cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry at different values of the Rossby number (Ro). A numerical study is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain to estimate the gravity wave flux with high accuracy. Continuous gravity wave radiation is observed in three stages of vortical flows: co-rotating of the vortices, merging of the vortices, and unsteady motion of the merged vortex. A cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry appears at all stages at smaller Ro (≤20). Gravity waves from anticyclones are always larger than those from cyclones and have a local maximum at smaller Ro (∼2) compared with that for an idealized case of a co-rotating vortex pair with a constant rotation rate. The source originating in the Coriolis acceleration has a key role in cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry in gravity waves. An additional important factor is that at later stages, the merged axisymmetric anticyclone rotates faster than the elliptical cyclone due to the effect of the Rossby deformation radius, since a rotation rate higher than the inertial cutoff frequency is required to radiate gravity waves.

  17. Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices in the f-plane shallow water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko

    2015-12-01

    Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices is investigated numerically in a rotating shallow water system in order to focus on cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry at different values of the Rossby number (Ro). A numerical study is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain to estimate the gravity wave flux with high accuracy. Continuous gravity wave radiation is observed in three stages of vortical flows: co-rotating of the vortices, merging of the vortices, and unsteady motion of the merged vortex. A cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry appears at all stages at smaller Ro (≤20). Gravity waves from anticyclones are always larger than those from cyclones and have a local maximum at smaller Ro (˜2) compared with that for an idealized case of a co-rotating vortex pair with a constant rotation rate. The source originating in the Coriolis acceleration has a key role in cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry in gravity waves. An additional important factor is that at later stages, the merged axisymmetric anticyclone rotates faster than the elliptical cyclone due to the effect of the Rossby deformation radius, since a rotation rate higher than the inertial cutoff frequency is required to radiate gravity waves.

  18. A Study of Co-Rotating Wake Vortex Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristol, Robert; Savas, Omer

    2000-11-01

    Observations of an instability between pairs of co-rotating wake vortices produced from a flapped airfoil are presented. Data from particle imaging velocimetry and flow-visualization show the growth of a periodic disturbance on the weaker vortex, leading to merger of the two vortices in approximately one orbit. The instability grows in a plane inclined at 45 degrees with respect to the line connecting the two vortices, suggesting that it is driven by the straining field of the stronger vortex acting upon the weaker one. A linear stability analysis of the problem is presented, which is a generalization of the Crow theory, covering the case for an unequal pair of vortices. Within the confines of this analysis, the straining field emerges as the primary mechanism for instability, with the effects of self-rotation and orbit-induced rotation acting together to stabilize the pair. However, the linear theory fails to reproduce the experimental results, most likely because of strong interactions due to the close proximity of the finite-size vortices. Finally, results are shown from the spectral Navier-Stokes solver in cylindrical co-ordinates of Marcus et. al., which produces instabilities similar to the ones observed experimentally. Circulation-based Reynolds numbers for the experiments reach 300,000 while those for the simulations reach 60,000.

  19. Dynamics of quasi 2D co-rotating vortex merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandekar, Akshay G.

    Merger of vortices is examined experimentally to compare the merger of slender parallel vortices generated coincidentally. It is known that like-sign vortices rotate around a common center of circulation and merger between the vortices may occur under certain conditions. This merger is dependent on the strength of the vortex circulation, distance of separation between the centers of the two vortices, ReGamma, and vorticity distribution. Quasi-2D experimental data is examined and merger relations are derived. The 2D experiments conducted in a vortex generator tank uses high aspect ratio rotating paddles. The vortex merger tank generates slender co-rotating vortices and are examined using PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry). Merger characteristics are compared at centerline, 25% span and 5% span for different circulation strengths. Symmetric and asymmetric mergers are studied and it is found that in both cases, the vortex pair rotates around an axis perpendicular to the plane of the vortex pair. Symmetric merger is seen to occur at the center between the two vortices whereas in asymmetric merger the stronger vortex breaks the weaker vortex filaments and continues to follow its path. Wall effects seem to have an effect of vortex braiding and vortex stretching. Closer to the wall, the merger time increases while the merged vortex dissipates faster than at the centerline.

  20. Corotation lag limit on mass-loss rate from Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. S.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1987-01-01

    Considering rapid escape of H2O from Io during an early hot evolutionary epoch, an H2O plasma torus is constructed by balancing dissociation and ionization products against centrifugally driven diffusion, including for the first time the effects of corotation lag resulting from mass loading. Two fundamental limits are found as the mass injection rate increases: (1) an 'ignition' limit of 1.1 x 10 to the 6th kg/s, beyond which the torus cannot ionize itself and photoionization dominates; and (2) the ultimate mass loading limit of 1.3 x 10 to the 7th kg/s, which occurs when neutrals newly created by charge exchange and recombination cannot leave the torus, thereby bringing magnetospherically driven transport to a halt. Connecting this limit with the variations of Io's temperature in its early evolution epoch gives an estimate of the upper limit on the total mass loss from Io, about 3.0 x 10 to the 20th kg (for high-opacity nebula) and about 8.9 x 10 to the 20th kg (for low-opacity nebula). These limits correspond to eroding 8 km and 22 km of H2O from the surface. It is concluded that compared to the other Galilean satellites, Io was created basically dry.

  1. 14 CFR 29.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine torque. 29.361 Section 29.361... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.361 Engine torque. The limit engine torque may not be less than the following: (a) For turbine engines, the highest of— (1)...

  2. 14 CFR 29.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine torque. 29.361 Section 29.361... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.361 Engine torque. The limit engine torque may not be less than the following: (a) For turbine engines, the highest of— (1)...

  3. 14 CFR 29.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine torque. 29.361 Section 29.361... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.361 Engine torque. The limit engine torque may not be less than the following: (a) For turbine engines, the highest of— (1)...

  4. 14 CFR 29.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine torque. 29.361 Section 29.361... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.361 Engine torque. The limit engine torque may not be less than the following: (a) For turbine engines, the highest of— (1)...

  5. 14 CFR 29.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine torque. 29.361 Section 29.361... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.361 Engine torque. The limit engine torque may not be less than the following: (a) For turbine engines, the highest of— (1)...

  6. Computerized Torque Control for Large dc Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, Richard M.; Carroll, Michael J.; Geiger, Ronald V.

    1987-01-01

    Speed and torque ranges in generator mode extended. System of shunt resistors, electronic switches, and pulse-width modulation controls torque exerted by large, three-phase, electronically commutated dc motor. Particularly useful for motor operating in generator mode because it extends operating range to low torque and high speed.

  7. Detecting planets in Kepler lightcurves using methods developed for CoRoT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grziwa, S.; Korth, J.; Pätzold, M.

    2011-10-01

    Launched in March 2009, Kepler is the second space telescope dedicated to the search for extrasolar planets. NASA released 150.000 lightcurves to the public in 2010 and announced that Kepler has found 1.235 candidates. The Rhenish Institute for Environmental Research (RIU-PF) is one of the detection groups from the CoRoT space mission. RIU-PF developed the software package EXOTRANS for the detection of transits in stellar lightcurves. EXOTRANS is designed for the fast automated processing of huge amounts of data and was easily adapted to the analysis of Kepler lightcurves. The use of different techniques and philosophies helps to find more candidates and to rule out others. We present the analysis of the Kepler lightcurves with EXOTRANS. Results of our filter (trend, harmonic) and detection (dcBLS) techniques are compared with the techniques used by Kepler (PDC, TPS). The different approaches to rule out false positives are discussed and additional candidates found by EXOTRANS are presented.

  8. Nanocontact based spin torque oscillators with two free layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucaille, R.; Kim, J.-V.; Devolder, T.; Petit-Watelot, S.; Manfrini, M.; Van Roy, W.; Lagae, L.

    2017-03-01

    We study a spin torque oscillator based on magnetic vortices hosted by a pseudo spin valve, and generated and confined by a nanocontact configuration. In addition to the standard functioning modes of such spin torque oscillators, we present evidence for field and current conditions leading to a novel extinction regime, where the oscillator response is transiently quenched. We model the dynamics analytically for two non-interacting vortices, one in each magnetic layer. The similarity of their trajectories makes them prone to interact. We argue that they can synchronize and then follow identical orbits, which leads to the extinction of the RF voltage emission.

  9. Data Analysis Provenance: Use Case for Exoplanet Search in CoRoT Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, L.; Salete Marcon Gomes Vaz, M.; Emílio, M.; Ferreira da Rocha, J. C.; Janot Pacheco, E.; Carlos Boufleur, R.

    2012-09-01

    CoRoT (COnvection Rotation and Planetary Transits) is a mission led by the French national space agency CNES, in collaboration with Austria, Spain, Germany, Belgium and Brazil. The mission priority is dedicated to exoplanet search and stellar seismology. CoRoT light curves database became public after one year of their delivery to the CoRoT Co-Is, following the CoRoT data policy. The CoRoT archive contains thousands of light curves in FITS format. Several exoplanet search algorithms require detrend algorithms to remove both stellar and instrumental signal, improving the chance to detect a transit. Different detrend and transit detection algorithms can be applied to the same database. Tracking the origin of the information and how the data was derived in each level in the data analysis process is essential to allow sharing, reuse, reprocessing and further analysis. This work aims at applying a formalized and codified knowledge model by means of domain ontology. It allows to enrich the data analysis with semantic and standardization. It holds the provenance information in the database for a posteriori recovers by humans or software agents.

  10. Interface structure of co-rotating interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Roelof, E. C.; Forsyth, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    Plasma and particle observations on Ulysses during its passes through the southern and northern heliosphere have revealed that, inside the streamer belt, the large-scale structure of the quiet global heliosphere is dominated by corotating interaction regions (CIRs). Therefore, considerable attention is now being given to the internal plasma structure of CIRs, and in particular, to the manifestations of the stream interfaces that should mark their origins as interactions between low speed solar wind (in the low-latitude streamer belt) and high speed solar wind (from the equatorial extensions of the high latitude polar coronal holes). The SWICS and HI-SCALE experiments on Ulysses combine plasma and energetic particle measurements that are of considerable utility for such studies because, between them, they cover the proton energy range from 10 eV to 5 MeV. These measurements are used, together with magnetic field data, to study the remarkable series of CIRs that occurred during the period beginning July 1992 and the end of 1993 as Ulysses rose from the ecliptic to a southern heliographic latitude of 48 deg. The structure of the regions between the forward and reverse shocks were previously analyzed in terms of the proton specific entropy argument log that should exhibit a discontinuous jump at the stream interface. It was claimed that the stream interface, defined with respect to specific entropy, is also associated with a discontinuity in energetic proton intensities. The energetic particle data (greater than 60 keV) and how they were ordered with respect to interfaces and with respect to the magnetic field were examined.

  11. Particle acceleration at corotating interaction regions in the heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubouchi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Hybrid simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of both solar wind protons and interplanetary pickup ions (PUIs) around the corotating interaction region (CIR). The one-dimensional system is applied in order to focus on processes in the direction of CIR propagation. The CIR is bounded by forward and reverse shocks, which are responsible for particle acceleration. The effective acceleration of solar wind protons takes place when the reverse shock (fast wind side) favors a quasi-parallel regime. The diffusive process accounts for this acceleration, and particles can gain energy in a suprathermal range (on the order of 10 keV). In contrast, the PUI acceleration around the shock differs from the conventional model in which the motional electric field along the shock surface accelerates particles. Owing to their large gyroradius, PUIs can gyrate between the upstream and downstream, several proton inertial lengths away from the shock. This 'cross-shock' gyration results in a net velocity increase in the field-aligned component, indicating that the magnetic mirror force is responsible for acceleration. The PUIs that remain in the vicinity of the shock for a long duration (tens of gyroperiods) gain much energy and are reflected back toward the upstream. These reflected energetic PUIs move back and forth along the magnetic field between a pair of CIRs that are magnetically connected. The PUIs are repeatedly accelerated in each reflection, leading to a maximum energy gain close to 100 keV. This mechanism can be evaluated in terms of 'preacceleration' for the generation of anomalous cosmic rays.

  12. An analysis of the CoRoT-2 system: a young spotted star and its inflated giant planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, T.; Havel, M.

    2011-03-01

    . Conclusions: Additional observations of CoRoT-2 that could help us to understand this system include searches for an infrared excess, a debris disk, and additional companions. The determination of a complete infrared lightcurve including both the primary and secondary transits would also be extremely valuable to constrain the planet's atmospheric properties and determine the planet-to-star radius ratio in a manner less vulnerable to systematic errors caused by stellar activity.

  13. Low-Torque Seal Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Borowski, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The EcoTurn Class K production prototypes have passed all AAR qualification tests and received conditional approval. The accelerated life test on the second set of seals is in progress. Due to the performance of the first set, no problems are expected.The seal has demonstrated superior performance over the HDL seal in the test lab with virtually zero torque and excellent contamination exclusion and grease retention.

  14. Torque and Twist against Superlubricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Alexander E.; Dienwiebel, Martin; Frenken, Joost W. M.; Klafter, Joseph; Urbakh, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Superlubricity between incommensurate surfaces provides a desired low-friction state essential for the function of small-scale machines. Here we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that superlubricity in contacts lubricated by lamellar solids might be eliminated due to torque-induced reorientation coupled to lateral motion. We find that the possibility of reorientation always leads to stabilization of a high frictional state which corresponds to a commensurate configuration.

  15. Torque and twist against superlubricity.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Alexander E; Dienwiebel, Martin; Frenken, Joost W M; Klafter, Joseph; Urbakh, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Superlubricity between incommensurate surfaces provides a desired low-friction state essential for the function of small-scale machines. Here we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that superlubricity in contacts lubricated by lamellar solids might be eliminated due to torque-induced reorientation coupled to lateral motion. We find that the possibility of reorientation always leads to stabilization of a high frictional state which corresponds to a commensurate configuration.

  16. Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valish, Dana J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 and early 2010, a test was performed to quantify the torque required to manipulate joints in several existing operational and prototype space suits in an effort to develop joint torque requirements appropriate for a new Constellation Program space suit system. The same test method was levied on the Constellation space suit contractors to verify that their suit design meets the requirements. However, because the original test was set up and conducted by a single test operator there was some question as to whether this method was repeatable enough to be considered a standard verification method for Constellation or other future space suits. In order to validate the method itself, a representative subset of the previous test was repeated, using the same information that would be available to space suit contractors, but set up and conducted by someone not familiar with the previous test. The resultant data was compared using graphical and statistical analysis and a variance in torque values for some of the tested joints was apparent. Potential variables that could have affected the data were identified and re-testing was conducted in an attempt to eliminate these variables. The results of the retest will be used to determine if further testing and modification is necessary before the method can be validated.

  17. Torque coordinating robust control of shifting process for dry dual clutch transmission equipped in a hybrid car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.-G.; Chen, H.-J.; Yang, Y.-Y.; He, L.

    2015-09-01

    For a hybrid car equipped with dual clutch transmission (DCT), the coordination control problems of clutches and power sources are investigated while taking full advantage of the integrated starter generator motor's fast response speed and high accuracy (speed and torque). First, a dynamic model of the shifting process is established, the vehicle acceleration is quantified according to the intentions of the driver, and the torque transmitted by clutches is calculated based on the designed disengaging principle during the torque phase. Next, a robust H∞ controller is designed to ensure speed synchronisation despite the existence of model uncertainties, measurement noise, and engine torque lag. The engine torque lag and measurement noise are used as external disturbances to initially modify the output torque of the power source. Additionally, during the torque switch phase, the torque of the power sources is smoothly transitioned to the driver's demanded torque. Finally, the torque of the power sources is further distributed based on the optimisation of system efficiency, and the throttle opening of the engine is constrained to avoid sharp torque variations. The simulation results verify that the proposed control strategies effectively address the problem of coordinating control of clutches and power sources, establishing a foundation for the application of DCT in hybrid cars.

  18. Existence of a component corotating with the earth in high-latitude disturbance magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, A.; Kim, J. S.; Sugiura, M.

    1982-01-01

    A study of the data from the high-latitude North American IMS network of magnetic stations suggests that there is a component in substorm perturbations that corotates with the earth. It is as yet not certain whether the existence of this component stems from the corotation of a part of the magnetospheric plasma involved in the substorm mechanism or if it is a 'phase change' resulting from the control of the substorm manifestations by the earth's main magnetic field which is not axially symmetric. There are other geophysical phenomena showing a persistence of longitudinal variations corotating with the earth. These phenomena are of significance for a better understanding of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling.

  19. New Torque Estimation Method Considering Spatial Harmonics and Torque Ripple Reduction in Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Hajime; Tomigashi, Yoshio; Ueyama, Kenji; Inoue, Yukinori; Morimoto, Shigeo

    This paper proposes a new torque estimation method that takes into account the spatial harmonics of permanent magnet synchronous motors and that is capable of real-time estimation. First, the torque estimation equation of the proposed method is derived. In the method, the torque ripple of a motor can be estimated from the average of the torque calculated by the conventional method (cross product of the fluxlinkage and motor current) and the torque calculated from the electric input power to the motor. Next, the effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by simulations in which two kinds of motors with different components of torque ripple are considered. The simulation results show that the proposed method estimates the torque ripple more accurately than the conventional method. Further, the effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by performing on experiment. It is shown that the torque ripple is decreased by using the proposed method to the torque control.

  20. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold.

    PubMed

    Beeby, Morgan; Ribardo, Deborah A; Brennan, Caitlin A; Ruby, Edward G; Jensen, Grant J; Hendrixson, David R

    2016-03-29

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes.

  1. The study of Be stars with the CoRoT satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diago, P. D.; Gutierrez-Soto, J.; Fabregat, J.; Suso, J.; COROT Be Team

    2011-11-01

    The CoRoT space mission, launched in December 2006, is a spacecraft devoted to the study of the stellar interiors and the exo-planet search. Concerning the seismology of the Be stars, the presence of pulsations in late-type Be stars is still a matter of controversy. It constitutes an important issue to establish the relationship between non-radial pulsations and the mass-loss mechanism in Be stars. In this field, the CoRoT satellite is providing data with an unprecedent quality and precision that is confirming non-radial pulsations in Be stars. The CoRoT Be Team is an international collaboration composed by members from France, Spain, Brazil and Belgium and is in charge of the exploitation and analysis of the Be stars data. In this work we present the highlighted results of the observed Be stars by CoRoT and the future prospects of the CoRoT Be Team. These results include the detection of the Be star HD 49 330 during an outburst phase and the measurement of the change in the oscillation spectrum during this rare event. These observations gave insight into the nature of the explosion. It will help to solve a question that has been pending for years: are oscillations the cause of the outbursts? Moreover, for the first time, the CoRoT satellite has detected simultaneously the rotational and the pulsational frequencies for the Be star HD 50 209, which constitutes a proof of the presence of pulsations in the Be stars. %J Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics VI, Proceedings of the IX Scientific Meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society (SEA), held in Madrid, September 13 - 17, 2010, Eds.: M. R. Zapatero Osorio, J. Gorgas, J. Maiz Apellaniz, J. R. Pardo, and A. Gil de Paz., p. 531-531

  2. Torque magnetometry in unconventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lu

    This thesis describes torque magnetometry studies on unconventional superconductors. Torque magnetometry measures the anisotropic magnetization of samples by recording their torque signals in a tilted magnetic field. Applied to superconductors, this method provides a reliable way to measure the field dependence of magnetization with high resolution under extreme conditions: DC magnetic fields from zero to 45.2 T, and temperature from 300 mK to 300K. The results can be used to determine many important parameters, such as the upper critical field H c2, the superconducting condensation energy, the onset temperature of diamagnetic signals, and so on. We carried out the torque magnetometry measurements on unconventional superconductors---high Tc superconductors and the p-wave superconductor Sr2RuO4---and uncovered new features that do not exist in conventional BCS superconductors. In high Tc superconductors, our torque magnetometry studies focus on the properties of the vortex liquid state. First, by comparing the observed magnetization curves with the Nernst effect results in Bi 2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta, we confirm that the unusually large Nernst effect signals originate from the surviving vortex liquid state above Tc. Second, the M-H curves near the critical temperature Tc suggest that the nature of the transition is the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Near Tc, the magnetization response at low field is strongly nonlinear, and the T dependence of the magnetic susceptibility in the low-field limit approaches the predicted curve from the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Third, the measurements in intense magnetic field up to 45 T reveal the unusual, weak T-dependence of Hc2. These observations strongly support the existence of the vortex liquid state above Tc. The superconducting state is destroyed by the phase fluctuation of the pair condensate, while the pair condensate keeps its amplitude above T c. Further studies in single-layered high Tc superconductors reveal more

  3. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXVII. CoRoT-28b, a planet orbiting an evolved star, and CoRoT-29b, a planet showing an asymmetric transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, J.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Montagnier, G.; Fridlund, M.; Ammler-von Eiff, M.; Chaintreuil, S.; Damiani, C.; Deleuil, M.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Ferrigno, A.; Gandolfi, D.; Guillot, T.; Guenther, E. W.; Hatzes, A.; Hébrard, G.; Klagyivik, P.; Parviainen, H.; Pasternacki, Th.; Pätzold, M.; Sebastian, D.; Tadeu dos Santos, M.; Wuchterl, G.; Aigrain, S.; Alonso, R.; Almenara, J.-M.; Armstrong, J. D.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barge, P.; Barros, S. C. C.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Carpano, S.; Chaffey, C.; Deeg, H. J.; Díaz, R. F.; Dvorak, R.; Erikson, A.; Grziwa, S.; Korth, J.; Lammer, H.; Lindsay, C.; Mazeh, T.; Moutou, C.; Ofir, A.; Ollivier, M.; Pallé, E.; Rauer, H.; Rouan, D.; Samuel, B.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.

    2015-07-01

    Context. We present the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets by the satellite CoRoT. Aims: We aim at a characterization of the planetary bulk parameters, which allow us to further investigate the formation and evolution of the planetary systems and the main properties of the host stars. Methods: We used the transit light curve to characterize the planetary parameters relative to the stellar parameters. The analysis of HARPS spectra established the planetary nature of the detections, providing their masses. Further photometric and spectroscopic ground-based observations provided stellar parameters (log g, Teff, v sin i) to characterize the host stars. Our model takes the geometry of the transit to constrain the stellar density into account, which when linked to stellar evolutionary models, determines the bulk parameters of the star. Because of the asymmetric shape of the light curve of one of the planets, we had to include the possibility in our model that the stellar surface was not strictly spherical. Results: We present the planetary parameters of CoRoT-28b, a Jupiter-sized planet (mass 0.484 ± 0.087 MJup; radius 0.955 ± 0.066 RJup) orbiting an evolved star with an orbital period of 5.208 51 ± 0.000 38 days, and CoRoT-29b, another Jupiter-sized planet (mass 0.85 ± 0.20 MJup; radius 0.90 ± 0.16 RJup) orbiting an oblate star with an orbital period of 2.850 570 ± 0.000 006 days. The reason behind the asymmetry of the transit shape is not understood at this point. Conclusions: These two new planetary systems have very interesting properties and deserve further study, particularly in the case of the star CoRoT-29. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, was developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany, and Spain. Based on observations obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Corot photometry of TYC 455-791-1 (Strassmeier+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Granzer, T.; Mallonn, M.; Weber, M.; Weingrill, J.

    2016-11-01

    From the original CoRoT white-light flux obtained on two consecutive runs, we filter out obvious outliers from the SAA (south Atlantic Anomaly). The third column are the remaining CoRoT data points. The two data set were merged using individual zero-points of 716386.54e- for the first data set and 721882.56e- for the second data set, respectively. The magnitudes thus calculates are in column four. The last column is the combined model of the transit plus a 12th order Fourier-series fit to the out-of-transit data. (1 data file).

  5. Multiple star systems observed with CoRoT and Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, John

    2015-09-01

    The CoRoT and Kepler satellites were the first space platforms designed to perform high-precision photometry for a large number of stars. Multiple systems display a wide variety of photometric variability, making them natural benefactors of these missions. I review the work arising from CoRoT and Kepler observations of multiple systems, with particular emphasis on eclipsing binaries containing giant stars, pulsators, triple eclipses and/or low-mass stars. Many more results remain untapped in the data archives of these missions, and the future holds the promise of K2, TESS and PLATO.

  6. Spin-orbit torque opposing the Oersted torque in ultrathin Co/Pt bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, T. D. Irvine, A. C.; Heiss, D.; Kurebayashi, H.; Ferguson, A. J.; Wang, M.; Hindmarch, A. T.; Rushforth, A. W.

    2014-02-10

    Current-induced torques in ultrathin Co/Pt bilayers were investigated using an electrically driven ferromagnetic resonance technique. The angle dependence of the resonances, detected by a rectification effect as a voltage, was analysed to determine the symmetries and relative magnitudes of the spin-orbit torques. Both anti-damping (Slonczewski) and field-like torques were observed. As the ferromagnet thickness was reduced from 3 to 1 nm, the sign of the sum of the field-like torque and Oersted torque reversed. This observation is consistent with the emergence of a Rashba spin orbit torque in ultra-thin bilayers.

  7. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. VIII. CoRoT-7b: the first super-Earth with measured radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léger, A.; Rouan, D.; Schneider, J.; Barge, P.; Fridlund, M.; Samuel, B.; Ollivier, M.; Guenther, E.; Deleuil, M.; Deeg, H. J.; Auvergne, M.; Alonso, R.; Aigrain, S.; Alapini, A.; Almenara, J. M.; Baglin, A.; Barbieri, M.; Bruntt, H.; Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Cabrera, J.; Catala, C.; Carone, L.; Carpano, S.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Dvorak, R.; Erikson, A.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Foing, B.; Fressin, F.; Gandolfi, D.; Gillon, M.; Gondoin, Ph.; Grasset, O.; Guillot, T.; Hatzes, A.; Hébrard, G.; Jorda, L.; Lammer, H.; Llebaria, A.; Loeillet, B.; Mayor, M.; Mazeh, T.; Moutou, C.; Pätzold, M.; Pont, F.; Queloz, D.; Rauer, H.; Renner, S.; Samadi, R.; Shporer, A.; Sotin, Ch.; Tingley, B.; Wuchterl, G.; Adda, M.; Agogu, P.; Appourchaux, T.; Ballans, H.; Baron, P.; Beaufort, T.; Bellenger, R.; Berlin, R.; Bernardi, P.; Blouin, D.; Baudin, F.; Bodin, P.; Boisnard, L.; Boit, L.; Bonneau, F.; Borzeix, S.; Briet, R.; Buey, J.-T.; Butler, B.; Cailleau, D.; Cautain, R.; Chabaud, P.-Y.; Chaintreuil, S.; Chiavassa, F.; Costes, V.; Cuna Parrho, V.; de Oliveira Fialho, F.; Decaudin, M.; Defise, J.-M.; Djalal, S.; Epstein, G.; Exil, G.-E.; Fauré, C.; Fenouillet, T.; Gaboriaud, A.; Gallic, A.; Gamet, P.; Gavalda, P.; Grolleau, E.; Gruneisen, R.; Gueguen, L.; Guis, V.; Guivarc'h, V.; Guterman, P.; Hallouard, D.; Hasiba, J.; Heuripeau, F.; Huntzinger, G.; Hustaix, H.; Imad, C.; Imbert, C.; Johlander, B.; Jouret, M.; Journoud, P.; Karioty, F.; Kerjean, L.; Lafaille, V.; Lafond, L.; Lam-Trong, T.; Landiech, P.; Lapeyrere, V.; Larqué, T.; Laudet, P.; Lautier, N.; Lecann, H.; Lefevre, L.; Leruyet, B.; Levacher, P.; Magnan, A.; Mazy, E.; Mertens, F.; Mesnager, J.-M.; Meunier, J.-C.; Michel, J.-P.; Monjoin, W.; Naudet, D.; Nguyen-Kim, K.; Orcesi, J.-L.; Ottacher, H.; Perez, R.; Peter, G.; Plasson, P.; Plesseria, J.-Y.; Pontet, B.; Pradines, A.; Quentin, C.; Reynaud, J.-L.; Rolland, G.; Rollenhagen, F.; Romagnan, R.; Russ, N.; Schmidt, R.; Schwartz, N.; Sebbag, I.; Sedes, G.; Smit, H.; Steller, M. B.; Sunter, W.; Surace, C.; Tello, M.; Tiphène, D.; Toulouse, P.; Ulmer, B.; Vandermarcq, O.; Vergnault, E.; Vuillemin, A.; Zanatta, P.

    2009-10-01

    Aims: We report the discovery of very shallow (Δ F/F ≈ 3.4× 10-4), periodic dips in the light curve of an active V = 11.7 G9V star observed by the CoRoT satellite, which we interpret as caused by a transiting companion. We describe the 3-colour CoRoT data and complementary ground-based observations that support the planetary nature of the companion. Methods: We used CoRoT colours information, good angular resolution ground-based photometric observations in- and out- of transit, adaptive optics imaging, near-infrared spectroscopy, and preliminary results from radial velocity measurements, to test the diluted eclipsing binary scenarios. The parameters of the host star were derived from optical spectra, which were then combined with the CoRoT light curve to derive parameters of the companion. Results: We examined all conceivable cases of false positives carefully, and all the tests support the planetary hypothesis. Blends with separation >0.40´´or triple systems are almost excluded with a 8 × 10-4 risk left. We conclude that, inasmuch we have been exhaustive, we have discovered a planetary companion, named CoRoT-7b, for which we derive a period of 0.853 59 ± 3 × 10-5 day and a radius of Rp = 1.68 ± 0.09 R_Earth. Analysis of preliminary radial velocity data yields an upper limit of 21 M_Earth for the companion mass, supporting the finding. Conclusions: CoRoT-7b is very likely the first Super-Earth with a measured radius. This object illustrates what will probably become a common situation with missions such as Kepler, namely the need to establish the planetary origin of transits in the absence of a firm radial velocity detection and mass measurement. The composition of CoRoT-7b remains loosely constrained without a precise mass. A very high surface temperature on its irradiated face, ≈1800-2600 K at the substellar point, and a very low one, ≈50 K, on its dark face assuming no atmosphere, have been derived. The CoRoT space mission, launched on 27

  8. Larger plantar flexion torque variability implies less stable balance in the young: an association affected by knee position.

    PubMed

    Mello, Emanuele Moraes; Magalhães, Fernando Henrique; Kohn, André Fabio

    2013-12-01

    The present study examined the association between plantar flexion torque variability during isolated isometric contractions and during quiet bipedal standing. For plantar flexion torque measurements in quiet stance (QS), subjects stood still over a force plate. The mean plantar flexion torque level exerted by each subject in QS (divided by 2 to give the torque due to a single leg) served as the target torque level for right leg force-matching tasks in extended knee (KE) and flexed knee (KF) conditions. Muscle activation levels (EMG amplitudes) of the triceps surae and mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation of plantar flexion torque were computed from signals acquired during periods with and without visual feedback. No significant correlations were found between EMG amplitudes and torque variability, regardless of the condition and muscle being analyzed. A significant correlation was found between torque variability in QS and KE, whereas no significant correlation was found between torque variability in QS and KF, regardless of vision availability. Therefore, torque variability measured in a controlled extended knee plantar flexion contraction is a predictor of torque variability in the anterior-posterior direction when the subjects are in quiet standing. In other words, larger plantar flexion torque variability in KE (but not in KF) implies less stable balance. The mechanisms underlying the findings above are probably associated with the similar proprioceptive feedback from the triceps surae in QS and KE and poorer proprioceptive feedback from the triceps surae in KF due to the slackening of the gastrocnemii. An additional putative mechanism includes the different torque contributions of each component of the triceps surae in the two knee angles. From a clinical and research standpoint, it would be advantageous to be able to estimate changes in balance ability by means of simple measurements of torque variability in a force matching task.

  9. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XX. CoRoT-20b: A very high density, high eccentricity transiting giant planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleuil, M.; Bonomo, A. S.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Erikson, A.; Bouchy, F.; Havel, M.; Aigrain, S.; Almenara, J.-M.; Alonso, R.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barge, P.; Bordé, P.; Bruntt, H.; Cabrera, J.; Carpano, S.; Cavarroc, C.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Damiani, C.; Deeg, H. J.; Dvorak, R.; Fridlund, M.; Hébrard, G.; Gandolfi, D.; Gillon, M.; Guenther, E.; Guillot, T.; Hatzes, A.; Jorda, L.; Léger, A.; Lammer, H.; Mazeh, T.; Moutou, C.; Ollivier, M.; Ofir, A.; Parviainen, H.; Queloz, D.; Rauer, H.; Rodríguez, A.; Rouan, D.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.; Tal-Or, L.; Tingley, B.; Weingrill, J.; Wuchterl, G.

    2012-02-01

    We report the discovery by the CoRoT space mission of a new giant planet, CoRoT-20b. The planet has a mass of 4.24 ± 0.23 MJup and a radius of 0.84 ± 0.04 RJup. With a mean density of 8.87 ± 1.10 g cm-3, it is among the most compact planets known so far. Evolutionary models for the planet suggest a mass of heavy elements of the order of 800 M⊕ if embedded in a central core, requiring a revision either of the planet formation models or both planet evolution and structure models. We note however that smaller amounts of heavy elements are expected by more realistic models in which they are mixed throughout the envelope. The planet orbits a G-type star with an orbital period of 9.24 days and an eccentricity of 0.56.The star's projected rotational velocity is vsini = 4.5 ± 1.0 km s-1, corresponding to a spin period of 11.5 ± 3.1 days if its axis of rotation is perpendicular to the orbital plane. In the framework of Darwinian theories and neglecting stellar magnetic breaking, we calculate the tidal evolution of the system and show that CoRoT-20b is presently one of the very few Darwin-stable planets that is evolving toward a triple synchronous state with equality of the orbital, planetary and stellar spin periods. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany, and Spain.

  10. The role of interaction torque and muscle torque in the control of downward squatting.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroto; Murakami, Kenichi; Kawakami, Shingo; Suzuki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were first to analyze the multijoint dynamics of downward squatting, and to examine the contribution of interaction torque and muscle torque to net torque, and second, to examine mechanisms of movement control. [Subjects] The subjects were 31 healthy men with a mean age of 21.0 ± 1.2 years (range, 19-24 years). [Methods] Squatting tasks with the trunk in two positions, an erect and anterior tilt position, were performed by the subjects. Net, interaction, muscle, and gravity torque were calculated according to the Lagrange equation using 3D tracking data. [Results] The contribution ratio of interaction torque to net torque was approximately 90%, irrespective of the joint and task. In contrast, muscle torque showed complicated behavior to compensate for gravity torque. A combined muscle and gravity torque profile showed flexion or dorsiflexion immediately after the initiation of the movement, and it later changed to extension or plantar flexion. [Conclusion] The torque that contributes almost exclusively to the net torque was interaction torque. The combination of muscle and gravity torque at the knee joint and the hip joint is important for movement control, independent of the starting position.

  11. Landau-Lifshitz theory of thermomagnonic torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2015-07-01

    We derive the thermomagnonic torque associated with smooth magnetic textures subjected to a temperature gradient in the framework of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. Our approach captures on equal footing two distinct contributions: (i) a local entropic torque that is caused by a temperature dependence of the effective exchange field, the existence of which had been previously suggested based on numerics, and (ii) the well-known spin-transfer torque induced by thermally induced magnon flow. The dissipative components of two torques have the same structure, following a common phenomenology, but opposite signs, with the twice as large entropic torque leading to a domain-wall motion toward the hotter region. We compare the efficiency of the torque-driven domain-wall motion with the recently proposed Brownian thermophoresis.

  12. Molecular characterization of human Torque Teno virus

    PubMed Central

    WEI, YOUPING; CHEN, MINYANG; YANG, XIA; ZHANG, LIMING; RAO, LIHUA; YUAN, FEIFANG; WANG, YANGQIN; GONG, JING; LI, LIANPING

    2015-01-01

    The present study analyzed the presence of human Torque Teno virus (TTV) in hospitalized patients from different departments. In total, 378 serum specimens were collected from the patients (171 with cardiovascular disease, 192 with tumor and 15 with gastroenteritis) and analyzed by ELISA and nest-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect the presence of TTV. The results showed that 64 specimens (17%) were TTV positive from detection with the human ELISA kit, and the patients aged <30 years have a higher prevalence. TTV in males was more common than in female patients. In addition, nest-PCR was used to detect TTV within different phylogenetic groups among the 64 specimens, and the results showed that groups 1 (TA278 strain), 4 (KC009) and 5 (CT39) were much more prevalent than groups 2 (PMV isolate) and 3 (11 genotypes) in the different departmental patients. PMID:26623023

  13. Spin-Orbit Torques and Anisotropic Magnetization Damping in Skyrmion Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hals, Kjetil; Brataas, Arne

    2014-03-01

    We theoretically study the effects of reactive and dissipative homogeneous spin-orbit torques and anisotropic damping on the current-driven skyrmion dynamics in cubic chiral magnets. Our results demonstrate that spin-orbit torques play a significant role in the current-induced skyrmion velocity. The dissipative spin-orbit torque generates a relativistic Magnus force on the skyrmions, whereas the reactive spin-orbit torque yields a correction to both the drift velocity along the current direction and the transverse velocity associated with the Magnus force. The spin-orbit torque corrections to the velocity scale linearly with the skyrmion size, which is inversely proportional to the spin-orbit coupling. Consequently, the reactive spin-orbit torque correction can be the same order of magnitude as the non-relativistic contribution. More importantly, the dissipative spin-orbit torque can be the dominant force that causes a deflected motion of the skyrmions if the torque exhibits a linear or quadratic relationship with the spin-orbit coupling. In addition, we demonstrate that the skyrmion velocity is determined by anisotropic magnetization damping parameters governed by the skyrmion size.

  14. Design of a new torque standard machine based on a torque generation method using electromagnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Atsuhiro; Ueda, Kazunaga; Fujii, Kenichi

    2017-02-01

    To allow the application of torque standards in various industries, we have been developing torque standard machines based on a lever deadweight system, i.e. a torque generation method using gravity. However, this method is not suitable for expanding the low end of the torque range, because of the limitations to the sizes of the weights and moment arms. In this study, the working principle of the torque generation method using an electromagnetic force was investigated by referring to watt balance experiments used for the redefinition of the kilogram. Applying this principle to a rotating coordinate system, an electromagnetic force type torque standard machine was designed and prototyped. It was experimentally demonstrated that SI-traceable torque could be generated by converting electrical power to mechanical power. Thus, for the first time, SI-traceable torque was successfully realized using a method other than that based on the force of gravity.

  15. 40 CFR 1065.310 - Torque calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... range. Oscillate or rotate the dynamometer during calibration to reduce frictional static hysteresis... during calibration to reduce frictional static hysteresis. In this case, the reference torque...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.310 - Torque calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... range. Oscillate or rotate the dynamometer during calibration to reduce frictional static hysteresis... during calibration to reduce frictional static hysteresis. In this case, the reference torque...

  17. Torque limited drive for manual valves

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Philip G.; Underwood, Daniel E.

    1989-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a torque-limiting handwheel device for preventing manual valves from being damaged due to the application of excessive torque during the opening or closing operation of the valves. Torque can only be applied when ridges in the handwheel assembly engage in channels machined in the face of the baseplate. The amount of torque required for disengagement of the ridges from the channels is determined by the force exerted by various Bellville springs and the inclination of the side faces of the channels.

  18. Torque limited drive for manual valves

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Philip G.; Underwood, Daniel E.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a torque-limiting handwheel device for preventing manual valves from being damaged due to the application of excessive torque during the opening or closing operation of the valves. Torque can only be applied when ridges in the handwheel assembly engage in channels machined in the face of the baseplate. The amount of torque required for disengagement of the ridges from the channels is determined by the force exerted by various Bellville springs and the inclination of the side faces of the channels.

  19. The intimate relation between the low T/W instability and the corotation point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passamonti, A.; Andersson, N.

    2015-01-01

    We study the low T/W instability associated with the f mode of differentially rotating stars, where T and W are, respectively, the kinetic and gravitational energy of the star. Our stellar models are described by a polytropic equation of state and the rotation profile is given by the standard j-constant law. The properties of the relevant oscillation modes, including the instability growth time, are determined from time evolutions of the linearized dynamical equations in Newtonian gravity. In order to analyse the instability we monitor also the canonical energy and angular momentum. Our results demonstrate that the l = m = 2 f mode becomes unstable as soon as a corotation point develops inside the star (i.e. whenever there is a point where the mode's pattern speed matches the bulk angular velocity). Considering various degrees of differential rotation, we show that the instability grows faster deep inside the corotation region and deduce an empirical relation that correlates the mode frequency and the star's parameters, which captures the main features of the l = m = 2 f-mode growth time. This function is proportional to the product of the kinetic to gravitational energy ratio and the gradient of the star's spin, strengthening further the relationship between the corotation point and the low T/W instability. We briefly consider also the l = m = 2 r mode and demonstrate that it never moves far inside the corotation region even for significant differential rotation.

  20. CoRoT-2a Magnetic Activity: Hints for Possible Star-Planet Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Isabella; Lanza, Antonino F.; Leto, Giuseppe; Messina, Sergio; Barge, Pierre; Baglin, Annie

    2009-09-01

    CoRoT-2a is a young (≈0.5 Gyr) G7V star accompanied by a transiting hot-Jupiter, discovered by the CoRoT satellite (Alonso et al. Astron Astrophys 482:L21, 2008; Bouchy et al. Astron Astrophys 482:L25, 2008). An analysis of its photospheric activity, based on spot modelling techniques previously developed by our group for the analysis of the Sun as a star, shows that the active regions on CoRoT-2a arised within two active longitudes separated by about 180° and rotating with periods of 4.5221 and 4.5543 days, respectively, at epoch of CoRoT observations (112 continous days centered at ≈2007.6). We show that the total spotted area oscillates with a period of about 28.9 days, a value close to 10 times the synodic period of the planet with respect to the active longitude pattern rotating in 4.5221 days. Moreover, the variance of the stellar flux is modulated in phase with the planet orbital period. This suggests a possible star-planet magnetic interaction, a phenomenon already seen in other extrasolar planetary systems hosting hot-Jupiters.

  1. High-torque quiet gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Paul E.

    1995-07-01

    A high-torque quiet gear construction consists of an inner hub having a plurality of circumferentially spaced arms extending radially outwardly therefrom, and an outer ring member having a plurality of circumferentially spaced-teeth extending radially inwardly therefrom. The ring member further includes a plurality of gear formations on an outer surface thereof for intermeshing with other gears. The teeth of the ring member are received in spaced relation in corresponding spaces formed between adjacent arms of the hub. An elastomeric member is received in the space formed between the hub and the ring member to form a resilient correction between the arms of the hub and the teeth of the ring member. The side surfaces of the arms and the teeth extend generally parallel to each other and at least partially overlap in a longitudinal direction. The purpose of this configuration is to place the elastomeric member in compression when torque is applied to the hub. Since elastomeric material is relatively incompressible, the result is low shear loads on the adhesive bonds which hold the elastomeric member to both the hub and outer ring member.

  2. Long-Term Tracking of Corotating Density Structures Using Heliospheric Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, I.; Rouillard, A. P.; Davies, J. A.; Bothmer, V.; Eastwood, J. P.; Gallagher, P.; Harrison, R. A.; Kilpua, E.; Möstl, C.; Perry, C. H.; Rodriguez, L.; Lavraud, B.; Génot, V.; Pinto, R. F.; Sanchez-Diaz, E.

    2016-08-01

    The systematic monitoring of the solar wind in high-cadence and high-resolution heliospheric images taken by the Solar-Terrestrial Relation Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft permits the study of the spatial and temporal evolution of variable solar wind flows from the Sun out to 1 AU, and beyond. As part of the EU Framework 7 (FP7) Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service (HELCATS) project, we have generated a catalog listing the properties of 190 corotating structures well-observed in images taken by the Heliospheric Imager (HI) instruments onboard STEREO-A (ST-A). Based on this catalog, we present here one of very few long-term analyses of solar wind structures advected by the background solar wind. We concentrate on the subset of plasma density structures clearly identified inside corotating structures. This analysis confirms that most of the corotating density structures detected by the heliospheric imagers comprises a series of density inhomogeneities advected by the slow solar wind that eventually become entrained by stream interaction regions. We have derived the spatial-temporal evolution of each of these corotating density structures by using a well-established fitting technique. The mean radial propagation speed of the corotating structures is found to be 311 ±31 km s^{-1}. Such a low mean value corresponds to the terminal speed of the slow solar wind rather than the speed of stream interfaces, which is typically intermediate between the slow and fast solar wind speeds ({˜} 400 km s^{-1}). Using our fitting technique, we predicted the arrival time of each corotating density structure at different probes in the inner heliosphere. We find that our derived speeds are systematically lower by {˜} 100 km s^{-1} than those measured in situ at the predicted impact times. Moreover, for cases when a stream interaction region is clearly detected in situ at the estimated impact time, we find that our derived speeds are lower than the speed of the

  3. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission . XIX. CoRoT-23b: a dense hot Jupiter on an eccentric orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouan, D.; Parviainen, H.; Moutou, C.; Deleuil, M.; Fridlund, M.; Ofir, A.; Havel, M.; Aigrain, S.; Alonso, R.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barge, P.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Cabrera, J.; Cavarroc, C.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Deeg, H. J.; Diaz, R. F.; Dvorak, R.; Erikson, A.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Gandolfi, D.; Gillon, M.; Guillot, T.; Hatzes, A.; Hébrard, G.; Jorda, L.; Léger, A.; Llebaria, A.; Lammer, H.; Lovis, C.; Mazeh, T.; Ollivier, M.; Pätzold, M.; Queloz, D.; Rauer, H.; Samuel, B.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.; Tingley, B.; Wuchterl, G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of CoRoT-23b, a hot Jupiter transiting in front of its host star with a period of 3.6314 ± 0.0001 days. This planet was discovered thanks to photometric data secured with the CoRoT satellite, combined with spectroscopic radial velocity (RV) measurements. A photometric search for possible background eclipsing binaries conducted at CFHT and OGS concluded with a very low risk of false positives. The usual techniques of combining RV and transit data simultaneously were used to derive stellar and planetary parameters. The planet has a mass of Mp = 2.8 ± 0.3 MJup, a radius of Rpl= 1.05 ± 0.13RJup, a density of ≈ 3 g cm-3. RV data also clearly reveal a nonzero eccentricity of e = 0.16 ± 0.02. The planet orbits a mature G0 main sequence star of V = 15.5 mag, with a mass M⋆ = 1.14 ± 0.08 M⊙, a radius R ⋆ = 1. 61 ± 0.18 R⊙ and quasi-solarabundances. The age of the system is evaluated to be 7 Gyr, not far from the transition to subgiant, in agreement with the rather large stellar radius. The two features of a significant eccentricity of the orbit and of a fairly high density are fairly uncommon for a hot Jupiter. The high density is, however, consistent with a model of contraction of a planet at this mass, given the age of the system. On the other hand, at such an age, circularization is expected to be completed. In fact, we show that for this planetary mass and orbital distance, any initial eccentricity should not totally vanish after 7 Gyr, as long as the tidal quality factor Qp is more than a few 105, a value that is the lower bound of the usually expected range. Even if CoRoT-23b features a density and an eccentricity that are atypical of a hot Jupiter, it is thus not an enigmatic object. The CoRoT space mission, launched on 27 December 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. First CoRoT data are available to the public from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot

  4. On the role of corotation radius in the low T/W dynamical instability of differentially rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shin'ichirou; Saijo, Motoyuki

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the nature of so-called low T/W dynamical instability in a differentially rotating star, by focusing on the role played by the corotation radius of the unstable oscillation modes. A one-dimensional model of linear perturbation, which neglects dependence of variables on the coordinate along the rotational axis of the star, is solved to obtain stable and unstable eigenmodes. A linear eigenmode having a corotation radius, at which azimuthal pattern speed of the mode coincides with the stellar angular velocity, is categorized to either a complex (growing or damping) mode or a purely real mode belonging to a continuous spectrum of frequency. We compute canonical angular momentum and its flux to study eigenmodes with corotation radius. In a dynamically unstable mode, sound wave transports its angular momentum in such a way that the absolute value of the angular momentum is increased on both sides of the corotation radius. We further evaluate growth of amplitude of reflected sound wave incident to a corotation point, and find that the overreflection of the wave and the trapping of it between the corotation radius and the surface of the star may qualitatively explain dependences of eigenfrequencies on the stellar differential rotation. The results suggest that the low T/W instability may be caused by overreflection of sound waves trapped mainly between the surface of the star and a corotation radius.

  5. Theory comparison and numerical benchmarking on neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhirui; Park, Jong-Kyu; Logan, Nikolas; Kim, Kimin; Menard, Jonathan E.; Liu, Yueqiang

    2014-04-15

    Systematic comparison and numerical benchmarking have been successfully carried out among three different approaches of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) theory and the corresponding codes: IPEC-PENT is developed based on the combined NTV theory but without geometric simplifications [Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 065002 (2009)]; MARS-Q includes smoothly connected NTV formula [Shaing et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 025022 (2010)] based on Shaing's analytic formulation in various collisionality regimes; MARS-K, originally computing the drift kinetic energy, is upgraded to compute the NTV torque based on the equivalence between drift kinetic energy and NTV torque [J.-K. Park, Phys. Plasma 18, 110702 (2011)]. The derivation and numerical results both indicate that the imaginary part of drift kinetic energy computed by MARS-K is equivalent to the NTV torque in IPEC-PENT. In the benchmark of precession resonance between MARS-Q and MARS-K/IPEC-PENT, the agreement and correlation between the connected NTV formula and the combined NTV theory in different collisionality regimes are shown for the first time. Additionally, both IPEC-PENT and MARS-K indicate the importance of the bounce harmonic resonance which can greatly enhance the NTV torque when E×B drift frequency reaches the bounce resonance condition.

  6. Magnetic tweezers for the measurement of twist and torque.

    PubMed

    Lipfert, Jan; Lee, Mina; Ordu, Orkide; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; Dekker, Nynke H

    2014-05-19

    Single-molecule techniques make it possible to investigate the behavior of individual biological molecules in solution in real time. These techniques include so-called force spectroscopy approaches such as atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers, flow stretching, and magnetic tweezers. Amongst these approaches, magnetic tweezers have distinguished themselves by their ability to apply torque while maintaining a constant stretching force. Here, it is illustrated how such a "conventional" magnetic tweezers experimental configuration can, through a straightforward modification of its field configuration to minimize the magnitude of the transverse field, be adapted to measure the degree of twist in a biological molecule. The resulting configuration is termed the freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers. Additionally, it is shown how further modification of the field configuration can yield a transverse field with a magnitude intermediate between that of the "conventional" magnetic tweezers and the freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers, which makes it possible to directly measure the torque stored in a biological molecule. This configuration is termed the magnetic torque tweezers. The accompanying video explains in detail how the conversion of conventional magnetic tweezers into freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers and magnetic torque tweezers can be accomplished, and demonstrates the use of these techniques. These adaptations maintain all the strengths of conventional magnetic tweezers while greatly expanding the versatility of this powerful instrument.

  7. Ultrasonic resonant piezoelectric actuator with intrinsic torque measurement.

    PubMed

    Pott, Peter P; Matich, Sebastian; Schlaak, Helmut F

    2012-11-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic actuators are widely used in small-scale actuation systems, in which a closed-loop position control is usually utilized. To save an additional torque sensor, the intrinsic measurement capabilities of the piezoelectric material can be employed. To prove feasibility, a motor setup with clearly separated actuation for the friction and driving forces is chosen. The motor concept is based on resonant ultrasonic vibrations. To assess the effects of the direct piezoelectric effect, a capacitance bridge-type circuit has been selected. Signal processing is done by a measurement card with an integrated field-programmable gate array. The motor is used to drive a winch, and different torques are applied by means of weights to be lifted. Assessing the bridge voltage, a good proportionality to the applied torque of 1.47 mV/mN·m is shown. A hysteresis of 1% has been determined. The chosen motor concept is useful for intrinsic torque measurement. However, it provides drawbacks in terms of limited mechanical performance, wear, and thermal losses because of the soft piezoelectric material. Future work will comprise the application of the method to commercially available piezoelectric actuators as well as the implementation of the measurement circuit in an embedded system.

  8. Insertion torque, resonance frequency, and removal torque analysis of microimplants.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yu-Chuan; Ting, Chun-Chan; Du, Je-Kang; Chen, Chun-Ming; Wu, Ju-Hui; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to compare the insertion torque (IT), resonance frequency (RF), and removal torque (RT) among three microimplant brands. Thirty microimplants of the three brands were used as follows: Type A (titanium alloy, 1.5-mm × 8-mm), Type B (stainless steel, 1.5-mm × 8-mm), and Type C (titanium alloy, 1.5-mm × 9-mm). A synthetic bone with a 2-mm cortical bone and bone marrow was used. Each microimplant was inserted into the synthetic bone, without predrilling, to a 7 mm depth. The IT, RF, and RT were measured in both vertical and horizontal directions. One-way analysis of variance and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient tests were used for intergroup and intragroup comparisons, respectively. In the vertical test, the ITs of Type C (7.8 Ncm) and Type B (7.5 Ncm) were significantly higher than that of Type A (4.4 Ncm). The RFs of Type C (11.5 kHz) and Type A (10.2 kHz) were significantly higher than that of Type B (7.5 kHz). Type C (7.4 Ncm) and Type B (7.3 Ncm) had significantly higher RTs than did Type A (4.1 Ncm). In the horizontal test, both the ITs and RTs were significantly higher for Type C, compared with Type A. No significant differences were found among the groups, and the study hypothesis was accepted. Type A had the lowest inner/outer diameter ratio and widest apical facing angle, engendering the lowest IT and highest RF values. However, no significant correlations in the IT, RF, and RT were observed among the three groups.

  9. Radiation Forces and Torques without Stress (Tensors)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2011-01-01

    To understand radiation forces and torques or to calculate them does not require invoking photon or electromagnetic field momentum transfer or stress tensors. According to continuum electromagnetic theory, forces and torques exerted by radiation are a consequence of electric and magnetic fields acting on charges and currents that the fields induce…

  10. Casimir torque on a cylindrical gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Varun

    2014-08-01

    I utilize effective field theory(EFT) techniques to calculate the Casimir torque on a cylindrical gear in the presence of a polarizable but neutral object and present results for the energy and torque as a function of angle for a gear with multiple cogs, as well as for the case of a concentric cylindrical gear.

  11. 14 CFR 25.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.361 Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1) A limit engine torque.... (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts and supporting structure must be designed...

  12. 14 CFR 25.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.361 Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1) A limit engine torque.... (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts and supporting structure must be designed...

  13. 14 CFR 25.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.361 Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1) A limit engine torque.... (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts and supporting structure must be designed...

  14. 14 CFR 25.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.361 Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1) A limit engine torque.... (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts and supporting structure must be designed...

  15. 14 CFR 25.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.361 Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1) A limit engine torque.... (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts and supporting structure must be designed...

  16. The power of low-resolution spectroscopy: On the spectral classification of planet candidates in the ground-based CoRoT follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammler-von Eiff, M.; Sebastian, D.; Guenther, E. W.; Stecklum, B.; Cabrera, J.

    2015-02-01

    Planetary transits detected by the CoRoT mission can be mimicked by a low-mass star in orbit around a giant star. Spectral classification helps to identify the giant stars and also early-type stars which are often excluded from further follow-up. We study the potential and the limitations of low-resolution spectroscopy to improve the photometric spectral types of CoRoT candidates. In particular, we want to study the influence of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the target spectrum in a quantitative way. We built an own template library and investigate whether a template library from the literature is able to reproduce the classifications. Including previous photometric estimates, we show how the additional spectroscopic information improves the constraints on spectral type. Low-resolution spectroscopy (R≈ 1000) of 42 CoRoT targets covering a wide range in SNR (1-437) and of 149 templates was obtained in 2012-2013 with the Nasmyth spectrograph at the Tautenburg 2 m telescope. Spectral types have been derived automatically by comparing with the observed template spectra. The classification has been repeated with the external CFLIB library. The spectral class obtained with the external library agrees within a few sub-classes when the target spectrum has a SNR of about 100 at least. While the photometric spectral type can deviate by an entire spectral class, the photometric luminosity classification is as close as a spectroscopic classification with the external library. A low SNR of the target spectrum limits the attainable accuracy of classification more strongly than the use of external templates or photometry. Furthermore we found that low-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy ensures that good planet candidates are kept that would otherwise be discarded based on photometric spectral type alone.

  17. Estimating Torque Imparted on Spacecraft Using Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.; Macala, Glenn A.

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of missions with spacecraft flying by planetary moons with atmospheres; there will be future missions with similar flybys. When a spacecraft such as Cassini flies by a moon with an atmosphere, the spacecraft will experience an atmospheric torque. This torque could be used to determine the density of the atmosphere. This is because the relation between the atmospheric torque vector and the atmosphere density could be established analytically using the mass properties of the spacecraft, known drag coefficient of objects in free-molecular flow, and the spacecraft velocity relative to the moon. The density estimated in this way could be used to check results measured by science instruments. Since the proposed methodology could estimate disturbance torque as small as 0.02 N-m, it could also be used to estimate disturbance torque imparted on the spacecraft during high-altitude flybys.

  18. In-line rotating capacitive torque sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-09-10

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for measuring torques developed along a rotating mechanical assembly comprising a rotating inner portion and a stationary outer portion. The rotating portion has an electrically-conductive flexing section fitted between two coaxial shafts in a configuration which varies radially in accordance with applied torque. The stationary portion comprises a plurality of conductive plates forming a surface concentric with and having a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the rotating portion. The capacitance between the outer, nonrotating and inner, rotating portion varies with changes in the radial configuration of the rotating portion. Signal output varies approximately linearly with torque for small torques, nonlinearly for larger torques. The sensor is preferably surrounded by a conductive shell to minimize electrical interference from external sources. 18 figures.

  19. Torque requirement of rotating rods in airflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.; Crossman, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the torque required for rotating a rotor disk fitted with a number of radially arranged rods placed into a ducted airflow. An array of stationary rods, also radially arranged, was placed upstream close to the rotor with a small gap between the rods to cause wake interference. The results show that torque generally increased with airflow and the rate of increase varied considerably. At lower values of airflow, the rate of increase was larger than at higher airflow, and definite torque peaks occurred at certain airflow rates, where the torque attained a maximum within the test airflow range. During the test, a maximum blade passage frequency of 2037 Hz was attained. The results also show that the torque peaks occurred at the same Strouhal number for all speeds.

  20. Torque transducer based on fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Jiang, Shu; Li, Jiang; Lin, Jiejun; Qi, Hongli

    2016-11-01

    In order to obtain the accurate torque measurements in harsh condition, such as marine environment, a torque transducer based on fiber Bragg grating is proposed in this paper. According to its optimized elastomer design and fiber Bragg grati ng patching tactics, the new proposed torque transducer realizes automatic compensations of temperature and bending moment which avoids influences from environment. The accuracy and stability of the torquetransducer, as well as its under water performance are tested by loading tests both in air and in underwater environment, which indicate the designed tor que transducer is not only able to realize highaccurate and robust measurements, but also can be applied in torque sensing in harsh environment. We believe the proposed design detailed illustrated in this paper provides important reference for studies and applications on torque measurements in marine environment.

  1. In-line rotating capacitive torque sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring torques developed along a rotating mechanical assembly comprising a rotating inner portion and a stationary outer portion. The rotating portion has an electrically-conductive flexing section fitted between two coaxial shafts in a configuration which varies radially in accordance with applied torque. The stationary portion comprises a plurality of conductive plates forming a surface concentric with and having a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the rotating portion. The capacitance between the outer, nonrotating and inner, rotating portion varies with changes in the radial configuration of the rotating portion. Signal output varies approximately linearly with torque for small torques, nonlinearly for larger torques. The sensor is preferably surrounded by a conductive shell to minimize electrical interference from external sources.

  2. RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING TORQUE REQUIREMENTS COMPLIANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R.; Leduc, D.

    2011-03-24

    Shipping containers used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in commerce employ a variety of closure mechanisms. Often, these closure mechanisms require a specific amount of torque be applied to a bolt, nut or other threaded fastener. It is important that the required preload is achieved so that the package testing and analysis is not invalidated for the purpose of protecting the public. Torque compliance is a means of ensuring closure preload, is a major factor in accomplishing the package functions of confinement/containment, sub-criticality, and shielding. This paper will address the importance of applying proper torque to package closures, discuss torque value nomenclature, and present one methodology to ensure torque compliance is achieved.

  3. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XVII. The hot Jupiter CoRoT-17b: a very old planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csizmadia, Sz.; Moutou, C.; Deleuil, M.; Cabrera, J.; Fridlund, M.; Gandolfi, D.; Aigrain, S.; Alonso, R.; Almenara, J.-M.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barge, P.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Bruntt, H.; Carone, L.; Carpano, S.; Cavarroc, C.; Cochran, W.; Deeg, H. J.; Díaz, R. F.; Dvorak, R.; Endl, M.; Erikson, A.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Fruth, Th.; Gazzano, J.-C.; Gillon, M.; Guenther, E. W.; Guillot, T.; Hatzes, A.; Havel, M.; Hébrard, G.; Jehin, E.; Jorda, L.; Léger, A.; Llebaria, A.; Lammer, H.; Lovis, C.; MacQueen, P. J.; Mazeh, T.; Ollivier, M.; Pätzold, M.; Queloz, D.; Rauer, H.; Rouan, D.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.; Tingley, B.; Titz-Weider, R.; Wuchterl, G.

    2011-07-01

    We report on the discovery of a hot Jupiter-type exoplanet, CoRoT-17b, detected by the CoRoT satellite. It has a mass of 2.43 ± 0.30 MJup and a radius of 1.02 ± 0.07 RJup, while its mean density is 2.82 ± 0.38 g/cm3. CoRoT-17b is in a circular orbit with a period of 3.7681 ± 0.0003 days. The host star is an old (10.7 ± 1.0 Gyr) main-sequence star, which makes it an intriguing object for planetary evolution studies. The planet's internal composition is not well constrained and can range from pure H/He to one that can contain ~380 earth masses of heavier elements. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Part of the observations were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based on observations made with HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile (ESO program 184.C-0639). Based on observations made with the IAC80 telescope operated on the island of Tenerife by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in the Spanish Observatorio del Teide. Part of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  4. Correlation between architectural variables and torque in the erector spinae muscle during maximal isometric contraction.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio; González-Sánchez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This study analysed whether a significant relationship exists between the torque and muscle thickness and pennation angle of the erector spinae muscle during a maximal isometric lumbar extension with the lumbar spine in neutral position. This was a cross-sectional study in which 46 healthy adults performed three repetitions for 5 s of maximal isometric lumbar extension with rests of 90 s. During the lumbar extensions, bilateral ultrasound images of the erector spinae muscle (to measure pennation angle and muscle thickness) and torque were acquired. Reliability test analysis calculating the internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) of the measure, correlation between pennation angle, muscle thickness and torque extensions were examined. Through a linear regression the contribution of each independent variable (muscle thickness and pennation angle) to the variation of the dependent variable (torque) was calculated. The results of the reliability test were: 0.976-0.979 (pennation angle), 0.980-0.980 (muscle thickness) and 0.994 (torque). The results show that pennation angle and muscle thickness were significantly related to each other with a range between 0.295 and 0.762. In addition, multiple regression analysis showed that the two variables considered in this study explained 68% of the variance in the torque. Pennation angle and muscle thickness have a moderate impact on the variance exerted on the torque during a maximal isometric lumbar extension with the lumbar spine in neutral position.

  5. Optimal design and selection of magneto-rheological brake types based on braking torque and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Lang, V. T.; Choi, S. B.

    2015-06-01

    In developing magnetorheological brakes (MRBs), it is well known that the braking torque and the mass of the MRBs are important factors that should be considered in the product’s design. This research focuses on the optimal design of different types of MRBs, from which we identify an optimal selection of MRB types, considering braking torque and mass. In the optimization, common types of MRBs such as disc-type, drum-type, hybrid-type, and T-shape types are considered. The optimization problem is to find an optimal MRB structure that can produce the required braking torque while minimizing its mass. After a brief description of the configuration of the MRBs, the MRBs’ braking torque is derived based on the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model of the magnetorheological fluid. Then, the optimal designs of the MRBs are analyzed. The optimization objective is to minimize the mass of the brake while the braking torque is constrained to be greater than a required value. In addition, the power consumption of the MRBs is also considered as a reference parameter in the optimization. A finite element analysis integrated with an optimization tool is used to obtain optimal solutions for the MRBs. Optimal solutions of MRBs with different required braking torque values are obtained based on the proposed optimization procedure. From the results, we discuss the optimal selection of MRB types, considering braking torque and mass.

  6. Torque Measurement of 3-DOF Haptic Master Operated by Controllable Electrorheological Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jong-Seok; Choi, Seung-Bok; Lee, Yang-Sub

    2015-02-01

    This work presents a torque measurement method of 3-degree-of-freedom (3-DOF) haptic master featuring controllable electrorheological (ER) fluid. In order to reflect the sense of an organ for a surgeon, the ER haptic master which can generate the repulsive torque of an organ is utilized as a remote controller for a surgery robot. Since accurate representation of organ feeling is essential for the success of the robot-assisted surgery, it is indispensable to develop a proper torque measurement method of 3-DOF ER haptic master. After describing the structural configuration of the haptic master, the torque models of ER spherical joint are mathematically derived based on the Bingham model of ER fluid. A new type of haptic device which has pitching, rolling, and yawing motions is then designed and manufactured using a spherical joint mechanism. Subsequently, the field-dependent parameters of the Bingham model are identified and generating repulsive torque according to applied electric field is measured. In addition, in order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed torque model, a comparative work between simulated and measured torques is undertaken.

  7. Research on new dynamic torque calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Zhong Yu; Yin, Xiao

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic torque calibration method based on rotating table and interferometric system is studied in this paper. A load mass with certain moment of inertia are screwed on the top of torque transducer, the dynamic torque is realized by load object are traceable to angular acceleration and moment of inertia of the object by M (t)=I θ ¨(t) , where I is the total moment of inertia acting on the sensing element of the torque transducer and θ ¨ is the time and spatial-dependent angular acceleration of the load object which is directly measured by a laser interferometer. This paper will introduce a dynamic torque calibration system developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses servomotor to generate dynamic torque in the range from 0.1Nm to 200Nm, and heterodyne laser interferometers cooperated with column grating are used for angular acceleration measurement. An airbearing system is developed to increase the performance of the dynamic turque calibration system. This paper introduce the setup of the dynamic torque calibration system.

  8. Switching Torque Converter: Concept and Preliminary Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Koichi; Ikei, Yasushi

    It is preferable to refrain from switching the torque in mechanical systems because the abrupt change tends to cause vibration and noise. However, such vibration can be beneficial if it is used to store mechanical energy. Moreover, torque switching operations at higher frequencies are becoming possible because of the recent advances in clutch devices. This paper describes a novel torque conversion mechanism based on torque switching operations. The fundamental principle of the mechanism is the reciprocal translation between the work to and from axles and the rotational energy of a flywheel. Clutches are used to intermittently connect or disconnect the axles with the flywheel; the output torque is controlled by changing the time ratio of the connection. By performing switching operations at a higher frequency, almost continuous torque conversion can be realized. A prototype was created using electrorheological fluid clutches, and it showed the potential for torque conversion. The performance of the prototype was also analyzed by numerical simulation; this showed that the prototype worked in accordance with the principle. Moreover, the potential capability of the principle was investigated using a numerical model and the results suggest that by improving the mechanical design, a considerable improvement in performance is possible.

  9. Torque Ripple Reduction of Reluctance Torque Assisted Motors Using Asymmetric Flux Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramoto, Kenji; Takeda, Yoji; Sanada, Masayuki; Morimoto, Shigeo

    Interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) is efficient and can be operated in wide speed region; therefore it is used widely. However, torque ripple of reluctance torque assisted motors, for example IPMSM and synchronous reluctance motor (SynRM), is very large. The skew is known in the prior art as a torque ripple reduction method of AC motors. Although the skew is effective for torque ripple reduction, structure is complicated and it has the disadvantage that average torque will decrease. The discontinuous variation of magnetic resistance between flux barriers and teeth cause the torque ripple. In this paper, in order to ease the discontinuous variation of magnetic resistance, flux barriers are asymmetrically designed so that the relative position relation between flux barriers and teeth may not be in agreement as much as possible. As a result, the torque ripple can be reduced dramatically without the average torque decrease. The experimental motor has been fabricated and the results of measuring torque ripple prove the validity of the torque ripple reduction using asymmetric flux barriers.

  10. Magnetic torque on a rotating superconducting sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    The London theory of superconductivity is used to calculate the torque on a superconducting sphere rotating in a uniform applied magnetic field. The London theory is combined with classical electrodynamics for a calculation of the direct effect of excess charge on a rotating superconducting sphere. Classical electrodynamics, with the assumption of a perfect Meissner effect, is used to calculate the torque on a superconducting sphere rotating in an arbitrary magnetic induction; this macroscopic approach yields results which are correct to first order. Using the same approach, the torque due to a current loop encircling the rotating sphere is calculated.

  11. Direct computation of the sound from a compressible co-rotating vortex pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Brian E.; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1992-01-01

    The far-field sound from corotating vortices is computed by direct computation of the unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations on a computational mesh that extends to two acoustic wavelengths in all directions. The vortices undergo a period of corotation followed by a sudden merger. A 2D version of Moehring's equation is developed and used in conjunction with source terms computed in the simulation to predict the far-field sound. The prediction agrees with the simulation to within 3 percent. Results of far-field pressure fluctuations for an acoustically noncompact case are also presented for which the prediction is 66 percent too high. Results also indicate that the monopole contribution of 'viscous sound' is negligible for this flow.

  12. Stellar parameters for stars of the CoRoT exoplanet field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, C.; Maciel, S. C.; Vieira, S.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Leão, I. C.; de Oliveira, G. P.; Correia, C.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Catelan, M.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Spectroscopic observations represent a fundamental step in the physical characterization of stars and, in particular, in the precise location of stars in the HR diagram. Rotation is also a key parameter, impacting stellar properties and evolution, which modulates the interior and manifests itself on the surface of stars. To date, the lack of analysis based on large samples has prevented our understanding of the real impact of stellar parameters and rotation on the stellar evolution as well as on the behavior of surface abundances. The space missions, CoRoT and Kepler, are providing us with rotation periods for thousands of stars, thus enabling a robust assessment of the behavior of rotation for different populations and evolutionary stages. For these reasons, the follow-up programs are fundamental to increasing the returns of these space missions. An analysis that combines spectroscopic data and rotation/modulation periods obtained from these space missions provides the basis for establishing the evolutionary behavior of the angular momentum of solar-like stars at different evolutionary stages, and the relation of rotation with other relevant physical and chemical parameters. Aims: To support the computation and evolutionary interpretation of periods associated with the rotational modulation, oscillations, and variability of stars located in the CoRoT fields, we are conducting a spectroscopic survey for stars located in the fields already observed by the satellite. These observations allow us to compute physical and chemical parameters for our stellar sample. Methods: Using spectroscopic observations obtained with UVES/VLT and Hydra/Blanco, and based on standard analysis techniques, we computed physical and chemical parameters (Teff, log (g), [Fe/H], vmic, vrad, vsin (i), and A(Li)) for a large sample of CoRoT targets. Results: We provide physical and chemical parameters for a sample comprised of 138 CoRoT targets. Our analysis shows the stars in our

  13. Influence of magnetic reluctances of magnetic elements on servo valve torque motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changhai; Jiang, Hongzhou

    2016-01-01

    The current research of electro-hydraulic servo valves mainly focuses on the vibration, pressure oscillating and source of noise. Unfortunately, literatures relating to the study of the influence of the magnetic reluctances of the magnetic elements are rarely available. This paper aims to analyze the influence of the magnetic reluctances of the magnetic elements on torque motor. Considering these magnetic reluctances ignored in previous literatures, a new mathematical model of servo valve torque motor is developed and proposed based on the fundamental laws of electromagnetism. By using this new mathematical model and the previous models, electromagnetic torque constant and magnetic spring stiffness are evaluated for a given set of torque motor parameters. A computer simulation by using AMESim software is also performed for the same set of torque motor parameters to verify the proposed model. The theoretical results of electromagnetic torque constant and magnetic spring stiffness evaluated by the proposed model render closer agreement with the simulation results than those evaluated by the previous models. In addition, an experimental measurement of the magnetic flux densities in the air-gaps is carried out by using SFL218 servo valve torque motor. Compared with the theoretical results of the magnetic flux densities in the air-gaps evaluated by the previous models, the theoretical results evaluated by the proposed model also show better agreement with the experimental data. The proposed model shows the influence of the magnetic reluctances of the magnetic elements on the servo valve torque motor, and offers modified and analytical expressions to electromagnetic torque constant and magnetic spring stiffness. These modified and analytical expressions could provide guidance more accurately for a linear control design approach and sensitivity analysis on electro-hydraulic servo valves than the previous expressions.

  14. Mariner Venus/Mercury 1973 solar radiation force and torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgevic, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The need for an improvement of the mathematical model of the solar radiation force and torques for the Mariner Venus/Mercury spacecraft arises from the fact that this spacecraft will be steering toward the inner planets (Venus and Mercury), where, due to the proximity of the Sun, the effect of the solar radiation pressure is much larger than it was on the antecedent Mariner spacecraft, steering in the opposite direction. Therefore, although the model yielded excellent results in the case of the Mariner 9 Mars Orbiter, additional effects of negligible magnitudes for the previous missions of the Mariner spacecraft should now be included in the model. This study examines all such effects and incorporates them into the already existing model, as well as using the improved model for calculation of the solar radiation force and torques acting on the Mariner Venus/Mercury spacecraft.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CoRoT 105906206 frequencies analysis (da Silva+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, R.; Maceroni, C.; Gandolfi, D.; Lehmann, H.; Hatzes, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    The file frequenc.dat contains the table with 220 frequencies, amplitudes, and phases, together with their uncertainties, derived for the light curve of CoRoT 105906206 with pulsations only (after subtracting the best binary model). The uncertainties are the formal values computed using equations (4), (10), and (11) of Montgomery & O'Donoghue (1999DSSN...13...28M). (1 data file).

  16. Exploring the Helium Core of the δ Scuti Star CoRoT 102749568 with Asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinghao; Li, Yan; Lin, Guifang; Chen, Yanhui; Guo, Junjun

    2017-01-01

    Based on regularities in rotational splitting, we seek possible multiplets for the observed frequencies of CoRoT 102749568. There are 21 sets of multiplets identified, including four sets of multiplets with l = 1, nine sets of multiplets with l = 2, and eight sets of multiplets with l = 3. In particular, there are three complete triplets (f10, f12, f14), (f31, f34, f35), and (f41, f43, f44). The rotational period of CoRoT 102749568 is estimated to be {1.34}-0.05+0.04 days. When doing model fittings, three l = 1 modes (f12, f34, and f43) and the radial first overtone f13 are used. Our results shows that the three nonradial modes (f12, f34, and f43) are mixed modes, which mainly provide constraints on the helium core. The radial first overtone f13 mainly provides constraint on the stellar envelope. Hence the size of the helium core of CoRoT 102749568 is determined to be {M}{He} = 0.148 ± 0.003 M⊙ and {R}{He} = 0.0581 ± 0.0007 R⊙. The fundamental parameters of CoRoT 102749568 are determined to be M = 1.54 ± 0.03 M⊙, Z=0.006, {f}{ov}=0.004+/- 0.002, {log} g=3.696+/- 0.003, {T}{eff}=6886+/- 70 K, R = 2.916 ± 0.039 R⊙, and L = 17.12 ± 1.13 L⊙.

  17. A rotating Michelson interferometer from the co-rotating point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraner, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The phase shift induced by a uniform rotation in a Michelson interferometer is re-derived in the geometrical framework of the coordinate-free formalism of general relativity from the co-rotating point of view. The effect is second order in the ratio of the interferometer's speed to the speed of light and further suppressed by the ratio of the length of the interferometer's arms to the radius of rotation. The relation of the effect to gravitational time dilation is discussed.

  18. CoRoT observations of the young open cluster Dolidze 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripepi, V.; Leccia, S.; Baglin, A.; Ruoppo, A.; Bernabei, S.; Zwintz, K.; Cusano, F.; Gandolfi, D.; Guenter, E. W.; Alencar, S.; Marconi, M.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Palla, F.; Alcalá, J. M.; Boehm, T.; Catala, C.; Chavero, C.; Corradi, W. S.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; de La Reza, R.; Deluil, M.; Favata, F.; Fernandez, M.; Gregorio-Hetem, J.; Lepine, J. D. R.; Pinheiro, F. J. G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Quast, G.; Torres, C. A. O.; Weiss, W.

    2010-07-01

    We present some preliminary results based on the CoRoT observations of the young distant cluster Dolidze 25. The light curve for the 28 stars observed by the satellite have been analyzed and the relevant periodogram presented. As a result we have found two binary, three Pulsating Be, three SPB, two Spotted and one ellipsoidal variables. Noteworthy, we have also identified one PMS δ Scuti candidate.

  19. Speckle Imaging of Kepler and CoRoT Exo-planet Transit Candidate Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Horch, Elliott; Sherry, William; Ciardi, David

    2010-08-01

    Kepler and CoRoT are complementary space missions dedicated to the detection of exoplanets. The primary science goal of CoRoT is to find Neptune-sized (>3 Earth radii) planets in intermediate orbits, while the prime science goal of Kepler is to find Earth-sized planets (<3 Earth radii) in year-long orbits. Both missions employ the photometric transit method and both spacecraft are performing well with nominal operation of the spacecraft, telescopes, electronics, and instruments. As with ground-based surveys, Kepler and CoRoT candidates need to be screened for background eclipsing binary stars which, when photometrically blended with the primary target, can mimic exo-planetary transits. The list of candidate transiting planets found by Kepler/CoRoT requires follow-up to ascertain probable or certain exo- planet detection. While Earth-sized (and Neptune-sized in long orbital periods) exo-planets can not currently (easily) be confirmed from the ground, many of the false positive eliminations steps can be performed by ground-based observations. Follow-up for Kepler exo-planet candidates is now aimed at Neptune-size and smaller planets in longer period orbits. This proposal aims to obtain high resolution speckle imaging to observe Kepler/CoRoT exo-planet transit candidates in order to eliminate the largest false positive contributor in any transit search - background eclipsing binary stars or faint companion stars.

  20. A Model for Plasma Transport in a Corotation-Dominated Magnetosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontius, Duane Henry, Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The gross structures of the magnetospheres of the outer planets are decided by processes quite different from those predominant in that of the earth. The terrestrial plasmapause, the boundary beyond which plasma motion is principally determined by magnetospheric interaction with the solar wind, is typically inside geosynchronous orbit. Within the plasmasphere, rotational effects are present, but gravity exceeds the centrifugal force of corotation. In contrast, the Jovian plasmasphere extends to a distance at least twenty times farther than synchronous orbit, affording a large region where rotational effects are expected to he clearly manifest (Brice and Ioannidis, 1970). The goal of this thesis is to develop an appropriate theoretical model for treating the problem of plasma transport in a corotation dominated plasmasphere. The model presented here is intended to describe the radial transport of relatively cold plasma having an azimuthally uniform distribution in a dipolar magnetic field. The approach is conceptually similar to that of the radial diffusion model in that small scale motions are examined to infer global consequences, but the physical understanding of those small scale motions is quite different. In particular, discrete flux tubes of small cross section are assumed to move over distances large compared to their widths. The present model also differs from the corotating convection model by introducing a mechanism whereby the conservation of flux tube content along flowlines is violated. However, it is quite possible that a global convection pattern co -exists with the motions described here, leading to longitudinal asymmetries in the plasma distribution.

  1. THE CoRoT DISCOVERY OF A UNIQUE TRIPLE-MODE CEPHEID IN THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Poretti, E.; Baglin, A.; Weiss, W. W.

    2014-11-10

    The exploitation of the CoRoT treasure of stars observed in the exoplanetary field allowed the detection of a unusual triple-mode Cepheid in the Milky Way, CoRoT 0223989566. The two modes with the largest amplitudes and a period ratio of 0.80 are identified with the first (P {sub 1} = 1.29 days) and second (P {sub 2} = 1.03 days) radial overtones. The third period, which has the smallest amplitude but is able to produce combination terms with the other two, is the longest one (P {sub 3} = 1.89 days). The ratio of 0.68 between the first-overtone period and the third period is the unusual feature. Its identification with the fundamental radial or a nonradial mode is discussed with respect to similar cases in the Magellanic Clouds. In both cases, the period triplet and the respective ratios make the star unique in our Galaxy. The distance derived from the period-luminosity relation and the galactic coordinates put CoRoT 0223989566 in the metal-rich environment of the ''outer arm'' of the Milky Way.

  2. Modeling the propagation of solar energetic particles in corotating compression regions of solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharov, L.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Torsti, J.; Anttila, A.; Sahla, T.

    2003-11-01

    We present the first modeling of solar energetic particle (SEP) events inside corotating compression regions. We consider gradual compressions in the interplanetary magnetic field brought on by interaction of the solar wind streams of different speed. The compression model is similar to that previously suggested for the acceleration of low-energy particles associated with corotating interaction regions (CIRs). In the framework of focused transport, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of the SEP propagation, adiabatic deceleration and reacceleration. A trap-like structure of the interplanetary magnetic field modifies the SEP intensity-time profiles, energy spectra, and anisotropy. Particle diffusion and adiabatic deceleration are typically reduced. For this reason, at a corotating vantage point the SEP event development after the intensity maximum is slower than would be expected based on the modeling in the standard, Archimedean spiral field. At the noncorotating spacecraft the magnetic tube convection past the observer becomes more important. The numerical model forms a basis on which to interpret SEP observations made by present and future spacecrafts at the longitude-dependent speed of solar wind. In particular, the modeling results are similar to the patterns observed with the ERNE particle telescope on board SOHO in August 1996. In the proton anisotropy data, we find a signature of the magnetic mirror associated with the CIR. A relation is established between the spectra observed at 1 AU and the SEP injection spectrum near the Sun.

  3. BEER analysis of Kepler and CoRoT light curves. III. Spectroscopic confirmation of seventy new beaming binaries discovered in CoRoT light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal-Or, L.; Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The BEER algorithm searches stellar light curves for the BEaming, Ellipsoidal, and Reflection photometric modulations that are caused by a short-period companion. These three effects are typically of very low amplitude and can mainly be detected in light curves from space-based photometers. Unlike eclipsing binaries, these effects are not limited to edge-on inclinations. Aims: Applying the algorithm to wide-field photometric surveys such as CoRoT and Kepler offers an opportunity to better understand the statistical properties of short-period binaries. It also widens the window for detecting intrinsically rare systems, such as short-period brown-dwarf and massive-planetary companions to main-sequence stars. Methods: Applying the search to the first five long-run center CoRoT fields, we identified 481 non-eclipsing candidates with periodic flux amplitudes of 0.5-87 mmag. Optimizing the Anglo-Australian-Telescope pointing coordinates and the AAOmega fiber-allocations with dedicated softwares, we acquired six spectra for 231 candidates and seven spectra for another 50 candidates in a seven-night campaign. Analysis of the red-arm AAOmega spectra, which covered the range of 8342-8842 Å, yielded a radial-velocity precision of ~1 km s-1. Spectra containing lines of more than one star were analyzed with the two-dimensional correlation algorithm TODCOR. Results: The measured radial velocities confirmed the binarity of seventy of the BEER candidates - 45 single-line binaries, 18 double-line binaries, and 7 diluted binaries. We show that red giants introduce a major source of false candidates and demonstrate a way to improve BEER's performance in extracting higher fidelity samples from future searches of CoRoT light curves. The periods of the confirmed binaries span a range of 0.3-10 days and show a rise in the number of binaries per ΔlogP toward longer periods. The estimated mass ratios of the double-line binaries and the mass ratios assigned to the single

  4. Increasing Elbow Torque Output of Stroke Patients by EMG-Controlled External Torque

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract- A control algorithm for using homogenic EMG to control external assisting torque is developed for improving the elbow capability of...sacrificing performance. Keywords - Elbow , EMG, assisting torque, stroke I. INTRODUCTION Hemiparesis, which means partial loss of muscle strength...system to increase the total torque capability of the elbow for this class of patients. The system was controlled by surface EMG of biceps and

  5. Damping assembly for a torque converter clutch

    SciTech Connect

    Dull, D.C.

    1989-12-26

    This patent describes a turbine damped torque converter and clutch. It comprises: a pressure plate; a torque converter turbine; a torque converter impeller; means including a control chamber for the pressure plate means for controlling the apply and release of the clutch for engaging the clutch with the impeller; a torque converter output shaft; a planetary gear arrangement including an input gear drivingly connected with the pressure plate, a reaction gear drivingly connected with the turbine, an output member drivingly connected with the output shaft and pinion gear means meshing with the input gear and the reaction gear for drivingly interconnecting the turbine and the pressure plate at a drive ratio of the turbine to the pressure plate of less than 1:1; and one-way drive means disposed between the turbine and the output shaft for preventing the turbine from overrunning the output shaft.

  6. Torque equilibrium attitude control for Skylab reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    All the available torque equilibrium attitudes (most were useless from the standpoint of lack of electrical power) and the equilibrium seeking method are presented, as well as the actual successful application during the 3 weeks prior to Skylab reentry.

  7. Improved computed torque control for industrial robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uebel, Mark; Minis, Ioannis; Cleary, Kevin

    1992-01-01

    The authors examine the computed torque control problem for a robot arm with flexible, geared, joint drive systems which are typical in many industrial robots. The standard computed torque algorithm is not directly applicable to this class of manipulators due to the dynamics introduced by the joint drive systems. The proposed approach overcomes this problem by combining a novel computed torque algorithm with simple torque controllers at each joint of the robot. The control scheme is applied to a seven degree-of-freedom industrial manipulator, and the system performance in standard tasks is evaluated using both dynamic simulation and actual experiments. The results show that the proposed controller leads to improved tracking performance over a conventional PD (proportional plus derivative) controller.

  8. Fundamental limits of optical force and torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimzadegan, A.; Alaee, R.; Fernandez-Corbaton, I.; Rockstuhl, C.

    2017-01-01

    Optical force and torque provide unprecedented control on the spatial motion of small particles. A valid scientific question, that has many practical implications, concerns the existence of fundamental upper bounds for the achievable force and torque exerted by a plane wave illumination with a given intensity. Here, while studying isotropic particles, we show that different light-matter interaction channels contribute to the exerted force and torque, and analytically derive upper bounds for each of the contributions. Specific examples for particles that achieve those upper bounds are provided. We study how and to which extent different contributions can add up to result in the maximum optical force and torque. Our insights are important for applications ranging from molecular sorting, particle manipulation, and nanorobotics up to ambitious projects such as laser-propelled spaceships.

  9. Torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Losby, J E; Fani Sani, F; Grandmont, D T; Diao, Z; Belov, M; Burgess, J A J; Compton, S R; Hiebert, W K; Vick, D; Mohammad, K; Salimi, E; Bridges, G E; Thomson, D J; Freeman, M R

    2015-11-13

    A universal, torque-mixing method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy is presented. In analogy to resonance detection by magnetic induction, the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment can be measured in sensitive broadband spectroscopy, here using a resonant mechanical torque sensor. Unlike induction, the torque amplitude allows equilibrium magnetic properties to be monitored simultaneously with the spin dynamics. Comprehensive electron spin resonance spectra of a single-crystal, mesoscopic yttrium iron garnet disk at room temperature reveal assisted switching between magnetization states and mode-dependent spin resonance interactions with nanoscale surface imperfections. The rich detail allows analysis of even complex three-dimensional spin textures. The flexibility of microelectromechanical and optomechanical devices combined with broad generality and capabilities of torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy offers great opportunities for development of integrated devices.

  10. Torque-mixing Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob; Compton, Shawn; Hiebert, Wayne; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory; Thomson, Douglas; Freeman, Mark

    A universal, mechanical torque method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy is presented. In analogy to resonance detection by induction, a signal proportional to the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment can be measured as a pure mechanical torque in broadband, frequency-swept spectroscopy. Comprehensive electron spin resonance of a single-crystal, mesoscopic yttrium iron garnet disk at room temperature are presented to demonstrate the method. The rich detail allows analysis of even complex 3D spin textures.

  11. Mandibular lip bumper for molar torque control.

    PubMed

    Celentano, Giuseppe; Longobardi, Annalisa; Cannavale, Rosangela; Perillo, Letizia

    2011-01-01

    Treatment effects of lip bumpers alone include flaring of the mandibular incisors, distalization and uprighting of the mandibular first molars, and buccal expansion of the canines, premolars, and molar. Lip forces are transmitted through this appliance onto the molars. Moreover the lip bumper is able to derotate, expand or constrict, upright and reinforce the anchorage whereas torque control is lacking. Aim of this paper is the presentation of a new type of lip bumper that allows the molar torque control.

  12. Understanding mechanisms and factors related to implant fixation; a model study of removal torque.

    PubMed

    Stenlund, Patrik; Murase, Kohei; Stålhandske, Christina; Lausmaa, Jukka; Palmquist, Anders

    2014-06-01

    Osseointegration is a prerequisite for achieving a stable long-term fixation and load-bearing capacity of bone anchored implants. Removal torque measurements are often used experimentally to evaluate the fixation of osseointegrated screw-shaped implants. However, a detailed understanding of the way different factors influence the result of removal torque measurements is lacking. The present study aims to identify the main factors contributing to anchorage. Individual factors important for implant fixation were identified using a model system with an experimental design in which cylindrical or screw-shaped samples were embedded in thermosetting polymers, in order to eliminate biological variation. Within the limits of the present study, it is concluded that surface topography and the mechanical properties of the medium surrounding the implant affect the maximum removal torque. In addition to displaying effects individually, these factors demonstrate interplay between them. The rotational speed was found not to influence the removal torque measurements within the investigated range.

  13. Oscillation characteristics of zero-field spin transfer oscillators with field-like torque

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yuan-Yuan; Xue, Hai-Bin; Liu, Zhe-Jie

    2015-05-15

    We theoretically investigate the influence of the field-like spin torque term on the oscillation characteristics of spin transfer oscillators, which are based on MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) consisting of a perpendicular magnetized free layer and an in-plane magnetized pinned layer. It is demonstrated that the field-like torque has a strong impact on the steady-state precession current region and the oscillation frequency. In particular, the steady-state precession can occur at zero applied magnetic field when the ratio between the field-like torque and the spin transfer torque takes up a negative value. In addition, the dependence of the oscillation properties on the junction sizes has also been analyzed. The results indicate that this compact structure of spin transfer oscillator without the applied magnetic field is practicable under certain conditions, and it may be a promising configuration for the new generation of on-chip oscillators.

  14. Large amplitude oscillation of magnetization in spin-torque oscillator stabilized by field-like torque

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro Kubota, Hitoshi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Tsunegi, Sumito

    2015-05-07

    Oscillation frequency of spin torque oscillator with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and an in-plane magnetized pinned layer is theoretically investigated by taking into account the field-like torque. It is shown that the field-like torque plays an important role in finding the balance between the energy supplied by the spin torque and the dissipation due to the damping, which results in a steady precession. The validity of the developed theory is confirmed by performing numerical simulations based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation.

  15. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... limit pilot forces and torques are as follows: Control Maximum forces or torques for design...

  16. Torque and Learning and Behavior Problems in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zendel, Ivan H.; Pihl, R. O.

    1980-01-01

    Findings indicate minimal differences, on diagnostic tests, between children who exhibited torque and those who did not. Torque is defined as the circling of any X in a clockwise direction. Torque is not associated with learning problems in school. Diagnostic utility of torque should be carefully considered. (Author)

  17. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... limit pilot forces and torques are as follows: Control Maximum forces or torques for design...

  18. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... limit pilot forces and torques are as follows: Control Maximum forces or torques for design...

  19. Fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Olli, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    The observation of a fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields is reported. The torque was determined by measuring the acoustically induced angular deflection of a polished cylinder suspended by a torsion fiber. This torque was measured in a sound field of amplitude greater than that in which first-order acoustic torque has been observed.

  20. Forecasting the Dst index during corotating interaction region events using synthesized solar wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyas, T.; Spencer, E.; Raj, A.; Sojka, J.; Mays, M. L.

    2012-03-01

    Observations from SOHO, STEREO, and ACE during the declining phase of the solar cycle toward the deep minimum in 2008 are analyzed to establish the timing of corotating interaction region (CIR) activity. This analysis is then employed to synthesize signals of the z component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz, solar wind radial velocity vx, and solar wind proton density Np at 1 AU. The synthesized signals are used as a substitute for ACE measurements to represent solar wind forcing due to coronal hole driven CIR events occurring during multiple Bartel rotations (BR 2381 to BR 2393). The signals drive a low-order physics-based model of the magnetosphere called WINDMI, one of whose outputs is the ground-based measurement of the Dst index. Estimating the arrival of CIR events for future rotations using ACE and SOHO data during BR 2381 produced what we refer to as an uncalibrated yearly forecast. We next generated a video-calibrated estimate of the arrival times of CIR events in addition to information from BR 2381 using SOHO and STEREO images of the Sun in order to produce a simulated 3.5 day ahead forecast of possible geomagnetic activity. The time of arrival of CIR events is taken to be the travel time of density compressions as seen in a noninertial frame according to a radial solar wind speed of 500 km/s and a distance of 1 AU. We were able to forecast the timing of CIR-induced geomagnetic activity to within 12 h for 17 out of 28 events by using the expected recurrence of the events through multiple Bartel rotations together with SOHO and STEREO coronal hole sightings made 3.5 days before every event. The uncertainty in the IMF Bz led to a forecast of levels of geomagnetic activity on an ensemble basis, yielding a distribution of different possible Dst signatures. We used a 10-sample ensemble and a 50-sample ensemble to obtain typical representations of geomagnetic activity. Depending on the periodicity and intensity of fluctuations in Bz, we obtained

  1. WR 110: A Single Wolf-Rayet Star with Corotating Interaction Regions in its Wind?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Cameron, C.; Fahed, R.; Gamen, R. C.; Lefèvre, L.; Rowe, J. F.; St-louis, N.; Muntean, V.; De La Chevrotière, A.; Guenther, D. B.; Kuschnig, R.; Matthews, J. M.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2011-07-01

    A 30 day contiguous photometric run with the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) satellite on the WN5-6b star WR 110 (HD 165688) reveals a fundamental periodicity of P = 4.08 ± 0.55 days along with a number of harmonics at periods P/n, with n ≈ 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, and a few other possible stray periodicities and/or stochastic variability on timescales longer than about a day. Spectroscopic radial velocity studies fail to reveal any plausible companion with a period in this range. Therefore, we conjecture that the observed light-curve cusps of amplitude ~0.01 mag that recur at a 4.08 day timescale may arise in the inner parts, or at the base, of a corotating interaction region (CIR) seen in emission as it rotates around with the star at constant angular velocity. The hard X-ray component seen in WR 110 could then be a result of a high velocity component of the CIR shock interacting with the ambient wind at several stellar radii. Given that most hot, luminous stars showing CIRs have two CIR arms, it is possible that either the fundamental period is 8.2 days or, more likely in the case of WR 110, there is indeed a second weaker CIR arm for P = 4.08 days, that occurs ~two-thirds of a rotation period after the main CIR. If this interpretation is correct, WR 110 therefore joins the ranks with three other single WR stars, all WN, with confirmed CIR rotation periods (WR 1, WR 6, and WR 134), albeit with WR 110 having by far the lowest amplitude photometric modulation. This illustrates the power of being able to secure intense, continuous high-precision photometry from space-based platforms such as MOST. It also opens the door to revealing low-amplitude photometric variations in other WN stars, where previous attempts have failed. If all WN stars have CIRs at some level, this could be important for revealing sources of magnetism or pulsation in addition to rotation periods. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Limb-darkening for CoRoT, Kepler, Spitzer (Claret+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claret, A.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Witte, S.

    2012-09-01

    The knowledge of how the specific intensity is distributed over the stellar disk is crucial for interpreting the light curves of extrasolar transiting planets, double-lined eclipsing binaries, and other astrophysical phenomena. To provide theoretical inputs for light curve modelling codes, we present new calculations of limb-darkening coefficients for the spherically symmetric PHOENIX models. The limb-darkening coefficients were computed by covering the transmission curves of Kepler, CoRoT, and Spitzer space missions, as well as the passbands of the Stromgren, Johnson-Cousins, Sloan, and 2MASS. These computations adopted the least-square method. In addition, we also calculated the linear and bi-parametric approximations by adopting the flux conservation method as an additional tool for estimating the theoretical error bars in the limb-darkening coefficients. Six laws were used to describe the specific intensity distribution: linear, quadratic, square root, logarithmic, exponential, and a more general one with 4 terms. The computations are presented for the solar chemical composition, with logg varying between 2.5 and 5.5 and effective temperatures between 1500K-4800K. The adopted Microturbulent velocity and the mixing-length parameters are 2.0km/s and 2.0, respectively. Model are for solar metallicity. (17 data files).

  3. Torque Production in a Halbach Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center initiated the investigation of torque production in a Halbach machine for the Levitated Ducted Fan (LDF) Project to obtain empirical data in determining the feasibility of using a Halbach motor for the project. LDF is a breakthrough technology for "Electric Flight" with the development of a clean, quiet, electric propulsor system. Benefits include zero emissions, decreased dependence on fossil fuels, increased efficiency, increased reliability, reduced maintenance, and decreased operating noise levels. A commercial permanent magnet brushless motor rotor was tested with a custom stator. An innovative rotor utilizing a Halbach array was designed and developed to fit directly into the same stator. The magnets are oriented at 90deg to the adjacent magnet, which cancels the magnetic field on the inside of the rotor and strengthens the field on the outside of the rotor. A direct comparison of the commercial rotor and the Halbach rotor was made. In addition, various test models were designed and developed to validate the basic principles described, and the theoretical work that was performed. The report concludes that a Halbach array based motor can provide significant improvements in electric motor performance and reliability.

  4. A reactive torque control law for gyroscopically controlled space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method of control is developed based on the reactive torques as seen by the individual CMG gimbals. The application of a torque to the gimbal of a CMG rotates the momentum vector and applies a torque to the spacecraft according to well-known laws. The response (rotation) of the vehicle produces a reverse or reaction torque opposing the torque producing the gimbal movement. The reactive torque and the pseudoinverse control schemes are contrasted in order to point out the simplicity of the first method. Simulation was performed only to the extent necessary to prove that reactive torque stabilization and control is feasible.

  5. The γ Doradus CoRoT target HD 49434. I. Results from the ground-based campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uytterhoeven, K.; Mathias, P.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Rodríguez, E.; Amado, P. J.; Le Contel, D.; Jankov, S.; Niemczura, E.; Pollard, K. R.; Brunsden, E.; Paparó, M.; Costa, V.; Valtier, J.-C.; Garrido, R.; Suárez, J. C.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Chapellier, E.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Marin, A. J.; Aceituno, F. J.; Casanova, V.; Rolland, A.; Olivares, I.

    2008-10-01

    Context: We present an extensive ground-based photometric and spectroscopic campaign of the γ Dor CoRoT target HD 49434. This campaign was a preparatory step of the CoRoT satellite observations, which occurred between October 2007 and March 2008. Aims: With satellite data, detection of low-degree pulsation modes only is achievable, and, as no filters are available, with poor identification. Ground-based data promise eventually to identify additional modes and provide extra input for the identification: spectroscopic data allows the detection of high-degree modes and an estimate of the azimuthal number m. We attempt to detect and identify as many pulsation modes as possible from the ground-based dataset of the γ Dor star HD 49434, and anticipate the CoRoT results. Methods: We searched for frequencies in the multi-colour variations, the pixel-to-pixel variations across the line profiles, and the moments variations in a large dataset, consisting of both multi-colour photometric and spectroscopic data from different observatories, using different frequency analysis methods. We performed a tentative mode identification of the spectroscopic frequencies using the Moment Method and the Intensity Period Search Method. We also completed an abundance analysis. Results: The frequency analysis clearly indicates the presence of four frequencies in the 0.2-1.7 d-1 interval, as well as six frequencies in the 5-12 d-1 domain. The low frequencies are typical of γ Dor variables, while the high frequencies are common to δ Sct pulsators. We propose that the frequency 2.666 d-1 is the rotational frequency. All modes, for which an identification was possible, appear to be high-degree modes (3 ≤ ell ≤ 8). We did not find evidence for a possible binary nature of the star HD 49434. The element abundances that we derived are consistent with values obtained in previous analyses. Conclusions: We classify the γ Dor star HD 49434 as a hybrid pulsator, which pulsates simultaneously in p

  6. HD 50844: a new look at δ Scuti stars from CoRoT space photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poretti, E.; Michel, E.; Garrido, R.; Lefèvre, L.; Mantegazza, L.; Rainer, M.; Rodríguez, E.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Amado, P. J.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Moya, A.; Niemczura, E.; Suárez, J. C.; Zima, W.; Baglin, A.; Auvergne, M.; Baudin, F.; Catala, C.; Samadi, R.; Alvarez, M.; Mathias, P.; Paparò, M.; Pápics, P.; Plachy, E.

    2009-10-01

    Context: Aims: This work presents the results obtained by CoRoT on HD 50844, the only δ Sct star observed in the CoRoT initial run (57.6 d). The aim of these CoRoT observations was to investigate and characterize for the first time the pulsational behaviour of a δ Sct star, when observed at a level of precision and with a much better duty cycle than from the ground. Methods: The 140 016 datapoints were analysed using independent approaches (SigSpec software and different iterative sine-wave fittings) and several checks performed (splitting of the timeseries in different subsets, investigation of the residual light curves and spectra). A level of 10-5 mag was reached in the amplitude spectra of the CoRoT timeseries. The space monitoring was complemented by ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy, which allowed the mode identification of 30 terms. Results: The frequency analysis of the CoRoT timeseries revealed hundreds of terms in the frequency range 0-30 d-1. All the cross-checks confirmed this new result. The initial guess that δ Sct stars have a very rich frequency content is confirmed. The spectroscopic mode identification gives theoretical support since very high-degree modes (up to ℓ=14) are identified. We also prove that cancellation effects are not sufficient in removing the flux variations associated to these modes at the noise level of the CoRoT measurements. The ground-based observations indicate that HD 50844 is an evolved star that is slightly underabundant in heavy elements, located on the Terminal Age Main Sequence. Probably due to this unfavourable evolutionary status, no clear regular distribution is observed in the frequency set. The predominant term (f_1=6.92 d-1) has been identified as the fundamental radial mode combining ground-based photometric and spectroscopic data. Conclusions: The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with participation of ESA's RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria

  7. An asteroseismic study of the β Cephei CoRoT main target HD 180642: results from the ground-based campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briquet, M.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Morel, T.; Aerts, C.; De Cat, P.; Mathias, P.; Lefever, K.; Miglio, A.; Poretti, E.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Paparó, M.; Rainer, M.; Carrier, F.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Valtier, J. C.; Benkő, J. M.; Bognár, Zs.; Niemczura, E.; Amado, P. J.; Suárez, J. C.; Moya, A.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Garrido, R.

    2009-09-01

    The β Cephei star HD 180642 was observed by the CoRoT satellite during a run of 156 days in 2007. The space white light photometry revealed the rich frequency spectrum of the star (Degroote et al. 2009). In the present study, we provide additional information on the target, based on both ground-based multi-colour photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy. We place our object in the (Teff, log g) diagram. In addition, we derive the chemical abundances of several elements as well as the metallicity of HD 180642. Finally, we put constraints on the identification of some modes. All these observational constraints will be used to compute stellar models of the target.

  8. New Technique of High-Performance Torque Control Developed for Induction Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.

    2003-01-01

    Two forms of high-performance torque control for motor drives have been described in the literature: field orientation control and direct torque control. Field orientation control has been the method of choice for previous NASA electromechanical actuator research efforts with induction motors. Direct torque control has the potential to offer some advantages over field orientation, including ease of implementation and faster response. However, the most common form of direct torque control is not suitable for the highspeed, low-stator-flux linkage induction machines designed for electromechanical actuators with the presently available sample rates of digital control systems (higher sample rates are required). In addition, this form of direct torque control is not suitable for the addition of a high-frequency carrier signal necessary for the "self-sensing" (sensorless) position estimation technique. This technique enables low- and zero-speed position sensorless operation of the machine. Sensorless operation is desirable to reduce the number of necessary feedback signals and transducers, thus improving the reliability and reducing the mass and volume of the system. This research was directed at developing an alternative form of direct torque control known as a "deadbeat," or inverse model, solution. This form uses pulse-width modulation of the voltage applied to the machine, thus reducing the necessary sample and switching frequency for the high-speed NASA motor. In addition, the structure of the deadbeat form allows the addition of the high-frequency carrier signal so that low- and zero-speed sensorless operation is possible. The new deadbeat solution is based on using the stator and rotor flux as state variables. This choice of state variables leads to a simple graphical representation of the solution as the intersection of a constant torque line with a constant stator flux circle. Previous solutions have been expressed only in complex mathematical terms without a

  9. An in-depth study of HD 174966 with CoRoT photometry and HARPS spectroscopy. Large separation as a new observable for δ Scuti stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Hernández, A.; Moya, A.; Michel, E.; Suárez, J. C.; Poretti, E.; Martín-Ruíz, S.; Amado, P. J.; Garrido, R.; Rodríguez, E.; Rainer, M.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Rodrigo, C.; Solano, E.; Rodón, J. R.; Mathias, P.; Rolland, A.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Baudin, F.; Catala, C.; Samadi, R.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: The aim of this work was to use a multi-approach technique to derive the most accurate values possible of the physical parameters of the δ Sct star HD 174966, which was observed with the CoRoT satellite. In addition, we searched for a periodic pattern in the frequency spectra with the goal of using it to determine the mean density of the star. Methods: First, we extracted the frequency content from the CoRoT light curve. Then, we derived the physical parameters of HD 174966 and carried a mode identification out from the spectroscopic and photometric observations. We used this information to look for the models fulfilling all the conditions and discussed the inaccuracies of the method because of the rotation effects. In a final step, we searched for patterns in the frequency set using a Fourier transform, discussed its origin, and studied the possibility of using the periodicity to obtain information about the physical parameters of the star. Results: A total of 185 peaks were obtained from the Fourier analysis of the CoRoT light curve, all of which were reliable pulsating frequencies. From the spectroscopic observations, 18 oscillation modes were detected and identified, and the inclination angle (62.5°-17.5+7.5) and the rotational velocity of the star (142 km s-1) were estimated. From the multi-colour photometric observations, only three frequencies were detected that correspond to the main ones in the CoRoT light curve. We looked for periodicities within the 185 frequencies and found a quasiperiodic pattern Δν ~ 64 μHz. Using the inclination angle, the rotational velocity, and an Echelle diagram (showing a double comb outside the asymptotic regime), we concluded that the periodicity corresponds to a large separation structure. The quasiperiodic pattern allowed us to discriminate models from a grid. As a result, the value of the mean density is achieved with a 6% uncertainty. So, the Δν pattern could be used as a new observable for A-F type stars. The

  10. A method to accurately estimate the muscular torques of human wearing exoskeletons by torque sensors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Beomsoo; Jeon, Doyoung

    2015-04-09

    In exoskeletal robots, the quantification of the user's muscular effort is important to recognize the user's motion intentions and evaluate motor abilities. In this paper, we attempt to estimate users' muscular efforts accurately using joint torque sensor which contains the measurements of dynamic effect of human body such as the inertial, Coriolis, and gravitational torques as well as torque by active muscular effort. It is important to extract the dynamic effects of the user's limb accurately from the measured torque. The user's limb dynamics are formulated and a convenient method of identifying user-specific parameters is suggested for estimating the user's muscular torque in robotic exoskeletons. Experiments were carried out on a wheelchair-integrated lower limb exoskeleton, EXOwheel, which was equipped with torque sensors in the hip and knee joints. The proposed methods were evaluated by 10 healthy participants during body weight-supported gait training. The experimental results show that the torque sensors are to estimate the muscular torque accurately in cases of relaxed and activated muscle conditions.

  11. Near Earth Asteroid Scout Solar Sail Thrust and Torque Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andy; Ahmad, Naeem; Miller, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout is a solar sail mission whose objective is to scout at least one Near Earth Asteroid to help prepare for human missions to Near Earth Asteroids. NEA Scout will launch as a secondary payload on the first SLS-Orion mission. NEA Scout will perform a small trim maneuver shortly after deploy from the spent SLS upper stage using a cold gas propulsion system, but from that point on will depend entirely on the solar sail for thrust. As such, it is important to accurately characterize the thrust of the sail in order to achieve mission success. Additionally, the solar sail creates a relatively large solar disturbance torque that must be mitigated. For early mission design studies a flat plate model of the solar sail with a fixed center of pressure was adequate, but as mission concepts and the sail design matured, greater fidelity was required. Here we discuss the progress to a three-dimensional sail model that includes the effects of tension and thermal deformation that has been derived from a large structural Finite Element Model (FEM) developed by the Langley Research Center. We have found that the deformed sail membrane affects torque relatively much more than thrust; a flat plate model could potentially model thrust well enough to close mission design studies, but a three-dimensional solar sail is essential to control system design. The three-dimensional solar sail model revealed that thermal deformations of unshielded booms would create unacceptably large solar disturbance torques. The original large FEM model was used in control and mission simulations, but was resulted in simulations with prohibitive run times. This led us to adapt the Generalized Sail Model (GSM) of Rios-Reyes. A design reference sail model has been baselined for NEA Scout and has been used to design the mission and control system for the sailcraft. Additionally, since NEA Scout uses reaction wheels for attitude pointing and control, the solar torque model is

  12. Study of the geoeffectiveness of coronal mass ejections, corotating interaction regions and their associated structures observed during Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin, A.; Falak, Z.

    2016-08-01

    The interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and the corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are the two most important structures of the interplanetary medium affecting the Earth and the near-Earth space environment. We study the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling during the passage of ICMEs and CIRs, in the Solar Cycle 23 (Jan. 1995-Dec. 2009), and their relative geoeffectiveness. We utilize the timings of different features of these structures, their arrival and duration. As geomagnetic parameter, we utilize high time resolution data of Dst and AE indices. In addition to these geomagnetic indices, we utilize the simultaneous and similar time resolution data of interplanetary plasma and field, namely, solar wind velocity, interplanetary magnetic field, its north-south component and dawn-dusk electric field. We apply the method of superposed epoch analysis. Utilizing the properties of various structures during the passage of ICMEs and CIRs, and variations observed in plasma and field parameters during their passage along with the simultaneous changes observed in geomagnetic parameters, we identify the interplanetary conditions, plasma/field parameters and their relative importance in solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. Geospace consequences of ICMEs and CIRs, and the implications of these results for solar wind-magnetosphere coupling are discussed.

  13. Self-oscillation in spin torque oscillator stabilized by field-like torque

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Tsunegi, Sumito; Kubota, Hitoshi; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2014-04-14

    The effect of the field-like torque on the self-oscillation of the magnetization in spin torque oscillator with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer was studied theoretically. A stable self-oscillation at zero field is excited for negative β while the magnetization dynamics stops for β = 0 or β > 0, where β is the ratio between the spin torque and the field-like torque. The reason why only the negative β induces the self-oscillation was explained from the view point of the energy balance between the spin torque and the damping. The oscillation power and frequency for various β were also studied by numerical simulation.

  14. Muscle torque of healthy individuals and individuals with spastic hemiparesis after passive static streching.

    PubMed

    Tatsukawa DE Freitas, Sérgio Takeshi; DE Carvalho Abreu, Elizângela Márcia; Dos Reis, Mariane Cecilia; DE Souza Cunha, Bruna; Souza Moreira Prianti, Tamires; Pupio Silva Lima, Fernanda; Oliveira Lima, Mário

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity is one of the main causes of contracture, muscle weakness and subsequent functional incapacity. The passive static stretching can be included as having the purpose of increasing musculoskeletal flexibility, however, it also can influence the muscle torque. The objective is to verify the immediate effect of passive static stretching in the muscle strength of healthy and those who present spastic hemiparesis. There were assessed 20 subjects, 10 spastic hemiparetic (EG) and 10 healthy individuals (CG), including both sexes, aged between 22 and 78 years. The torque of extensor muscles of the knee was analyzed using isokinetic dynamometer. Results have shown that EG has less muscle torque compared to CG ( p < 0.01). In addition, EG presented a decrease in significance of muscle torque after stretching ( p < 0.05), however, it has not shown significant alteration in muscle torque of CG after performing the program that was prescribed. Immediately after the passive stretch, a significant torque decrease can be seen in hypertonic muscle; it is believed that this reduction may be associated with the physiological overlap between actin and myosin filaments and so preventing the muscle to develop a maximum contraction.

  15. Electro-orientation of a metal nanowire counterbalanced by thermal torques.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel; Ramos, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    The rotational diffusion of electrically polarized metal nanowires suspended in an electrolyte is studied. The alignment of a Brownian nanowire in an ac field with a given direction is not complete due to thermal (fluctuating) torques. The orientation distribution allows us to examine the electrokinetic torques acting on the nanowire for smaller voltages than in previous deterministic experiments. In addition, the torques are obtained without recurring to the rotational friction coefficient as in dynamic deterministic experiments. The present results are in accordance with previous deterministic results of electro-orientation of metal nanowires. Nanowire rotation is originated by both the electrical torque on the induced dipole and by induced-charge electro-osmotic flow around the particle. At low frequencies of the applied ac field, induced-charge electro-osmotic orientation dominates while induced dipole torque orientation dominates at high frequencies. The angular standard deviation and the rotational rate are calculated from the measured fluctuating angle as a function of time, and good agreement with theoretical predictions is found. The experiments at high frequency indicate that the electrical torque on a nanowire near an insulating wall is reduced with respect to the bulk.

  16. Reduce torques and stick the landing: limb posture during landing in toads.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Emanuel; Larson, Neil P; Abbott, Emily M; Danos, Nicole

    2014-10-15

    A controlled landing, where an animal does not crash or topple, requires enough stability to allow muscles to effectively dissipate mechanical energy. Toads (Rhinella marina) are exemplary models for understanding the mechanics and motor control of landing given their ability to land consistently during bouts of continuous hopping. Previous studies in anurans have shown that ground reaction forces (GRFs) during landing are significantly higher compared with takeoff and can potentially impart large torques about the center of mass (COM), destabilizing the body at impact. We predict that in order to minimize such torques, toads will align their COM with the GRF vector during the aerial phase in anticipation of impact. We combined high-speed videography and force-plate ergometry to quantify torques at the COM and relate the magnitude of torques to limb posture at impact. We show that modulation of hindlimb posture can shift the position of the COM by about 20% of snout-vent length. Rapid hindlimb flexion during the aerial phase of a hop moved the COM anteriorly and reduced torque by aligning the COM with the GRF vector. We found that the addition of extrinsic loads did not significantly alter landing behavior but did change the torques experienced at impact. We conclude that anticipatory hindlimb flexion during the aerial phase of a hop is a critical feature of a mechanically stable landing that allows toads to quickly string together multiple, continuous hops.

  17. Study on Transmission Torque Characteristics of a Surface-Permanent-Magnet-Type Magnetic Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niguchi, Noboru; Hirata, Katsuhiro; Hayakawa, Yuichi

    Magnetic gears have some advantages such as low mechanical loss and maintenance-free operation that are not observed in conventional mechanical gears. In addition, magnetic gears have inherent overload protection. Therefore, magnetic gears are expected to be used in special applications; for example, they can be used in a joint of a humanoid robot. Recently, various types of new magnetic gears have been proposed. Among these new gears, a surface-permanent-magnet-type (SPM-type) magnetic gear employing harmonic magnetic flux has gained attention because of its high transmission torque density, though it has a complex structure with multipole magnets. Some studies on an SPM-type magnetic gear have been carried out, but there are few papers on cogging torque. This paper describes the transmission torque characteristics of an SPM-type magnetic gear. The operating principle and the transmission torque under synchronous operation are formulated in accordance with the gear ratio. High orders of the cogging torque are computed by employing the 3-D finite element method, and the validity of the analysis is verified by carrying out measurements on a prototype. Furthermore, a method for reducing the cogging torque is discussed.

  18. CoRoT light curves of Blazhko RR Lyrae stars. Evidence of a strong correlation between phase and amplitude modulations of CoRoT ID 0105288363

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadid, M.; Perini, C.; Bono, G.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Weiss, W. W.; Deboscher, J.

    2011-03-01

    Context. The CoRoT - Convection Rotation and planetary Transits - space mission provides a unique opportunity to monitor RR Lyrae stars with excellent time-sampling, unprecedented photometric precision, and a long time base of 150 days. Aims: The pulsation characteristics of RR Lyrae stars rely on robust physics, but we still lack a firm quantitative understanding of the physical mechanisms driving the Blazhko modulation and the long-term changes in their pulsation behavior. We use the high-precision space data of an unknown RR Lyrae star CoRoT ID 0105288363 observed during a second long run centered on the Galaxy - LRc02 -, to improve our understanding of the pulsation properties of RR Lyrae stars. Methods: The CoRoT data were corrected using a jump and trend filtering code. We applied different period-finding techniques including Period04, MuFrAn, PDM, and SigSpec. Amplitude and phase modulation were investigated using an analytical function method as well as traditional O-C diagrams. Results: For the first time, we detect significant cycle-to-cycle changes in the Blazhko modulation, which appear to be analogous to those predicted by Stothers - owing to the suppression of turbulent convection - to explain this phenomenon. We discuss the clear correlations between the phase and the amplitude of the bump, and the skewness and acuteness of the light curve during different Blazhko cycles. We find that these quantities are strongly anticorrelated with the fundamental pulsation period. This provides a strong support to the slow convective cycle model suggested by Stothers. We also detect a long-term modulation period in the maximum brightness spectrum. A more extended coverage of the long-term modulation is required to constrain its period. Seventh-order side peaks of the pulsation multiplet structure are also visible with the left-side peak amplitudes being higher than those of the right. This has never previously been detected. Future theoretical investigations are

  19. Torque transmission between square wire and bracket as a function of measurement, form and hardness parameters.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Brandies, H; Orthuber, W; Es-Souni, M; Meyer, S

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of cross section, edge geometry and structural hardness on torque transmission between square wire and bracket. For this purpose, 5 different brands of stainless steel square wire in 3 dimensions (0.016" x 0.016", 0.016" x 0.022" and 0.017" x 0.025") were inserted into edgewise brackets with a slot size of 0.018" and loaded with different torques (1 and 3 Ncm). The slot and wire geometries were analyzed by computer on ground specimens before and after loading. In addition, the Vickers hardness and micro-hardness of the unstressed and stressed metal surfaces were determined. While the slot size was very accurately maintained, the wire dimensions deviated downwards by an average of 10%. Torque transmission led to notching and bending-up phenomena on the bracket slot flanks. A torque loading of 3 Ncm increased the torque play of 0.016" x 0.022" wires by 3.6 degrees, and of 0.017" x 0.025" wires by 3.7 degrees. In the case of 0.016" x 0.016" wires, an effective torque transmission was no longer possible. The average Vickers hardness of the wires was 533 kp/mm2, and that of the brackets 145 kp/mm2. The micro-hardness in the deformation area of stressed internal slot walls increased with increasing load transmission from 204 to 338 kp/mm2. As a result of excessively small wire dimensions and plastic deformation of the brackets, a relatively large torque play occurs. Deformation and notching in the area of the internal slot walls are inconsistent with demands for recycling brackets. A standardization of bracket wire systems stating the actual torque play would be desirable.

  20. Torque shudder protection device and method

    DOEpatents

    King, Robert D.; De Doncker, Rik W. A. A.; Szczesny, Paul M.

    1997-01-01

    A torque shudder protection device for an induction machine includes a flux command generator for supplying a steady state flux command and a torque shudder detector for supplying a status including a negative status to indicate a lack of torque shudder and a positive status to indicate a presence of torque shudder. A flux adapter uses the steady state flux command and the status to supply a present flux command identical to the steady state flux command for a negative status and different from the steady state flux command for a positive status. A limiter can receive the present flux command, prevent the present flux command from exceeding a predetermined maximum flux command magnitude, and supply the present flux command to a field oriented controller. After determining a critical electrical excitation frequency at which a torque shudder occurs for the induction machine, a flux adjuster can monitor the electrical excitation frequency of the induction machine and adjust a flux command to prevent the monitored electrical excitation frequency from reaching the critical electrical excitation frequency.

  1. Torque shudder protection device and method

    DOEpatents

    King, R.D.; Doncker, R.W.A.A. De.; Szczesny, P.M.

    1997-03-11

    A torque shudder protection device for an induction machine includes a flux command generator for supplying a steady state flux command and a torque shudder detector for supplying a status including a negative status to indicate a lack of torque shudder and a positive status to indicate a presence of torque shudder. A flux adapter uses the steady state flux command and the status to supply a present flux command identical to the steady state flux command for a negative status and different from the steady state flux command for a positive status. A limiter can receive the present flux command, prevent the present flux command from exceeding a predetermined maximum flux command magnitude, and supply the present flux command to a field oriented controller. After determining a critical electrical excitation frequency at which a torque shudder occurs for the induction machine, a flux adjuster can monitor the electrical excitation frequency of the induction machine and adjust a flux command to prevent the monitored electrical excitation frequency from reaching the critical electrical excitation frequency. 5 figs.

  2. Torque expression of 0.018 and 0.022 inch conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Sifakakis, Iosif; Pandis, Nikolaos; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore; Katsaros, Christos; Bourauel, Christoph

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the moments generated with low- and high-torque brackets. Four different bracket prescription-slot combinations of the same bracket type (Mini Diamond® Twin) were evaluated: high-torque 0.018 and 0.022 inch and low-torque 0.018 and 0.022 inch. These brackets were bonded on identical maxillary acrylic resin models with levelled and aligned teeth and each model was mounted on the orthodontic measurement and simulation system (OMSS). Ten specimens of 0.017 × 0.025 inch and ten 0.019 × 0.025 inch stainless steel archwires (ORMCO) were evaluated in the low- and high-torque 0.018 inch and 0.022 inch brackets, respectively. The wires were ligated with elastomerics into the brackets and each measurement was repeated once after religation. Two-way analysis of variance and t-test were conducted to compare the generated moments between wires at low- and high-torque brackets separately. The maximum moment generated by the 0.017 × 0.025 inch stainless steel archwire in the 0.018 inch brackets at +15 degrees ranged from 14.33 and 12.95 Nmm for the high- and low-torque brackets, respectively. The measured torque in the 0.022 inch brackets with the 0.019 × 0.025 inch stainless steel archwire was 9.32 and 6.48 Nmm, respectively. The recorded differences of maximum moments between the high- and low-torque series were statistically significant. High-torque brackets produced higher moments compared with low-torque brackets. Additionally, in both high- and low-torque configurations, the thicker 0.019 × 0.025 inch steel archwire in the 0.022 inch slot system generated lower moments in comparison with the 0.017 × 0.025 inch steel archwire in the 0.018 inch slot system.

  3. Variable Torque Prescription: State of Art.

    PubMed Central

    Lacarbonara, Mariano; Accivile, Ettore; Abed, Maria R.; Dinoi, Maria Teresa; Monaco, Annalisa; Marzo, Giuseppe; Capogreco, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The variable prescription is widely described under the clinical aspect: the clinics is the result of the evolution of the state-of-the-art, aspect that is less considered in the daily literature. The state-of-the-art is the key to understand not only how we reach where we are but also to learn how to manage propely the torque, focusing on the technical and biomechanical purpos-es that led to the change of the torque values over time. The aim of this study is to update the clinicians on the aspects that affect the torque under the biomechanical sight, helping them to understand how to managing it, following the “timeline changes” in the different techniques so that the Variable Prescription Orthodontic (VPO) would be a suitable tool in every clinical case. PMID:25674173

  4. Thomas precession: Where is the torque

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, R.A. )

    1992-04-01

    Special relativity appears to violate the conservation of angular momentum {bold L} since it predicts that an accelerated gyroscope will precess, i.e., {bold L} will change in the absence of any applied torque. The paradox is resolved in a simple example by demonstrating that there is a torque present. The mass distribution in the gyroscope undergoes a relativistic distortion, and the center of mass is displaced away from the position of the accelerating force. The resulting torque {tau}={ital d}{bold L}/{ital dt}. The model also shows the physical origins of spin-orbit coupling and of the oscillating term.'' A related calculation shows why a moving magnetic dipole has an {ital electric} dipole moment.

  5. RFID Torque Sensing Tag System for Fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Lin, Gregory Y. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Kennedy, Timothy F. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides an RFID-based torque sensor that can be used to quickly monitor off the shelf fasteners including fasteners that are used in expensive satellites or other uses where fastener failure can be very costly. In one embodiment, an antenna, RFID ring and spring comprise a sensor tag that can be interrogated with an interrogation signal produced by an interrogator device. When sufficient torque is applied to the fastener, an RFID circuit is connected, and produces a radio frequency (RF) signal that can be read by the interrogator. In one embodiment, the RFID circuit does not transmit when the spring member is not compressed, thereby indicating insufficient tensioning of the fastener. The present invention offers the ability to remotely, quickly, and inexpensively verify that any number of fasteners are torqued properly upon initial installation. Where applicable, the present invention allows low cost monitoring over the life of the fastener.

  6. Torque for an Inertial Piezoelectric Rotary Motor

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jichun

    2013-01-01

    For a novel inertial piezoelectric rotary motor, the equation of the strain energy in the piezoceramic bimorph and the equations of the strain energy and the kinetic energy in the rotor are given. Based on them, the dynamic equation of the motor is obtained. Using these equations, the inertial driving torque of the motor is investigated. The results show that the impulsive driving torque changes with changing peak voltage of the excitation signal, the piezoelectric stress constant, the thickness of the piezoceramic bimorph, and the rotor radius obviously. Tests about the motor torque are completed which verifies the theory analysis here in. The results can be used to design the operating performance of the motor. PMID:24470794

  7. AX-5 space suit bearing torque investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, Stuart; Vykukal, Vic; Mackendrick, Robert; Culbertson, Philip, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The symptoms and eventual resolution of a torque increase problem occurring with ball bearings in the joints of the AX-5 space suit are described. Starting torques that rose 5 to 10 times initial levels were observed in crew evaluation tests of the suit in a zero-g water tank. This bearing problem was identified as a blocking torque anomaly, observed previously in oscillatory gimbal bearings. A large matrix of lubricants, ball separator designs and materials were evaluated. None of these combinations showed sufficient tolerance to lubricant washout when repeatedly cycled in water. The problem was resolved by retrofitting a pressure compensated, water exclusion seal to the outboard side of the bearing cavity. The symptoms and possible remedies to blocking are discussed.

  8. Presenting new exoplanet candidates for the CoRoT chromatic light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boufleur, Rodrigo; Emilio, Marcelo; Andrade, Laerte; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; De La Reza, Ramiro

    2015-08-01

    One of the most promising topics of modern Astronomy is the discovery and characterization of extrasolar planets due to its importance for the comprehension of planetary formation and evolution. Missions like MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars Telescope) (Walker et al., 2003) and especially the satellites dedicated to the search for exoplanets CoRoT (Convection, Rotation and planetary Transits) (Baglin et al., 1998) and Kepler (Borucki et al., 2003) produced a great amount of data and together account for hundreds of new discoveries. An important source of error in the search for planets with light curves obtained from space observatories are the displacements occuring in the data due to external causes. This artificial charge generation phenomenon associated with the data is mainly caused by the impact of high energy particles onto the CCD (Pinheiro da Silva et al. 2008), although other sources of error, not as well known also need to be taken into account. So, an effective analysis of the light curves depends a lot on the mechanisms employed to deal with these phenomena. To perform our research, we developed and applied a different method to fix the light curves, the CDAM (Corot Detrend Algorithm Modified), inspired by the work of Mislis et al. (2012). The paradigms were obtained using the BLS method (Kovács et al., 2002). After a semiautomatic pre-analysis associated with a visual inspection of the planetary transits signatures, we obtained dozens of exoplanet candidates in very good agreement with the literature and also new unpublished cases. We present the study results and characterization of the new cases for the chromatic channel public light curves of the CoRoT satellite.

  9. Reduced elbow extension torque during vibrations.

    PubMed

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Coza, Aurel; Nigg, Benno M

    2012-08-31

    Impact sports and vibration platforms trigger vibrations within soft tissues and the skeleton. Although the long-term effects of vibrations on the body have been studied extensively, the acute effects of vibrations are little understood. This study determined the influence of acute vibrations at different frequencies and elbow angles on maximal isometric elbow extension torque and muscle activity. Vibrations were generated by a pneumatic vibrator attached to the lever of a dynamometer, and were applied on the forearm of 15 healthy female subjects. The subjects were instructed to push maximally against the lever at three different elbow angles, while extension torque and muscle activity were quantified and compared between vibration and non-vibration (control) conditions. A change in vibration frequency had no significant effects on torque and muscle activity although vibrations in general decreased the maximal extension torque relative to the control by 1.8% (±5.7%, p>0.05), 7.4% (±7.9%, p<0.01), and 5.0% (±8.2%, p<0.01) at elbow angles of 60°, 90°, and 120°, respectively. Electromyographic activity increased significantly between ∼30% and 40% in both triceps and biceps with vibrations. It is speculated that a similar increase in muscle activity between agonist and antagonist, in combination with an unequal increase in muscle moment arms about the elbow joint, limit the maximal extension torque during exposure to vibrations. This study showed that maximal extension torque decreased during vibration exposure while muscle activity increased and suggests that vibrations may be counterproductive during activities requiring maximal strength but potentially beneficial for strength training.

  10. Atmospheric Gravitational Torque Variations Based on Various Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Braulio V.; Rowlands, David; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Advancements in the study of the Earth's variable rate of rotation and the motion of its rotation axis have given impetus to the analysis of the torques between the atmosphere, oceans and solid Earth. The output from global general circulation models of the atmosphere (pressure, surface stress) is being used as input to the torque computations. Gravitational torque between the atmosphere, oceans and solid Earth is an important component of the torque budget. Computation of the gravitational torque involves the adoption of a gravitational model from a wide variety available. The purpose of this investigation is to ascertain to what extent this choice might influence the results of gravitational torque computations.

  11. Variable Polarization from Co-Rotating Interaction Regions in Massive Star Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, Richard; St. Louis, Nicole; Tremblay, Patrick; Proulx-Giraldeau, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Co-rotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) are a well-known phenomenon in the solar wind, and is a favored culprit for certain cyclical behavior observed in the spectra of some massive stars. A prime example are the discrete absorption components (DACs) seen in the UV wind lines of many O stars. Here we report on modeling for the variable continuum polarization that could arise from the presence of CIR structures. Considerations are limited to optically thin scattering. Using a core-halo approach for winds that are thick to electron scattering, an application to observed variable polarization of WR6 (EZ CMa; HD 50896) is presented.

  12. Rotation period distribution of CoRoT and Kepler Sun-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leão, I. C.; Pasquini, L.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Neves, V.; Valcarce, A. A. R.; de Oliveira, L. L. A.; Freire da Silva, D.; de Freitas, D. B.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Baglin, A.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: We study the distribution of the photometric rotation period (Prot), which is a direct measurement of the surface rotation at active latitudes, for three subsamples of Sun-like stars: one from CoRoT data and two from Kepler data. For this purpose, we identify the main populations of these samples and interpret their main biases specifically for a comparison with the solar Prot. Methods: Prot and variability amplitude (A) measurements were obtained from public CoRoT and Kepler catalogs, which were combined with public data of physical parameters. Because these samples are subject to selection effects, we computed synthetic samples with simulated biases to compare with observations, particularly around the location of the Sun in the Hertzsprung-Russel (HR) diagram. Publicly available theoretical grids and empirical relations were used to combine physical parameters with Prot and A. Biases were simulated by performing cutoffs on the physical and rotational parameters in the same way as in each observed sample. A crucial cutoff is related with the detectability of the rotational modulation, which strongly depends on A. Results: The synthetic samples explain the observed Prot distributions of Sun-like stars as having two main populations: one of young objects (group I, with ages younger than ~1 Gyr) and another of main-sequence and evolved stars (group II, with ages older than ~1 Gyr). The proportions of groups I and II in relation to the total number of stars range within 64-84% and 16-36%, respectively. Hence, young objects abound in the distributions, producing the effect of observing a high number of short periods around the location of the Sun in the HR diagram. Differences in the Prot distributions between the CoRoT and Kepler Sun-like samples may be associated with different Galactic populations. Overall, the synthetic distribution around the solar period agrees with observations, which suggests that the solar rotation is normal with respect to Sun

  13. Modelling Flow and Heat Transfer in Co-Rotating Twin-Screw Extruders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, C.; Faria, R.; Covas, J. A.; Gaspar-Cunha, A.

    2007-04-01

    This work presents a modelling routine of co-rotating twin-screw extrusion, from hopper to die. The program accounts for a sequence of individual stages linked together by boundary conditions, namely starve-fed solids conveying, solids conveying under pressure, delay, melting, melt conveying without pressure and melt conveying under pressure. It predicts the evolution along the screw and die of temperature, shear rate, residence time, viscosity, mechanical power consumption, pressure and fill ratio. The results obtained showed adequate sensitivity to changes in operating conditions and screw geometry and are in agreement with current theoretical and experimental knowledge.

  14. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XI. CoRoT-8b: a hot and dense sub-Saturn around a K1 dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Deleuil, M.; Cabrera, J.; Jorda, L.; Lovis, C.; Csizmadia, S.; Aigrain, S.; Almenara, J. M.; Alonso, R.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barge, P.; Benz, W.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bruntt, H.; Carone, L.; Carpano, S.; Deeg, H.; Dvorak, R.; Erikson, A.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Fridlund, M.; Gandolfi, D.; Gazzano, J.-C.; Gillon, M.; Guenther, E.; Guillot, T.; Guterman, P.; Hatzes, A.; Havel, M.; Hébrard, G.; Lammer, H.; Léger, A.; Mayor, M.; Mazeh, T.; Moutou, C.; Pätzold, M.; Pepe, F.; Ollivier, M.; Queloz, D.; Rauer, H.; Rouan, D.; Samuel, B.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.; Tingley, B.; Udry, S.; Weingrill, J.; Wuchterl, G.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-8b, a dense small Saturn-class exoplanet that orbits a K1 dwarf in 6.2 days, and we derive its orbital parameters, mass, and radius. Methods: We analyzed two complementary data sets: the photometric transit curve of CoRoT-8b as measured by CoRoT and the radial velocity curve of CoRoT-8 as measured by the HARPS spectrometer. Results: We find that CoRoT-8b is on a circular orbit with a semi-major axis of 0.063 ± 0.001 AU. It has a radius of 0.57 ± 0.02 RJ, a mass of 0.22 ± 0.03 MJ, and therefore a mean density of 1.6 ± 0.1 g cm-3. Conclusions: With 67% of the size of Saturn and 72% of its mass, CoRoT-8b has a density comparable to that of Neptune (1.76 g cm-3). We estimate its content in heavy elements to be 47-63 {M}_⊕, and the mass of its hydrogen-helium envelope to be 7-23 {M}_⊕. At 0.063 AU, the thermal loss of hydrogen of CoRoT-8b should be no more than 0.1% over an assumed integrated lifetime of 3 Ga. Observations made with SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (PNP.07B.MOUT), and the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (081.C-0388 and 083.C-0186). The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain.Both data sets are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/520/A66

  15. OBSERVATIONS OF BINARY STARS WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL SPECKLE SURVEY INSTRUMENT. IV. OBSERVATIONS OF KEPLER, CoRoT, AND HIPPARCOS STARS FROM THE GEMINI NORTH TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Horch, Elliott P.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Ciardi, David R. E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov E-mail: ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of 71 speckle observations of binary and unresolved stars, most of which were observed with the DSSI speckle camera at the Gemini North Telescope in 2012 July. The main purpose of the run was to obtain diffraction-limited images of high-priority targets for the Kepler and CoRoT missions, but in addition, we observed a number of close binary stars where the resolution limit of Gemini was used to better determine orbital parameters and/or confirm results obtained at or below the diffraction limit of smaller telescopes. Five new binaries and one triple system were discovered, and first orbits are calculated for other two systems. Several systems are discussed in detail.

  16. Torque limit of PM motors for field-weakening region operation

    SciTech Connect

    Royak, Semyon; Harbaugh, Mark M

    2012-02-14

    The invention includes a motor controller and technique for controlling a permanent magnet motor. In accordance with one aspect of the present technique, a permanent magnet motor is controlled by receiving a torque command, determining a physical torque limit based on a stator frequency, determining a theoretical torque limit based on a maximum available voltage and motor inductance ratio, and limiting the torque command to the smaller of the physical torque limit and the theoretical torque limit. Receiving the torque command may include normalizing the torque command to obtain a normalized torque command, determining the physical torque limit may include determining a normalized physical torque limit, determining a theoretical torque limit may include determining a normalized theoretical torque limit, and limiting the torque command may include limiting the normalized torque command to the smaller of the normalized physical torque limit and the normalized theoretical torque limit.

  17. The CoRoT star ID 100866999: a hybrid γ Doradus-δ Scuti star in an eclipsing binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapellier, E.; Mathias, P.

    2013-08-01

    Context. The presence of g- and p-modes allows testing stellar models from the core to the envelope. Moreover, binarity in an eclipsing system constrains the physical parameters of the pulsating star. Aims: CoRot ID 100866999 is a relatively large-amplitude hybrid γ Doradus-δ Scuti star with two clearly distinct frequency domains. The large number of detected frequencies allows a detailed study of the interaction between them. In addition, we can derive the fundamental parameters of both components from the study of the eclipsing light curve. Methods: After removing the eclipsing phases, we analyzed the data with the Period04 package up to a signal-to-noise ratio S/N = 4. The light curve was then prewhitened with these oscillation frequencies to derive the fundamental parameters of the two components. Results: The eclipsing light curve analysis results in a (1.8+1.1) M⊙ system, both components being main sequence stars. We detect 124 frequencies related to luminosity variations of the primary. They are present in two well-separated domains: 89 frequencies in the interval [0.30;3.64] d-1 and 35 in the interval [14.57; 33.96] d-1. There are 22 γ Doradus frequencies separated by a constant period interval ΔP = 0.03493 d. These frequencies correspond to a series of g-modes of degree ℓ = 1 with successive radial orders k. We identify 21 linear combinations between the first nine γ Doradus frequencies. The δ Scuti domain is dominated by a large-amplitude frequency F = 16.9803 d-1. The eight first γ Doradus frequencies fi are present with much lower amplitude in the δ Scuti domain as F ± fi. These interactions between g- and p-modes confirm the phenomenon we detected in another CoRoT star. The amplitude and the phase of the main frequency F shows a double-wave modulation along the orbital phase, giving rise to series of combination frequencies. Such combination frequencies are also detected, with lower amplitude, for the first γ Doradus modes. The CoRoT

  18. The Effect of Manipulating Subject Mass on Lower Extremity Torque Patterns During Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John K.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Hagan, R. Donald

    2007-01-01

    During locomotion, humans adapt their motor patterns to maintain coordination despite changing conditions (Reisman et al., 2005). Bernstein (1967) proposed that in addition to the present state of a given joint, other factors, including limb inertia and velocity, must be taken into account to allow proper motion to occur. During locomotion with added mass counterbalanced using vertical suspension to maintain body weight, vertical ground reaction forces (GRF's) increase during walking but decrease during running, suggesting that adaptation may be velocity-specific (De Witt et al., 2006). It is not known, however, how lower extremity joint torques adapt to changes in inertial forces. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of increasing body mass while maintaining body weight upon lower-limb joint torque during walking and running. We hypothesized that adaptations in joint torque patterns would occur with the addition of body mass.

  19. A New Twist on Torque Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, W. Brian

    2014-01-01

    The traditional introductory-level meterstick-balancing lab assumes that students already know what torque is and that they readily identify it as a physical quantity of interest. We propose a modified version of this activity in which students qualitatively and quantitatively measure the amount of force required to keep the meterstick level. The…

  20. Torque Limits for Fasteners in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Yi

    2002-01-01

    The two major classes of laminate joints are bonded and bolted. Often the two classes are combined as bonded-bolted joints. Several characteristics of fiber reinforced composite materials render them more susceptible to joint problems than conventional metals. These characteristics include weakness in in-plane shear, transverse tension/compression, interlaminar shear, and bearing strength relative to the strength and stiffness in the fiber direction. Studies on bolted joints of composite materials have been focused on joining assembly subject to in-plane loads. Modes of failure under these loading conditions are net-tension failure, cleavage tension failure, shear-out failure, bearing failure, etc. Although the studies of torque load can be found in literature, they mainly discussed the effect of the torque load on in-plane strength. Existing methods for calculating torque limit for a mechanical fastener do not consider connecting members. The concern that a composite member could be crushed by a preload inspired the initiation of this study. The purpose is to develop a fundamental knowledge base on how to determine a torque limit when a composite member is taken into account. Two simplified analytical models were used: a stress failure analysis model based on maximum stress criterion, and a strain failure analysis model based on maximum strain criterion.

  1. Torque-balanced vibrationless rotary coupling

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Donald M.

    1980-01-01

    This disclosure describes a torque-balanced vibrationless rotary coupling for transmitting rotary motion without unwanted vibration into the spindle of a machine tool. A drive member drives a driven member using flexible connecting loops which are connected tangentially and at diametrically opposite connecting points through a free floating ring.

  2. Torque wrench allows readings from inaccessible locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Barnardo, M.

    1966-01-01

    Torque wrench with an adjustable drive shaft permits indicator to remain in view when used on sections of equipment with limited access. The shaft is capable of protruding from either side of the wrench head by means of spring loaded balls.

  3. Electric Field Driven Torque in ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John H.; Rajapakshe, Kimal I.; Infante, Hans L.; Claycomb, James R.

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  4. Anatomy of a bearing torque problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, Damon D.

    1987-01-01

    In the early 1970s, an antenna despin drive was developed for MBB solar science satellite HELIOS. A problem with high bearing drag torque that was encountered on the two flight models of this drive, after successful tests were completed on twelve bearings, an engineering model, and the qualification unit is discussed.

  5. Torque-while-turnaround scan mirror assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starkus, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    A scan mirror assembly which is part of a thematic mapper system is described with emphasis on mechanical aspects of the design. Features of the oscillating scan mirror mechanism include: a low level of structural vibration for the impact energies involved in mirror oscillation and return of energy lost during impact to the mirror by applying torque during the instant of impact.

  6. Air brake-dynamometer accurately measures torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Air brake-dynamometer assembly combines the principles of the air turbine and the air pump to apply braking torque. The assembly absorbs and measures power outputs of rotating machinery over a wide range of shaft speeds. It can also be used as an air turbine.

  7. 14 CFR 23.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.361 Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1... and supporting structure must be designed to withstand each of the following: (1) A limit...

  8. 14 CFR 23.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.361 Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1... and supporting structure must be designed to withstand each of the following: (1) A limit...

  9. 14 CFR 23.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.361 Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1... and supporting structure must be designed to withstand each of the following: (1) A limit...

  10. 14 CFR 23.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.361 Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1... and supporting structure must be designed to withstand each of the following: (1) A limit...

  11. 14 CFR 23.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.361 Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1... and supporting structure must be designed to withstand each of the following: (1) A limit...

  12. Determining the Co-Rotation Radius of Nearby Spiral Galaxies Using Spiral Arm Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shameer Abdeen, Mohamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.; Pour Imani, Hamed; Shields, Douglas W.; Eufrasio, Rafael; Berlanga Medina, Jazmin; Monson, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Density wave theory, originally proposed by C.C. Lin and Frank Shu (Lin & Shu 1964), views the spiral arm structures in spiral galaxies as density waves that propagates through the galactic disk. Resonances within orbits create standing wave patterns of density waves that we observe as spiral arms. The theory predicts the existence of a radius known as the co-rotation radius in which the spiral arm pattern speed matches the velocities of the stars within the disk. We introduce a novel way of determining the co-rotation radius, based on an image overlaying technique, which involves tracing the arms of spiral galaxies on images observed from different wavelengths. For the purpose of this study, 12 nearby galaxies were analyzed from four different wavelengths using pitch angle measurements from a previous study (Hamed et al. 2016). We used optical wavelength images (B-Band,440 nm), two infrared wavelength (Infrared; 3.6 µm and 8 µm) Spitzer Space Telescope images and ultraviolet images from GALEX. The results were verified by checking against results compiled from the literature.

  13. Synergies of CoRoT asteroseismology and APOGEE spectroscopy -- Applications to Galactic Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Friedrich; Chiappini, Cristina; Silva Rodrigues, Thaíse; Miglio, Andrea; Montalbàn, Josefina; Mosser, Benoit; Girardi, Leo; Valentini, Marica; Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    We present the first coherent dataset of 678 solar-like oscillating CoRoT red-giant stars located in two fields of the Galactic disc which have been followed up spectroscopically by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE).For the first time in a homogeneous analysis, ages and chemical abundance patterns of field stars have been measured over a largeradial range of the Milky Way's disc (4.5 kpc corotation.We also highlight some possibilities to use the present sample to constrain stellar models (thermo-haline mixing, determining evolutionary stages from spectroscopy alone).

  14. Implications of the Corotation Theorem on the MRI in Axial Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montani, G.; Cianfrani, F.; Pugliese, D.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the linear stability of an axially symmetric ideal plasma disk, embedded in a magnetic field and endowed with a differential rotation. This study is performed by adopting the magnetic flux function as the fundamental dynamical variable, in order to outline the role played by the corotation theorem on the linear mode structure. Using some specific assumptions (e.g., plasma incompressibility and propagation of the perturbations along the background magnetic field), we select the Alfvénic nature of the magnetorotational instability, and, in the geometric optics limit, we determine the dispersion relation describing the linear spectrum. We show how the implementation of the corotation theorem (valid for the background configuration) on the linear dynamics produces the cancellation of the vertical derivative of the disk angular velocity (we check such a feature also in the standard vector formalism to facilitate comparison with previous literature, in both the axisymmetric and three-dimensional cases). As a result, we clarify that the unstable modes have, for a stratified disk, the same morphology, proper of a thin-disk profile, and the z-dependence has a simple parametric role.

  15. Corotating and transient structures of IMF at Venus and Earth orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marubashi, K.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetometer data obtained from the Pioneer Venus orbiter (PVO) provide a unique data base for studying interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) structures at 0.7 AU. Comparison of the same structure observed at 0.7 and 1 AU provides information about the effects of stream interactions between these two distances. Besides, the PVO observations provide solar wind conditions at various longitude separations from the Sun-Earth line, because the orbital motion of Venus is about 0.6 deg/day faster than that of Earth. Thus, it is possible to examine the effects of time variations in the coronal conditions on the solar wind conditions by comparing corotating structures observed at Earth and those from the PVO at different longitude separations. Some results obtained so far are as follows. We have found several transient structures observed at both 0.7 and 1 AU, when the Sun, Venus, and Earth are closely aligned. Each event exhibits magnetic field variations very similar to each other between Venus and Earth, implying that the effects of stream interactions are small. The IMF sector boundaries were compared between the Venus and Earth orbits as typical examples of corotating structures. We have found both well-correlated and poorly-correlated structures depending on the longitude separation between the Earth and Venus, and on the persistence of the sector structures.

  16. Ulysses high-latitude observations of ions accelerated by co-rotating interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.; Goldstein, B. E.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of energetic ions (E approximately 1 MeV) from the Ulysses spacecraft during its first pass from the ecliptic plane to the southern high-latitude regions of the heliosphere. At latitudes less than approximately 13 deg S Ulysses was completely immersed in the heliomagnetic streamer belt, and observed a approximately 1 MeV proton intensity which showed little evidence of a periodic structure. Between approximately 13 deg S and approximately 29 deg S Ulysses observed one dominant recurrent co-rotating interaction region, its reverse shocks being mainly responsible for accelerating the approximately 1 MeV protons. At approximately 29 deg S the spacecraft left this region and entered the solar wind flow from the polar coronal hole. From approximately 29 deg up to approximately 45 deg S, reverse shocks from this and other interaction regions were still being observed. Accelerated energetic ions, with proton-to-alpha ratio signatures consistent with having been accelerated by the reverse shocks of these co-rotating interacting regions, were still being observed up to latitudes of approximately 50 deg S.

  17. 40 CFR 1066.240 - Torque transducer verification and calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Torque transducer verification and...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.240 Torque transducer verification and calibration. Calibrate torque-measurement systems as described in 40 CFR 1065.310....

  18. 40 CFR 1066.240 - Torque transducer verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Torque transducer verification. 1066... POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.240 Torque transducer verification. Verify torque-measurement systems by performing the verifications described in §§ 1066.270...

  19. 40 CFR 1066.240 - Torque transducer verification and calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Torque transducer verification and...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.240 Torque transducer verification and calibration. Calibrate torque-measurement systems as described in 40 CFR 1065.310....

  20. 40 CFR 90.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used...-cell or transfer standard may be used to verify the torque measurement system. (1) The master...

  1. 40 CFR 90.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used...-cell or transfer standard may be used to verify the torque measurement system. (1) The master...

  2. 40 CFR 90.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used...-cell or transfer standard may be used to verify the torque measurement system. (1) The master...

  3. 40 CFR 90.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used...-cell or transfer standard may be used to verify the torque measurement system. (1) The master...

  4. Performances improvements and torque ripple minimization for VSI fed induction machine with direct control torque.

    PubMed

    Abdelli, R; Rekioua, D; Rekioua, T

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes a torque ripple reduction technique with constant switching frequency for direct torque control (DTC) of an induction motor (IM). This method enables a minimum torque ripple control. In order to obtain a constant switching frequency and hence a torque ripple reduction, we propose a control technique for IM. It consists of controlling directly the electromagnetic torque by using a modulated hysteresis controller. The design methodology is based on space vector modulation (SVM) of electrical machines with digital vector control. MATLAB simulations supported with experimental study are used. The simulation and experimental results of this proposed algorithm show an adequate dynamic to IM; however, the research can be extended to include synchronous motors as well. The implementation of the proposed algorithm is described. It doesn't require any PI controller in the torque control loop. The hardware inverter is controlled digitally using a Texas Instruments TMS320F240 digital signal processor (DSP) with composed C codes for generating the required references. The results obtained from simulation and experiments confirmed the feasibility of the proposed strategy compared to the conventional one.

  5. Effect of head contact on the rim of the cup on the offset loading and torque in hip joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Williams, Sophie; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2013-11-01

    Head contact on the rim of the cup causes stress concentration and consequently increased wear. The head contact on the rim of the cup may in addition cause an offset load and torque on the cup. The head-rim contact resulting from microseparation or subluxation has been investigated. An analytical model has been developed to calculate the offset loading and resultant torque on the cup as a function of the translational displacement of the head under simplified loading condition of the hip joint at heel strike during a walking cycle. The magnitude of the torque on the cup was found to increase with the increasing translational displacement, larger diameter heads, eccentric cups, and the coefficient of friction of the contact. The effects of cup inclination, cup rim radius, and cup coverage angle on the magnitude of the torque were found to be relatively small with a maximum variation in the torque magnitude being lower than 20%. This study has shown an increased torque due to the head loading on the rim of the cup, and this may contribute to the incidence of cup loosening. Particularly, metal-on-metal hip joints with larger head diameters may produce the highest offset loading torque.

  6. A new model to compute the desired steering torque for steer-by-wire vehicles and driving simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fankem, Steve; Müller, Steffen

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with the control of the hand wheel actuator in steer-by-wire (SbW) vehicles and driving simulators (DSs). A novel model for the computation of the desired steering torque is presented. The introduced steering torque computation does not only aim to generate a realistic steering feel, which means that the driver should not miss the basic steering functionality of a modern conventional steering system such as an electric power steering (EPS) or hydraulic power steering (HPS), and this in every driving situation. In addition, the modular structure of the steering torque computation combined with suitably selected tuning parameters has the objective to offer a high degree of customisability of the steering feel and thus to provide each driver with his preferred steering feel in a very intuitive manner. The task and the tuning of each module are firstly described. Then, the steering torque computation is parameterised such that the steering feel of a series EPS system is reproduced. For this purpose, experiments are conducted in a hardware-in-the-loop environment where a test EPS is mounted on a steering test bench coupled with a vehicle simulator and parameter identification techniques are applied. Subsequently, how appropriate the steering torque computation mimics the test EPS system is objectively evaluated with respect to criteria concerning the steering torque level and gradient, the feedback behaviour and the steering return ability. Finally, the intuitive tuning of the modular steering torque computation is demonstrated for deriving a sportier steering feel configuration.

  7. Close-in planet migration due to magnetic torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Brun, Allan Sacha; Matt, Sean; Réville, Victor

    2015-08-01

    The diversity of masses, sizes and orbits of known exoplanets has prompted recent efforts in the scientific community to explore the broad range of interactions that can exist between planets and their host stars. In addition to tidal interactions, planets orbiting inside the stellar wind Alfv ´en radius can magnetically interact with their host. These interactions could lead to an angular momentum transfer between the planet and its host, resulting in a substantial planetary migration and participating in the dynamical (in)stability of the system. Among the star-planet interaction (SPI) models that have been developed, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations combine state of the art numerical models of cool star magnetospheres with simplified models of planets. The advantage of these global, dynamical models is the ability to assess the effects of SPI in a self-consistent way, by modelling the full interaction channel from the planetary magnetosphere down to the lower stellar corona.We will present our study of global magnetic SPI using the PLUTO code. We first give an overview of different types of interactions, depending on the stellar wind and orbital properties. Based on our previous exploratory 2D axisymmetric study, we develop our magnetic interaction model in 3D to tackle the full geometry of the star-wind- planet connection. We study the formation of Aflv ´en wings and parametrize the key physical ingredients (magnetic field strength and topology, orbital distance, stellar wind mass and angular momentum loss rates) controlling the magnetic torques which lead to planet migration. These torques are shown to operate on time-scales comparable to tidal torques for sufficiently compact systems and favorable magnetic topologies.

  8. Gravitational torque on the inner core and decadal polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, Mathieu

    2008-03-01

    A decadal polar motion with an amplitude of approximately 25 milliarcsecs (mas) is observed over the last century, a motion known as the Markowitz wobble. The origin of this motion remains unknown. In this paper, we investigate the possibility that a time-dependent axial misalignment between the density structures of the inner core and mantle can explain this signal. The longitudinal displacement of the inner core density structure leads to a change in the global moment of inertia of the Earth. In addition, as a result of the density misalignment, a gravitational equatorial torque leads to a tilt of the oblate geometric figure of the inner core, causing a further change in the global moment of inertia. To conserve angular momentum, an adjustment of the rotation vector must occur, leading to a polar motion. We develop theoretical expressions for the change in the moment of inertia and the gravitational torque in terms of the angle of longitudinal misalignment and the density structure of the mantle. A model to compute the polar motion in response to time-dependent axial inner core rotations is also presented. We show that the polar motion produced by this mechanism can be polarized about a longitudinal axis and is expected to have decadal periodicities, two general characteristics of the Markowitz wobble. The amplitude of the polar motion depends primarily on the Y12 spherical harmonic component of mantle density, on the longitudinal misalignment between the inner core and mantle, and on the bulk viscosity of the inner core. We establish constraints on the first two of these quantities from considerations of the axial component of this gravitational torque and from observed changes in length of day. These constraints suggest that the maximum polar motion from this mechanism is smaller than 1 mas, and too small to explain the Markowitz wobble.

  9. Finest light curve details, physical parameters, and period fluctuations of CoRoT RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkő, J. M.; Szabó, R.; Derekas, A.; Sódor, Á.

    2016-12-01

    The CoRoT satellite supplied the scientific community with a huge data base of variable stars. Among them the RR Lyrae stars have intensively been discussed in numerous papers in the last few years, but the latest runs have not been checked to find RR Lyrae stars up to now. Our main goal was to fill this gap and complete the CoRoT RR Lyrae sample. We found nine unstudied RR Lyrae stars. Seven of them are new discoveries. We identified three new Blazhko stars. The Blazhko effect shows non-strictly repetitive nature for all stars. The frequency spectrum of the Blazhko star CoRoT 104948132 contains second overtone frequency with the highest known period ratio. The harmonic amplitude and phase declines with the harmonic order were studied for non-Blazhko stars. We found a period dependent but similar shape amplitude decline for all stars. We discovered significant random period fluctuation for one of the two oversampled target, CM Ori. After a successful transformation of the CoRoT band parameters to the Johnson V values we estimated the basic physical properties such as mass, luminosity, metallicity. The sample can be divided into two subgroups with respect to the metallicity but otherwise the physical parameters are in the canonical range of RR Lyrae stars.

  10. A Two Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensing System to Monitor the Torque of Rotating Shaft

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongjiao; Liang, Lei; Yuan, Yinquan; Xu, Gang; Liu, Fang

    2016-01-01

    By fixing two FBGs on the surface of a rotating shaft along the direction of ±45° and using dynamic wavelength demodulation technology, we propose an optical fiber sensing system to monitor the driving torque and torsion angle of the rotating shaft. In theory, the dependence relation of the dynamic difference of central wavelengths on the torque and torsion angle of the rotating shaft has been deduced. To verify an optical fiber sensing system, a series of sensing experiments have been completed and the measured data are approximately consistent with the theoretical analysis. The difference of two central wavelengths can be expressed as the sum of two parts: a “DC” part and a harmonic “AC” part. The driving torque or torsion angle is linear with the “DC” part of the difference of two central wavelengths, the harmonic “AC” part, meaning the torsion angle vibration, illustrates that periodic vibration torque may be caused by inhomogeneous centrifugal forces or inhomogeneous additional torques produced by the driving system and the load. PMID:26805843

  11. Optical interaction between small plasmonic nanowires: a perspective from induced forces and torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekeroth, Ricardo M. Abraham

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses a new numerical study of the near electromagnetic coupling between two small, metallic nanowires under plane-wave illumination. The forces and torques induced give a different point of view of the interaction. The analysis of these near-field, mechanical observables is based entirely on the plasmon hybridization model, with the help of an adequate correlation with far fields. Although several studies of the opto-mechanical inductions have been done, unexpected features of the movement are obtained. ‘Coordinated’ spin for the wires are found, in addition to binding or repulsion forces between the wires and scattering forces. For heterodimers, also orbital torques are obtained. The binding and rotation of the nanowires as well as orbital torques are strongly dependent on the plasmonic excitations of the system. They identify uniquely the surface plasmons. In particular, dark modes can be optically detected without using evanescent fields. The optical forces and torques are calculated exactly by Maxwell stress tensor. ‘Realistic’ infinite nanowires of silver and gold are simulated by a size correction in bulk dielectric function. Thus, the importance of this correction on the mechanical results is also studied. The results can contribute to the design of devices for real observation/detection of surface plasmons. The spectra of forces, and specially of torques, show more resolved resonances because overlapping effects are not as present as in far-field calculations. The spinning of wires found and the analysis made could open new directions of studies and applications of dimers.

  12. A Two Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensing System to Monitor the Torque of Rotating Shaft.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjiao; Liang, Lei; Yuan, Yinquan; Xu, Gang; Liu, Fang

    2016-01-21

    By fixing two FBGs on the surface of a rotating shaft along the direction of ± 45° and using dynamic wavelength demodulation technology, we propose an optical fiber sensing system to monitor the driving torque and torsion angle of the rotating shaft. In theory, the dependence relation of the dynamic difference of central wavelengths on the torque and torsion angle of the rotating shaft has been deduced. To verify an optical fiber sensing system, a series of sensing experiments have been completed and the measured data are approximately consistent with the theoretical analysis. The difference of two central wavelengths can be expressed as the sum of two parts: a "DC" part and a harmonic "AC" part. The driving torque or torsion angle is linear with the "DC" part of the difference of two central wavelengths, the harmonic "AC" part, meaning the torsion angle vibration, illustrates that periodic vibration torque may be caused by inhomogeneous centrifugal forces or inhomogeneous additional torques produced by the driving system and the load.

  13. Strong orbital expansion of Saturn’s inner ice-rich moons through ring torques and mutual resonances during their accretion from a massive ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Julien; Canup, Robin M.

    2015-11-01

    Saturn has a diversity of moons with possibly diverse origins. Titan likely formed in Saturn’s sub-nebula (e.g., Canup & Ward 2006). The small moons interior to Mimas are likely recent aggregates of ring’s material spreading through the Roche limit (Charnoz et al. 2010). The origin of the mid-size moons, Mimas through Rhea, is debated. Charnoz et al. (2011) considered a massive ice-rock ring and strong tidal dissipation in Saturn (Q ~ 103), and found that moons out to Rhea could be spawned from such a ring. However such a small value for Q for Saturn is debated. In addition, capture into mutual Mean Motion Resonances (MMR) and resulting eccentricity growth (not included in the Charnoz et al. (2011) model) could lead to orbital destabilization as the moons tidally expand over such large distances (Peale & Canup 2015).Here we consider weak planetary tides (Q ≥ 104) and investigate whether Mimas, Enceladus and Tethys could have been spawned from a massive ice ring (Canup 2010). In this scenario, the rock in these moons would be delivered by material from outside the rings, e.g. by heliocentric impactors during the LHB (Canup 2013). We have expanded a numerical model developed to study the Moon’s accretion (Salmon and Canup 2012, 2014), which couples an analytic Roche-interior disk model to the N-body code SyMBA (Duncan et al. 1998) for satellites, so that we can directly track their accretion and mutual interactions (including MMRs), as well as their tidal interaction with the planet. We consider an initially large Saturn (Fortney et al. 2007) and its progressive contraction, which impacts the strength of tides and the location of the corotation resonance. We perform simulations with and without Dione and Rhea, and study the influence of tidal dissipation into the moons.We find that recoil of the moons due to ring torques, together with capture of moons into MMRs, can produce a distribution similar to that observed. If tidal dissipation in the moons was weak

  14. Structural and core parameters of the hot B subdwarf KPD 0629-0016 from CoRoT g-mode asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Grootel, V.; Charpinet, S.; Fontaine, G.; Green, E. M.; Brassard, P.

    2010-12-01

    Context. The asteroseismic exploitation of long period, g-mode hot B subdwarf pulsators (sdBVs), undermined so far by limitations associated with ground-based observations, has now become possible, thanks to high quality data obtained from space such as those recently gathered with the CoRoT (COnvection, ROtation, and planetary Transits) satellite. Aims: We propose a detailed seismic analysis of the sdBVs star KPD 0629-0016, the first compact pulsator monitored with CoRoT, using the g-mode pulsations recently uncovered by that space-borne observatory during short run SRa03. Methods: We use a forward modeling approach on the basis of our latest sdB models, which are now suitable for the accurate computation of the g-mode pulsation properties. The simultaneous match of the independent periods observed in KPD 0629-0016 with those of the models leads objectively to the identification of the pulsation modes and, more importantly, to the determination of the structural and core parameters of the star. Results: The optimal model we found closely reproduces the 18 observed periods retained in our analysis at a 0.23% level on average. These are identified as low-degree (ℓ = 1 and 2), intermediate-order (k = -9 through -74) g-modes. The structural and core parameters for KPD 0629-0016 are the following (formal fitting errors only): Teff = 26 290 ± 530 K, log g = 5.450 ± 0.034, M_* = 0.471 ± 0.002 M⊙, log (Menv/M_*) = -2.42 ± 0.07, log (1-Mcore/M_*) = -0.27 ± 0.01, and Xcore(C+O) = 0.41 ± 0.01. We additionally derive an age of 42.6 ± 1.0 Myr after the zero-age extreme horizontal branch, the radius R = 0.214 ± 0.009 R⊙, the luminosity L = 19.7 ± 3.2 L⊙, the absolute magnitude MV = 4.23 ± 0.13, the reddening index E(B-V) = 0.128 ± 0.023, and the distance d = 1190 ± 115 pc. Conclusions: The advent of high-precision time-series photometry from space with instruments like CoRoT now allows as demonstrated with KPD 0629-0016 the full exploitation of g-modes as

  15. Methods of torque ripple reduction for flux reversal motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakil, Gaurang; Sheth, N. K.; Miller, David

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents two-dimensional finite element based results for various methods of torque ripple reduction in flux-reversal motors. The effects of variation in magnet and rotor pole heights, rotor pole skewing, and multiple teeth per rotor pole on the cogging torque, developed torque, torque ripple, and phase inductance and also an optimum value of the magnet and rotor pole heights, skew angle, and choice of teeth per rotor pole with the teeth depth resulting in torque ripple reduction are presented.

  16. Accretion dynamics and disk evolution in NGC 2264: a study based on CoRoT photometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencar, S. H. P.; Teixeira, P. S.; Guimarães, M. M.; McGinnis, P. T.; Gameiro, J. F.; Bouvier, J.; Aigrain, S.; Flaccomio, E.; Favata, F.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The young cluster NGC 2264 was observed with the CoRoT satellite for 23 days uninterruptedly in March 2008 with unprecedented photometric accuracy. We present the first results of our analysis of the accreting population belonging to the cluster as observed by CoRoT. Aims: We search for possible light curve variability of the same nature as that observed in the classical T Tauri star AA Tau, which was attributed to a magnetically controlled inner disk warp. The inner warp dynamics is supposed to be directly associated with the interaction between the stellar magnetic field and the inner disk region. Methods: We analyzed the CoRoT light curves of 83 previously known classical T Tauri stars that belong to NGC 2264 classifying them according to their light-curve morphology. We also studied the CoRoT light-curve morphology as a function of a Spitzer-based classification of the star-disk systems. Results: The classification derived on the basis of the CoRoT light-curve morphology agrees very well with the Spitzer IRAC-based classification of the systems. The percentage of AA Tau-like light curves decreases as the inner disk dissipates, from 40% ± 10% in systems with thick inner disks to 36% ± 16% in systems with anemic disks and zero in naked photosphere systems. Indeed, 91% ± 29% of the CTTS with naked photospheres exhibit pure spot-like variability, while only 18% ± 7% of the thick disk systems do so, presumably those seen at low inclination and thus free of variable obscuration. Conclusions: AA Tau-like light curves are found to be fairly common, with a frequency of at least ~30 to 40% in young stars with inner dusty disks. The temporal evolution of the light curves indicates that the structure of the inner disk warp, located close to the corotation radius and responsible for the obscuration episodes, varies over a timescale of a few (~1-3) rotational periods. This probably reflects the highly dynamical nature of the star-disk magnetospheric interaction

  17. Students' difficulties in interpreting the torque vector in a physical situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro; Hinojosa, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    In this article we investigate students' difficulties in interpreting the torque vector in a physical situation. To identify these difficulties, we carried out task-based interviews with undergraduate physics majors completing a junior level course in mechanics. In the task, we presented a drawing of a beam that is initially at equilibrium over a fulcrum. Later, a weight is hung from the left side. We detected an alternative conception in which students thought that the left side of the beam and the weight would have additional motion in the direction of the torque vector. To quantify students having this alternative conception, we designed and administered a multiple-choice question to undergraduate physics majors completing a sophomore-level modern physics course. We found that 18% of the students had this conception. Based on these results, we present some suggestions for instruction of the torque vector concept.

  18. Large voltage-induced modification of spin-orbit torques in Pt/Co/GdOx

    SciTech Connect

    Emori, Satoru Bauer, Uwe; Woo, Seonghoon; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report on large modifications of current-induced spin-orbit torques in a gated Pt/Co/Gd-oxide microstrip due to voltage-driven O{sup 2−} migration. The Slonczewski-like and field-like torques are quantified using a low-frequency harmonic technique based on the polar magneto-optical Kerr effect. Voltage-induced oxidation of Co enhances the Slonczewski-like torque by as much as an order of magnitude and simultaneously reduces the anisotropy energy barrier by a factor of ∼5. Such magneto-ionic tuning of interfacial spin-orbit effects may significantly enhance the efficiency of magnetization switching and provide additional degrees of freedom in spintronic devices.

  19. Large voltage-induced modification of spin-orbit torques in Pt/Co/GdOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emori, Satoru; Bauer, Uwe; Woo, Seonghoon; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report on large modifications of current-induced spin-orbit torques in a gated Pt/Co/Gd-oxide microstrip due to voltage-driven O2- migration. The Slonczewski-like and field-like torques are quantified using a low-frequency harmonic technique based on the polar magneto-optical Kerr effect. Voltage-induced oxidation of Co enhances the Slonczewski-like torque by as much as an order of magnitude and simultaneously reduces the anisotropy energy barrier by a factor of ˜5. Such magneto-ionic tuning of interfacial spin-orbit effects may significantly enhance the efficiency of magnetization switching and provide additional degrees of freedom in spintronic devices.

  20. Significance of the Pars Interarticularis in the Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw Technique: An In Vivo Insertional Torque Study

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose Cortical bone trajectory (CBT), a more medial-to-lateral and shorter path than the traditional one for spinal fusion, is thought to be effective for severely degenerated vertebrae because screws are primarily stabilized at the posterior elements. We evaluated the efficacy of this approach through in vivo insertional torque measurement. Overview of Literature There has been only one prior in vivo study on CBT insertional torque. Methods Between January 2013 and April 2014, a total of 22 patients underwent posterior lumbar fusion using the CBT technique. The maximum insertional torque, which covers the radial strength needed for insertion, was measured for 113 screws, 8 of which were inserted for L5 spondylolysis. The insertional torque for cases with (n=8) and without (n=31) spondylolysis of L5 were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). To evaluate vertebral degeneration, we classified 53 vertebrae without spondylolysis by lumbar radiography using semiquantitative methods; the insertional torque for the 105 screws used was compared on the basis of this classification. Additionally, differences in insertional torque among cases grouped by age, sex, and lumbar level were evaluated for these 105 screws using ANOVA and the Tukey test. Results The mean insertional torque was significantly lower for patients with spondylolysis than for those without spondylolysis (4.25 vs. 8.24 in-lb). There were no statistical differences in insertional torque according to vertebral grading or level. The only significant difference in insertional torque between age and sex groups was in men <75 years and women ≥75 years (10 vs. 5.5 in-lb). Conclusions Although CBT should be used with great caution in patient with lysis who are ≥75 years, it is well suited for dealing with severely degenerated vertebrae because the pars interarticularis plays a very important role in the implementation of this technique. PMID:27790318

  1. Torque generated by the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, H C; Turner, L

    1993-01-01

    Cells of the bacterium Escherichia coli were tethered and spun in a high-frequency rotating electric field at a series of discrete field strengths. This was done first at low field strengths, then at field strengths generating speeds high enough to disrupt motor function, and finally at low field strengths. Comparison of the initial and final speed versus applied-torque plots yielded relative motor torque. For backward rotation, motor torque rose steeply at speeds close to zero, peaking, on average, at about 2.2 times the stall torque. For forward rotation, motor torque remained approximately constant up to speeds of about 60% of the zero-torque speed. Then the torque dropped linearly with speed, crossed zero, and reached a minimum, on average, at about -1.7 times the stall torque. The zero-torque speed increased with temperature (about 90 Hz at 11 degrees C, 140 Hz at 16 degrees C, and 290 Hz at 23 degrees C), while other parameters remained approximately constant. Sometimes the motor slipped at either extreme (delivered constant torque over a range of speeds), but eventually it broke. Similar results were obtained whether motors broke catastrophically (suddenly and completely) or progressively or were de-energized by brief treatment with an uncoupler. These results are consistent with a tightly coupled ratchet mechanism, provided that elastic deformation of force-generating elements is limited by a stop and that mechanical components yield at high applied torques. PMID:8298044

  2. Influence of the Earth s Corotation Field on the Atmospheric Electricity: Latitudinal Variation and Response to the Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumin, Y.

    Influence of the magnetospheric convection field on the atmospheric electricity is widely studied, both theoretically and experimentally, from the early 1970s. On the other hand, a considerably less attention was paid to the effects of plasmaspheric corotation field, since it was usually believed that the electric field of corotation of the solid Earth is fitted smoothly to the corotation field of plasmasphere, so that no potential difference is formed between them in the lower atmosphere. A conjecture on the important role of corotation field in the global atmospheric-electric circuit was done a few years ago in [P.A. Bespalov, Yu.V. Chugunov, J. Atmos. Terr. Phys., 1996, v.58, p.601] and several subsequent works. Unfortunately, because of using an oversimplified model of plasmasphere (in the form of a spherically-symmetric envelope with isotropic conductivity and rigid-body rotation), no reliable numerical estimates were derived, and no comparison with experimental distributions of the atmospheric electric field could be conducted. The main aim of the present report is to study the corotation effects in the framework of a considerably more realistic analytical model, where conductivity of the plasmasphere is strongly anisotropic, and the magnetic field lines are substantially distorted (stretched to "infinity") in the polar regions. Escape of polarization electric charges along the distorted field lines results in appreciable decrease (by 10-15 V/m) in the average atmospheric electric field at high latitudes. Such phenomenon was experimentally discovered as early as the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958) but was not quantitatively explained by now. Yet another interesting effect following from our model is changing the high-latitude electric field due to variations in the degree of distortion of the magnetic field lines at different levels of the solar activity. These transient changes in the atmospheric electricity should be symmetric about the noon

  3. Comparative clustering analysis of variable stars in the Hipparcos, OGLE Large Magellanic Cloud, and CoRoT exoplanet databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarro, L. M.; Debosscher, J.; Aerts, C.; López, M.

    2009-10-01

    Context: Discovery of new variability classes in large surveys using multivariate statistics techniques such as clustering, relies heavily on the correct understanding of the distribution of known classes as point processes in parameter space. Aims: Our objective is to analyze the correspondence between the classical stellar variability types and the clusters found in the distribution of light curve parameters and colour indices of stars in the CoRoT exoplanet sample. The final aim is to help in the identification on new types of variability by first identifying the well known variables in the CoRoT sample. Methods: We apply unsupervised classification algorithms to identify clusters of variable stars from modes of the probability density distribution. We use reference variability databases (Hipparcos and OGLE) as a framework to calibrate the clustering methodology. Furthermore, we use the results from supervised classification methods to interpret the resulting clusters. Results: We interpret the clusters in the Hipparcos and OGLE LMC databases in terms of large-amplitude radial pulsators in the classical instability strip and of various types of eclipsing binaries. The Hipparcos data also provide clear distributions for low-amplitude nonradial pulsators. We show that the preselection of targets for the CoRoT exoplanet programme results in a completely different probability density landscape than the OGLE data, the interpretation of which involves mainly classes of low-amplitude variability in main-sequence stars. Our findings will be incorporated to improve the supervised classification used in the CoRoT catalogue production, once the existence of new classes or subtypes will be confirmed from complementary spectroscopic observations. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with participation of ESA's RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain.

  4. Spin diffusion and torques in disordered antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a drift-diffusion equation of spin transport in collinear bipartite metallic antiferromagnets. Starting from a model tight-binding Hamiltonian, we obtain the quantum kinetic equation within Keldysh formalism and expand it to the lowest order in spatial gradient using Wigner expansion method. In the diffusive limit, these equations track the spatio-temporal evolution of the spin accumulations and spin currents on each sublattice of the antiferromagnet. We use these equations to address the nature of the spin transfer torque in (i) a spin-valve composed of a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet, (ii) a metallic bilayer consisting of an antiferromagnet adjacent to a heavy metal possessing spin Hall effect, and in (iii) a single antiferromagnet possessing spin Hall effect. We show that the latter can experience a self-torque thanks to the non-vanishing spin Hall effect in the antiferromagnet.

  5. Spin diffusion and torques in disordered antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-03-15

    We have developed a drift-diffusion equation of spin transport in collinear bipartite metallic antiferromagnets. Starting from a model tight-binding Hamiltonian, we obtain the quantum kinetic equation within Keldysh formalism and expand it to the lowest order in spatial gradient using Wigner expansion method. In the diffusive limit, these equations track the spatio-temporal evolution of the spin accumulations and spin currents on each sublattice of the antiferromagnet. We use these equations to address the nature of the spin transfer torque in (i) a spin-valve composed of a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet, (ii) a metallic bilayer consisting of an antiferromagnet adjacent to a heavy metal possessing spin Hall effect, and in (iii) a single antiferromagnet possessing spin Hall effect. We show that the latter can experience a self-torque thanks to the non-vanishing spin Hall effect in the antiferromagnet.

  6. Manipulating quantum information with spin torque

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Brian; Datta, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    The use of spin torque as a substitute for magnetic fields is now well established for classical operations like the switching of a nanomagnet. What we are describing here could be viewed as an application of spin torque like effects to quantum processes involving single qubit rotations as well as two qubit entanglement. A key ingredient of this scheme is the use of a large number of itinerant electrons whose cumulative effect is to produce the desired qubit operations on static spins. Each interaction involves entanglement and collapse of wavefunctions so that the operation is only approximately unitary. However, we show that the non-unitary component of the operations can be kept below tolerable limits with proper design. As a capstone example, we present the implementation of a complete CNOT gate using the proposed spin potential based architecture, and show that the fidelity under ideal conditions can be made acceptably close to one. PMID:26648524

  7. Six component robotic force-torque sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grahn, Allen R.; Hutchings, Brad L.; Johnston, David R.; Parsons, David C.; Wyatt, Roland F.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a two-phase contract studying the feasibility of a miniaturized six component force-torque sensor and development of a working laboratory system were described. The principle of operation is based upon using ultrasonic pulse-echo ranging to determine the position of ultrasonic reflectors attached to a metal or ceramic cover plate. Because of the small size of the sensor, this technology may have application in robotics, to sense forces and torques at the finger tip of a robotic end effector. Descriptions are included of laboratory experiments evaluating materials and techniques for sensor fabrication and of the development of support electronics for data acquisition, computer interface, and operator display.

  8. Manipulation of spin transfer torque using light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo; Vendelbjerg, Karsten; Sham, Lu

    We show that the spin transfer torque induced by a spin-polarized current on a nanomagnet as the current flows through a semiconductor-nanomagnet-semiconductor junction is externally controlled by shining the junction off-resonantly with a strong laser beam. The excitonic coherence driven by the laser dresses the virtual electron-hole pairs coupling conduction and valence bands and inducing an evanescent state in the proximity of the nanomagnet. The Fano-like quantum interference between this localized state and the continuum spectrum is different in the two spin channels and hence it dramatically alters the spin transport, leading to the coherent control of the spin transfer torque. This work is supported by EU-FP7 Marie Curie Initial Training Network INDEX.

  9. Torque Transmission Device at Zero Leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    In a few critical applications, mechanical transmission of power by rotation at low speed is required without leakage at an interface. Herein we examine a device that enables torque to be transmitted across a sealed environmental barrier. The barrier represents the restraint membrane through which the torque is transmitted. The power is transferred through elastic deformation of a circular tube into an elliptical cross-section. Rotation of the principle axis of the ellipse at one end results in a commensurate rotation of an elliptical cross section at the other end of the tube. This transfer requires no rigid body rotation of the tube allowing a membrane to seal one end from the other. Both computational and experimental models of the device are presented.

  10. An Optical Torque Sensor for Robotic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palli, G.; Pirozzi, S.

    2013-10-01

    In this article, the design and the experimental evaluation of a torque sensor based on optoelectronic components integrated in a suitably designed plastic compliant frame are reported. The sensing principle is based on the variation of the photocurrent flowing through a PhotoDetector (PD) as a consequence of the variation of its relative position, with respect of a Light Emitting Diode (LED), caused by the deformation of the sensor frame under the effect of the torque to be measured. The sensor frame has been designed as a planar structure that shows preferential deformation along a rotation axis normal to the symmetry plane. This article reports the sensor basic working principle, the compliant frame design and verification, the calibration of the sensor, and the experimental evaluation of its sensitivity and frequency response.

  11. Mode coupling in spin torque oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Steven S. -L.; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dong; Heinonen, Olle

    2016-09-15

    A number of recent experimental works have shown that the dynamics of a single spin torque oscillator can exhibit complex behavior that stems from interactions between two or more modes of the oscillator, such as observed mode-hopping or mode coexistence. There has been some initial work indicating how the theory for a single-mode (macro-spin) spin torque oscillator should be generalized to include several modes and the interactions between them. In the present work, we rigorously derive such a theory starting with the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation for magnetization dynamics by expanding up to third-order terms in deviation from equilibrium. Here, our results show how a linear mode coupling, which is necessary for observed mode-hopping to occur, arises through coupling to a magnon bath. In conclusion, the acquired temperature dependence of this coupling implies that the manifold of orbits and fixed points may shift with temperature.

  12. Mode coupling in spin torque oscillators

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Steven S. -L.; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dong; ...

    2016-09-15

    A number of recent experimental works have shown that the dynamics of a single spin torque oscillator can exhibit complex behavior that stems from interactions between two or more modes of the oscillator, such as observed mode-hopping or mode coexistence. There has been some initial work indicating how the theory for a single-mode (macro-spin) spin torque oscillator should be generalized to include several modes and the interactions between them. In the present work, we rigorously derive such a theory starting with the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation for magnetization dynamics by expanding up to third-order terms in deviation from equilibrium. Here, our resultsmore » show how a linear mode coupling, which is necessary for observed mode-hopping to occur, arises through coupling to a magnon bath. In conclusion, the acquired temperature dependence of this coupling implies that the manifold of orbits and fixed points may shift with temperature.« less

  13. Comparison of regression models for estimation of isometric wrist joint torques using surface electromyography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several regression models have been proposed for estimation of isometric joint torque using surface electromyography (SEMG) signals. Common issues related to torque estimation models are degradation of model accuracy with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. This work compares the performance of the most commonly used regression models under these circumstances, in order to assist researchers with identifying the most appropriate model for a specific biomedical application. Methods Eleven healthy volunteers participated in this study. A custom-built rig, equipped with a torque sensor, was used to measure isometric torque as each volunteer flexed and extended his wrist. SEMG signals from eight forearm muscles, in addition to wrist joint torque data were gathered during the experiment. Additional data were gathered one hour and twenty-four hours following the completion of the first data gathering session, for the purpose of evaluating the effects of passage of time and electrode displacement on accuracy of models. Acquired SEMG signals were filtered, rectified, normalized and then fed to models for training. Results It was shown that mean adjusted coefficient of determination (Ra2) values decrease between 20%-35% for different models after one hour while altering arm posture decreased mean Ra2 values between 64% to 74% for different models. Conclusions Model estimation accuracy drops significantly with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. Therefore model retraining is crucial for preserving estimation accuracy. Data resampling can significantly reduce model training time without losing estimation accuracy. Among the models compared, ordinary least squares linear regression model (OLS) was shown to have high isometric torque estimation accuracy combined with very short training times. PMID:21943179

  14. An experimental apparatus for Casimir torque measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, David A. T.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    We have developed an experiment to measure the Casimir torque. In our experiment, a solid birefringent crystal causes a nematic liquid crystal director to rotate such that the extraordinary axes are aligned. A transparent and isotropic dielectric spacer layer is used to separate the two birefringent materials and an all-optical technique is used for detection. In this talk, we report on the progress of this experiment. Department of Physics, Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics.

  15. An ironless armature brushless torque motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    A high torque motor with improved servo mechanism is reported. Armature windings are cast into an epoxy cylinder and armature conductors are integrally cast with an aluminum mounting ring which provides thermal conductance directly into the structure. This configuration eliminates magnetic hysteresis because there is no relative motion between the rotating magnetic field and any stationary iron. The absence of destabilization forces provides a fast electrical response compared with a typical torquer of conventional construction.

  16. Measurement of edgewise torque force in vitro.

    PubMed

    Steyn, C L

    1977-05-01

    The construction of a model for the measurement of palatal root torque is described. It was demonstrated that: 1. Halfway between the apex of a tooth and the arch wire the force was double that which was delivered at the apex. 2. The lateral incisors were subjected to appreciably more force than the central incisors. 3. The smaller the number of teeth acted upon, the greater the force they received.

  17. Flux-Based Deadbeat Control of Induction-Motor Torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Lorenz, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    An improved method and prior methods of deadbeat direct torque control involve the use of pulse-width modulation (PWM) of applied voltages. The prior methods are based on the use of stator flux and stator current as state variables, leading to mathematical solutions of control equations in forms that do not lend themselves to clear visualization of solution spaces. In contrast, the use of rotor and stator fluxes as the state variables in the present improved method lends itself to graphical representations that aid in understanding possible solutions under various operating conditions. In addition, the present improved method incorporates the superposition of high-frequency carrier signals for use in a motor-self-sensing technique for estimating the rotor shaft angle at any speed (including low or even zero speed) without need for additional shaft-angle-measuring sensors.

  18. Tidal Torques. Critical Review of Some Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efroimsky, Michael; Williams, J. G.

    2008-05-01

    We compare two derivations of a popular formula for the tidal despinning rate, and emphasise that both are strongly limited to the case of a vanishing inclination and a certain (sadly, unrealistic) law of frequency-dependence of the quality factor. One method is based on the MacDonald torque, the other on the Darwin torque. Fortunately, the second approach is general enough to accommodate both a finite inclination and the actual rheology. We also address the rheological models with the Q factor scaling as the tidal frequency to a positive fractional power, and disprove the popular belief that these models introduce discontinuities into the equations and thus are unrealistic at low frequencies. Though such models indeed make the conventional expressions for the torque diverge for vanishing frequencies, the emerging infinities reveal not the impossible nature of one or another rheology, but a subtle flaw in the underlying mathematical model of friction. Flawed is the common misassumption that damping merely provides phase lags to the terms of the Fourier series for the tidal potential. A careful hydrodynamical treatment by Sir George Darwin (1879), with viscosity explicitly included, had demonstrated that the magnitudes of the terms, too, get changed -- a fine detail later neglected as ``irrelevant". Reinstating of this detail tames the fake infinities and rehabilitates the ``impossible" scaling law (which happens to be the actual law the terrestrial planets obey at low frequencies).

  19. Insulating nanomagnets driven by spin torque

    DOE PAGES

    Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Ding, Junjia; Zhang, Wei; ...

    2016-11-29

    Magnetic insulators, such as yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12), are ideal materials for ultra-low power spintronics applications due to their low energy dissipation and efficient spin current generation and transmission. Recently, it has been realized that spin dynamics can be driven very effectively in micrometer-sized Y3Fe5O12/Pt heterostructures by spin-Hall effects. We demonstrate here the excitation and detection of spin dynamics in Y3Fe5O12/Pt nanowires by spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance. The nanowires defined via electron-beam lithography are fabricated by conventional room temperature sputtering deposition on Gd3Ga5O12 substrates and lift-off. We observe field-like and anti-damping-like torques acting on the magnetization precession, which are due tomore » simultaneous excitation by Oersted fields and spin-Hall torques. The Y3Fe5O12/Pt nanowires are thoroughly examined over a wide frequency and power range. We observe a large change in the resonance field at high microwave powers, which is attributed to a decreasing effective magnetization due to microwave absorption. By comparing different nanowire widths, the importance of geometrical confinements for magnetization dynamics becomes evident. In conclusion, our results are the first stepping stones toward the realization of integrated magnonic logic devices based on insulators, where nanomagnets play an essential role.« less

  20. Dynamics of a split torque helicopter transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, Majid; Krantz, Timothy

    A high reduction ratio split torque gear train has been proposed as an alternative to a planetary configuration for the final stage of a helicopter transmission. A split torque design allows a high ratio of power-to-weight for the transmission. The design studied in this work includes a pivoting beam that acts to balance thrust loads produced by the helical gear meshes in each of two parallel power paths. When the thrust loads are balanced, the torque is split evenly. A mathematical model was developed to study the dynamics of the system. The effects of time varying gear mesh stiffness, static transmission errors, and flexible bearing supports are included in the model. The model was demonstrated with a test case. Results show that although the gearbox has a symmetric configuration, the simulated dynamic behavior of the first and second compound gears are not the same. Also, results show that shaft location and mesh stiffness tuning are significant design parameters that influence the motions of the system.

  1. Dynamics of a split torque helicopter transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidi, Majid; Krantz, Timothy

    1992-01-01

    A high reduction ratio split torque gear train has been proposed as an alternative to a planetary configuration for the final stage of a helicopter transmission. A split torque design allows a high ratio of power-to-weight for the transmission. The design studied in this work includes a pivoting beam that acts to balance thrust loads produced by the helical gear meshes in each of two parallel power paths. When the thrust loads are balanced, the torque is split evenly. A mathematical model was developed to study the dynamics of the system. The effects of time varying gear mesh stiffness, static transmission errors, and flexible bearing supports are included in the model. The model was demonstrated with a test case. Results show that although the gearbox has a symmetric configuration, the simulated dynamic behavior of the first and second compound gears are not the same. Also, results show that shaft location and mesh stiffness tuning are significant design parameters that influence the motions of the system.

  2. Space Suit Joint Torque Measurement Method Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valish, Dana; Eversley, Karina

    2012-01-01

    In 2009 and early 2010, a test method was developed and performed to quantify the torque required to manipulate joints in several existing operational and prototype space suits. This was done in an effort to develop joint torque requirements appropriate for a new Constellation Program space suit system. The same test method was levied on the Constellation space suit contractors to verify that their suit design met the requirements. However, because the original test was set up and conducted by a single test operator there was some question as to whether this method was repeatable enough to be considered a standard verification method for Constellation or other future development programs. In order to validate the method itself, a representative subset of the previous test was repeated, using the same information that would be available to space suit contractors, but set up and conducted by someone not familiar with the previous test. The resultant data was compared using graphical and statistical analysis; the results indicated a significant variance in values reported for a subset of the re-tested joints. Potential variables that could have affected the data were identified and a third round of testing was conducted in an attempt to eliminate and/or quantify the effects of these variables. The results of the third test effort will be used to determine whether or not the proposed joint torque methodology can be applied to future space suit development contracts.

  3. Switching efficiency improvement in spin torque majority gates

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Dmitri E. Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-05-07

    Spin torque majority gate (STMG) is one of the promising options for beyond complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor logic. Improvement of its performance—switching speed vs. required current—is critical for its competitiveness. In this paper, (a) we identify an optimized layout of the gate comprised of thin magnetic wires with in-plane magnetization; (b) we optimize geometries of perpendicular magnetization spin torque majority gates. Micromagnetic simulations demonstrate an improvement in switching current for in-plane magnetization (with less than 1 ns switching time) from 6 mA in the original scheme to 1.5 mA in the present one. Additionally, failures of switching caused by vortex formation are eliminated and desired output magnetization is achieved. Various geometries of STMG with perpendicular magnetization are explored. The scheme with a straight cross proves to be the most advantageous. It is predicted to operate with the switching current of 50 μA and less than 4 ns switching time.

  4. Near Earth Asteroid Scout Thrust and Torque Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andrew; Ahmad, Naeem; Miller, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout is a solar sail mission whose objective is to scout at least one Near Earth Asteroid in preparation for manned missions to asteroids. NEA Scout will use a solar sail as the primary means of propulsion. Thus it is important for mission planning to accurately characterize the thrust of the sail. Additionally, the solar sail creates a relatively large solar disturbance torque that must be mitigated. For early mission design studies a flat plate model of the solar sail with a fixed center of pressure was adequate, but as mission concepts and the sail design matured, greater fidelity was required. Here we discuss the progress to a three-dimensional sail model that includes the effects of tension and thermal deformation that has been derived from a large structural Finite Element Model (FEM) developed by the Langley Research Center. We have found that the deformed sail membrane affects torque relatively much more than thrust. We have also found that other than uncertainty over the precise shape, the effect of small (approximately millimeter scale) wrinkles on the diffusivity of the sail is the leading remaining source of uncertainty. We demonstrate that millimeter-scale wrinkles can be modeled analytically as a change in the fraction of specular reflection. Finally we discuss the implications of these results for the NEA Scout mission.

  5. A three-dimensional model of corotating streams in the solar wind. 1: Theoretical foundations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.

    1978-01-01

    The theoretical and mathematical background pertinent to the study of steady, corotating solar wind structure in all three spatial dimensions (3-D) is discussed. The dynamical evolution of the plasma in interplanetary space (defined as the region beyond roughly 35 solar radii where the flow is supersonic) is approximately described by the nonlinear, single fluid, polytropic (magneto-) hydrodynamic equations. Efficient numerical techniques for solving this complex system of coupled, hyperbolic partial differential equations are outlined. The formulation is inviscid and nonmagnetic, but methods allow for the potential inclusion of both features with only modest modifications. One simple, highly idealized, hydrodynamic model stream is examined to illustrate the fundamental processes involved in the 3-D dynamics of stream evolution. Spatial variations in the rotational stream interaction mechanism were found to produce small nonradial flows on a global scale that lead to the transport of mass, energy, and momentum away from regions of relative compression and into regions of relative rarefaction.

  6. Numerical study of mixed convection between two corotating symmetrically heated disks

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, C.Y.; Yan, W.M. Hua Fan Inst. of Technology, Taipei )

    1993-03-01

    This article is concerned with a numerical study of mixed convection between two symmetrically heated corotating disks. Both thermal boundary conditions of constant wall temperature and uniform heat flux are considered. By applying the boundary-layer approximation and a linear relation for density variation in centrifugal force term, the governing equations reduce to a Boussinesq system of parabolic nature. The spatially developing flow and heat transfer are studied numerically. The effects of centrifugal buoyancy, Coriolis force, radial through-flow, and wall-heating on the flow structure and heat transfer performance are examined in detail. The results reveal that the centrifugal buoyancy, which was ignored in prior studies, is indeed a significant effect in this class of rotating flows. 19 refs.

  7. Modelling the Influence of Corotating Interaction Regions on Jovian MeV-electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, A.; Effenberger, F.; Fichtner, H.; Heber, B.; Kleimann, J.; Kopp, A.; Potgieter, M. S.; Sternal, O.; Wiengarten, T.

    2015-08-01

    Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) are recurrent structures in the solar wind characterized by velocity jumps and a magnetic field compression. Since the 1970s it is known that Jupiter is a quasicontinuous source of MeV-electrons dominating the flux in the inner heliosphere. In connection with CIRs, this flux is modulated mainly by changing propagation conditions in the inner heliosphere. In order to model these recurrent variations in Jovian electron intensity the VLUGR3-Code was used to solve Parker's Transport Equation. The diffusion as well as the solar wind speed are modelled from 0.1 to 50 AU. Two different approaches are used, one derived by Kissmann (2002) and another by Giacalone et al (2002) which was further developed. The simulation results are compared to IMP-8 electron count rates to investigate the differences of the two solar wind models in the propagation code.

  8. Stellar rotation at young ages: new results from Corot's monitoring NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata, F.; Micela, G.; Alencar, S.; Aigrain, S.; Zwintz, K.

    2010-11-01

    Stellar rotation at young ages: new results from Corot's Angular momentum is one of the driving forces in the early evolution of stars. Issues such as the coupling between the star and the accretion disk (the so-called disk regulation paradigm), are traced by the evolution of rotational momentum, but affect the star-forming process as a whole. One of the features observed in star-forming regions (e.g. ONC and NGC 2264) of age between 1 and few Myr, for masses above 0.25 solar masses, is a bimodality of the rotational period distribution, with a peak around 1 day and the other at around 4 to 7 days. This bimodality has been interpreted as the smoking gun of the disk-locking mechanism (with the fast rotators having lost their disk and the slow ones still being regulated by their disks).

  9. Looking for planetary candidates in the CoRoT Long Run LRc10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannoni, A.; Borsa, F.; Poretti, E.; Lodato, G.; Rainer, M.; Frustagli, G.

    We analysed the public data of the CoRoT Long Run LRc10 looking for planetary candidates. In a first step we removed outliers and trends caused by stellar activity and instrumental problems. Then we applied the Box-fitting Least Squares (BLS) algorithm to detect periodic decreases in luminosity. From all the significative transit detections, we selected the ones that passed different checks. For the 7 planetary candidates found, we applied a new ``ad hoc'' normalization and fitted the orbital parameters, to verify their reliability. Using the stellar temperature information, we could estimate the dimensions that the candidates should have if confirmed. Our research method demonstrated to be sensitive to candidates with hypothetic dimension up to ˜3.5 REarth on stars of mag V≃14.

  10. The Spin Torque Lego - from spin torque nano-devices to advanced computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grollier, Julie

    2013-03-01

    Spin transfer torque (STT), predicted in 1996, and first observed around 2000, brought spintronic devices to the realm of active elements. A whole class of new devices, based on the combined effects of STT for writing and Giant Magneto-Resistance or Tunnel Magneto-Resistance for reading has emerged. The second generation of MRAMs, based on spin torque writing : the STT-RAM, is under industrial development and should be out on the market in three years. But spin torque devices are not limited to binary memories. We will rapidly present how the spin torque effect also allows to implement non-linear nano-oscillators, spin-wave emitters, controlled stochastic devices and microwave nano-detectors. What is extremely interesting is that all these functionalities can be obtained using the same materials, the exact same stack, simply by changing the device geometry and its bias conditions. So these different devices can be seen as Lego bricks, each brick with its own functionality. During this talk, I will show how spin torque can be engineered to build new bricks, such as the Spintronic Memristor, an artificial magnetic nano-synapse. I will then give hints on how to assemble these bricks in order to build novel types of computing architectures, with a special focus on neuromorphic circuits. Financial support by the European Research Council Starting Grant NanoBrain (ERC 2010 Stg 259068) is acknowledged.

  11. The CoRoT and Kepler Revolution in Stellar Variability Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degroote, Pieter; Debosscher, Jonas

    2012-04-01

    Space-based observations of variable stars have revolutionized the field of variability studies. Dedicated satellites such as the CoRoT and Kepler missions have duty cycles which are unachievable from the ground, and effectively solve many of the aliasing problems prevalent in ground-based observation campaigns. Moreover, the location above the Earth's atmosphere eliminates a major source of scatter prevalent in observations from the ground. These two major improvements in instrumentation have triggered significant increases in our knowledge of the stars, but in order to reap the full benefits they are also obliging the community to adopt more efficient techniques for handling, analysing and interpreting the vast amounts of new, high-precision data in an effective yet comprehensive manner. This workshop heard an outline of the history and development of asteroseismology, and descriptions of the two space missions (CoRoT and Kepler) which have been foremost in accelerating those recent developments. Informal discussions on numerous points peppered the proceedings, and involved the whole audience at times. The conclusions which the workshop reached have been distilled into a list of seven recommendations (Section 5) for the asteroseismology community to study and absorb. In fact, while addressing activities (such as stellar classification or analysing and modelling light curves) that could be regarded as specific to the community in question, the recommendations include advice on matters such as improving communication, incorporating trans-disciplinary knowledge and involving the non-scientific public that are broad enough to serve as guidelines for the astrophysical community at large.

  12. The CoRoT satellite in flight: description and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auvergne, M.; Bodin, P.; Boisnard, L.; Buey, J.-T.; Chaintreuil, S.; Epstein, G.; Jouret, M.; Lam-Trong, T.; Levacher, P.; Magnan, A.; Perez, R.; Plasson, P.; Plesseria, J.; Peter, G.; Steller, M.; Tiphène, D.; Baglin, A.; Agogué, P.; Appourchaux, T.; Barbet, D.; Beaufort, T.; Bellenger, R.; Berlin, R.; Bernardi, P.; Blouin, D.; Boumier, P.; Bonneau, F.; Briet, R.; Butler, B.; Cautain, R.; Chiavassa, F.; Costes, V.; Cuvilho, J.; Cunha-Parro, V.; de Oliveira Fialho, F.; Decaudin, M.; Defise, J.-M.; Djalal, S.; Docclo, A.; Drummond, R.; Dupuis, O.; Exil, G.; Fauré, C.; Gaboriaud, A.; Gamet, P.; Gavalda, P.; Grolleau, E.; Gueguen, L.; Guivarc'h, V.; Guterman, P.; Hasiba, J.; Huntzinger, G.; Hustaix, H.; Imbert, C.; Jeanville, G.; Johlander, B.; Jorda, L.; Journoud, P.; Karioty, F.; Kerjean, L.; Lafond, L.; Lapeyrere, V.; Landiech, P.; Larqué, T.; Laudet, P.; Le Merrer, J.; Leporati, L.; Leruyet, B.; Levieuge, B.; Llebaria, A.; Martin, L.; Mazy, E.; Mesnager, J.-M.; Michel, J.-P.; Moalic, J.-P.; Monjoin, W.; Naudet, D.; Neukirchner, S.; Nguyen-Kim, K.; Ollivier, M.; Orcesi, J.-L.; Ottacher, H.; Oulali, A.; Parisot, J.; Perruchot, S.; Piacentino, A.; Pinheiro da Silva, L.; Platzer, J.; Pontet, B.; Pradines, A.; Quentin, C.; Rohbeck, U.; Rolland, G.; Rollenhagen, F.; Romagnan, R.; Russ, N.; Samadi, R.; Schmidt, R.; Schwartz, N.; Sebbag, I.; Smit, H.; Sunter, W.; Tello, M.; Toulouse, P.; Ulmer, B.; Vandermarcq, O.; Vergnault, E.; Wallner, R.; Waultier, G.; Zanatta, P.

    2009-10-01

    Context: CoRoT is a space telescope dedicated to stellar seismology and the search for extrasolar planets. The mission is led by the CNES in association with French laboratories and has a large international participation. The European Space Agency (ESA), Austria, Belgium, and Germany contribute to the payload, and Spain and Brazil contribute to the ground segment. Development of the spacecraft, which is based on a PROTEUS low earth orbit (LEO) recurrent platform, commenced in October 2000, and the satellite was launched on December 27, 2006. Aims: The instrument and platform characteristics prior to launch have been described in ESA publication (SP-1306). In the present paper we explain the behaviour in flight, based on raw and corrected data. Methods: Five runs have been completed since January 2007. The data used here are essentially those acquired during the commissioning phase and from a long run that lasted 146 days. These enable us to give a complete overview of the instrument and platform behaviour for all environmental conditions. The ground based data processing is not described in detail because the most important method has been published elsewhere. Results: We show that the performance specifications are easily satisfied when the environmental conditions are favourable. Most of the perturbations, hence data corrections, are related to LEO perturbations: high energy particles inside the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), eclipses and temperature variations, and line of sight fluctuations due to the attitude control system. Straylight due to the reflected light from the earth, which is controlled by the telescope and baffle design, appears to be negligible. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with contributions from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany and Spain. Four French laboratories associated with the CNRS (LESIA, LAM, IAS, OMP) collaborate with CNES on the satellite development. The

  13. Large Amplitude IMF Fluctuations in Corotating Interaction Regions: Ulysses at Midlatitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Ho, Christian M.; Arballo, John K.; Goldstein, Bruce E.; Balogh, Andre

    1995-01-01

    Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs), formed by high-speed corotating streams interacting with slow speed streams, have been examined from -20 deg to -36 deg heliolatitudes. The high-speed streams emanate from a polar coronal hole that Ulysses eventually becomes fully embedded in as it travels towards the south pole. We find that the trailing portion of the CIR, from the interface surface (IF) to the reverse shock (RS), contains both large amplitude transverse fluctuations and magnitude fluctuations. Similar fluctuations have been previously noted to exist within CIRs detected in the ecliptic plane, but their existence has not been explained. The normalized magnetic field component variances within this portion of the CIR and in the trailing high-speed stream are approximately the same, indicating that the fluctuations in the CIR are compressed Alfven waves. Mirror mode structures with lower intensities are also observed in the trailing portion of the CIR, presumably generated from a local instability driven by free energy associated with compression of the high-speed solar wind plasma. The mixture of these two modes (compressed Alfven waves and mirror modes) plus other modes generated by three wave processes (wave-shock interactions) lead to a lower Alfvenicity within the trailing portion of the CfR than in the high-speed stream proper. The results presented in this paper suggest a mechanism for generation of large amplitude B(sub z) fluctuations within CIRS. Such phenomena have been noted to be responsible for the generation of moderate geomagnetic storms during the declining phase of the solar cycle.

  14. The CoRoT chemical peculiar target star HD 49310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Fröhlich, H.-E.; Netopil, M.; Weiss, W. W.; Lüftinger, T.

    2015-02-01

    Context. The magnetic chemically peculiar (CP) stars of the upper main sequence are well-suited laboratories for investigating the influence of local magnetic fields on the stellar surface because they produce inhomogeneities (spots) that can be investigated in detail as the star rotates. Aims: We studied the inhomogeneous surface structure of the CP2 star HD 49310 based on high-quality CoRoT photometry obtained during 25 days. The data have nearly no gaps. This analysis is similar to a spectroscopic Doppler-imaging analysis, but it is not a tomographic method. Methods: We performed detailed light-curve fitting in terms of stationary circular bright spots. Furthermore, we derived astrophysical parameters with which we located HD 49310 within the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We also investigated the possible connection of this star to the nearby young open cluster NGC 2264. Results: With a Bayesian technique, we produced a surface map that shows six bright spots. After removing some artefacts, the residuals of the observed and synthetic photometric data are ± 0.123 mmag. The rotational period of the star is P = 1.91909 ± 0.00001 days. Our photometric observations therefore cover about 13 full rotational cycles. Three spots are very large with diameters of ≃ 40deg. The spots are brighter by 40% than the unperturbed stellar photosphere. Conclusions: HD 49310 is a classical silicon (CP2) star with a mass of about 3 M⊙. It is not a member of NGC 2264. Our analysis shows the potential of using high-quality photometric data to analyse the surface structure of CP stars. A comprehensive analysis of similar archival data, preferrably from space missions, would contribute significantly to our understanding of surface phenomena of CP stars and their temporal evolution. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with participation of ESA's RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain.

  15. Nature and measurements of torque ripple of permanent-magnet adjustable-speed motors

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.; Scoggins, B.P.; Scudiere, M.B.; Marlino, L.D.; Adams, D.J.; Pillay, P.

    1995-08-01

    Torque ripple of permanent-magnet motors can be classified into four types depending on the nature of their origin. The four types are pulsating torque, fluctuating torque, reluctance cogging torque, and inertia and mechanical system torque. Pulsating torques are inherently produced by the trapezoidal back-emf`s and trapezoidal currents used in certain permanent-magnet adjustable-speed motors. The torque ripples caused by pulsating torques may be reduced by purposely produced fluctuating counter torques. Air-gap torque measurements are conducted on a sample motor. Experimental results agree with theoretical expectations.

  16. Torque Ripple Reduction in Direct Torque Control Based Induction Motor using Intelligent Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar, Ambarapu; Vijaya Kumar, M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents intelligent control scheme together with conventional control scheme to overcome the problems with uncertainties in the structure encountered with classical model based design of induction motor drive based on direct torque control (DTC). It allows high dynamic performance to be obtained with very simple hysteresis control scheme. Direct control of the torque and flux is achieved by proper selection of inverter voltage space vector through a lookup table. This paper also presents the application of intelligent controllers like neural network and fuzzy logic controllers to control induction machines with DTC. Intelligent controllers are used to emulate the state selector of the DTC. With implementation of intelligent controllers the system is also verified and proved to be operated stably with reduced torque ripple. The proposed method validity and effectiveness has been verified by computer simulations using Matlab/Simulink®. These results are compared with the ones obtained with a classical DTC using proportional integral speed controller.

  17. Bevel gear driver and method having torque limit selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention comprises a torque drive mechanism utilizing axially translatable, mutually engageable transmission members having mating crown gears, driven and driving members with a three-element drive train being biased together by resilient means or by a fluid actuator system, the apparatus being operable to transmit a precisely controlled degree of torque to a driven member. The apparatus is applicable for use in hand tools and as a replacement for impact torque drivers, torque wrenches, motorized screw drivers, or the like, wherein the applied torque must be precisely controlled or limited. The bevel torque drive includes a drive gear which is axially displaceable and rotatable within cylindrical driver housing, a rotatable intermediate gear, and an output gear. Key rotationally secures displaceable gear with respect to input shaft but permits axial movement therebetween. A thrust bearing is preferably connected to the lower end of shaft for support to reduce play and friction between shaft and a transmission joint disc during rotation of the gear train. Coaxially mounted coiled spring is footed against displaceable gear for biasing the displaceable gear toward and into engagement with the intermediate gear for driving intermediate gear and output gear. Torque control is achieved by the use of straight or spiral beveled gears which are of configurations adapted to withdraw from mutual engagement upon the torque exceeding a predetermined limit. The novel, advantageous features of the invention include the configuration of the mating, crown gear sets and the axially translatable, slidable drive gear. The mechanism is capable of transmitting a high degree of torque within a narrow, compact transmission housing. The compact size and narrow, elongated configuration of the housing is particularly applicable for use in hand tools and in multiple torque driver mechanisms in which it is necessary to drive multiple fasteners which are located in close proximity. Prior

  18. None of the rotor residues of F1-ATPase are essential for torque generation.

    PubMed

    Chiwata, Ryohei; Kohori, Ayako; Kawakami, Tomonari; Shiroguchi, Katsuyuki; Furuike, Shou; Adachi, Kengo; Sutoh, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-20

    F1-ATPase is a powerful rotary molecular motor that can rotate an object several hundred times as large as the motor itself against the viscous friction of water. Forced reverse rotation has been shown to lead to ATP synthesis, implying that the mechanical work against the motor's high torque can be converted into the chemical energy of ATP. The minimal composition of the motor protein is α3β3γ subunits, where the central rotor subunit γ turns inside a stator cylinder made of alternately arranged α3β3 subunits using the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. The rotor consists of an axle, a coiled coil of the amino- and carboxyl-terminal α-helices of γ, which deeply penetrates the stator cylinder, and a globular protrusion that juts out from the stator. Previous work has shown that, for a thermophilic F1, significant portions of the axle can be truncated and the motor still rotates a submicron sized bead duplex, indicating generation of up to half the wild-type (WT) torque. Here, we inquire if any specific interactions between the stator and the rest of the rotor are needed for the generation of a sizable torque. We truncated the protruding portion of the rotor and replaced part of the remaining axle residues such that every residue of the rotor has been deleted or replaced in this or previous truncation mutants. This protrusionless construct showed an unloaded rotary speed about a quarter of the WT, and generated one-third to one-half of the WT torque. No residue-specific interactions are needed for this much performance. F1 is so designed that the basic rotor-stator interactions for torque generation and control of catalysis rely solely upon the shape and size of the rotor at very low resolution. Additional tailored interactions augment the torque to allow ATP synthesis under physiological conditions.

  19. Study on Torque Calculation for Hybrid Magnetic Coupling and Influencing Factor Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuang; Guo, Yong-cun; Wang, Peng-yu; Li, De-yong

    2017-03-01

    Specific to a problem that the present transmission of magnetic coupling torque was subjected to restrictions of its own structure, a hybrid magnetic coupling was proposed. Then, finite element method was adopted to carry out numerical calculations for its three-dimensional magnetic field to obtain three-dimensional magnetic field distribution of radial and axial configurations. Major influencing factors of its torque, such as lengths of axial and radial air gaps, thicknesses of axial and radial permanent magnets, the number of slots in axial copper rotor, thickness of axial and radial copper rotor, etc., were analyzed. The relevant results indicated that in certain conditions of shapes, ten magnetic poles of the axial permanent magnet rotor, nine of the radial permanent magnet rotor and nine slots from the axial copper rotor were used. Correspondingly, the axial copper rotor had a thickness of 20 mm and it was 5 mm for the radial copper rotor. Moreover, the maximum torque could reach 190 N.m approximately. If lengths of axial and radial air gaps increased, the torque may go down otherwise. Within a certain scope, the torque rose in the first place and then fell with increases in the permanent magnet thickness of axial permanent magnetic rotor, the number of axial and radial magnetic poles, the number of slots in axial copper rotor, and the thickness of axial copper rotor. Additionally, the number of slots in the axial copper rotor could not be equivalent to that of magnetic poles in axial permanent magnetic rotor. However, as the permanent magnet thickness of radial permanent magnetic rotor rose, the torque went up as well.

  20. None of the Rotor Residues of F1-ATPase Are Essential for Torque Generation

    PubMed Central

    Chiwata, Ryohei; Kohori, Ayako; Kawakami, Tomonari; Shiroguchi, Katsuyuki; Furuike, Shou; Adachi, Kengo; Sutoh, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    F1-ATPase is a powerful rotary molecular motor that can rotate an object several hundred times as large as the motor itself against the viscous friction of water. Forced reverse rotation has been shown to lead to ATP synthesis, implying that the mechanical work against the motor’s high torque can be converted into the chemical energy of ATP. The minimal composition of the motor protein is α3β3γ subunits, where the central rotor subunit γ turns inside a stator cylinder made of alternately arranged α3β3 subunits using the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. The rotor consists of an axle, a coiled coil of the amino- and carboxyl-terminal α-helices of γ, which deeply penetrates the stator cylinder, and a globular protrusion that juts out from the stator. Previous work has shown that, for a thermophilic F1, significant portions of the axle can be truncated and the motor still rotates a submicron sized bead duplex, indicating generation of up to half the wild-type (WT) torque. Here, we inquire if any specific interactions between the stator and the rest of the rotor are needed for the generation of a sizable torque. We truncated the protruding portion of the rotor and replaced part of the remaining axle residues such that every residue of the rotor has been deleted or replaced in this or previous truncation mutants. This protrusionless construct showed an unloaded rotary speed about a quarter of the WT, and generated one-third to one-half of the WT torque. No residue-specific interactions are needed for this much performance. F1 is so designed that the basic rotor-stator interactions for torque generation and control of catalysis rely solely upon the shape and size of the rotor at very low resolution. Additional tailored interactions augment the torque to allow ATP synthesis under physiological conditions. PMID:24853745

  1. Final report on the torque comparison EURAMET.M.T-S2, measurand torque: 10 N.m, 20 N.m, 40 N.m, 60 N.m, 80 N.m, and 100 N.m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röske, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the EURAMET comparison EURAMET.M.T-S2 was to compare the measuring capabilities up to 100 N.m of a reference-type torque calibration machine of ZAG, Slovenia, with the torque standard machine of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) acting as pilot laboratory. A very stable TT1 torque transducer with well-known properties and two torque measuring bridges was used as travelling standard. According to the technical protocol, torque steps of at least 10 N.m, 20 N.m, 40 N.m, 60 N.m, 80 N.m, and 100 N.m had to be measured both in clockwise and anticlockwise directions. For each of the torque steps and both senses of direction of the torque vector, En values were calculated. The results are in general in good agreement with the claimed measurement uncertainties except for the very first measurement at ZAG with additional support and four plate couplings. It seems to be sufficient in a vertical set-up (vertical torque axis) to use only two flexible couplings and there is no need for a further support between the transducers. The measurements with two couplings fulfill the requirement to the En value and support ZAG's claimed uncertainties of measurement. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  2. Effect of environmental torques on short-term attitude prediction for a rolling-wheel spacecraft in a sun-synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    A numerical evaluation and an analysis of the effects of environmental disturbance torques on the attitude of a hexagonal cylinder rolling wheel spacecraft were performed. The resulting perturbations caused by five such torques were found to be very small and exhibited linearity such that linearized equations of motion yielded accurate results over short periods and the separate perturbations contributed by each torque were additive in the sense of superposition. Linearity of the torque perturbations was not affected by moderate system design changes and persisted for torque-to-angular momentum ratios up to 100 times the nominal expected value. As these conditions include many possible applications, similar linear behavior might be anticipated for other rolling-wheel spacecraft.

  3. Torque resolver design for tendon-driven manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.; Tsai, Lung-Wen

    1992-08-01

    Given a set of desired joint torques in an n-DOF tendon-driven manipulator with n + 1 control tendons, the determination of tendon forces is an indeterminate problem. Usually, the pseudo-inverse technique is used to solve for such a problem. In this paper, rather than using the pseudo-inverse technique is used to solve for such a problem. In this paper, rather than using the pseudo-inverse technique, an efficient methodology for transforming joint torques (n elements) to motor torques (n + 1 elements) has been developed. This technique called ``torque resolver``, utilizes two circuit-like operators to transform torques between the two different vector spaces. It can be easily programmed on a digital computer or implemented into an analog-circuit system. It is hoped that this technique will make real-time computed-torque control feasible. The technique has been demonstrated through the dynamic simulation of a three-DOF manipulator.

  4. Torque resolver design for tendon-driven manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.; Tsai, Lung-Wen.

    1992-01-01

    Given a set of desired joint torques in an n-DOF tendon-driven manipulator with n + 1 control tendons, the determination of tendon forces is an indeterminate problem. Usually, the pseudo-inverse technique is used to solve for such a problem. In this paper, rather than using the pseudo-inverse technique is used to solve for such a problem. In this paper, rather than using the pseudo-inverse technique, an efficient methodology for transforming joint torques (n elements) to motor torques (n + 1 elements) has been developed. This technique called torque resolver'', utilizes two circuit-like operators to transform torques between the two different vector spaces. It can be easily programmed on a digital computer or implemented into an analog-circuit system. It is hoped that this technique will make real-time computed-torque control feasible. The technique has been demonstrated through the dynamic simulation of a three-DOF manipulator.

  5. Bevel Gear Driver and Method Having Torque Limit Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including an axially displaceable gear with a biasing assembly to bias the displaceable gear into an engagement position. A rotatable cap is provided with a micrometer dial to select a desired output torque. An intermediate bevel gear assembly is disposed between an input gear and an output gear. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at a desired torque limit. The torque limit is adjustable and may be adjusted manually or automatically depending on the type of biasing assembly provided. A clutch assembly automatically limits axial force applied to a fastener by the operator to avoid alteration of the desired torque limit.

  6. Insulating Nanomagnets Driven by Spin Torque.

    PubMed

    Jungfleisch, Matthias B; Ding, Junjia; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Wanjun; Pearson, John E; Novosad, Valentine; Hoffmann, Axel

    2017-01-11

    Magnetic insulators, such as yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12), are ideal materials for ultralow power spintronics applications due to their low energy dissipation and efficient spin current generation and transmission. Recently, it has been realized that spin dynamics can be driven very effectively in micrometer-sized Y3Fe5O12/Pt heterostructures by spin-Hall effects. We demonstrate here the excitation and detection of spin dynamics in Y3Fe5O12/Pt nanowires by spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance. The nanowires defined via electron-beam lithography are fabricated by conventional room temperature sputtering deposition on Gd3Ga5O12 substrates and lift-off. We observe field-like and antidamping-like torques acting on the magnetization precession, which are due to simultaneous excitation by Oersted fields and spin-Hall torques. The Y3Fe5O12/Pt nanowires are thoroughly examined over a wide frequency and power range. We observe a large change in the resonance field at high microwave powers, which is attributed to a decreasing effective magnetization due to microwave absorption. These heating effects are much more pronounced in the investigated nanostructures than in comparable micron-sized samples. By comparing different nanowire widths, the importance of geometrical confinements for magnetization dynamics becomes evident: quantized spin-wave modes across the width of the wires are observed in the spectra. Our results are the first stepping stones toward the realization of integrated magnonic logic devices based on insulators, where nanomagnets play an essential role.

  7. Insulating nanomagnets driven by spin torque

    SciTech Connect

    Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Ding, Junjia; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Wanjun; Pearson, John E.; Novosad, Valentine; Hoffmann, Axel

    2016-11-29

    Magnetic insulators, such as yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12), are ideal materials for ultra-low power spintronics applications due to their low energy dissipation and efficient spin current generation and transmission. Recently, it has been realized that spin dynamics can be driven very effectively in micrometer-sized Y3Fe5O12/Pt heterostructures by spin-Hall effects. We demonstrate here the excitation and detection of spin dynamics in Y3Fe5O12/Pt nanowires by spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance. The nanowires defined via electron-beam lithography are fabricated by conventional room temperature sputtering deposition on Gd3Ga5O12 substrates and lift-off. We observe field-like and anti-damping-like torques acting on the magnetization precession, which are due to simultaneous excitation by Oersted fields and spin-Hall torques. The Y3Fe5O12/Pt nanowires are thoroughly examined over a wide frequency and power range. We observe a large change in the resonance field at high microwave powers, which is attributed to a decreasing effective magnetization due to microwave absorption. By comparing different nanowire widths, the importance of geometrical confinements for magnetization dynamics becomes evident. In conclusion, our results are the first stepping stones toward the realization of integrated magnonic logic devices based on insulators, where nanomagnets play an essential role.

  8. Domain wall oscillations induced by spin torque in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sbiaa, R.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2015-02-07

    Using micromagnetic simulations, the effects of the non-adiabatic spin torque (β) and the geometry of nanowires on domain wall (DW) dynamics are investigated. For the case of in-plane anisotropy nanowire, it is observed that the type of DW and its dynamics depends on its dimension. For a fixed length, the critical switching current decreases almost exponentially with the width W, while the DW speed becomes faster for larger W. For the case of perpendicular anisotropy nanowire, it was observed that DW dynamics depends strongly on β. For small values of β, oscillations of DW around the center of nanowire were revealed even after the current is switched off. In addition to nanowire geometry and intrinsic material properties, β could provide a way to control DW dynamics.

  9. Resonant excitation of coupled skyrmions by spin-transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Y. Y.; Wang, H.; Yang, T.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2016-12-01

    Resonant excitations of coupled skyrmions in Co/Ru/Co nanodisks activated by spin-transfer torque (STT) have been studied by micromagnetic simulations. It is found that STT is an effective method to manipulate skyrmion dynamics. Unlike the dynamics driven by a microwave field, two skyrmions with opposite chiralities move synchronously in the same direction when they are driven by STT, which makes it easier to observe the dynamics of coupled skyrmions in experiments. Resonant excitations of coupled skyrmions can be controlled by changing the frequency or amplitude ratio of a dual-frequency alternating current (AC). In addition, the magnetostatic interaction between the two skyrmions plays an important role in the dynamics of coupled skyrmions.

  10. Switching current density reduction in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions

    SciTech Connect

    You, Chun-Yeol

    2014-01-28

    We investigate the switching current density reduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions using micromagnetic simulations. We find that the switching current density can be reduced with elongated lateral shapes of the magnetic tunnel junctions, and additional reduction can be achieved by using a noncollinear polarizer layer. The reduction is closely related to the details of spin configurations during switching processes with the additional in-plane anisotropy.

  11. Small-Bolt Torque-Tension Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posey, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    The device described here measures the torque-tension relationship for fasteners as small as #0. The small-bolt tester consists of a plate of high-strength steel into which three miniature load cells are recessed. The depth of the recess is sized so that the three load cells can be shimmed, the optimum height depending upon the test hardware. The three miniature load cells are arranged in an equilateral triangular configuration with the test bolt aligned with the centroid of the three. This is a kinematic arrangement.

  12. Torque-induced precession of bacterial flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogonya, Yuji; Sawano, Yoichiro; Wakebe, Hiromichi; Inoue, Yuichi; Ishijima, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is an ion-driven rotary machine in the cell envelope of bacteria. Using a gold nanoparticle as a probe, we observed the precession of flagella during rotation. Since the mechanism of flagella precession was unknown, we investigated it using a combination of full simulations, theory, and experiments. The results show that the mechanism can be well explained by fluid mechanics. The validity of our theory was confirmed by our full simulation, which was utilized to predict both the filament tilt angle and motor torque from experimental flagellar precession data. The knowledge obtained is important in understanding mechanical properties of the bacterial motor and hook.

  13. Torque-induced precession of bacterial flagella.

    PubMed

    Shimogonya, Yuji; Sawano, Yoichiro; Wakebe, Hiromichi; Inoue, Yuichi; Ishijima, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-12-22

    The bacterial flagellar motor is an ion-driven rotary machine in the cell envelope of bacteria. Using a gold nanoparticle as a probe, we observed the precession of flagella during rotation. Since the mechanism of flagella precession was unknown, we investigated it using a combination of full simulations, theory, and experiments. The results show that the mechanism can be well explained by fluid mechanics. The validity of our theory was confirmed by our full simulation, which was utilized to predict both the filament tilt angle and motor torque from experimental flagellar precession data. The knowledge obtained is important in understanding mechanical properties of the bacterial motor and hook.

  14. Torque anomaly in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulling, S. A.; Mera, F. D.; Trendafilova, C. S.

    2013-02-01

    The expectation values of energy density and pressure of a quantum field inside a wedge-shaped region appear to violate the expected relationship between torque and total energy as a function of angle. In particular, this is true of the well-known Deutsch-Candelas stress tensor for the electromagnetic field, whose definition requires no regularization except possibly at the vertex. Unlike a similar anomaly in the pressure exerted by a reflecting boundary against a perpendicular wall, this problem cannot be dismissed as an artifact of an ad hoc regularization.

  15. High-torque open-end wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giandomenico, A.; Dame, J. M.; Behimer, H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A wrench is described that is usable where limited access normally requires an open-end wrench, but which has substantially the high-torque capacity and small radial clearance characteristics of a closed-end wrench. The wrench includes a sleeve forming a nut-engageable socket with a gap in its side, and an adaptor forming a socket with a gap in its side, the adaptor closely surrounding the sleeve and extending across the gap in the sleeve. The sleeve and adaptor have surfaces that become fully engaged when a wrench handle is applied to the adaptor to turn it so as to tighten a nut engaged by the sleeve.

  16. Preparation Torque Limit for Composites Joined with Mechanical Fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Frank P.; Yi, Zhao

    2005-01-01

    Current design guidelines for determining torque ranges for composites are based on tests and analysis from isotropic materials. Properties of composites are not taken into account. No design criteria based upon a systematic analytical and test analyses is available. This paper is to study the maximum torque load a composite component could carry prior to any failure. Specifically, the torque-tension tests are conducted. NDT techniques including acoustic emission, thermography and photomicroscopy are also utilized to characterize the damage modes.

  17. Muscle torque preservation and physical activity in individuals with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Janice J.; Lomaglio, Melanie J.; MacIntyre, Donna L.

    2011-01-01

    Background A greater percent loss of concentric versus eccentric muscle torque (i.e., relative eccentric muscle torque preservation) has been reported in the paretic limb of individuals with stroke and has been attributed to hypertonia and/or co-contractions. Stroke provides a unique condition for examining mechanisms underlying eccentric muscle preservation because both limbs experience similar amounts of general physical activity, but the paretic side is impaired directly by the brain lesion. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine 1) whether eccentric preservation also exists in the nonparetic limb and 2) the relationship of eccentric or concentric torque preservation with physical activity in stroke. We hypothesized that the nonparetic muscles would demonstrate eccentric muscle preservation, which would suggest that non-neural mechanisms may also contribute to its relative preservation. Methods Eighteen stroke and 18 healthy control subjects (age and sex matched) completed a physical activity questionnaire. Maximum voluntary concentric and eccentric joint torques of the ankle, knee and hip flexors and extensors were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer at 30°/s for the paretic and nonparetic muscles. Relative concentric and eccentric peak torque preservation were expressed as a percentage of control subject torque. Results Relative eccentric torque was higher (more preserved) than relative concentric torque for paretic, as well as nonparetic muscles. Physical activity correlated with paretic (r=0.640, p=0.001) and nonparetic concentric torque preservation (r=0.508, p=0.009), but not with eccentric torque preservation for either leg. Conclusions The relative preservation of eccentric torque in the nonparetic muscles suggest a role of non-neural mechanisms and could also explain the preservation observed in other chronic health conditions. Loss of concentric, but not eccentric muscle torque was related to physical inactivity in stroke. PMID

  18. Electronic measurement of variable torques in precision work technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maehr, M.

    1978-01-01

    Approaches for the determination of torques on the basis of length measurements are discussed. Attention is given to torque determinations in which the deformation of a shaft is measured, an electric measurement of the torsion angle, and an approach proposed by Buschmann (1970). Methods for a torque determination conducted with the aid of force measurements make use of piezoelectric approaches. The components used by these methods include a quartz crystal and a charge amplifier.

  19. The Torque of High Speed Scanning Micromirrors with Vertical Combdrives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Hiroyuki; Lee, Daesung; Zappe, Stefan; Solgaard, Olav

    2003-12-01

    200 μm by 200 μm scanning micromirror actuated by vertical combdrives was fabricated. It is important to estimate the torque in order to know the tilt angle. We propose a way to estimate the torque by using the capacitance derived from the overlap area between the upper and lower comb teeth. The tilt angle that was estimated using the calculated torque was about 80% of the measured tilt.

  20. Maximum Torque and Momentum Envelopes for Reaction Wheel Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R. G.; Markley, F. Landis

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft reaction wheel maneuvers are limited by the maximum torque and/or angular momentum which the wheels can provide. For an n-wheel configuration, the torque or momentum envelope can be obtained by projecting the n-dimensional hypercube, representing the domain boundary of individual wheel torques or momenta, into three dimensional space via the 3xn matrix of wheel axes. In this paper, the properties of the projected hypercube are discussed, and algorithms are proposed for determining this maximal torque or momentum envelope for general wheel configurations. Practical implementation strategies for specific wheel configurations are also considered.

  1. Current-induced spin torque resonance of a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Michael; Chiba, Takahiro; Niedermayr, Arthur; Lotze, Johannes; Huebl, Hans; Geprägs, Stephan; Takahashi, Saburo; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2015-10-01

    We report the observation of current-induced spin torque resonance in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers. An alternating charge current at GHz frequencies in the platinum gives rise to dc spin pumping and spin Hall magnetoresistance rectification voltages, induced by the Oersted fields of the ac current and the spin Hall effect-mediated spin transfer torque. In ultrathin yttrium iron garnet films, we observe spin transfer torque actuated magnetization dynamics which are significantly larger than those generated by the ac Oersted field. Spin transfer torques thus efficiently couple charge currents and magnetization dynamics also in magnetic insulators, enabling charge current-based interfacing of magnetic insulators with microwave devices.

  2. Cogging Torque Characteristics of a Magnetic-Geared Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niguchi, Noboru; Hirata, Katsuhiro

    This paper describes the cogging torque characteristics of a magnetic-geared motor with permanent magnets only on the high-speed rotor. The operational principle, which is different from that of the magnetic-geared motor with permanent magnets on the high-speed rotor and stator, is described. The torque characteristics, especially the order of the cogging torque, are mathematically formulated and verified by conducting 3-D finite element analysis and carrying out measurements on a prototype. Furthermore, a novel cogging torque reduction method is proposed and verified as well.

  3. Spin reversal and orbital torques on a viscous fluid Rayleigh sphere located arbitrarily in acoustical Bessel vortex (spiraling) beams.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2016-12-01

    negative spin torque generation may be exploited from the standpoint of particle sizing, and possibly other applications in particle manipulation and rotation. In addition, an application of the spin and orbital radiation torque formulations derived here in the Rayleigh limit concerns the inverse determination of the host fluid viscosity from the induced sphere spinning and/or orbital rotation.

  4. High Altitude Increases Alteration in Maximal Torque but Not in Rapid Torque Development in Knee Extensors after Repeated Treadmill Sprinting

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Olivier; Brocherie, Franck; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed knee extensor neuromuscular adjustments following repeated treadmill sprints in different normobaric hypoxia conditions, with special reference to rapid muscle torque production capacity. Thirteen team- and racquet-sport athletes undertook 8 × 5-s “all-out” sprints (passive recovery = 25 s) on a non-motorized treadmill in normoxia (NM; FiO2 = 20.9%), at low (LA; FiO2 = 16.8%) and high (HA; FiO2 = 13.3%) normobaric hypoxia (simulated altitudes of ~1800 m and ~3600 m, respectively). Explosive (~1 s; “fast” instruction) and maximal (~5 s; “hard” instruction) voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) of the knee extensors (KE), with concurrent electromyographic (EMG) activity recordings of the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles, were performed before and 1-min post-exercise. Rate of torque development (RTD) and EMG (i.e., Root Mean Square or RMS) rise from 0 to 30, −50, −100, and −200 ms were recorded, and were also normalized to maximal torque and EMG values, respectively. Distance covered during the first 5-s sprint was similar (P > 0.05) in all conditions. A larger (P < 0.05) sprint decrement score and a shorter (P < 0.05) cumulated distance covered over the eight sprints occurred in HA (−8 ± 4% and 178 ± 11 m) but not in LA (−7 ± 3% and 181 ± 10 m) compared to NM (−5 ± 2% and 183 ± 9 m). Compared to NM (−9 ± 7%), a larger (P < 0.05) reduction in MVC torque occurred post-exercise in HA (−14 ± 9%) but not in LA (-12 ± 7%), with no difference between NM and LA (P > 0.05). Irrespectively of condition (P > 0.05), peak RTD (−6 ± 11%; P < 0.05), and normalized peak RMS activity for VL (−8 ± 11%; P = 0.07) and RF (−14 ± 11%; P < 0.01) muscles were reduced post-exercise, whereas reductions (P < 0.05) in absolute RTD occurred within the 0–100 (−8 ± 9%) and 0–200 ms (−10 ± 8%) epochs after contraction onset. After normalization to MVC torque, there was no difference in RTD values

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GTC transit light curves of CoRoT-29b (Palle+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palle, E.; Chen, G.; Alonso, R.; Nowak, G.; Deeg, H.; Cabrera, J.; Murgas, F.; Parviainen, H.; Nortmann, L.; Hoyer, S.; Prieto-Arranz, J.; Nespral, D.; Cabrera Lavers, A.; Iro, N.

    2016-04-01

    2 transit light curves of the hot Jupiter CoRoT-29b obtained on the nights of 2014/7/31 and 2015/7/8 using the OSIRIS instrument at the 10.4-m GTC telescope. The light curves have been integrated over the bandpass of 515-915nm, where the wavelength range of 755-765 nm has been excluded due to presence of strong telluric O2 absorption. (2 data files).

  6. Corotating Interaction Regions in Stellar Winds: Particle Acceleration and Non-thermal Radio Emission in Hot Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A co-rotating interaction region (CIR) forms in a stellar wind when a fast stream from a rotating star overtakes a slow stream. The CIR's were studied in detail in the solar wind over the past decade primarily because they are efficient sources of particle acceleration. Here, CIR's in OB star winds are used to explain two properties of such winds: deposition of non-radiative energy in the wind far from the stellar surfaces and acceleration of non-thermal particles.

  7. Dynamics of a split torque helicopter transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.

    1994-06-01

    Split torque designs, proposed as alternatives to traditional planetary designs for helicopter main rotor transmissions, can save weight and be more reliable than traditional designs. This report presents the results of an analytical study of the system dynamics and performance of a split torque gearbox that uses a balance beam mechanism for load sharing. The Lagrange method was applied to develop a system of equations of motion. The mathematical model includes time-varying gear mesh stiffness, friction, and manufacturing errors. Cornell's method for calculating the stiffness of spur gear teeth was extended and applied to helical gears. The phenomenon of sidebands spaced at shaft frequencies about gear mesh fundamental frequencies was simulated by modeling total composite gear errors as sinusoid functions. Although the gearbox has symmetric geometry, the loads and motions of the two power paths differ. Friction must be considered to properly evaluate the balance beam mechanism. For the design studied, the balance beam is not an effective device for load sharing unless the coefficient of friction is less than 0.003. The complete system stiffness as represented by the stiffness matrix used in this analysis must be considered to precisely determine the optimal tooth indexing position.

  8. Nonambipolarity, orthogonal conductivity, poloidal flow, and torque

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, G.W.; Perkins, F.W.

    1989-02-01

    Nonambipolar processes, such as neutral injection onto trapped orbits or ripple-diffusion loss of ..cap alpha..-particles, act to charge a plasma. A current j/sub r/ across magnetic surfaces must arise in the bulk plasma to maintain charge neutrality. An axisymmetric, neoclassical model of the bulk plasma shows that these currents are carried by the ions and exert a j/sub r/B/sub theta/R/c torque in the toroidal direction. A driven poloidal flow V/sub theta/ = E/sub r/'c/B must also develop. The average current density is related to the radial electric field E/sub r/' = E/sub r/ + v/sub /phi//B/sub theta//c in a frame moving with the plasma via the orthogonal conductivity = sigma/sub /perpendicular//E/sub r/', which has the value sigma/sub /perpendicular// = (1.65epsilon/sup 1/2/)(ne/sup 2/..nu../sub ii//M..cap omega../sub theta//sup 2/) in the banana regime. If an ignited plasma loses an appreciable fraction ..delta.. of its thermonuclear ..cap alpha..-particles by banana ripple diffusion, then the torque will spin the plasma to sonic rotation in a time /tau//sub s/ approx. 2/tau//sub E//..delta.., /tau//sub E/ being the energy confinement time. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Chiral spin torque at magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Thomas, Luc; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    Spin-polarized currents provide a powerful means of manipulating the magnetization of nanodevices, and give rise to spin transfer torques that can drive magnetic domain walls along nanowires. In ultrathin magnetic wires, domain walls are found to move in the opposite direction to that expected from bulk spin transfer torques, and also at much higher speeds. Here we show that this is due to two intertwined phenomena, both derived from spin-orbit interactions. By measuring the influence of magnetic fields on current-driven domain-wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni/Co trilayers, we find an internal effective magnetic field acting on each domain wall, the direction of which alternates between successive domain walls. This chiral effective field arises from a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction at the Co/Pt interfaces and, in concert with spin Hall currents, drives the domain walls in lock-step along the nanowire. Elucidating the mechanism for the manipulation of domain walls in ultrathin magnetic films will enable the development of new families of spintronic devices.

  10. Galactic archaeology with asteroseismology and spectroscopy: Red giants observed by CoRoT and APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, F.; Chiappini, C.; Rodrigues, T. S.; Miglio, A.; Montalbán, J.; Mosser, B.; Girardi, L.; Valentini, M.; Noels, A.; Morel, T.; Johnson, J. A.; Schultheis, M.; Baudin, F.; de Assis Peralta, R.; Hekker, S.; Themeßl, N.; Kallinger, T.; García, R. A.; Mathur, S.; Baglin, A.; Santiago, B. X.; Martig, M.; Minchev, I.; Steinmetz, M.; da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Allende Prieto, C.; Cunha, K.; Beers, T. C.; Epstein, C.; García Pérez, A. E.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Harding, P.; Holtzman, J.; Majewski, S. R.; Mészáros, Sz.; Nidever, D.; Pan, K.; Pinsonneault, M.; Schiavon, R. P.; Schneider, D. P.; Shetrone, M. D.; Stassun, K.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, G.

    2017-01-01

    With the advent of the space missions CoRoT and Kepler, it has recently become feasible to determine precise asteroseismic masses and relative ages for large samples of red giant stars. We present the CoRoGEE dataset, obtained from CoRoT light curves for 606 red giants in two fields of the Galactic disc that have been co-observed by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). We used the Bayesian parameter estimation code PARAM to calculate distances, extinctions, masses, and ages for these stars in a homogeneous analysis, resulting in relative statistical uncertainties of ≲2% in distance, 4% in radius, 9% in mass and 25% in age. We also assessed systematic age uncertainties stemming from different input physics and mass loss. We discuss the correlation between ages and chemical abundance patterns of field stars over a broad radial range of the Milky Way disc (5 kpc

  11. Disentangling planetary and stellar activity features in the CoRoT-2 light curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, G.; Deleuil, M.; Almenara, J.-M.; Barros, S. C. C.; Lanza, A. F.; Montalto, M.; Boisse, I.; Santerne, A.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Meunier, N.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: Stellar activity is an important source of systematic errors and uncertainties in the characterization of exoplanets. Most of the techniques used to correct for this activity focus on an ad hoc data reduction. Methods: We have developed a software for the combined fit of transits and stellar activity features in high-precision long-duration photometry. Our aim is to take advantage of the modelling to derive correct stellar and planetary parameters, even in the case of strong stellar activity. Results: We use an analytic approach to model the light curve. The code KSint, modified by adding the evolution of active regions, is implemented into our Bayesian modelling package PASTIS. The code is then applied to the light curve of CoRoT-2. The light curve is divided in segments to reduce the number of free parameters needed by the fit. We perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis in two ways. In the first, we perform a global and independent modelling of each segment of the light curve, transits are not normalized and are fitted together with the activity features, and occulted features are taken into account during the transit fit. In the second, we normalize the transits with a model of the non-occulted activity features, and then we apply a standard transit fit, which does not take the occulted features into account. Conclusions: Our model recovers the activity features coverage of the stellar surface and different rotation periods for different features. We find variations in the transit parameters of different segments and show that they are likely due to the division applied to the light curve. Neglecting stellar activity or even only bright spots while normalizing the transits yields a 1.2σ larger and 2.3σ smaller transit depth, respectively. The stellar density also presents up to 2.5σ differences depending on the normalization technique. Our analysis confirms the inflated radius of the planet (1.475 ± 0.031RJ) found by other authors. We show that

  12. Dynamic Young Stars and their Disks: A Temporal View of NGC 2264 with Spitzer and CoRoT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, Ann Marie; Stauffer, John; Bouvier, Jèrôme

    2014-01-01

    Variability is a signature feature of young stars. Among the well known light curve phenomena are periodic variations attributed to surface spots and irregular changes associated with accretion or circumstellar disk material. While decades of photometric monitoring have provided a framework for classifying young star variability, we still know surprisingly little about its underlying mechanisms and connections to the surrounding disks. In the past few years, dedicated photometric monitoring campaigns from the ground and space have revolutionized our view of young stars in the time domain. We present a selection of optical and infrared time series from several recent campaigns, highlighting the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264 ("CSI 2264")- a joint30-day effort with the Spitzer, CoRoT, and MOST telescopes. The extraordinary photometric precision, high cadence, and long time baseline of these observations is now enabling correlation of variability properties at very different wavelengths, corresponding to locations from the stellar surface to the inner 0.1 AU of the disk. We present some results of the CSI 2264 program, including new classes of optical/infrared behavior. Further efforts to tie observed variability features to physical models will provide insights into the inner disk environment at a time when planet formation may be underway. Based on data from the Spitzer and CoRoT missions. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with participation of ESA-s RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain.

  13. Influence of joint angle on EMG-torque model during constant-posture, quasi-constant-torque contractions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Liu, Lukai; Martel, Francois; Rancourt, Denis; Clancy, Edward A

    2013-10-01

    Electromyogram (EMG)-torque modeling is of value to many different application areas, including ergonomics, clinical biomechanics and prosthesis control. One important aspect of EMG-torque modeling is the ability to account for the joint angle influence. This manuscript describes an experimental study which relates the biceps/triceps surface EMG of 12 subjects to elbow torque at seven joint angles (spanning 45-135°) during constant-posture, quasi-constant-torque contractions. Advanced EMG amplitude (EMGσ) estimation processors (i.e., whitened, multiple-channel) were investigated and three non-linear EMGσ-torque models were evaluated. When EMG-torque models were formed separately for each of the seven distinct joint angles, a minimum "gold standard" error of 4.23±2.2% MVCF90 resulted (i.e., error relative to maximum voluntary contraction at 90° flexion). This model structure, however, did not directly facilitate interpolation across angles. The best model which did so (i.e., parameterized the angle dependence), achieved an error of 4.17±1.7% MVCF90. Results demonstrated that advanced EMGσ processors lead to improved joint torque estimation. We also contrasted models that did vs. did not account for antagonist muscle co-contraction. Models that accounted for co-contraction estimated individual flexion muscle torques that were ∼29% higher and individual extension muscle torques that were ∼68% higher.

  14. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers

    PubMed Central

    van Oene, Maarten M.; Dickinson, Laura E.; Cross, Bronwen; Pedaci, Francesco; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in principle allow the application and active control of a calibrated load torque, to study single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli. We manipulate the external load on the motor by adjusting the magnetic field experienced by a magnetic bead linked to the motor, and we probe the motor’s response. A simple model describes the average motor speed over the entire range of applied fields. We extract the motor torque at stall and find it to be similar to the motor torque at drag-limited speed. In addition, use of the magnetic tweezers allows us to force motor rotation in both forward and backward directions. We monitor the motor’s performance before and after periods of forced rotation and observe no destructive effects on the motor. Our experiments show how magnetic tweezers can provide active and fast control of the external load while also exposing remaining challenges in calibration. Through their non-invasive character and straightforward parallelization, magnetic tweezers provide an attractive platform to study nanoscale rotary motors at the single-motor level. PMID:28266562

  15. Spin transfer torque in the semiconductor/ferromagnetic structure in the presence of Rashba effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahedi, Javad; Ghasab Satoory, Sahar

    2017-02-01

    Spin transfer torque in magnetic structures occurs when the transverse component of the spin current that flows from the nonmagnetic medium to ferromagnetic medium are absorbed by the interface. In this paper, considering the Rashba effect on semiconductor region, we have discussed the spin transfer torque in semiconductor/ferromagnetic structure and obtained the components of spin-current density for two models: (I)-single electron and (II)- the distribution of electrons. We have shown that whatever the difference between Fermi surfaces in semiconductor and Fermi spheres for the up and down spins in ferromagnetic increase, the transmission probability decreases. The obtained results for the values used in this article illustrate that Rashba effect increases the difference between a Fermi sphere in semiconductors and Fermi sphere for the up and down spins in ferromagnetic. The results also show that the Rashba effect, brings an additional contribution to the components of spin transfer torque, which is not exist in the absence of the Rashba interaction. Moreover, the Rashba term has also different effects on the transverse components of the spin torque transfer.

  16. Characteristics of a multilayer one-touch-point ultrasonic motor for high torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seong-Su; Park, Tae-Gone; Park, Jong-Kyu

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a one-touch-point ultrasonic motor is proposed. Fabricating the stator is easy because of its simple structure and the use of a punching technique. Also, a thin stator is advantageous to use in tight spaces. A thin metal plate was used as a V-shaped stator and two to the upper and two to the lower ceramic plates were attached to the upper and the lower surfaces respectively of the metal plate. When two sinusoidal sources with a phase difference of 90 degrees were applied to the stator, an elliptical displacement was generated at contact tip of the stator. Modeling of the ultrasonic motor was done and the displacement characteristics were defined by using a finite element analysis program (ATILA). To improve the speed and the torque of the ultrasonic motor, we analyzed the effects of the leg angle and the number of ceramic layers. In addition, a model with large x-axis and y-axis displacements was fabricated, and the speed and the torque were measured under various conditions. The elliptical motion of the contact tip of the stator was consistently obtained at the resonance frequency. The maximum speed and torque were obtained by using maximum elliptical displacement model. The speed and the torque increased linearly with increasing voltage.

  17. Intramuscular pressure and torque during isometric, concentric and eccentric muscular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Styf, J.; Ballard, R.; Aratow, M.; Crenshaw, A.; Watenpaugh, D.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Intramuscular pressures, electromyography (EMG) and torque generation during isometric, concentric and eccentric maximal isokinetic muscle activity were recorded in 10 healthy volunteers. Pressure and EMG activity were continuously and simultaneously measured side by side in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles. Ankle joint torque and position were monitored continuously by an isokinetic dynamometer during plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the foot. The increased force generation during eccentric muscular activity, compared with other muscular activity, was not accompanied by higher intramuscular pressure. Thus, this study demonstrated that eccentric muscular activity generated higher torque values for each increment of intramuscular pressure. Intramuscular pressures during antagonistic co-activation were significantly higher in the tibilis anterior muscle (42-46% of maximal agonistic activity) compared with the soleus muscle (12-29% of maximal agonistic activity) and was largely due to active recruitment of muscle fibers. In summary, eccentric muscular activity creates higher torque values with no additional increase of the intramuscular pressure compared with concentric and isometric muscular activity.

  18. Major Geomagnetic Storms (Dst less than or equal to -100 nT) Generated by Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Webb, D. F.; Zhang, J.; Berdichevsky, B. D.; Biesecker, D. A.; Kasper, J. C.; Kataoka, R.; Steinberg, J. T.; Thompson, B. J.; Wu, C.-C.; Zhukov, A. N.

    2006-01-01

    Seventy-nine major geomagnetic storms (minimum Dst less than or equal to -100 nT) observed in 1996 to 2004 were the focus of a Living with a Star Coordinated Data-Analysis Workshop (CDAW) in March, 2005. In 9 cases, the storm driver appears to have been purely a corotating interaction region (CIR) without any contribution from coronal mass ejection-related material (interplanetary coronal mass ejections, ICMEs). These storms were generated by structures within CIRs located both before and/or after the stream interface that included persistently southward magnetic fields for intervals of several hours. We compare their geomagnetic effects with those of 159 CIRs observed during 1996 - 2005. The major storms form the extreme tail of a continuous distribution of CIR geoeffectiveness which peaks at Dst approx. -40 nT but is subject to a prominent seasonal variation of - 40 nT which is ordered by the spring and fall equinoxes and the solar wind magnetic field direction towards or away from the Sun. The O'Brien and McPherron [2000] equations, which estimate Dst by integrating the incident solar wind electric field and incorporating a ring current loss term, largely account for the variation in storm size. They tend to underestimate the size of the larger CIR-associated storms by Dst approx. 20 nT. This suggests that injection into the ring current may be more efficient than expected in such storms. Four of the nine major storms in 1996 - 2004 occurred during a period of less than three solar rotations in September - November, 2002, also the time of maximum mean IMF and solar magnetic field intensity during the current solar cycle. The maximum CIR-storm strength found in our sample of events, plus additional 23 probable CIR-associated Dst less than or equal to -100 nT storms in 1972 - 1995, is (Dst = -161 nT). This is consistent with the maximum storm strength (Dst approx. -180 nT) expected from the O'Brien and McPherron equations for the typical range of solar wind

  19. EDITORIAL: Spin-transfer-torque-induced phenomena Spin-transfer-torque-induced phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohata, Atsufumi

    2011-09-01

    This cluster, consisting of five invited articles on spin-transfer torque, offers the very first review covering both magnetization reversal and domain-wall displacement induced by a spin-polarized current. Since the first theoretical proposal on spin-transfer torque—reported by Berger and Slonczewski independently—spin-transfer torque has been experimentally demonstrated in both vertical magnetoresistive nano-pillars and lateral ferromagnetic nano-wires. In the former structures, an electrical current flowing vertically in the nano-pillar exerts spin torque onto the thinner ferromagnetic layer and reverses its magnetization, i.e., current-induced magnetization switching. In the latter structures, an electrical current flowing laterally in the nano-wire exerts torque onto a domain wall and moves its position by rotating local magnetic moments within the wall, i.e., domain wall displacement. Even though both phenomena are induced by spin-transfer torque, each phenomenon has been investigated separately. In order to understand the physical meaning of spin torque in a broader context, this cluster overviews both cases from theoretical modellings to experimental demonstrations. The earlier articles in this cluster focus on current-induced magnetization switching. The magnetization dynamics during the reversal has been calculated by Kim et al using the conventional Landau--Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, adding a spin-torque term. This model can explain the dynamics in both spin-valves and magnetic tunnel junctions in a nano-pillar form. This phenomenon has been experimentally measured in these junctions consisting of conventional ferromagnets. In the following experimental part, the nano-pillar junctions with perpendicularly magnetized FePt and half-metallic Heusler alloys are discussed from the viewpoint of efficient magnetization reversal due to a high degree of spin polarization of the current induced by the intrinsic nature of these alloys. Such switching can

  20. Anterior tooth morphology and its effect on torque.

    PubMed

    van Loenen, M; Degrieck, J; De Pauw, G; Dermaut, L

    2005-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the variation in crown-root angle (CRA) of the upper incisors and canines as well as the variation in their labial contour. In addition, the influence of the variability of the labial contour and of different bracket heights on torque was evaluated. Proximal radiographs were taken of 160 extracted maxillary teeth (81 incisors and 79 canines). They were digitized and analysed with Jasc Paint Shop Pro 7TM and Mathcad 2001 Professional. The incisal edge, the centre of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), and the root apex were digitized to define the crown and root long axis. For all teeth the CRA was measured. At several heights of the labial surface a tangent was determined, enabling measurement of the inclination of the labial surface. The CRA had great variability, ranging from 167 to 195 degrees for the canines (mean value 183 degrees) and from 171 to 195 degrees for the incisors (average 184 degrees). The mean inclinations of the labial surfaces for the incisors varied greatly. Between 4 and 4.5 mm from the incisal edge the standard deviations (SD) were the smallest and between 2 and 4.5 mm from the incisal edge the labial surface angle differed by approximately 10 degrees. For the canines the mean inclinations of the buccal surface also varied. This angle differed by around 10 degrees between 2 and 4.5 mm from the incisal edge, but the SD were much larger than for the incisors. It can be concluded that placement of a bracket on a tooth at varying heights, still within a clinically acceptable range, results in important differences in the amount of root torque.

  1. Identifying the upper atmosphere structure of the inflated hot sub-Neptune CoRoT-24b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvan, Ines; Lammer, Helmut; Erkaev, Nikolai V.; Fossati, Luca; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Guenther, Eike; Odert, Petra; Kislyakova, Kristina G.; Lendl, Monika

    2016-04-01

    The CoRoT satellite mission discovered two Neptune-type planets, CoRoT-24b and CoRoT-24c, with observed transit radii of ≈3.7REarth and ≈4.9REarth and masses of ≤5.7MEarth and ≈28MEarth, respectively. From the deduced low mean densities it can be expected that their planetary cores are most likely surrounded by H2 dominated envelopes. While having very similar radii, the outer planet CoRoT-24c is at least 4.9 times more massive than its neighbour, indicating that their atmospheres can be fundamentally different. Therefore, we have investigated the upper atmosphere structure and escape rates of these two planets. We applied a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model including heating by absorption of stellar extreme ultraviolet and X-ray (XUV) radiation, under the assumption that the observed transit radius RT is produced by Rayleigh scattering and H2-H2 collision absorption in a pure hydrogen atmosphere. This corresponds to a pressure level near 1 bar. We find an unsustainably high hydrodynamic escape rate of 1.6 × 1011 g/s for the atmosphere of CoRoT-24b. If real, such high atmospheric escape would lead to substantial mass loss from the planetary atmosphere, shrinking it to ≈2.2REarth within ≈4 Myr, which is inconsistent with the old age of the system. The solution to this discrepancy is that the observed transit radius RT must be 30-60% larger than the actual planetary radius at the 1 bar pressure level. We suggest that the observed transit radius RT is produced by absorption through scattering processes due to high altitude clouds or hazes. The Kepler satellite has discovered similar close-in low-density Neptune-type planets. We propose that it is very likely that the observed transit radii for the vast majority of these planets also differ from their actual planetary radii at the 1 bar pressure level. This would introduce a systematic bias in the measured radii and has dramatic implications in the determination of the mass-radius relation and for planet

  2. The physics of pressure variation in microchannels within corotating or static discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Abhijit; Sengupta, Sayantan

    2016-10-01

    We formulate a comprehensive analysis for the radial pressure variation in flow through microchannels within corotating (or static) discs, which is important for its fundamental value and application potential in macrofluidic and microfluidic devices. The uniqueness and utility of the present approach emanate from our ability to describe the physics completely in terms of non-dimensional numbers and to determine quantitatively the separate roles of inertia, centrifugal force, Coriolis force, and viscous effects in the overall radial pressure difference (Δpio). It is established here that the aspect ratio (ratio of inter-disc spacing and disc radius) plays only a secondary role as an independent parameter, its major role being contained within a newly identified dynamic similarity number (Ds). For radial inflow, it is shown that the magnitude of Δpio decreases monotonically as the tangential speed ratio (γ) increases but exhibits a minima when Ds is varied. For radial outflow, it is shown that Δpio increases monotonically as the flow coefficient (ϕ) decreases but evinces a maxima when Ds is varied. It is further shown that for the radial inflow case, the minima in the magnitude of Δpio exist even when the rotational speed of the discs is reduced to zero (static discs). The demonstrated existence of these extrema (i.e., minima for radial inflow and maxima for radial outflow) creates the scope for device optimization.

  3. Stability of a pair of co-rotating vortices with axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Clément; Schaeffer, Nathanaël; Le Dizès, Stéphane; Thompson, Mark

    2008-09-01

    The three-dimensional linear temporal stability properties of a flow composed of two corotating q-vortices (also called Batchelor vortices) are predicted by numerical stability analysis. As for the corresponding counter-rotating case, when the axial flow parameter is increased, different instability modes are observed and identified as a combination of resonant Kelvin modes of azimuthal wavenumbers m and m +2 within each vortex. In particular, we show that the sinuous mode, which is the dominant instability mode without axial flow, is stabilized in the presence of a moderate axial flow. Different types of mode with a large amplitude in the critical layer are also identified. For small separation distances (above the merging threshold), unstable eigenmodes, corresponding to axial wavenumbers that cannot be easily identified with simple resonant interactions of Kelvin modes, are also observed. Their growth rate is a substantial fraction of the growth rates of low-order resonant modes. The effects of the Reynolds number and vortex separation distance on the growth rate parameter map are considered. Finally, we analyze the similarities and differences between the stability characteristics of co- and counter-rotating vortex pairs.

  4. Corotating high-speed solar-wind streams and recurrent cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Y. P.; Badruddin

    2007-05-01

    We studied the solar magnetic cycle dependence of cosmic ray depressions due to the corotating high-speed solar wind streams (CSWS) during different polarity states of the heliosphere. The daily averaged cosmic ray intensity data from Climax, Oulu, and Thule neutron monitors together with simultaneous solar wind plasma and field data were subjected to the superposed epoch analysis with respect to CSWS start time. These analyses were carried out separately in different polarity states of the heliosphere A < 0 and A > 0 during solar minimum as well as during the periods of variable solar activity. Although the average variations in the solar wind velocity, IMF strength, and its variance are almost similar, the amplitudes of CSWS-associated cosmic ray depressions are quite different during different polarity epochs; they are larger during A > 0 than A < 0 periods. Further, correlation analysis between cosmic ray intensity and solar wind velocity during CSWS shows differences in their relationship during A > 0 and A < 0; they are much better during A > 0 than A < 0. Two other solar wind parameters, IMF strength and its variance, do not show a significant relationship with cosmic ray intensity change through the passage of these streams, although the initial depression coincides the enhancement of the two parameters. These results are discussed in the light of existing models of galactic cosmic ray modulation.

  5. Hydrothermal waves and corotating rolls in laterally heated convection in simple liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-García, Carlos; Madruga, Santiago; Echebarria, Blas; Lebon, Georgy; Burguete, Javier

    2004-12-01

    The stability of a liquid layer with an undeformable interface open to the atmosphere, subjected to a horizontal temperature gradient, is theoretically analysed. Buoyancy and surface tension forces give rise to a basic flow for any temperature difference applied on the system. Depending on the liquid depth, this basic flow is destabilised either by an oscillatory instability, giving rise to the so-called hydrothermal waves, or by a stationary instability leading to corotating rolls. Oscillatory perturbations are driven by the basic flow and therefore one must distinguish between convective and absolute thresholds. The instability mechanisms as well as the different regimes observed in experiments are discussed. The calculations are performed for a fluid used in recent experiments, namely silicone oil of 0.65 cSt (Pr = 10). In particular, it is shown that two branches of absolute instability exist, which may be related to the two types of hydrothermal waves observed experimentally.

  6. Corotating Interaction Regions as Seen by the STEREO Heliospheric Imagers 2007 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlon, T. M.; Milan, S. E.; Davies, J. A.; Williams, A. O.

    2015-08-01

    NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission has coincided with a pronounced solar minimum. This allowed for easier detection of corotating interaction regions (CIRs). CIRs are formed by the interaction between fast and slow solar-wind streams ejected from source regions on the solar surface that rotate with the Sun. High-density plasma blobs that have become entrained at the stream interface can be tracked out to large elongations in data from the Heliospheric Imager (HI) instruments onboard STEREO. These blobs act as tracers of the CIR itself such that their HI signatures can be used to estimate CIR source location and radial speed. We estimate the kinematic properties of solar-wind transients associated with 40 CIRs detected by the HI instrument onboard the STEREO-A spacecraft between 2007 and 2010. We identify in-situ signatures of these transients at L1 using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and compare the in-situ parameters with the HI results. We note that solar-wind transients associated with CIRs appear to travel at or close to the slow solar-wind speed preceding the event as measured in situ. We also highlight limitations in the commonly used analysis techniques of solar-wind transients by considering variability in the solar wind.

  7. Existence of Corotating and Counter-Rotating Vortex Pairs for Active Scalar Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmidi, Taoufik; Mateu, Joan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we study the existence of corotating and counter-rotating pairs of simply connected patches for Euler equations and the {(SQG)_{α}} equations with {α in (0,1)}. From the numerical experiments implemented for Euler equations in Deem and Zabusky (Phys Rev Lett 40(13):859-862, 1978), Pierrehumbert (J Fluid Mech 99:129-144, 1980), Saffman and Szeto (Phys Fluids 23(12):2339-2342, 1980) it is conjectured the existence of a curve of steady vortex pairs passing through the point vortex pairs. There are some analytical proofs based on variational principle (Keady in J Aust Math Soc Ser B 26:487-502, 1985; Turkington in Nonlinear Anal Theory Methods Appl 9(4):351-369, 1985); however, they do not give enough information about the pairs, such as the uniqueness or the topological structure of each single vortex. We intend in this paper to give direct proofs confirming the numerical experiments and extend these results for the {(SQG)_{α}} equation when {α in (0,1)}. The proofs rely on the contour dynamics equations combined with a desingularization of the point vortex pairs and the application of the implicit function theorem.

  8. Dynamics of Quasi 2D and 3D Co-rotating Vortex Merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandekar, Akshay; Jacob, Jamey

    2013-11-01

    Merger of vortices is examined experimentally to compare the merger of slender parallel vortices generated either coincidentally or continuously. It is known that like-sign vortices rotate around a common center of circulation and merger between the vortices may occur under certain conditions. This merger is dependent on the strength of the vortex circulation, distance of separation between the centers of the two vortices, ReΓ , and vorticity distribution. Quasi-2D and 3D experimental data is examined and merger relations are derived. The former uses high aspect ratio rotating paddles in a tank and while the latter are from wing-tip vortices in a wind tunnel. The vortex merger tank generates slender co-rotating vortices and are examined using PIV, while in the wind tunnel two opposing wings are arranged at opposite angles of attack to generate a pair of vortices that merge downstream. A 5-hole probe is used to obtain 3D velocity vectors via wake survey, along with PIV. The procedure is performed in the wake at different distances to observe merger under different conditions. Temporally and spatially dependent relations in quasi-2D and 3D vortex merger are derived. Merger behavior is generally similar between the cases, but instabilities along quasi-2D vortices may affect.

  9. Large-deflection statics analysis of active cardiac catheters through co-rotational modelling.

    PubMed

    Peng Qi; Chen Qiu; Mehndiratta, Aadarsh; I-Ming Chen; Haoyong Yu

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a co-rotational concept for large-deflection formulation of cardiac catheters. Using this approach, the catheter is first discretized with a number of equal length beam elements and nodes, and the rigid body motions of an individual beam element are separated from its deformations. Therefore, it is adequate for modelling arbitrarily large deflections of a catheter with linear elastic analysis at the local element level. A novel design of active cardiac catheter of 9 Fr in diameter at the beginning of the paper is proposed, which is based on the contra-rotating double helix patterns and is improved from the previous prototypes. The modelling section is followed by MATLAB simulations of various deflections when the catheter is exerted different types of loads. This proves the feasibility of the presented modelling approach. To the best knowledge of the authors, it is the first to utilize this methodology for large-deflection static analysis of the catheter, which will enable more accurate control of robot-assisted cardiac catheterization procedures. Future work would include further experimental validations.

  10. Abundance and Source Population of Suprathermal Heavy Ions in Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensema, R. J.; Desai, M. I.; Broiles, T. W.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we analyze the abundances of suprathermal heavy ions in 75 Corotating Interaction Region (CIR) events between January 1st 1995 and December 31st 2008. We correlate the heavy ion abundances in these CIRs with those measured in the solar wind and suprathermal populations upstream of these events. Our analysis reveals that the CIR suprathermal heavy ion abundances vary by nearly two orders of magnitude over the solar activity cycle, with higher abundances (e.g., Fe/O) occurring during solar maximum and depleted values occurring during solar minimum. The abundances are also energy dependent, with larger abundances at higher energies, particularly during solar maximum. Following the method used by Mason et al. 2008, we correlate the CIR abundances with the corresponding solar wind and suprathermal values measured during 6-hour intervals for upstream periods spanning 10 days prior to the start of each CIR event. This correlation reveals that suprathermal heavy ions are better correlated with upstream suprathermal abundances measured at the same energy compared with the solar wind heavy ion abundances. Using the 6-hour averaging method, we also identified timeframes of maximum correlation between the CIR and the upstream suprathermal abundances, and find that the time of maximum correlation depends on the energy of the suprathermal ions. We discuss the implications of these results in terms of previous studies of CIR and suprathermal particles, and CIR seed populations and acceleration mechanisms.

  11. Cosmic-Ray Transport in Heliospheric Magnetic Structures. II. Modeling Particle Transport through Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Andreas; Wiengarten, Tobias; Fichtner, Horst; Effenberger, Frederic; Kühl, Patrick; Heber, Bernd; Raath, Jan-Louis; Potgieter, Marius S.

    2017-03-01

    The transport of cosmic rays (CRs) in the heliosphere is determined by the properties of the solar wind plasma. The heliospheric plasma environment has been probed by spacecraft for decades and provides a unique opportunity for testing transport theories. Of particular interest for the three-dimensional (3D) heliospheric CR transport are structures such as corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which, due to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength and magnetic fluctuations within and due to the associated shocks as well as stream interfaces, do influence the CR diffusion and drift. In a three-fold series of papers, we investigate these effects by modeling inner-heliospheric solar wind conditions with the numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework Cronos (Wiengarten et al., referred as Paper I), and the results serve as input to a transport code employing a stochastic differential equation approach (this paper). While, in Paper I, we presented results from 3D simulations with Cronos, the MHD output is now taken as an input to the CR transport modeling. We discuss the diffusion and drift behavior of Galactic cosmic rays using the example of different theories, and study the effects of CIRs on these transport processes. In particular, we point out the wide range of possible particle fluxes at a given point in space resulting from these different theories. The restriction of this variety by fitting the numerical results to spacecraft data will be the subject of the third paper of this series.

  12. The changing phases of extrasolar planet CoRoT-1b.

    PubMed

    Snellen, Ignas A G; de Mooij, Ernst J W; Albrecht, Simon

    2009-05-28

    Hot Jupiters are a class of extrasolar planet that orbit their parent stars at very short distances. They are expected to be tidally locked, which can lead to a large temperature difference between their daysides and nightsides. Infrared observations of eclipsing systems have yielded dayside temperatures for a number of transiting planets. The day-night contrast of the transiting extrasolar planet HD 189733b was 'mapped' using infrared observations. It is expected that the contrast between the daysides and nightsides of hot Jupiters is much higher at visual wavelengths, shorter than that of the peak emission, and could be further enhanced by reflected stellar light. Here we report the analysis of optical photometric data obtained over 36 planetary orbits of the transiting hot Jupiter CoRoT-1b. The data are consistent with the nightside hemisphere of the planet being entirely black, with the dayside flux dominating the optical phase curve. This means that at optical wavelengths the planet's phase variation is just as we see it for the interior planets in the Solar System. The data allow for only a small fraction of reflected light, corresponding to a geometric albedo of <0.20.

  13. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397 Section 29.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of...

  14. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397 Section 27.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of...

  15. 40 CFR 91.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Provisions § 91.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used to convert a weight or a... with the adjusted or repaired system. (b) Option. A master load-cell or transfer standard may be...

  16. 40 CFR 90.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Dynamometer torque cell calibration. 90... Equipment Provisions § 90.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used to convert a... (a)(6) of this section with the adjusted or repaired system. (b) Option. A master load-cell...

  17. 40 CFR 91.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Dynamometer torque cell calibration. 91....306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used to convert a weight or a force... with the adjusted or repaired system. (b) Option. A master load-cell or transfer standard may be...

  18. 40 CFR 91.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Provisions § 91.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used to convert a weight or a... with the adjusted or repaired system. (b) Option. A master load-cell or transfer standard may be...

  19. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  20. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  1. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  2. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  3. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  4. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  5. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  6. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  7. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  8. Force and torque characteristics for magnetically driven blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Pan; Haik, Yousef; Kilani, Mohammad; Chen, Ching-Jen

    2002-03-01

    Magnetically driven screw pumps were designed and fabricated for pumping biological fluids. The magnetic field simulations for three different magnetic coupling arrangements were obtained numerically. The force and torque for the three arrangements were computed. The effect of the separation gap between poles and the rotational angle on the force and torque is also presented. The pump characteristics were obtained experimentally.

  9. Torque meter aids study of hysteresis motor rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, M.

    1967-01-01

    Torque meter, simulating hysteresis motor operation, allows rotor ring performance characteristics to be analyzed. The meter determines hysteresis motor torque and actual stresses of the ring due to its mechanical situation and rotation, aids in the study of asymmetries or defects in motor rings, and measures rotational hysteresis.

  10. Isometric and isokinetic torque curves at the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Yoon, T S; Park, D S; Kang, S W; Chun, S I; Shin, J S

    1991-03-01

    Isometric and isokinetic torques of bilateral quadriceps and hamstrings were measured with Isokinetic Rehabilitation and Testing System (Model No. Cybex 340) on 40 normal untrained subjects, 20 males and 20 females, ranging between the ages of 23 and 35 years. The mean peak isometric and isokinetic torque values of both muscle groups showed no significant differences between dominant (right) and nondominant (left) limbs in both sexes; however there were significant differences between the male and the female. As the angular velocity increased, the peak torque significantly decreased, and the point of peak torque output occurred significantly later in the range of motion for quadriceps and hamstrings (p less than 0.01). There were no significant changes in the hamstrings to quadriceps (H/Q) ratios as the angular velocity increased. However, there were significant differences of mean H/Q ratio between male and female (p less than 0.01). Height had significant positive correlation with peak isometric and isokinetic torques for both quadriceps and hamstrings (p less than 0.01). Weight was found to correlate significantly with peak isometric and isokinetic torques (p less than 0.01). The mean isometric torques were significantly higher than the mean isokinetic torques for any joint angles in both sexes (p less than .01).

  11. 40 CFR 91.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Provisions § 91.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used to convert a weight or a... with the adjusted or repaired system. (b) Option. A master load-cell or transfer standard may be...

  12. 40 CFR 91.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Provisions § 91.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used to convert a weight or a... with the adjusted or repaired system. (b) Option. A master load-cell or transfer standard may be...

  13. From CoRoT 102899501 to the Sun. A time evolution model of chromospheric activity on the main sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondoin, P.; Gandolfi, D.; Fridlund, M.; Frasca, A.; Guenther, E. W.; Hatzes, A.; Deeg, H. J.; Parviainen, H.; Eigmüller, P.; Deleuil, M.

    2012-12-01

    Aims: The present study reports measurements of the rotation period of a young solar analogue, estimates of its surface coverage by photospheric starspots and of its chromospheric activity level, and derivations of its evolutionary status. Detailed observations of many young solar-type stars, such as the one reported in the present paper, provide insight into rotation and magnetic properties that may have prevailed on the Sun in its early evolution. Methods: Using a model based on the rotational modulation of the visibility of active regions, we analysed the high-accuracy CoRoT lightcurve of the active star CoRoT 102899501. Spectroscopic follow-up observations were used to derive its fundamental parameters. We compared the chromospheric activity level of Corot 102899501 with the R'HK index distribution vs age established on a large sample of solar-type dwarfs in open clusters. We also compared the chromospheric activity level of this young star with a model of chromospheric activity evolution established by combining relationships between the R'HK index and the Rossby number with a recent model of stellar rotation evolution on the main sequence. Results: We measure the spot coverage of the stellar surface as a function of time and find evidence for a tentative increase from 5 - 14% at the beginning of the observing run to 13-29% 35 days later. A high level of magnetic activity on Corot 102899501 is corroborated by a strong emission in the Balmer and Ca ii H and K lines (R'HK ~ -4). The starspots used as tracers of the star rotation constrain the rotation period to 1.625 ± 0.002 days and do not show evidence for differential rotation. The effective temperature (Teff = 5180 ± 80 K), surface gravity (log g = 4.35 ± 0.1), and metallicity ([M/H] = 0.05 ± 0.07 dex) indicate that the object is located near the evolutionary track of a 1.09 ± 0.12 M⊙ pre-main sequence star at an age of 23 ± 10 Myr. This value is consistent with the "gyro-age" of about 8-25 Myr

  14. Maximum Torque and Momentum Envelopes for Reaction Wheel Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Reynolds, Reid G.; Liu, Frank X.; Lebsock, Kenneth L.

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft reaction wheel maneuvers are limited by the maximum torque and/or angular momentum that the wheels can provide. For an n-wheel configuration, the torque or momentum envelope can be obtained by projecting the n-dimensional hypercube, representing the domain boundary of individual wheel torques or momenta, into three dimensional space via the 3xn matrix of wheel axes. In this paper, the properties of the projected hypercube are discussed, and algorithms are proposed for determining this maximal torque or momentum envelope for general wheel configurations. Practical strategies for distributing a prescribed torque or momentum among the n wheels are presented, with special emphasis on configurations of four, five, and six wheels.

  15. Approaching the standard quantum limit of mechanical torque sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, P. H.; Hauer, B. D.; Doolin, C.; Souris, F.; Davis, J. P.

    2016-10-01

    Reducing the moment of inertia improves the sensitivity of a mechanically based torque sensor, the parallel of reducing the mass of a force sensor, yet the correspondingly small displacements can be difficult to measure. To resolve this, we incorporate cavity optomechanics, which involves co-localizing an optical and mechanical resonance. With the resulting enhanced readout, cavity-optomechanical torque sensors are now limited only by thermal noise. Further progress requires thermalizing such sensors to low temperatures, where sensitivity limitations are instead imposed by quantum noise. Here, by cooling a cavity-optomechanical torque sensor to 25 mK, we demonstrate a torque sensitivity of 2.9 yNm/. At just over a factor of ten above its quantum-limited sensitivity, such cryogenic optomechanical torque sensors will enable both static and dynamic measurements of integrated samples at the level of a few hundred spins.

  16. Time efficient spacecraft maneuver using constrained torque distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xibin; Yue, Chengfei; Liu, Ming; Wu, Baolin

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the time efficient maneuver of rigid satellites with inertia uncertainty and bounded external disturbance. A redundant cluster of four reaction wheels is used to control the spacecraft. To make full use of the controllability and avoid frequent unload for reaction wheels, a maximum output torque and maximum angular momentum constrained torque distribution method is developed. Based on this distribution approach, the maximum allowable acceleration and velocity of the satellite are optimized during the maneuvering. A novel braking curve is designed on the basis of the optimization strategy of the control torque distribution. A quaternion-based sliding mode control law is proposed to render the state to track the braking curve strictly. The designed controller provides smooth control torque, time efficiency and high control precision. Finally, practical numerical examples are illustrated to show the effectiveness of the developed torque distribution strategy and control methodology.

  17. Torque Sensor Based on Tunnel-Diode Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Young, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A proposed torque sensor would be capable of operating over the temperature range from 1 to 400 K, whereas a typical commercially available torque sensor is limited to the narrower temperature range of 244 to 338 K. The design of this sensor would exploit the wide temperature range and other desirable attributes of differential transducers based on tunnel-diode oscillators as described in "Multiplexing Transducers Based on Tunnel-Diode Oscillators". The proposed torque sensor would include three flexural springs that would couple torque between a hollow outer drive shaft and a solid inner drive shaft. The torque would be deduced from the torsional relative deflection of the two shafts, which would be sensed via changes in capacitances of two capacitors defined by two electrodes attached to the inner shaft and a common middle electrode attached to the outer shaft.

  18. Design of digital load torque observer in hybrid electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yukun; Zhang, Haoming; Wang, Yinghai

    2008-12-01

    In hybrid electric vehicle, engine begain to work only when motor was in high speed in order to decrease tail gas emission. However, permanent magnet motor was sensitive to its load, adding engine to the system always made its speed drop sharply, which caused engine to work in low efficiency again and produced much more environment pollution. Dynamic load torque model of permanent magnet synchronous motor is established on the basic of motor mechanical equation and permanent magnet synchronous motor vector control theory, Full- digital load torque observer and compensation control system is made based on TMS320F2407A. Experiment results prove load torque observer and compensation control system can detect and compensate torque disturbing effectively, which can solve load torque disturbing and decrease gas pollution of hybrid electric vehicle.

  19. Spin-wave-induced spin torque in Rashba ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetsu, Nobuyuki; Miura, Daisuke; Sakuma, Akimasa

    2015-05-01

    We study the effects of Rashba spin-orbit coupling on the spin torque induced by spin waves, which are the plane-wave dynamics of magnetization. The spin torque is derived from linear-response theory, and we calculate the dynamic spin torque by considering the impurity-ladder-sum vertex corrections. This dynamic spin torque is divided into three terms: a damping term, a distortion term, and a correction term for the equation of motion. The distorting torque describes a phenomenon unique to the Rashba spin-orbit coupling system, where the distorted motion of magnetization precession is subjected to the anisotropic force from the Rashba coupling. The oscillation mode of the precession exhibits an elliptical trajectory, and the ellipticity depends on the strength of the nesting effects, which could be reduced by decreasing the electron lifetime.

  20. Special-Purpose High-Torque Permanent-Magnet Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III

    1995-01-01

    Permanent-magnet brushless motors that must provide high commanded torques and satisfy unusual heat-removal requirement are developed. Intended for use as thrust-vector-control actuators in large rocket engines. Techniques and concepts used to design improved motors for special terrestrial applications. Conceptual motor design calls for use of rotor containing latest high-energy-product rare-earth permanent magnets so that motor produces required torque while drawing smallest possible currents from power supply. Torque generated by electromagnetic interaction between stator and permanent magnets in rotor when associated electronic circuits applied appropriately temporally and spatially phased currents to stator windings. Phase relationships needed to produce commanded torque computed in response to torque command and to electronically sensed angular position of rotor relative to stator.

  1. Torque Characteristics of Saturated Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akeshi; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Wakui, Shinichi; Mikami, Hiroyuki; Ide, Kazumasa; Shima, Kazuo

    The evaluation of torque characteristics in a saturated magnetic field for permanent-magnet (PM) synchronous motors is presented. The torque saturation characteristics of non-salient and salient pole machines are investigated by finite element analysis and measurement. Thus, it is found that the torque saturation originates in the magnetic saturation in both the stator teeth, which are located on the leading position toward the direct axis, and in the stator back yoke, which is located on the lagging position toward the direct axis. This mechanism can also explain the reason for the significant torque saturation in the salient-pole machine; the higher inductance of the quadrature axis of the salient-pole machine causes a significant magnetic saturation in the stator back yoke. Therefore, less saliency or a wider back yoke can improve the torque saturation.

  2. Approaching the standard quantum limit of mechanical torque sensing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, P. H.; Hauer, B. D.; Doolin, C.; Souris, F.; Davis, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the moment of inertia improves the sensitivity of a mechanically based torque sensor, the parallel of reducing the mass of a force sensor, yet the correspondingly small displacements can be difficult to measure. To resolve this, we incorporate cavity optomechanics, which involves co-localizing an optical and mechanical resonance. With the resulting enhanced readout, cavity-optomechanical torque sensors are now limited only by thermal noise. Further progress requires thermalizing such sensors to low temperatures, where sensitivity limitations are instead imposed by quantum noise. Here, by cooling a cavity-optomechanical torque sensor to 25 mK, we demonstrate a torque sensitivity of 2.9 yNm/. At just over a factor of ten above its quantum-limited sensitivity, such cryogenic optomechanical torque sensors will enable both static and dynamic measurements of integrated samples at the level of a few hundred spins. PMID:27762273

  3. Forces and torques on rotating spirochete flagella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Huber, Greg; Wolgemuth, Charles W

    2011-12-23

    Spirochetes are a unique group of motile bacteria that are distinguished by their helical or flat-wave shapes and the location of their flagella, which reside within the tiny space between the bacterial cell wall and the outer membrane (the periplasm). In Borrelia burgdorferi, rotation of the flagella produces cellular undulations that drive swimming. How these shape changes arise due to the forces and torques that act between the flagella and the cell body is unknown. It is possible that resistive forces come from friction or from fluid drag, depending on whether or not the flagella are in contact with the cell wall. Here, we consider both of these cases. By analyzing the motion of an elastic flagellum rotating in the periplasmic space, we show that the flagella are most likely separated from the bacterial cell wall by a lubricating layer of fluid. This analysis then provides drag coefficients for rotation and sliding of a flagellum within the periplasm.

  4. Forces and Torques on Rotating Spirochete Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Huber, Greg; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2011-12-01

    Spirochetes are a unique group of motile bacteria that are distinguished by their helical or flat-wave shapes and the location of their flagella, which reside within the tiny space between the bacterial cell wall and the outer membrane (the periplasm). In Borrelia burgdorferi, rotation of the flagella produces cellular undulations that drive swimming. How these shape changes arise due to the forces and torques that act between the flagella and the cell body is unknown. It is possible that resistive forces come from friction or from fluid drag, depending on whether or not the flagella are in contact with the cell wall. Here, we consider both of these cases. By analyzing the motion of an elastic flagellum rotating in the periplasmic space, we show that the flagella are most likely separated from the bacterial cell wall by a lubricating layer of fluid. This analysis then provides drag coefficients for rotation and sliding of a flagellum within the periplasm.

  5. IM Direct Torque Control with no flux distortion and no static torque error.

    PubMed

    Lokriti, Abdesslam; Salhi, Issam; Doubabi, Said

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to improve DTC control strategy performances. In fact, we propose controlling both stator flux components (real and imaginary) through two hysteresis controllers. Thus, a new switching table which is independent from sector determination, and does not introduce zero voltage vectors is established; with much reduced size when compared to Takahashi's one. The proposed strategy has allowed cutting off with flux and current harmonics related to distortion caused by sector exchanges. Also, we provide theoretical evidence about the existence of static torque error in classical DTC, and propose a simple PI-type controller to cancel it. The proposed strategy is validated by simulation and practically on a DSPace 1104 board, for a 1.5 (kW) induction motor and various torque references.

  6. Torque teno virus (TTV): current status.

    PubMed

    Hino, Shigeo; Miyata, Hironori

    2007-01-01

    Torque teno virus (TTV), currently classified into the family Circoviridae, genus Anellovirus, was first found in a patient with non-A-E hepatitis. TTV has a single stranded circular DNA of approximately 3.8 kb. TTVs are extraordinarily diverse, spanning five groups including SANBAN and SEN viruses. Torque teno mini virus (TTMV) with approximately 2.9 kb genome also has wide variants. Recently, two related 2.2- and 2.6-kb species joined this community. Recombinations between variants are frequent. This extensive TTV diversity remains unexplained; it is unclear how TTVs could be viable, and why they require such genetic variation. An unequivocal culture system is still not available. TTVs are ubiquitous in > 90% of adults worldwide but no human pathogenicity of TTV has been fully established. Epidemiological surveys need to specify the variants being studied and clinical targets, and must calibrate the sensitivity of the assay used. Potentially interesting observations include a higher viral load in patients with severe idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, cancer and lupus. Active replication was also found in infants with acute respiratory diseases. TTV/TTMV-related viruses were found in chimpanzees, apes, African monkeys and tupaias, and also in chickens, pigs, cows, sheep and dogs. Experimentally, rhesus monkeys were persistently infected by TTV, but only 1/53 chimpanzees. TTV transcribes three species of mRNAs, 3.0-, 1.2- and 1.0-kb in the ratio of 60:5:35. Recently, at least three mRNAs were shown in chicken anaemia virus. The genomic region -154/-76 contains a critical promoter. TTV seems to have at least three proteins; however, the definite functions of these proteins await further research work.

  7. Torque Splitting by a Concentric Face Gear Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filler, Robert R.; Heath, Gregory F.; Slaughter, Stephen C.; Lewicki, David G.

    2002-01-01

    Tests of a 167 Kilowatt (224 Horsepower) split torque face gearbox were performed by the Boeing Company in Mesa, Arizona, while working under a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Technology Reinvestment Program (TRP). This paper provides a summary of these cooperative tests, which were jointly funded by Boeing and DARPA. Design, manufacture and testing of the scaled-power TRP proof-of-concept (POC) split torque gearbox followed preliminary evaluations of the concept performed early in the program. The split torque tests were run using 200 N-m (1767 in-lbs) torque input to each side of the transmission. During tests, two input pinions were slow rolled while in mesh with the two face gears. Two idler gears were also used in the configuration to recombine torque near the output. Resistance was applied at the output face gear to create the required loading conditions in the gear teeth. A system of weights, pulleys and cables were used in the test rig to provide both the input and output loading. Strain gages applied in the tooth root fillets provided strain indication used to determine torque splitting conditions at the input pinions. The final two pinion-two idler tests indicated 52% to 48% average torque split capabilities for the two pinions. During the same tests, a 57% to 43% average distribution of the torque being recombined to the upper face gear from the lower face gear was measured between the two idlers. The POC split torque tests demonstrated that face gears can be applied effectively in split torque rotorcraft transmissions, yielding good potential for significant weight, cost and reliability improvements over existing equipment using spiral bevel gearing.

  8. Unsteady aerodynamic forces and torques on falling parallelograms in coupled tumbling-helical motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Kapil; Chang, Song; Wang, Z. Jane

    2013-05-01

    Falling parallelograms exhibit coupled motion of autogyration and tumbling, similar to the motion of falling tulip seeds, unlike maple seeds which autogyrate but do not tumble, or rectangular cards which tumble but do not gyrate. This coupled tumbling and autogyrating motion are robust, when card parameters, such as aspect ratio, internal angle, and mass density, are varied. We measure the three-dimensional (3D) falling kinematics of the parallelograms and quantify their descending speed, azimuthal rotation, tumbling rotation, and cone angle in each falling. The cone angle is insensitive to the variation of the card parameters, and the card tumbling axis does not overlap with but is close to the diagonal axis. In addition to this connection to the dynamics of falling seeds, these trajectories provide an ideal set of data to analyze 3D aerodynamic force and torque at an intermediate range of Reynolds numbers, and the results will be useful for constructing 3D aerodynamic force and torque models. Tracking these free falling trajectories gives us a nonintrusive method for deducing instantaneous aerodynamic forces. We determine the 3D aerodynamic forces and torques based on Newton-Euler equations. The dynamical analysis reveals that, although the angle of attack changes dramatically during tumbling, the aerodynamic forces have a weak dependence on the angle of attack. The aerodynamic lift is dominated by the coupling of translational and rotational velocities. The aerodynamic torque has an unexpectedly large component perpendicular to the card. The analysis of the Euler equation suggests that this large torque is related to the deviation of the tumbling axis from the principle axis of the card.

  9. Reliability of metatarsophalangeal and ankle joint torque measurements by an innovative device.

    PubMed

    Man, Hok-Sum; Leung, Aaron Kam-Lun; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Sterzing, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    The toe flexor muscles maintain body balance during standing and provide push-off force during walking, running, and jumping. Additionally, they are important contributing structures to maintain normal foot function. Thus, weakness of these muscles may cause poor balance, inefficient locomotion and foot deformities. The quantification of metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) stiffness is valuable as it is considered as a confounding factor in toe flexor muscles function. MPJ and ankle joint stiffness measurement is still largely depended on manual skills as current devices do not have good control on alignment, angular joint speed and displacement during measurement. Therefore, this study introduces an innovative dynamometer and protocol procedures for MPJ and ankle Joint torque measurement with precise and reliable foot alignment, angular joint speed and displacement control. Within-day and between-day test-retest experiments on MPJ and ankle joint torque measurement were conducted on ten and nine healthy male subjects respectively. The mean peak torques of MPJ and ankle joint of between-day and within-day measurement were 1.50±0.38Nm/deg and 1.19±0.34Nm/deg. The corresponding torques of the ankle joint were 8.24±2.20Nm/deg and 7.90±3.18Nm/deg respectively. Intraclass-correlation coefficients (ICC) of averaged peak torque of both joints of between-day and within-day test-retest experiments were ranging from 0.91 to 0.96, indicating the innovative device is systematic and reliable for the measurements and can be used for multiple scientific and clinical purposes.

  10. Functional torque ratios and torque curve analysis of shoulder rotations in overhead athletes with and without impingement symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zanca, Gisele G; Oliveira, Ana B; Saccol, Michele F; Ejnisman, Benno; Mattiello-Rosa, Stela M

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we evaluated the peak torque, functional torque ratios, and torque curve profile of the shoulder rotators in overhead athletes with impingement symptoms so as to examine possible alterations in response to sports training and shoulder pain. Twenty-one overhead athletes with impingement symptoms were compared with 25 overhead athletes and 21 non-athletes, none of whom were symptomatic for impingement. The participants performed five maximal isokinetic concentric and eccentric contractions of medial and lateral shoulder rotations at 1.57 rad · s(-1) and 3.14 rad · s(-1). Isokinetic peak torque was used to calculate the eccentric lateral rotation-to-concentric medial rotation and the eccentric medial rotation-to-concentric lateral rotation ratios. An analysis of the torque curve profiles was also carried out. The eccentric lateral rotation-to-concentric medial rotation torque ratio of asymptomatic athletes was lower than that of non-athletes at both test velocities. The concentric medial rotation isokinetic peak torque of the asymptomatic athletes, at 3.14 rad · s(-1), was greater than that of the non-athletes, and the peak appeared to occur earlier in the movement for athletes than non-athletes. These findings suggest that there may be adaptations to shoulder function in response to throwing practice. The eccentric medial rotation-to-concentric lateral rotation torque ratio was altered neither by the practice of university-level overhead sports nor impingement symptoms.

  11. Estimations of One Repetition Maximum and Isometric Peak Torque in Knee Extension Based on the Relationship Between Force and Velocity.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Yoshito; Hatanaka, Yasuhiko; Arai, Tomoaki; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate whether a linear regression formula based on the relationship between joint torque and angular velocity measured using a high-speed video camera and image measurement software is effective for estimating 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and isometric peak torque in knee extension. Subjects comprised 20 healthy men (mean ± SD; age, 27.4 ± 4.9 years; height, 170.3 ± 4.4 cm; and body weight, 66.1 ± 10.9 kg). The exercise load ranged from 40% to 150% 1RM. Peak angular velocity (PAV) and peak torque were used to estimate 1RM and isometric peak torque. To elucidate the relationship between force and velocity in knee extension, the relationship between the relative proportion of 1RM (% 1RM) and PAV was examined using simple regression analysis. The concordance rate between the estimated value and actual measurement of 1RM and isometric peak torque was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Reliability of the regression line of PAV and % 1RM was 0.95. The concordance rate between the actual measurement and estimated value of 1RM resulted in an ICC(2,1) of 0.93 and that of isometric peak torque had an ICC(2,1) of 0.87 and 0.86 for 6 and 3 levels of load, respectively. Our method for estimating 1RM was effective for decreasing the measurement time and reducing patients' burden. Additionally, isometric peak torque can be estimated using 3 levels of load, as we obtained the same results as those reported previously. We plan to expand the range of subjects and examine the generalizability of our results.

  12. Thermally induced magnonic spin current, thermomagnonic torques, and domain-wall dynamics in the presence of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.-G.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Guo, G.-H.; Sukhov, A.; Dugaev, V.; Barnaś, J.; Berakdar, J.

    2016-09-01

    Thermally activated domain-wall (DW) motion in magnetic insulators has been considered theoretically, with a particular focus on the role of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) and thermomagnonic torques. The thermally assisted DW motion is a consequence of the magnonic spin current due to the applied thermal bias. In addition to the exchange magnonic spin current and the exchange adiabatic and the entropic spin transfer torques, we also consider the DMI-induced magnonic spin current, thermomagnonic DMI fieldlike torque, and the DMI entropic torque. Analytical estimations are supported by numerical calculations. We found that the DMI has a substantial influence on the size and the geometry of DWs, and that the DWs become oriented parallel to the long axis of the nanostrip. Increasing the temperature smoothes the DWs. Moreover, the thermally induced magnonic current generates a torque on the DWs, which is responsible for their motion. From our analysis it follows that for a large enough DMI the influence of DMI-induced fieldlike torque is much stronger than that of the DMI and the exchange entropic torques. By manipulating the strength of the DMI constant, one can control the speed of the DW motion, and the direction of the DW motion can be switched, as well. We also found that DMI not only contributes to the total magnonic current, but also it modifies the exchange magnonic spin current, and this modification depends on the orientation of the steady-state magnetization. The observed phenomenon can be utilized in spin caloritronics devices, for example in the DMI based thermal diodes. By switching the magnetization direction, one can rectify the total magnonic spin current.

  13. Identifying the `true' radius of the hot sub-Neptune CoRoT-24b by mass-loss modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammer, H.; Erkaev, N. V.; Fossati, L.; Juvan, I.; Odert, P.; Cubillos, P. E.; Guenther, E.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Johnstone, C. P.; Lüftinger, T.; Güdel, M.

    2016-09-01

    For the hot exoplanets CoRoT-24b and CoRoT-24c, observations have provided transit radii RT of 3.7 ± 0.4R⊕ and 4.9 ± 0.5R⊕, and masses of ≤5.7M⊕ and 28 ± 11M⊕, respectively. We study their upper atmosphere structure and escape applying an hydrodynamic model. Assuming RT ≈ RPL, where RPL is the planetary radius at the pressure of 100 mbar, we obtained for CoRoT-24b unrealistically high thermally driven hydrodynamic escape rates. This is due to the planet's high temperature and low gravity, independent of the stellar EUV flux. Such high escape rates could last only for <100 Myr, while RPL shrinks till the escape rate becomes less than or equal to the maximum possible EUV-driven escape rate. For CoRoT-24b, RPL must be therefore located at ≈1.9-2.2R⊕ and high altitude hazes/clouds possibly extinct the light at RT. Our analysis constraints also the planet's mass to be 5-5.7M⊕. For CoRoT-24c, RPL and RT lie too close together to be distinguished in the same way. Similar differences between RPL and RT may be present also for other hot, low-density sub-Neptunes.

  14. Lunar and Solar Torques on the Oceanic Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Bills, Bruce G.; Chao, Benjamin F.

    1998-01-01

    Brosche and Seiler recently suggested that direct lunar and solar tidal torques on the oceanic tides play a significant role in the earth's short-period angular momentum balance ("short-period" here meaning daily and sub-daily). We reexamine that suggestion here, concentrating on axial torques and hence on variations in rotation rate. Only those spherical harmonic components of the ocean tide having the same degree and order as the tidal potential induce nonzero torques. Prograde components (those moving in the same direction as the tide-generating body) produce the familiar secular braking of the earth's rotation. Retrograde components, however, produce rapid variations in UTI at twice the tidal frequency. There also exist interaction torques between tidal constituents, e.g. solar torques on lunar tides. They generate UTI variations at frequencies equal to the sums and differences of the original tidal frequencies. We give estimates of the torques and angular momentum variations for each of the important regimes, secular to quarter-diurnal. For the M(sub 2) potential acting on the M(sub 2) ocean tide, we find an associated angular momentum variation of amplitude 3 x 10(exp 19) N m. This is 5 to 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the angular momentum variations associated with tidal currents. We conclude that these torques do not play a significant role in the short-period angular momentum balance.

  15. Microscopic theory of spin-orbit torques in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ado, I. A.; Tretiakov, Oleg A.; Titov, M.

    2017-03-01

    We formulate a general microscopic approach to spin-orbit torques in thin ferromagnet/heavy-metal bilayers in linear response to electric current or electric field. The microscopic theory we develop avoids the notion of spin currents and spin-Hall effect. Instead, the torques are directly related to a local spin polarization of conduction electrons, which is computed from generalized Kubo-Středa formulas. A symmetry analysis provides a one-to-one correspondence between polarization susceptibility tensor components and different torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for magnetization dynamics. The spin-orbit torques arising from Rashba or Dresselhaus type of spin-orbit interaction are shown to have different symmetries. We analyze these spin-orbit torques microscopically for a generic electron model in the presence of an arbitrary smooth magnetic texture. For a model with spin-independent disorder we find a major cancellation of the torques. In this case the only remaining torque corresponds to the magnetization-independent Edelstein effect. Furthermore, our results are applied to analyze the dynamics of a skyrmion under the action of electric current.

  16. Development of a multilayered wide-ranged torque magnetorheological brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossa, Carlos; Jaegy, Adrien; Micaelli, Alain; Lozada, José

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the design of a multilayered magnetorheological brake from modelling to prototyping and characterization. A magnetostatic model intended to provide a specific magnetic flux density over a fluid gap regardless of the dimensions of the fluid surface is proposed. The ferromagnetic path and the coil are dimensioned in consequence. The model needs only three inputs to completely define the brake, i.e. the number of fluid gaps, the inner radius of the smallest fluid gap and the fluid gap depth. The evaluation criteria are defined by the torque density, the controllability and the reactivity, described as a function of the dimensions and the number of fluid gaps. The model has been optimized to improve the torque density. The brake has four fluid gaps and has been built and characterized. The expected torque when the fluid reaches the desired induction is 3.4 N m and the measured torque is 3.6 N m. This represents a relative error of 5.5%. The brake has 60 mm diameter, 39 mm width with a hollow shaft of 12 mm diameter. When exploited up to complete saturation, the measured torque is 5.3 N m with 19 W power consumption. The brake has a torque density of 48.1 kN m-2 and a maximum-to-minimum torque ratio of 176, with 50 ms electromechanical time constant.

  17. Equatorial Mountain Torques and Cold Surges in a GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, Francois; Mailler, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    The dynamical relations between the equatorial atmospheric angular momentum, the equatorial mountain torque and the cold surges are analysed in a General Circultaion Model (GCM). First we show that the global equatorial atmospheric momentum budget is very well closed in the model which is a clear benefit when we compare with results from the NCEP reanalysis. We then confirm that the equatorial torques due to the Tibetan plateau, the Rockies and the Andes are well related to the cold surges developping over South Eastern China, North America, and the Southern South America respectively. For all these mountains, a peack in the Equatorial mountain torque component that points locally toward the pole preceeds by few days the development of the cold surges, yielding a predictive interest to our results. We also analyse the contributions to the torques of the parameterized mountain stresses and find that they contribute substantially. In experiments without the parameterized stresses, we also find that the explicit terms partly compensate the parameterized contributions to the torque, and the cold surges are not much affected. This shows that the cold surges can be well captured by models, providing that the synoptic conditions prior to their onset are well represented. The compensation between torques is nevertheless not complete and some weekening of the cold surges is found when the mountain forcings are reduced. This illustrates how the exact torques are needed at a given time to produce the correct synoptic scale dynamics at a later stage.

  18. Coupling between corotation and Lindblad resonances in the presence of secular precession rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Moutamid, Maryame; Sicardy, Bruno; Renner, Stéfan

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of two satellites with masses and orbiting a massive central planet in a common plane, near a first order mean motion resonance ( m integer). We consider only the resonant terms of first order in eccentricity in the disturbing potential of the satellites, plus the secular terms causing the orbital apsidal precessions. We obtain a two-degrees-of-freedom system, associated with the two critical resonant angles and , where and are the mean longitude and longitude of periapsis of , respectively, and where the primed quantities apply to . We consider the special case where (restricted problem). The symmetry between the two angles and is then broken, leading to two different kinds of resonances, classically referred to as corotation eccentric resonance (CER) and Lindblad eccentric Resonance (LER), respectively. We write the four reduced equations of motion near the CER and LER, that form what we call the CoraLin model. This model depends upon only two dimensionless parameters that control the dynamics of the system: the distance between the CER and LER, and a forcing parameter that includes both the mass and the orbital eccentricity of the disturbing satellite. Three regimes are found: for the system is integrable, for of order unity, it exhibits prominent chaotic regions, while for large compared to 2, the behavior of the system is regular and can be qualitatively described using simple adiabatic invariant arguments. We apply this model to three recently discovered small Saturnian satellites dynamically linked to Mimas through first order mean motion resonances: Aegaeon, Methone and Anthe. Poincaré surfaces of section reveal the dynamical structure of each orbit, and their proximity to chaotic regions. This work may be useful to explore various scenarii of resonant capture for those satellites.

  19. Source Population and Acceleration Location of Suprathermal Heavy Ions in Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filwett, R. J.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.; Broiles, T. W.

    2017-03-01

    We have analyzed the ∼20–320 keV nucleon‑1 suprathermal (ST) heavy ion abundances in 41 corotating interaction regions (CIRs) observed by the Wind spacecraft from 1995 January to 2008 December. Our results are: (1) the CIR Fe/CNO and NeS/CNO ratios vary with the sunspot number, with values being closer to average solar energetic particle event values during solar maxima and lower than nominal solar wind values during solar minima. The physical mechanism responsible for the depleted abundances during solar minimum remains an open question. (2) The Fe/CNO increases with energy in the 6 events that occurred during solar maximum, while no such trends are observed for the 35 events during solar minimum. (3) The Fe/CNO shows no correlation with the average solar wind speed. (4) The Fe/CNO is well correlated with the corresponding upstream ∼20–320 keV nucleon‑1 Fe/CNO and not with the solar wind Fe/O measured by ACE in 31 events. Using the correlations between the upstream ∼20–40 keV nucleon‑1 Fe/CNO and the ∼20–320 keV nucleon‑1 Fe/CNO in CIRs, we estimate that, on average, the ST particles traveled ∼2 au along the nominal Parker spiral field line, which corresponds to upper limits for the radial distance of the source or acceleration location of ∼1 au beyond Earth orbit. Our results are consistent with those obtained from recent surveys, and confirm that CIR ST heavy ions are accelerated more locally, and are at odds with the traditional viewpoint that CIR ions seen at 1 au are bulk solar wind ions accelerated between 3 and 5 au.

  20. Solar wind interaction with comet 67P: Impacts of corotating interaction regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, N. J. T.; Eriksson, A. I.; Odelstad, E.; Vigren, E.; Andrews, D. J.; Johansson, F.; Burch, J. L.; Carr, C. M.; Cupido, E.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Goldstein, R.; Halekas, J. S.; Henri, P.; Koenders, C.; Mandt, K.; Mokashi, P.; Nemeth, Z.; Nilsson, H.; Ramstad, R.; Richter, I.; Wieser, G. Stenberg

    2016-02-01

    We present observations from the Rosetta Plasma Consortium of the effects of stormy solar wind on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Four corotating interaction regions (CIRs), where the first event has possibly merged with a coronal mass ejection, are traced from Earth via Mars (using Mars Express and Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission) to comet 67P from October to December 2014. When the comet is 3.1-2.7 AU from the Sun and the neutral outgassing rate ˜1025-1026 s-1, the CIRs significantly influence the cometary plasma environment at altitudes down to 10-30 km. The ionospheric low-energy (˜5 eV) plasma density increases significantly in all events, by a factor of >2 in events 1 and 2 but less in events 3 and 4. The spacecraft potential drops below -20 V upon impact when the flux of electrons increases. The increased density is likely caused by compression of the plasma environment, increased particle impact ionization, and possibly charge exchange processes and acceleration of mass-loaded plasma back to the comet ionosphere. During all events, the fluxes of suprathermal (˜10-100 eV) electrons increase significantly, suggesting that the heating mechanism of these electrons is coupled to the solar wind energy input. At impact the magnetic field strength in the coma increases by a factor of 2-5 as more interplanetary magnetic field piles up around the comet. During two CIR impact events, we observe possible plasma boundaries forming, or moving past Rosetta, as the strong solar wind compresses the cometary plasma environment. We also discuss the possibility of seeing some signatures of the ionospheric response to tail disconnection events.

  1. Atmospheric parameters and chemical properties of red giants in the CoRoT asteroseismology fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, T.; Miglio, A.; Lagarde, N.; Montalbán, J.; Rainer, M.; Poretti, E.; Eggenberger, P.; Hekker, S.; Kallinger, T.; Mosser, B.; Valentini, M.; Carrier, F.; Hareter, M.; Mantegazza, L.

    2014-04-01

    A precise characterisation of the red giants in the seismology fields of the CoRoT satellite is a prerequisite for further in-depth seismic modelling. High-resolution FEROS and HARPS spectra were obtained as part of the ground-based follow-up campaigns for 19 targets holding great asteroseismic potential. These data are used to accurately estimate their fundamental parameters and the abundances of 16 chemical species in a self-consistent manner. Some powerful probes of mixing are investigated (the Li and CNO abundances, as well as the carbon isotopic ratio in a few cases). The information provided by the spectroscopic and seismic data is combined to provide more accurate physical parameters and abundances. The stars in our sample follow the general abundance trends as a function of the metallicity observed in stars of the Galactic disk. After an allowance is made for the chemical evolution of the interstellar medium, the observational signature of internal mixing phenomena is revealed through the detection at the stellar surface of the products of the CN cycle. A contamination by NeNa-cycled material in the most massive stars is also discussed. With the asteroseismic constraints, these data will pave the way for a detailed theoretical investigation of the physical processes responsible for the transport of chemical elements in evolved, low- and intermediate-mass stars. Based on observations collected at La Silla Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the FEROS and HARPS spectrograph at the 2.2 and 3.6-m telescopes under programs LP178.D-0361, LP182.D-0356, and LP185.D-0056.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTables A.2 to A.6 are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/564/A119

  2. The three dimensional structure of corotating interaction regions and modeling of the heavy ion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broiles, Thomas W.

    Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) are compression regions that form in interplanetary space at the interfaces between slow and fast solar wind streams. This dissertation studies the three-dimensional orientation of planar magnetic structures within CIRs near Earth, how their orientation evolves, and the implications for the structure and properties of parent coronal holes. This dissertation also shows our work of modeling the response of the Heavy Ion Sensor (HIS) for the Solar Orbiter mission. We will discuss the methods and results of each chapter below. In Chapter 2, we have surveyed the properties of 153 co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) observed at 1 AU from January, 1995 through December, 2008. We identified that 74 of the 153 CIRs contain planar magnetic structures (PMSs). For planar and non-planar CIRs, we compared distributions of the bulk plasma and magnetic field parameters. Our identification of CIRs and their features yields the following results: (1) The thermal, magnetic, and dynamic pressures within CIRs are strongly correlated. (2) There is no statistical difference between planar and non-planar CIRs in the distributions and correlations between bulk plasma and magnetic field parameters. (3) The mean observed CIR azimuthal tilt is within 1 sigma of the predicted Parker spiral at 1 AU, while the mean meridional tilt is about 20°. (4) The meridional tilt of CIRs changes from one solar rotation to the next, with no relationship between successive reoccurrences. (5) The meridional tilt of CIRs in the ecliptic is not ordered by the magnetic field polarity of the parent coronal hole. (6) Although solar wind deflection is a function of CIR shape and speed, the relationship is not in agreement with that predicted by Lee [2000]. We conclude the following: (1) PMSs in CIRs are not caused by a unique characteristic in the local plasma or magnetic field. (2) The lack of relationship between CIR tilt and its parent coronal hole suggests that coronal

  3. The effect of movement direction on joint torque covariation.

    PubMed

    Shemmell, Jonathan; Hasan, Ziaul; Gottlieb, Gerald L; Corcos, Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed that unconstrained upper limb movements are coordinated via a kinetic constraint that produces dynamic muscle torques at each moving joint that are a linear function of a single torque command. This constraint has been termed linear synergy (Gottlieb et al. J Neurophysiol 75:1760-1764, 1996). The current study tested two hypotheses: (1) that the extent of covariation between dynamic muscle torques at the shoulder and elbow varied with the direction of movement and (2) that the extent to which muscle torques deviated from linear synergy would be reproduced by a simulation of pointing movements in which the path of the hand was constrained to be straight. Dynamic muscle torques were calculated from sagittal plane pointing movements performed by 12 participants to targets in eight different directions. The results of principal component analyses performed on the muscle torque data demonstrated direction-dependent variation in the extent to which dynamic muscle torques covaried at the shoulder and elbow. Linear synergy was deviated from substantially in movement directions for which the magnitude of muscle torque was low at one joint. A simulation of movements with straight hand paths was able to accurately estimate the amount of covariation between muscle torques at the two joints in many directions. These results support the idea that a kinematic constraint is imposed by the central nervous system during unconstrained pointing movements. Linear synergy may also be applied as a coordinating constraint in circumstances where its application allows the path of the moving endpoint to remain close to a straight line.

  4. Interactions between torque and helical buckling in drilling

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Halsey, G.W.; Kyllingstad, A.

    1995-12-31

    The effects of torque on helical buckling are a concern in coiled tubing drilling. These effects are also important in conventional drilling of long horizontal wells. This paper presents theoretical models for the effects of torque on helical buckling, normal contact force, and pitch of helix in the curved well bore. The effects of helical buckling and the post-buckling contact forces on torque and drag in a drilling operation are also modelled. The models are used for realistic simulations for both conventional drilling and coiled tubing applications.

  5. Thermal spin-transfer torques on magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhe; Wang, Shuai; Xia, Ke

    2010-04-01

    We studied the spin-transfer torques acting on magnetic domain walls in the presence of a nonequilibrium thermal distribution using a generalized Landauer-Büttiker formalism, where the energy flow is described on the same footing as the electric current. First-principles transport calculations have been performed in Ni and Co domain walls as typical examples. The temperature difference between two sides of the domain wall can induce remarkable spin- transfer torques, which are comparable with the current-induced torques required for the domain wall motion.

  6. Spin torque and Nernst effects in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalev, Alexey A.; Zyuzin, Vladimir

    2016-04-11

    Here, we predict that a temperature gradient can induce a magnon-mediated intrinsic torque in systems with a nontrivial magnon Berry curvature. With the help of a microscopic linear response theory of nonequilibrium magnon-mediated torques and spin currents we identify the interband and intraband components that manifest in ferromagnets with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions and magnetic textures. To illustrate and assess the importance of such effects, we apply the linear response theory to the magnon-mediated spin Nernst and torque responses in a kagome lattice ferromagnet.

  7. A flight simulator control system using electric torque motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musick, R. O.; Wagner, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    Control systems are required in flight simulators to provide representative stick and rudder pedal characteristics. A system has been developed that uses electric dc torque motors instead of the more common hydraulic actuators. The torque motor system overcomes certain disadvantages of hydraulic systems, such as high cost, high power consumption, noise, oil leaks, and safety problems. A description of the torque motor system is presented, including both electrical and mechanical design as well as performance characteristics. The system develops forces sufficiently high for most simulations, and is physically small and light enough to be used in most motion-base cockpits.

  8. High torque DC motor fabrication and test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makus, P.

    1976-01-01

    The testing of a standard iron and standard alnico permanent magnet two-phase, brushless dc spin motor for potential application to the space telescope has been concluded. The purpose of this study was to determine spin motor power losses, magnetic drag, efficiency and torque speed characteristics of a high torque dc motor. The motor was designed and built to fit an existing reaction wheel as a test vehicle and to use existing brass-board commutation and torque command electronics. The results of the tests are included in this report.

  9. Antiferromagnetic domain wall motion driven by spin-orbit torques

    PubMed Central

    Shiino, Takayuki; Oh, Se-Hyeok; Haney, Paul M.; Lee, Seo-Won; Go, Gyungchoon; Park, Byong-Guk; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls driven by spin-orbit torques in antiferromagnet/heavy metal bilayers. We show that spin-orbit torques drive antiferromagnetic domain walls much faster than ferromagnetic domain walls. As the domain wall velocity approaches the maximum spin-wave group velocity, the domain wall undergoes Lorentz contraction and emits spin-waves in the terahertz frequency range. The interplay between spin-orbit torques and the relativistic dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls leads to the efficient manipulation of antiferromagnetic spin textures and paves the way for the generation of high frequency signals from antiferromagnets. PMID:27588878

  10. Could CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b be remnants of evaporated gas or ice giants?

    PubMed Central

    Leitzinger, M.; Odert, P.; Kulikov, Yu.N.; Lammer, H.; Wuchterl, G.; Penz, T.; Guarcello, M.G.; Micela, G.; Khodachenko, M.L.; Weingrill, J.; Hanslmeier, A.; Biernat, H.K.; Schneider, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present thermal mass loss calculations over evolutionary time scales for the investigation if the smallest transiting rocky exoplanets CoRoT-7b (∼1.68REarth) and Kepler-10b (∼1.416REarth) could be remnants of an initially more massive hydrogen-rich gas giant or a hot Neptune-class exoplanet. We apply a thermal mass loss formula which yields results that are comparable to hydrodynamic loss models. Our approach considers the effect of the Roche lobe, realistic heating efficiencies and a radius scaling law derived from observations of hot Jupiters. We study the influence of the mean planetary density on the thermal mass loss by placing hypothetical exoplanets with the characteristics of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus to the orbital location of CoRoT-7b at 0.017 AU and Kepler-10b at 0.01684 AU and assuming that these planets orbit a K- or G-type host star. Our findings indicate that hydrogen-rich gas giants within the mass domain of Saturn or Jupiter cannot thermally lose such an amount of mass that CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b would result in a rocky residue. Moreover, our calculations show that the present time mass of both rocky exoplanets can be neither a result of evaporation of a hydrogen envelope of a “Hot Neptune” nor a “Hot Uranus”-class object. Depending on the initial density and mass, these planets most likely were always rocky planets which could lose a thin hydrogen envelope, but not cores of thermally evaporated initially much more massive and larger objects. PMID:21969736

  11. Could CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b be remnants of evaporated gas or ice giants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitzinger, M.; Odert, P.; Kulikov, Yu. N.; Lammer, H.; Wuchterl, G.; Penz, T.; Guarcello, M. G.; Micela, G.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Weingrill, J.; Hanslmeier, A.; Biernat, H. K.; Schneider, J.

    2011-10-01

    We present thermal mass loss calculations over evolutionary time scales for the investigation if the smallest transiting rocky exoplanets CoRoT-7b (∼1.68REarth) and Kepler-10b (∼1.416REarth) could be remnants of an initially more massive hydrogen-rich gas giant or a hot Neptune-class exoplanet. We apply a thermal mass loss formula which yields results that are comparable to hydrodynamic loss models. Our approach considers the effect of the Roche lobe, realistic heating efficiencies and a radius scaling law derived from observations of hot Jupiters. We study the influence of the mean planetary density on the thermal mass loss by placing hypothetical exoplanets with the characteristics of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus to the orbital location of CoRoT-7b at 0.017 AU and Kepler-10b at 0.01684 AU and assuming that these planets orbit a K- or G-type host star. Our findings indicate that hydrogen-rich gas giants within the mass domain of Saturn or Jupiter cannot thermally lose such an amount of mass that CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b would result in a rocky residue. Moreover, our calculations show that the present time mass of both rocky exoplanets can be neither a result of evaporation of a hydrogen envelope of a “Hot Neptune” nor a “Hot Uranus”-class object. Depending on the initial density and mass, these planets most likely were always rocky planets which could lose a thin hydrogen envelope, but not cores of thermally evaporated initially much more massive and larger objects.

  12. Could CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b be remnants of evaporated gas or ice giants?

    PubMed

    Leitzinger, M; Odert, P; Kulikov, Yu N; Lammer, H; Wuchterl, G; Penz, T; Guarcello, M G; Micela, G; Khodachenko, M L; Weingrill, J; Hanslmeier, A; Biernat, H K; Schneider, J

    2011-10-01

    We present thermal mass loss calculations over evolutionary time scales for the investigation if the smallest transiting rocky exoplanets CoRoT-7b (∼1.68REarth) and Kepler-10b (∼1.416REarth) could be remnants of an initially more massive hydrogen-rich gas giant or a hot Neptune-class exoplanet. We apply a thermal mass loss formula which yields results that are comparable to hydrodynamic loss models. Our approach considers the effect of the Roche lobe, realistic heating efficiencies and a radius scaling law derived from observations of hot Jupiters. We study the influence of the mean planetary density on the thermal mass loss by placing hypothetical exoplanets with the characteristics of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus to the orbital location of CoRoT-7b at 0.017 AU and Kepler-10b at 0.01684 AU and assuming that these planets orbit a K- or G-type host star. Our findings indicate that hydrogen-rich gas giants within the mass domain of Saturn or Jupiter cannot thermally lose such an amount of mass that CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b would result in a rocky residue. Moreover, our calculations show that the present time mass of both rocky exoplanets can be neither a result of evaporation of a hydrogen envelope of a "Hot Neptune" nor a "Hot Uranus"-class object. Depending on the initial density and mass, these planets most likely were always rocky planets which could lose a thin hydrogen envelope, but not cores of thermally evaporated initially much more massive and larger objects.

  13. Influence of Joint Angle on EMG-Torque Model During Constant-Posture, Torque-Varying Contractions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Liu, Lukai; Clancy, Edward A

    2015-11-01

    Relating the electromyogram (EMG) to joint torque is useful in various application areas, including prosthesis control, ergonomics and clinical biomechanics. Limited study has related EMG to torque across varied joint angles, particularly when subjects performed force-varying contractions or when optimized modeling methods were utilized. We related the biceps-triceps surface EMG of 22 subjects to elbow torque at six joint angles (spanning 60° to 135°) during constant-posture, torque-varying contractions. Three nonlinear EMG σ -torque models, advanced EMG amplitude (EMG σ ) estimation processors (i.e., whitened, multiple-channel) and the duration of data used to train models were investigated. When EMG-torque models were formed separately for each of the six distinct joint angles, a minimum "gold standard" error of 4.01±1.2% MVC(F90) resulted (i.e., error relative to maximum voluntary contraction at 90° flexion). This model structure, however, did not directly facilitate interpolation across angles. The best model which did so achieved a statistically equivalent error of 4.06±1.2% MVC(F90). Results demonstrated that advanced EMG σ processors lead to improved joint torque estimation as do longer model training durations.

  14. Displaced narrow absorption components in the spectra of mass-losing OB stars - Indications of corotating interaction regions?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The discovery of displaced narrow components (DNCs) in an increasingly large number of stars of various spectral types suggests that an explanation of these features may contribute significantly to understanding of winds from stars of all types. The reported properties of DNCs are summarized here with a view to evaluating one particular scenario for DNC formation which involves corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the stellar wind. The relevant features of the CIR scenario are summarized, and the extent to which DNC properties support the CIR scenario is discussed.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Planetary transit candidates in CoRoT SRc01 field (Erikson+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erikson, A.; Santerne, A.; Renner, S.; Barge, P.; Aigrain, S.; Alapini, A.; Almenara, J.-M.; Alonso, R.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Benz, W.; Bonomo, A. S.; Borde, P.; Bouchy, F.; Bruntt, H.; Cabrera, J.; Carone, L.; Carpano, S.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Deleuil, M.; Deeg, H. J.; Diaz, R. F.; Dvorak, R.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Fridlund, M.; Gandolfi, D.; Gazzano, J.-C.; Gillon, M.; Guenther, E. W.; Guillot, T.; Hatzes, A.; Hebrard, G.; Jorda, L.; Lammer, H.; Leger, A.; Llebaria, A.; Mayor, M.; Mazeh, T.; Moutou, C.; Ollivier, M.; Ofir, A.; Paetzold, M.; Pepe, F.; Pont, F.; Queloz, D.; Rabus, M.; Rauer, H.; Regulo, C.; Rouan, D.; Samuel, B.; Schneider, J.; Shporer, A.; Tingley, B.; Udry, S.; Wuchterl, G.

    2012-04-01

    Among the acquired data, we analyzed those for 1269 sources in the chromatic bands and 5705 in the monochromatic band. Instrumental noise and the stellar variability were treated with several detrending tools, to which several transit-search algorithms were subsequently applied. Fifty-one sources were classified as planetary transit candidates and 26 were followed up with ground-based observations. Until now, no planet has been detected in the CoRoT data from the SRc01 field. (1 data file).

  16. Seventy new non-eclipsing BEER binaries discovered in CoRoT lightcurves and confirmed by RVs from AAOmega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal-Or, Lev; Faigler, Simchon; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2015-09-01

    We applied the BEER algorithm to the CoRoT lightcurves from the first five LRc fields and identified 481 non-eclipsing BEER candidates with periodic lightcurve modulations and amplitudes of 0.5 - 87 mmag. Medium-resolution spectra of 281 candidates were obtained in a seven-night AAOmega radial-velocity (RV) campaign, with a precision of ˜ 1 km/s. The RVs confirmed the binarity of 70 of the BEER candidates, with periods of 0.3 - 10 days.

  17. Absolute reliability of hamstring to quadriceps strength imbalance ratios calculated using peak torque, joint angle-specific torque and joint ROM-specific torque values.

    PubMed

    Ayala, F; De Ste Croix, M; Sainz de Baranda, P; Santonja, F

    2012-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the absolute reliability of conventional (H/Q(CONV)) and functional (H/Q(FUNC)) hamstring to quadriceps strength imbalance ratios calculated using peak torque values, 3 different joint angle-specific torque values (10°, 20° and 30° of knee flexion) and 4 different joint ROM-specific average torque values (0-10°, 11-20°, 21-30° and 0-30° of knee flexion) adopting a prone position in recreational athletes. A total of 50 recreational athletes completed the study. H/Q(CONV) and H/Q(FUNC) ratios were recorded at 3 different angular velocities (60, 180 and 240°/s) on 3 different occasions with a 72-96 h rest interval between consecutive testing sessions. Absolute reliability was examined through typical percentage error (CVTE), percentage change in the mean (CM) and intraclass correlations (ICC) as well as their respective confidence limits. H/Q(CONV) and H/Q(FUNC) ratios calculated using peak torque values showed moderate reliability values, with CM scores lower than 2.5%, CV(TE) values ranging from 16 to 20% and ICC values ranging from 0.3 to 0.7. However, poor absolute reliability scores were shown for H/Q(CONV) and H/Q(FUNC) ratios calculated using joint angle-specific torque values and joint ROM-specific average torque values, especially for H/Q(FUNC) ratios (CM: 1-23%; CV(TE): 22-94%; ICC: 0.1-0.7). Therefore, the present study suggests that the CV(TE) values reported for H/Q(CONV) and H/Q(FUNC) (≈18%) calculated using peak torque values may be sensitive enough to detect large changes usually observed after rehabilitation programmes but not acceptable to examine the effect of preventitive training programmes in healthy individuals. The clinical reliability of hamstring to quadriceps strength ratios calculated using joint angle-specific torque values and joint ROM-specific average torque values are questioned and should be re-evaluated in future research studies.

  18. Giant spin-torque diode sensitivity in the absence of bias magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bin; Carpentieri, Mario; Hao, Xiaojie; Jiang, Hongwen; Katine, Jordan A.; Krivorotov, Ilya N.; Ocker, Berthold; Langer, Juergen; Wang, Kang L.; Zhang, Baoshun; Azzerboni, Bruno; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Finocchio, Giovanni; Zeng, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Microwave detectors based on the spin-torque diode effect are among the key emerging spintronic devices. By utilizing the spin of electrons in addition to charge, they have the potential to overcome the theoretical performance limits of their semiconductor (Schottky) counterparts. However, so far, practical implementations of spin-diode microwave detectors have been limited by the necessity to apply a magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate nanoscale magnetic tunnel junction microwave detectors, exhibiting high-detection sensitivity of 75,400 mV mW−1 at room temperature without any external bias fields, and for low-input power (micro-Watts or lower). This sensitivity is significantly larger than both state-of-the-art Schottky diode detectors and existing spintronic diodes. Micromagnetic simulations and measurements reveal the essential role of injection locking to achieve this sensitivity performance. This mechanism may provide a pathway to enable further performance improvement of spin-torque diode microwave detectors. PMID:27052973

  19. Observation of thermal spin-transfer torque via ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Bai, Lihui; Chen, Xiaobin; Guo, Hong; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.; Hu, C.-M.

    2016-08-01

    The thermal spin-transfer torque (TSTT) in magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) was systematically studied using electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Evidence for the existence of TSTT in MTJs is observed. A temperature difference was applied across an MTJ acting as a TSTT on the free layer of the MTJ. The FMR of the free layer was then excited by a microwave current and electrically detected as a dc voltage. We found that the FMR line shape was changed by the TSTT, indicated by the ratio of dispersive and Lorentz components of the FMR spectra (D /L ). D /L increases by increasing the temperature difference. In addition, we analyze the magnetization orientation dependence of TSTT and provide solid evidence that this dependence differs from the magnetization orientation dependence of spin-transfer torque driven by a dc bias.

  20. Experimental Robot Position Sensor Fault Tolerance Using Accelerometers and Joint Torque Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Hal A.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1997-01-01

    Robot systems in critical applications, such as those in space and nuclear environments, must be able to operate during component failure to complete important tasks. One failure mode that has received little attention is the failure of joint position sensors. Current fault tolerant designs require the addition of directly redundant position sensors which can affect joint design. The proposed method uses joint torque sensors found in most existing advanced robot designs along with easily locatable, lightweight accelerometers to provide a joint position sensor fault recovery mode. This mode uses the torque sensors along with a virtual passive control law for stability and accelerometers for joint position information. Two methods for conversion from Cartesian acceleration to joint position based on robot kinematics, not integration, are presented. The fault tolerant control method was tested on several joints of a laboratory robot. The controllers performed well with noisy, biased data and a model with uncertain parameters.

  1. The use of skeletal extension torque in reversing Dupuytren contractures of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Agee, John M; Goss, Ben C

    2012-07-01

    Dupuytren contracture of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint can be reversed by an extension torque transmitted from an external device, the Digit Widget, by skeletal pins to the middle phalanx. This extension torque, generated by the same elastic bands dentists use to align teeth, gradually restores length to soft tissues palmar to the PIP joint's axis of rotation. Simultaneously, tissues dorsal to the joint's axis will shorten toward normal length as the PIP progressively straightens. Although the contractile nodules and bands of Dupuytren disease may be excised either before or after reversal of the joint's contracture, a 2-staged approach is preferred: (1) reverse the PIP flexion contracture, and (2) excise the diseased tissue from the straightened finger. We believe this 2-staged approach yields better results. In addition, it is technically easier to avoid injury to nerves and arteries while excising the nodules and bands, when one operates through palmar skin of more nearly normal length.

  2. PREFACE: The Science of Making Torque from Wind 2014 (TORQUE 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Jakob; Bak, Christian; Bechmann, Andreas; Bingöl, Ferhat; Dellwik, Ebba; Dimitrov, Nikolay; Giebel, Gregor; Hansen, Martin O. L.; Jensen, Dorte Juul; Larsen, Gunner; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Natarajan, Anand; Rathmann, Ole; Sathe, Ameya; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Nørkær Sørensen, Niels

    2014-06-01

    The 186 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the fifth Science of Making Torque from Wind conference, which is organized by the European Academy of Wind Energy (EAWE, www.eawe.eu). The conference, also called Torque 2014, is held at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) 17-20 June 2014. The EAWE conference series started in 2004 in Delft, the Netherlands. In 2007 it was held in Copenhagen, in 2010 in Heraklion, Greece, and then in 2012 in Oldenburg, Germany. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown approximately by 25% annually over the last couple of decades and covers now 2-3% of the global electrical power consumption. In order to make a significant impact on one of the large challenges of our time, namely global warming, the growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research and education in wind turbine aerodynamics and wind resources, the two topics which are the main subjects of this conference. Similar to the growth in electrical power production by wind is the growth in scientific papers about wind energy. Over the last decade the number of papers has also grown by about 25% annually, and many research based companies all over the world are founded. Hence, the wind energy research community is rapidly expanding and the Torque conference series offers a good opportunity to meet and exchange ideas. We hope that the Torque 2014 will heighten the quality of the wind energy research, while the participants will enjoy each others company in Copenhagen. Many people have been involved in producing the Torque 2014 proceedings. The work by more than two hundred reviewers ensuring the quality of the papers is greatly appreciated. The timely evaluation and coordination of the reviews would not have been possible without the work of sixteen ''section editors'' all from DTU Wind Energy: Christian Bak, Andreas Bechmann, Ferhat Bingöl, Ebba Dellwik, Nikolay Dimitrov, Gregor Giebel, Martin

  3. Determination of the Contamination Rate and the Associated Error for Targets Observed by CoRoT in the Exoplanet Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardes, B.; Chabaud, P.-Y.; Guterman, P.

    2012-09-01

    In the CoRoT exoplanet field of view, photometric measurements are obtained by aperture integration using a generic collection of masks. The total flux held within the photometric mask may be split in two parts, the target flux itself and the flux due to the nearest neighbours considered as contaminants. So far ExoDat (http://cesam.oamp.fr/exodat) gives a rough estimate of the contamination rate for all potential exoplanet targets (level-0) based on generic PSF shapes built before CoRoT launch. Here, we present the updated estimate of the contamination rate (level-1) with its associated error. This estimate is done for each target observed by CoRoT in the exoplanet channel using a new catalog of PSF built from the first available flight images and taking into account the line of sight of the satellite (i.e. the satellite orientation).

  4. Torque balance at a line of contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukman, Dirk Jan

    2003-03-01

    Kerins and Boiteux (Physica A 117 (1983) 575) were the first to apply Noether's theorem to the van der Waals theory of non-uniform fluids. In particular, for a three-phase line of contact, they showed that the translation invariance of the variational integral for the excess free energy implies a balance of forces at the three-phase line. In this paper we consider the implications of the rotation invariance of the variational integral for the excess free energy. Intuitively, one would expect this invariance to lead to an equation of torque balance, and this is indeed the case-the total moment of the forces around the line of contact is zero. In the course of the calculation it will be necessary to find an expression for the surface of tension for a model with a multi-component density, which is a simple extension of earlier work by Fisher and Wortis (Phys. Rev. 29 (1984) 6252). At the same time, we extend to multi-component densities those authors’ results for the Tolman length and the equimolar surface, making contact with a more general calculation by Groenewold and Bedeaux (Physica A 214 (1995) 356).

  5. Deformation of a micro-torque swimmer

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takuji; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Imai, Yohsuke; Omori, Toshihiro; Matsunaga, Daiki

    2016-01-01

    The membrane tension of some kinds of ciliates has been suggested to regulate upward and downward swimming velocities under gravity. Despite its biological importance, deformation and membrane tension of a ciliate have not been clarified fully. In this study, we numerically investigated the deformation of a ciliate swimming freely in a fluid otherwise at rest. The cell body was modelled as a capsule with a hyperelastic membrane enclosing a Newtonian fluid. Thrust forces due to the ciliary beat were modelled as torques distributed above the cell body. The effects of membrane elasticity, the aspect ratio of the cell's reference shape, and the density difference between the cell and the surrounding fluid were investigated. The results showed that the cell deformed like a heart shape, when the capillary number was sufficiently large. Under the influence of gravity, the membrane tension at the anterior end decreased in the upward swimming while it increased in the downward swimming. Moreover, gravity-induced deformation caused the cells to move gravitationally downwards or upwards, which resulted in a positive or negative geotaxis-like behaviour with a physical origin. These results are important in understanding the physiology of a ciliate's biological responses to mechanical stimuli. PMID:26997893

  6. Spin orbit torque based electronic neuron

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Abhronil Choday, Sri Harsha; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-04-06

    A device based on current-induced spin-orbit torque (SOT) that functions as an electronic neuron is proposed in this work. The SOT device implements an artificial neuron's thresholding (transfer) function. In the first step of a two-step switching scheme, a charge current places the magnetization of a nano-magnet along the hard-axis, i.e., an unstable point for the magnet. In the second step, the SOT device (neuron) receives a current (from the synapses) which moves the magnetization from the unstable point to one of the two stable states. The polarity of the synaptic current encodes the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the neuron input and determines the final orientation of the magnetization. A resistive crossbar array, functioning as synapses, generates a bipolar current that is a weighted sum of the inputs. The simulation of a two layer feed-forward artificial neural network based on the SOT electronic neuron shows that it consumes ∼3× lower power than a 45 nm digital CMOS implementation, while reaching ∼80% accuracy in the classification of 100 images of handwritten digits from the MNIST dataset.

  7. Torque and Muscle Activation Impairment Along With Insulin Resistance Are Associated With Falls in Women With Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Góes, Suelen M; Stefanello, Joice M F; Homann, Diogo; Lodovico, Angélica; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L; Rodacki, André L F

    2016-11-01

    Góes, SM, Stefanello, JMF, Homann, D, Lodovico, A, Hubley-Kozey, CL, and Rodacki, ALF. Torque and muscle activation impairment along with insulin resistance are associated with falls in women with fibromyalgia. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3155-3164, 2016-Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain condition associated with reduced muscle strength, which can lead to functional incapacity and higher risk of falls. The purpose of the study was to compare maximal ankle joint torque, muscle activation, and metabolic changes between women with and without FM. In addition, the relationship between those aspects and retrospectively reported falls in women with FM was determined. Twenty-nine middle-aged women with FM and 30 controls were recruited. Fall history, pain intensity, and pain threshold were assessed. Plasma glucose levels and insulin resistance (IR) were determined. Peak torque and rate of torque development (RTD) were calculated, and muscle activation was assessed from maximum isometric voluntary ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion contractions. In addition, voluntary muscle activation failure of the anterior tibialis muscle during maximal dorsiflexion was calculated. When compared to controls, women with FM reported higher number of retrospectively reported falls, exhibited higher IR, showed reduced plantar flexion and dorsiflexion RTD, had lower plantar flexion peak torque, and demonstrated more antagonist coactivation and higher muscle activation failure (p ≤ 0.05). Higher muscle activation failure was explained by glucose level and pain intensity (adj R = 0.28; p ≤ 0.05). Reduced plantar flexion and dorsiflexion peak torque explained 80% of retrospectively reported falls variance; also, high antagonist coactivation (odds ratio [OR] = 1.6; p ≤ 0.05) and high IR (OR = 1.8; p ≤ 0.05) increased the chance of falls in the FM group. A combination of metabolic factors and muscle function increased the odds of retrospectively reporting a fall in FM. Both aspects

  8. Macroscopic response of particle-reinforced elastomers subjected to prescribed torques or rotations on the particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siboni, Morteza H.; Ponte Castañeda, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    Particle-reinforced rubbers are composite materials consisting of randomly distributed, stiff fibers/particles in a soft elastomeric material. Since the particles are stiff compared to the embedding rubber, their deformation can be ignored for all practical purposes. However, due to the softness of the rubber, they can undergo rigid body translations and rotations. Constitutive models accounting for the effect of such particle motions on the macroscopic response under prescribed deformations on the boundary have been developed recently. But, in some applications (e.g., magneto-active elastomers), the particles may experience additional torques as a consequence of an externally applied (magnetic) field, which, in turn, can affect the overall rotation of the particles in the rubber, and therefore also the macroscopic response of the composite. This paper is concerned with the development of constitutive models for particle-reinforced elastomers, which are designed to account for externally applied torques on the internally distributed particles, in addition to the externally applied deformation on the boundary of the composite. For this purpose, we propose a new variational framework involving suitably prescribed eigenstresses on the particles. For simplicity, the framework is applied to an elastomer reinforced by aligned, rigid, cylindrical fibers of elliptical cross section, which can undergo finite rotations in the context of a finite-deformation, plane strain problem for the composite. In particular, expressions are derived for the average in-plane rotation of the fibers as a function of the torques that are applied on them, both under vanishing and prescribed strain on the boundary. The results of this work will make possible the development of improved constitutive models for magneto-active elastomers, and other types of smart composite materials that are susceptible to externally applied torques.

  9. Investigation of spin torque driven magnetization reversal in elliptical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Angelique; Mewes, Claudia K. A.; Mewes, Tim

    2011-03-01

    Spin transfer torque [1, 2] can be utilized to switch the magnetization in small ferromagnetic elements, which can be used to implement a magnetic random access memory. One crucial parameter for spin torque switching is the critical current required to achieve switching. To investigate spin transfer torque we simulate the magnetization dynamics using our Matlab based micromagnetic code (M3) , which uses a fast Fourier transform method to evaluate the longrange magnetostatic field, exchange interaction is implemented using 6, 12 or 26 neighbor methods and also includes adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin torque terms. We have performed simulations using different mesh sizes to examine the influence of the cell size on the micromagnetic results. We have investigated the influence of the current density and pinned layer orientation on the magnetization dynamics and in particular on the switching time. This work was supported by REU supplement #1023069 for NSF DMR #0804243.

  10. Torque and Schizophrenic Vulnerability: As the World Turns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Theodore H.

    1977-01-01

    Based upon reports of parents and guardians, with subjects at an average age of 21 years, it was found that 11 of the youngsters who had exhibited torque had in the interim been diagnosed as schizophrenic. (Author)

  11. Estimation of Coriolis Force and Torque Acting on Ares-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Ryan M.; Kulikov, Igor K.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Luchinsky, Dmitry; Orr, Jeb

    2011-01-01

    A document describes work on the origin of Coriolis force and estimating Coriolis force and torque applied to the Ares-1 vehicle during its ascent, based on an internal ballistics model for a multi-segmented solid rocket booster (SRB).

  12. Constant torque in flagellar bacterial motors optimizes space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, Carlos A.; di Salvo, Mario E.

    2012-02-01

    Experiments indicate that the torque provided by the bacterial rotary motor is approximately constant over a large range of angular speeds. Constant torque implies that the power spent in active motion is proportional to the instantaneous bacterial speed, if the relation between angular speed and swimming speed is linear. Here we show that a constant torque maximizes the volume of the region explored by a bacterium in a resource-depleted medium. Given that nutrients in the ocean are often concentrated in separate, ephemeral patches, we propose that the observed constancy of the torque may be a trait evolved to maximize bacterial survival in the ocean. We also discuss the dependence of the explored volume with the particular features of the bacterial propulsion mechanism.

  13. Fill-in binary loop pulse-torque quantizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lory, C. B.

    1975-01-01

    Fill-in binary (FIB) loop provides constant heating of torque generator, an advantage of binary current switching. At the same time, it avoids mode-related dead zone and data delay of binary, an advantage of ternary quantization.

  14. Production Experiences with the Cray-Enabled TORQUE Resource Manager

    SciTech Connect

    Ezell, Matthew A; Maxwell, Don E; Beer, David

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing resources utilize batch systems to manage the user workload. Cray systems are uniquely different from typical clusters due to Cray s Application Level Placement Scheduler (ALPS). ALPS manages binary transfer, job launch and monitoring, and error handling. Batch systems require special support to integrate with ALPS using an XML protocol called BASIL. Previous versions of Adaptive Computing s TORQUE and Moab batch suite integrated with ALPS from within Moab, using PERL scripts to interface with BASIL. This would occasionally lead to problems when all the components would become unsynchronized. Version 4.1 of the TORQUE Resource Manager introduced new features that allow it to directly integrate with ALPS using BASIL. This paper describes production experiences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the new TORQUE software versions, as well as ongoing and future work to improve TORQUE.

  15. Spin–torque generator engineered by natural oxidation of Cu

    PubMed Central

    An, Hongyu; Kageyama, Yuito; Kanno, Yusuke; Enishi, Nagisa; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    The spin Hall effect is a spin–orbit coupling phenomenon, which enables electric generation and detection of spin currents. This relativistic effect provides a way for realizing efficient spintronic devices based on electric manipulation of magnetization through spin torque. However, it has been believed that heavy metals are indispensable for the spin–torque generation. Here we show that the spin Hall effect in Cu, a light metal with weak spin–orbit coupling, is significantly enhanced through natural oxidation. We demonstrate that the spin–torque generation efficiency of a Cu/Ni81Fe19 bilayer is enhanced by over two orders of magnitude by tuning the surface oxidation, reaching the efficiency of Pt/ferromagnetic metal bilayers. This finding illustrates a crucial role of oxidation in the spin Hall effect, opening a route for engineering the spin–torque generator by oxygen control and manipulating magnetization without using heavy metals. PMID:27725654

  16. Spin-torque generator engineered by natural oxidation of Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hongyu; Kageyama, Yuito; Kanno, Yusuke; Enishi, Nagisa; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-10-01

    The spin Hall effect is a spin-orbit coupling phenomenon, which enables electric generation and detection of spin currents. This relativistic effect provides a way for realizing efficient spintronic devices based on electric manipulation of magnetization through spin torque. However, it has been believed that heavy metals are indispensable for the spin-torque generation. Here we show that the spin Hall effect in Cu, a light metal with weak spin-orbit coupling, is significantly enhanced through natural oxidation. We demonstrate that the spin-torque generation efficiency of a Cu/Ni81Fe19 bilayer is enhanced by over two orders of magnitude by tuning the surface oxidation, reaching the efficiency of Pt/ferromagnetic metal bilayers. This finding illustrates a crucial role of oxidation in the spin Hall effect, opening a route for engineering the spin-torque generator by oxygen control and manipulating magnetization without using heavy metals.

  17. Spin torque ferromagnetic resonance in Heusler based magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Phung, Timothy; Pushp, Aakash; Jeong, Jaewoo; Ferrante, Yari; Rettner, Charles; Hughes, Brian P.; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    Heusler compounds are of interest as electrode materials for use in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) due to their half metallic character, which leads to high spin polarization and high tunneling magnetoresistance. Whilst much work has focused on the influence of the half metallic character of the Heusler compounds on the magnetoresistance of MTJs, there is much less work investigating the influence of this electronic structure on the spin transfer torque. Here, we investigate the bias dependence of the anti-damping like and field-like spin transfer torque components as a function of the bias voltage in symmetric (CoMnSi/MgO/CoMnSi) and asymmetric (CoMnSi/MgO/CoFe) structure magnetic tunnel junctions using spin transfer torque ferromagnetic resonance. Lastly, we report on the effect of asymmetric bias dependence of the differential conductance on the spin transfer torque.

  18. Torque engineering in trilayer spin-hall system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Gaurav; Jalil, Mansoor Bin Abdul; Liang, Gengchiau

    2016-02-01

    A trilayer system with perpendicularly magnetized metallic (FMM) free-layer, heavy metal (HM) with strong spin-hall effect and ferromagnetic insulating (FMI) substrate has been proposed to significantly enhance the torque acting on FMM. Its magnitude can be engineered by configuring the magnetization of the FMI. The analytical solution has been developed for four stable magnetization states (non-magnetic and magnetization along three Cartesian axes) of FMI to comprehensively appraise the anti-damping torque on FMM and the Gain factor. It is shown that the proposed system has much larger gain and torque compared to a bilayer system (or a trilayer system with non-magnetic substrate). The performance improvement may be extremely large for system with a thin HM. Device optimization is shown to be non-trivial and various constraints have been explained. These results would enable design of more efficient spin-orbit torque memories and logic with faster switching at yet lower current.

  19. Vector control structure of an asynchronous motor at maximum torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chioncel, C. P.; Tirian, G. O.; Gillich, N.; Raduca, E.

    2016-02-01

    Vector control methods offer the possibility to gain high performance, being widely used. Certain applications require an optimum control in limit operating conditions, as, at maximum torque, that is not always satisfied. The paper presents how the voltage and the frequency for an asynchronous machine (ASM) operating at variable speed are determinate, with an accent on the method that keeps the rotor flux constant. The simulation analyses consider three load types: variable torque and speed, variable torque and constant speed, constant torque and variable speed. The final values of frequency and voltage are obtained through the proposed control schemes with one controller using the simulation language based on the Maple module. The dynamic analysis of the system is done for the case with P and PI controller and allows conclusions on the proposed method, which can have different applications, as the ASM in wind turbines.

  20. Helicopter transmission arrangements with split-torque gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, G.

    1983-01-01

    As an alternative to component development, the case for improved drive-train configuration is argued. In particular, the use of torque-splitting gear trains is proposed as a practicable means of improving the effectiveness of helicopter main gearboxes.

  1. CoRoT 101186644: A transiting low-mass dense M-dwarf on an eccentric 20.7-day period orbit around a late F-star. Discovered in the CoRoT lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal-Or, L.; Mazeh, T.; Alonso, R.; Bouchy, F.; Cabrera, J.; Deeg, H. J.; Deleuil, M.; Faigler, S.; Fridlund, M.; Hébrard, G.; Moutou, C.; Santerne, A.; Tingley, B.

    2013-05-01

    We present the study of the CoRoT transiting planet candidate 101186644, also named LRc01_E1_4780. Analysis of the CoRoT lightcurve and the HARPS spectroscopic follow-up observations of this faint (mV = 16) candidate revealed an eclipsing binary composed of a late F-type primary (Teff = 6090 ± 200 K) and a low-mass, dense late M-dwarf secondary on an eccentric (e = 0.4) orbit with a period of ~20.7 days. The M-dwarf has a mass of 0.096 ± 0.011 M⊙, and a radius of 0.104-0.006+0.026 R⊙, which possibly makes it the smallest and densest late M-dwarf reported so far. Unlike the claim that theoretical models predict radii that are 5-15% smaller than measured for low-mass stars, this one seems to have a radius that is consistent and might even be below the radius predicted by theoretical models. Based on observations made with the 1-m telescope at the Wise Observatory, Israel, the Swiss 1.2-m Leonhard Euler telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile, the IAC-80 telescope at the Observatory del Teide, Canarias, Spain, and the 3.6-m telescope at La Silla Observatory (ESO), Chile (program 184.C-0639).

  2. Heat Control via Torque Control in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, Richard; Colligan, Kevin; Knapp, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In a proposed advance in friction stir welding, the torque exerted on the workpiece by the friction stir pin would be measured and controlled in an effort to measure and control the total heat input to the workpiece. The total heat input to the workpiece is an important parameter of any welding process (fusion or friction stir welding). In fusion welding, measurement and control of heat input is a difficult problem. However, in friction stir welding, the basic principle of operation affords the potential of a straightforward solution: Neglecting thermal losses through the pin and the spindle that supports it, the rate of heat input to the workpiece is the product of the torque and the speed of rotation of the friction stir weld pin and, hence, of the spindle. Therefore, if one acquires and suitably processes data on torque and rotation and controls the torque, the rotation, or both, one should be able to control the heat input into the workpiece. In conventional practice in friction stir welding, one uses feedback control of the spindle motor to maintain a constant speed of rotation. According to the proposal, one would not maintain a constant speed of rotation: Instead, one would use feedback control to maintain a constant torque and would measure the speed of rotation while allowing it to vary. The torque exerted on the workpiece would be estimated as the product of (1) the torque-multiplication ratio of the spindle belt and/or gear drive, (2) the force measured by a load cell mechanically coupled to the spindle motor, and (3) the moment arm of the load cell. Hence, the output of the load cell would be used as a feedback signal for controlling the torque (see figure).

  3. Design and Development of a Segmented Magnet Homopolar Torque Converter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-01

    IchineVr^V5^ thl ^^^P" concept in large homopolar crLt^ in th^ fi /I蔾’ ^^^C’ a^ electrodynamic power losses created in the fluid during machine...AD-A008 843 DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF A SEGMENTED MAGNET HOMOPOLAR TORQUE CONVERTER C. J. Mole, et al Westinghouse Electric Corporation...This program is for the research and development of a new mechanical power trans- mission concept: the segmented magnet homopolar torque converter

  4. Orion - Super Koropon(Registered Trademark) Torque/Tension Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemminger, Edgar G.; McLeod, Christopher; Peil, John

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this testing was to obtain torque tension data for the use of Super Koropon Primer Base which was proposed for use on the Orion project. This compound is a corrosion inhibitor/sealer used on threaded fasteners and inserts as specified per NASA/JSC PRC-4004, Sealing of Joints and Faying Surfaces. Some secondary objectives of this testing, were to identify the effect on torque coefficient of several variables. This document contains the outcome of the testing.

  5. Gluing Bifurcations in Coupled Spin Torque Nano-Oscillators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    REPORT Gluing bifurcations in coupled spin torque nano -oscillators 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Over the past few years it has been...shown, through theory and experiments, that the AC current produced by spin torque nano -oscillators (STNO), coupled in an array, can lead to feedback...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nano -oscillators, symmetry, bifurcations Katherine

  6. Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This joint mobility KC lecture included information from two papers, "A Method for and Issues Associated with the Determination of Space Suit Joint Requirements" and "Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing," as presented for the International Conference on Environmental Systems in 2009 and 2010, respectively. The first paper discusses historical joint torque testing methodologies and approaches that were tested in 2008 and 2009. The second paper discusses the testing that was completed in 2009 and 2010.

  7. A comparative assessment of torque generated by lingual and conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Sifakakis, Iosif; Pandis, Nikolaos; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore; Katsaros, Christos; Bourauel, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bracket type on the labiopalatal moments generated by lingual and conventional brackets. Incognito™ lingual brackets (3M Unitek), STb™ lingual brackets (Light Lingual System; ORMCO), In-Ovation L lingual brackets (DENTSPLY GAC), and conventional 0.018 inch slot brackets (Gemini; 3M Unitek) were bonded on identical maxillary acrylic resin models with levelled and aligned teeth. Each model was mounted on the orthodontic measurement and simulation system and 10 0.0175 × 0.0175 TMA wires were used for each bracket type. The wire was ligated with elastomerics into the Incognito, STb, and conventional brackets and each measurement was repeated once after religation. A 15 degrees buccal root torque (+15 degrees) and then a 15 degrees palatal root torque (-15 degrees) were gradually applied to the right central incisor bracket. After each activation, the bracket returned to its initial position and the moments in the sagittal plane were recorded during these rotations of the bracket. One-way analysis of variance with post hoc multiple comparisons (Tukey test at 0.05 error rate) was conducted to assess the effect on bracket type on the generated moments. The magnitude of maximum moment at +15 degrees ranged 8.8, 8.2, 7.1, and 5.8 Nmm for the Incognito, STb, conventional Gemini, and the In-Ovation L brackets, respectively; similar values were recorded at -15 degrees: 8.6, 8.1, 7.0, and 5.7 Nmm, respectively. The recorded differences of maximum moments were statistically significant, except between the Incognito and STb brackets. Additionally, the torque angles were evaluated at which the crown torque fell well below the minimum levels of 5.0 Nmm, as well as the moment/torque ratio at the last part of the activation/deactivation curve, between 10 and 15 degrees. The lowest torque expression was observed at the self-ligating lingual brackets, followed by the conventional brackets. The Incognito and STb lingual brackets

  8. System and method for determining the net output torque from a waste heat recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Tricaud, Christophe; Ernst, Timothy C.; Zigan, James A.

    2016-12-13

    The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery system with a system and method for calculation of the net output torque from the waste heat recovery system. The calculation uses inputs from existing pressure and speed sensors to create a virtual pump torque sensor and a virtual expander torque sensor, and uses these sensors to provide an accurate net torque output from the WHR system.

  9. Lunar and Solar Torques on the Oceanic Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Bills, Bruce G.; Chao, Benjamin Fong

    1998-01-01

    A general framework for calculating lunar and solar torques on the oceanic tides is developed in terms of harmonic constituents. Axial torques and their associated angular momentum and earth-rotation variations are deduced from recent satellite-altimeter and satellite-tracking tide solutions. Torques on the prograde components of the tide produce the familiar secular braking of the rotation rate. The estimated secular acceleration is approximately -1300 sec/century(sup 2) (less 4% after including atmospheric tides); the implied rate of change in the length of day is 2.28 milliseconds/century. Torques on the retrograde components of the tide produce periodic rotation variations at twice the tidal frequency. Interaction torques, e.g. solar torques on lunar tides, generate a large suite of rotation-rate variations at sums and differences of the original tidal frequencies. These are estimated for periods from 18.6 years to quarter-diurnal. At subdaily periods the angular momentum variations are 5 to 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the variations caused by ocean tidal currents.

  10. Enhanced spin orbit torques by oxygen incorporation in tungsten films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phung, Timothy; Demasius, Kai-Uwe; Zhang, Weifeng; Hughes, Brian P.; Yang, See-Hun; Kellock, Andrew; Han, Wei; Pushp, Aakash; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    Spin orbit torques are generated by the conversion of charge to spin currents in non-magnetic materials. The origin of these torques is of considerable debate. One of the most interesting materials is metallic tungsten for which large spin orbit torques have been found in thin films that are stabilized in the A15 (β-phase) structure. Here we report, using spin transfer torque ferromagnetic resonance, large spin Hall angles of up to ~-0.5 by incorporating oxygen into tungsten films. Whilst the incorporation of oxygen into the tungsten leads to significant changes in its microstructure and electrical resistivity, the large spin Hall angles measured are found to be remarkably insensitive to the oxygen doping level (12-44%). This invariance of the spin Hall angle with the bulk W(O) properties for higher oxygen concentrations suggests that the spin orbit torques in this system may actually be partly interfacial in origin, and induced by scattering of the electrons at the W(O) |CoFeB interface rather than from the interior of the W(O) film. Our results show an intriguing novel path towards enhanced spin orbit torques.

  11. Changes in voluntary torque and electromyographic activity following oral baclofen.

    PubMed

    Hornby, T George; Heckman, C J; Harvey, Richard L; Rymer, W Zev

    2004-12-01

    The consequences of baclofen intake on voluntary motor behaviors remain unclear. We studied the effects of single oral doses of baclofen on voluntary, isometric knee extension torques and surface and single motor unit (MU) electromyographic (EMG) activity from the vastus lateralis in 11 individuals without neurological injury. Examination of submaximal to maximal contractions of varying duration performed pre- and post-baclofen ingestion revealed significant decreases in maximal knee torques and EMG magnitude, accompanied by an increase in slope of the torque-EMG relation. A decreased slope of the torque-MU firing rate relation was also demonstrated post-baclofen, but without changes in minimal firing rates or recruitment forces. During sustained contractions at < or =25% of maximal voluntary torque elicited after baclofen ingestion, increased EMG activity was observed without significant differences in MU firing rates. Our results demonstrate a clear reduction in the maximal torque-generating ability following baclofen. Specific changes in MU firing patterns indicate that weakness may be due partly to reduced motoneuronal excitability, although use of MU discharge patterns to assess these effects is limited in its sensitivity.

  12. The Solar Wind and Geomagnetic Activity as a Function of Time Relative to Corotating Interaction Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherron, Robert L.; Weygand, James

    2006-01-01

    Corotating interaction regions during the declining phase of the solar cycle are the cause of recurrent geomagnetic storms and are responsible for the generation of high fluxes of relativistic electrons. These regions are produced by the collision of a high-speed stream of solar wind with a slow-speed stream. The interface between the two streams is easily identified with plasma and field data from a solar wind monitor upstream of the Earth. The properties of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field are systematic functions of time relative to the stream interface. Consequently the coupling of the solar wind to the Earth's magnetosphere produces a predictable sequence of events. Because the streams persist for many solar rotations it should be possible to use terrestrial observations of past magnetic activity to predict future activity. Also the high-speed streams are produced by large unipolar magnetic regions on the Sun so that empirical models can be used to predict the velocity profile of a stream expected at the Earth. In either case knowledge of the statistical properties of the solar wind and geomagnetic activity as a function of time relative to a stream interface provides the basis for medium term forecasting of geomagnetic activity. In this report we use lists of stream interfaces identified in solar wind data during the years 1995 and 2004 to develop probability distribution functions for a variety of different variables as a function of time relative to the interface. The results are presented as temporal profiles of the quartiles of the cumulative probability distributions of these variables. We demonstrate that the storms produced by these interaction regions are generally very weak. Despite this the fluxes of relativistic electrons produced during those storms are the highest seen in the solar cycle. We attribute this to the specific sequence of events produced by the organization of the solar wind relative to the stream interfaces. We also

  13. Examination of North-South symmetry in Saturn's sub-corotating Magnetosphere: Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    We previously investigated Saturn's sub-corotating mass-loaded spiraling magnetosphere using observations of Bφ (the azimuthal magnetic field component) in14 identical Cassini orbits near midnight in the Southern hemisphere from 0° to -80 °latitude . The basic equation representing the Magnetospheric- Ionospheric- Interaction (M-I-A), developed by Hill (1979) for Jupiter and modified by Cowley and Bunce (2002) for Saturn, is: Ip = Σp (1- ω/Ωs). Ip is the Ionospheric Pedersen Current; G is obtained from ionospheric radius, Ri, colatitude, θi, and the planetary magnetic field, Bs; Σp is altitude-integrated Pedersen conductivity; ω and Ωs are the angular rotation rates of the magnetospheric field and of Saturn Kilometric Radiation, a proxy for the planetary field rotation. The relation should hold irrespective of how the mass originates an important consideration since plasma injections are frequently imposed on radial outflow from the inner magnetosphere and used to obtain ω. Ampere's law relates Ip (Ri, θi) to Bφ (r, θ, radial distance and colatitude). It has been found that I/G = A exp(-Bθi), an exponential dependence that was not predicted, and implies that A= Σp while the exponential yields (1- ω/Ωs) so ω(θi) is determined. The derived values of ω yield a quasi-linear function of equatorial distance or L. (This dependence and an alternative expression for Ip/G also imply that ionospheric neutrals rotate at the same rate as Bs). Σp varies between 7.5 and 1.1 mho and ω(L) also varies significantly orbit-to-orbit. These are temporal variations since the orbits are spatially identical. ω(L) has been compared with ω(L) in publications based on azimuthal rotation velocity, Vφ. Hill(1979) is used to study M*, the rate of mass outflow. The general approach above has now been applied to the Northern hemisphere and the same 14 orbits. We report on the important issue of North-South symmetries and asymmetries. .

  14. VARIATIONS OF THE MUON FLUX AT SEA LEVEL ASSOCIATED WITH INTERPLANETARY ICMEs AND COROTATING INTERACTION REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Augusto, C. R. A.; Kopenkin, V.; Navia, C. E.; Tsui, K. H.; Shigueoka, H.; Fauth, A. C.; Kemp, E.; Manganote, E. J. T.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Miranda, P.; Ticona, R.; Velarde, A.

    2012-11-10

    We present the results of an ongoing survey on the association between the muon flux variation at ground level (3 m above sea level) registered by the Tupi telescopes (Niteri-Brazil, 22.{sup 0}9S, 43.{sup 0}2W, 3 m) and the Earth-directed transient disturbances in the interplanetary medium propagating from the Sun (such as coronal mass ejections (CME), and corotating interaction regions (CIRs)). Their location inside the South Atlantic Anomaly region enables the muon telescopes to achieve a low rigidity of response to primary and secondary charged particles. The present study is primarily based on experimental events obtained by the Tupi telescopes in the period from 2010 August to 2011 December. This time period corresponds to the rising phase of solar cycle 24. The Tupi events are studied in correlation with data obtained by space-borne detectors (SOHO, ACE, GOES). Identification of interplanetary structures and associated solar activity was based on the nomenclature and definitions given by the satellite observations, including an incomplete list of possible interplanetary shocks observed by the CELIAS/MTOF Proton Monitor on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. Among 29 experimental events reported in the present analysis, there are 15 possibly associated with the CMEs and sheaths, and 3 events with the CIRs (forward or reverse shocks); the origin of the remaining 11 events has not been determined by the satellite detectors. We compare the observed time (delayed or anticipated) of the muon excess (positive or negative) signal on Earth (the Tupi telescopes) with the trigger time of the interplanetary disturbances registered by the satellites located at Lagrange point L1 (SOHO and ACE). The temporal correlation of the observed ground-based events with solar transient events detected by spacecraft suggests a real physical connection between them. We found that the majority of observed events detected by the Tupi experiment were delayed in

  15. Radar absorption due to a corotating interaction region encounter with Mars detected by MARSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David D.; Gurnett, Donald A.; Kirchner, Donald L.; David Winningham, J.; Frahm, Rudy A.; Brain, David A.; Mitchell, David L.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Nielsen, Erling; Espley, Jared R.; Acuña, Mario H.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    2010-03-01

    Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) is a subsurface and topside ionosphere radar sounder aboard the European Space Agency spacecraft Mars Express, in orbit at Mars since 25 December 2003, and in operation since 17 June 2005. The ionospheric sounding mode of MARSIS is capable of detecting the reflection of the sounding wave from the martian surface. This ability has been used in previous work to show that the surface reflection is absorbed and disappears during periods when high fluxes of energetic particles are incident on the ionosphere of Mars. These absorption events are believed to be the result of increased collisional damping of the sounding wave, caused by increased electron density below the spacecraft, in turn caused by impact ionization from the impinging particles. In this work we identify two absorption events that were isolated during periods when the surface reflection is consistently visible and when Mars is nearly at opposition. The visibility of the surface reflection is viewed in conjunction with particle and photon measurements taken at both Mars and Earth. Both absorption events are found to coincide with Earth passing through solar wind speed and ion flux signatures indicative of a corotating interaction region (CIR). The two events are separated by an interval of approximately 27 days, corresponding to one solar rotation. The first of the two events coincides with abruptly enhanced particle fluxes seen in situ at Mars. Simultaneous with the particle enhancement there are an abrupt decrease in the intensity of electron oscillations, typically seen by the Mars Express particle instrument ASPERA-3 between the magnetic pileup boundary and the martian bow shock, and a sharp drop in the solar wind pressure, seen in the proxy quantity based on MGS magnetometer observations. The decrease in oscillation intensity is therefore the probable effect of a relaxation of the martian bow shock. The second absorption event does

  16. Spin-torque-driven excitations in magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Seinige, H.; Staudacher, T.; Tsoi, M.

    2011-03-01

    Spin transfer torque (STT) refers to a novel method to control and manipulate magnetic moments using an electrical current. For the past decade it has proven to be a fascinating domain of research with a number of manifestations in various systems interesting both from fundamental science's point of view as well as for technological applications. In ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic (F/N) multilayers a dc electrical current can switch and/or drive its constituent F parts into high-frequency precession which is of interest for microwave and magnetic recording technologies. Interestingly, application of high-frequency currents can also drive the multilayer, e.g., into ferromagnetic resonance (STT-FMR) precession. In our experiments we use point contacts to inject high microwave currents into a variety of magnetic thin films including NiFe/Cu/NiFe/IrMn and NiFe/Cu/Co spin valves, and single ferromagnetic (NiFe or Co) films. The resulting magnetodynamics are detected electrically when a small rectified dc voltage appears across the contact at resonance. We find that in addition to a standard FMR, the microwave currents can excite other resonance modes in our point contacts. We study the behavior of the excitations as a function of applied magnetic field, dc bias current, and microwave frequency. Supported in part by NSF grants DMR-06-45377.

  17. Measurements of Torque and Spindown in Couette Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Matt; Ji, Hantao; Chen, Fei

    2002-11-01

    Accretion disks are formed when interstellar gas accretes onto a central massive object such as a black hole or star. The effects of viscosity and hydrodynamic processes fail to explain the outward transport of angular momentum necessary for the fast accretion. Magnetorotational instability (MRI) has been regarded as the dominant mechanism, but has not yet been realized in the laboratory. It is hoped that MRI will be observed utilizing an applied external magnetic field and two concentric rotating cylinders to create a differential angular velocity in liquid gallium. Before this is possible, however, certain characteristics of the setup must be examined in water. For example, due to rigid boundaries on the top and bottom, Eckman circulation competes with MRI for outward angular momentum transport. The torque coupling between the two rotating cylinders can be used to characterize Eckman effects. This will establish "background noise" due to the existing angular momentum transport mechanisms for the MRI in the liquid gallium experiment. Additionally, the Eckman effect can be determined by measurements of time scale of spindown by pressure sensors. Detailed experimental results and comparison to theory will be presented.

  18. Global occurrence of Torque teno virus in water systems.

    PubMed

    Charest, A J; Plummer, J D; Long, S C; Carducci, A; Verani, M; Sidhu, J P S

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial indicator organisms are used globally to assess the microbiological safety of waters. However, waterborne viral outbreaks have occurred in drinking water systems despite negative bacterial results. Using viral markers may therefore provide more accurate health risk assessment data. In this study, fecal, wastewater, stormwater, surface water (fresh and salt), groundwater, and drinking water samples were analyzed for the presence or concentration of traditional indicators, innovative indicators and viral markers. Samples were obtained in the United States, Italy, and Australia and results compared to those reported for studies conducted in Asia and South America as well. Indicators included total coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, male-specific coliphages, somatic coliphages and microviradae. Viral markers included adenovirus, polyomavirus, and a potential new surrogate, Torque teno virus (TTV). TTV was more frequently found in wastewaters (38-100%) and waters influenced by waste discharges (25%) than in surface waters used as drinking water sources (5%). TTV was also specific to human rather than animal feces. While TTV numbers were strongly correlated to other viral markers in wastewaters, suggesting its utility as a fecal contamination marker, data limitations and TTV presence in treated drinking waters demonstrates that additional research is needed on this potential viral indicator.

  19. GROUND-BASED NEAR-INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE SECONDARY ECLIPSE OF CoRoT-2b

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, R.; Deeg, H. J.; Rabus, M.; Kabath, P.

    2010-04-15

    We present the results of a ground-based search for the secondary eclipse of the 3.3 M {sub Jup} transiting planet CoRoT-2b. We performed near-infrared photometry using the LIRIS instrument on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope, in the H and K{sub s} filters. We monitored the star around two expected secondary eclipses in two nights under very good observing conditions. For the depth of the secondary eclipse, in the H band we found a 3{sigma} upper limit of 0.17%, whereas we detected a tentative eclipse with a depth of 0.16% {+-} 0.09% in the K{sub s} band. These depths can be translated into brightness temperatures of T{sub H} < 2250 K and T{sub K{sub s}}= 1890{sup +260}{sub -350} K, which indicate an inefficient re-distribution of the incident stellar flux from the planet's day side to its night side. Our results are in agreement with the CoRoT optical measurement (Alonso et al.) and with Spitzer 4.5 and 8 {mu}m results (Gillon et al.)

  20. Report on Toyota/Prius Motor Torque-Capability, Torque-Property, No-Load Back EMF, and Mechanical Losses

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2004-09-30

    In today's hybrid vehicle market, the Toyota Prius drive system is currently considered the leader in electrical, mechanical, and manufacturing innovations. It is significant that in today's marketplace, Toyota is able to manufacture and sell the vehicle for a profit. This project's objective is to test the torque capability of the 2004 Prius motor and to analyze the torque properties relating to the rotor structure. The tested values of no-load back electromotive force (emf) and mechanical losses are also presented.