Science.gov

Sample records for additional dependent variable

  1. Numerical solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using density gradients as additional dependent variables. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical solution of two dimensional, time dependent, compressible viscous Navier-Stokes equations about arbitrary bodies was treated using density gradients as additional dependent variables. Thus, six dependent variables were computed with the SOR iteration method. Besides formulation for pressure gradient terms, a formulation for computing the body density was presented. To approximate the governing equations, an implicit finite difference method was employed. In computing the solution for the flow about a circular cylinder, a problem arose near the wall at both stagnation points. Thus, computations with various conditions were tried to examine the problem. Also, computations with and without formulations are compared. The flow variables were computed on 37 by 40 field first, then on an 81 by 40 field.

  2. Reward-dependent modulation of movement variability.

    PubMed

    Pekny, Sarah E; Izawa, Jun; Shadmehr, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Movement variability is often considered an unwanted byproduct of a noisy nervous system. However, variability can signal a form of implicit exploration, indicating that the nervous system is intentionally varying the motor commands in search of actions that yield the greatest success. Here, we investigated the role of the human basal ganglia in controlling reward-dependent motor variability as measured by trial-to-trial changes in performance during a reaching task. We designed an experiment in which the only performance feedback was success or failure and quantified how reach variability was modulated as a function of the probability of reward. In healthy controls, reach variability increased as the probability of reward decreased. Control of variability depended on the history of past rewards, with the largest trial-to-trial changes occurring immediately after an unrewarded trial. In contrast, in participants with Parkinson's disease, a known example of basal ganglia dysfunction, reward was a poor modulator of variability; that is, the patients showed an impaired ability to increase variability in response to decreases in the probability of reward. This was despite the fact that, after rewarded trials, reach variability in the patients was comparable to healthy controls. In summary, we found that movement variability is partially a form of exploration driven by the recent history of rewards. When the function of the human basal ganglia is compromised, the reward-dependent control of movement variability is impaired, particularly affecting the ability to increase variability after unsuccessful outcomes. PMID:25740529

  3. Problems Identifying Independent and Dependent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leatham, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses one step from the scientific method--that of identifying independent and dependent variables--from both scientific and mathematical perspectives. It begins by analyzing an episode from a middle school mathematics classroom that illustrates the need for students and teachers alike to develop a robust understanding of…

  4. Choice of Variables and Preconditioning for Time Dependent Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, Eli; Vatsa, Verr N.

    2003-01-01

    We consider the use of low speed preconditioning for time dependent problems. These are solved using a dual time step approach. We consider the effect of this dual time step on the parameter of the low speed preconditioning. In addition, we compare the use of two sets of variables, conservation and primitive variables, to solve the system. We show the effect of these choices on both the convergence to a steady state and the accuracy of the numerical solutions for low Mach number steady state and time dependent flows.

  5. Repeated Sprints: An Independent Not Dependent Variable.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jonathan M; Macpherson, Tom W; Spears, Iain R; Weston, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    The ability to repeatedly perform sprints has traditionally been viewed as a key performance measure in team sports, and the relationship between repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and performance has been explored extensively. However, when reviewing the repeated-sprint profile of team-sports match play it appears that the occurrence of repeated-sprint bouts is sparse, indicating that RSA is not as important to performance as commonly believed. Repeated sprints are, however, a potent and time-efficient training strategy, effective in developing acceleration, speed, explosive leg power, aerobic power, and high-intensity-running performance--all of which are crucial to team-sport performance. As such, we propose that repeated-sprint exercise in team sports should be viewed as an independent variable (eg, a means of developing fitness) as opposed to a dependent variable (eg, a means of assessing fitness/performance). PMID:27197118

  6. 38 CFR 3.650 - Rate for additional dependent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rate for additional dependent. 3.650 Section 3.650 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Adjustments and Resumptions § 3.650 Rate for additional dependent....

  7. 38 CFR 3.650 - Rate for additional dependent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rate for additional dependent. 3.650 Section 3.650 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Adjustments and Resumptions § 3.650 Rate for additional dependent....

  8. Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test: adult norms and moderator variables.

    PubMed

    Wiens, A N; Fuller, K H; Crossen, J R

    1997-08-01

    This study examined the performance of a sample of 821 healthy job applicants on the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT). Subjects had previously passed basic academic skills tests and physical examinations and were deemed free of cognitive impairment and medical illness. They were also motivated to perform well on cognitive tests. Gender, ethnicity, and education were not significant moderator variables in our subjects. Age and IQ did significantly affect PASAT test results. Normative data are stratified by age and WAIS-R Full Scale IQ scores to be useful to those who administer the PASAT in clinical practice. PMID:9342683

  9. 38 CFR 3.650 - Rate for additional dependent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be effective from the date of potential entitlement of the additional dependent. (2) Where benefits... for periods prior to the date the full rate is awarded shall be the difference between the...

  10. 38 CFR 3.650 - Rate for additional dependent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be effective from the date of potential entitlement of the additional dependent. (2) Where benefits... for periods prior to the date the full rate is awarded shall be the difference between the...

  11. Concentration dependence of variability in growth rates of microtubules.

    PubMed Central

    Pedigo, Susan; Williams, Robley C

    2002-01-01

    Growth and shortening of microtubules in the course of their polymerization and depolymerization have previously been observed to occur at variable rates. To gain insight into the meaning of this prominent variability, we studied the way in which its magnitude depends on the growth rate of experimentally observed and computer-simulated microtubules. The dynamic properties of plus-ended microtubules nucleated by pieces of Chlamydomonas flagellar axonemes were observed in real time by video-enhanced differential interference contrast light microscopy at differing tubulin concentrations. By means of a Monte Carlo algorithm, populations of microtubules were simulated that had similar growth and dynamic properties to the experimentally observed microtubules. By comparison of the experimentally observed and computer-simulated populations of microtubules, we found that 1) individual microtubules displayed an intrinsic variability that did not change as the rate of growth for a population increased, and 2) the variability was approximately fivefold greater than predicted by a simple model of subunit addition and loss. The model used to simulate microtubule growth has no provision for incorporation of lattice defects of any type, nor sophisticated geometry of the growing end. Thus, these as well as uncontrolled experimental variables were eliminated as causes for the prominent variability. PMID:12324403

  12. Validity of a Residualized Dependent Variable after Pretest Covariance Adjustments: Still the Same Variable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimon, Kim; Henson, Robin K.

    2015-01-01

    The authors empirically examined whether the validity of a residualized dependent variable after covariance adjustment is comparable to that of the original variable of interest. When variance of a dependent variable is removed as a result of one or more covariates, the residual variance may not reflect the same meaning. Using the pretest-posttest…

  13. Bayesian Network Models for Local Dependence among Observable Outcome Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Russell G.; Mulder, Joris; Hemat, Lisa A.; Yan, Duanli

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian network models offer a large degree of flexibility for modeling dependence among observables (item outcome variables) from the same task, which may be dependent. This article explores four design patterns for modeling locally dependent observations: (a) no context--ignores dependence among observables; (b) compensatory context--introduces…

  14. Computer optimization program finds values for several independent variables that minimize a dependent variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warech, E. J.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program finds values of independent variables which minimize the dependent variable. This optimization program has been used on the F-1 and J-2 engine programs to establish minimum film coolant requirements.

  15. RNA-template dependent de novo telomere addition.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Gloria; Jönsson, Franziska; Weil, Patrick Philipp; Postberg, Jan; Lipps, Hans J

    2016-08-01

    De novo addition of telomeric sequences can occur at broken chromosomes and must be well controlled, which is essential during programmed DNA reorganization processes. In ciliated protozoa an extreme form of DNA-reorganization is observed during macronuclear differentiation after sexual reproduction leading to the elimination of specific parts of the germline genome. Regulating these processes involves small noncoding RNAs, but in addition DNA-reordering, excision and amplification require RNA templates deriving from the parental macronucleus. We show that these putative RNA templates can carry telomeric repeats. Microinjection of RNA templates carrying modified telomeres into the developing macronucleus leads to modified telomeres in vegetative cells, providing strong evidence, that de novo addition of telomeres depends on a telomere-containing transcript from the parental macronucleus. PMID:26786510

  16. The Variable Transition State in Polar Additions to Pi Bonds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2010-01-01

    A vast majority of polar additions of Bronsted acids to alkynes involve a termolecular transition state. With strong acids, considerable positive charge is developed on carbon and Markovnikov addition predominates. In less acidic solutions, however, the reaction is much slower and the transition state more closely resembles the olefinic product.…

  17. Are Compliance-Gaining Strategies Dependent on Situational Variables?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Sally; Backus, Dencil

    1982-01-01

    Finds little support for previous research that the use of persuasive strategy is dependent on situational variables, such as intimacy of the interpersonal relationship and duration of the consequences of compliance or noncompliance. Concludes, rather, that the use of a strategy may depend on unanalyzed aspects of the message content. (PD)

  18. Distance and azimuthal dependence of ground-motion variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Jagdish Chandra; Mai, Paul Martin; Galis, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the near-field ground-motion variability by computing the seismic wavefield for five previously published kinematic rupture models of the M 7.3 1992 Landers earthquake, several simplified rupture models based on the Landers event, and a large M 7.8 scenario earthquake in Southern California. The ground motion simulations are accomplished by solving the elasto-dynamic equations of motion using a generalized finite-difference method. The simulated waveforms are calibrated against near-field strong-motion recordings for the Landers earthquake. We then analyze our simulation-based data-set of ground-motions, binned with respect to distance and azimuth to compute mean and standard deviation of peak ground velocity (PGV). We consider different 1D-velocity-density profiles for the Landers simulations, and a 3D heterogeneous Earth structure for the ShakeOut scenario, and for both cases we honor geometrical fault complexity. The ground-motion variability, σln(PGV), estimated from numerical simulations is higher in the near-field (Joyner-Boore distance RJB <20 km) compared to that associated with standard ground-motion prediction equations. We find that σln(PGV)decreases with increasing distance from the fault as a power law. The physical explanation of a large near-field σln(PGV)is the presence of strong directivity and rupture complexity. We also show that intra-event ground-motion variability is high in the rupture-propagation direction (both forward and backward directivity regions), but low in the direction perpendicular to rupture propagation for unilateral ruptures. We observe that the power-law decay of σln(PGV) is primarily controlled by slip heterogeneity. In addition, σln(PGV) as function of azimuth is sensitive to variations in both rupture speed and slip heterogeneity. We also find that the azimuthal dependence of mean, μln(PGV), can be approximated by a Cauchy-Lorentz function, which may potentially help in estimation of ground motion for

  19. The discovery of timescale-dependent color variability of quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yu-Han; Wang, Jun-Xian; Chen, Xiao-Yang; Zheng, Zhen-Ya E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.cn

    2014-09-01

    Quasars are variable on timescales from days to years in UV/optical and generally appear bluer while they brighten. The physics behind the variations in fluxes and colors remains unclear. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey g- and r-band photometric monitoring data for quasars in Stripe 82, we find that although the flux variation amplitude increases with timescale, the color variability exhibits the opposite behavior. The color variability of quasars is prominent at timescales as short as ∼10 days, but gradually reduces toward timescales up to years. In other words, the variable emission at shorter timescales is bluer than that at longer timescales. This timescale dependence is clearly and consistently detected at all redshifts from z = 0 to 3.5; thus, it cannot be due to contamination to broadband photometry from emission lines that do not respond to fast continuum variations. The discovery directly rules out the possibility that simply attributes the color variability to contamination from a non-variable redder component such as the host galaxy. It cannot be interpreted as changes in global accretion rate either. The thermal accretion disk fluctuation model is favored in the sense that fluctuations in the inner, hotter region of the disk are responsible for short-term variations, while longer-term and stronger variations are expected from the larger and cooler disk region. An interesting implication is that one can use quasar variations at different timescales to probe disk emission at different radii.

  20. Handling Time-dependent Variables: Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Frencken, Jos F; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-06-15

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods, antibiotics constitute time-dependent exposures. Cox regression models are suited for determining such associations. After explaining the concepts of hazard, hazard ratio, and proportional hazards, the effects of treating antibiotic exposure as fixed or time-dependent variables are illustrated and discussed. Wider acceptance of these techniques will improve quantification of the effects of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance development and provide better evidence for guideline recommendations. PMID:27025824

  1. Smoke optical depths - Magnitude, variability, and wavelength dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Russell, P. B.; Colburn, D. A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Allen, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne autotracking sun-photometer has been used to measure magnitudes, temporal/spatial variabilities, and the wavelength dependence of optical depths in the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared spectrum of smoke from two forest fires and one jet fuel fire and of background air. Jet fuel smoke optical depths were found to be generally less wavelength dependent than background aerosol optical depths. Forest fire smoke optical depths, however, showed a wide range of wavelength depedences, such as incidents of wavelength-independent extinction.

  2. Shoulder pain and time dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion variability.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Chandrasekaran; Moon, Yaejin; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2016-07-01

    Manual wheelchair propulsion places considerable repetitive mechanical strain on the upper limbs leading to shoulder injury and pain. While recent research indicates that the amount of variability in wheelchair propulsion and shoulder pain may be related. There has been minimal inquiry into the fluctuation over time (i.e. time-dependent structure) in wheelchair propulsion variability. Consequently the purpose of this investigation was to examine if the time-dependent structure in the wheelchair propulsion parameters are related to shoulder pain. 27 experienced wheelchair users manually propelled their own wheelchair fitted with a SMARTWheel on a roller at 1.1m/s for 3min. Time-dependent structure of cycle-to-cycle fluctuations in contact angle and inter push time interval was quantified using sample entropy (SampEn) and compared between the groups with/without shoulder pain using non-parametric statistics. Overall findings were, (1) variability observed in contact angle fluctuations during manual wheelchair propulsion is structured (Z=3.15;p<0.05), (2) individuals with shoulder pain exhibited higher SampEn magnitude for contact angle during wheelchair propulsion than those without pain (χ(2)(1)=6.12;p<0.05); and (3) SampEn of contact angle correlated significantly with self-reported shoulder pain (rs (WUSPI) =0.41;rs (VAS)=0.56;p<0.05). It was concluded that the time-dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion may provide novel information for tracking and monitoring shoulder pain. PMID:27134151

  3. A Stepwise Approach of Finding Dependent Variables via Coefficient of Intrinsic Dependence.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ya-Chun; Liu, Li-Yu Daisy

    2016-01-01

    The coefficient of intrinsic dependence (CID) is capable of determining associations among variables without making distributional or functional assumptions regarding random variables. In this study, we developed the partial coefficient of intrinsic dependence (pCID) to facilitate the step-by-step selection of variables that are relevant to a target variable. The strategy of selecting relevant variables using the CID along with the pCID can eliminate interference from other relevant variables. From simulation results, we observed that the proposed method is more sensitive to curvilinearity and more specific to linearity than the combination of Pearsons correlation coefficient and the partial correlation coefficient (PCC/pPCC). This property may provide the opportunity to index different levels of curvilinearity according to CID/pCID outcomes. In practice trials conducted using publicly available microarray data, the CID/pCID procedure successfully identified cold-responsive genes related to three C-repeat binding factors, and was especially effective at identifying some sample-specific gene-gene interactions. Therefore, the proposed strategy may be beneficial in meta-analysis to distinguish general forms of relationships from the noise. PMID:26645623

  4. Use of generalised additive models to categorise continuous variables in clinical prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In medical practice many, essentially continuous, clinical parameters tend to be categorised by physicians for ease of decision-making. Indeed, categorisation is a common practice both in medical research and in the development of clinical prediction rules, particularly where the ensuing models are to be applied in daily clinical practice to support clinicians in the decision-making process. Since the number of categories into which a continuous predictor must be categorised depends partly on the relationship between the predictor and the outcome, the need for more than two categories must be borne in mind. Methods We propose a categorisation methodology for clinical-prediction models, using Generalised Additive Models (GAMs) with P-spline smoothers to determine the relationship between the continuous predictor and the outcome. The proposed method consists of creating at least one average-risk category along with high- and low-risk categories based on the GAM smooth function. We applied this methodology to a prospective cohort of patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The predictors selected were respiratory rate and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood (PCO2), and the response variable was poor evolution. An additive logistic regression model was used to show the relationship between the covariates and the dichotomous response variable. The proposed categorisation was compared to the continuous predictor as the best option, using the AIC and AUC evaluation parameters. The sample was divided into a derivation (60%) and validation (40%) samples. The first was used to obtain the cut points while the second was used to validate the proposed methodology. Results The three-category proposal for the respiratory rate was ≤ 20;(20,24];> 24, for which the following values were obtained: AIC=314.5 and AUC=0.638. The respective values for the continuous predictor were AIC=317.1 and AUC=0.634, with no statistically

  5. Effect of Methamphetamine Dependence on Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brook L.; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William

    2010-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (METH) is an increasing popular and highly addictive stimulant associated with autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction, cardiovascular pathology, and neurotoxicity. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used to assess autonomic function and predict mortality in cardiac disorders and drug intoxication, but has not been characterized in METH use. We recorded HRV in a sample of currently abstinent individuals with a history of METH dependence compared to age- and gender-matched drug-free comparison subjects. Method HRV was assessed using time domain, frequency domain, and nonlinear entropic analyses in 17 previously METH-dependent and 21 drug-free comparison individuals during a 5 minute rest period. Results The METH-dependent group demonstrated significant reduction in HRV, reduced parasympathetic activity, and diminished heartbeat complexity relative to comparison participants. More recent METH use was associated with increased sympathetic tone. Conclusion Chronic METH exposure may be associated with decreased HRV, impaired vagal function, and reduction in heart rate complexity as assessed by multiple methods of analysis. We discuss and review evidence that impaired HRV may be related to the cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects of prolonged METH use. PMID:21182570

  6. Characterizing heart rate variability by scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing; Gao, Jianbo; Tung, Wen-wen

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies on heart rate variability (HRV) using chaos theory, fractal scaling analysis, and many other methods, while fruitful in many aspects, have produced much confusion in the literature. Especially the issue of whether normal HRV is chaotic or stochastic remains highly controversial. Here, we employ a new multiscale complexity measure, the scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent (SDLE), to characterize HRV. SDLE has been shown to readily characterize major models of complex time series including deterministic chaos, noisy chaos, stochastic oscillations, random 1/f processes, random Levy processes, and complex time series with multiple scaling behaviors. Here we use SDLE to characterize the relative importance of nonlinear, chaotic, and stochastic dynamics in HRV of healthy, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation subjects. We show that while HRV data of all these three types are mostly stochastic, the stochasticity is different among the three groups.

  7. Increased rainfall variability and N addition accelerate litter decomposition in a restored prairie.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition and projected increases in rainfall variability (the frequency of drought and heavy rainfall events) are expected to strongly influence ecosystem processes such as litter decomposition. However, how these two global change factors interact to influence litter decomposition is largely unknown. I examined how increased rainfall variability and nitrogen addition affected mass and nitrogen loss of litter from two tallgrass prairie species, Schizachyrium scoparium and Solidago canadensis, and isolated the effects of each during plant growth and during litter decomposition. I increased rainfall variability by consolidating ambient rainfall into larger events and simulated chronic nitrogen deposition using a slow-release urea fertilizer. S. scoparium litter decay was more strongly regulated by the treatments applied during plant growth than by those applied during decomposition. During plant growth, increased rainfall variability resulted in S. scoparium litter that subsequently decomposed more slowly and immobilized more nitrogen than litter grown under ambient conditions, whereas nitrogen addition during plant growth accelerated subsequent mass loss of S. scoparium litter. In contrast, S. canadensis litter mass and N losses were enhanced under either N addition or increased rainfall variability both during plant growth and during decomposition. These results suggest that ongoing changes in rainfall variability and nitrogen availability are accelerating nutrient cycling in tallgrass prairies through their combined effects on litter quality, environmental conditions, and plant community composition. PMID:26216200

  8. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  9. Scales of variability of black carbon plumes and their dependence on resolution of ECHAM6-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigum, Natalie; Stier, Philip; Schutgens, Nick; Kipling, Zak

    2015-04-01

    Prediction of the aerosol effect on climate depends on the ability of three-dimensional numerical models to accurately estimate aerosol properties. However, a limitation of traditional grid-based models is their inability to resolve variability on scales smaller than a grid box. Past research has shown that significant aerosol variability exists on scales smaller than these grid-boxes, which can lead to discrepancies between observations and aerosol models. The aim of this study is to understand how a global climate model's (GCM) inability to resolve sub-grid scale variability affects simulations of important aerosol features. This problem is addressed by comparing observed black carbon (BC) plume scales from the HIPPO aircraft campaign to those simulated by ECHAM-HAM GCM, and testing how model resolution affects these scales. This study additionally investigates how model resolution affects BC variability in remote and near-source regions. These issues are examined using three different approaches: comparison of observed and simulated along-flight-track plume scales, two-dimensional autocorrelation analysis, and 3-dimensional plume analysis. We find that the degree to which GCMs resolve variability can have a significant impact on the scales of BC plumes, and it is important for models to capture the scales of aerosol plume structures, which account for a large degree of aerosol variability. In this presentation, we will provide further results from the three analysis techniques along with a summary of the implication of these results on future aerosol model development.

  10. Variability of interconnected wind plants: correlation length and its dependence on variability time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Handschy, Mark A.

    2015-04-01

    The variability in wind-generated electricity complicates the integration of this electricity into the electrical grid. This challenge steepens as the percentage of renewably-generated electricity on the grid grows, but variability can be reduced by exploiting geographic diversity: correlations between wind farms decrease as the separation between wind farms increases. But how far is far enough to reduce variability? Grid management requires balancing production on various timescales, and so consideration of correlations reflective of those timescales can guide the appropriate spatial scales of geographic diversity grid integration. To answer ‘how far is far enough,’ we investigate the universal behavior of geographic diversity by exploring wind-speed correlations using three extensive datasets spanning continents, durations and time resolution. First, one year of five-minute wind power generation data from 29 wind farms span 1270 km across Southeastern Australia (Australian Energy Market Operator). Second, 45 years of hourly 10 m wind-speeds from 117 stations span 5000 km across Canada (National Climate Data Archive of Environment Canada). Finally, four years of five-minute wind-speeds from 14 meteorological towers span 350 km of the Northwestern US (Bonneville Power Administration). After removing diurnal cycles and seasonal trends from all datasets, we investigate dependence of correlation length on time scale by digitally high-pass filtering the data on 0.25-2000 h timescales and calculating correlations between sites for each high-pass filter cut-off. Correlations fall to zero with increasing station separation distance, but the characteristic correlation length varies with the high-pass filter applied: the higher the cut-off frequency, the smaller the station separation required to achieve de-correlation. Remarkable similarities between these three datasets reveal behavior that, if universal, could be particularly useful for grid management. For high

  11. Variability of interconnected wind plants: correlation length and its dependence on variability time scale

    DOE PAGESBeta

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Handschy, Mark A.

    2015-04-02

    The variability in wind-generated electricity complicates the integration of this electricity into the electrical grid. This challenge steepens as the percentage of renewably-generated electricity on the grid grows, but variability can be reduced by exploiting geographic diversity: correlations between wind farms decrease as the separation between wind farms increases. However, how far is far enough to reduce variability? Grid management requires balancing production on various timescales, and so consideration of correlations reflective of those timescales can guide the appropriate spatial scales of geographic diversity grid integration. To answer 'how far is far enough,' we investigate the universal behavior of geographic diversity by exploring wind-speed correlations using three extensive datasets spanning continents, durations and time resolution. First, one year of five-minute wind power generation data from 29 wind farms span 1270 km across Southeastern Australia (Australian Energy Market Operator). Second, 45 years of hourly 10 m wind-speeds from 117 stations span 5000 km across Canada (National Climate Data Archive of Environment Canada). Finally, four years of five-minute wind-speeds from 14 meteorological towers span 350 km of the Northwestern US (Bonneville Power Administration). After removing diurnal cycles and seasonal trends from all datasets, we investigate dependence of correlation length on time scale by digitally high-pass filtering the data on 0.25–2000 h timescales and calculating correlations between sites for each high-pass filter cut-off. Correlations fall to zero with increasing station separation distance, but the characteristic correlation length varies with the high-pass filter applied: the higher the cut-off frequency, the smaller the station separation required to achieve de-correlation. Remarkable similarities between these three datasets reveal behavior that, if universal, could be particularly useful for grid management. For high

  12. Variability of interconnected wind plants: correlation length and its dependence on variability time scale

    SciTech Connect

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Handschy, Mark A.

    2015-04-02

    The variability in wind-generated electricity complicates the integration of this electricity into the electrical grid. This challenge steepens as the percentage of renewably-generated electricity on the grid grows, but variability can be reduced by exploiting geographic diversity: correlations between wind farms decrease as the separation between wind farms increases. However, how far is far enough to reduce variability? Grid management requires balancing production on various timescales, and so consideration of correlations reflective of those timescales can guide the appropriate spatial scales of geographic diversity grid integration. To answer 'how far is far enough,' we investigate the universal behavior of geographic diversity by exploring wind-speed correlations using three extensive datasets spanning continents, durations and time resolution. First, one year of five-minute wind power generation data from 29 wind farms span 1270 km across Southeastern Australia (Australian Energy Market Operator). Second, 45 years of hourly 10 m wind-speeds from 117 stations span 5000 km across Canada (National Climate Data Archive of Environment Canada). Finally, four years of five-minute wind-speeds from 14 meteorological towers span 350 km of the Northwestern US (Bonneville Power Administration). After removing diurnal cycles and seasonal trends from all datasets, we investigate dependence of correlation length on time scale by digitally high-pass filtering the data on 0.25–2000 h timescales and calculating correlations between sites for each high-pass filter cut-off. Correlations fall to zero with increasing station separation distance, but the characteristic correlation length varies with the high-pass filter applied: the higher the cut-off frequency, the smaller the station separation required to achieve de-correlation. Remarkable similarities between these three datasets reveal behavior that, if universal, could be particularly useful for grid management. For high

  13. Addition of simultaneous heat and solute transport and variable fluid viscosity to SEAWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorne, D.; Langevin, C.D.; Sukop, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    SEAWAT is a finite-difference computer code designed to simulate coupled variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. This paper describes a new version of SEAWAT that adds the ability to simultaneously model energy and solute transport. This is necessary for simulating the transport of heat and salinity in coastal aquifers for example. This work extends the equation of state for fluid density to vary as a function of temperature and/or solute concentration. The program has also been modified to represent the effects of variable fluid viscosity as a function of temperature and/or concentration. The viscosity mechanism is verified against an analytical solution, and a test of temperature-dependent viscosity is provided. Finally, the classic Henry-Hilleke problem is solved with the new code. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. How Variables Uncorrelated with the Dependent Variable Can Actually Make Excellent Predictors: The Important Suppressor Variable Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Kristin K.

    Many researchers are unfamiliar with suppressor variables and how they operate in multiple regression analyses. This paper describes the role suppressor variables play in a multiple regression model and provides practical examples that explain how they can change research results. A variable that when added as another predictor increases the total…

  15. Heart rate variability during sleep in detoxified alcohol-dependent males: A comparison with healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Ganesha, Suhas; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Muralidharan, Kesavan; Benegal, Vivek; Gangadhar, Bangalore N.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Alcohol dependence can lead to autonomic neuropathy resulting in increased cardiac morbidity and mortality. This has previously been evaluated using heart-rate variability. Aims: We compared sleep heart-rate variability of alcohol-dependent patients with that of healthy controls in this study. Settings and Design: This study was conducted at NIMHANS, Bangalore. A case control study design was adopted. Materials and Methods: Sleep heart-rate variability of 20 male alcohol-dependent inpatients was recorded on the 5th day after detoxification. Sleep heart-rate variability was also recorded in 18 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Statistical Analysis: The groups were compared using t-test for continuous variables and Chi-squared test for discrete variables. Results: Both time and frequency domain measures were significantly lower in the patients as compared to the controls, indicating decreased HRV in alcohol-dependent individuals. Conclusions: Decreased HRV in alcohol dependence indicates potential autonomic neuropathy. PMID:23825854

  16. Latitudinal dependence of the variability of the micrometeor altitude distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, J. J.; Janches, D.

    2009-06-01

    We present a study of the diurnal behavior of the observed meteor altitude distribution at different seasons and latitudes. The meteor altitude distribution provides an indication of where the meteoric mass deposition occurs in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). This can be utilized to model the input of metallic constituents into the MLT and accurately understand the chemistry of this region. We show that the observed altitude distributions have distinct variability at each location: at high latitudes there is a weak diurnal and strong seasonal variability while at tropical latitudes the opposite behavior is observed. We explain these results by correlating them with the astronomical and physical properties of the meteoric flux. Finally, we discussed the potential influences that these results have on the metal chemistry and aeronomy of this atmospheric region.

  17. The Energy Dependence of GRB Minimum Variability Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkhou, V. Zach; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Littlejohns, Owen M.

    2015-10-01

    We constrain the minimum variability timescales for 938 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor instrument prior to 2012 July 11. The tightest constraints on progenitor radii derived from these timescales are obtained from light curves in the hardest energy channel. In the softer bands—or from measurements of the same GRBs in the hard X-rays from Swift—we show that variability timescales tend to be a factor of two to three longer. Applying a survival analysis to account for detections and upper limits, we find median minimum timescale in the rest frame for long-duration and short-duration GRBs of 45 and 10 ms, respectively. Less than 10% of GRBs show evidence for variability on timescales below 2 ms. These shortest timescales require Lorentz factors ≳ 400 and imply typical emission radii R≈ 1× {10}14 cm for long-duration GRBs and R≈ 3× {10}13 cm for short-duration GRBs. We discuss implications for the GRB fireball model and investigate whether or not GRB minimum timescales evolve with cosmic time.

  18. On Direction of Dependence in Latent Variable Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Eye, Alexander; Wiedermann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Approaches to determining direction of dependence in nonexperimental data are based on the relation between higher-than second-order moments on one side and correlation and regression models on the other. These approaches have experienced rapid development and are being applied in contexts such as research on partner violence, attention deficit…

  19. Source-Manipulating Wavelength-Dependent Continuous-Variable Quantum Key Distribution with Heterodyne Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Geli; Huang, Dazu; Guo, Ying

    2016-05-01

    The intensities of signal and local oscillator (LO) can be elegantly manipulated for the noise-based quantum system while manipulating the wavelength-dependent modulation in source to increase the performance of the continuous-variable key distribution in terms of the secret key rate and maximal transmission distance. The source-based additional noises can be tuned and stabilized to the suitable values to eliminate the effect of the LO fluctuations and defeat the potential attacks in imperfect quantum channels. It is firmly proved that the secret key rate can be manipulated in source over imperfect channels by the intensities of signal and LO with different wavelengths, which have an effect on the optimal signal-to-noise ratio of the heterodyne detectors resulting from the detection efficiency and the additional electronic noise as well. Simulation results show that there is a nice balance between the secret key rate and the maximum transmission distance.

  20. Regression Methods for Categorical Dependent Variables: Effects on a Model of Student College Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Kelly E.

    2012-01-01

    The use of categorical dependent variables with the classical linear regression model (CLRM) violates many of the model's assumptions and may result in biased estimates (Long, 1997; O'Connell, Goldstein, Rogers, & Peng, 2008). Many dependent variables of interest to educational researchers (e.g., professorial rank, educational…

  1. 34 CFR 75.534 - Training grants-automatic increases for additional dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training grants-automatic increases for additional dependents. 75.534 Section 75.534 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Allowable Costs § 75.534 Training...

  2. 34 CFR 75.534 - Training grants-automatic increases for additional dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Training grants-automatic increases for additional dependents. 75.534 Section 75.534 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Allowable Costs § 75.534 Training...

  3. 34 CFR 75.534 - Training grants-automatic increases for additional dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Training grants-automatic increases for additional dependents. 75.534 Section 75.534 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Allowable Costs § 75.534 Training...

  4. 34 CFR 75.534 - Training grants-automatic increases for additional dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Training grants-automatic increases for additional dependents. 75.534 Section 75.534 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Allowable Costs § 75.534 Training...

  5. 34 CFR 75.534 - Training grants-automatic increases for additional dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Training grants-automatic increases for additional dependents. 75.534 Section 75.534 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Allowable Costs § 75.534 Training...

  6. [Scale-dependency of spatial variability of soil available nutrients].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi-Yong; Yang, Jing-Song; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2011-02-01

    With the support of GIS and by using classical statistics and geostatistics methods, the spatial variability of soil available P (AP) and available K (AK) in cultivated lands in Yucheng City of Shandong Province was approached at county and township scales. The results showed that both the soil AP and AK followed the logarithmic normal distribution, with the coefficient of variation (CV) at the two scales being 26.5% - 36.6% and presenting a moderate variation. With the decrease of the scale, the CV of the soil AP and AK increased. Both the soil AP and AK were spatially correlated with scale. At county scale, the soil AP and AK had a larger spatial correlation distance, being 9.0 km and 26.5 km, respectively; while at township scale, the soil AP and AK had a smaller spatial correlation distance, being 1.7 km and 2.8 km, respectively. The spatial distribution of the soil AP and AK at the two scales was obviously different, which was mainly affected by structural factors and random factors. PMID:21608258

  7. Spectral variability of deciduous leaves depending on the developmental stages and tree condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Ryu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Foliar spectral characteristics could be the key information in modeling forest ecosystem and the remote sensing of vegetation identification. But it is not easy to determine a typical leaf spectrum of a species in a standardized state. That is because of variables critically influencing on the spectral property of leaves, such as inter- and intra-species features, phenological phase, or biotic and abiotic stress. In this study, we attempted to quantify the spectral variability of leaves depending on species, developmental stages, and the condition of trees. The contribution of these factors to the spectral variation was analyzed at the single leaf level, with a large number of samples from deciduous plants in the urban forested area. First, we collected tens of leaf-samples at every biweekly fieldwork in the growing season, for the selected 5 tree species popular in urban parks; Acer palmatum, Carpinus laxiflora, Prunus yedoensis, Quercus acutissima, and Zelkova serrata. And absorbance, reflectance and transmittance spectra of the leaves were acquired at the short-visible (400-700 nm) to infrared (700-2500 nm) spectral region with 1 nm interval. Seasonality in these leaf-spectra was used to understand the inter-species variation depending on developmental stages. Second, as a benchmark for testing intra-species variability and differences by tree condition, we additionally analyzed the spectral reflectance of 504 ripe leaves from 56 cherry trees (Cerasus × yedoensis) collected in the middle of summer. Last, using ANOVA (analysis of variance) and general linear model, we assessed the influence of our tested variables (i.e., species, developmental stage, and tree condition) on the spectral characteristics and their vegetation indices. As a result, we clarified that the changes in leaf-spectra was apparent across all the tested species during the growing season from May to June, indicating the increasing trend of absorbance in photosynthetically active radiation

  8. Pattern of inbreeding depression, condition dependence, and additive genetic variance in Trinidadian guppy ejaculate traits

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Clelia; Devigili, Alessandro; Dosselli, Ryan; Pilastro, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In polyandrous species, a male's reproductive success depends on his fertilization capability and traits enhancing competitive fertilization success will be under strong, directional selection. This leads to the prediction that these traits should show stronger condition dependence and larger genetic variance than other traits subject to weaker or stabilizing selection. While empirical evidence of condition dependence in postcopulatory traits is increasing, the comparison between sexually selected and ‘control’ traits is often based on untested assumption concerning the different strength of selection acting on these traits. Furthermore, information on selection in the past is essential, as both condition dependence and genetic variance of a trait are likely to be influenced by the pattern of selection acting historically on it. Using the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a livebearing fish with high levels of multiple paternity, we performed three independent experiments on three ejaculate quality traits, sperm number, velocity, and size, which have been previously shown to be subject to strong, intermediate, and weak directional postcopulatory selection, respectively. First, we conducted an inbreeding experiment to determine the pattern of selection in the past. Second, we used a diet restriction experiment to estimate their level of condition dependence. Third, we used a half-sib/full-sib mating design to estimate the coefficients of additive genetic variance (CVA) underlying these traits. Additionally, using a simulated predator evasion test, we showed that both inbreeding and diet restriction significantly reduced condition. According to predictions, sperm number showed higher inbreeding depression, stronger condition dependence, and larger CVA than sperm velocity and sperm size. The lack of significant genetic correlation between sperm number and velocity suggests that the former may respond to selection independently one from other ejaculate quality traits

  9. Multiple correlation computer program determines relationships between several independent and dependent variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspar, H.; Newsbaum, J. B.

    1967-01-01

    Relationships between independent and dependent variables are determined by multiple correlation computer program. This is applied to research and experimental design and development of complex hardware and components that require test programs.

  10. The biobehavioral family model: testing social support as an additional exogenous variable.

    PubMed

    Woods, Sarah B; Priest, Jacob B; Roush, Tara

    2014-12-01

    This study tests the inclusion of social support as a distinct exogenous variable in the Biobehavioral Family Model (BBFM). The BBFM is a biopsychosocial approach to health that proposes that biobehavioral reactivity (anxiety and depression) mediates the relationship between family emotional climate and disease activity. Data for this study included married, English-speaking adult participants (n = 1,321; 55% female; M age = 45.2 years) from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a nationally representative epidemiological study of the frequency of mental disorders in the United States. Participants reported their demographics, marital functioning, social support from friends and relatives, anxiety and depression (biobehavioral reactivity), number of chronic health conditions, and number of prescription medications. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the items used in the measures of negative marital interactions, social support, and biobehavioral reactivity, as well as the use of negative marital interactions, friends' social support, and relatives' social support as distinct factors in the model. Structural equation modeling indicated a good fit of the data to the hypothesized model (χ(2)  = 846.04, p = .000, SRMR = .039, CFI = .924, TLI = .914, RMSEA = .043). Negative marital interactions predicted biobehavioral reactivity (β = .38, p < .001), as did relatives' social support, inversely (β = -.16, p < .001). Biobehavioral reactivity predicted disease activity (β = .40, p < .001) and was demonstrated to be a significant mediator through tests of indirect effects. Findings are consistent with previous tests of the BBFM with adult samples, and suggest the important addition of family social support as a predicting factor in the model. PMID:24981970

  11. Variable selection in covariate dependent random partition models: an application to urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Barcella, William; Iorio, Maria De; Baio, Gianluca; Malone-Lee, James

    2016-04-15

    Lower urinary tract symptoms can indicate the presence of urinary tract infection (UTI), a condition that if it becomes chronic requires expensive and time consuming care as well as leading to reduced quality of life. Detecting the presence and gravity of an infection from the earliest symptoms is then highly valuable. Typically, white blood cell (WBC) count measured in a sample of urine is used to assess UTI. We consider clinical data from 1341 patients in their first visit in which UTI (i.e. WBC ≥ 1) is diagnosed. In addition, for each patient, a clinical profile of 34 symptoms was recorded. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian nonparametric regression model based on the Dirichlet process prior aimed at providing the clinicians with a meaningful clustering of the patients based on both the WBC (response variable) and possible patterns within the symptoms profiles (covariates). This is achieved by assuming a probability model for the symptoms as well as for the response variable. To identify the symptoms most associated to UTI, we specify a spike and slab base measure for the regression coefficients: this induces dependence of symptoms selection on cluster assignment. Posterior inference is performed through Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. PMID:26536840

  12. Load-dependent Optimization of Honeycombs for Sandwich Components - New Possibilities by Using Additive Layer Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riss, Fabian; Schilp, Johannes; Reinhart, Gunther

    Due to their feasible geometric complexity, additive layer manufacturing (ALM) processes show a highpotential for the production of lightweight components.Therefore, ALM processes enable the realization of bionic-designedcomponents like honeycombs, which are optimized depending upon load and outer boundary conditions.This optimization is based on a closed-loop, three-steps methodology: At first, each honeycomb is conformed to the surface of the part. Secondly, the structure is optimizedfor lightweight design.It is possible to achieve a homogeneous stress distribution in the part by varying the wall thickness, honeycombdiameter and the amount of honeycombs, depending on the subjected stresses and strains. At last, the functional components like threads or bearing carriers are integrated directly into the honeycomb core.Using all these steps as an iterative process, it is possible to reduce the mass of sandwich components about 50 percent compared to conventional approaches.

  13. A Bayesian Alternative to Mutual Information for the Hierarchical Clustering of Dependent Random Variables

    PubMed Central

    Marrelec, Guillaume; Messé, Arnaud; Bellec, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The use of mutual information as a similarity measure in agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC) raises an important issue: some correction needs to be applied for the dimensionality of variables. In this work, we formulate the decision of merging dependent multivariate normal variables in an AHC procedure as a Bayesian model comparison. We found that the Bayesian formulation naturally shrinks the empirical covariance matrix towards a matrix set a priori (e.g., the identity), provides an automated stopping rule, and corrects for dimensionality using a term that scales up the measure as a function of the dimensionality of the variables. Also, the resulting log Bayes factor is asymptotically proportional to the plug-in estimate of mutual information, with an additive correction for dimensionality in agreement with the Bayesian information criterion. We investigated the behavior of these Bayesian alternatives (in exact and asymptotic forms) to mutual information on simulated and real data. An encouraging result was first derived on simulations: the hierarchical clustering based on the log Bayes factor outperformed off-the-shelf clustering techniques as well as raw and normalized mutual information in terms of classification accuracy. On a toy example, we found that the Bayesian approaches led to results that were similar to those of mutual information clustering techniques, with the advantage of an automated thresholding. On real functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) datasets measuring brain activity, it identified clusters consistent with the established outcome of standard procedures. On this application, normalized mutual information had a highly atypical behavior, in the sense that it systematically favored very large clusters. These initial experiments suggest that the proposed Bayesian alternatives to mutual information are a useful new tool for hierarchical clustering. PMID:26406245

  14. A Bayesian Alternative to Mutual Information for the Hierarchical Clustering of Dependent Random Variables.

    PubMed

    Marrelec, Guillaume; Messé, Arnaud; Bellec, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The use of mutual information as a similarity measure in agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC) raises an important issue: some correction needs to be applied for the dimensionality of variables. In this work, we formulate the decision of merging dependent multivariate normal variables in an AHC procedure as a Bayesian model comparison. We found that the Bayesian formulation naturally shrinks the empirical covariance matrix towards a matrix set a priori (e.g., the identity), provides an automated stopping rule, and corrects for dimensionality using a term that scales up the measure as a function of the dimensionality of the variables. Also, the resulting log Bayes factor is asymptotically proportional to the plug-in estimate of mutual information, with an additive correction for dimensionality in agreement with the Bayesian information criterion. We investigated the behavior of these Bayesian alternatives (in exact and asymptotic forms) to mutual information on simulated and real data. An encouraging result was first derived on simulations: the hierarchical clustering based on the log Bayes factor outperformed off-the-shelf clustering techniques as well as raw and normalized mutual information in terms of classification accuracy. On a toy example, we found that the Bayesian approaches led to results that were similar to those of mutual information clustering techniques, with the advantage of an automated thresholding. On real functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) datasets measuring brain activity, it identified clusters consistent with the established outcome of standard procedures. On this application, normalized mutual information had a highly atypical behavior, in the sense that it systematically favored very large clusters. These initial experiments suggest that the proposed Bayesian alternatives to mutual information are a useful new tool for hierarchical clustering. PMID:26406245

  15. Temperature-Dependent Electrical and Micromechanical Properties of Lanthanum Titanate with Additions of Yttria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature-dependent elastic properties were determined by establishing continuous flexural vibrations in the material at its lowest resonance frequency of 31tHz. The imaginary part of the complex impedance plotted as a function of frequency and temperature reveals a thermally activated peak, which decreases in magnitude as the temperature increases. Additions of yttria do not degrade the electromechanical in particularly the elastic and anelastic properties of lanthanum titanate. Y2O3/La2Ti2O7 exhibits extremely low internal friction and hence may be more mechanical fatigue-resistant at low strains.

  16. Temperature Dependent Electrical and Micromechanical Properties of Lanthanum Titanate with Additions of Yttria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2003-01-01

    Lanthanum titanate (La2Ti2O7) a layered distorted perovskite (1) with space group Pna2(sub 1) has been shown to have potential as a high temperature piezoelectric (2). However this highly refractory oxide compound must be consolidated at relatively high temperatures approximately 1400 C. Commercial La2Ti207 powders were mechanically alloyed with additions of Y2O3 to lower the consolidation temperature by 300 C and to provide post processing mechanical stability. Temperature dependent electrical, elastic and anelastic behavior were selected as nondestructive means of evaluating the effects of yttria on the properties of this ferroceramic material.

  17. Thyroid-hormone-disrupting chemicals: evidence for dose-dependent additivity or synergism.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Kevin M; Craft, Elena S; Hedge, Joan M; Gennings, Chris; Simmons, Jane E; Carchman, Richard A; Carter, W Hans; DeVito, Michael J

    2005-11-01

    ) and the experimentally observed mixture response (the empirical model). A likelihood-ratio test revealed statistically significant departure from dose additivity. There was no deviation from additivity at the lowest doses of the mixture, but there was a greater-than-additive effect at the three highest mixtures doses. At high doses the additivity model underpredicted the empirical effects by 2- to 3-fold. These are the first results to suggest dose-dependent additivity and synergism in TDCs that may act via different mechanisms in a complex mixture. The results imply that cumulative risk approaches be considered when assessing the risk of exposure to chemical mixtures that contain TDCs. PMID:16263510

  18. Repetition priming in simple addition depends on surface form and typicality.

    PubMed

    Sciama, S C; Semenza, C; Butterworth, B

    1999-01-01

    Repetition priming and recognition memory for numbers were measured in four experiments using single-digit addition. Results of the first two experiments indicate that when numbers were presented as number words and dot configurations, preexposure of the same problem in the same notation produced greater reaction-time benefit than did preexposure of the same problem in Arabic-digit notation. In contrast, when numbers were presented as Arabic digits, preexposure of the same problem in Arabic digit, number word, and dot notation produced the same amount of priming. In the third experiment, priming was shown to be greatest, for all three notations, when the task performed on preexposure trials (addition or multiplication) matched the task performed on repetition trials (addition). Results of the fourth experiment, measuring recognition memory, were comparable to the priming results in the sense that memory was superior when notation matched across repetitions if the test involved number words and dot configurations but not Arabic digits. These data are interpreted in terms of models of numerical cognition, and they support the hypothesis that the influence of surface form on repetition priming depends on the typicality of the input for the task. PMID:10087861

  19. Carbonate clumped isotope variability in shallow water corals: Temperature dependence and growth-related vital effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenger, Casey; Affek, Hagit P.; Felis, Thomas; Thiagarajan, Nivedita; Lough, Janice M.; Holcomb, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Geochemical variations in shallow water corals provide a valuable archive of paleoclimatic information. However, biological effects can complicate the interpretation of these proxies, forcing their application to rely on empirical calibrations. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry (Δ47) is a novel paleotemperature proxy based on the temperature dependent "clumping" of 13C-18O bonds. Similar Δ47-temperature relationships in inorganically precipitated calcite and a suite of biogenic carbonates provide evidence that carbonate clumped isotope variability may record absolute temperature without a biological influence. However, large departures from expected values in the winter growth of a hermatypic coral provided early evidence for possible Δ47 vital effects. Here, we present the first systematic survey of Δ47 in shallow water corals. Sub-annual Red Sea Δ47 in two Porites corals shows a temperature dependence similar to inorganic precipitation experiments, but with a systematic offset toward higher Δ47 values that consistently underestimate temperature by ˜8 °C. Additional analyses of Porites, Siderastrea, Astrangia and Caryophyllia corals argue against a number of potential mechanisms as the leading cause for this apparent Δ47 vital effect including: salinity, organic matter contamination, alteration during sampling, the presence or absence of symbionts, and interlaboratory differences in analytical protocols. However, intra- and inter-coral comparisons suggest that the deviation from expected Δ47 increases with calcification rate. Theoretical calculations suggest this apparent link with calcification rate is inconsistent with pH-dependent changes in dissolved inorganic carbon speciation and with kinetic effects associated with CO2 diffusion into the calcifying space. However, the link with calcification rate may be related to fractionation during the hydration/hydroxylation of CO2 within the calcifying space. Although the vital effects we describe will

  20. Spray droplet sizes with additives discharged from an air-assisted variable-rate nozzle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding droplet size distributions is essential to achieve constant spray quality for real-time variable-rate sprayers that synchronize spray outputs with canopy structures. Droplet sizes were measured for a custom-designed, air-assisted, five-port nozzle coupled with a pulse width modulated (...

  1. Dependence of vestibular reactions on frequency of action of sign-variable accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapayev, E. V.; Vorobyev, O. A.; Ivanov, V. V.

    1980-01-01

    It was revealed that during the tests with continuous action of sign variable Coriolis acceleration the development of kinetosis was proportionate to the time of head inclinations in the range of 1 to 4 seconds while illusions of rocking in sagittal plane was more expressed in fast inclinations. The obtained data provided the evidence of sufficient dependence of vestibulovegetative and vestibulosensory reactions on the period of repetition of sign variable Coriolis acceleration.

  2. A WntD-Dependent Integral Feedback Loop Attenuates Variability in Drosophila Toll Signaling.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Neta; Averbukh, Inna; Haskel-Ittah, Michal; Degani, Neta; Schejter, Eyal D; Barkai, Naama; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2016-02-22

    Patterning by morphogen gradients relies on the capacity to generate reproducible distribution profiles. Morphogen spread depends on kinetic parameters, including diffusion and degradation rates, which vary between embryos, raising the question of how variability is controlled. We examined this in the context of Toll-dependent dorsoventral (DV) patterning of the Drosophila embryo. We find that low embryo-to-embryo variability in DV patterning relies on wntD, a Toll-target gene expressed initially at the posterior pole. WntD protein is secreted and disperses in the extracellular milieu, associates with its receptor Frizzled4, and inhibits the Toll pathway by blocking the Toll extracellular domain. Mathematical modeling predicts that WntD accumulates until the Toll gradient narrows to its desired spread, and we support this feedback experimentally. This circuit exemplifies a broadly applicable induction-contraction mechanism, which reduces patterning variability through a restricted morphogen-dependent expression of a secreted diffusible inhibitor. PMID:26906736

  3. Different definitions in childhood asthma: how dependable is the dependent variable?

    PubMed

    Van Wonderen, K E; Van Der Mark, L B; Mohrs, J; Bindels, P J E; Van Aalderen, W M C; Ter Riet, G

    2010-07-01

    There is abundant literature on how to select and statistically deal with predictors in prediction models. Less attention has been paid to the choice of the outcome. We assessed the impact of different asthma definitions on prevalence estimates and on the prediction model's performances. We searched PubMed and extracted data of definitions used to diagnose childhood asthma (between 6 and 18 yrs) in cohort studies. Next, using data from an ongoing cohort study (n = 186), we constructed and compared four prediction models which all predict asthma at age 6 yrs, using a fixed set of predictors and four different definitions in turn. We defined an area of clinical indecision (posterior probability between 25% and 60%) and calculated the number of children who remained inside this area. 122 papers yielded 60 different definitions. Prevalence estimates varied between 15.1% and 51.1% depending on the asthma definition used. The percentage of children whose posterior asthma probability was in the area of clinical indecision varied from 14.9% to 65.3%. Variation in definitions and its effect on the performance of prediction models may be another source of otherwise inexplicable variation in daily clinical decision making. More uniformity of operational asthma definitions seems needed. PMID:20032011

  4. Vagal-dependent nonlinear variability in the respiratory pattern of anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, R. R.; Jacono, F. J.; Fishman, M.; Loparo, K. A.; Rybak, I. A.

    2011-01-01

    Physiological rhythms, including respiration, exhibit endogenous variability associated with health, and deviations from this are associated with disease. Specific changes in the linear and nonlinear sources of breathing variability have not been investigated. In this study, we used information theory-based techniques, combined with surrogate data testing, to quantify and characterize the vagal-dependent nonlinear pattern variability in urethane-anesthetized, spontaneously breathing adult rats. Surrogate data sets preserved the amplitude distribution and linear correlations of the original data set, but nonlinear correlation structure in the data was removed. Differences in mutual information and sample entropy between original and surrogate data sets indicated the presence of deterministic nonlinear or stochastic non-Gaussian variability. With vagi intact (n = 11), the respiratory cycle exhibited significant nonlinear behavior in templates of points separated by time delays ranging from one sample to one cycle length. After vagotomy (n = 6), even though nonlinear variability was reduced significantly, nonlinear properties were still evident at various time delays. Nonlinear deterministic variability did not change further after subsequent bilateral microinjection of MK-801, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, in the Kölliker-Fuse nuclei. Reversing the sequence (n = 5), blocking N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors bilaterally in the dorsolateral pons significantly decreased nonlinear variability in the respiratory pattern, even with the vagi intact, and subsequent vagotomy did not change nonlinear variability. Thus both vagal and dorsolateral pontine influences contribute to nonlinear respiratory pattern variability. Furthermore, breathing dynamics of the intact system are mutually dependent on vagal and pontine sources of nonlinear complexity. Understanding the structure and modulation of variability provides insight into disease effects on respiratory

  5. The theory of planned behaviour and healthy eating: Examining additive and moderating effects of social influence variables.

    PubMed

    Povey, R; Conner, M; Sparks, P; James, R; Shepherd, R

    2000-11-01

    Abstract This paper examines the additive and moderating effects of social influence variables (injunctive norms, descriptive norms, perceived social support) within the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). The target behaviour is the decision to eat healthily. Questionnaire responses on components of the TPB, descriptive norms, perceived social support, and subsequent healthy eating were obtained from a prospective sample of 235 members of the general public. Good predictions of intentions (42% of variance explained) and behaviour (15% of variance explained) were found using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Neither descriptive norms nor perceived social support added to these predictions of intentions over and above the TPB variables. However, perceived social support was found to act as a moderator variable on the relationship between perceived behavioral control and intention, and the relationship between attitude and intention. Implications for exploring the role of social influence variables on decisions concerning health behavioun an discussed. PMID:22175258

  6. Information-theoretical analysis of the statistical dependencies among three variables: Applications to written language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Damián G.; Zanette, Damián H.; Samengo, Inés

    2015-08-01

    We develop the information-theoretical concepts required to study the statistical dependencies among three variables. Some of such dependencies are pure triple interactions, in the sense that they cannot be explained in terms of a combination of pairwise correlations. We derive bounds for triple dependencies, and characterize the shape of the joint probability distribution of three binary variables with high triple interaction. The analysis also allows us to quantify the amount of redundancy in the mutual information between pairs of variables, and to assess whether the information between two variables is or is not mediated by a third variable. These concepts are applied to the analysis of written texts. We find that the probability that a given word is found in a particular location within the text is not only modulated by the presence or absence of other nearby words, but also, on the presence or absence of nearby pairs of words. We identify the words enclosing the key semantic concepts of the text, the triplets of words with high pairwise and triple interactions, and the words that mediate the pairwise interactions between other words.

  7. Omnibus Tests for Interactions in Repeated Measures Designs with Dichotomous Dependent Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serlin, Ronald C.; Marascuilo, Leonard A.

    When examining a repeated measures design with independent groups for a significant group by trial interaction, classical analysis of variance or multivariate procedures can be used if the assumptions underlying the tests are met. Neither procedure may be justified for designs with small sample sizes and dichotomous dependent variables. An omnibus…

  8. Relationship Between Field Dependence - Field Independence, Piaget Conservation Tasks and School Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicker, Tommie E.; O'Tuel, Frances S.

    This study investigates relationships among conservation, field dependence/independence, school variables, achievement, screening measures, sex and race. A total of 124 first, second and third graders in a Southern rural school were administered 8 typical Piagetian conservation tasks (PCT), Children's Embedded Figures Test (CEFT), Comprehensive…

  9. Human Performance Technology (HPT): An Examination of Definitions through Dependent and Independent Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irlbeck, Sonja A.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a chronological perspective of human performance technology (HPT) definitions and an evaluation of them in terms of independent and dependent variables. Discusses human competence and performance technology and compares the definitions with the goals that have been articulated for HPT. (Author/LRW)

  10. DENSITY-DEPENDENT FLOW IN ONE-DIMENSIONAL VARIABLY-SATURATED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A one-dimensional finite element is developed to simulate density-dependent flow of saltwater in variably saturated media. The flow and solute equations were solved in a coupled mode (iterative), in a partially coupled mode (non-iterative), and in a completely decoupled mode. P...

  11. Field Dependency, n Power and Locus of Control Variables in Alcohol Aversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Query, William T.

    1983-01-01

    Compared individual differences and treatment effectiveness in male volunteer alcoholics (N=47) in a 10-day electroconditioning aversion program. Follow-up showed combination therapy was more successful. Internals and hard liquor drinkers tended to be abstinent as predicted. Field dependency was a more unstable variable for outcome. (Author/JAC)

  12. Distribution of Personal Income in Agriculture-Dependent Counties of Midwestern States: A Policy Variables Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goreham, Gary A.; And Others

    Significant social, demographic, and economic changes have occurred in the North Central states since 1960. This document examines structural and policy variables related to distribution of income, during the years 1960-80 in the 397 counties defined as agriculture-dependent in 13 North Central states. Personal income distribution has been…

  13. Enhancing quantum entanglement for continuous variables by a coherent superposition of photon subtraction and addition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Su-Yong; Kim, Ho-Joon; Ji, Se-Wan; Nha, Hyunchul

    2011-07-15

    We investigate how the entanglement properties of a two-mode state can be improved by performing a coherent superposition operation ta+ra{sup {dagger}} of photon subtraction and addition, proposed by Lee and Nha [Phys. Rev. A 82, 053812 (2010)], on each mode. We show that the degree of entanglement, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-type correlation, and the performance of quantum teleportation can be all enhanced for the output state when the coherent operation is applied to a two-mode squeezed state. The effects of the coherent operation are more prominent than those of the mere photon subtraction a and the addition a{sup {dagger}} particularly in the small-squeezing regime, whereas the optimal operation becomes the photon subtraction (case of r=0) in the large-squeezing regime.

  14. On Integrating Variables and Separating Facts in the Complex Relationship between Dependency and Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Robert F.

    2007-01-01

    Presents a reply by Robert Bornstein to comments from Chronister and regarding his article, "The complex relationship between dependency and domestic violence: Converging psychological factors and social forces." In addition to raising some important issues regarding the link between dependency and domestic violence, the comments by Chronister and…

  15. Statistical inference for the additive hazards model under outcome-dependent sampling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jichang; Liu, Yanyan; Sandler, Dale P.; Zhou, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effective study design and proper inference procedures for data from such designs are always of particular interests to study investigators. In this article, we propose a biased sampling scheme, an outcome-dependent sampling (ODS) design for survival data with right censoring under the additive hazards model. We develop a weighted pseudo-score estimator for the regression parameters for the proposed design and derive the asymptotic properties of the proposed estimator. We also provide some suggestions for using the proposed method by evaluating the relative efficiency of the proposed method against simple random sampling design and derive the optimal allocation of the subsamples for the proposed design. Simulation studies show that the proposed ODS design is more powerful than other existing designs and the proposed estimator is more efficient than other estimators. We apply our method to analyze a cancer study conducted at NIEHS, the Cancer Incidence and Mortality of Uranium Miners Study, to study the risk of radon exposure to cancer. PMID:26379363

  16. Using instrumental variables to estimate a Cox's proportional hazards regression subject to additive confounding

    PubMed Central

    Tosteson, Tor D.; Morden, Nancy E.; Stukel, Therese A.; O'Malley, A. James

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of treatment effects is one of the primary goals of statistics in medicine. Estimation based on observational studies is subject to confounding. Statistical methods for controlling bias due to confounding include regression adjustment, propensity scores and inverse probability weighted estimators. These methods require that all confounders are recorded in the data. The method of instrumental variables (IVs) can eliminate bias in observational studies even in the absence of information on confounders. We propose a method for integrating IVs within the framework of Cox's proportional hazards model and demonstrate the conditions under which it recovers the causal effect of treatment. The methodology is based on the approximate orthogonality of an instrument with unobserved confounders among those at risk. We derive an estimator as the solution to an estimating equation that resembles the score equation of the partial likelihood in much the same way as the traditional IV estimator resembles the normal equations. To justify this IV estimator for a Cox model we perform simulations to evaluate its operating characteristics. Finally, we apply the estimator to an observational study of the effect of coronary catheterization on survival. PMID:25506259

  17. Dust Around Herbig Ae Stars: Additional Constraints from their Photometric and Polarimetric Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivova, N. A.; Ilin, V. B.; Fischer, O.

    1996-01-01

    For the Herbig Ae stars with Algol-like minima (UX Ori, WW Vul, etc), the effects of circumstellar dust include: excess infrared emission, anomalous ultraviolet extinction, the 'blueing' of the stars in minima accompanying by an increase of intrinsic polarization. Using a Monte-Carlo code for polarized radiation transfer we have simulated these effects and compared the results obtained for different models with the observational data available. We found that the photometric and polarimetric behavior of the stars provided essential additional constraints on the circumstellar dust models. The models with spheroidal shell geometry and compact (non-fluffy) dust grains do not appear to be able to explain all the data.

  18. Spatially variable synergistic effects of disturbance and additional nutrients on kelp recruitment and recovery.

    PubMed

    Carnell, Paul E; Keough, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the impact of multiple stressors on ecosystems is of pronounced importance, particularly when one or more of those stressors is anthropogenic. Here we investigated the role of physical disturbance and increased nutrients on reefs dominated by the canopy-forming kelp Ecklonia radiata. We combined experimental kelp canopy removals and additional nutrient at three different locations in a large embayment in temperate southeastern Australia. Over the following winter recruitment season, Ecklonia recruitment was unaffected by increased nutrients alone, but tripled at all sites where the canopy had been removed. At one site, the combination of disturbance and increased nutrients resulted in more than four times the recruitment of the introduced kelp Undaria pinnatifida. Six months after disturbance, the proliferation of the Undaria canopy in the canopy-removal and nutrient-addition treatment negatively influenced the recovery of the native kelp Ecklonia. Given the otherwise competitive dominance of adult Ecklonia, this provides a mechanism whereby Undaria could maintain open space for the following recruitment season. This interplay between disturbance, nutrients and the response of native and invasive species makes a compelling case for how a combination of factors can influence species dynamics. PMID:24604540

  19. Exocyst-Dependent Membrane Addition Is Required for Anaphase Cell Elongation and Cytokinesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Vanderleest, Timothy E; Jewett, Cayla E; Sechi, Stefano; Frappaolo, Anna; Fabian, Lacramioara; Robinett, Carmen C; Brill, Julie A; Loerke, Dinah; Fuller, Margaret T; Blankenship, J Todd

    2015-11-01

    Mitotic and cytokinetic processes harness cell machinery to drive chromosomal segregation and the physical separation of dividing cells. Here, we investigate the functional requirements for exocyst complex function during cell division in vivo, and demonstrate a common mechanism that directs anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow progression during cell division. We show that onion rings (onr) and funnel cakes (fun) encode the Drosophila homologs of the Exo84 and Sec8 exocyst subunits, respectively. In onr and fun mutant cells, contractile ring proteins are recruited to the equatorial region of dividing spermatocytes. However, cytokinesis is disrupted early in furrow ingression, leading to cytokinesis failure. We use high temporal and spatial resolution confocal imaging with automated computational analysis to quantitatively compare wild-type versus onr and fun mutant cells. These results demonstrate that anaphase cell elongation is grossly disrupted in cells that are compromised in exocyst complex function. Additionally, we observe that the increase in cell surface area in wild type peaks a few minutes into cytokinesis, and that onr and fun mutant cells have a greatly reduced rate of surface area growth specifically during cell division. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy reveals a massive build-up of cytoplasmic astral membrane and loss of normal Golgi architecture in onr and fun spermatocytes, suggesting that exocyst complex is required for proper vesicular trafficking through these compartments. Moreover, recruitment of the small GTPase Rab11 and the PITP Giotto to the cleavage site depends on wild-type function of the exocyst subunits Exo84 and Sec8. Finally, we show that the exocyst subunit Sec5 coimmunoprecipitates with Rab11. Our results are consistent with the exocyst complex mediating an essential, coordinated increase in cell surface area that potentiates anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow ingression. PMID:26528720

  20. Exocyst-Dependent Membrane Addition Is Required for Anaphase Cell Elongation and Cytokinesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Vanderleest, Timothy E.; Jewett, Cayla E.; Sechi, Stefano; Frappaolo, Anna; Fabian, Lacramioara; Robinett, Carmen C.; Brill, Julie A.; Loerke, Dinah; Fuller, Margaret T.; Blankenship, J. Todd

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic and cytokinetic processes harness cell machinery to drive chromosomal segregation and the physical separation of dividing cells. Here, we investigate the functional requirements for exocyst complex function during cell division in vivo, and demonstrate a common mechanism that directs anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow progression during cell division. We show that onion rings (onr) and funnel cakes (fun) encode the Drosophila homologs of the Exo84 and Sec8 exocyst subunits, respectively. In onr and fun mutant cells, contractile ring proteins are recruited to the equatorial region of dividing spermatocytes. However, cytokinesis is disrupted early in furrow ingression, leading to cytokinesis failure. We use high temporal and spatial resolution confocal imaging with automated computational analysis to quantitatively compare wild-type versus onr and fun mutant cells. These results demonstrate that anaphase cell elongation is grossly disrupted in cells that are compromised in exocyst complex function. Additionally, we observe that the increase in cell surface area in wild type peaks a few minutes into cytokinesis, and that onr and fun mutant cells have a greatly reduced rate of surface area growth specifically during cell division. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy reveals a massive build-up of cytoplasmic astral membrane and loss of normal Golgi architecture in onr and fun spermatocytes, suggesting that exocyst complex is required for proper vesicular trafficking through these compartments. Moreover, recruitment of the small GTPase Rab11 and the PITP Giotto to the cleavage site depends on wild-type function of the exocyst subunits Exo84 and Sec8. Finally, we show that the exocyst subunit Sec5 coimmunoprecipitates with Rab11. Our results are consistent with the exocyst complex mediating an essential, coordinated increase in cell surface area that potentiates anaphase cell elongation and cleavage furrow ingression. PMID:26528720

  1. Emergence of context-dependent variability across a basal ganglia network

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, Sarah C.; Rajan, Raghav; Joshua, Mati; Doupe, Allison J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Context-dependence is a key feature of cortical-basal ganglia circuit activity, and in songbirds, the cortical outflow of a basal ganglia circuit specialized for song, LMAN, shows striking increases in trial-by-trial variability and bursting when birds sing alone rather than to females. To reveal where this variability and its social regulation emerge, we recorded stepwise from cortico-striatal (HVC) neurons and their target spiny and pallidal neurons in Area X. We find that cortico-striatal and spiny neurons both show precise singing-related firing across both social settings. Pallidal neurons, in contrast, exhibit markedly increased trial-by-trial variation when birds sing alone, created by highly variable pauses in firing. This variability persists even when recurrent inputs from LMAN are ablated. These data indicate that variability and its context-sensitivity emerge within the basal ganglia network, suggest a network mechanism for this emergence, and highlight variability generation and regulation as basal ganglia functions. PMID:24698276

  2. The performance of robust multivariate regression in simultaneous dependence of variables in linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alih, Ekele; Ong, Hong Choon

    2014-07-01

    The application of Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) to a single equation assumes among others, that the predictor variables are truly exogenous; that there is only one-way causation between the dependent variable yi and the predictor variables xij. If this is not true and the xij 'S are at the same time determined by yi, the OLS assumption will be violated and a single equation method will give biased and inconsistent parameter estimates. The OLS also suffers a huge set back in the presence of contaminated data. In order to rectify these problems, simultaneous equation models have been introduced as well as robust regression. In this paper, we construct a simultaneous equation model with variables that exhibit simultaneous dependence and we proposed a robust multivariate regression procedure for estimating the parameters of such models. The performance of the robust multivariate regression procedure was examined and compared with the OLS multivariate regression technique and the Three-Stage Least squares procedure (3SLS) using numerical simulation experiment. The performance of the robust multivariate regression and (3SLS) were approximately equally better than OLS when there is no contamination in the data. Nevertheless, when contaminations occur in the data, the robust multivariate regression outperformed the 3SLS and OLS.

  3. Spatiotemporal Dependency of Age-Related Changes in Brain Signal Variability

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, A. R.; Vakorin, V.; Kovacevic, N.; Wang, H.; Diaconescu, A.; Protzner, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical and empirical work has focused on the variability of network dynamics in maturation. Such variability seems to reflect the spontaneous formation and dissolution of different functional networks. We sought to extend these observations into healthy aging. Two different data sets, one EEG (total n = 48, ages 18–72) and one magnetoencephalography (n = 31, ages 20–75) were analyzed for such spatiotemporal dependency using multiscale entropy (MSE) from regional brain sources. In both data sets, the changes in MSE were timescale dependent, with higher entropy at fine scales and lower at more coarse scales with greater age. The signals were parsed further into local entropy, related to information processed within a regional source, and distributed entropy (information shared between two sources, i.e., functional connectivity). Local entropy increased for most regions, whereas the dominant change in distributed entropy was age-related reductions across hemispheres. These data further the understanding of changes in brain signal variability across the lifespan, suggesting an inverted U-shaped curve, but with an important qualifier. Unlike earlier in maturation, where the changes are more widespread, changes in adulthood show strong spatiotemporal dependence. PMID:23395850

  4. Demographic variability and density-dependent dynamics of a free-ranging rhesus macaque population

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pacheco, Raisa; Rawlins, Richard G.; Kessler, Matthew J.; Williams, Lawrence E.; Ruiz-Maldonado, Tagrid M.; González-Martínez, Janis; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V.; Sabat, Alberto M.

    2014-01-01

    Density-dependence is hypothesized as the major mechanism of population regulation. However, the lack of long-term demographic data has hampered the use of density-dependent models in nonhuman primates. In this study, we make use of the long-term demographic data from Cayo Santiago’s rhesus macaques to parameterize and analyze both a density-independent and a density-dependent population matrix model, and compare their projections with the observed population changes. We also employ a retrospective analysis to determine how variance in vital rates, and covariance among them, contributed to the observed variation in long-term fitness across different levels of population density. The population exhibited negative density-dependence in fertility and the model incorporating this relationship accounted for 98% of the observed population dynamics. Variation in survival and fertility of sexually active individuals contributed the most to the variation in long-term fitness, while vital rates displaying high temporal variability exhibited lower sensitivities. Our findings are novel in describing density-dependent dynamics in a provisioned primate population, and in suggesting that selection is acting to lower the variance in the population growth rate by minimizing the variation in adult survival at high density. Because density-dependent mechanisms may become stronger in wild primate populations due to increasing habitat loss and food scarcity, our study demonstrates it is important to incorporate variation in population size, as well as demographic variability into population viability analyses for a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating the growth of primate populations. PMID:23847126

  5. Genetic variability in tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene in alcohol dependence and alcohol-related psychopathological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Plemenitaš, Anja; Kores Plesničar, Blanka; Kastelic, Matej; Porcelli, Stefano; Serretti, Alessandro; Dolžan, Vita

    2015-09-14

    Heritability plays an important role in the development and expression of alcohol dependence. The present genetic association study explored the role of TPH2 polymorphisms and their haplotypes to investigate its role in alcohol dependence and comorbid psychopathological symptoms. The sample included 101 subjects currently diagnosed as alcohol abusers, 100 abstinent alcohol-dependent subjects and 97 healthy controls. Subjects were genotyped for TPH2 rs4570625, rs1843809, rs7305115, rs4290270. TPH2 genotypes were not associated with alcohol dependence, but GGAA haplotype was less common (p=0.038) and GTAA and GGGT were more common (p=0.011 and p=0.021, respectively), in currently dependent patients compared to controls. Exploratory analysis of genotypes in currently dependent patients showed that rs1843809 was associated with depressive and aggressive traits (p=0.045 and p=0.001, respectively), rs4290270 with depressive and anxiety traits (p=0.040 and p=0.025, respectively) and rs4570625 with aggressive traits (p=0.011). In abstinent subjects rs1843809 genotype was associated with traits of social anxiety (p=0.003). Only association between rs1843809 and the BDHI score (p=0.001) and associations between GTAA haplotype and Zung Anxiety Scale and BDHI score (p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively), in currently dependent patients remained significant after applying the Bonferroni's correction. Our findings support a potential role of TPH2 in alcohol dependence. TPH2 genetic variability may be also associated with anxiety and aggression traits in alcohol dependent subjects. PMID:26232682

  6. Major histocompatibility complex harbors widespread genotypic variability of non-additive risk of rheumatoid arthritis including epistasis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Bowes, John; Plant, Darren; Viatte, Sebastien; Yarwood, Annie; Massey, Jonathan; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genotypic variability based genome-wide association studies (vGWASs) can identify potentially interacting loci without prior knowledge of the interacting factors. We report a two-stage approach to make vGWAS applicable to diseases: firstly using a mixed model approach to partition dichotomous phenotypes into additive risk and non-additive environmental residuals on the liability scale and secondly using the Levene's (Brown-Forsythe) test to assess equality of the residual variances across genotype groups per marker. We found widespread significant (P < 2.5e-05) vGWAS signals within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) across all three study cohorts of rheumatoid arthritis. We further identified 10 epistatic interactions between the vGWAS signals independent of the MHC additive effects, each with a weak effect but jointly explained 1.9% of phenotypic variance. PTPN22 was also identified in the discovery cohort but replicated in only one independent cohort. Combining the three cohorts boosted power of vGWAS and additionally identified TYK2 and ANKRD55. Both PTPN22 and TYK2 had evidence of interactions reported elsewhere. We conclude that vGWAS can help discover interacting loci for complex diseases but require large samples to find additional signals. PMID:27109064

  7. Major histocompatibility complex harbors widespread genotypic variability of non-additive risk of rheumatoid arthritis including epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Bowes, John; Plant, Darren; Viatte, Sebastien; Yarwood, Annie; Massey, Jonathan; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genotypic variability based genome-wide association studies (vGWASs) can identify potentially interacting loci without prior knowledge of the interacting factors. We report a two-stage approach to make vGWAS applicable to diseases: firstly using a mixed model approach to partition dichotomous phenotypes into additive risk and non-additive environmental residuals on the liability scale and secondly using the Levene’s (Brown-Forsythe) test to assess equality of the residual variances across genotype groups per marker. We found widespread significant (P < 2.5e-05) vGWAS signals within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) across all three study cohorts of rheumatoid arthritis. We further identified 10 epistatic interactions between the vGWAS signals independent of the MHC additive effects, each with a weak effect but jointly explained 1.9% of phenotypic variance. PTPN22 was also identified in the discovery cohort but replicated in only one independent cohort. Combining the three cohorts boosted power of vGWAS and additionally identified TYK2 and ANKRD55. Both PTPN22 and TYK2 had evidence of interactions reported elsewhere. We conclude that vGWAS can help discover interacting loci for complex diseases but require large samples to find additional signals. PMID:27109064

  8. Variability of visual responses of superior colliculus neurons depends on stimulus velocity.

    PubMed

    Mochol, Gabriela; Wójcik, Daniel K; Wypych, Marek; Wróbel, Andrzej; Waleszczyk, Wioletta J

    2010-03-01

    Visually responding neurons in the superficial, retinorecipient layers of the cat superior colliculus receive input from two primarily parallel information processing channels, Y and W, which is reflected in their velocity response profiles. We quantified the time-dependent variability of responses of these neurons to stimuli moving with different velocities by Fano factor (FF) calculated in discrete time windows. The FF for cells responding to low-velocity stimuli, thus receiving W inputs, increased with the increase in the firing rate. In contrast, the dynamics of activity of the cells responding to fast moving stimuli, processed by Y pathway, correlated negatively with FF whether the response was excitatory or suppressive. These observations were tested against several types of surrogate data. Whereas Poisson description failed to reproduce the variability of all collicular responses, the inclusion of secondary structure to the generating point process recovered most of the observed features of responses to fast moving stimuli. Neither model could reproduce the variability of low-velocity responses, which suggests that, in this case, more complex time dependencies need to be taken into account. Our results indicate that Y and W channels may differ in reliability of responses to visual stimulation. Apart from previously reported morphological and physiological differences of the cells belonging to Y and W channels, this is a new feature distinguishing these two pathways. PMID:20203179

  9. Stochasticity and Determinism: How Density-Independent and Density-Dependent Processes Affect Population Variability

    PubMed Central

    Ohlberger, Jan; Rogers, Lauren A.; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    2014-01-01

    A persistent debate in population ecology concerns the relative importance of environmental stochasticity and density dependence in determining variability in adult year-class strength, which contributes to future reproduction as well as potential yield in exploited populations. Apart from the strength of the processes, the timing of density regulation may affect how stochastic variation, for instance through climate, translates into changes in adult abundance. In this study, we develop a life-cycle model for the population dynamics of a large marine fish population, Northeast Arctic cod, to disentangle the effects of density-independent and density-dependent processes on early life-stages, and to quantify the strength of compensatory density dependence in the population. The model incorporates information from scientific surveys and commercial harvest, and dynamically links multiple effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on all life-stages, from eggs to spawners. Using a state-space approach we account for observation error and stochasticity in the population dynamics. Our findings highlight the importance of density-dependent survival in juveniles, indicating that this period of the life cycle largely determines the compensatory capacity of the population. Density regulation at the juvenile life-stage dampens the impact of stochastic processes operating earlier in life such as environmental impacts on the production of eggs and climate-dependent survival of larvae. The timing of stochastic versus regulatory processes thus plays a crucial role in determining variability in adult abundance. Quantifying the contribution of environmental stochasticity and compensatory mechanisms in determining population abundance is essential for assessing population responses to climate change and exploitation by humans. PMID:24893001

  10. Stochasticity and determinism: how density-independent and density-dependent processes affect population variability.

    PubMed

    Ohlberger, Jan; Rogers, Lauren A; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2014-01-01

    A persistent debate in population ecology concerns the relative importance of environmental stochasticity and density dependence in determining variability in adult year-class strength, which contributes to future reproduction as well as potential yield in exploited populations. Apart from the strength of the processes, the timing of density regulation may affect how stochastic variation, for instance through climate, translates into changes in adult abundance. In this study, we develop a life-cycle model for the population dynamics of a large marine fish population, Northeast Arctic cod, to disentangle the effects of density-independent and density-dependent processes on early life-stages, and to quantify the strength of compensatory density dependence in the population. The model incorporates information from scientific surveys and commercial harvest, and dynamically links multiple effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on all life-stages, from eggs to spawners. Using a state-space approach we account for observation error and stochasticity in the population dynamics. Our findings highlight the importance of density-dependent survival in juveniles, indicating that this period of the life cycle largely determines the compensatory capacity of the population. Density regulation at the juvenile life-stage dampens the impact of stochastic processes operating earlier in life such as environmental impacts on the production of eggs and climate-dependent survival of larvae. The timing of stochastic versus regulatory processes thus plays a crucial role in determining variability in adult abundance. Quantifying the contribution of environmental stochasticity and compensatory mechanisms in determining population abundance is essential for assessing population responses to climate change and exploitation by humans. PMID:24893001

  11. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998-2000 tropical ozone climatology 2. Tropospheric variability and the zonal wave-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Kirchhoff, Volker W. J. H.; Posny, FrançOise; Coetzee, Gert J. R.; Hoegger, Bruno; Kawakami, Shuji; Ogawa, Toshihiro; Fortuin, J. P. F.; Kelder, H. M.

    2003-01-01

    The first view of stratospheric and tropospheric ozone variability in the Southern Hemisphere tropics is provided by a 3-year record of ozone soundings from the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) network (http://croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/shadoz). Observations covering 1998-2000 were made over Ascension Island, Nairobi (Kenya), Irene (South Africa), Réunion Island, Watukosek (Java), Fiji, Tahiti, American Samoa, San Cristóbal (Galapagos), and Natal (Brazil). Total, stratospheric, and tropospheric column ozone amounts usually peak between August and November. Other features are a persistent zonal wave-one pattern in total column ozone and signatures of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in stratospheric ozone. The wave-one is due to a greater concentration of free tropospheric ozone over the tropical Atlantic than the Pacific and appears to be associated with tropical general circulation and seasonal pollution from biomass burning. Tropospheric ozone over the Indian and Pacific Oceans displays influences of the waning 1997-1998 El Niño, seasonal convection, and pollution transport from Africa. The most distinctive feature of SHADOZ tropospheric ozone is variability in the data, e.g., a factor of 3 in column amount at 8 of 10 stations. Seasonal and monthly means may not be robust quantities because statistics are frequently not Gaussian even at sites that are always in tropical air. Models and satellite retrievals should be evaluated on their capability for reproducing tropospheric variability and fine structure. A 1999-2000 ozone record from Paramaribo, Surinam (6°N, 55°W) (also in SHADOZ) shows a marked contrast to southern tropical ozone because Surinam is often north of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). A more representative tropospheric ozone climatology for models and satellite retrievals requires additional Northern Hemisphere tropical data.

  12. Productivity depends more on the rate than the frequency of N addition in a temperate grassland

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunhai; Feng, Jinchao; Isbell, Forest; Lü, Xiaotao; Han, Xingguo

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key limiting resource for aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) in diverse terrestrial ecosystems. The relative roles of the rate and frequency (additions yr−1) of N application in stimulating ANPP at both the community- and species-levels are largely unknown. By independently manipulating the rate and frequency of N input, with nine rates (from 0 to 50 g N m−2 year−1) crossed with two frequencies (twice year−1 or monthly) in a temperate steppe of northern China across 2008–2013, we found that N addition increased community ANPP, and had positive, negative, or neutral effects for individual species. There were similar ANPP responses at the community- or species-level when a particular annual amount of N was added either twice year−1 or monthly. The community ANPP was less sensitive to soil ammonium at lower frequency of N addition. ANPP responses to N addition were positively correlated with annual precipitation. Our results suggest that, over a five-year period, there will be similar ANPP responses to a given annual N input that occurs either frequently in small amounts, as from N deposition, or that occur infrequently in larger amounts, as from application of N fertilizers. PMID:26218675

  13. Memory effects, two color percolation, and the temperature dependence of Mott variable-range hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agam, Oded; Aleiner, Igor L.

    2014-06-01

    There are three basic processes that determine hopping transport: (a) hopping between normally empty sites (i.e., having exponentially small occupation numbers at equilibrium), (b) hopping between normally occupied sites, and (c) transitions between normally occupied and unoccupied sites. In conventional theories all these processes are considered Markovian and the correlations of occupation numbers of different sites are believed to be small (i.e., not exponential in temperature). We show that, contrary to this belief, memory effects suppress the processes of type (c) and manifest themselves in a subleading exponential temperature dependence of the variable-range hopping conductivity. This temperature dependence originates from the property that sites of type (a) and (b) form two independent resistor networks that are weakly coupled to each other by processes of type (c). This leads to a two-color percolation problem which we solve in the critical region.

  14. Progression of Nicotine Dependence, Mood Level, and Mood Variability in Adolescent Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Piasecki, Thomas M.; Hedeker, Donald; Dierker, Lisa C.; Mermelstein, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    Mood processes are theorized to play a role in the initiation and progression of smoking behavior. Available work using real-time assessments in samples of young smokers, including several reports from the Social and Emotional Contexts of Adolescent Smoking Patterns (SECASP) study, has indicated that smoking events acutely improve mood and that escalating smoking frequency may stabilize mood. However, prior analyses have not specifically evaluated within-person change in nicotine dependence, which is conceptually distinguishable from frequent smoking and may be associated with unique mood consequences. The current investigation addressed this question using data from 329 adolescent SECASP participants (9th or 10th grade at recruitment) who contributed mood reports via ecological momentary assessment in up to four 1-week bursts over the course of 24 months. Mixed-effects location-scale analyses revealed that within-person increases in scores on the Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale were associated with elevations in negative mood level and increased variability of both positive and negative moods. These effects remained when within-person changes in smoking frequency were covaried and were not fully attributable to a subgroup of youth who rapidly escalated their smoking frequency over time. The findings indicate that adolescents tend to show increasing levels of positive mood states, decreasing levels of negative mood, and diminishing mood variability between ages 16 to 18, but progression of nicotine dependence may counteract some of these developmental gains. Emergence of withdrawal symptoms is a likely explanation for the adverse mood effects associated with dependence progression. PMID:26974687

  15. On the nature of motor planning variables during arm pointing movement: Compositeness and speed dependence.

    PubMed

    Vu, Van Hoan; Isableu, Brice; Berret, Bastien

    2016-07-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the nature of the variables and rules underlying the planning of unrestrained 3D arm reaching. To identify whether the brain uses kinematic, dynamic and energetic values in an isolated manner or combines them in a flexible way, we examined the effects of speed variations upon the chosen arm trajectories during free arm movements. Within the optimal control framework, we uncovered which (possibly composite) optimality criterion underlays at best the empirical data. Fifteen participants were asked to perform free-endpoint reaching movements from a specific arm configuration at slow, normal and fast speeds. Experimental results revealed that prominent features of observed motor behaviors were significantly speed-dependent, such as the chosen reach endpoint and the final arm posture. Nevertheless, participants exhibited different arm trajectories and various degrees of speed dependence of their reaching behavior. These inter-individual differences were addressed using a numerical inverse optimal control methodology. Simulation results revealed that a weighted combination of kinematic, energetic and dynamic cost functions was required to account for all the critical features of the participants' behavior. Furthermore, no evidence for the existence of a speed-dependent tuning of these weights was found, thereby suggesting subject-specific but speed-invariant weightings of kinematic, energetic and dynamic variables during the motor planning process of free arm movements. This suggested that the inter-individual difference of arm trajectories and speed dependence was not only due to anthropometric singularities but also to critical differences in the composition of the subjective cost function. PMID:27132233

  16. Cytotoxic Effects of Temozolomide and Radiation are Additive- and Schedule-Dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, Anthony J.; Ruff, Elliot M.; Martindale, Christine; Lovegrove, Nadia; Short, Susan C.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Despite aggressive therapy comprising radical radiation and temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy, the prognosis for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains poor, particularly if tumors express O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT). The interactions between radiation and TMZ remain unclear and have important implications for scheduling and for developing strategies to improve outcomes. Methods and Materials: Factors determining the effects of combination therapy on clonogenic survival, cell-cycle checkpoint signaling and DNA repair were investigated in four human glioma cell lines (T98G, U373-MG, UVW, U87-MG). Results: Combining TMZ and radiation yielded additive cytotoxicity, but only when TMZ was delivered 72 h before radiation. Radiosensitization was not observed. TMZ induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest at 48-72 h, coincident with phosphorylation of Chk1 and Chk2. Additive G2/M arrest and Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation was only observed when TMZ preceded radiation by 72 h. The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) inhibitor KU-55933 increased radiation sensitivity and delayed repair of radiation-induced DNA breaks, but did not influence TMZ effects. The multiple kinase inhibitor caffeine enhanced the cytotoxicity of chemoradiation and exacerbated DNA damage. Conclusions: TMZ is not a radiosensitizing agent but yields additive cytotoxicity in combination with radiation. Our data indicate that TMZ treatment should commence at least 3 days before radiation to achieve maximum benefit. Activation of G2/M checkpoint signaling by TMZ and radiation has a cytoprotective effect that can be overcome by dual inhibition of ATM and ATR. More specific inhibition of checkpoint signaling will be required to increase treatment efficacy without exacerbating toxicity.

  17. Timing and Variability of Galactose Metabolic Gene Activation Depend on the Rate of Environmental Change

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bo; Ott, William; Josić, Krešimir; Bennett, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of gene network activity allows cells to respond to changes in environmental conditions. For example, the galactose utilization network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by the presence of galactose but repressed by glucose. If both sugars are present, the yeast will first metabolize glucose, depleting it from the extracellular environment. Upon depletion of glucose, the genes encoding galactose metabolic proteins will activate. Here, we show that the rate at which glucose levels are depleted determines the timing and variability of galactose gene activation. Paradoxically, we find that Gal1p, an enzyme needed for galactose metabolism, accumulates more quickly if glucose is depleted slowly rather than taken away quickly. Furthermore, the variability of induction times in individual cells depends non-monotonically on the rate of glucose depletion and exhibits a minimum at intermediate depletion rates. Our mathematical modeling suggests that the dynamics of the metabolic transition from glucose to galactose are responsible for the variability in galactose gene activation. These findings demonstrate that environmental dynamics can determine the phenotypic outcome at both the single-cell and population levels. PMID:26200924

  18. Measuring Temperaturelike State Variables in History-Dependent Jammed Granular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bililign, Ephraim; Daniels, Karen

    Granular systems are athermal, thus a complete statistical mechanics framework must be based on a set of macroscopic state variables which excludes temperature. One leading theory incorporates a stress-based ensemble, and predicts a Boltzmann-like distribution of the force-moment tensor with respect to the conjugate, temperature-like variable, angoricity. We experimentally test this theory on a static, bidisperse, two-dimensional packing of discs. Basal friction is eliminated by floating the discs on a sub-fluidizing upflow of air, and the packings are subjected to either uniaxial compression or simple shear. We simultaneously measure the contact forces acting on each disc using photoelasticity. These measurements are repeated over many configurations of discs by dilating and rearranging the system, and the angoricity is computed as a function of the confining pressure. In particular, we test the predicted linear relationship between angoricity and pressure. Comparison to prior results and numerical simulations also suggests a history-dependent angoricity, an undesirable feature in the proposed state variable.

  19. Delay-dependent resilient-robust stabilisation of uncertain networked control systems with variable sampling intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feisheng; Zhang, Huaguang; Liu, Zhenwei; Li, Ranran

    2014-03-01

    This work is concerned with the robust resilient control problem for uncertain networked control systems (NCSs) with variable sampling intervals, variant-induced delays and possible data dropouts, which is seldom considered in current literature. It is mainly based on the continuous time-varying-delay system approach. Followed by the nominal case, delay-dependent resilient robust stabilising conditions for the closed-loop NCS against controller gain variations are derived by employing a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional which makes good use of the information of both lower and upper bounds on the varying input delay, and the upper bound on the variable sampling interval as well. A feasible solution of the obtained criterion formulated as linear matrix inequalities can be gotten. A tighter bounding technique is presented for acquiring the time derivative of the functional so as to utilise many more useful elements, meanwhile neither slack variable nor correlated augmented item is introduced to reduce overall computational burden. Two examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. THE GJ1214 SUPER-EARTH SYSTEM: STELLAR VARIABILITY, NEW TRANSITS, AND A SEARCH FOR ADDITIONAL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Berta, Zachory K.; Charbonneau, David; Bean, Jacob; Irwin, Jonathan; Burke, Christopher J.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Nutzman, Philip; Falco, Emilio E.

    2011-07-20

    The super-Earth GJ1214b transits a nearby M dwarf that exhibits a 1% intrinsic variability in the near-infrared. Here, we analyze new observations to refine the physical properties of both the star and planet. We present three years of out-of-transit photometric monitoring of the stellar host GJ1214 from the MEarth Observatory and find the rotation period to be long, most likely an integer multiple of 53 days, suggesting low levels of magnetic activity and an old age for the system. We show that such variability will not pose significant problems to ongoing studies of the planet's atmosphere with transmission spectroscopy. We analyze two high-precision transit light curves from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) along with seven others from the MEarth and Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory 1.2 m telescopes, finding physical parameters for the planet that are consistent with previous work. The VLT light curves show tentative evidence for spot occultations during transit. Using two years of MEarth light curves, we place limits on additional transiting planets around GJ1214 with periods out to the habitable zone of the system. We also improve upon the previous photographic V-band estimate for the star, finding V = 14.71 {+-} 0.03.

  1. The GJ1214 Super-Earth System: Stellar Variability, New Transits, and a Search for Additional Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Zachory K.; Charbonneau, David; Bean, Jacob; Irwin, Jonathan; Burke, Christopher J.; Désert, Jean-Michel; Nutzman, Philip; Falco, Emilio E.

    2011-07-01

    The super-Earth GJ1214b transits a nearby M dwarf that exhibits a 1% intrinsic variability in the near-infrared. Here, we analyze new observations to refine the physical properties of both the star and planet. We present three years of out-of-transit photometric monitoring of the stellar host GJ1214 from the MEarth Observatory and find the rotation period to be long, most likely an integer multiple of 53 days, suggesting low levels of magnetic activity and an old age for the system. We show that such variability will not pose significant problems to ongoing studies of the planet's atmosphere with transmission spectroscopy. We analyze two high-precision transit light curves from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) along with seven others from the MEarth and Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory 1.2 m telescopes, finding physical parameters for the planet that are consistent with previous work. The VLT light curves show tentative evidence for spot occultations during transit. Using two years of MEarth light curves, we place limits on additional transiting planets around GJ1214 with periods out to the habitable zone of the system. We also improve upon the previous photographic V-band estimate for the star, finding V = 14.71 ± 0.03.

  2. Vectran Fiber Time-Dependent Behavior and Additional Static Loading Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fette, Russell B.; Sovinski, Marjorie F.

    2004-01-01

    Vectran HS appears from literature and testing to date to be an ideal upgrade from Kevlar braided cords for many long-term, static-loading applications such as tie-downs on solar arrays. Vectran is a liquid crystalline polymer and exhibits excellent tensile properties. The material has been touted as a zero creep product. Testing discussed in this report does not support this statement, though the creep is on the order of four times slower than with similar Kevlar 49 products. Previous work with Kevlar and new analysis of Vectran testing has led to a simple predictive model for Vectran at ambient conditions. The mean coefficient of thermal expansion (negative in this case) is similar to Kevlar 49, but is not linear. A positive transition in the curve occurs near 100 C. Out-gassing tests show that the material performs well within parameters for most space flight applications. Vectran also offers increased abrasion resistance, minimal moisture regain, and similar UV degradation. The effects of material construction appear to have a dramatic effect in stress relaxation for braided Vectran. To achieve the improved relaxation rate, upgrades must also examine alternate construction or preconditioning methods. This report recommends Vectran HS as a greatly improved replacement material for applications where time-dependent relaxation is a major factor.

  3. Priming effect in agricultural and forest soils depending on glucose level and N addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splettstoesser, Thomas; Kumar, Amit; Sun, Yue

    2015-04-01

    Growing plants continuously release easily available organic compounds into the rhizosphere. By their interactions with soil microbial biomass (MB) these compounds result in changes of organic matter turnover rates. The understanding of this priming effect (PE) is important for the estimation of climate change impacts on different land use systems. In order to investigate the PE, we conducted a soil incubation experiment under laboratory conditions with two loamy soils: one under cropland and the second under a deciduous forest near Göttingen. 13C and 14C Glucose were added in four levels reaching from 10% to 300% of MB-C. Furthermore two nitrogen levels were established in order to investigate the effects of fertilization on PE. During the whole experiment CO2 release was monitored by trapping in a NaOH solution. Nitrogen mineralization rate, activity of enzymes, and composition of MB were analyzed at the start, after one day, after one week and at the end of the experiment. The results on priming effects induced in agricultural and forest soils depending on N and glucose levels will be presented.

  4. Ionic strength-dependent changes in tentacular ion exchangers with variable ligand density. I. Structural properties.

    PubMed

    Bhambure, Rahul; Gillespie, Christopher M; Phillips, Michael; Graalfs, Heiner; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-09-01

    The ligand density critically affects the performance of ion-exchange resins in such measures as the adsorption capacity and transport characteristics. However, for tentacular and other polymer-modified exchangers, the mechanistic basis of the effect of ligand density on performance is not yet fully understood. In this study we map the ionic strength-dependent structural changes in tentacular cation exchangers with variable ligand densities as the basis for subsequent investigation of effects on functional properties. Inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to assess the effect of ionic strength on the pore size and intraparticle architecture of resin variants with different ligand densities. Comparison of ISEC and cryo-SEM results shows a considerable reduction in average pore size with increasing ligand density; these methods also confirm an increase of average pore size at higher ionic strengths. SAXS analysis of ionic strength-dependent conformational changes in the grafted polyelectrolyte layer shows a characteristic ionomer peak at values of the scattering vector q (0.1-0.2Å(-1)) that depend on the ligand density and the ionic strength of the solution. This peak attribution reflects nanoscale changes in the structure of the grafted polyelectrolyte chains that can in turn be responsible for observed pore-size changes in the resins. Finally, salt breakthrough experiments confirm a stronger Donnan exclusion effect on pore accessibility for small ions in the high ligand density variant. PMID:27544749

  5. X-point position dependence of edge intrinsic toroidal rotation on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Karpushov, A. N.; Sauter, O.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Reimerdes, H.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Camenen, Y.

    2015-05-15

    Recent theoretical work predicts intrinsic toroidal rotation in the tokamak edge to depend strongly on the normalized major radial position of the X-point. With this motivation, we conducted a series of Ohmic L-mode shots on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable, moving the X-point from the inboard to the outboard edge of the last closed flux surface in both lower and upper single null configurations. The edge toroidal rotation evolved from strongly co-current for an inboard X-point to either vanishing or counter-current for an outboard X-point, in agreement with the theoretical expectations. The whole rotation profile shifted roughly rigidly with the edge rotation, resulting in variation of the peak core rotation by more than a factor of two. Core rotation reversals had little effect on the edge rotation. Edge rotation was slightly more counter-current for unfavorable than favorable ∇B drift discharges.

  6. Variable Temperature Stress in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Maupas) and Its Implications for Sensitivity to an Additional Chemical Stressor

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J.

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of studies has investigated how chemical sensitivity is affected by temperature, however, almost always under different constant rather than more realistic fluctuating regimes. Here we compared how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to copper at constant temperatures (8–24°C) and under fluctuation conditions of low (±4°C) and high (±8°C) amplitude (averages of 12, 16, 20°C and 16°C respectively). The DEBkiss model was used to interpret effects on energy budgets. Increasing constant temperature from 12–24°C reduced time to first egg, life-span and population growth rates consistent with temperature driven metabolic rate change. Responses at 8°C did not, however, accord with this pattern (including a deviation from the Temperature Size Rule), identifying a cold stress effect. High amplitude variation and low amplitude variation around a mean temperature of 12°C impacted reproduction and body size compared to nematodes kept at the matching average constant temperatures. Copper exposure affected reproduction, body size and life-span and consequently population growth. Sensitivity to copper (EC50 values), was similar at intermediate temperatures (12, 16, 20°C) and higher at 24°C and especially the innately stressful 8°C condition. Temperature variation did not increase copper sensitivity. Indeed under variable conditions including time at the stressful 8°C condition, sensitivity was reduced. DEBkiss identified increased maintenance costs and increased assimilation as possible mechanisms for cold and higher copper concentration effects. Model analysis of combined variable temperature effects, however, demonstrated no additional joint stressor response. Hence, concerns that exposure to temperature fluctuations may sensitise species to co-stressor effects seem unfounded in this case. PMID:26784453

  7. Variable Temperature Stress in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Maupas) and Its Implications for Sensitivity to an Additional Chemical Stressor.

    PubMed

    Cedergreen, Nina; Nørhave, Nils Jakob; Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of studies has investigated how chemical sensitivity is affected by temperature, however, almost always under different constant rather than more realistic fluctuating regimes. Here we compared how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to copper at constant temperatures (8-24°C) and under fluctuation conditions of low (±4°C) and high (±8°C) amplitude (averages of 12, 16, 20°C and 16°C respectively). The DEBkiss model was used to interpret effects on energy budgets. Increasing constant temperature from 12-24°C reduced time to first egg, life-span and population growth rates consistent with temperature driven metabolic rate change. Responses at 8°C did not, however, accord with this pattern (including a deviation from the Temperature Size Rule), identifying a cold stress effect. High amplitude variation and low amplitude variation around a mean temperature of 12°C impacted reproduction and body size compared to nematodes kept at the matching average constant temperatures. Copper exposure affected reproduction, body size and life-span and consequently population growth. Sensitivity to copper (EC50 values), was similar at intermediate temperatures (12, 16, 20°C) and higher at 24°C and especially the innately stressful 8°C condition. Temperature variation did not increase copper sensitivity. Indeed under variable conditions including time at the stressful 8°C condition, sensitivity was reduced. DEBkiss identified increased maintenance costs and increased assimilation as possible mechanisms for cold and higher copper concentration effects. Model analysis of combined variable temperature effects, however, demonstrated no additional joint stressor response. Hence, concerns that exposure to temperature fluctuations may sensitise species to co-stressor effects seem unfounded in this case. PMID:26784453

  8. Post-lumpectomy CT-guided tumor bed delineation for breast boost and partial breast irradiation: Can additional pre- and postoperative imaging reduce interobserver variability?

    PubMed Central

    DEN HARTOGH, MARISKA D.; PHILIPPENS, MARIELLE E.P.; VAN DAM, IRIS E.; KLEYNEN, CATHARINA E.; TERSTEEG, ROBBERT J.H.A.; KOTTE, ALEXIS N.T.J.; VAN VULPEN, MARCO; VAN ASSELEN, BRAM; VAN DEN BONGARD, DESIRÉE H.J.G.

    2015-01-01

    For breast boost radiotherapy or accelerated partial breast irradiation, the tumor bed (TB) is delineated by the radiation oncologist on a planning computed tomography (CT) scan. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the interobserver variability (IOV) of the TB delineation is reduced by providing the radiation oncologist with additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT scans. A total of 14 T1-T2 breast cancer patients underwent a standard planning CT in the supine treatment position following lumpectomy, as well as additional pre- and postoperative imaging in the same position. Post-lumpectomy TBs were independently delineated by four breast radiation oncologists on standard postoperative CT and on CT registered to an additional imaging modality. The additional imaging modalities used were postoperative MRI, preoperative contrast-enhanced (CE)-CT and preoperative CE-MRI. A cavity visualization score (CVS) was assigned to each standard postoperative CT by each observer. In addition, the conformity index (CI), volume and distance between centers of mass (dCOM) of the TB delineations were calculated. On CT, the median CI was 0.57, with a median volume of 22 cm3 and dCOM of 5.1 mm. The addition of postoperative MRI increased the median TB volume significantly to 28 cm3 (P<0.001), while the CI (P=0.176) and dCOM (P=0.110) were not affected. The addition of preoperative CT or MRI increased the TB volume to 26 and 25 cm3, respectively (both P<0.001), while the CI increased to 0.58 and 0.59 (both P<0.001) and the dCOM decreased to 4.7 mm (P=0.004) and 4.6 mm (P=0.001), respectively. In patients with CVS≤3, the median CI was 0.40 on CT, which was significantly increased by all additional imaging modalities, up to 0.52, and was accompanied by a median volume increase up to 6 cm3. In conclusion, the addition of postoperative MRI, preoperative CE-CT or preoperative CE-MRI did not result in a considerable reduction in the IOV in postoperative CT

  9. Elevated intraindividual variability in methamphetamine dependence is associated with poorer everyday functioning.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Erin E; Doyle, Katie L; Minassian, Arpi; Henry, Brook L; Perry, William; Marcotte, Thomas D; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor

    2014-12-15

    Methamphetamine (MA) dependence is associated with executive dysfunction, but no studies have evaluated MA-related elevations in neurocognitive intraindividual variability (IIV), an expression of cognitive dyscontrol linked to poor daily functioning in populations with frontal systems injury. We examined IIV during a vigilance task in a well-characterized sample of 35 MA-dependent (MA+) and 55 non-MA using comparison participants (MA-) as part of a larger neuropsychological battery that included self-report and performance-based measures of everyday functioning. A mixed model ANOVA was conducted while controlling for covariates, including factors that differed between the groups (e.g., education) and those with conceptual relevance to IIV: mean reaction time, global cognitive performance, and HIV-infection (which was comparable across groups; p=0.32). This analysis revealed significantly elevated IIV among MA+ relative to MA- individuals that was comparable in magnitude across all trial blocks of the vigilance task. Within the MA group, elevated IIV was associated with executive dysfunction, psychomotor slowing, and recency of MA use, as well as poorer automobile driving simulator performance, worse laboratory-based functional skills, and more cognitive complaints. MA-users are vulnerable to IIV elevation, likely due to cognitive dyscontrol, which may increase their risk of real-world problems. PMID:25081313

  10. Field Variable Associations With Scratch Orientation-Dependence of UHMWPE Wear: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Matthew C.; Glennon, Liam P.; Baer, Thomas E.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Scratches on the metal bearing surface of metal-on-polyethylene total joint replacements have been found to appreciably accelerate abrasive/adhesive wear of polyethylene, and constitute a source of the considerable variability of wear rate seen within clinical cohorts. Scratch orientation with respect to the local direction of relative surface sliding is presumably a factor affecting instantaneous debris liberation during articulation. Method of Approach A three-dimensional local finite element model was developed of orientation-specific polyethylene articulation with a scratched metal counterface, to explore continuum-level stress/strain parameters potentially correlating with the orientation dependence of scratch wear in a corresponding physical experiment. Results Computed maximum stress values exceeded the yield strength of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) for all scratch orientations, but did not vary appreciably among scratch orientations. Two continuum-level parameters judged most consistent overall with the direction dependence of experimental wear were: (1) cumulative compressive total normal strain in the direction of loading, and (2) maximum instantaneous compressive total normal strain transverse to the sliding direction. Conclusions Such stress/strain metrics could be useful in global computational models of wear acceleration, as surrogates to incorporate anisotropy of local metal surface roughening. PMID:19045548

  11. Elevated intraindividual variability in methamphetamine dependence is associated with poorer everyday functioning

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Erin E.; Doyle, Katie L.; Minassian, Arpi; Henry, Brook; Perry, William; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) dependence is associated with executive dysfunction, but no studies have evaluated MA-related elevations in neurocognitive intraindividual variability (IIV), an expression of cognitive dyscontrol linked to poor daily functioning in populations with frontal systems injury. We examined IIV during a vigilance task in a well-characterized sample of 35 MA-dependent (MA+) and 55 non-MA using comparison participants (MA−) as part of a larger neuropsychological battery that included self-report and performance-based measures of everyday functioning. A mixed model ANOVA was conducted while controlling for covariates, including factors that differed between the groups (e.g., education) and those with conceptual relevance to IIV: mean reaction time, global cognitive performance, and HIV-infection (which was comparable across groups; p = .32). This analysis revealed significantly elevated IIV among MA+ relative to MA− individuals that was comparable in magnitude across all trial blocks of the vigilance task. Within the MA group, elevated IIV was associated with executive dysfunction, psychomotor slowing, and recency of MA use, as well as poorer automobile driving simulator performance, worse laboratory-based functional skills, and more cognitive complaints. MA-users are vulnerable to IIV elevation, likely due to cognitive dyscontrol, which may increase their risk of real-world problems. PMID:25081313

  12. The severity of retinal pathology in homozygous Crb1rd8/rd8 mice is dependent on additional genetic factors

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Ulrich F.O.; Carvalho, Livia S.; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha kleine; Cowing, Jill A.; Greenaway, Simon; Chu, Colin J.; Herrmann, Philipp; Smith, Alexander J.; Munro, Peter M.G.; Potter, Paul; Bainbridge, James W.B.; Ali, Robin R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phenotype–genotype correlations in retinal degeneration is a major challenge. Mutations in CRB1 lead to a spectrum of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies with variable phenotypes suggesting the influence of modifying factors. To establish the contribution of the genetic background to phenotypic variability associated with the Crb1rd8/rd8 mutation, we compared the retinal pathology of Crb1rd8/rd8/J inbred mice with that of two Crb1rd8/rd8 lines backcrossed with C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. Topical endoscopic fundal imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy fundus images of all three Crb1rd8/rd8 lines showed a significant increase in the number of inferior retinal lesions that was strikingly variable between the lines. Optical coherence tomography, semithin, ultrastructural morphology and assessment of inflammatory and vascular marker by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the lesions were associated with photoreceptor death, Müller and microglia activation and telangiectasia-like vascular remodelling—features that were stable in the inbred, variable in the second, but virtually absent in the third Crb1rd8/rd8 line, even at 12 months of age. This suggests that the Crb1rd8/rd8 mutation is necessary, but not sufficient for the development of these degenerative features. By whole-genome SNP analysis of the genotype–phenotype correlation, a candidate region on chromosome 15 was identified. This may carry one or more genetic modifiers for the manifestation of the retinal pathology associated with mutations in Crb1. This study also provides insight into the nature of the retinal vascular lesions that likely represent a clinical correlate for the formation of retinal telangiectasia or Coats-like vasculopathy in patients with CRB1 mutations that are thought to depend on such genetic modifiers. PMID:25147295

  13. The severity of retinal pathology in homozygous Crb1rd8/rd8 mice is dependent on additional genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Carvalho, Livia S; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha Kleine; Cowing, Jill A; Greenaway, Simon; Chu, Colin J; Herrmann, Philipp; Smith, Alexander J; Munro, Peter M G; Potter, Paul; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phenotype-genotype correlations in retinal degeneration is a major challenge. Mutations in CRB1 lead to a spectrum of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies with variable phenotypes suggesting the influence of modifying factors. To establish the contribution of the genetic background to phenotypic variability associated with the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation, we compared the retinal pathology of Crb1(rd8/rd8)/J inbred mice with that of two Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines backcrossed with C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. Topical endoscopic fundal imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy fundus images of all three Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines showed a significant increase in the number of inferior retinal lesions that was strikingly variable between the lines. Optical coherence tomography, semithin, ultrastructural morphology and assessment of inflammatory and vascular marker by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the lesions were associated with photoreceptor death, Müller and microglia activation and telangiectasia-like vascular remodelling-features that were stable in the inbred, variable in the second, but virtually absent in the third Crb1(rd8/rd8) line, even at 12 months of age. This suggests that the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation is necessary, but not sufficient for the development of these degenerative features. By whole-genome SNP analysis of the genotype-phenotype correlation, a candidate region on chromosome 15 was identified. This may carry one or more genetic modifiers for the manifestation of the retinal pathology associated with mutations in Crb1. This study also provides insight into the nature of the retinal vascular lesions that likely represent a clinical correlate for the formation of retinal telangiectasia or Coats-like vasculopathy in patients with CRB1 mutations that are thought to depend on such genetic modifiers. PMID:25147295

  14. The Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998-2002 Tropical Ozone Climatology. 3; Instrumentation and Station-to-Station Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacqueline C.; Smit, Herman G. J.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Johnson, Bryan J.; Kirchhoff, Volker W. J. H.; Schmidlin, Francis J.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: Since 1998 the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) project has collected more than 2000 ozone profiles from a dozen tropical and subtropical sites using balloon-borne electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes. The data (with accompanying pressure-temperature-humidity soundings) are archived. Analysis of ozonesonde imprecision within the SHADOZ dataset revealed that variations in ozonesonde technique could lead to station-to-station biases in the measurements. In this paper imprecisions and accuracy in the SHADOZ dataset are examined in light of new data. When SHADOZ total ozone column amounts are compared to version 8 TOMS (2004 release), discrepancies between sonde and satellite datasets decline 1-2 percentage points on average, compared to version 7 TOMS. Variability among stations is evaluated using total ozone normalized to TOMS and results of laboratory tests on ozonesondes (JOSE-2O00, Julich Ozonesonde Intercomparison Experiment). Ozone deviations from a standard instrument in the JOSE flight simulation chamber resemble those of SHADOZ station data relative to a SHADOZ-defined climatological reference. Certain systematic variations in SHADOZ ozone profiles are accounted for by differences in solution composition, data processing and instrument (manufacturer). Instrument bias leads to a greater ozone measurement above 25 km over Nairobi and to lower total column ozone at three Pacific sites compared to other SHADOZ stations at 0-20 deg.S.

  15. Using XMM-Newton to study the energy dependent variability of H 1743-322 during its 2014 outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiele, H.; Yu, W.

    2016-04-01

    Black hole transients during bright outbursts show distinct changes of their spectral and variability properties as they evolve during an outburst, that are interpreted as evidence for changes in the accretion flow and X-ray emitting regions. We obtained an anticipated XMM-Newton ToO observation of H 1743-322 during its outburst in September 2014. Based on data of eight outbursts observed in the last 10 years we expected to catch the start of the hard-to-soft state transition. The fact that neither the general shape of the observed power density spectrum nor the characteristic frequency show an energy dependence implies that the source still stays in the low-hard state at the time of our observation near outburst peak. The spectral properties agree with the source being in the low-hard state and a Swift/XRT monitoring of the outburst reveals that H 1743-322 stays in the low-hard state during the entire outburst (a. k. a. `failed outburst'). We derive the averaged QPO waveform and obtain phase-resolved spectra. Comparing the phase-resolved spectra to the phase averaged energy spectrum reveals spectral pivoting. We compare variability on long and short time scales using covariance spectra and find that the covariance ratio does not show an increase towards lower energies as has been found in other black hole X-ray binaries. There are two possible explanations: either the absence of additional disc variability on longer time scales is related to the rather high inclination of H 1743-322 compared to other black hole X-ray binaries or it is the reason why we observe H 1743-322 during a failed outburst. More data on failed outbursts and on high-inclination sources will be needed to investigate these two possibilities further.

  16. Using XMM-Newton to study the energy dependent variability of H 1743-322 during its 2014 outburst★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiele, H.; Yu, W.

    2016-04-01

    Black hole transients during bright outbursts show distinct changes of their spectral and variability properties as they evolve during an outburst, that are interpreted as evidence for changes in the accretion flow and X-ray emitting regions. We obtained an anticipated XMM-Newton ToO observation of H 1743-322 during its outburst in September 2014. Based on data of eight outbursts observed in the last 10 years we expected to catch the start of the hard-to-soft state transition. The fact that neither the general shape of the observed power density spectrum nor the characteristic frequency show an energy dependence implies that the source still stays in the low-hard state at the time of our observation near outburst peak. The spectral properties agree with the source being in the low-hard state and a Swift/XRT monitoring of the outburst reveals that H 1743-322 stays in the low-hard state during the entire outburst (a. k. a. `failed outburst'). We derive the averaged QPO waveform and obtain phase-resolved spectra. Comparing the phase-resolved spectra to the phase averaged energy spectrum reveals spectral pivoting. We compare variability on long and short time scales using covariance spectra and find that the covariance ratio does not show an increase towards lower energies as has been found in other black hole X-ray binaries. There are two possible explanations: either the absence of additional disc variability on longer time scales is related to the rather high inclination of H 1743-322 compared to other black hole X-ray binaries or it is the reason why we observe H 1743-322 during a failed outburst. More data on failed outbursts and on high-inclination sources will be needed to investigate these two possibilities further.

  17. Using XMM-Newton to study the energy-dependent variability of H 1743-322 during its 2014 outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiele, H.; Yu, W.

    2016-08-01

    Black hole transients evolve during bright outbursts, showing distinct changes in their spectral and variability properties. These changes are interpreted as evidence for changes in the accretion flow and in the X-ray-emitting regions. We obtained an anticipated XMM-Newton Target of Opportunity observation of H 1743-322 during its outburst in 2014 September. Based on data from eight outbursts observed in the last 10 yr, we expected to catch the start of the hard-to-soft state transition. The fact that neither the general shape of the observed power density spectrum nor the characteristic frequency shows an energy dependence implies that the source remained in the low-hard state at the time of our observation near outburst peak. The spectral properties agree with the source being in the low-hard state, and a Swift/XRT monitoring of the outburst revealed that H 1743-322 stayed in the low-hard state during the entire outburst (known as a `failed outburst'). Here we derive the averaged QPO waveform and obtain phase-resolved spectra. A comparison of the phase-resolved spectra with the phase-averaged energy spectrum reveals spectral pivoting. We compare variability on long and short time-scales using covariance spectra and find that the covariance ratio does not show an increase towards lower energies. In other binaries an increase has been found. There are two possible explanations: either the absence of additional disc variability on longer time-scales is related to the high inclination of H 1743-322 compared with other black hole X-ray binaries, or it is the reason why we observe H 1743-322 during a failed outburst. More data on failed outbursts and on high-inclination sources will be needed in order to investigate these two possibilities further.

  18. Mapping and decomposing scale-dependent soil moisture variability within an Inner Bluegrass landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrum, Carla Jill

    There is a shared desire among public and private sectors to produce more reliable predictions, accurate mapping, and appropriate scaling of soil moisture and associated parameters across landscapes. A discrepancy often exists between the scale at which soil hydrologic properties are measured and the scale at which they are modeled for management purposes. Moreover, little is known about the relative importance of hydrologic modeling parameters as soil moisture fluctuates with time. More research is needed to establish which observation scales in space and time are optimal for managing soil moisture variation over large spatial extents and how these scales are affected by fluctuations in soil moisture content with time. This research fuses high resolution geoelectric and light detection and ranging (LiDAR) as auxiliary measures to support sparse direct soil sampling over a 40 hectare inner BluegrassKentucky (USA) landscape. A Veris 3100 was used to measure shallow and deep apparent electrical conductivity (aEC) in tandem with soil moisture sampling on three separate dates with ascending soil moisture contents ranging from plant wilting point to near field capacity. Terrain attributes were produced from 2010 LiDAR ground returns collected at ≤1 m nominal pulse spacing. Exploratory statistics revealed several variables best associate with soil moisture, including terrain features (slope, profile curvature, and elevation), soil physical and chemical properties (calcium, cation exchange capacity, organic matter, clay and sand) and aEC for each date. Multivariate geostatistics, time stability analyses, and spatial regression were performed to characterize scale-dependent soil moisture patterns in space with time to determine which soil-terrain parameters influence soil moisture distribution. Results showed that soil moisture variation was time stable across the landscape and primarily associated with long-range (˜250 m) soil physicochemical properties. When the soils

  19. Three Ingredients for Improved Global Aftershock Forecasts: Tectonic Region, Time-Dependent Catalog Incompleteness, and Inter-Sequence Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. T.; Hardebeck, J.; Felzer, K. R.; Michael, A. J.; van der Elst, N.

    2015-12-01

    Following a large earthquake, seismic hazard can be orders of magnitude higher than the long-term average as a result of aftershock triggering. Due to this heightened hazard, there is a demand from emergency managers and the public for rapid, authoritative, and reliable aftershock forecasts. In the past, USGS aftershock forecasts following large, global earthquakes have been released on an ad-hoc basis with inconsistent methods, and in some cases, aftershock parameters adapted from California. To remedy this, we are currently developing an automated aftershock product that will generate more accurate forecasts based on the Reasenberg and Jones (Science, 1989) method. To better capture spatial variations in aftershock productivity and decay, we estimate regional aftershock parameters for sequences within the Garcia et al. (BSSA, 2012) tectonic regions. We find that regional variations for mean aftershock productivity exceed a factor of 10. The Reasenberg and Jones method combines modified-Omori aftershock decay, Utsu productivity scaling, and the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution. We additionally account for a time-dependent magnitude of completeness following large events in the catalog. We generalize the Helmstetter et al. (2005) equation for short-term aftershock incompleteness and solve for incompleteness levels in the global NEIC catalog following large mainshocks. In addition to estimating average sequence parameters within regions, we quantify the inter-sequence parameter variability. This allows for a more complete quantification of the forecast uncertainties and Bayesian updating of the forecast as sequence-specific information becomes available.

  20. Sampling variability and estimates of density dependence: a composite-likelihood approach.

    PubMed

    Lele, Subhash R

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that sampling variability, if not properly taken into account, affects various ecologically important analyses. Statistical inference for stochastic population dynamics models is difficult when, in addition to the process error, there is also sampling error. The standard maximum-likelihood approach suffers from large computational burden. In this paper, I discuss an application of the composite-likelihood method for estimation of the parameters of the Gompertz model in the presence of sampling variability. The main advantage of the method of composite likelihood is that it reduces the computational burden substantially with little loss of statistical efficiency. Missing observations are a common problem with many ecological time series. The method of composite likelihood can accommodate missing observations in a straightforward fashion. Environmental conditions also affect the parameters of stochastic population dynamics models. This method is shown to handle such nonstationary population dynamics processes as well. Many ecological time series are short, and statistical inferences based on such short time series tend to be less precise. However, spatial replications of short time series provide an opportunity to increase the effective sample size. Application of likelihood-based methods for spatial time-series data for population dynamics models is computationally prohibitive. The method of composite likelihood is shown to have significantly less computational burden, making it possible to analyze large spatial time-series data. After discussing the methodology in general terms, I illustrate its use by analyzing a time series of counts of American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) from the Breeding Bird Survey data, San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) population abundance data, and spatial time series of Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) redds count data. PMID:16634310

  1. The Dependence of Cloud Particle Size on Non-Aerosol-Loading Related Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, H.; Liu, G.

    2005-03-18

    An enhanced concentration of aerosol may increase the number of cloud drops by providing more cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), which in turn results in a higher cloud albedo at a constant cloud liquid water path. This process is often referred to as the aerosol indirect effect (AIE). Many in situ and remote sensing observations support this hypothesis (Ramanathan et al. 2001). However, satellite observed relations between aerosol concentration and cloud drop size are not always in agreement with the AIE. Based on global analysis of cloud effective radius (r{sub e}) and aerosol number concentration (N{sub a}) derived from satellite data, Sekiguchi et al. (2003) found that the correlations between the two variables can be either negative, or positive, or none, depending on the location of the clouds. They discovered that significantly negative r{sub e} - N{sub a} correlation can only be identified along coastal regions of the continents where abundant continental aerosols inflow from land, whereas Feingold et al. (2001) found that the response of r{sub e} to aerosol loading is the greatest in the region where aerosol optical depth ({tau}{sub a}) is the smallest. The reason for the discrepancy is likely due to the variations in cloud macroscopic properties such as geometrical thickness (Brenguier et al. 2003). Since r{sub e} is modified not only by aerosol but also by cloud geometrical thickness (H), the correlation between re and {tau}{sub a} actually reflects both the aerosol indirect effect and dependence of H. Therefore, discussing AIE based on the r{sub e}-{tau}{sub a} correlation without taking into account variations in cloud geometrical thickness may be misleading. This paper is motivated to extract aerosols' effect from overall effects using the independent measurements of cloud geometrical thickness, {tau}{sub a} and r{sub e}.

  2. Radial dependence of line profile variability in seven O9-B0.5 stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Marcolino, W.; Hillier, D. J.; Donati, J.-F.; Bouret, J.-C.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Massive stars show a variety of spectral variabilities: discrete absorption components in UV P-Cygni profiles, optical line profile variability, X-ray variability, and radial velocity modulations. Aims: Our goal is to study the spectral variability of single OB stars to better understand the relation between photospheric and wind variability. For that, we rely on high spectral resolution and on high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra collected with the spectrograph NARVAL on the Télescope Bernard Lyot at Pic du Midi. Methods: We investigated the variability of twelve spectral lines by means of the temporal variance spectrum. The selected lines probe the radial structure of the atmosphere from the photosphere to the outer wind. We also performed a spectroscopic analysis with atmosphere models to derive the stellar and wind properties and to constrain the formation region of the selected lines. Results: We show that variability is observed in the wind lines of all bright giants and supergiants on a daily timescale. Lines formed in the photosphere are sometimes variable, sometimes not. The dwarf stars do not show any sign of variability. If variability is observed on a daily timescale, it can also (but not always) be observed on hourly timescales, albeit with lower amplitude. There is a very clear correlation between amplitude of the variability and fraction of the line formed in the wind. Strong anti-correlations between the different parts of the temporal variance spectrum are observed. Conclusions: Our results indicate that variability is stronger in lines formed in the wind. A link between photospheric and wind variability is not obvious from our study, since wind variability is observed regardless of the level of photospheric variability. Different photospheric lines also show different degrees of variability. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. An Empirical, Nonparametric Simulator for Multivariate Random Variables with Differing Marginal Densities and Nonlinear Dependence with Hydroclimatic Applications.

    PubMed

    Lall, Upmanu; Devineni, Naresh; Kaheil, Yasir

    2016-01-01

    Multivariate simulations of a set of random variables are often needed for risk analysis. Given a historical data set, the goal is to develop simulations that reproduce the dependence structure in that data set so that the risk of potentially correlated factors can be evaluated. A nonparametric, copula-based simulation approach is developed and exemplified. It can be applied to multiple variables or to spatial fields with arbitrary dependence structures and marginal densities. The nonparametric simulator uses logspline density estimation in the univariate setting, together with a sampling strategy to reproduce dependence across variables or spatial instances, through a nonparametric numerical approximation of the underlying copula function. The multivariate data vectors are assumed to be independent and identically distributed. A synthetic example is provided to illustrate the method, followed by an application to the risk of livestock losses in Mongolia. PMID:26177987

  4. Time-dependent excitation and ionization modelling of absorption-line variability due to GRB 080310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreeswijk, P. M.; Ledoux, C.; Raassen, A. J. J.; Smette, A.; De Cia, A.; Woźniak, P. R.; Fox, A. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Jakobsson, P.

    2013-01-01

    We model the time-variable absorption of Fe II, Fe III, Si II, C II and Cr II detected in Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectra of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 080310, with the afterglow radiation exciting and ionizing the interstellar medium in the host galaxy at a redshift of z = 2.42743. To estimate the rest-frame afterglow brightness as a function of time, we use a combination of the optical VRI photometry obtained by the RAPTOR-T telescope array, which is presented in this paper, and Swift's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observations. Excitation alone, which has been successfully applied for a handful of other GRBs, fails to describe the observed column density evolution in the case of GRB 080310. Inclusion of ionization is required to explain the column density decrease of all observed Fe II levels (including the ground state 6D9/2) and increase of the Fe III 7S3 level. The large population of ions in this latter level (up to 10% of all Fe III) can only be explained through ionization of Fe II, as a large fraction of the ionized Fe II ions (we calculate 31% using the Flexible Atomic and Cowan codes) initially populate the 7S3 level of Fe III rather than the ground state. This channel for producing a significant Fe III 7S3 level population may be relevant for other objects in which absorption lines from this level, the UV34 triplet, are observed, such as broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and η Carinae. This provides conclusive evidence for time-variable ionization in the circumburst medium, which to date has not been convincingly detected. However, the best-fit distance of the neutral absorbing cloud to the GRB is 200-400 pc, i.e. similar to GRB-absorber distance estimates for GRBs without any evidence for ionization. We find that the presence of time-varying ionization in GRB 080310 is likely due to a combination of the super-solar iron abundance ([Fe/H] = +0.2) and the low H I column density (log N(H i) = 18.7) in the host of GRB 080310. Finally

  5. Time-of-day dependence of isokinetic leg strength and associated interday variability.

    PubMed Central

    Wyse, J P; Mercer, T H; Gleeson, N P

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the interday variability and time-of-day effects on selected isokinetic leg strength indices. Nine adult collegiate sportsmen (mean(s.e.) age 19.6(0.5) years; mean(s.e.) height 1.81(0.02) m; mean(s.e.) body mass 76.5(3.1) kg) completed a series of nine test sessions, organized so that each subject was tested three times within a day (08.00-09.00 hours; 13.00-14.00 hours; 18.00-19.30 hours), on three occasions, each separated by a minimum of 7 days. Gravity-corrected indices of extension peak torque (EPT), flexion peak torque (FPT), and the peak torque ratio (PTR), at contraction velocities of 1.05 rad s-1 and 3.14 rad s-1, were calculated for each subject using an isokinetic dynamometer. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance of coefficient of variation (V%) scores revealed no significant differences in performance variability across within-subject factors of time-of-day and performance index (P > 0.05). Overall mean(s.e.) V% for scores across experimental conditions were 3.97(0.72)% at 1.05 rad s-1 and 5.98(1.23)% at 3.14 rad s-1, suggesting that similar levels of measurement error occur between 08.00-19.30 hours. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance of absolute strength indices (EPT, FPT and PTR) revealed that significantly higher scores were achieved during session 3 (18.00-19.30 hours), with mean(s.e.) values of 249.1(40.0) N m, 149.0(32.3) N m, 59.5(5.0)% at 1.05 rad s-1, and 172.1(38.7) N m, 121.3(27.7) N m, 71.1(6.2)% at 3.14 rad s-1, respectively (P < 0.05). This finding appears to be consistent with current knowledge about time-of-day effects on the assessment of muscular strength. Thus for stable and maximal values to be obtained during isokinetic leg testing, the use of multiple-trial protocols is recommended, with testing occurring as close to 18.00-19.30 hours as possible. In addition, the observed significant time-of-day effect suggests that appropriate comparison of maximal isokinetic leg

  6. Buprenorphine versus methadone for opioid dependence: predictor variables for treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Borella, F; Zaimovic, A; Moi, G; Bussandri, M; Bubici, C; Bertacca, S

    2004-07-15

    The present study compared in a clinical non-experimental setting the efficacy of buprenorphine (BUP) and methadone (METH) in the treatment of opioid dependence: all the subjects included in the study showed severe long-lasting heroin addiction. Participants (154) were applicants to a 12 weeks treatment program, who were assigned to either METH (78) (mean doses 81.5 +/- 36.4 mg) or BUP (76) (mean doses 9.2 +/- 3.4 mg) treatment. Aim of the study was to evaluate patient/treatment variables possibly influencing retention rate, abstinence from illicit drugs and mood changes. METH patients showed a higher retention rate at week 4 (78.2 versus 65.8) (P < 0.05), but BUP and METH were equally effective in sustaining retention in treatment and compliance with medication at week 12 (61.5 versus 59.2). Retention rate was influenced by dose, psychosocial functioning and not by psychiatric comorbidity in METH patients. In contrast, BUP maintained patients who completed the observational period showed a significantly higher rate of depression than those who dropped out (P < 0.01) and the intention to treat sample (P < 0.05). No relationship between retention and dose, or retention and psychosocial functioning was evidenced for BUP patients. The risk of positive urine testing was similar between METH and BUP, as expression of illicit drug use in general. At week 12, the patients treated with METH showed more risk of illicit opioid use than those treated with BUP (32.1% versus 25.6%) (P < 0.05). Negative urines were associated with higher doses in both METH and BUP patients. As evidenced for retention, substance abuse history and psychosocial functioning appear unable to influence urinalyses results in BUP patients. Buprenorphine maintained patients who showed negative urines presented a significantly higher rate of depression than those with positive urines (P < 0.05). Alternatively, psychiatric comorbidity was found unrelated to urinalyses results in METH patients. Our data

  7. Variability of humic acid properties depending on their precursor material: a study of peat profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2015-04-01

    and impact of environmental conditions on the surfactant properties of humic matter. Amongst the main objectives of the study was the identification of the dependence of the humic acid properties on the composition of original living matter in the peat, especially considering high variability of peat composition in the studied bogs. Despite some correlation between peat botanical composition and properties exist, in general the similarities are much more expressed, thus indicating the significance of microbial decay processes on the properties of humic material. Acknowledgement: Support from a project ResProd

  8. The benefits of an additional worker are task-dependent: assessing low-back injury risks during prefabricated (panelized) wall construction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunwook; Nussbaum, Maury A; Jia, Bochen

    2012-09-01

    Team manual material handling is a common practice in residential construction where prefabricated building components (e.g., wall panels) are increasingly used. As part of a larger effort to enable proactive control of ergonomic exposures among workers handling panels, this study explored the effects of additional workers on injury risks during team-based panel erection tasks, specifically by quantifying how injury risks are affected by increasing the number of workers (by one, above the nominal or most common number). Twenty-four participants completed panel erection tasks with and without an additional worker under different panel mass and size conditions. Four risk assessment methods were employed that emphasized the low back. Though including an additional worker generally reduced injury risk across several panel masses and sizes, the magnitude of these benefits varied depending on the specific task and exhibited somewhat high variability within a given task. These results suggest that a simple, generalizable recommendation regarding team-based panel erection tasks is not warranted. Rather, a more systems-level approach accounting for both injury risk and productivity (a strength of panelized wall systems) should be undertaken. PMID:22226545

  9. Being selective at the plate: processing dependence between perceptual variables relates to hitting goals and performance.

    PubMed

    Gray, Rob

    2013-08-01

    Performance of a skill that involves acting on a goal object (e.g., a ball to be hit) can influence one's judgment of the size and speed of that object. The present study examined how these action-specific effects are affected when the goal of the actor is varied and they are free to choose between alternative actions. In Experiment 1, expert baseball players were asked to perform three different directional hitting tasks in a batting simulation and make interleaved perceptual judgments about three ball parameters (speed, plate crossing location, and size). Perceived ball size was largest (and perceived speed was slowest) when the ball crossing location was optimal for the particular hitting task the batter was performing (e.g., an "outside" pitch for opposite-field hitting). The magnitude of processing dependency between variables (speed vs. location and size vs. location) was positively correlated with batting performance. In Experiment 2, the action-specific effects observed in Experiment 1 were mimicked by systematically changing the ball diameter in the simulation as a function of plate crossing location. The number of swing initiations was greater when ball size was larger, and batters were more successful in the hitting task for which the larger pitches were optimal (e.g., greater number of pull hits than opposite-field hits when "inside" pitches were larger). These findings suggest attentional accentuation of goal-relevant targets underlies action-related changes in perception and are consistent with an action selection role for these effects. PMID:23163787

  10. Variability of Mass Dependence of Auroral Acceleration Processes with Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghielmetti, Arthur G.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation are to improve understanding of the mass dependent variability of the auroral acceleration processes and so to clarify apparent discrepancies regarding the altitude and local time variations with solar cycle by investigating: (1) the global morphological relationships between auroral electric field structures and the related particle signatures under varying conditions of solar activity, and (2) the relationships between the electric field structures and particle signatures in selected events that are representative of the different conditions occurring during a solar cycle. The investigation is based in part on the Lockheed UFI data base of UpFlowing Ion (UFI) events in the 5OO eV to 16keV energy range and associated electrons in the energy range 7O eV to 24 keV. This data base was constructed from data acquired by the ion mass spectrometer on the S3-3 satellite in the altitude range of I to 1.3 Re. The launch of the POLAR spacecraft in early 1996 and successful operation of its TIMAS ion mass spectrometer has provided us with data from within the auroral acceleration regions during the current solar minimum. The perigee of POLAR is at about 1 Re, comparable to that of S3-3. The higher sensitivity and time resolution of TIMAS compared to the ion mass spectrometer on S3-3 together with its wider energy range, 15 eV to 33 keV, facilitate more detailed studies of upflowing ions.

  11. Characterization of Seasonally Dependent Emergent Vegetation Variables for Coastal Impact Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellern, C.; Grossman, E.; Linneman, S. R.; Fuller, R.

    2015-12-01

    Emergent wetland vegetation has been shown to mitigate coastal inundation and erosion hazards by reducing wave energy through friction (Shepard et al., 2011), although its use in coastal protection planning is limited because predictive models require improved vegetation data. We isolated biophysical characteristics (biomass, stem density, rigidity, etc.) of plants using horizontal digital photographs (Side-On Photos) in conjunction with remote sensing and physical surveys. We studied the dominant salt-marsh species/assemblages in Port Susan Bay of Washington State, a vulnerable estuary that has experienced up to 1 kilometer of marsh retreat since the mid-1960s. We measured plant height, stem diameter, stem density (area available for flow) from fall to early spring (August 2014 through April 2015) using Side-On Photography and digital image processing techniques. Metrics from Side-On Photography were highly correlated to physical lab measurements. Vegetation rigidity was measured in-situ with a handheld digital scale with respect to measurement height and bending angle. Plant elasticity showed a strong correlation to stem diameter in two dominant bulrush species. We employed remote sensing supervised classifications techniques (Maximum-Likelihood and Decision Tree Classifiers) to hyperspectral imagery to map the spatial extent of vegetation assemblages with an overall accuracy of 86.7%. Combining these methods enabled us to extrapolate and validate vegetation characteristics across the study area and to estimate species-specific friction coefficients for input to cross-shore wave models. On-going studies include sensitivity analyses of wave models to seasonally-dependent vegetation parameters in the nearshore and ultimately wave impacts along the coast. By accounting for site-specific and spatiotemporal variability in vegetation data, we inform scientific understanding of the interactions of vegetation, waves, and sediment processes.

  12. Template-dependent nucleotide addition in the reverse (3′-5′) direction by Thg1-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Shoko; Suzuki, Tateki; Chen, Meirong; Kato, Koji; Yu, Jian; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Thg1-like protein (TLP) catalyzes the addition of a nucleotide to the 5′-end of truncated transfer RNA (tRNA) species in a Watson-Crick template–dependent manner. The reaction proceeds in two steps: the activation of the 5′-end by adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)/guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), followed by nucleotide addition. Structural analyses of the TLP and its reaction intermediates have revealed the atomic detail of the template-dependent elongation reaction in the 3′-5′ direction. The enzyme creates two substrate binding sites for the first- and second-step reactions in the vicinity of one reaction center consisting of two Mg2+ ions, and the two reactions are executed at the same reaction center in a stepwise fashion. When the incoming nucleotide is bound to the second binding site with Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, the 3′-OH of the incoming nucleotide and the 5′-triphosphate of the tRNA are moved to the reaction center where the first reaction has occurred. That the 3′-5′ elongation enzyme performs this elaborate two-step reaction in one catalytic center suggests that these two reactions have been inseparable throughout the process of protein evolution. Although TLP and Thg1 have similar tetrameric organization, the tRNA binding mode of TLP is different from that of Thg1, a tRNAHis-specific G−1 addition enzyme. Each tRNAHis binds to three of the four Thg1 tetramer subunits, whereas in TLP, tRNA only binds to a dimer interface and the elongation reaction is terminated by measuring the accepter stem length through the flexible β-hairpin. Furthermore, mutational analyses show that tRNAHis is bound to TLP in a similar manner as Thg1, thus indicating that TLP has a dual binding mode. PMID:27051866

  13. Dependency of the Cusp Density Anomaly on the Variability of Forcing Inside and Outside the Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkman, D. G.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Clemmons, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth's magnetospheric cusp provides direct access of energetic particles to the thermosphere. These particles produce ionization and kinetic (particle) heating of the atmosphere. The increased ionization coupled with enhanced electric fields in the cusp produces increased Joule heating and ion drag forcing. These energy inputs largely determine the neutral density structure in the cusp region. Measurements by the CHAMP satellite (460-390- km altitude) have shown a region of strong enhanced density attributed to the combination of cusp particle and Joule heating. The Streak mission (325-123 km), on the other hand, observed a relative depletion in density in the cusp. While particle precipitation in the cusp is comparatively well constrained, the characteristics of the steady and fluctuating components of the electric field in the cusp are poorly constrained. Also, the significance of harder particle precipitation in areas adjacent to the cusp in particular at lower altitudes has not been addressed as it relates to the cusp density anomaly. We address the response of the cusp region to a range electrodynamical forcing with our high resolution two-dimensional time-dependent nonhydrostatic nonlinear dynamical model. We take advantage of our model's high resolution and focus on a more typical cusp width of 2 degrees in latitude. Earlier simulations have also shown a significant contribution from soft particle precipitation. We simulate the atmospheric response to a range of realizable magnitudes of the fluctuating and steady components of the electric field to examine the dependence of the magnitude of the cusp density anomaly on a large range of observed characteristics of the electrodynamical forcing and examine, in particular, the importance of particle heating relative to Joule heating. In addition we investigate the role of harder particle precipitation in areas adjacent to the cusp in determining the lower altitude cusp density and wind structure. We compare

  14. Additional photoelectric observations and analysis of the variability of the beta Cephei stars 12 and 16 Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzebowski, T.; Jerzykiewicz, M.; Rios Herrera, M.; Rios Berumen, M.

    1980-04-01

    We present photoelectric observations of two Cephei variables - 12 and 16 Lacertae- made in 1977 in the Observatory of Zacatecas. The results of a frequency analysis made with these data and with the data obtained in the same year at the San Pedro Martir, Chiran and Bialkow Observatories are also given.

  15. Inaccuracy of Self-Evaluation as Additional Variable for Prediction of Students at Risk of Failing First-Year Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potgieter, Marietjie; Ackermann, Mia; Fletcher, Lizelle

    2010-01-01

    Early identification of students at risk of failing first-year chemistry allows timely intervention. Cognitive factors alone are insufficient predictors for success; however, non cognitive factors are usually difficult to measure. We have explored the use of demographic and performance variables, as well as the accuracy of self-evaluation as an…

  16. Contractile strength during variable heart duration is species and preload dependent.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos A A; Janssen, Paul M L

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of beat-to-beat variability on cardiac contractility. Cardiac trabeculae were isolated from the right ventricle of rabbits and beagle dogs and stimulated to isometrically contract, alternating between fixed steady state versus variable interbeat intervals. Trabeculae were stimulated at physiologically relevant frequencies for each species (dog 1 and 4 Hz; rabbit 2 and 4 Hz) intercalating fixed periods with 40% variability. A subset of the trabeculae (at 90% of optimal length) was stretched prior to stimulation between 5 and 13% and stimulated at the same frequencies with a fixed versus 40% variation. Fixed rate response at the same base frequency was measured before and after each variable period and the average force reported. In canine preparations no change in force was observed as a result of the imposed variability in beat-to-beat duration. In the rabbit, we observed a nonsignificant decrease in force between fixed and variable pacing at both 2 and 4 Hz (n = 8) when 40% variability was introduced. When a 5% and 13% stretch was applied, the correlation coefficient sharply increased, indicating a more prominent impact of the prebeat duration on the following cycle with higher preload. PMID:22131801

  17. Diverse endonucleolytic cleavage sites in the mammalian transcriptome depend upon microRNAs, Drosha, and additional nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Karginov, Fedor V.; Cheloufi, Sihem; Chong, Mark M.W.; Stark, Alexander; Smith, Andrew D.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    The lifespan of a mammalian mRNA is determined, in part, by the binding of regulatory proteins and small RNA-guided complexes. The conserved endonuclease activity of Argonaute2 requires extensive complementarity between a small RNA and its target and is not used by animal microRNAs, which pair with their targets imperfectly. Here, we investigate the endonucleolytic function of Ago2 and other nucleases by transcriptome-wide profiling of mRNA cleavage products retaining 5′-phosphate groups in mouse ES. We detect a prominent signature of Ago2-dependent cleavage events and validate several such targets. Unexpectedly, a broader class of Ago2-independent cleavage sites is also observed, indicating participation of additional nucleases in site-specific mRNA cleavage. Within this class, we identify a cohort of Drosha-dependent mRNA cleavage events that functionally regulate mRNA levels in mES cells, including one in the Dgcr8 mRNA. Together, these results highlight the underappreciated role of endonucleolytic cleavage in controlling mRNA fates in mammals. PMID:20620951

  18. Diverse endonucleolytic cleavage sites in the mammalian transcriptome depend upon microRNAs, Drosha, and additional nucleases.

    PubMed

    Karginov, Fedor V; Cheloufi, Sihem; Chong, Mark M W; Stark, Alexander; Smith, Andrew D; Hannon, Gregory J

    2010-06-25

    The life span of a mammalian mRNA is determined, in part, by the binding of regulatory proteins and small RNA-guided complexes. The conserved endonuclease activity of Argonaute2 requires extensive complementarity between a small RNA and its target and is not used by animal microRNAs, which pair with their targets imperfectly. Here we investigate the endonucleolytic function of Ago2 and other nucleases by transcriptome-wide profiling of mRNA cleavage products retaining 5' phosphate groups in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We detect a prominent signature of Ago2-dependent cleavage events and validate several such targets. Unexpectedly, a broader class of Ago2-independent cleavage sites is also observed, indicating participation of additional nucleases in site-specific mRNA cleavage. Within this class, we identify a cohort of Drosha-dependent mRNA cleavage events that functionally regulate mRNA levels in mESCs, including one in the Dgcr8 mRNA. Together, these results highlight the underappreciated role of endonucleolytic cleavage in controlling mRNA fates in mammals. PMID:20620951

  19. Activity in a Cortical-Basal Ganglia Circuit for Song Is Required for Social Context-Dependent Vocal Variability

    PubMed Central

    Stepanek, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    Variability in adult motor output is important for enabling animals to respond to changing external conditions. Songbirds are useful for studying variability because they alter the amount of variation in their song depending on social context. When an adult zebra finch male sings to a female (“directed”), his song is highly stereotyped, but when he sings alone (“undirected”), his song varies across renditions. Lesions of the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN), the output nucleus of a cortical-basal ganglia circuit for song, reduce song variability to that of the stereotyped “performance” state. However, such lesions not only eliminate LMAN's synaptic input to its targets, but can also cause structural or physiological changes in connected brain regions, and thus cannot assess whether the acute activity of LMAN is important for social modulation of adult song variability. To evaluate the effects of ongoing LMAN activity, we reversibly silenced LMAN in singing zebra finches by bilateral reverse microdialysis of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol. We found that LMAN inactivation acutely reduced undirected song variability, both across and even within syllable renditions, to the level of directed song variability in all birds examined. Song variability returned to pre-muscimol inactivation levels after drug washout. However, unlike LMAN lesions, LMAN inactivation did not eliminate social context effects on song tempo in adult birds. These results indicate that the activity of LMAN neurons acutely and actively generates social context-dependent increases in adult song variability but that social regulation of tempo is more complex. PMID:20884763

  20. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  1. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  2. Addition of 5-fluorouracil to doxorubicin-paclitaxel sequence increases caspase-dependent apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zoli, Wainer; Ulivi, Paola; Tesei, Anna; Fabbri, Francesco; Rosetti, Marco; Maltoni, Roberta; Giunchi, Donata Casadei; Ricotti, Luca; Brigliadori, Giovanni; Vannini, Ivan; Amadori, Dino

    2005-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to evaluate the activity of a combination of doxorubicin (Dox), paclitaxel (Pacl) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), to define the most effective schedule, and to investigate the mechanisms of action in human breast cancer cells. Methods The study was performed on MCF-7 and BRC-230 cell lines. The cytotoxic activity was evaluated by sulphorhodamine B assay and the type of drug interaction was assessed by the median effect principle. Cell cycle perturbation and apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry, and apoptosis-related marker (p53, bcl-2, bax, p21), caspase and thymidylate synthase (TS) expression were assessed by western blot. Results 5-FU, used as a single agent, exerted a low cytotoxic activity in both cell lines. The Dox→Pacl sequence produced a synergistic cytocidal effect and enhanced the efficacy of subsequent exposure to 5-FU in both cell lines. Specifically, the Dox→Pacl sequence blocked cells in the G2-M phase, and the addition of 5-FU forced the cells to progress through the cell cycle or killed them. Furthermore, Dox→Pacl pretreatment produced a significant reduction in basal TS expression in both cell lines, probably favoring the increase in 5-FU activity. The sequence Dox→Pacl→48-h washout→5-FU produced a synergistic and highly schedule-dependent interaction (combination index < 1), resulting in an induction of apoptosis in both experimental models regardless of hormonal, p53, bcl-2 or bax status. Apoptosis in MCF-7 cells was induced through caspase-9 activation and anti-apoptosis-inducing factor hyperexpression. In the BRC-230 cell line, the apoptotic process was triggered only by a caspase-dependent mechanism. In particular, at the end of the three-drug treatment, caspase-8 activation triggered downstream executioner caspase-3 and, to a lesser degree, caspase-7. Conclusion In our experimental models, characterized by different biomolecular profiles representing the different biology of human breast

  3. What determines the spatial variability of soil respiration and its temperature dependence (Q10) at catchment scale (Rur Catchment, Germany)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nele; Welp, Gerhard; Amelung, Wulf

    2016-04-01

    Climate change is suspected to alter temperature, soil moisture, and nutrient inputs to the soil. These factors are supposed to strongly influence soil respiration. The degree by which respiration will respond to these changes is crucial for assessing future CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere. We assume that the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q10) differs spatially depending on land use, soil unit, and texture owing to their diverse properties of soil organic matter quantity and quality. We further hypothesize that the Q10 value is additionally regulated by soil moisture and nutrient status. On the basis of soil and land use maps we divided the Rur catchment (Western Germany, 2350 km²) into so called environmental soil classes (ESC) that combine each a unique combination of the factors land use, soil unit, and texture. We took nine samples from each of the 12 most common ESC's and incubated them at five temperatures (5-25°C), at four soil moisture levels (30-75% water holding capacity), and with an unfertilized and a fertilized treatment. So far, our results indicate that both soil respiration and the Q10 value are spatially highly variable with Q10 values ranging from 1 to 4. The Q10 value is altered by the level of soil moisture and decreases when soils are as moist as 75% water holding capacity. Fertilization has no effect on the Q10 value. Currently, we are processing the whole data-set to derive the effect of ESC's on the Q10 value. Recent data suggest that forest soils are more sensitive to warming than cropland soils.

  4. The influence of non-solvent addition on the independent and dependent parameters in roller electrospinning of polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Cengiz-Callioglu, Funda; Jirsak, Oldrich; Dayik, Mehmet

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses the effects of 1,1,2,2 tetrachlorethylen (TCE) non-solvent addition on the independent (electrical conductivity, dielectric constant, surface tension and the theological properties of the solution etc.) and dependent parameters (number of Taylor cones per square meter (NTC/m2), spinning performance for one Taylor cone (SP/TC), total spinning performance (SP), fiber properties such as diameter, diameter uniformity, non-fibrous area) in roller electrospinning of polyurethane (PU). The same process parameters (voltage, distance of the electrodes, humidity, etc.) were applied for all solutions during the spinning process. According to the results, the effect of TCE non-solvent concentration on the dielectric constant, surface tension, rheological properties of the solution and also spinning performance was important statistically. Beside these results, TCE non-solvent concentration effects quality of fiber and nano web structure. Generally high fiber density, low non-fibrous percentage and uniform nanofibers were obtained from fiber morphology analyses. PMID:23901497

  5. Age Dependent Variability in Gene Expression in Fischer 344 Rat Retina.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent evidence suggests older adults may be a sensitive population with regard to environmental exposure to toxic compounds. One source of this sensitivity could be an enhanced variability in response. Studies on phenotypic differences have suggested that variation in response d...

  6. A Better Lemon Squeezer? Maximum-Likelihood Regression with Beta-Distributed Dependent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithson, Michael; Verkuilen, Jay

    2006-01-01

    Uncorrectable skew and heteroscedasticity are among the "lemons" of psychological data, yet many important variables naturally exhibit these properties. For scales with a lower and upper bound, a suitable candidate for models is the beta distribution, which is very flexible and models skew quite well. The authors present maximum-likelihood…

  7. Altered blood oxygen level-dependent signal variability in chronic post-traumatic stress disorder during symptom provocation

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jun; Zhang, Li; Qi, Rongfeng; Xu, Qiang; Li, Weihui; Hou, Cailan; Zhong, Yuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; He, Zhong; Li, Lingjiang; Lu, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent research suggests that variability in brain signal provides important information about brain function in health and disease. However, it is unknown whether blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal variability is altered in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We aimed to identify the BOLD signal variability changes of PTSD patients during symptom provocation and compare the brain patterns of BOLD signal variability with those of brain activation. Methods Twelve PTSD patients and 14 age-matched controls, who all experienced a mining accident, underwent clinical assessment as well as fMRI scanning while viewing trauma-related and neutral pictures. BOLD signal variability and brain activation were respectively examined with standard deviation (SD) and general linear model analysis, and compared between the PTSD and control groups. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to explore the association between PTSD symptom severity and these two brain measures across all subjects as well as in the PTSD group. Results PTSD patients showed increased activation in the middle occipital gyrus compared with controls, and an inverse correlation was found between PTSD symptom severity and brain activation in the hippocampus and anterior cingulate cortex/medial prefrontal cortex. Brain variability analysis revealed increased SD in the insula, anterior cingulate cortex/medial prefrontal cortex, and vermis, and decreased SD in the parahippocapal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, somatosensory cortex, and striatum. Importantly, SD alterations in several regions were found in both traumatic and neutral conditions and were stratified by PTSD symptom severity. Conclusion BOLD signal variability may be a reliable and sensitive biomarker of PTSD, and combining brain activation and brain variability analysis may provide complementary insight into the neural basis of this disorder. PMID:26229476

  8. Intraspecies Variability Affects Heterotypic Biofilms of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia: Evidences of Strain-Dependence Biofilm Modulation by Physical Contact and by Released Soluble Factors

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Graziela Murta; Colombo, Andrea Vieira; Rodrigues, Paulo Henrique; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that strain and virulence diversity exist within the population structure of Porphyromonas gingivalis. In the present study we investigate intra- and inter-species variability in biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and partners Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. All strains tested showed similar hydrophobicity, except for P. gingivalis W83 which has roughly half of the hydrophobicity of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. An intraspecies variability in coaggregation of P. gingivalis with P. intermedia was also found. The association P. gingivalis W83/P. intermedia 17 produced the thickest biofilm and strain 17 was prevalent. In a two-compartment system P. gingivalis W83 stimulates an increase in biomass of strain 17 and the latter did not stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis W83. In addition, P. gingivalis W83 also stimulates the growth of P. intermedia ATCC25611 although strain W83 was prevalent in the association with P. intermedia ATCC25611. P. gingivalis ATCC33277 was prevalent in both associations with P. intermedia and both strains of P. intermedia stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. FISH images also showed variability in biofilm structure. Thus, the outcome of the association P. gingivalis/P. intermedia seems to be strain-dependent, and both soluble factors and physical contact are relevant. The association P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens ATCC33563 produced larger biomass than each monotypic biofilm, and P. gingivalis was favored in consortia, while no differences were found in the two-compartment system. Therefore, in consortia P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens physical contact seems to favor P. gingivalis growth. The intraspecies variability found in our study suggests strain-dependence in ability of microorganisms to recognize molecules in other bacteria which may further elucidate the dysbiosis event during periodontitis development giving additional explanation for periodontal bacteria, such as P. gingivalis and P

  9. Application of Differential Transform Method to Thermoelastic Problem for Annular Disks of Variable Thickness with Temperature-Dependent Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Ryoichi

    2012-02-01

    This article analyzes the one-dimensional steady temperature field and related thermal stresses in an annular disk of variable thickness that has a temperature-dependent heat transfer coefficient and is capable of temperature-dependent internal heat generation. The temperature dependencies of the thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and the coefficient of linear thermal expansion of the disk are considered, whereas Poisson's ratio is assumed to be constant. The differential transform method (DTM) is employed to analyze not only the nonlinear heat conduction but also the resulting thermal stresses. Analytical solutions are developed for the temperature and thermal stresses in the form of simple power series. Numerical calculations are performed for an annular cooling/heating fin of variable thickness. Numerical results show that the sufficiently converged analytical solutions are in good agreement with the solutions obtained by the Adomian decomposition method and give the effects of the temperature-dependent parameters on the temperature and thermal stress profiles in the disk. The DTM is useful as a new analytical method for solving thermoelastic problems for a body with temperature-dependent parameters including material properties.

  10. Relationships among selected physical science misconceptions held by preservice elementary teachers and four variables: Formal reasoning ability, working memory capacity, verbal intelligence, and field dependence/independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Leslie Little

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of selected cognitive abilities and physical science misconceptions held by preservice elementary teachers. The cognitive abilities under investigation were: formal reasoning ability as measured by the Lawson Classroom Test of Formal Reasoning (Lawson, 1978); working memory capacity as measured by the Figural Intersection Test (Burtis & Pascual-Leone, 1974); verbal intelligence as measured by the Acorn National Academic Aptitude Test: Verbal Intelligence (Kobal, Wrightstone, & Kunze, 1944); and field dependence/independence as measured by the Group Embedded Figures Test (Witkin, Oltman, & Raskin, 1971). The number of physical science misconceptions held by preservice elementary teachers was measured by the Misconceptions in Science Questionnaire (Franklin, 1992). The data utilized in this investigation were obtained from 36 preservice elementary teachers enrolled in two sections of a science methods course at a small regional university in the southeastern United States. Multiple regression techniques were used to analyze the collected data. The following conclusions were reached following an analysis of the data. The variables of formal reasoning ability and verbal intelligence were identified as having significant relationships, both individually and in combination, to the dependent variable of selected physical science misconceptions. Though the correlations were not high enough to yield strong predictors of physical science misconceptions or strong relationships, they were of sufficient magnitude to warrant further investigation. It is recommended that further investigation be conducted replicating this study with a larger sample size. In addition, experimental research should be implemented to explore the relationships suggested in this study between the cognitive variables of formal reasoning ability and verbal intelligence and the dependent variable of selected physical science misconceptions

  11. Contact-dependent performance variability of monolayer MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Gyuchull; Yoon, Youngki

    2014-11-24

    Using self-consistent quantum transport simulations, we investigate the performance variability of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) field-effect transistors (FETs) with various contact properties. Varying the Schottky barrier in MoS{sub 2} FETs affects the output characteristics more significantly than the transfer characteristics. If doped contacts are realized, the performance variation due to non-ideal contacts becomes negligible; otherwise, channel doping can effectively suppress the performance variability in metal-contact devices. Our scaling study also reveals that for sub-10-nm channels, doped-contact devices can be more robust in terms of switching, while metal-contact MoS{sub 2} FETs can undergo the smaller penalty in output conductance.

  12. Framework for assessing key variable dependencies in loose-abrasive grinding and polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.; Aikens, D.M.; Brown, N.J.

    1995-12-01

    This memo describes a framework for identifying all key variables that determine the figuring performance of loose-abrasive lapping and polishing machines. This framework is intended as a tool for prioritizing R&D issues, assessing the completeness of process models and experimental data, and for providing a mechanism to identify any assumptions in analytical models or experimental procedures. Future plans for preparing analytical models or performing experiments can refer to this framework in establishing the context of the work.

  13. A method for detecting season-dependent modes of climate variability: S-EOF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; An, Soon-Il

    2005-08-01

    Anomalous climate is often regulated by the annual cycle. Based on this physical consideration, we propose a new method termed as Season-reliant Empirical Orthogonal Function (S-EOF) analysis to detect major modes of climate variability. The S-EOF analysis of Indo-Pacific SST during the past 54 years reveals two statistically significant leading modes, which are not obtainable by using conventional EOF analysis. These modes represent the Indo-Pacific Low-Frequency (LF) and Quasi-Biennial (QB) modes associated ENSO, and reveal the fundamental differences between the LF and QB modes in their seasonal evolution, fractional variance structure, and interdecadal variation and trend. The interdecadal variability is coupled with the LF mode, suggesting that decadal-interdecadal SST variation is primarily represented by the ENSO-like interdecadal regime shift in the late 1970s. A warming trend is mingled with the QB mode, accounting for a large portion of the local SST variability in the Maritime Continent-western Pacific horseshoe region.

  14. Age-Dependent Variability in Gene Expression in Male Fischer 344 Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Wright, Fred A.; Royland, Joyce

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that older adults may be a sensitive population with regard to environmental exposure to toxic compounds. One source of this sensitivity could be an enhanced variability in response. Studies on phenotypic differences have suggested that variation in response does increase with age. However, few reports address the question of variation in gene expression as an underlying cause for increased variability of phenotypic response in the aged. In this study, we utilized global analysis to compare variation in constitutive gene expression in the retinae of young (4 months), middle-aged (11 months), and aged (23 months) Fischer 344 rats. Three hundred and forty transcripts were identified in which variance in expression increased from 4 to 23 months of age, while only 12 transcripts were found for which it decreased. Functional roles for identified genes were clustered in basic biological categories including cell communication, function, metabolism, and response to stimuli. Our data suggest that population stochastically induced variability should be considered in assessing sensitivity due to old age. PMID:18936298

  15. A computer program suitable for fitting linear models when the dependent variable is dichotomous, polichotomous or censored survival and non-linear models when the dependent variable is quantitative.

    PubMed

    Morabito, A; Marubini, E

    1976-03-01

    Given a set of measurements of s explanatory variables corresponding to each experimental unit, a computer program, whose methodological background can be found in [2] has been written in FORTRAN IV language in order to perform regression analyses when the dependent variable is: (i) dichotomous; (ii) polichotomous; (iii) censored survival. In the two former the Cox's [6] linear logistic models are used while in the third one it has been resorted to the models suggested by Feigl and Zelen [8]. The statistical estimation procedure is maximum likelihood and among the different algorithms developed to reach this goal, the one published by Van der Voort and Dorpema [3], has been utilized. Furthermore, when the dependent variable is quantitative, the program is suitable to fit any function non-linear in the parameters; the pertinent function and its first and second derivatives must be provided by the user. In the present version, implemented on a Univac 1106 machine, the program fits directly the Gompertz function. PMID:1269260

  16. Time dependent analysis of assay comparability: a novel approach to understand intra- and inter-site variability over time.

    PubMed

    Winiwarter, Susanne; Middleton, Brian; Jones, Barry; Courtney, Paul; Lindmark, Bo; Page, Ken M; Clark, Alan; Landqvist, Claire

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate here a novel use of statistical tools to study intra- and inter-site assay variability of five early drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics in vitro assays over time. Firstly, a tool for process control is presented. It shows the overall assay variability but allows also the following of changes due to assay adjustments and can additionally highlight other, potentially unexpected variations. Secondly, we define the minimum discriminatory difference/ratio to support projects to understand how experimental values measured at different sites at a given time can be compared. Such discriminatory values are calculated for 3 month periods and followed over time for each assay. Again assay modifications, especially assay harmonization efforts, can be noted. Both the process control tool and the variability estimates are based on the results of control compounds tested every time an assay is run. Variability estimates for a limited set of project compounds were computed as well and found to be comparable. This analysis reinforces the need to consider assay variability in decision making, compound ranking and in silico modeling. PMID:25697964

  17. Distance-dependent Ground motion variability from source models of the 1992 Landers earthquake and synthetic rupture models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, J. C.; Mai, P. M.; Galis, M.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate near field ground motion variability due to five different kinematic rupture models for 1992 Landers earthquake. The ground motion simulations are accomplished by solving the elasto-dynamic equations of motion using a generalized finite-difference method (Ely et al., 2008). Simulated waveforms are calibrated against near-field strong-motion recordings. We then analyze a large data-set of ground-motions from 2000 sites, binned with respect to distance and azimuth to compute mean and standard deviation of peak ground velocity (PGV). We consider 1D-velocity structures as used in the source inversions, and honor the geometrical complexity due to fault segmentation. Our simulations reveal that ground motion variability is reduced as the distance from the fault increases. Variability in the kinematic sources has considerable impact on the resulting shaking variability, although the five source models considered are derived by inversion of seismic and/or geodetic data. Simulated mean PGV and its standard deviation are comparable to empirical estimates using the ground-motion prediction equation (GMPE) of Boore and Atkinson (2008). In addition, we find that intra-event ground motion variability is large in fault-parallel and small in fault-normal direction. We also compare our simulations with and without Spudich and Chiou (2008) directivity corrections, applied to Boore and Atkinson (2008), which shows that slip heterogeneity controls near-field ground-motion variability. We further investigate the effect of slip heterogeneity by considering eleven (ten heterogeneous and one uniform) synthetic rupture models. Heterogeneous slip models are generated following the algorithm of Mai and Beroza (2002) for different correlation lengths and Hurst exponents. We then examine synthetic seismograms calculated at 1500 stations for the eleven rupture models, confirming that the distance decay of ground motion variability is due to slip heterogeneity.

  18. Field Dependence-Independence as a Variable in Second Language Cloze Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles; Hansen, Jacqueline

    1983-01-01

    A study of test performance and field dependent-independent (FD/I) cognitive style in 250 college students showed consistently positive correlation between FI and cloze test scores, and other measures such as final grade. It is suggested cloze tests may call forth cognitive restructuring capabilities more easily for more field independent…

  19. Management-dependent soil property variability of Southeastern U.S. Coastal Plain plinthic kandiudults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) defines a management or use-dependent property as a type of dynamic soil property which changes on a human time-scale due to anthropogenic disturbances (indicative of soil change). Interest in soil change and C sequestration has led to increased emphasis ...

  20. The Relationships between Cognitive Style of Field Dependence and Learner Variables in E-Learning Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozcu, Omer Faruk

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between cognitive styles of field dependent learners with their attitudes towards e-learning (distance education) and instructional behavior in e-learning instruction. The Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) and the attitude survey (for students' preferences) towards e-learning instruction as distance…

  1. Field Dependence-Independence as a Variable in Second Language Cloze Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jacqueline; Stansfield, Charles

    This paper explores the influence of field independent-dependent cognitive style on second language test performance, especially as it relates to performance on the integrative type of measure known as the cloze test. Approximately 250 college students enrolled in a first semester Spanish course formed the sample group for this correlational…

  2. The variability and dietary dependence of urinary oxalate excretion in recurrent calcium stone formers.

    PubMed

    Brown, J M; Stratmann, G; Cowley, D M; Mottram, B M; Chalmers, A H

    1987-07-01

    Twenty-two recurrent calcium stone formers had 24-h urinary oxalate excretions on their home diets which were significantly greater than those of 30 normal subjects (0.48 +/- 0.23 mmol/d; mean +/- SD compared with 0.31 +/- 0.11; P less than 0.01). The stone formers also demonstrated marked day to day variability in oxalate excretion indicating that a single normal urinary oxalate measurement did not exclude significant hyperoxaluria at other times. On a hospital diet containing 1000 mg calcium per day, urinary oxalate excretion fell significantly from 0.48 +/- 0.23 mmol/d to 0.32 +/- 0.12; P less than 0.01. As the urinary calcium excretion in and out of hospital was similar, it seems unlikely that low calcium intake at home was responsible for the hyperoxaluria. All patients had recurrent symptomatic stone disease and had been advised to avoid foods rich in oxalate. Whilst poor compliance is a possible explanation for the variability in oxalate excretion, we believe it is more likely that there is an inadvertent intake of oxalogenic precursors in their diet. As normal subjects do not demonstrate hyperoxaluria on similar home diets, stone formers may have a metabolic defect in the handling of these precursors. PMID:3662388

  3. Variability in projected elevation dependent warming in boreal midlatitude winter in CMIP5 climate models and its potential drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Imtiaz; Sinsky, Eric; Miller, James R.

    2016-04-01

    The future rate of climate change in mountains has many potential human impacts, including those related to water resources, ecosystem services, and recreation. Analysis of the ensemble mean response of CMIP5 global climate models (GCMs) shows amplified warming in high elevation regions during the cold season in boreal midlatitudes. We examine how the twenty-first century elevation-dependent response in the daily minimum surface air temperature [d(ΔTmin)/dz] varies among 27 different GCMs during winter for the RCP 8.5 emissions scenario. The focus is on regions within the northern hemisphere mid-latitude band between 27.5°N and 40°N, which includes both the Rocky Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau/Himalayas. We find significant variability in d(ΔTmin)/dz among the individual models ranging from 0.16 °C/km (10th percentile) to 0.97 °C/km (90th percentile), although nearly all of the GCMs (24 out of 27) show a significant positive value for d(ΔTmin)/dz. To identify some of the important drivers associated with the variability in d(ΔTmin)/dz during winter, we evaluate the co-variance between d(ΔTmin)/dz and the differential response of elevation-based anomalies in different climate variables as well as the GCMs' spatial resolution, their global climate sensitivity, and their elevation-dependent free air temperature response. We find that d(ΔTmin)/dz has the strongest correlation with elevation-dependent increases in surface water vapor, followed by elevation-dependent decreases in surface albedo, and a weak positive correlation with the GCMs' free air temperature response.

  4. Social communication intervention effects vary by dependent variable type in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Paul J.; Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Woynaroski, Tiffany; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Sandbank, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have difficulty communicating in ways that are primarily for initiating and maintaining social relatedness (i.e., social communication). We hypothesized that the way researchers measured social communication would affect whether treatment effects were found. Using a best evidence review method, we found that treatments were shown to improve social communication outcomes approximately 54% of the time. The probability that a treatment affected social communication varied greatly depending on whether social communication was directly targeted (63%) or not (39%). Finally, the probability that a treatment affected social communication also varied greatly depending on whether social communication as measured in (a) contexts very similar to treatment sessions (82%) or (b) contexts that differed from treatment on at least setting, materials, and communication partner (33%). This paper also provides several methodological contributions. PMID:25346776

  5. Culture and social class as intervening variables in relapse prevention with chemically dependent women.

    PubMed

    Weiner, H D; Wallen, M C; Zankowski, G L

    1990-01-01

    Craving and relapse are complex, poorly understood phenomena. A distinctive and baffling characteristic of the disease of chemical dependency is the continuing impulse to use alcohol and/or other drugs, even after lengthy periods of sobriety. This article discusses relapse prevention, focusing on public-sector chemically dependent women. Relapse among these women must be seen in the total context of their lives. Poverty and social disorganization do not directly cause relapse, but problems related to daily life under such conditions represent significant risk factors. The Eagleville Hospital treatment model and relapse prevention programs are described, and it is noted that public-sector women typically present with problems related to being raised in addicted households, residing in drug-saturated inner-city environments, deficits in child-rearing skills, destructive (often abusive) relationships with men, social interactions involving other substance abusers, few (if any) work skills, minimal educational achievement, low self-esteem, and poor self-image. A case study illustrates the course of treatment and relapse prevention efforts with a typical public-sector chemically dependent woman. PMID:2374071

  6. Uracil residues dependent on the deaminase AID in immunoglobulin gene variable and switch regions

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Robert W; Saribasak, Huseyin; Martomo, Stella A; McClure, Rhonda L; Yang, William; Vaisman, Alexandra; Gramlich, Hillary S; Schatz, David G; Woodgate, Roger; Wilson, David M; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates diversity of immunoglobulin genes through deamination of cytosine to uracil. Two opposing models have been proposed for the deamination of DNA or RNA by AID. Although most data support DNA deamination, there is no physical evidence of uracil residues in immunoglobulin genes. Here we demonstrate their presence by determining the sensitivity of DNA to digestion with uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) and abasic endonuclease. Using several methods of detection, we identified uracil residues in the variable and switch regions. Uracil residues were generated within 24 h of B cell stimulation, were present on both DNA strands and were found to replace mainly cytosine bases. Our data provide direct evidence for the model that AID functions by deaminating cytosine residues in DNA. PMID:21151102

  7. Dependence of three variables on the social vulnerability of 497 districts in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiz, Muhammad Fadli; Sa'idah, NurFaizatus

    2015-12-01

    Here we present about social vulnerability in Indonesia. Our study is to analyze relationship between at least 3 characteristics which effecting social vulnerability using correlation analysis. Actually, ten variables which defined as social vulnerability, but we decided as 3 main characteristics; percentage of female population, rate of population increase, and percentage of poor population. The study shows that percentage of female population and rate of population increase has - 0,153 correlation. Other method, that is Principal Component Analysis (PCA) also applied. This analysis also give 3 main characteristics from 184 districts with female population ≥ 50% in Indonesia. We hope, this study can be one of reference in determining principle component that effecting social vulnerability for helping communities better prepare for any disaster.

  8. Dependence of P-wave dispersion on mean arterial pressure as an independent hemodynamic variable in school children

    PubMed Central

    González, Emilio F.; Llanes, María del Carmen; Llanes, Merlin Garí; García, Yosvany

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The relationship between diastolic dysfunction and P-wave dispersion (PWD) in the electrocardiogram has been studied for some time. In this regard, echocardiography is emerging as a diagnostic tool to improve risk stratification for mild hypertension. Objective: To determine the dependence of PWD on the electrocardiogram and on echocardiographic variables in a pediatric population. Methods: 515 children from three elementary schools were studied from a total of 565 children. Those whose parents did not want them to take part in the study, as well as those with known congenital diseases, were excluded. Tests including 12-lead surface ECGs and 4 blood pressure (BP) measurements were performed. Maximum and minimum P-values were measured, and the PWD on the electrocardiogram was calculated. Echocardiography for structural measurements and the pulsed Doppler of mitral flow were also performed. Results: A significant correlation in statistical variables was found between PWD and mean BP for pre-hypertensive and hypertensive children, i.e., r = 0.32, p <0.01 and r = 0.33, p <0.01, respectively. There was a significant correlation found between PWD and the left atrial area (r = 0.45 and p <0.01). Conclusions: We highlight the dependency between PWD, the electrocardiogram and mean blood pressure. We also draw attention to the dependence of PWD on the duration of the mitral inflow A-wave. This result provides an explanation for earlier changes in atrial electrophysiological and hemodynamic characteristics in pediatric patients. PMID:24892616

  9. Time-dependent many-variable variational Monte Carlo method for nonequilibrium strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, Kota; Ohgoe, Takahiro; Imada, Masatoshi

    2015-12-01

    We develop a time-dependent variational Monte Carlo (t-VMC) method for quantum dynamics of strongly correlated electrons. The t-VMC method has been recently applied to bosonic systems and quantum spin systems. Here we propose a time-dependent trial wave function with many variational parameters, which is suitable for nonequilibrium strongly correlated electron systems. As the trial state, we adopt the generalized pair-product wave function with correlation factors and quantum-number projections. This trial wave function has been proven to accurately describe ground states of strongly correlated electron systems. To show the accuracy and efficiency of our trial wave function in nonequilibrium states as well, we present our benchmark results for relaxation dynamics during and after interaction quench protocols of fermionic Hubbard models. We find that our trial wave function well reproduces the exact results for the time evolution of physical quantities such as energy, momentum distribution, spin structure factor, and superconducting correlations. These results show that the t-VMC with our trial wave function offers an efficient and accurate way to study challenging problems of nonequilibrium dynamics in strongly correlated electron systems.

  10. Human bone marrow stromal cells display variable anatomic site-dependent response and recovery from irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Damek-Poprawa, Monika; Stefanik, Derek; Levin, Lawrence M.; Akintoye, Sunday O.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Orofacial bone is commonly affected by osteoradionecrosis (ORN) during head and neck cancer radiotherapy possibly due to interactions of several factors including radiation damage to resident bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Irradiation causes DNA damage, triggers p53-dependent signaling resulting in either cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis. In same individuals, disproportionately higher rapid growth of orofacial BMSCs relative to those of axial/appendicular bones suggests their response to radiation is skeletally site-specific. We hypothesized that survival and osteogenic recovery capacity of irradiated human BMSCs is site-dependent based on anatomic skeletal site of origin. Methods Early passage BMSCs from maxilla, mandible and iliac crest of four normal volunteers were exposed to 2.5 to 10 Gy gamma radiation to evaluate clonogenic survival, effects on cell cycle, DNA damage, p53-related response and in vivo osteogenic regenerative capacity. Results Orofacial bone marrow stromal cells (OF-MSCs) survived higher radiation doses and recovered quicker than iliac crest (IC-MSCs) based on clonogenic survival, proliferation and accumulation in G0G1 phase. Post-irradiation p53 level was relatively unchanged but expression of p21, a downstream effector was moderately increased in OF-MSCs. Re-establishment of in vivo bone regeneration was delayed more in irradiated IC-MSCs relative to OF-MSCs. Conclusions Effect of irradiation on human BMSCs was skeletal site-specific with OF-MSCs displaying higher radio-resistance and quicker recovery than IC-MSCs. PMID:20378097

  11. Scale-dependency of the hydraulic properties of a variably saturated heterogeneous sandy subsoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaux, M.; Vanclooster, M.

    2006-08-01

    SummaryThe effective hydraulic behaviour of heterogeneous sand was experimentally investigated at two scales under transient flow upper boundary conditions. At the monoliths-scale, one-dimensional inverse modelling was performed from a transient infiltration experiment by implementing in the objective function the outflow and pressure head time series at four depths. Notwithstanding the important heterogeneity of the subsoil, principally due to the presence of discontinuous clay and a stone layer, we observed that the effective behaviour was surprisingly well reproduced. It was also observed that the structural features mainly induced a kind of hysteresis between the saturation and drainage cycles of the outflow time series. Subsequently, 104 Kopecky cores (100 cm 3) were sub-sampled throughout the monolith, mainly in the sandy matrix. The variability of local hydraulic parameters was investigated by optimising the local hydraulic parameters from multi-step outflow experiments and measured retention points. The comparison between 1-D optimised, measured and Kopecky-averaged retention curves showed relatively similar shape near saturation. In contrast to this, important discrepancies existed between averaged local scale hydraulic conductivity and effective hydraulic conductivity close to saturation. Different experimental designs at different scales may explain the observed discrepancies. It is further suggested that the monolith-scale effective hydraulic functions are more representative for wet soil conditions. This case study illustrates the complexity of finding validated scaling relationships for the hydraulic properties of heterogeneous soils at scales larger than the usual small column scale.

  12. Spatio-temporal dependencies between hospital beds, physicians and health expenditure using visual variables and data classification in statistical table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medyńska-Gulij, Beata; Cybulski, Paweł

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyses the use of table visual variables of statistical data of hospital beds as an important tool for revealing spatio-temporal dependencies. It is argued that some of conclusions from the data about public health and public expenditure on health have a spatio-temporal reference. Different from previous studies, this article adopts combination of cartographic pragmatics and spatial visualization with previous conclusions made in public health literature. While the significant conclusions about health care and economic factors has been highlighted in research papers, this article is the first to apply visual analysis to statistical table together with maps which is called previsualisation.

  13. Study of temperature-dependent ultrathin oxide growth on Si(111) using variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, Bhola N.; Woollam, John A.

    1990-01-01

    The monolayer-sensitive variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry technique was used to study the temperature-dependent growth mechanisms of an ultrathin oxide layer on top of silicon. The oxidation was done in atomic oxygen produced in a pure oxygen plasma and driven by an RF power source. The results have been compared with the recently proposed model of Murali and Murarka for ultrathin oxide growth on top of silicon. The activation energies of different growth parameters associated with the oxide growth have also been determined.

  14. Association Mapping of Complex Trait Loci With Context-Dependent Effects and Unknown Context Variable

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpää, Mikko J.; Bhattacharjee, Madhuchhanda

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for Bayesian analysis of genetic heterogeneity and multilocus association in random population samples is presented. The method is valid for quantitative and binary traits as well as for multiallelic markers. In the method, individuals are stochastically assigned into two etiological groups that can have both their own, and possibly different, subsets of trait-associated (disease-predisposing) loci or alleles. The method is favorable especially in situations when etiological models are stratified by the factors that are unknown or went unmeasured, that is, if genetic heterogeneity is due to, for example, unknown genes × environment or genes × gene interactions. Additionally, a heterogeneity structure for the phenotype does not need to follow the structure of the general population; it can have a distinct selection history. The performance of the method is illustrated with simulated example of genes × environment interaction (quantitative trait with loosely linked markers) and compared to the results of single-group analysis in the presence of missing data. Additionally, example analyses with previously analyzed cystic fibrosis and type 2 diabetes data sets (binary traits with closely linked markers) are presented. The implementation (written in WinBUGS) is freely available for research purposes from http://www.rni.helsinki.fi/∼mjs/. PMID:17028339

  15. ENERGY-DEPENDENT POWER SPECTRAL STATES AND ORIGIN OF APERIODIC VARIABILITY IN BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Wenfei; Zhang Wenda

    2013-06-20

    We found that the black hole candidate MAXI J1659-152 showed distinct power spectra, i.e., power-law noise (PLN) versus band-limited noise (BLN) plus quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) below and above about 2 keV, respectively, in observations with Swift and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the 2010 outburst, indicating a high energy cutoff of the PLN and a low energy cutoff of the BLN and QPOs around 2 keV. The emergence of the PLN and the fading of the BLN and QPOs initially took place below 2 keV when the source entered the hard intermediate state and settled in the soft state three weeks later. The evolution was accompanied by the emergence of the disk spectral component and decreases in the amplitudes of variability in the soft and hard X-ray bands. Our results indicate that the PLN is associated with an optically thick disk in both hard and intermediate states, and the power spectral state is independent of the X-ray energy spectral state in a broadband view. We suggest that in the hard or intermediate state, the BLN and QPOs emerge from the innermost hot flow subjected to Comptonization, while the PLN originates from the optically thick disk farther out. The energy cutoffs of the PLN and the BLN or QPOs then follow the temperature of the seed photons from the inner edge of the optically thick disk, while the high frequency cutoff of the PLN follows the orbital frequency of the inner edge of the optically thick disk as well.

  16. Oxygen additive amount dependence of rate of photoresist removal by H radicals generated on a tungsten hot-wire catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masashi; Umemoto, Hironobu; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Shikama, Tomokazu; Nishiyama, Takashi; Horibe, Hideo

    2016-07-01

    We examined an environmentally friendly photoresist removal method using radicals produced by decomposing mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen on a hot tungsten catalyst. The photoresist removal rate increased with the oxygen additive amount (the flow rate ratio of oxygen to hydrogen) up to an optimal amount and then decreased gradually. When the catalyst temperature was 1600 °C, the optimal oxygen additive amount was 1.0% and the removal rate was 1.7 times higher than that in the pure hydrogen system. At 2000 °C, the optimal amount increased to 2.5% but the increase ratio decreased by 1.3 times. At high catalyst temperatures, the absolute removal rate as well as the optimal oxygen additive amount is high, but the increase ratio is low. At the optimal oxygen additive amount, H, O, and OH radicals may exert their effects together to decompose photosensitive polymers.

  17. Advanced alpha spectrum analysis based on the fitting and covariance analysis of dependent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihantola, S.; Pelikan, A.; Pöllänen, R.; Toivonen, H.

    2011-11-01

    The correct handling of statistical uncertainties is crucial especially when unfolding alpha spectra that contain a low number of counts or overlapping peaks from different nuclides. For this purpose, we have developed a new spectrum analysis software package called ADAM, which performs a full covariance calculus for alpha-particle emitting radionuclides. By analyzing a large number of simulated and measured spectra, the program was proved to give unbiased peak areas and statistically correct uncertainty limits. This applies regardless of the peak areas and the number of unknown parameters during the fitting. In addition, ADAM performs reliable deconvolution for multiplets, which opens the way for the determination of isotope ratios, such as 239Pu/240Pu.

  18. Seismic hazard from induced seismicity: effect of time-dependent hazard variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convertito, V.; Sharma, N.; Maercklin, N.; Emolo, A.; Zollo, A.

    2012-12-01

    Geothermal systems are drawing large attention worldwide as an alternative source of energy. Although geothermal energy is beneficial, field operations can produce induced seismicity whose effects can range from light and unfelt to severe damaging. In a recent paper by Convertito et al. (2012), we have investigated the effect of time-dependent seismicity parameters on seismic hazard from induced seismicity. The analysis considered the time-variation of the b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter relationship and the seismicity rate, and assumed a non-homogeneous Poisson model to solve the hazard integral. The procedure was tested in The Geysers geothermal area in Northern California where commercial exploitation has started in the 1960s. The analyzed dataset consists of earthquakes recorded during the period 2007 trough 2010 by the LBNL Geysers/Calpine network. To test the reliability of the analysis, we applied a simple forecasting procedure which compares the estimated hazard values in terms of ground-motion values having fixed probability of exceedance and the observed ground-motion values. The procedure is feasible for monitoring purposes and for calibrating the production/extraction rate to avoid adverse consequences. However, one of the main assumptions we made concern the fact that both median predictions and standard deviation of the ground-motion prediction equation (GMPE) are stationary. Particularly for geothermal areas where the number of recorded earthquakes can rapidly change with time, we want to investigate how a variation of the coefficients of the used GMPE and of the standard deviation influences the hazard estimates. Basically, we hypothesize that the physical-mechanical properties of a highly fractured medium which is continuously perturbed by field operations can produce variations of both source and medium properties that cannot be captured by a stationary GMPE. We assume a standard GMPE which accounts for the main effects which modify the scaling

  19. Nitrogen-Dependent Regulation of De Novo Cytokinin Biosynthesis in Rice: The Role of Glutamine Metabolism as an Additional Signal

    PubMed Central

    Kamada-Nobusada, Tomoe; Makita, Nobue; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinin activity in plants is closely related to nitrogen availability, and an Arabidopsis gene for adenosine phosphate-isopentenyltransferase (IPT), IPT3, is regulated by inorganic nitrogen sources in a nitrate-specific manner. In this study, we have identified another regulatory system of cytokinin de novo biosynthesis in response to nitrogen status. In rice, OsIPT4, OsIPT5, OsIPT7 and OsIPT8 were up-regulated in response to exogenously applied nitrate and ammonium, with accompanying accumulation of cytokinins. Pre-treatment of roots with l-methionine sulfoximine, a potent inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, abolished the nitrate- and ammonium-dependent induction of OsIPT4 and OsIPT5, while glutamine application induced their expression. Thus, neither nitrate nor ammonium, but glutamine or a related metabolite, is essential for the induction of these IPT genes in rice. On the other hand, glutamine-dependent induction of IPT3 occurs in Arabidopsis, at least to some extent. In transgenic lines repressing the expression of OsIPT4, which is the dominant IPT in rice roots, the nitrogen-dependent increase of cytokinin in the xylem sap was significantly reduced, and seedling shoot growth was retarded despite sufficient nitrogen. We conclude that plants possess multiple regulation systems for nitrogen-dependent cytokinin biosynthesis to modulate growth in response to nitrogen availability. PMID:24058148

  20. X-ray Variability Characteristics of the Narrow line SEYFERT 1 MKN 766 I: Energy Dependent Timing Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Turner, T. J.; Papadakis, I.; Arevalo, P.; Reeves, J. N.; Miller, L.

    2007-01-01

    We present the energy-dependent power spectral density (PSD) and cross-spectral properties of Mkn 766 obtained from a six-revolution XMM-Newton observation in 2005. The resulting PSDs, which have highest temporal frequency resolution for an AGN PSD to date, show breaks which increase in temporal frequency as photon energy increases; break frequencies differ by an average of approx.0.4 in the log between the softest and hardest bands. The consistency of the 2001 and 2005 observations variability properties, namely PSD shapes and the linear rms-flux relation, suggests the 2005 observation is simply a low-flux extension of the 2001 observation. The coherence function is measured to be approx.0.6-0.9 at temporal frequencies below the PSD break, and is lower for relatively larger energy band separation; coherence also drops significantly towards zero above the PSD break frequency. Temporal frequency-dependent soft-to-hard time lags are detected in this object for the first time: lags increase towards longer time scales and as energy separation increases. Cross-spectral properties are the thus consistent with previous measurements for Mkn 766 (Vaughan & Fabian 2003) and other accreting black hole systems. The results are discussed in the context of several variability models, including those based on inwardly-propagating viscosity variations in the accretion disk.

  1. Insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in dairy cows with variable fat mobilization around calving.

    PubMed

    Weber, C; Schäff, C T; Kautzsch, U; Börner, S; Erdmann, S; Görs, S; Röntgen, M; Sauerwein, H; Bruckmaier, R M; Metges, C C; Kuhla, B; Hammon, H M

    2016-08-01

    fatty acids decreased during HGC and EGHIC, but in both clamps, pp nonesterified fatty acid concentrations did not reach the ap levels. The study demonstrated a minor influence of different degrees of body fat mobilization on insulin metabolism in cows during the transition period. The distinct decrease in the glucose-dependent release of insulin pp is the most striking finding that explains the impaired insulin action after calving, but does not explain differences in body fat mobilization between HLFC and LLFC cows. PMID:27179866

  2. Variability in Ozone in the Tropical Upper Troposphere-Lower Stratosphere from the 1998-2000 SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. M.; Witte, J. C.; McPeters, R. D.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Oltmans, S. J.; Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.; Coetzee, G. J. R.; Posny, F.; Kawakami, S.; Ogawa, T.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first view of lower stratospheric and upper tropospheric structure from sondes is provided by a 3-year, 10-site record from the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) network: . Observations covering 1998-2000 were made over Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Reunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil. Taking the UT/LS (upper troposphere- lower stratosphere) as the region between 12 and 17 km, we examine ozone variability in this region on a week-to-week and seasonal basis. The tropopause is lower in September-October-November than in March-April-May, when ozone is a minimum at most SHADOZ stations. A zonal wave-one pattern (referring to ozone mixing ratios greater over the Atlantic and adjacent continents than over the Pacific and eastern Indian Ocean), persists all year. The wave, predominantly in the troposphere and with variable magnitude, appears to be due to general circulation - with subsidence over the Atlantic and frequent deep convection over the Pacific and Indian Ocean. The variability of deep convection most prominent at Java, Fiji, Samoa and Natal - is explored in time-vs-altitude ozone curtains. Stratospheric incursions into the troposphere are most prominent in soundings at Irene and Reunion Island.

  3. Evidence of Shared Genome-Wide Additive Genetic Effects on Interpersonal Trauma Exposure and Generalized Vulnerability to Drug Dependence in a Population of Substance Users.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Rohan H C; Nugent, Nicole R; Brick, Leslie A; Bidwell, Cinnamon L; McGeary, John E; Keller, Matthew C; Knopik, Valerie S

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which additive genetic effects on trauma are shared with additive genetic effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate additive genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with additive genetic effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma. PMID:27214850

  4. Maximum-likelihood estimation of channel-dependent trial-to-trial variability of auditory evoked brain responses in MEG

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We propose a mathematical model for multichannel assessment of the trial-to-trial variability of auditory evoked brain responses in magnetoencephalography (MEG). Methods Following the work of de Munck et al., our approach is based on the maximum likelihood estimation and involves an approximation of the spatio-temporal covariance of the contaminating background noise by means of the Kronecker product of its spatial and temporal covariance matrices. Extending the work of de Munck et al., where the trial-to-trial variability of the responses was considered identical to all channels, we evaluate it for each individual channel. Results Simulations with two equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) with different trial-to-trial variability, one seeded in each of the auditory cortices, were used to study the applicability of the proposed methodology on the sensor level and revealed spatial selectivity of the trial-to-trial estimates. In addition, we simulated a scenario with neighboring ECDs, to show limitations of the method. We also present an illustrative example of the application of this methodology to real MEG data taken from an auditory experimental paradigm, where we found hemispheric lateralization of the habituation effect to multiple stimulus presentation. Conclusions The proposed algorithm is capable of reconstructing lateralization effects of the trial-to-trial variability of evoked responses, i.e. when an ECD of only one hemisphere habituates, whereas the activity of the other hemisphere is not subject to habituation. Hence, it may be a useful tool in paradigms that assume lateralization effects, like, e.g., those involving language processing. PMID:24939398

  5. Using rain-on-snow events to evaluate the quality of bias correction to represent complex inter-variable dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Ole; Bosshard, Thomas; Weingartner, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    A key issue for adaptation planning is the information of projections about changes of extremes. Climate projections of meteorological extremes and their downscaling are a challenge on their own. Yet - at least in hydrology - meteorological extremes are not necessarily hydrological extremes. These can also result from a sequence of days with only moderate meteorological conditions, too. This sequences are called "storylines". In climate change impact assess studies it is relevant to know, whether these meteorological storylines are represented in regional climate models, and how well can bias correction preserve or improve the representation. One storyline leading to hydrological extremes are rain-on-snow events, and more specifically rain-on-snowfall events. These events challenge the regional climate model and the bias correction in terms of representing absolute values and inter-variable dependences. This study makes use of the rain-on-snow-storylines to evaluate the performance of regional climate models and a bias correction method in reproducing complex inter-variable dependencies. At first, we applied a hydrological model to a mesoscale catchment in Switzerland that is known to be effected by rain-on-snow events. At second, the ERA-Interim driven regional climate model RCA4.5 - developed at SMHI - with a spatial resolution of 0.11 * 0.11 degree was used to drive the hydrological model. At third, bias-correction of the RCM was done applying the distribution based scaling (DBS) bias-correction method (Yang et al., 2010) developed at the SMHI. The bias-corrected data then also served as driving input data to the hydrological model. Based on the simulated runoff, as well as simulated precipitation, temperature, and snow pack data, an algorithm to detect rain-on-snow events was applied. Finally, the presence or absents of rain-on-snow events for the three different climate input data, ERA.RCA4.5, DBS corrected ERA.RC4 and observed climate, are evaluated within

  6. Polymyxin Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phoQ Mutants Is Dependent on Additional Two-Component Regulatory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gutu, Alina D.; Sgambati, Nicole; Strasbourger, Pnina; Brannon, Mark K.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Haugen, Eric; Kaul, Rajinder K.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop resistance to polymyxin as a consequence of mutations in the PhoPQ regulatory system, mediated by covalent lipid A modification. Transposon mutagenesis of a polymyxin-resistant phoQ mutant defined 41 novel loci required for resistance, including two regulatory systems, ColRS and CprRS. Deletion of the colRS genes, individually or in tandem, abrogated the polymyxin resistance of a ΔphoQ mutant, as did individual or tandem deletion of cprRS. Individual deletion of colR or colS in a ΔphoQ mutant also suppressed 4-amino-l-arabinose addition to lipid A, consistent with the known role of this modification in polymyxin resistance. Surprisingly, tandem deletion of colRS or cprRS in the ΔphoQ mutant or individual deletion of cprR or cprS failed to suppress 4-amino-l-arabinose addition to lipid A, indicating that this modification alone is not sufficient for PhoPQ-mediated polymyxin resistance in P. aeruginosa. Episomal expression of colRS or cprRS in tandem or of cprR individually complemented the Pm resistance phenotype in the ΔphoQ mutant, while episomal expression of colR, colS, or cprS individually did not. Highly polymyxin-resistant phoQ mutants of P. aeruginosa isolated from polymyxin-treated cystic fibrosis patients harbored mutant alleles of colRS and cprS; when expressed in a ΔphoQ background, these mutant alleles enhanced polymyxin resistance. These results define ColRS and CprRS as two-component systems regulating polymyxin resistance in P. aeruginosa, indicate that addition of 4-amino-l-arabinose to lipid A is not the only PhoPQ-regulated biochemical mechanism required for resistance, and demonstrate that colRS and cprS mutations can contribute to high-level clinical resistance. PMID:23459479

  7. High interindividual variability in dose-dependent reduction in speed of movement after exposing C. elegans to shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Angstman, Nicholas B.; Kiessling, Maren C.; Frank, Hans-Georg; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (br-mTBI) little is known about the connections between initial trauma and expression of individual clinical symptoms. Partly due to limitations of current in vitro and in vivo models of br-mTBI, reliable prediction of individual short- and long-term symptoms based on known blast input has not yet been possible. Here we demonstrate a dose-dependent effect of shock wave exposure on C. elegans using shock waves that share physical characteristics with those hypothesized to induce br-mTBI in humans. Increased exposure to shock waves resulted in decreased mean speed of movement while increasing the proportion of worms rendered paralyzed. Recovery of these two behavioral symptoms was observed during increasing post-traumatic waiting periods. Although effects were observed on a population-wide basis, large interindividual variability was present between organisms exposed to the same highly controlled conditions. Reduction of cavitation by exposing worms to shock waves in polyvinyl alcohol resulted in reduced effect, implicating primary blast effects as damaging components in shock wave induced trauma. Growing worms on NGM agar plates led to the same general results in initial shock wave effect in a standard medium, namely dose-dependence and high interindividual variability, as raising worms in liquid cultures. Taken together, these data indicate that reliable prediction of individual clinical symptoms based on known blast input as well as drawing conclusions on blast input from individual clinical symptoms is not feasible in br-mTBI. PMID:25705183

  8. High interindividual variability in dose-dependent reduction in speed of movement after exposing C. elegans to shock waves.

    PubMed

    Angstman, Nicholas B; Kiessling, Maren C; Frank, Hans-Georg; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (br-mTBI) little is known about the connections between initial trauma and expression of individual clinical symptoms. Partly due to limitations of current in vitro and in vivo models of br-mTBI, reliable prediction of individual short- and long-term symptoms based on known blast input has not yet been possible. Here we demonstrate a dose-dependent effect of shock wave exposure on C. elegans using shock waves that share physical characteristics with those hypothesized to induce br-mTBI in humans. Increased exposure to shock waves resulted in decreased mean speed of movement while increasing the proportion of worms rendered paralyzed. Recovery of these two behavioral symptoms was observed during increasing post-traumatic waiting periods. Although effects were observed on a population-wide basis, large interindividual variability was present between organisms exposed to the same highly controlled conditions. Reduction of cavitation by exposing worms to shock waves in polyvinyl alcohol resulted in reduced effect, implicating primary blast effects as damaging components in shock wave induced trauma. Growing worms on NGM agar plates led to the same general results in initial shock wave effect in a standard medium, namely dose-dependence and high interindividual variability, as raising worms in liquid cultures. Taken together, these data indicate that reliable prediction of individual clinical symptoms based on known blast input as well as drawing conclusions on blast input from individual clinical symptoms is not feasible in br-mTBI. PMID:25705183

  9. Space Takes Time: Concentration Dependent Output Codes from Primary Olfactory Networks Rapidly Provide Additional Information at Defined Discrimination Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kevin C.; Bradley, Samual; Chapman, Phillip D.; Staudacher, Erich M.; Tiede, Regina; Schachtner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    As odor concentration increases, primary olfactory network representations expand in spatial distribution, temporal complexity and duration. However, the direct relationship between concentration dependent odor representations and the psychophysical thresholds of detection and discrimination is poorly understood. This relationship is absolutely critical as thresholds signify transition points whereby representations become meaningful to the organism. Here, we matched stimulus protocols for psychophysical assays and intracellular recordings of antennal lobe (AL) projection neurons (PNs) in the moth Manduca sexta to directly compare psychophysical thresholds and the output representations they elicit. We first behaviorally identified odor detection and discrimination thresholds across an odor dilution series for a panel of structurally similar odors. We then characterized spatiotemporal spiking patterns across a population of individually filled and identified AL PNs in response to those odors at concentrations below, at, and above identified thresholds. Using spatial and spatiotemporal based analyses we observed that each stimulus produced unique representations, even at sub-threshold concentrations. Mean response latency did not decrease and the percent glomerular activation did not increase with concentration until undiluted odor. Furthermore, correlations between spatial patterns for odor decreased, but only significantly with undiluted odor. Using time-integrated Euclidean distance (ED) measures, we determined that added spatiotemporal information was present at the discrimination but not detection threshold. This added information was evidenced by an increase in integrated distance between the sub-detection and discrimination threshold concentrations (of the same odor) that was not present in comparison of the sub-detection and detection threshold. After consideration of delays for information to reach the AL we find that it takes ~120–140 ms for the AL to

  10. Modeling of time dependent localized flow shear stress and its impact on cellular growth within additive manufactured titanium implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ziyu; Yuan, Lang; Lee, Peter D; Jones, Eric; Jones, Julian R

    2014-01-01

    Bone augmentation implants are porous to allow cellular growth, bone formation and fixation. However, the design of the pores is currently based on simple empirical rules, such as minimum pore and interconnects sizes. We present a three-dimensional (3D) transient model of cellular growth based on the Navier–Stokes equations that simulates the body fluid flow and stimulation of bone precursor cellular growth, attachment, and proliferation as a function of local flow shear stress. The model's effectiveness is demonstrated for two additive manufactured (AM) titanium scaffold architectures. The results demonstrate that there is a complex interaction of flow rate and strut architecture, resulting in partially randomized structures having a preferential impact on stimulating cell migration in 3D porous structures for higher flow rates. This novel result demonstrates the potential new insights that can be gained via the modeling tool developed, and how the model can be used to perform what-if simulations to design AM structures to specific functional requirements. PMID:24664988

  11. Statistical Frequency-Dependent Analysis of Trial-to-Trial Variability in Single Time Series by Recurrence Plots

    PubMed Central

    Tošić, Tamara; Sellers, Kristin K.; Fröhlich, Flavio; Fedotenkova, Mariia; beim Graben, Peter; Hutt, Axel

    2016-01-01

    For decades, research in neuroscience has supported the hypothesis that brain dynamics exhibits recurrent metastable states connected by transients, which together encode fundamental neural information processing. To understand the system's dynamics it is important to detect such recurrence domains, but it is challenging to extract them from experimental neuroscience datasets due to the large trial-to-trial variability. The proposed methodology extracts recurrent metastable states in univariate time series by transforming datasets into their time-frequency representations and computing recurrence plots based on instantaneous spectral power values in various frequency bands. Additionally, a new statistical inference analysis compares different trial recurrence plots with corresponding surrogates to obtain statistically significant recurrent structures. This combination of methods is validated by applying it to two artificial datasets. In a final study of visually-evoked Local Field Potentials in partially anesthetized ferrets, the methodology is able to reveal recurrence structures of neural responses with trial-to-trial variability. Focusing on different frequency bands, the δ-band activity is much less recurrent than α-band activity. Moreover, α-activity is susceptible to pre-stimuli, while δ-activity is much less sensitive to pre-stimuli. This difference in recurrence structures in different frequency bands indicates diverse underlying information processing steps in the brain. PMID:26834580

  12. Self-Produced Time Intervals Are Perceived as More Variable and/or Shorter Depending on Temporal Context in Subsecond and Suprasecond Ranges

    PubMed Central

    Mitani, Keita; Kashino, Makio

    2016-01-01

    The processing of time intervals is fundamental for sensorimotor and cognitive functions. Perceptual and motor timing are often performed concurrently (e.g., playing a musical instrument). Although previous studies have shown the influence of body movements on time perception, how we perceive self-produced time intervals has remained unclear. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the timing mechanisms are distinct for the sub- and suprasecond ranges. Here, we compared perceptual performances for self-produced and passively presented time intervals in random contexts (i.e., multiple target intervals presented in a session) across the sub- and suprasecond ranges (Experiment 1) and within the sub- (Experiment 2) and suprasecond (Experiment 3) ranges, and in a constant context (i.e., a single target interval presented in a session) in the sub- and suprasecond ranges (Experiment 4). We show that self-produced time intervals were perceived as shorter and more variable across the sub- and suprasecond ranges and within the suprasecond range but not within the subsecond range in a random context. In a constant context, the self-produced time intervals were perceived as more variable in the suprasecond range but not in the subsecond range. The impairing effects indicate that motor timing interferes with perceptual timing. The dependence of impairment on temporal contexts suggests multiple timing mechanisms for the subsecond and suprasecond ranges. In addition, violation of the scalar property (i.e., a constant variability to target interval ratio) was observed between the sub- and suprasecond ranges. The violation was clearer for motor timing than for perceptual timing. This suggests that the multiple timing mechanisms for the sub- and suprasecond ranges overlap more for perception than for motor. Moreover, the central tendency effect (i.e., where shorter base intervals are overestimated and longer base intervals are underestimated) disappeared with motor timing within the

  13. Self-Produced Time Intervals Are Perceived as More Variable and/or Shorter Depending on Temporal Context in Subsecond and Suprasecond Ranges.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Keita; Kashino, Makio

    2016-01-01

    The processing of time intervals is fundamental for sensorimotor and cognitive functions. Perceptual and motor timing are often performed concurrently (e.g., playing a musical instrument). Although previous studies have shown the influence of body movements on time perception, how we perceive self-produced time intervals has remained unclear. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the timing mechanisms are distinct for the sub- and suprasecond ranges. Here, we compared perceptual performances for self-produced and passively presented time intervals in random contexts (i.e., multiple target intervals presented in a session) across the sub- and suprasecond ranges (Experiment 1) and within the sub- (Experiment 2) and suprasecond (Experiment 3) ranges, and in a constant context (i.e., a single target interval presented in a session) in the sub- and suprasecond ranges (Experiment 4). We show that self-produced time intervals were perceived as shorter and more variable across the sub- and suprasecond ranges and within the suprasecond range but not within the subsecond range in a random context. In a constant context, the self-produced time intervals were perceived as more variable in the suprasecond range but not in the subsecond range. The impairing effects indicate that motor timing interferes with perceptual timing. The dependence of impairment on temporal contexts suggests multiple timing mechanisms for the subsecond and suprasecond ranges. In addition, violation of the scalar property (i.e., a constant variability to target interval ratio) was observed between the sub- and suprasecond ranges. The violation was clearer for motor timing than for perceptual timing. This suggests that the multiple timing mechanisms for the sub- and suprasecond ranges overlap more for perception than for motor. Moreover, the central tendency effect (i.e., where shorter base intervals are overestimated and longer base intervals are underestimated) disappeared with motor timing within the

  14. Inference for binomial probability based on dependent Bernoulli random variables with applications to meta-analysis and group level studies.

    PubMed

    Bakbergenuly, Ilyas; Kulinskaya, Elena; Morgenthaler, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    We study bias arising as a result of nonlinear transformations of random variables in random or mixed effects models and its effect on inference in group-level studies or in meta-analysis. The findings are illustrated on the example of overdispersed binomial distributions, where we demonstrate considerable biases arising from standard log-odds and arcsine transformations of the estimated probability p̂, both for single-group studies and in combining results from several groups or studies in meta-analysis. Our simulations confirm that these biases are linear in ρ, for small values of ρ, the intracluster correlation coefficient. These biases do not depend on the sample sizes or the number of studies K in a meta-analysis and result in abysmal coverage of the combined effect for large K. We also propose bias-correction for the arcsine transformation. Our simulations demonstrate that this bias-correction works well for small values of the intraclass correlation. The methods are applied to two examples of meta-analyses of prevalence. PMID:27192062

  15. A numerical model for density-and-viscosity-dependent flows in two-dimensional variably saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boufadel, Michel C.; Suidan, Makram T.; Venosa, Albert D.

    1999-04-01

    We present a formulation for water flow and solute transport in two-dimensional variably saturated media that accounts for the effects of the solute on water density and viscosity. The governing equations are cast in a dimensionless form that depends on six dimensionless groups of parameters. These equations are discretized in space using the Galerkin finite element formulation and integrated in time using the backward Euler scheme with mass lumping. The modified Picard method is used to linearize the water flow equation. The resulting numerical model, the MARUN model, is verified by comparison to published numerical results. It is then used to investigate beach hydraulics at seawater concentration (about 30 g l -1) in the context of nutrients delivery for bioremediation of oil spills on beaches. Numerical simulations that we conducted in a rectangular section of a hypothetical beach revealed that buoyancy in the unsaturated zone is significant in soils that are fine textured, with low anisotropy ratio, and/or exhibiting low physical dispersion. In such situations, application of dissolved nutrients to a contaminated beach in a freshwater solution is superior to their application in a seawater solution. Concentration-engendered viscosity effects were negligible with respect to concentration-engendered density effects for the cases that we considered.

  16. Inference for binomial probability based on dependent Bernoulli random variables with applications to meta‐analysis and group level studies

    PubMed Central

    Bakbergenuly, Ilyas; Morgenthaler, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We study bias arising as a result of nonlinear transformations of random variables in random or mixed effects models and its effect on inference in group‐level studies or in meta‐analysis. The findings are illustrated on the example of overdispersed binomial distributions, where we demonstrate considerable biases arising from standard log‐odds and arcsine transformations of the estimated probability p^, both for single‐group studies and in combining results from several groups or studies in meta‐analysis. Our simulations confirm that these biases are linear in ρ, for small values of ρ, the intracluster correlation coefficient. These biases do not depend on the sample sizes or the number of studies K in a meta‐analysis and result in abysmal coverage of the combined effect for large K. We also propose bias‐correction for the arcsine transformation. Our simulations demonstrate that this bias‐correction works well for small values of the intraclass correlation. The methods are applied to two examples of meta‐analyses of prevalence. PMID:27192062

  17. The Influence of Environmental Variables on the Presence of White Sharks, Carcharodon carcharias at Two Popular Cape Town Bathing Beaches: A Generalized Additive Mixed Model

    PubMed Central

    Weltz, Kay; Kock, Alison A.; Winker, Henning; Attwood, Colin; Sikweyiya, Monwabisi

    2013-01-01

    Shark attacks on humans are high profile events which can significantly influence policies related to the coastal zone. A shark warning system in South Africa, Shark Spotters, recorded 378 white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) sightings at two popular beaches, Fish Hoek and Muizenberg, during 3690 six-hour long spotting shifts, during the months September to May 2006 to 2011. The probabilities of shark sightings were related to environmental variables using Binomial Generalized Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs). Sea surface temperature was significant, with the probability of shark sightings increasing rapidly as SST exceeded 14°C and approached a maximum at 18°C, whereafter it remains high. An 8 times (Muizenberg) and 5 times (Fish Hoek) greater likelihood of sighting a shark was predicted at 18°C than at 14°C. Lunar phase was also significant with a prediction of 1.5 times (Muizenberg) and 4 times (Fish Hoek) greater likelihood of a shark sighting at new moon than at full moon. At Fish Hoek, the probability of sighting a shark was 1.6 times higher during the afternoon shift compared to the morning shift, but no diel effect was found at Muizenberg. A significant increase in the number of shark sightings was identified over the last three years, highlighting the need for ongoing research into shark attack mitigation. These patterns will be incorporated into shark awareness and bather safety campaigns in Cape Town. PMID:23874668

  18. The influence of environmental variables on the presence of white sharks, Carcharodon carcharias at two popular Cape Town bathing beaches: a generalized additive mixed model.

    PubMed

    Weltz, Kay; Kock, Alison A; Winker, Henning; Attwood, Colin; Sikweyiya, Monwabisi

    2013-01-01

    Shark attacks on humans are high profile events which can significantly influence policies related to the coastal zone. A shark warning system in South Africa, Shark Spotters, recorded 378 white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) sightings at two popular beaches, Fish Hoek and Muizenberg, during 3690 six-hour long spotting shifts, during the months September to May 2006 to 2011. The probabilities of shark sightings were related to environmental variables using Binomial Generalized Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs). Sea surface temperature was significant, with the probability of shark sightings increasing rapidly as SST exceeded 14 °C and approached a maximum at 18 °C, whereafter it remains high. An 8 times (Muizenberg) and 5 times (Fish Hoek) greater likelihood of sighting a shark was predicted at 18 °C than at 14 °C. Lunar phase was also significant with a prediction of 1.5 times (Muizenberg) and 4 times (Fish Hoek) greater likelihood of a shark sighting at new moon than at full moon. At Fish Hoek, the probability of sighting a shark was 1.6 times higher during the afternoon shift compared to the morning shift, but no diel effect was found at Muizenberg. A significant increase in the number of shark sightings was identified over the last three years, highlighting the need for ongoing research into shark attack mitigation. These patterns will be incorporated into shark awareness and bather safety campaigns in Cape Town. PMID:23874668

  19. The 1998-2000 SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes) Tropical Ozone Climatology. 2; Stratospheric and Tropospheric Ozone Variability and the Zonal Wave-One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Kirchhoff, Volker W. J. H.; Posny, Francoise; Coetzee, Gert J. R.; Hoegger, Bruno; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is the second 'reference' or 'archival' paper for the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) network and is a follow-on to the recently accepted paper with similar first part of title. The latter paper compared SHADOZ total ozone with satellite and ground-based instruments and showed that the equatorial wave-one in total ozone is in the troposphere. The current paper presents details of the wave-one structure and the first overview of tropospheric ozone variability over the southern Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean basins. The principal new result is that signals of climate effects, convection and offsets between biomass burning seasonality and tropospheric ozone maxima suggest that dynamical factors are perhaps more important than pollution in determining the tropical distribution of tropospheric ozone. The SHADOZ data at () are setting records in website visits and are the first time that the zonal view of tropical ozone structure has been recorded - thanks to the distribution of the 10 sites that make up this validation network.

  20. Oxygen-Dependent Cell-to-Cell Variability in the Output of the Escherichia coli Tor Phosphorelay

    PubMed Central

    Roggiani, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli senses and responds to trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in the environment through the TorT-TorS-TorR signal transduction system. The periplasmic protein TorT binds TMAO and stimulates the hybrid kinase TorS to phosphorylate the response regulator TorR through a phosphorelay. Phosphorylated TorR, in turn, activates transcription of the torCAD operon, which encodes the proteins required for anaerobic respiration via reduction of TMAO to trimethylamine. Interestingly, E. coli respires TMAO in both the presence and absence of oxygen, a behavior that is markedly different from the utilization of other alternative electron acceptors by this bacterium. Here we describe an unusual form of regulation by oxygen for this system. While the average level of torCAD transcription is the same for aerobic and anaerobic cultures containing TMAO, the behavior across the population of cells is strikingly different under the two growth conditions. Cellular levels of torCAD transcription in aerobic cultures are highly heterogeneous, in contrast to the relatively homogeneous distribution in anaerobic cultures. Thus, oxygen regulates the variance of the output but not the mean for the Tor system. We further show that this oxygen-dependent variability stems from the phosphorelay. IMPORTANCE Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is utilized by numerous bacteria as an electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration. In E. coli, expression of the proteins required for TMAO respiration is tightly regulated by a signal transduction system that is activated by TMAO. Curiously, although oxygen is the energetically preferred electron acceptor, TMAO is respired even in the presence of oxygen. Here we describe an interesting and unexpected form of regulation for this system in which oxygen produces highly variable expression of the TMAO utilization proteins across a population of cells without affecting the mean expression of these proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first reported

  1. Sulfate reduction in sulfuric material after re-flooding: Effectiveness of organic carbon addition and pH increase depends on soil properties.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chaolei; Fitzpatrick, Rob; Mosley, Luke M; Marschner, Petra

    2015-11-15

    Sulfuric material is formed upon oxidation of sulfidic material; it is extremely acidic, and therefore, an environmental hazard. One option for increasing pH of sulfuric material may be stimulation of bacterial sulfate reduction. We investigated the effects of organic carbon addition and pH increase on sulfate reduction after re-flooding in ten sulfuric materials with four treatments: control, pH increase to 5.5 (+pH), organic carbon addition with 2% w/w finely ground wheat straw (+C), and organic carbon addition and pH increase (+C+pH). After 36 weeks, in five of the ten soils, only treatment +C+pH significantly increased the concentration of reduced inorganic sulfur (RIS) compared to the control and increased the soil pore water pH compared to treatment+pH. In four other soils, pH increase or/and organic carbon addition had no significant effect on RIS concentration compared to the control. The RIS concentration in treatment +C+pH as percentage of the control was negatively correlated with soil clay content and initial nitrate concentration. The results suggest that organic carbon addition and pH increase can stimulate sulfate reduction after re-flooding, but the effectiveness of this treatment depends on soil properties. PMID:26024614

  2. A Nonparametric Simulator for Multivariate Random Variables with Differing Marginal Densities and Non-linear Dependence with Hydroclimatic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnham, D.; Lall, U.; Devineni, N.; Rahill-Marier, B.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrologic models often require as inputs stochastic simulations of meteorological variables that are mutually consistent and spatially coherent, i.e., have marginal and joint probability densities that correspond to those estimated from physically realized states, and have the appropriate spatial structure. These inputs may come from historical meteorological data, or from relatively small ensembles of integrations of numerical climate and weather models. Often, empirical modeling or simulation of multiple hydroclimatic variables, or simulations of hydrologic variables at multiple sites that respect the spatial co-variability may also be desired. A nonparametric simulation strategy is presented that is capable of 1) addressing marginal probability density functions that are different for each variable of interest and 2) reproducing the joint probability distribution across a potentially large set of variables or spatial instances. The application of rainfall simulations developed from historic rain gauge and radar data is explored. Such simulations are useful for urban hydrological modelers seeking more spatially resolved precipitation forcings.

  3. Biliary Elimination of Pemetrexed Is Dependent on Mrp2 in Rats: Potential Mechanism of Variable Response in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dzierlenga, Anika L; Clarke, John D; Klein, David M; Anumol, Tarun; Snyder, Shane A; Li, HongYu; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2016-08-01

    Hepatic multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) provides the biliary elimination pathway for many xenobiotics. Disruption of this pathway contributes to retention of these compounds and may ultimately lead to adverse drug reactions. MRP2 mislocalization from the canalicular membrane has been observed in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the late stage of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which is characterized by fat accumulation, oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis. MRP2/Mrp2 mislocalization is observed in both human NASH and the rodent methionine and choline-deficient (MCD) diet model, but the extent to which it impacts overall transport capacity of MRP2 is unknown. Pemetrexed is an antifolate chemotherapeutic indicated for non-small cell lung cancer, yet its hepatobiliary elimination pathway has yet to be determined. The purpose of this study was to quantify the loss of Mrp2 function in NASH using an obligate Mrp2 transport substrate. To determine whether pemetrexed is an obligate Mrp2 substrate, its cumulative biliary elimination was compared between wild-type and Mrp2(-/-) rats. No pemetrexed was detected in the bile of Mrp2(-/-) rats, indicating pemetrexed is completely reliant on Mrp2 function for biliary elimination. Comparing the biliary elimination of pemetrexed between MCD and control animals identified a transporter-dependent decrease in biliary excretion of 60% in NASH. This study identifies Mrp2 as the exclusive biliary elimination mechanism for pemetrexed, making it a useful in vivo probe substrate for Mrp2 function, and quantifying the loss of function in NASH. This mechanistic feature may provide useful insight into the impact of NASH on interindividual variability in response to pemetrexed. PMID:27233293

  4. The evolution of earthquake-nucleating slip instabilities under spatially variable steady-state rate dependence of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, S.; Viesca, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Following laboratory rock friction experiments, fault strength under sub-seismic slip speeds is thought to depend on a slip rate- and state-dependent friction. Laboratory-measured temperature dependence of the frictional properties and their implied variation with depth form the basis for current models of the seismic cycle. However, scant attention has been paid to the role such heterogeneity has on determining the location and manner in which an earthquake nucleating slip instability develops. Recent work demonstrates that a slip instability on a fault with rate-and-state friction (in which state evolution follows the aging law) occurs as the attraction of a dynamical system towards a fixed point (Viesca, this meeting). Based on this development, we find that the location of that fixed point may be determined if a heterogeneous distribution of the relative rate-weakening parameter a/b is known. (Rate-weakening occurs for 01). That this arises can be deduced considering that (i) the problem that determines the fixed points is equivalent to finding the equilibrium solution for a linearly slip-weakening crack, and (ii) heterogeneities in the parameter a/b have analogy in the equivalent problem to heterogeneities in the background stress. Physically, instability develops where rate-weakening is strongest. We examined the influence such a heterogeneity has on the fixed point attractor (and hence on the instability development) by considering the scenario of a rate-weakening patch embedded within a rate-strengthening region with in-plane or anti-plane slip conditions. Specifically, we solve for fixed points under a rate-weakening heterogeneity within |x|1) outside. Additionally, a linear stability analysis reveals the effect of heterogeneity on the stability of the fixed points of the dynamical system. The heterogeneity parameters (a

  5. Effects of additional repeated sprint training during preseason on performance, heart rate variability, and stress symptoms in futsal players: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Soares-Caldeira, Lúcio F; de Souza, Eberton A; de Freitas, Victor H; de Moraes, Solange M F; Leicht, Anthony S; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether supplementing regular preseason futsal training with weekly sessions of repeated sprints (RS) training would have positive effects on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and field test performance. Thirteen players from a professional futsal team (22.6 ± 6.7 years, 72.8 ± 8.7 kg, 173.2 ± 6.2 cm) were divided randomly into 2 groups (AddT: n = 6 and normal training group: n = 7). Both groups performed a RSA test, Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YoYo IR1), squat (SJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ), body composition, and heart rate variability (HRV) measures at rest before and after 4 weeks of preseason training. Athletes weekly stress symptoms were recorded by psychometric responses using the Daily Analysis of Life Demands for Athletes questionnaire and subjective ratings of well-being scale, respectively. The daily training load (arbitrary units) was assessed using the session of rating perceived exertion method. After the preseason training, there were no significant changes for body composition, SJ, CMJ, and RSAbest. The YoYo IR1, RSAmean, RSAworst, and RSAdecreament were significantly improved for both groups (p ≤ 0.05). The HRV parameters improved significantly within both groups (p ≤ 0.05) except for high frequency (HF, absolute and normalized units, [n.u.]), low frequency (LF) (n.u.), and the LF/HF ratio. A moderate effect size for the AddT group was observed for resting heart rate and several HRV measures. Training load and psychometric responses were similar between both groups. Additional RS training resulted in slightly greater positive changes for vagal-related HRV with similar improvements in performance and training stress during the preseason training in futsal players. PMID:24662230

  6. Variable effects of parabrachial nucleus lesions on salt appetite in rats depending upon experimental paradigm and saline concentration

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Edward M.; Grigson, Patricia S.; Norgren, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bilateral lesions of the gustatory (medial) zone of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) in the pons eliminate the salt appetite induced in rats by treatment with the diuretic drug, furosemide. The present studies re-examined NaCl intake of rats with PBN lesions induced by ibotenic acid, using multiple models of salt appetite. The impairment of a conditioned taste aversion, an established consequence of PBN damage, was used as an initial screen with which to assess the effectiveness of the lesions. Rats with PBN lesions did not drink either 0.3 M NaCl or 0.5 M NaCl in response to daily treatment with desoxycorticosterone acetate. These findings suggest that the excitatory stimulus of salt appetite mediated by mineralocorticoids is abolished by PBN lesions. In contrast, rats with PBN lesions drank some 0.5 M NaCl, and more 0.3 M NaCl, in addition to water in response to hypovolemia induced by subcutaneous injection of 30% polyethylene glycol solution. Those findings suggest that an excitatory stimulus of salt appetite, presumably mediated by angiotensin II, is not abolished by PBN lesions. These and other observations indicate that lesions of the gustatory PBN in rats may or may not eliminate salt appetite, depending on which model is used and which concentration of NaCl solution is available. PMID:23398436

  7. An Analysis of Some Variables Affecting the Internet Dependency Level of Turkish Adolescents by Using Decision Tree Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayri, Murat; Gunuc, Selim

    2010-01-01

    Internet dependency is going to expand into social life in wide area whereas it has been accepted as a pathological and psychological disease. Knowing the basic effects of internet dependency is an inevitable approach to use the internet technology healthy. In this study, internet dependency levels of 754 students were examined with the Internet…

  8. DIRECT Distances to Nearby Galaxies Using Detached Eclipsing Binaries and Cepheids. VII. Additional Variables in the Field M33A Discovered with Image Subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochejska, B. J.; Kaluzny, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Sasselov, D. D.; Szentgyorgyi, A. H.

    2001-04-01

    DIRECT is a project to directly obtain the distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, which occupy a crucial position near the bottom of the cosmological distance ladder. As the first step of the DIRECT project, we have searched for detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs) and new Cepheids in the M31 and M33 galaxies with 1 m class telescopes. In this paper, we present a catalog of variable stars discovered in the data from the follow-up observations of the DEB system D33J013346.2+304439.9 in field M33A (α=23.55d, δ=30.72d J2000.0), collected with the Kitt Peak National Observatory's 2.1 m telescope. In our search covering an area of 108 arcmin2, we have found 434 variable stars: 63 eclipsing binaries, 305 Cepheids, and 66 other periodic, possible long-period, or nonperiodic variables. Of these variables, 280 are newly discovered, mainly short-period and/or faint Cepheids. Their light curves were extracted using the ISIS image subtraction package. For 85% of the variables, we present light curves in standard V and B magnitudes, with the remaining 15% expressed in units of differential flux. We have discovered a population of first-overtone Cepheid candidates, and for eight of them we present strong arguments in favor of this interpretation. We also report on the detection of a nonlinearity in the KPNO T2KA and T1KA cameras. The catalog of variables, as well as their photometry (~7.8×104 BV measurements) and finding charts, is available electronically via anonymous ftp and the World Wide Web. The complete set of the CCD frames is available upon request. Based on observations obtained with the 2.1 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory.

  9. DIRECT Distances to Nearby Galaxies Using Detached Eclipsing Binaries and Cepheids. VIII. Additional Variables in the Field M33B Discovered with Image Subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochejska, B. J.; Kaluzny, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Sasselov, D. D.; Szentgyorgyi, A. H.

    2001-11-01

    DIRECT is a project to obtain directly the distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, which occupy a crucial position near the bottom of the cosmological distance ladder. As the first step of the DIRECT project we have searched for detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs) and new Cepheids in the M31 and M33 galaxies with 1 m class telescopes. In this eighth paper we present a catalog of variable stars discovered in the data from the follow-up observations of DEB system D33J013337.0+303032.8 in field M33B [(α,δ)=(23.48d,30.57d), J2000.0], collected with the Kitt Peak National Observatory 2.1 m telescope. In our search covering an area of 108 arcmin2 we have found 895 variable stars: 96 eclipsing binaries, 349 Cepheids, and 450 other periodic, possibly long-period or nonperiodic variables. Of these variables 612 are newly discovered. Their light curves were extracted using the ISIS image subtraction package. For 77% of the variables we present light curves in standard V and B magnitudes, with the remaining 23% expressed in units of differential flux. We have discovered a population of first-overtone Cepheid candidates, and for six of them we present strong arguments in favor of this interpretation. The catalog of variables, as well as their photometry (about 9.2×104 BV measurements) and finding charts, is available electronically via anonymous ftp and the World Wide Web. The complete set of the CCD frames is available upon request. Based on observations obtained with the 2.1 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  10. The immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: affected-sib-pair analysis and association studies.

    PubMed Central

    Veijola, R.; Knip, M.; Puukka, R.; Reijonen, H.; Cox, D. W.; Ilonen, J.

    1996-01-01

    We have analyzed immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region (VH) polymorphisms and genetic susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) by using a set of polymorphic loci that span approximately 1,000 kb of the VH region on chromosome 14q32. One hundred one Finnish families with at least two children affected with IDDM were studied. Conventional RFLPs determined by hybridization were used, since no microsatellite repeat markers have been available for this gene region. No evidence for linkage between the VH genes and IDDM could be obtained from haplotype-sharing analysis among the 133 diabetic sib pairs. The frequencies of various VH genotypes were also compared between 101 familial IDDM cases and 114 controls derived from the Finnish background population. The distribution of the genotypes at the VH2-B5 locus was significantly different between these groups (P=.004), the 3.4/3.4 genotype being less common in the IDDM cases. In addition, a different genotype distribution at the VH5-B2 locus was observed in the diabetic subjects (P = .022). When the IDDM cases were stratified by presence or absence of the high-risk HLA-DQB1*0302 allele, no differences in VH genotype frequencies were observed between the 0302-positive and 0302-negative cases. In the transmission test for linkage disequilibrium (TDT), no differences were found between the expected and observed frequencies of the transmitted alleles at the VH2-B5 or VH5-B2 locus. In conclusion, significant differences in VH genotype distributions were observed between the familial IDDM cases and the controls, but the observed associations could not be confirmed by the TDT. Haplotype sharing analysis provided no evidence for genetic linkage between the VH gene region and IDDM. Images Figure 1 PMID:8755935

  11. Coupling of nuclear quadrupole and octupole degrees of freedom in an angular momentum dependent potential of two deformation variables

    SciTech Connect

    Minkov, N.; Yotov, P.; Drenska, S.; Scheid, W.; Bonatsos, Dennis; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D.

    2006-04-26

    We propose a collective rotation-vibration Hamiltonian of nuclei in which the axial quadrupole {beta}2 and octupole {beta}3 variables are coupled through the centrifugal interaction. We consider that the system oscillates between positive and negative {beta}3-values by rounding a potential core in the ({beta}2,{beta}3)- space. We examine the effect of the 'rounding' in the structure of the spectrum.

  12. An investigation of the effects of history dependent damage in time dependent fracture mechanics; Phases I, II, and one half of Phase III - variable load conditions. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Brust, F.W.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Majumdar, B.S.

    1993-10-15

    The demands for structural systems to perform reliably under severe temperatures and load conditions continue to increase. These demands will continue with the development of advanced power generation methods, for aging nuclear and fossil fueled power plants, and for future aerospace applications. An understanding of the high-temperature creep crack growth process, which is a frequent failure mechanism in these structures, is important. Many investigations which have appeared to date are concerned with creep crack growth which occurs under a constant load and temperature. However, most structural components experience complicated load histories. The history of degradation and damage which accumulates at the crack tip is greatly influenced by these transients. This program aims at gaining an understanding of the history dependent high temperature failure process through a combined experimental and analytical effort. The development of a useful predictive methodology for characterizing this process is being undertaken.

  13. How Disability and School-Related Variables Influence Social Security Dependence among Vulnerable Young People in Their Late Twenties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myklebust, Jon Olav

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate how psychosocial difficulties, functional level and school factors affect social security dependence among former students with special needs (N = 373). These individuals have been followed prospectively from their teens and into their late twenties. The study is theoretically inspired by life-course…

  14. Shifts in plant functional types have time-dependent and regionally variable impacts on dryland ecosystem water balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradford, John B.; Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Lauenroth, William K.; Burke, Ingrid C.

    2014-01-01

    5. Synthesis. This study provides a novel, regional-scale assessment of how plant functional type transitions may impact ecosystem water balance in sagebrush-dominated ecosystems of North America. Results illustrate that the ecohydrological consequences of changing vegetation depend strongly on climate and suggest that decreasing woody plant abundance may have only limited impact on evapotranspiration and water yield.

  15. PARAMETRIC AND NON PARAMETRIC (MARS: MULTIVARIATE ADDITIVE REGRESSION SPLINES) LOGISTIC REGRESSIONS FOR PREDICTION OF A DICHOTOMOUS RESPONSE VARIABLE WITH AN EXAMPLE FOR PRESENCE/ABSENCE OF AMPHIBIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to provide a reference manual that could be used by investigators for making informed use of logistic regression using two methods (standard logistic regression and MARS). The details for analyses of relationships between a dependent binary response ...

  16. A study on socio-medical variables of drug-dependent persons volunteering for treatment in Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Navaratnam, V; Spencer, C P

    1978-01-01

    There has been a rapid increase in the past five years in the numbers of hospitalized drug dependents. While the studied population was clearly unrepresentative of the country-wide drug using population, it illustrates how the problem is neither limited to one particular stratum of society, nor to the few "traditional" drugs. Indeed, an increasingly youthful group of individuals drawn from all backgrounds is not only becoming dependent upon opiates, but is also using a range of other drugs, all of which are available on the market at relatively low cost. The market prices of drugs have an effect on the pattern of drug use; and many individuals move directly from tobacco to heroin smoking. Drug abuse continues to be a considerable public and governmental concern, and enforcement and treatment programmes are rapidly expanding in attempts to resolve this problem. PMID:352461

  17. Variable requirements for DNA-binding proteins at polycomb-dependent repressive regions in human HOX clusters.

    PubMed

    Woo, Caroline J; Kharchenko, Peter V; Daheron, Laurence; Park, Peter J; Kingston, Robert E

    2013-08-01

    Polycomb group (PcG)-mediated repression is an evolutionarily conserved process critical for cell fate determination and maintenance of gene expression during embryonic development. However, the mechanisms underlying PcG recruitment in mammals remain unclear since few regulatory sites have been identified. We report two novel prospective PcG-dependent regulatory elements within the human HOXB and HOXC clusters and compare their repressive activities to a previously identified element in the HOXD cluster. These regions recruited the PcG proteins BMI1 and SUZ12 to a reporter construct in mesenchymal stem cells and conferred repression that was dependent upon PcG expression. Furthermore, we examined the potential of two DNA-binding proteins, JARID2 and YY1, to regulate PcG activity at these three elements. JARID2 has differential requirements, whereas YY1 appears to be required for repressive activity at all 3 sites. We conclude that distinct elements of the mammalian HOX clusters can recruit components of the PcG complexes and confer repression, similar to what has been seen in Drosophila. These elements, however, have diverse requirements for binding factors, which, combined with previous data on other loci, speaks to the complexity of PcG targeting in mammals. PMID:23775117

  18. Neurons in a forebrain nucleus required for vocal plasticity rapidly switch between precise firing and variable bursting depending on social context.

    PubMed

    Kao, Mimi H; Wright, Brian D; Doupe, Allison J

    2008-12-01

    Song is a learned vocal behavior influenced by social interactions. Prior work has suggested that the anterior forebrain pathway (AFP), a specialized pallial-basal ganglia circuit critical for vocal plasticity, mediates the influence of social signals on song. Here, we investigate the signals the AFP sends to song motor areas and their dependence on social context by characterizing singing-related activity of single neurons in the AFP output nucleus LMAN (lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium). We show that interaction with females causes marked, real-time changes in firing properties of individual LMAN neurons. When males sing to females ("directed"), LMAN neurons exhibit reliable firing of single spikes precisely locked to song. In contrast, when males sing alone ("undirected"), the same LMAN neurons exhibit prominent burst firing and trial-by-trial variability. Burst structure and timing vary substantially across repeated undirected trials. Despite context-dependent differences in firing statistics, the average pattern of song-locked firing for an individual neuron is similar across behavioral contexts, suggesting a common underlying signal. Different LMAN neurons in the same bird, however, exhibit distinct firing patterns, suggesting that subsets of neurons jointly encode song features. Together, our findings demonstrate that behavioral interactions reversibly transform the signaling mode of LMAN neurons. Such changes may contribute to rapid switching of motor activity between variable and precise states. More generally, our results suggest that pallial-basal ganglia circuits contribute to motor learning and production through multiple mechanisms: patterned signals could guide changes in motor output while state-dependent variability could subserve motor exploration. PMID:19052215

  19. Wearable monitoring for mood recognition in bipolar disorder based on history-dependent long-term heart rate variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Gaetano; Nardelli, Mimma; Lanatà, Antonio; Gentili, Claudio; Bertschy, Gilles; Paradiso, Rita; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2014-09-01

    Current clinical practice in diagnosing patients affected by psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder is based only on verbal interviews and scores from specific questionnaires, and no reliable and objective psycho-physiological markers are taken into account. In this paper, we propose to use a wearable system based on a comfortable t-shirt with integrated fabric electrodes and sensors able to acquire electrocardiogram, respirogram, and body posture information in order to detect a pattern of objective physiological parameters to support diagnosis. Moreover, we implemented a novel ad hoc methodology of advanced biosignal processing able to effectively recognize four possible clinical mood states in bipolar patients (i.e., depression, mixed state, hypomania, and euthymia) continuously monitored up to 18 h, using heart rate variability information exclusively. Mood assessment is intended as an intrasubject evaluation in which the patient's states are modeled as a Markov chain, i.e., in the time domain, each mood state refers to the previous one. As validation, eight bipolar patients were monitored collecting and analyzing more than 400 h of autonomic and cardiovascular activity. Experimental results demonstrate that our novel concept of personalized and pervasive monitoring constitutes a viable and robust clinical decision support system for bipolar disorders recognizing mood states with a total classification accuracy up to 95.81%. PMID:24240031

  20. Monotonic Weighted Power Transformations to Additivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsay, J. O.

    1977-01-01

    A class of monotonic transformations which generalize the power transformation is fit to the independent and dependent variables in multiple regression so that the resulting additive relationship is optimized. Examples of analysis of real and artificial data are presented. (Author/JKS)

  1. Increased Variability and Asymmetric Expansion of the Hippocampal Spatial Representation in a Distal Cue-Dependent Memory Task.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Beom; Lee, Inah

    2016-08-01

    Place cells in the hippocampus fire at specific positions in space, and distal cues in the environment play critical roles in determining the spatial firing patterns of place cells. Many studies have shown that place fields are influenced by distal cues in foraging animals. However, it is largely unknown whether distal-cue-dependent changes in place fields appear in different ways in a memory task if distal cues bear direct significance to achieving goals. We investigated this possibility in this study. Rats were trained to choose different spatial positions in a radial arm in association with distal cue configurations formed by visual cue sets attached to movable curtains around the apparatus. The animals were initially trained to associate readily discernible distal cue configurations (0° vs. 80° angular separation between distal cue sets) with different food-well positions and then later experienced ambiguous cue configurations (14° and 66°) intermixed with the original cue configurations. Rats showed no difficulty in transferring the associated memory formed for the original cue configurations when similar cue configurations were presented. Place field positions remained at the same locations across different cue configurations, whereas stability and coherence of spatial firing patterns were significantly disrupted when ambiguous cue configurations were introduced. Furthermore, the spatial representation was extended backward and skewed more negatively at the population level when processing ambiguous cue configurations, compared with when processing the original cue configurations only. This effect was more salient for large cue-separation conditions than for small cue-separation conditions. No significant rate remapping was observed across distal cue configurations. These findings suggest that place cells in the hippocampus dynamically change their detailed firing characteristics in response to a modified cue environment and that some of the firing

  2. Caffeine Expectancy Questionnaire (CaffEQ): construction, psychometric properties, and associations with caffeine use, caffeine dependence, and other related variables.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Edward D; Juliano, Laura M

    2012-09-01

    Expectancies for drug effects predict drug initiation, use, cessation, and relapse, and may play a causal role in drug effects (i.e., placebo effects). Surprisingly little is known about expectancies for caffeine even though it is the most widely used psychoactive drug in the world. In a series of independent studies, the nature and scope of caffeine expectancies among caffeine consumers and nonconsumers were assessed, and a comprehensive and psychometrically sound Caffeine Expectancy Questionnaire (CaffEQ) was developed. After 2 preliminary studies, the CaffEQ was administered to 1,046 individuals from the general population along with other measures of interest (e.g., caffeine use history, anxiety). Exploratory factor analysis of the CaffEQ yielded a 7-factor solution. Subsequently, an independent sample of 665 individuals completed the CaffEQ and other measures, and a subset (n = 440) completed the CaffEQ again approximately 2 weeks later. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed good model fit, and test-retest reliability was very good. The frequency and quantity of caffeine use were associated with greater expectancies for withdrawal/dependence, energy/work enhancement, appetite suppression, social/mood enhancement, and physical performance enhancement and lower expectancies for anxiety/negative physical effects and sleep disturbance. Caffeine expectancies predicted various caffeine- associated features of substance dependence (e.g., use despite harm, withdrawal incidence and severity, perceived difficulty stopping use, tolerance). Expectancies for caffeine consumed via coffee were stronger than for caffeine consumed via soft drinks or tea. The CaffEQ should facilitate the advancement of our knowledge of caffeine and drug use in general. PMID:22149323

  3. The 1998-2000 SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes) Tropical Ozone Climatology: Ozonesonde Precision, Accuracy and Station-to-Station Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, J. C.; Thompson, Anne M.; McPeters, R. D.; Oltmans, S. J.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    As part of the SAFARI-2000 campaign, additional launches of ozonesondes were made at Irene, South Africa and at Lusaka, Zambia. These represent campaign augmentations to the SHADOZ database described in this paper. This network of 10 southern hemisphere tropical and subtropical stations, designated the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) project and established from operational sites, provided over 1000 profiles from ozonesondes and radiosondes during the period 1998-2000. (Since that time, two more stations, one in southern Africa, have joined SHADOZ). Archived data are available at: http://code9l6.gsfc.nasa.gov/Data-services/shadoz>. Uncertainties and accuracies within the SHADOZ ozone data set are evaluated by analyzing: (1) imprecisions in stratospheric ozone profiles and in methods of extrapolating ozone above balloon burst; (2) comparisons of column-integrated total ozone from sondes with total ozone from the Earth-Probe/TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) satellite and ground-based instruments; (3) possible biases from station-to-station due to variations in ozonesonde characteristics. The key results are: (1) Ozonesonde precision is 5%; (2) Integrated total ozone column amounts from the sondes are in good agreement (2-10%) with independent measurements from ground-based instruments at five SHADOZ sites and with overpass measurements from the TOMS satellite (version 7 data). (3) Systematic variations in TOMS-sonde offsets and in groundbased-sonde offsets from station to station reflect biases in sonde technique as well as in satellite retrieval. Discrepancies are present in both stratospheric and tropospheric ozone. (4) There is evidence for a zonal wave-one pattern in total and tropospheric ozone, but not in stratospheric ozone.

  4. Environmentally co‐occurring mercury resistance plasmids are genetically and phenotypically diverse and confer variable context‐dependent fitness effects

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Ellie; Lilley, Andrew K.; Paterson, Steve; Spiers, Andrew J.; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Plasmids are important mobile elements that can facilitate genetic exchange and local adaptation within microbial communities. We compared the sequences of four co‐occurring pQBR family environmental mercury resistance plasmids and measured their effects on competitive fitness of a P seudomonas fluorescens  SBW25 host, which was isolated at the same field site. Fitness effects of carriage differed between plasmids and were strongly context dependent, varying with medium, plasmid status of competitor and levels of environmental mercury. The plasmids also varied widely in their rates of conjugation and segregational loss. We found that few of the plasmid‐borne accessory genes could be ascribed functions, although we identified a putative chemotaxis operon, a type IV pilus‐encoding cluster and a region encoding putative arylsulfatase enzymes, which were conserved across geographically distant isolates. One plasmid, pQBR55, conferred the ability to catabolize sucrose. Transposons, including the mercury resistance Tn5042, appeared to have been acquired by different pQBR plasmids by recombination, indicating an important role for horizontal gene transfer in the recent evolution of pQBR plasmids. Our findings demonstrate extensive genetic and phenotypic diversity among co‐occurring members of a plasmid community and suggest a role for environmental heterogeneity in the maintenance of plasmid diversity. PMID:25969927

  5. Variable feeding regimes of the Kluchevskoy group volcanoes (Kamchatka, Russia) derived from time-dependent seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, I.; Gordeev, E.; Dobretsov, N. L.; Vernikovsky, V. A.; Senyukov, S.; Jakovlev, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of time-dependent local earthquake tomography for the Kluchevskoy group of volcanoes in Kamchatka. We consider the time period from 2001 to 2008, which covers several stages of activity for Kluchevskoy and Bezymyanny volcanoes. During the entire period, we robustly observe a mantle channel below 25 km depth with anomalously high Vp/Vs values (up to 2.2), which is interpreted to be the main feeding source of the volcanoes of the group. In the crust, we derived complex structure that varies over the observation time. During the pre-eruptive period, we detected two levels of magma sources: one in the middle crust and one just below Kluchevskoy volcano. In 2005, a year of powerful eruptions of Kluchevskoy and Besymyanny volcanoes, we observe a general increase in Vp/Vs throughout the crust. In the relaxation period following the eruption, the Vp/Vs values are generally low, and no anomalous zones in the crust are observed. We propose that very rapid variations in Vp/Vs are most likely due to abrupt changes in stress and deformation regime, which cause fracturing and the active transport of fluids. This causes positive feedback, and the excessive stresses in the crust lead to volcanic eruptions.

  6. A variable-order time-dependent neutron transport method for nuclear reactor kinetics using analytically-integrated space-time characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A. J.; Lee, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    A new time-dependent neutron transport method based on the method of characteristics (MOC) has been developed. Whereas most spatial kinetics methods treat time dependence through temporal discretization, this new method treats time dependence by defining the characteristics to span space and time. In this implementation regions are defined in space-time where the thickness of the region in time fulfills an analogous role to the time step in discretized methods. The time dependence of the local source is approximated using a truncated Taylor series expansion with high order derivatives approximated using backward differences, permitting the solution of the resulting space-time characteristic equation. To avoid a drastic increase in computational expense and memory requirements due to solving many discrete characteristics in the space-time planes, the temporal variation of the boundary source is similarly approximated. This allows the characteristics in the space-time plane to be represented analytically rather than discretely, resulting in an algorithm comparable in implementation and expense to one that arises from conventional time integration techniques. Furthermore, by defining the boundary flux time derivative in terms of the preceding local source time derivative and boundary flux time derivative, the need to store angularly-dependent data is avoided without approximating the angular dependence of the angular flux time derivative. The accuracy of this method is assessed through implementation in the neutron transport code DeCART. The method is employed with variable-order local source representation to model a TWIGL transient. The results demonstrate that this method is accurate and more efficient than the discretized method. (authors)

  7. Inter-seasonal and inter-variable dependencies in multi-model projections: lessons learnt from the CH2011 climate change scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Andreas; Liniger, Mark; Appenzeller, Christof

    2014-05-01

    The new climate change scenarios "CH2011" provide a consistent assessment of how precipitation and temperature may change in Switzerland during the 21st century. Digital data were made available at different spatial and temporal aggregation levels. Here we revisit one product of CH2011, the climate scenarios of seasonal means, with the aim to enhance its practicalities for impcat studies. These scenarios are based on the joint analysis of several regional climate models (RCMs) from the ENSEMBLES project that were all run according to the A1B emission scenario. Combined multi-model projections using a sophisticated Bayesian algorithm are provided for three different Swiss regions, four seasons and three projection periods in the 21st century. Uncertainty, arising from model-to-model projection and from internal decadal variability, is expressed with three estimates following an expert judgement: a lower, medium and upper estimate. In CH2011, the three uncertainty estimates are derived and provided in an univariate way separately for each lead-time, region and season without providing information on combined changes and uncertainties. Yet, for impact applications often several climatological variables must be considered together and across all four seasons. Here, we elucidate further on the inter-seasonal and inter-variable dependencies by inspecting correlations in the underlying climate model data of CH2011. The analysis shows that a firm conclusion on the correlation structure is highly challenged by the uncertainty of the different model projections, by the limited set of independent models and, possibly, the complex climate regime Switzerland is located in. Regarding the inter-variable relationship toward the end of the 21st century, confidence is still too low to make firm conclusions, although in summer a tendency for a negative relation can be inferred from the limited model set. Similar to the inter-variable relation, no recommendation can be given on how to

  8. Buoyant Migration of Melt with Variable Physical Properties: Effect of Melt Viscosity and Its Dependence on Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Release of a volatile phase, usually considered to be water, from the downgoing plate and the upward migration of volatile saturated melt toward higher temperatures in the interior of the wedge is one mechanism for generation of melt at a convergent plate boundary (Gill, 1981; Grove et al. 2012). However, other volatiles, including CO2, may be released. Adding CO2 reduces the water mole fraction in melt that is stable at a given temperature. Dissolved water has a large effect on melt viscosity; but, CO2 has practically none, leading to the possibility of significant viscosity variations in melt rising through the mantle wedge. This may have important implications for the heterogeneity of erupted melts as discussed below."Saffman-Taylor" instability occurs as a low viscosity fluid flowing in porous media displaces another of higher viscosity. The low viscosity fluid forms fingers that extend progressively into the high viscosity fluid. For miscible fluids (no surface tension effects) in a non-compacting matrix (Chouke, 1982), the development of fingers is controlled by interdiffusion of the fluids.Numerical experiments to be reported examine viscous fingering in a compacting permeable matrix at conditions appropriate for melt generation in a mantle wedge. Mixing of melts with different CO2/water by diffusion in silicate melts alone is generally slow; however, fingering reduces the scale of CO2/water heterogeneity making diffusion more effective. We explore the persistence of a CO2/water heterogeneity of a given scale rising through the mantle wedge at a rate fast enough to preserve 230Th disequilibrium. The rise height over which heterogeneity can persist as fingers develop depends on the viscosity, i.e. CO2/water, variation initially present; viscosity variations on the order of 10% allow km-scale heterogeneity to persist over vertical scales comparable to the height of the wedge.

  9. Meteorological variables affect fertility rate after intrauterine artificial insemination in sheep in a seasonal-dependent manner: a 7-year study.

    PubMed

    Palacios, C; Abecia, J A

    2015-05-01

    A total number of 48,088 artificial inseminations (AIs) have been controlled during seven consecutive years in 79 dairy sheep Spanish farms (41° N). Mean, maximum and minimum ambient temperatures (Ts), temperature amplitude (TA), mean relative humidity (RH), mean solar radiation (SR) and total rainfall of each insemination day and 15 days later were recorded. Temperature-humidity index (THI) and effective temperature (ET) have been calculated. A binary logistic regression model to estimate the risk of not getting pregnant compared to getting pregnant, through the odds ratio (OR), was performed. Successful winter inseminations were carried out under higher SR (P < 0.01) and summer inseminations under lower SR values (P < 0.05). Successful inseminations during the summer were performed under significantly lower maximum T (P < 0.01), while winter inseminations resulted in pregnancy when they were carried out under higher maximum (P < 0.05) and minimum Ts (P < 0.01). Up to five meteorological variables presented OR >1 (maximum T, ET and rainfall on AI day, and ET and rainfall on day 15), and two variables presented OR <1 (SR on AI day and maximum T on day 15). However, the effect of meteorological factors affected fertility in opposite ways, so T becomes a protective or risk factor on fertility depending on season. In conclusion, the percentage of pregnancy after AI in sheep is significantly affected by meteorological variables in a seasonal-dependent manner, so the parameters such as temperature reverse their effects in the hot or cold seasons. A forecast of the meteorological conditions could be a useful tool when AI dates are being scheduled. PMID:25056126

  10. Meteorological variables affect fertility rate after intrauterine artificial insemination in sheep in a seasonal-dependent manner: a 7-year study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, C.; Abecia, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    A total number of 48,088 artificial inseminations (AIs) have been controlled during seven consecutive years in 79 dairy sheep Spanish farms (41° N). Mean, maximum and minimum ambient temperatures ( Ts), temperature amplitude (TA), mean relative humidity (RH), mean solar radiation (SR) and total rainfall of each insemination day and 15 days later were recorded. Temperature-humidity index (THI) and effective temperature (ET) have been calculated. A binary logistic regression model to estimate the risk of not getting pregnant compared to getting pregnant, through the odds ratio (OR), was performed. Successful winter inseminations were carried out under higher SR ( P < 0.01) and summer inseminations under lower SR values ( P < 0.05). Successful inseminations during the summer were performed under significantly lower maximum T ( P < 0.01), while winter inseminations resulted in pregnancy when they were carried out under higher maximum ( P < 0.05) and minimum Ts ( P < 0.01). Up to five meteorological variables presented OR >1 (maximum T, ET and rainfall on AI day, and ET and rainfall on day 15), and two variables presented OR <1 (SR on AI day and maximum T on day 15). However, the effect of meteorological factors affected fertility in opposite ways, so T becomes a protective or risk factor on fertility depending on season. In conclusion, the percentage of pregnancy after AI in sheep is significantly affected by meteorological variables in a seasonal-dependent manner, so the parameters such as temperature reverse their effects in the hot or cold seasons. A forecast of the meteorological conditions could be a useful tool when AI dates are being scheduled.

  11. Novel analogues of chlormethiazole are neuroprotective in four cellular models of neurodegeneration by a mechanism with variable dependence on GABAA receptor potentiation

    PubMed Central

    VandeVrede, Lawren; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Luo, Jia; Qin, Zhihui; Yue, Lan; Pepperberg, David R; Thatcher, Gregory R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Chlormethiazole (CMZ), a clinical sedative/anxiolytic agent, did not reach clinical efficacy in stroke trials despite neuroprotection demonstrated in numerous animal models. Using CMZ as a lead compound, neuroprotective methiazole (MZ) analogues were developed, and neuroprotection and GABAA receptor dependence were studied. Experimental Approach: Eight MZs were selected from a novel library, of which two were studied in detail. Neuroprotection, glutamate release, intracellular calcium and response to GABA blockade by picrotoxin were measured in rat primary cortical cultures using four cellular models of neurodegeneration. GABA potentiation was assayed in oocytes expressing the α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor. Key Results: Neuroprotection against a range of insults was retained even with substantial chemical modification. Dependence on GABAA receptor activity was variable: at the extremes, neuroprotection by GN-28 was universally sensitive to picrotoxin, while GN-38 was largely insensitive. In parallel, effects on extracellular glutamate and intracellular calcium were associated with GABAA dependence. Consistent with these findings, GN-28 potentiated α1β2γ2 GABAA function, whereas GN-38 had a weak inhibitory effect. Neuroprotection against moderate dose oligomeric Aβ1–42 was also tolerant to structural changes. Conclusions and Implications: The results support the concept that CMZ does not contain a single pharmacophore, rather that broad-spectrum neuroprotection results from a GABAA-dependent mechanism represented by GN-28, combined with a mechanism represented in GN-38 that shows the least dependence on GABAA receptors. These findings allow further refinement of the neuroprotective pharmacophore and investigation into secondary mechanisms that will assist in identifying MZ-based compounds of use in treating neurodegeneration. PMID:24116891

  12. An alternative approach to exact wave functions for time-dependent coupled oscillator model of charged particle in variable magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Menouar, Salah; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2010-08-15

    The quantum states of time-dependent coupled oscillator model for charged particles subjected to variable magnetic field are investigated using the invariant operator methods. To do this, we have taken advantage of an alternative method, so-called unitary transformation approach, available in the framework of quantum mechanics, as well as a generalized canonical transformation method in the classical regime. The transformed quantum Hamiltonian is obtained using suitable unitary operators and is represented in terms of two independent harmonic oscillators which have the same frequencies as that of the classically transformed one. Starting from the wave functions in the transformed system, we have derived the full wave functions in the original system with the help of the unitary operators. One can easily take a complete description of how the charged particle behaves under the given Hamiltonian by taking advantage of these analytical wave functions.

  13. Sensitivity of Photosynthetic Gas Exchange and Growth of Lodgepole Pine to Climate Variability Depends on the Age of Pleistocene Glacial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, B.; Chapple, W.; Ewers, B. E.; Williams, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between soil conditions and climate variability plays a central role in the ecohydrological functions of montane conifer forests. Although soil moisture availability to trees is largely dependent on climate, the depth and texture of soil exerts a key secondary influence. Multiple Pleistocene glacial events have shaped the landscape of the central Rocky Mountains creating a patchwork of soils differing in age and textural classification. This mosaic of soil conditions impacts hydrological properties, and montane conifer forests potentially respond to climate variability quite differently depending on the age of glacial till and soil development. We hypothesized that the age of glacial till and associated soil textural changes exert strong control on growth and photosynthetic gas exchange of lodgepole pine. We examined physiological and growth responses of lodgepole pine to interannual variation in maximum annual snow water equivalence (SWEmax) of montane snowpack and growing season air temperature (Tair) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) across a chronosequence of Pleistocene glacial tills ranging in age from 700k to 12k years. Soil textural differences across the glacial tills illustrate the varying degrees of weathering with the most well developed soils with highest clay content on the oldest till surfaces. We show that sensitivity of growth and carbon isotope discrimination, an integrated measure of canopy gas exchange properties, to interannual variation SWEmax , Tair and VPD is greatest on young till surfaces, whereas trees on old glacial tills with well-developed soils are mostly insensitive to these interannual climate fluctuations. Tree-ring widths were most sensitive to changes in SWEmax on young glacial tills (p < 0.01), and less sensitive on the oldest till (p < 0.05). Tair correlates strongly with δ13C values on the oldest and youngest tills sites, but shows no significant relationship on the middle aged glacial till. It is clear that

  14. Density dependence and climate effects in Rocky Mountain elk: an application of regression with instrumental variables for population time series with sampling error.

    PubMed

    Creel, Scott; Creel, Michael

    2009-11-01

    1. Sampling error in annual estimates of population size creates two widely recognized problems for the analysis of population growth. First, if sampling error is mistakenly treated as process error, one obtains inflated estimates of the variation in true population trajectories (Staples, Taper & Dennis 2004). Second, treating sampling error as process error is thought to overestimate the importance of density dependence in population growth (Viljugrein et al. 2005; Dennis et al. 2006). 2. In ecology, state-space models are used to account for sampling error when estimating the effects of density and other variables on population growth (Staples et al. 2004; Dennis et al. 2006). In econometrics, regression with instrumental variables is a well-established method that addresses the problem of correlation between regressors and the error term, but requires fewer assumptions than state-space models (Davidson & MacKinnon 1993; Cameron & Trivedi 2005). 3. We used instrumental variables to account for sampling error and fit a generalized linear model to 472 annual observations of population size for 35 Elk Management Units in Montana, from 1928 to 2004. We compared this model with state-space models fit with the likelihood function of Dennis et al. (2006). We discuss the general advantages and disadvantages of each method. Briefly, regression with instrumental variables is valid with fewer distributional assumptions, but state-space models are more efficient when their distributional assumptions are met. 4. Both methods found that population growth was negatively related to population density and winter snow accumulation. Summer rainfall and wolf (Canis lupus) presence had much weaker effects on elk (Cervus elaphus) dynamics [though limitation by wolves is strong in some elk populations with well-established wolf populations (Creel et al. 2007; Creel & Christianson 2008)]. 5. Coupled with predictions for Montana from global and regional climate models, our results

  15. Cell Line-Dependent Variability of Coordinate Expression of p75NTR and CRABP1 and Modulation of Effects of Fenretinide on Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaoli Pu; Wang, Simeng; Li, Xingguo; Schor, Nina F.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood neural crest tumor. Fenretinide, a retinoic acid analogue, induces accumulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and consequent apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells. The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) enhances the antineuroblastoma cell efficacy of fenretinide in vitro. We examined the role of the retinoid binding protein, CRABP1, in p75NTR-mediated potentiation of the efficacy of fenretinide. Knockdown and overexpression, respectively, of either p75NTR or CRABP1 were effected in neuroblastoma cell lines using standard techniques. Expression was determined by qRT-PCR and confirmed at the protein level by Western blot. Metabolic viability was determined by Alamar blue assay. While protein content of CRABP1 correlated roughly with that of p75NTR in the three neuroblastoid or epithelioid human neuroblastoma cell lines studied, manipulation of p75NTR expression resulted in cell line-dependent, variable change in CRABP1 expression. Furthermore, in some cell lines, induced expression of CRABP1 in the absence of p75NTR did not alter cell sensitivity to fenretinide treatment. The effects of manipulation of p75NTR expression on CRABP1 expression and the effects of CRABP1 expression on fenretinide efficacy are therefore neuroblastoma cell line-dependent. Potentiation of the antineuroblastoma cell effects of fenretinide by p75NTR is not mediated solely through CRABP1. PMID:26843908

  16. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  17. Levan as a new additive for colon-specific films: a new approach in the use of exopolysaccharides in time-dependent free films (Aminoalkyl Methacrylate Copolymer RS).

    PubMed

    dos-Santos, Leandro Freire; Gómez-Pineda, Edgardo Alfonso; Colabone-Celligoi, Maria Antonia-Pedrine; Cavalcanti, Osvaldo Albuquerque

    2013-09-01

    Time-dependent films, augmented with prebiotics, offer potential strategy for colon-specific controlled drug release. In this study, we produced films containing levan (L) and Aminoalkyl Methacrylate Copolymer RS (ER). Free films of ER combined with levan were produced by the casting process and characterized by the mobility of the polymeric matrix, hydration, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA). The results of this study suggest that the exopolysaccharide levan can be used in combination with ER for colon specific materials. No evidence of incompatibilities between the levan and the synthetic polymer were detected, and levan improved the mobility of the polymeric matrix and the hydrophilicity of the system. Levan may have positively altered the density of the polymeric matrix, as visualized by thermal characterization. The endothermic decomposition peak was shifted with increasing amounts of levan. This new barrier polymer utilized a combination of time-dependent enzymatic mechanisms and can be considered promising for use in the coating of solid oral drugs for specific release. PMID:24035950

  18. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  19. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding protein (G/sub i/) and two additional pertussis toxin substrates associated with muscarinic receptors in rat heart myocytes: characterization and age dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Moscona-Amir, E.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-07-12

    The coupling of muscarinic receptors with G-proteins was investigated in cultured myocytes prepared from the hearts of newborn rats. The coupling was investigated in both young (5 days after plating) and aged (14 days after plating) cultures, in view of the completely different effects of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) on muscarinic agonist binding to homogenates from young vs aged cultures. Pretreatment of cultures from both ages by Bordetella pertussis toxin (IAP) was found to eliminate any Gpp(NH)p effect on carbamylcholine binding. IAP by itself induced a rightward shift in the carbamylcholine competition curve in homogenates from aged cultures, but no such effect was observed in homogenates from young cultures. IAP-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation of membrane preparations from young and aged cultures revealed major differences between them. Young cultures exhibited a major IAP substrate at 40 kDa, which was also recognized by anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ antibodies, and two novel IAP substrates at 28 and 42 kDa, which were weakly ADP-ribosylated by the toxin and were not recognized with either anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ or anti-..cap alpha../sub 0/ antibodies. In aged cultures, only the 40-kDa band (ribosylated to a lower degree) was detected. The parallel age-dependent changes in the three IAP substrates (28, 40, and 42 kDa) and in the interactions of the G-protein(s) with the muscarinic receptors strongly suggest close association between the two phenomena. All of these age-dependent changes in the G-protein related parameters were prevented by phosphatidylcholine-liposome treatment of the aged cultures. The role of the membrane lipid composition in these phenomena is discussed.

  20. Intrinsic dependence of the magnetic properties of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles prepared via chemical methods with addition of chelating agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, E. C.; Tenório, Mayara A.; Mecena, S. G.; Zucolotto, B.; Silva, L. S.; Jesus, C. B. R.; Meneses, C. T.; Duque, J. G. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the effect of addition of different chelating agents on the magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles produced by the combining of both co-precipitation and hydrothermal methods is reported. The Rietveld analyses of X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that our samples are single phase (space group: Fd-3m) with small average sizes. The weight losses observed in the thermogravimetric measurements together with the M×H curves show that the organic contamination coming from chelating agent decomposition can give rise to misinterpretation of the magnetization measurements. Besides, analyses of the zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) magnetization measurements and the M×H curves measured at room temperature allows us to state that both the average blocking temperature and particles size distribution are sensitive to the kind of chelating agent.

  1. Short-term variability in QT interval and ventricular arrhythmias induced by dofetilide are dependent on high-frequency autonomic oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Champeroux, P; Thireau, J; Judé, S; Laigot-Barbé, C; Maurin, A; Sola, M L; Fowler, J S L; Richard, S; Le Guennec, J Y

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The present study was undertaken to investigate an effect of dofetilide, a potent arrhythmic blocker of the voltage-gated K+ channel, hERG, on cardiac autonomic control. Combined with effects on ardiomyocytes, these properties could influence its arrhythmic potency. Experimental Approach The short-term variability of beat-to-beat QT interval (STVQT), induced by dofetilide is a strong surrogate of Torsades de pointes liability. Involvement of autonomic modulation in STVQT was investigated in healthy cynomolgus monkeys and beagle dogs by power spectral analysis under conditions of autonomic blockade with hexamethonium. Key Results Increase in STVQT induced by dofetilide in monkeys and dogs was closely associated with an enhancement of endogenous heart rate and QT interval high-frequency (HF) oscillations. These effects were fully suppressed under conditions of autonomic blockade with hexamethonium. Ventricular arrhythmias, including Torsades de pointes in monkeys, were prevented in both species when HF oscillations were suppressed by autonomic blockade. Similar enhancements of heart rate HF oscillations were found in dogs with other hERG blockers described as causing Torsades de pointes in humans. Conclusions and Implications These results demonstrate for the first time that beat-to-beat ventricular repolarization variability and ventricular arrhythmias induced by dofetilide are dependent on endogenous HF autonomic oscillations in heart rate. When combined with evidence of hERG-blocking properties, enhancement of endogenous HF oscillations in heart rate could constitute an earlier and more sensitive biomarker than STVQT for Torsades de pointes liability, applicable to preclinical regulatory studies conducted in healthy animals. PMID:25625756

  2. Bioaugmentation of nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidation by heterotrophic denitrifying sludge addition: A promising way for promotion of chemoautotrophic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ru; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, He-Ping; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Zhou, Xiao-Xin; Li, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidation (NAFO) is a new and valuable bio-process for the treatment of wastewaters with low C/N ratio, and the NAFO process is in state of the art. The heterotrophic denitrifying sludge (HDS), possessing NAFO activity, was used as bioaugmentation to enhance NAFO efficiency. At a dosage of 6% (V/V), the removal of nitrate and ferrous was 2.4 times and 2.3 times of as primary, and the volumetric removal rate (VRR) of nitrate and ferrous was 2.4 times and 2.2 times of as primary. Tracing experiments of HDS indicated that the bioaugmentation on NAFO reactor was resulted from the NAFO activity by HDS itself. The predominant bacteria in HDS were identified as Thauera (52.5%) and Hyphomicrobium (20.0%) which were typical denitrifying bacteria and had potential ability to oxidize ferrous. In conclusion, HDS could serve as bioaugmentation or a new seeding sludge for operating high-efficiency NAFO reactors. PMID:26348287

  3. Pressure-Dependent Competition among Reaction Pathways from First- and Second-O2 Additions in the Low-Temperature Oxidation of Tetrahydrofuran.

    PubMed

    Antonov, Ivan O; Zádor, Judit; Rotavera, Brandon; Papajak, Ewa; Osborn, David L; Taatjes, Craig A; Sheps, Leonid

    2016-08-25

    We report a combined experimental and quantum chemistry study of the initial reactions in low-temperature oxidation of tetrahydrofuran (THF). Using synchrotron-based time-resolved VUV photoionization mass spectrometry, we probe numerous transient intermediates and products at P = 10-2000 Torr and T = 400-700 K. A key reaction sequence, revealed by our experiments, is the conversion of THF-yl peroxy to hydroperoxy-THF-yl radicals (QOOH), followed by a second O2 addition and subsequent decomposition to dihydrofuranyl hydroperoxide + HO2 or to γ-butyrolactone hydroperoxide + OH. The competition between these two pathways affects the degree of radical chain-branching and is likely of central importance in modeling the autoignition of THF. We interpret our data with the aid of quantum chemical calculations of the THF-yl + O2 and QOOH + O2 potential energy surfaces. On the basis of our results, we propose a simplified THF oxidation mechanism below 700 K, which involves the competition among unimolecular decomposition and oxidation pathways of QOOH. PMID:27441526

  4. Fracture mode, microstructure and temperature-dependent elastic moduli for thermoelectric composites of PbTe-PbS with SiC nanoparticle additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Jennifer E.; Case, Eldon D.; Schmidt, Robert D.; Wu, Chun-I.; Hogan, Timothy P.; Trejo, Rosa M.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2013-12-01

    Twenty-six (Pb0.95Sn0.05Te)0.92(PbS)0.08-0.055% PbI2-SiC nanoparticle (SiCnp) composite thermoelectric specimens were either hot pressed or pulsed electric current sintered (PECS). Bloating (a thermally induced increase in porosity, P, for as-densified specimens) was observed during annealing at temperatures >603 K for hot-pressed specimens and PECS-processed specimens from wet milled powders, but in contrast seven out of seven specimens densified by PECS from dry milled powders showed no observable bloating following annealing at temperatures up to 936 K. In this study, bloating in the specimens was accessed via thermal annealing induced changes in (i) porosity measured by scanning electron microscopy on fractured specimen surfaces, (ii) specimen volume and (iii) elastic moduli. The moduli were measured by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. SiCnp additions (1-3.5 vol.%) changed the fracture mode from intergranular to transgranular, inhibited grain growth, and limited bloating in the wet milled PECS specimens. Inhibition of bloating likely occurs due to cleaning of contamination from powder particle surfaces via PECS processing which has been reported previously in the literature.

  5. Fracture mode, microstructure and temperature-dependent elastic moduli for thermoelectric composites of PbTe PbS with SiC nanoparticle additions

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Jennifer E; Case, Eldon D; Hogan, Timophy P.; Trejo, Rosa M; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-six (Pb0.95Sn0.05Te)0.92(PbS)0.08 0.055% PbI2 SiC nanoparticle (SiCnp) composite thermoelectric specimens were either hot pressed or pulsed electric current sintered (PECS). Bloating (a thermally induced increase in porosity, P, for as-densified specimens) was observed during annealing at temperatures >603 K for hot-pressed specimens and PECS-processed specimens from wet milled powders, but in contrast seven out of seven specimens densified by PECS from dry milled powders showed no observable bloating following annealing at temperatures up to 936 K. In this study, bloating in the specimens was accessed via thermal annealing induced changes in (i) porosity measured by scanning electron microscopy on fractured specimen surfaces, (ii) specimen volume and (iii) elastic moduli. The moduli were measured by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. SiCnp additions (1 3.5 vol.%) changed the fracture mode from intergranular to transgranular, inhibited grain growth, and limited bloating in the wet milled PECS specimens. Inhibition of bloating likely occurs due to cleaning of contamination from powder particle surfaces via PECS processing which has been reported previously in the literature.

  6. Variability in State-Dependent Plasticity of Intrinsic Properties during Cell-Autonomous Self-Regulation of Calcium Homeostasis in Hippocampal Model Neurons(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Sunandha; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2015-01-01

    How do neurons reconcile the maintenance of calcium homeostasis with perpetual switches in patterns of afferent activity? Here, we assessed state-dependent evolution of calcium homeostasis in a population of hippocampal pyramidal neuron models, through an adaptation of a recent study on stomatogastric ganglion neurons. Calcium homeostasis was set to emerge through cell-autonomous updates to 12 ionic conductances, responding to different types of synaptically driven afferent activity. We first assessed the impact of theta-frequency inputs on the evolution of ionic conductances toward maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Although calcium homeostasis emerged efficaciously across all models in the population, disparate changes in ionic conductances that mediated this emergence resulted in variable plasticity to several intrinsic properties, also manifesting as significant differences in firing responses across models. Assessing the sensitivity of this form of plasticity, we noted that intrinsic neuronal properties and the firing response were sensitive to the target calcium concentration and to the strength and frequency of afferent activity. Next, we studied the evolution of calcium homeostasis when afferent activity was switched, in different temporal sequences, between two behaviorally distinct types of activity: theta-frequency inputs and sharp-wave ripples riding on largely silent periods. We found that the conductance values, intrinsic properties, and firing response of neurons exhibited differential robustness to an intervening switch in the type of afferent activity. These results unveil critical dissociations between different forms of homeostasis, and call for a systematic evaluation of the impact of state-dependent switches in afferent activity on neuronal intrinsic properties during neural coding and homeostasis. PMID:26464994

  7. Surface vapor conductance derived from the ETRHEQ: Dependence on environmental variables and similarity to Oren's stomatal stress model for vapor pressure deficit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, G.; Rigden, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Daily time series of evapotranspiration and surface conductance to water vapor were estimated using the ETRHEQ method (Evapotranspiration from Relative Humidity at Equilibrium). ETRHEQ has been previously compared with ameriflux site-level measurements of ET at daily and seasonal time scales, with watershed water balance estimates, and with various benchmark ET data sets. The ETRHEQ method uses meteorological data collected at common weather stations and estimates the surface conductance by minimizing the vertical variance of the calculated relative humidity profile averaged over the day. The key advantage of the ETRHEQ method is that it does not require knowledge of the surface state (soil moisture, stomatal conductance, leaf are index, etc.) or site-specific calibration. The daily estimates of conductance from 229 weather stations for 53 years were analyzed for dependence on environmental variables known to impact stomatal conductance and soil diffusivity: surface temperature, surface vapor pressure deficit, solar radiation, antecedent precipitation (as a surrogate for soil moisture), and a seasonal vegetation greenness index. At each site the summertime (JJAS) conductance values estimated from ETRHEQ were fitted to a multiplicate Jarvis-type stress model. Functional dependence was not proscribed, but instead fitted using flexible piecewise-linear splines. The resulting stress functions reproduce the time series of conductance across a wide range of ecosystems and climates. The VPD stress term resembles that proposed by Oren (i.e., 1-m*log(VPD) ), with VPD measured in kilopascals. The equivalent value of m derived from our spline-fits at each station varied over a remarkably small range of 0.58 to 0.62, in agreement with Oren's original analysis based on leaf and tree-level measurements.

  8. Variability in State-Dependent Plasticity of Intrinsic Properties during Cell-Autonomous Self-Regulation of Calcium Homeostasis in Hippocampal Model Neurons1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Sunandha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract How do neurons reconcile the maintenance of calcium homeostasis with perpetual switches in patterns of afferent activity? Here, we assessed state-dependent evolution of calcium homeostasis in a population of hippocampal pyramidal neuron models, through an adaptation of a recent study on stomatogastric ganglion neurons. Calcium homeostasis was set to emerge through cell-autonomous updates to 12 ionic conductances, responding to different types of synaptically driven afferent activity. We first assessed the impact of theta-frequency inputs on the evolution of ionic conductances toward maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Although calcium homeostasis emerged efficaciously across all models in the population, disparate changes in ionic conductances that mediated this emergence resulted in variable plasticity to several intrinsic properties, also manifesting as significant differences in firing responses across models. Assessing the sensitivity of this form of plasticity, we noted that intrinsic neuronal properties and the firing response were sensitive to the target calcium concentration and to the strength and frequency of afferent activity. Next, we studied the evolution of calcium homeostasis when afferent activity was switched, in different temporal sequences, between two behaviorally distinct types of activity: theta-frequency inputs and sharp-wave ripples riding on largely silent periods. We found that the conductance values, intrinsic properties, and firing response of neurons exhibited differential robustness to an intervening switch in the type of afferent activity. These results unveil critical dissociations between different forms of homeostasis, and call for a systematic evaluation of the impact of state-dependent switches in afferent activity on neuronal intrinsic properties during neural coding and homeostasis. PMID:26464994

  9. Phosphazene-based ionic liquids: synthesis, temperature-dependent viscosity, and effect as additives in water lubrication of silicon nitride ceramics.

    PubMed

    Omotowa, Bamidele A; Phillips, Benjamin S; Zabinski, Jeffery S; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2004-08-23

    Phosphazene rings with (dimethylamino)ethoxy (1, 2), pyridylmethoxy (3), or (dimethylamino)propoxy (4) chains were synthesized and quaternized at the substitutent nitrogen by treatment with methyl iodide at 35 degrees C over 3-6 h to give polyiodo salts, 5-8. Subsequent metathesis with LiN(SO(2)CF(3))(2) or NaBF(4) gave the respective ionic salts, 9-13. The amide salts, 9-12, were viscous liquids with pour points at 55-100 degrees C, and the tetrafluoroborate salt, 13, was a solid, mp 168 degrees C. The compositions of 2 and 5-13 were confirmed by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. Compounds 1, 2, and 4 were viscous liquids (d(25) = 1.67 g cm(-3); eta(25) = 0.76-1.56 mPa s(-1) ) with pour points at approximately 15 degrees C. The solid polyquaternary salts, 5-8, melted at 130-194 degrees C. The ionic liquids, 9-12, had an average density of approximately 1.73 g cm(-3) at 25 degrees C, and viscosities (25 degrees C) ranged between 68.3 and 139.2 mPa s(-1). A plot of the viscosities of 9-12 vs temperature revealed an almost linear correlation between 55 and 120 degrees C. Friction and wear properties of water with 0.25 wt % of 9-12 as boundary lubricant additives were evaluated on Si(3)N(4)/Si(3)N(4) ceramic interfaces. The most significant observation is that they caused a decrease in the running-in period. PMID:15310229

  10. The Nature of Shared Cortical Variability

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Chun; Okun, Michael; Carandini, Matteo; Harris, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neuronal responses of sensory cortex are highly variable, and this variability is correlated across neurons. To assess how variability reflects factors shared across a neuronal population, we analyzed the activity of many simultaneously recorded neurons in visual cortex. We developed a simple model that comprises two sources of shared variability: a multiplicative gain, which uniformly scales each neuron’s sensory drive, and an additive offset, which affects different neurons to different degrees. This model captured the variability of spike counts and reproduced the dependence of pairwise correlations on neuronal tuning and stimulus orientation. The relative contributions of the additive and multiplicative fluctuations could vary over time and had marked impact on population coding. These observations indicate that shared variability of neuronal populations in sensory cortex can be largely explained by two factors that modulate the whole population. PMID:26212710

  11. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  12. Time Dependent Multi Zone Modeling of X-ray and Gamma-ray Variability of the TeV Blazar Mrk 421.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, Giovanni; Chen, X.

    2010-02-01

    We present a new time-dependent multi-zone code and its first application to study the SSC emission of Blazar Mrk 421. The code couples Fokker-Planck and Monte Carlo methods. All the light travel time effects are fully considered, internal and external. It has long been realized that simple one-zone homogeneous models are not adequate to describe several aspects of the phenomenology, in particular those pertaining to the complex multiwavelength variability. Progress has been made by several groups but important trade-offs have always been necessary, such as neglecting internal light travel time or the inclusion of IC losses in the electron evolution. Our code fully accounts for all the relevant effects, and it also affords us significant freedom w.r.t. geometry and "variability". This latter is implemented as a shock traveling along the jet, with electrons being injected as it sweeps the blob. Results are compared with the 2001 observations of Mrk 421. We also analyzed cases including a pre-existing cospatial electron population contributing to the SED, and external radiation field. It seems to be possible to achieve adequate fits to the observations, but a there remain several open issues, such as a systematic soft X-ray intraband lag, and a delay of the gamma-ray flare with respect to the X-ray flare. The two principal challenges are: 1. The simulated VHE spectrum is always softer than the observed one. 2. The correlation between the TeV gamma-ray and X-ray does not reproduce the (super)quadratic relationship observed in multiple occasions. In fact we have not been able to reproduce anything close to it in this first suite of models. We will report also on the extension of the code, and case studies, to jet-in-jet and spine-layer configurations, as well as to the study of red blazars. We acknowledge support from Chandra Award AR9-0016X

  13. On the sensitivity of long-term magnetotelluric monitoring in Southern Italy and source-dependent robust single station transfer function variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Gerardo; Balasco, Marianna; Lapenna, Vincenzo; Siniscalchi, Agata; Telesca, Luciano; Tripaldi, Simona

    2014-06-01

    Since 2007, a permanent magnetotelluric (MT) monitoring station has been working in the seismic area of the Agri Valley (Basilicata region, southern Italy) in order to investigate the stability of the MT transfer function. The station was installed in a rural area near the supposed seismogenic fault of the strong earthquake (Mw = 6.9) that struck the Agri Valley in 1857. Analysing about 4 yr of MT data characterized by a low seismic activity, the long-term systematic variations of robust single station MT transfer function estimates were observed in two different sounding period ranges. First, a significant seasonal component of variability for short periods was noted; these short periods were up to 16 s and were linked to variations in wetting/drying of soil moisture in the shallower layers. Second, a connection between the monitored estimates and global geomagnetic activity, Ap index, was found, particularly in the [20-100 s] period range. Analysing remote reference results and tipper estimates in shorter monitoring window, it was shown that such effect cannot be explained by a local or incoherent noise, and a large-scale coherent source should be claimed. We show that this effect is subtle because it produces smooth estimates, satisfying the dispersion relationship between apparent resistivity and phase, with small error bars. As the global geomagnetic activity level increases, robust estimators, like the median value, can be considered as a representative of the estimates due to the natural source, and they tend to stabilize when the Ap index approaches 10. It is also worth noting that our monitored time window includes the recent global minimum of solar activity which occurred in 2009, thus enhancing the estimate dependence on the Ap index.

  14. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  15. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  16. Interaction: Additivity plus Nonlinearity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, T. P.

    2004-01-01

    Whether or not there is an interaction between two factors in their effects on a dependent variable is often a central question. This paper proposes a general mechanism by which an interaction may arise: (a) the two factors are the same thing--or, at least, have a dimension in common--in the sense that it is meaningful to add (or subtract) them;…

  17. VERTICAL ATMOSPHERIC STRUCTURE IN A VARIABLE BROWN DWARF: PRESSURE-DEPENDENT PHASE SHIFTS IN SIMULTANEOUS HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE-SPITZER LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Buenzli, Esther; Apai, Daniel; Flateau, Davin; Morley, Caroline V.; Showman, Adam P.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Burrows, Adam; Marley, Mark S.; Reid, I. Neill

    2012-12-01

    Heterogeneous clouds or temperature perturbations in rotating brown dwarfs produce variability in the observed flux. We report time-resolved simultaneous observations of the variable T6.5 brown dwarf 2MASS J22282889-431026 over the wavelength ranges 1.1-1.7 {mu}m and broadband 4.5 {mu}m. Spectroscopic observations were taken with Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope and photometry with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The object shows sinusoidal infrared variability with a period of 1.4 hr at most wavelengths with peak-to-peak amplitudes between 1.45% and 5.3% of the mean flux. While the light curve shapes are similar at all wavelengths, their phases differ from wavelength to wavelength with a maximum difference of more than half of a rotational period. We compare the spectra with atmospheric models of different cloud prescriptions, from which we determine the pressure levels probed at different wavelengths. We find that the phase lag increases with decreasing pressure level, or higher altitude. We discuss a number of plausible scenarios that could cause this trend of light curve phase with probed pressure level. These observations are the first to probe heterogeneity in an ultracool atmosphere in both horizontal and vertical directions, and thus are an ideal test case for realistic three-dimensional simulations of the atmospheric structure with clouds in brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets.

  18. Dependence of the microwave radar cross section on ocean surface variables - Comparison of measurements and theory using data from the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, David E.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the ability of theoretical radar cross section (RCS) models to predict the absolute magnitude of the ocean radar cross section under a wide variety of sea and atmospheric conditions. The dependence of the RCS on wind stress (as opposed to wind speed) was also studied. An extensive amount of experimental data was acquired during the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment. Measurements across an ocean front demonstrated that the vertical polarization and horizontal polarization radar cross section were more strongly dependent on wind stress than on wind magnitude. Current theoretical models for the RCS, based on stress, were tested with this data. In situations where the Bragg scattering theory does not agree with the measured radar cross section (magnitude and angle dependence), revisions are hypothesized and evaluated.

  19. Demographic response to perturbations: the role of compensatory density dependence in a North American duck under variable harvest regulations and changing habitat.

    PubMed

    Péron, Guillaume; Nicolai, Christopher A; Koons, David N

    2012-09-01

    1. Most wild animal populations are subjected to many perturbations, including environmental forcing and anthropogenic mortality. How population size varies in response to these perturbations largely depends on life-history strategy and density regulation. 2. Using the mid-continent population of redhead Aythya americana (a North American diving duck), we investigated the population response to two major perturbations, changes in breeding habitat availability (number of ponds in the study landscape) and changes in harvest regulations directed at managing mortality patterns (bag limit). We used three types of data collected at the continental scale (capture-recovery, population surveys and age- and sex ratios in the harvest) and combined them into integrated population models to assess the interaction between density dependence and the effect of perturbations. 3. We observed a two-way interaction between the effects on fecundity of pond number and population density. Hatch-year female survival was also density dependent. Matrix modelling showed that population booms could occur after especially wet years. However, the effect of moderate variation in pond number was generally offset by density dependence the following year. 4. Mortality patterns were insensitive to changes in harvest regulations and, in males at least, insensitive to density dependence as well. We discuss potential mechanisms for compensation of hunting mortality as well as possible confounding factors. 5. Our results illustrate the interplay of density dependence and environmental variation both shaping population dynamics in a harvested species, which could be generalized to help guide the dual management of habitat and harvest regulations. PMID:22433018

  20. Applying the Transactional Stress and Coping Model to Sickle Cell Disorder and Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus: Identifying Psychosocial Variables Related to Adjustment and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocking, Matthew C.; Lochman, John E.

    2005-01-01

    This review paper examines the literature on psychosocial factors associated with adjustment to sickle cell disease and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in children through the framework of the transactional stress and coping (TSC) model. The transactional stress and coping model views adaptation to a childhood chronic illness as mediated by…

  1. High frequency variability of particle size distribution and its dependency on turbulence over the sea bottom during re-suspension processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renosh, P. R.; Schmitt, François G.; Loisel, Hubert; Sentchev, Alexei; Mériaux, Xavier

    2014-04-01

    The impact of tidal current, waves and turbulence on particles re-suspension over the sea bottom is studied through Eulerian high frequency measurements of velocity and particle size distribution (PSD) during 5 tidal cycles (65 h) in a coastal environment of the eastern English Channel. High frequency variability of PSD is observed along with the velocity fluctuations. Power spectral analysis shows that turbulent velocity and PSD parameters have similarities in their spectral behaviour over the whole range of examined temporal scales. The low frequency variability of particles is controlled by turbulence (β≃-5/3) and the high frequency is partly driven by dynamical processes impacted by the sea bottom interactions with turbulence (wall turbulence). Stokes number (St), rarely measured in situ, exhibits very low values, emphasizing that these particles can be considered as passive tracers. The effect of tide and waves on turbidity and PSD is highlighted. During slack tide, when the current reaches its minimum value, we observe a higher proportion of small particles compared to larger ones. To a lower extent, high significant wave heights are also associated with a greater concentration of suspended sediments and the presence of larger particles (larger Sauter's diameter DA, and lower PSD slope ξ).

  2. A method to assess the inter-annual weather-dependent variability in air pollution concentration and deposition based on weather typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleijel, Håkan; Grundström, Maria; Karlsson, Gunilla Pihl; Karlsson, Per Erik; Chen, Deliang

    2016-02-01

    Annual anomalies in air pollutant concentrations, and deposition (bulk and throughfall) of sulphate, nitrate and ammonium, in the Gothenburg region, south-west Sweden, were correlated with optimized linear combinations of the yearly frequency of Lamb Weather Types (LWTs) to determine the extent to which the year-to-year variation in pollution exposure can be partly explained by weather related variability. Air concentrations of urban NO2, CO, PM10, as well as O3 at both an urban and a rural monitoring site, and the deposition of sulphate, nitrate and ammonium for the period 1997-2010 were included in the analysis. Linear detrending of the time series was performed to estimate trend-independent anomalies. These estimated anomalies were subtracted from observed annual values. Then the statistical significance of temporal trends with and without LWT adjustment was tested. For the pollutants studied, the annual anomaly was well correlated with the annual LWT combination (R2 in the range 0.52-0.90). Some negative (annual average [NO2], ammonia bulk deposition) or positive (average urban [O3]) temporal trends became statistically significant (p < 0.05) when the LWT adjustment was applied. In all the cases but one (NH4 throughfall, for which no temporal trend existed) the significance of temporal trends became stronger with LWT adjustment. For nitrate and ammonium, the LWT based adjustment explained a larger fraction of the inter-annual variation for bulk deposition than for throughfall. This is probably linked to the longer time scale of canopy related dry deposition processes influencing throughfall being explained to a lesser extent by LWTs than the meteorological factors controlling bulk deposition. The proposed novel methodology can be used by authorities responsible for air pollution management, and by researchers studying temporal trends in pollution, to evaluate e.g. the relative importance of changes in emissions and weather variability in annual air pollution

  3. Neuronal variability of MSTd neurons changes differentially with eye movement and visually related variables.

    PubMed

    Brostek, Lukas; Büttner, Ulrich; Mustari, Michael J; Glasauer, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Neurons in macaque cortical area MSTd are driven by visual motion and eye movement related signals. This multimodal characteristic makes MSTd an ideal system for studying the dependence of neuronal activity on different variables. Here, we analyzed the temporal structure of spiking patterns during visual motion stimulation using 2 distinct behavioral paradigms: fixation (FIX) and optokinetic response. For the FIX condition, inter- and intra-trial variability of spiking activity decreased with increasing stimulus strength, complying with a recent neurophysiological study reporting stimulus-related decline of neuronal variability. In contrast, for the optokinetic condition variability increased together with increasing eye velocity while retinal image velocity remained low. Analysis of stimulus signal variability revealed a correlation between the normalized variance of image velocity and neuronal variability, but no correlation with normalized eye velocity variance. We further show that the observed difference in neuronal variability allows classifying spike trains according to the paradigm used, even when mean firing rates (FRs) were similar. The stimulus-dependence of neuronal variability may result from the local network structure and/or the variability characteristics of the input signals, but may also reflect additional timing-based mechanisms independent of the neuron's mean FR and related to the modality driving the neuron. PMID:22772648

  4. Variable Synthetic Capacitance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    Feedback amplifier circuit synthesizes electronically variable capacitance. Variable Synthetic Capacitor is amplifier circuit with follower/feedback configuration. Effective input capacitance depends on input set current. If synthetic capacitor is connected across resonant element of oscillator, oscillator frequency controlled via input set current. Circuit especially suitable for fine frequency adjustments of piezoelectric-crystal or inductor/capacitor resonant oscillators.

  5. A psychometric evaluation of adult patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus: prevalence of psychological dysfunction and relationship to demographic variables, metabolic control and complications.

    PubMed

    Winocour, P H; Main, C J; Medlicott, G; Anderson, D C

    1990-08-01

    The relationship between psychosocial traits and glycaemic control and complications was examined in 130 adults (83 men, 47 women) with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Abnormal depression ratings were observed in more women (19.1%) than men (12.0%), p less than 0.01, whilst obsessive symptoms were recorded more frequently in men (41.0 v 21.3%, p less than 0.01). Abnormal anxiety ratings were present in roughly 8-13% of men and women, although a notably low feeling of insecurity rating was observed more frequently in men (56.5%) than in women (38.3% of cases), p less than 0.05. Psychological scores were related to age, employment status and social class, but not to duration of diabetes or glycaemic control. The anxiety, depression and obsessive ratings correlated with one another (rs range 0.24-0.62, all p less than 0.001). Higher anxiety and depression ratings or overt psychological dysfunction was recorded in patients with neuropathic symptoms and signs, impotence, macrovascular disease or proliferative retinopathy. It is concluded that the presence of diabetic complications and adverse social circumstances are more relevant to psychological status than glycaemic control. PMID:2132190

  6. StralSV: assessment of sequence variability within similar 3D structures and application to polio RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Zemla, A; Lang, D; Kostova, T; Andino, R; Zhou, C

    2010-11-29

    Most of the currently used methods for protein function prediction rely on sequence-based comparisons between a query protein and those for which a functional annotation is provided. A serious limitation of sequence similarity-based approaches for identifying residue conservation among proteins is the low confidence in assigning residue-residue correspondences among proteins when the level of sequence identity between the compared proteins is poor. Multiple sequence alignment methods are more satisfactory - still, they cannot provide reliable results at low levels of sequence identity. Our goal in the current work was to develop an algorithm that could overcome these difficulties and facilitate the identification of structurally (and possibly functionally) relevant residue-residue correspondences between compared protein structures. Here we present StralSV, a new algorithm for detecting closely related structure fragments and quantifying residue frequency from tight local structure alignments. We apply StralSV in a study of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of poliovirus and demonstrate that the algorithm can be used to determine regions of the protein that are relatively unique or that shared structural similarity with structures that are distantly related. By quantifying residue frequencies among many residue-residue pairs extracted from local alignments, one can infer potential structural or functional importance of specific residues that are determined to be highly conserved or that deviate from a consensus. We further demonstrate that considerable detailed structural and phylogenetic information can be derived from StralSV analyses. StralSV is a new structure-based algorithm for identifying and aligning structure fragments that have similarity to a reference protein. StralSV analysis can be used to quantify residue-residue correspondences and identify residues that may be of particular structural or functional importance, as well as unusual or unexpected

  7. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goode, Daniel J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Lacombe, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55 years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently

  8. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: Depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling.

    PubMed

    Goode, Daniel J; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E; Lacombe, Pierre J

    2014-12-15

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently

  9. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: Depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goode, Daniel J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Lacombe, Pierre J.

    2014-12-01

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55 years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently

  10. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  11. Long-term variability of aerosol optical thickness in Eastern Europe over 2001-2014 according to the measurements at the Moscow MSU MO AERONET site with additional cloud and NO2 correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, N. Y.; Poliukhov, A. A.; Gorlova, I. D.

    2015-07-01

    The aerosol properties of the atmosphere were obtained within the framework of the AERONET program at the Moscow State University Meteorological Observatory (Moscow MSU MO) over 2001-2014 period. The quality data control has revealed the necessity of their additional cloud and NO2 correction. The application of cloud correction according to hourly visual cloud observations provides a decrease in average aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 500 nm of up to 0.03 compared with the standard dataset. We also show that the additional NO2 correction of the AERONET data is needed in large megalopolis, like Moscow, with 12 million residents and the NOx emission rates of about 100 kt yr-1. According to the developed method we estimated monthly mean NO2 content, which provides an additional decrease of 0.01 for AOT at 340 nm, and of about 0.015 - for AOT at 380 and 440 nm. The ratios of NO2 optical thickness to AOT at 380 and 440 nm are about 5-6 % in summer and reach 15-20 % in winter when both factors have similar effects on UV irradiance. Seasonal cycle of AOT at 500 nm is characterized by a noticeable summer and spring maxima, and minimum in winter conditions, changing from 0.08 in December and January up to 0.3 in August. The application of the additional cloud correction removes a local AOT maximum in February, and lowered the December artificial high AOT values. The pronounced negative AOT trends of about -1-5 % yr-1 have been obtained for most months, which could be attributed to the negative trends in emissions (E) of different aerosol precursors of about 116 Gg yr-2 in ESOx, 78 Gg yr-2 in ENMVOC, and 272 Gg yr-2 in ECO over European territory of Russia. No influence of natural factors on temporal AOT variations has been revealed.

  12. Long-term variability of aerosol optical thickness in Eastern Europe over 2001-2014 according to the measurements at the Moscow MSU MO AERONET site with additional cloud and NO2 correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, N. Y.; Poliukhov, A. A.; Gorlova, I. D.

    2016-02-01

    The atmospheric aerosol properties were obtained within the framework of the AERONET program at the Moscow State University Meteorological Observatory (Moscow MSU MO) over the 2001-2014 period. The quality data control has revealed the necessity of additional cloud screening and NO2 correction. The application of additional cloud screening according to hourly visual cloud observations provides a decrease in monthly average aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 500 nm of up to 0.03 compared with the standard data set. We also show that the additional NO2 correction of the AERONET version 2 data is needed in large megalopolis, like Moscow, with 12 million residents and NOx emission rates of about 100 kt yr-1. According to the developed method, we estimated monthly mean NO2 content, which provides an additional decrease of 0.01 for AOT at 340 nm, and of about 0.015 - for AOT at 380 and 440 nm. The ratios of NO2 optical thickness to AOT at 380 and 440 nm are about 5-6 % in summer and reach 15-20 % in winter when both factors have similar effects on UV irradiance. Seasonal cycle of AOT at 500 nm is characterized by a noticeable summer and spring maxima, and a minimum in winter conditions, changing from 0.08 in December and January up to 0.3 in August. The application of the additional cloud screening removes a local AOT maximum in February. Statistically significant negative trends in annual AOT for UV and mid-visible spectral range have been obtained both for average and 50 % quantile values. The pronounced negative changes were observed in most months with the rate of about -1-5 % yr-1 and could be attributed to the negative trends in emissions (E) of different aerosol precursors of about 135 Gg yr-2 in ESOx, 54 Gg yr-2 in ENMVOC, and slight negative changes in NOx over the European part of Russia. No significant influence of natural factors on temporal AOT variations has been revealed.

  13. Iterative Strain-Gage Balance Calibration Data Analysis for Extended Independent Variable Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Norbert Manfred

    2011-01-01

    A new method was developed that makes it possible to use an extended set of independent calibration variables for an iterative analysis of wind tunnel strain gage balance calibration data. The new method permits the application of the iterative analysis method whenever the total number of balance loads and other independent calibration variables is greater than the total number of measured strain gage outputs. Iteration equations used by the iterative analysis method have the limitation that the number of independent and dependent variables must match. The new method circumvents this limitation. It simply adds a missing dependent variable to the original data set by using an additional independent variable also as an additional dependent variable. Then, the desired solution of the regression analysis problem can be obtained that fits each gage output as a function of both the original and additional independent calibration variables. The final regression coefficients can be converted to data reduction matrix coefficients because the missing dependent variables were added to the data set without changing the regression analysis result for each gage output. Therefore, the new method still supports the application of the two load iteration equation choices that the iterative method traditionally uses for the prediction of balance loads during a wind tunnel test. An example is discussed in the paper that illustrates the application of the new method to a realistic simulation of temperature dependent calibration data set of a six component balance.

  14. Spontaneous neuronal burst discharges as dependent and independent variables in the maturation of cerebral cortex tissue cultured in vitro: a review of activity-dependent studies in live 'model' systems for the development of intrinsically generated bioelectric slow-wave sleep patterns.

    PubMed

    Corner, Michael A

    2008-11-01

    A survey is presented of recent experiments which utilize spontaneous neuronal spike trains as dependent and/or independent variables in developing cerebral cortex cultures when synaptic transmission is interfered with for varying periods of time. Special attention is given to current difficulties in selecting suitable preparations for carrying out biologically relevant developmental studies, and in applying spike-train analysis methods with sufficient resolution to detect activity-dependent age and treatment effects. A hierarchy of synchronized nested burst discharges which approximate early slow-wave sleep patterns in the intact organism is established as a stable basis for isolated cortex function. The complexity of reported long- and short-term homeostatic responses to experimental interference with synaptic transmission is reviewed, and the crucial role played by intrinsically generated bioelectric activity in the maturation of cortical networks is emphasized. PMID:18722470

  15. Distance dependent charge separation and recombination in semiconductor/molecular catalyst systems for water splitting† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, DFT calculations and additional transient absorption measurements. See DOI: 10.1039/c4cc05143b Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Willkomm, Janina; Muresan, Nicoleta M.; Lakadamyali, Fezile; Planells, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    The photoinduced reduction of three Co electrocatalysts immobilised on TiO2 is 104 times faster than the reverse charge recombination. Both processes show an exponential dependence on the distance between the semiconductor and the catalytic core. PMID:25207748

  16. Glucose Variability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The proposed contribution of glucose variability to the development of the complications of diabetes beyond that of glycemic exposure is supported by reports that oxidative stress, the putative mediator of such complications, is greater for intermittent as opposed to sustained hyperglycemia. Variability of glycemia in ambulatory conditions defined as the deviation from steady state is a phenomenon of normal physiology. Comprehensive recording of glycemia is required for the generation of any measurement of glucose variability. To avoid distortion of variability to that of glycemic exposure, its calculation should be devoid of a time component. PMID:23613565

  17. The Stoichiometry and Biophysical Properties of the Kv4 Potassium Channel Complex with K+ Channel-interacting Protein (KChIP) Subunits Are Variable, Depending on the Relative Expression Level*

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Kv4 is a voltage-gated K+ channel, which underlies somatodendritic subthreshold A-type current (ISA) and cardiac transient outward K+ (Ito) current. Various ion channel properties of Kv4 are known to be modulated by its auxiliary subunits, such as K+ channel-interacting protein (KChIP) or dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein. KChIP is a cytoplasmic protein and increases the current amplitude, decelerates the inactivation, and accelerates the recovery from inactivation of Kv4. Crystal structure analysis demonstrated that Kv4 and KChIP form an octameric complex with four Kv4 subunits and four KChIP subunits. However, it remains unknown whether the Kv4·KChIP complex can have a different stoichiometry other than 4:4. In this study, we expressed Kv4.2 and KChIP4 with various ratios in Xenopus oocytes and observed that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 gradually changed with the increase in co-expressed KChIP4. The tandem repeat constructs of Kv4.2 and KChIP4 revealed that the 4:4 (Kv4.2/KChIP4) channel shows faster recovery than the 4:2 channel, suggesting that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 change, depending on the number of bound KChIP4s. Subunit counting by single-molecule imaging revealed that the bound number of KChIP4 in each Kv4.2·KChIP4 complex was dependent on the expression level of KChIP4. Taken together, we conclude that the stoichiometry of Kv4·KChIP complex is variable, and the biophysical properties of Kv4 change depending on the number of bound KChIP subunits. PMID:24811166

  18. Ontogenetic thermal tolerance and performance of ectotherms at variable temperatures.

    PubMed

    Cavieres, G; Bogdanovich, J M; Bozinovic, F

    2016-07-01

    Early experience and environmental conditions during ontogeny may affect organismal structure, physiology and fitness. Here, we assessed the effect of developmental acclimation to environmental thermal variability on walking speed in Drosophila melanogaster adults. Our results showed a shift in the performance curve to the right. Thus, upper and lower thermal limits exhibited developmental plasticity. Additionally, in constant and variable climatic scenarios, flies shifted to the right the optimum temperature but the maximum performance decreased only in flies reared on high temperatures and high thermal variability. Overall, we showed that environmental cues during ontogeny might help to construct phenotypic variation, which supports the hypothesis of ontogenetic dependence of thermal tolerances. PMID:27118598

  19. Blade-order-dependent radiocarbon variability in brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) reflected a cold Oyashio water intrusion event in an embayment of the Sanriku coast, northeastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, N.; Fukuda, H.; Miyairi, Y.; Yokoyama, Y.; Nagata, T.

    2015-12-01

    Radiocarbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater varies greatly, both geographically and with depth. This "reservoir effect" is thought to be reflected in the radiocarbon content (∆14C) of marine organisms, via DIC fixation by primary producers and subsequent trophic transfer. The ∆14C of marine organismal soft tissues might thus provide unique information about their habitats, diets, migration and other environmental histories. However, the effectiveness of this approach has yet to be extensively explored, with data on ∆14C variability in soft tissues of marine organisms being markedly limited. Here we examined whether ∆14C values of individual pinnate blades (leaf-like structures) of brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) reflect the ∆14C of DIC in the water current prevailing at the time of blade formation. The study was conducted in Otsuchi Bay located in the Sanriku coastal region, northeastern Japan, where 14C-depleted cold Oyashio current and warm Tsugaru current (high ∆14C) converge, affecting the physiology and growth of marine organisms growing there. U. pinnatifida individuals cultured in the bay (length of saprophytes, 140-215 cm) were harvested in April 2014 and ∆14C of blades were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry. Younger blades formed after the Oyashio water intrusion had significantly lower ∆14C values compared to older blades formed before the event. The ∆14C values of younger and older blades were generally consistent with the ∆14C of DIC in Oyashio (-60.5 ‰) and Tsugaru (24.9 ‰) waters, respectively. Thus, despite possible turnover of organic carbon in seaweed soft tissues, blade-order-dependent ∆14C variability appeared to strongly reflect the Oyashio intrusion event (radiocarbon shift) in the bay.

  20. Additively Manufactured 3D Porous Ti-6Al-4V Constructs Mimic Trabecular Bone Structure and Regulate Osteoblast Proliferation, Differentiation and Local Factor Production in a Porosity and Surface Roughness Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Alice; Humayun, Aiza; Cohen, David J.; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing by laser sintering is able to produce high resolution metal constructs for orthopaedic and dental implants. In this study, we used a human trabecular bone template to design and manufacture Ti-6Al-4V constructs with varying porosity via laser sintering. Characterization of constructs revealed interconnected porosities ranging from 15–70% with compressive moduli of 2063–2954 MPa. These constructs with macro porosity were further surface-treated to create a desirable multi-scale micro-/nano-roughness, which has been shown to enhance the osseointegration process. Osteoblasts (MG63 cells) exhibited high viability when grown on the constructs. Proliferation (DNA) and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALP), an early differentiation marker, decreased as porosity increased, while osteocalcin (OCN), a late differentiation marker, as well as osteoprotegerin (OPG), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 4 (BMP2, BMP4) increased with increasing porosity. 3D constructs with the highest porosity and surface modification supported the greatest osteoblast differentiation and local factor production. These results indicate that additively manufactured 3D porous constructs mimicking human trabecular bone and produced with additional surface treatment can be customized for increased osteoblast response. Increased factors for osteoblast maturation and differentiation on high porosity constructs suggest the enhanced performance of these surfaces for increasing osseointegration in vivo. PMID:25287305

  1. The Additive Property of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaoussis, Dimitris S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents exercises that analyze the additive property of energy. Concludes that if a body has more than one component of energy depending on the same physical quantity, the body's total energy will be the algebraic sum of the components if a linear relationship exists between the energy components and that physical quantity. (JRH)

  2. Predicting Group-Level Outcome Variables from Variables Measured at the Individual Level: A Latent Variable Multilevel Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croon, Marcel A.; van Veldhoven, Marc J. P. M.

    2007-01-01

    In multilevel modeling, one often distinguishes between macro-micro and micro-macro situations. In a macro-micro multilevel situation, a dependent variable measured at the lower level is predicted or explained by variables measured at that lower or a higher level. In a micro-macro multilevel situation, a dependent variable defined at the higher…

  3. Variable Valve Actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Gutterman; A. J. Lasley

    2008-08-31

    Many approaches exist to enable advanced mode, low temperature combustion systems for diesel engines - such as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) or other HCCI-like combustion modes. The fuel properties and the quantity, distribution and temperature profile of air, fuel and residual fraction in the cylinder can have a marked effect on the heat release rate and combustion phasing. Figure 1 shows that a systems approach is required for HCCI-like combustion. While the exact requirements remain unclear (and will vary depending on fuel, engine size and application), some form of substantially variable valve actuation is a likely element in such a system. Variable valve actuation, for both intake and exhaust valve events, is a potent tool for controlling the parameters that are critical to HCCI-like combustion and expanding its operational range. Additionally, VVA can be used to optimize the combustion process as well as exhaust temperatures and impact the after treatment system requirements and its associated cost. Delphi Corporation has major manufacturing and product development and applied R&D expertise in the valve train area. Historical R&D experience includes the development of fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train on research engines as well as several generations of mechanical VVA for gasoline systems. This experience has enabled us to evaluate various implementations and determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. While a fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train system might be the 'ideal' solution technically for maximum flexibility in the timing and control of the valve events, its complexity, associated costs, and high power consumption make its implementation on low cost high volume applications unlikely. Conversely, a simple mechanical system might be a low cost solution but not deliver the flexibility required for HCCI operation. After modeling more than 200 variations of the

  4. A concentration dependent auto-relay-recognition by the same analyte: a dual fluorescence switch-on by hydrogen sulfide via Michael addition followed by reduction and staining for bio-activity.

    PubMed

    Das, Avijit Kumar; Goswami, Shyamaprosad; Dutta, Gorachand; Maity, Sibaprasad; Mandal, Tarun kanti; Khanra, Kalyani; Bhattacharyya, Nandan

    2016-01-14

    H2S is shown, for the first time, to play an extraordinary dual role due to its nucleophilicity and reducing property with our single chemosensor, PND [4-(piperidin-1-yl) naphthalene-1,2-dione]. The initial nucleophilic attack via Michael addition (a lower concentration of H2S, blue fluorescence) is followed by the reduction of the 1,2-diketo functionality (a higher concentration of H2S, green fluorescence). This chemosensor, which also shows biological response, is remarkably effective in sensing the same analyte (H2S) at its different concentrations in a relay pathway via a fluorescence "off-on-on" mechanism, and this is also supported by DFT calculation and Cyclic voltammograms. PMID:26510406

  5. Ubiquitinated, p62 immunopositive cerebellar cortical neuronal inclusions are evident across the spectrum of TDP-43 proteinopathies but are only rarely additionally immunopositive for phosphorylation-dependent TDP-43.

    PubMed

    King, Andrew; Maekawa, Satomi; Bodi, Istvan; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa

    2011-06-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP), frontotemporal lobar degeneration with motor neuron disease/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FTLD-MND/ALS) and MND/ALS are thought to represent a clinicopathological spectrum of TDP-43 proteinopathies. The cerebellum has been little studied in these conditions, probably because of the lack of cerebellar signs in most cases. We examined p62 immunohistochemistry on cerebellar sections from 43 TDP-43 proteinopathies (including cases of FTLD-TDP, FTLD-MND/ALS and MND/ALS) together with 72 cases of other neurodegenerative diseases, seven controls and three other disease conditions. In 11 of the TDP-43 proteinopathies (26%) there were numerous p62-positive cerebellar inclusions, predominantly within the granular layer, but also the molecular and Purkinje cell layer. Furthermore, only one of the remaining 82 cases (a familial tauopathy) showed similar p62 positivity. Immunohistochemistry for ubiquitin was positive in the granular layer inclusions. The immunohistochemistry for phosphorylation-independent TDP-43, hyperphosphorylated tau, α-synuclein, fusion sarcoma protein (FUS), and neurofilament was negative. In only one case (a case of FTLD-TDP) were the inclusions positive for phosphorylation-dependent TDP43 (p-TDP-43). Those TDP-43 proteinopathy cases that showed the cerebellar inclusions also tended to display other common features, such as a notable excess of p62 pathology when compared to TDP-43 pathology, especially within the pyramidal neurones of the hippocampus but also in some cases within the neocortex. The results suggest that p62-positive inclusions within the cerebellum are seen in a proportion of cases across the range of the TDP-43 proteinopathy spectrum and they appear to be relatively specific for this group of diseases. The question as to whether these cerebellar-positive cases represent a distinct subgroup remains to be answered. Furthermore, the relationship of the p62

  6. NK Cell and Ig Interplay in Defense against Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1: Epistatic Interaction of CD16A and IgG1 Allotypes of Variable Affinities Modulates Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Susceptibility to Clinical Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Moraru, Manuela; Black, Laurel E; Muntasell, Aura; Portero, Francisca; López-Botet, Miguel; Reyburn, Hugh T; Pandey, Janardan P; Vilches, Carlos

    2015-08-15

    HSV-1 latently infects most humans, causing a variable clinical picture that depends, in part, on host genetic factors. Both IgG and its cellular FcRs, CD16A and CD32A-C (encoded by FCGR3A and FCGR2A-C, respectively, on chromosome 1), display polymorphisms that could affect their defensive function. Of potential relevance are a FCGR3A dimorphism resulting in CD16A-valine/phenylalanine-158 allotypes with different IgG affinity, variations conditioning NK cell expression of CD32B or CD32C, and IgG1 H chain (IGHG1) and kappa-chain (IGKC) polymorphisms determining allotypes designated G1m and Km. In this study, we assessed the contribution of Ig genetic variations and their interaction with FcR polymorphism to HSV-1 susceptibility, as well as their impact on NK cell-mediated Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Our results show an epistatic interaction between IGHG1 and FCGR3A such that the higher affinity CD16A-158V/V genotype associates with an asymptomatic course of HSV-1 infection only in homozygotes for G1m3. Furthermore, CD16A-158V and G1m3 allotypes enhanced ADCC against opsonized HSV-1-infected fibroblasts. Conversely, Km allotypes and CD32B or CD32C expression on NK cells did not significantly influence HSV-1 susceptibility or ADCC. NK cells degranulating against immune serum-opsonized HSV-1-infected fibroblasts had heterogeneous phenotypes. Yet, enhanced ADCC was observed among NK cells showing a differentiated, memory-like phenotype (NKG2C(bright)NKG2A(-)CD57(+)FcRγ(-)), which expand in response to human CMV. These results extend our knowledge on the importance of immunogenetic polymorphisms and NK cell-Ab interplay in the host response against HSV-1 and point to the relevance of interactions between immune responses elicited during chronic coinfection by multiple herpesviruses. PMID:26179905

  7. Variability of electrode positions using electrode caps.

    PubMed

    Atcherson, Samuel R; Gould, Herbert Jay; Pousson, Monique A; Prout, Tina M

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the variability of electrode positions for a multi-channel, custom electrode cap placed onto participants' heads without taking scalp measurements. The electrode positions were digitized in a three-dimensional space for 10 young adult participants on three separate occasions. Positional variability was determined for 15 selected electrodes within the three-dimensional preauricular-nasion (PAN) coordinate system and from this system, angular coordinate variability was also determined. The standard deviations of the 15 selected electrodes ranged from 3.0 to 12.7 mm in the PAN system. These data resulted in a variability of 2.0 degrees to 10.4 degrees among the angular coordinates. The measurements indicated slightly greater variability of electrode positions compared to studies when electrodes were placed using scalp measurements. The implication of this study is that the use of electrode caps may not be appropriate when electroencephalographic (EEG) or evoked potential (EP) techniques depend on accurate electrode placement. Additionally, if a longitudinal study is performed, electrode locations should be checked to ensure that they conform with previous sessions. PMID:17929157

  8. Cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szkody, Paula; Cropper, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Recent observations of cataclysmic variables (CVs) at different wavelengths are reviewed, with a focus on their implications for theoretical models. Consideration is given to disk CVs (the flux distribution of the disk and changes during dwarf-nova outbursts), magnetic CVs (flux distributions and components), and the underlying stars. Typical data are presented in graphs, tables, and sample spectra, and it is concluded that more detailed multiwavelength observations are needed to improve models of radiative transfer and viscosity effects in accretion disks.

  9. Deconstructed transverse mass variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Virzi, Joseph S.; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2015-04-01

    Traditional searches for R-parity conserving natural supersymmetry (SUSY) require large transverse mass and missing energy cuts to separate the signal from large backgrounds. SUSY models with compressed spectra inherently produce signal events with small amounts of missing energy that are hard to explore. We use this difficulty to motivate the construction of "deconstructed" transverse mass variables which are designed preserve information on both the norm and direction of the missing momentum. We demonstrate the effectiveness of these variables in searches for the pair production of supersymmetric top-quark partners which subsequently decay into a final state with an isolated lepton, jets and missing energy. We show that the use of deconstructed transverse mass variables extends the accessible compressed spectra parameter space beyond the region probed by traditional methods. The parameter space can further be expanded to neutralino masses that are larger than the difference between the stop and top masses. In addition, we also discuss how these variables allow for novel searches of single stop production, in order to directly probe unconstrained stealth stops in the small stop- and neutralino-mass regime. We also demonstrate the utility of these variables for generic gluino and stop searches in all-hadronic final states. Overall, we demonstrate that deconstructed transverse variables are essential to any search wanting to maximize signal separation from the background when the signal has undetected particles in the final state.

  10. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  11. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  12. Risk assessment of groundwater level variability using variable Kriging methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2015-04-01

    Assessment of the water table level spatial variability in aquifers provides useful information regarding optimal groundwater management. This information becomes more important in basins where the water table level has fallen significantly. The spatial variability of the water table level in this work is estimated based on hydraulic head measured during the wet period of the hydrological year 2007-2008, in a sparsely monitored basin in Crete, Greece, which is of high socioeconomic and agricultural interest. Three Kriging-based methodologies are elaborated in Matlab environment to estimate the spatial variability of the water table level in the basin. The first methodology is based on the Ordinary Kriging approach, the second involves auxiliary information from a Digital Elevation Model in terms of Residual Kriging and the third methodology calculates the probability of the groundwater level to fall below a predefined minimum value that could cause significant problems in groundwater resources availability, by means of Indicator Kriging. The Box-Cox methodology is applied to normalize both the data and the residuals for improved prediction results. In addition, various classical variogram models are applied to determine the spatial dependence of the measurements. The Matérn model proves to be the optimal, which in combination with Kriging methodologies provides the most accurate cross validation estimations. Groundwater level and probability maps are constructed to examine the spatial variability of the groundwater level in the basin and the associated risk that certain locations exhibit regarding a predefined minimum value that has been set for the sustainability of the basin's groundwater resources. Acknowledgement The work presented in this paper has been funded by the Greek State Scholarships Foundation (IKY), Fellowships of Excellence for Postdoctoral Studies (Siemens Program), 'A simulation-optimization model for assessing the best practices for the

  13. Quantum Backreaction on Classical'' Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A. Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Rd., London SW7 2BZ )

    1995-01-30

    A mathematically consistent procedure for coupling quasiclassical and quantum variables through coupled Hamilton-Heisenberg equations of motion is derived from a variational principle. During evolution, the quasiclassical variables become entangled with the quantum variables with the result that the value of the quasiclassical variables depends on the quantum state. This provides a formalism to compute the backreaction of any quantum system on a quasiclassical one. In particular, it leads to a natural candidate for a theory of gravity coupled to quantized matter in which the gravitational field is not quantized.

  14. Investigation of spatio-temporal variability of water uptake in a groundwater-dependent ecosystem using a stable isotope approach (δ18O, δ2H): Pfyn Forest, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, G.; Masini, J.; Goldscheider, N.; Gobat, J. M.; Hunkeler, D.

    2012-04-01

    total humidity of soil, this could be due to rapid infiltration and/or fractionation mainly under equilibrium, i.e. with a relatively high atmospheric humidity, what is possible under forest canopy. Plant water is located under the LMWL in September 2010 when the soil was relatively drought. This evaporative signature could be a clue of water stress. More investigations are however needed to check if this parameter can be used routinely to address water stress. - Secondly, through an analysis of variance, data reveal that at the ecosystem scale, water uptake depends on the site (type of soil, surrounding vegetation, distance from the river), on the growing status (non growing, flowering, mature, water stress) and on the species (poplar, willow, alder, pine). - At last, when focusing at the temporal variability for some individuals, it appears that both rainwater and groundwater may participate to water uptake. The water uptake patterns seem more complicated in mature areas (far from the riverbed) than in frequently flooded zones. This could be due to a more complex soil texture patchwork in the former, and a globally finer soil texture. In particular, it appears that groundwater may sometimes replace rainwater through capillary rise during warm periods.

  15. Glycoengineered Monoclonal Antibodies with Homogeneous Glycan (M3, G0, G2, and A2) Using a Chemoenzymatic Approach Have Different Affinities for FcγRIIIa and Variable Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kurogochi, Masaki; Mori, Masako; Osumi, Kenji; Tojino, Mami; Sugawara, Shu-ichi; Takashima, Shou; Hirose, Yuriko; Tsukimura, Wataru; Mizuno, Mamoru; Amano, Junko; Matsuda, Akio; Tomita, Masahiro; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Shoda, Shin-Ichiro; Shirai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic antibodies have been developed, and IgG antibodies have been extensively generated in various cell expression systems. IgG antibodies contain N-glycans at the constant region of the heavy chain (Fc domain), and their N-glycosylation patterns differ during various processes or among cell expression systems. The Fc N-glycan can modulate the effector functions of IgG antibodies, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). To control Fc N-glycans, we performed a rearrangement of Fc N-glycans from a heterogeneous N-glycosylation pattern to homogeneous N-glycans using chemoenzymatic approaches with two types of endo-β-N-acetyl glucosaminidases (ENG’ases), one that works as a hydrolase to cleave all heterogeneous N-glycans, another that is used as a glycosynthase to generate homogeneous N-glycans. As starting materials, we used an anti-Her2 antibody produced in transgenic silkworm cocoon, which consists of non-fucosylated pauci-mannose type (Man2-3GlcNAc2), high-mannose type (Man4-9GlcNAc2), and complex type (Man3GlcNAc3-4) N-glycans. As a result of the cleavage of several ENG’ases (endoS, endoM, endoD, endoH, and endoLL), the heterogeneous glycans on antibodies were fully transformed into homogeneous-GlcNAc by a combination of endoS, endoD, and endoLL. Next, the desired N-glycans (M3; Man3GlcNAc1, G0; GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, G2; Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, A2; NeuAc2Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1) were transferred from the corresponding oxazolines to the GlcNAc residue on the intact anti-Her2 antibody with an ENG’ase mutant (endoS-D233Q), and the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody was obtained. The binding assay of anti-Her2 antibody with homogenous N-glycans with FcγRIIIa-V158 showed that the glycoform influenced the affinity for FcγRIIIa-V158. In addition, the ADCC assay for the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody (mAb-M3, mAb-G0, mAb-G2, and mAb-A2) was performed using SKBR-3 and BT-474 as target cells

  16. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  17. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  18. 26 CFR 1.151-2 - Additional exemptions for dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the taxpayer begins, or (2) Is a student, as defined in paragraph (b) of § 1.151-3. No exemption shall... 151(c) (old-age exemptions) and section 151(d) (exemptions for the blind) are allowed only for...

  19. 26 CFR 1.151-2 - Additional exemptions for dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the taxpayer begins, or (2) Is a student, as defined in paragraph (b) of § 1.151-3. No exemption shall... 151(c) (old-age exemptions) and section 151(d) (exemptions for the blind) are allowed only for...

  20. Variability in subpopulation formation propagates into biocatalytic variability of engineered Pseudomonas putida strains

    PubMed Central

    Lindmeyer, Martin; Jahn, Michael; Vorpahl, Carsten; Müller, Susann; Schmid, Andreas; Bühler, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Pivotal challenges in industrial biotechnology are the identification and overcoming of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in microbial processes. While the development of subpopulations of isogenic cells in bioprocesses is well described (intra-population variability), a possible variability between genetically identical cultures growing under macroscopically identical conditions (clonal variability) is not. A high such clonal variability has been found for the recombinant expression of the styrene monooxygenase genes styAB from Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120 in solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E using the alk-regulatory system from P. putida GPo1. In this study, the oxygenase subunit StyA fused to eGFP was used as readout tool to characterize the population structure in P. putida DOT-T1E regarding recombinant protein content. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that in individual cultures, at least two subpopulations with highly differing recombinant StyA-eGFP protein contents appeared (intra-population variability). Interestingly, subpopulation sizes varied from culture-to-culture correlating with the specific styrene epoxidation activity of cells derived from respective cultures (clonal variability). In addition, flow cytometric cell sorting coupled to plasmid copy number (PCN) determination revealed that detected clonal variations cannot be correlated to the PCN, but depend on the combination of the regulatory system and the host strain employed. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first work reporting that intra-population variability (with differing protein contents in the presented case study) causes clonal variability of genetically identical cultures. Respective impacts on bioprocess reliability and performance and strategies to overcome respective reliability issues are discussed. PMID:26483771

  1. Temperature fluctuations as a source of brown dwarf variability

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Marley, Mark S.

    2014-04-20

    A number of brown dwarfs are now known to be variable with observed amplitudes as large as 10%-30% at some wavelengths. While spatial inhomogeneities in cloud coverage and thickness are likely responsible for much of the observed variability, it is possible that some of the variations arise from atmospheric temperature fluctuations instead of, or in addition to, clouds. To better understand the role that thermal variability might play we present a case study of brown dwarf variability using a newly developed one-dimensional, time-stepping model of atmospheric thermal structure. We focus on the effects of thermal perturbations, intentionally simplifying the problem through omission of clouds and atmospheric circulation. Model results demonstrate that thermal perturbations occurring deep in the atmosphere (at pressures greater than 10 bar) of a model T-dwarf can be communicated to the upper atmosphere through radiative heating via the windows in near-infrared water opacity. The response time depends on where in the atmosphere a thermal perturbation is introduced. We show that, for certain periodic perturbations, the emission spectrum can have complex time- and wavelength-dependent behaviors, including phase shifts in times of maximum flux observed at different wavelengths. Since different wavelengths probe different levels in the atmosphere, these variations track a wavelength-dependent set of radiative exchanges happening between different atmospheric levels as a perturbation evolves in time. We conclude that thermal—as well as cloud—fluctuations must be considered as possible contributors to the observed brown dwarf variability.

  2. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  3. Variable Order and Distributed Order Fractional Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2002-01-01

    Many physical processes appear to exhibit fractional order behavior that may vary with time or space. The continuum of order in the fractional calculus allows the order of the fractional operator to be considered as a variable. This paper develops the concept of variable and distributed order fractional operators. Definitions based on the Riemann-Liouville definitions are introduced and behavior of the operators is studied. Several time domain definitions that assign different arguments to the order q in the Riemann-Liouville definition are introduced. For each of these definitions various characteristics are determined. These include: time invariance of the operator, operator initialization, physical realization, linearity, operational transforms. and memory characteristics of the defining kernels. A measure (m2) for memory retentiveness of the order history is introduced. A generalized linear argument for the order q allows the concept of "tailored" variable order fractional operators whose a, memory may be chosen for a particular application. Memory retentiveness (m2) and order dynamic behavior are investigated and applications are shown. The concept of distributed order operators where the order of the time based operator depends on an additional independent (spatial) variable is also forwarded. Several definitions and their Laplace transforms are developed, analysis methods with these operators are demonstrated, and examples shown. Finally operators of multivariable and distributed order are defined in their various applications are outlined.

  4. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  5. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  6. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  7. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  8. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  9. THE COLOR VARIABILITY OF QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Knecht, Matthias; Hogg, David W.; Shields, Joseph C.; Maoz, Dan; Bovy, Jo

    2012-01-10

    We quantify quasar color variability using an unprecedented variability database-ugriz photometry of 9093 quasars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, observed over 8 years at {approx}60 epochs each. We confirm previous reports that quasars become bluer when brightening. We find a redshift dependence of this blueing in a given set of bands (e.g., g and r), but show that it is the result of the flux contribution from less-variable or delayed emission lines in the different SDSS bands at different redshifts. After correcting for this effect, quasar color variability is remarkably uniform, and independent not only of redshift, but also of quasar luminosity and black hole mass. The color variations of individual quasars, as they vary in brightness on year timescales, are much more pronounced than the ranges in color seen in samples of quasars across many orders of magnitude in luminosity. This indicates distinct physical mechanisms behind quasar variability and the observed range of quasar luminosities at a given black hole mass-quasar variations cannot be explained by changes in the mean accretion rate. We do find some dependence of the color variability on the characteristics of the flux variations themselves, with fast, low-amplitude, brightness variations producing more color variability. The observed behavior could arise if quasar variability results from flares or ephemeral hot spots in an accretion disk.

  10. Variability of measured sonic boom signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmer, K. R.; Joshi, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: atmospheric turbulence; BOOMFILE Database description; BOOMFILE flight conditions; XB-70 Database descriptions; analysis progression; extended database; prediction method; overpressure variability dependence on flight conditions; loudness variability on flight conditions; sonic boom variability in repeat flights; and statistical distributions.

  11. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  12. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  13. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  14. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  15. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  16. TabVar: Tabulated Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Bachan, John

    2015-12-15

    TabVar: A Python library for manipulating datasets in the form of tabulated variables. Tables in tabvar contain many columns representing independent variables, but exactly one distinguished column for the dependent variable. Having a single distinguished column allows a natural lifting of arithmetic operators to tables, much (and in fact fully generalizing) multidimensional array arithmetic. The convenient syntax of whole-table arithmetic, along with the usual operations of filtering and aggregation, and all in the setting of python's interactive REPL allows for rapid exploration of datasets.

  17. TabVar: Tabulated Variables

    2015-12-15

    TabVar: A Python library for manipulating datasets in the form of tabulated variables. Tables in tabvar contain many columns representing independent variables, but exactly one distinguished column for the dependent variable. Having a single distinguished column allows a natural lifting of arithmetic operators to tables, much (and in fact fully generalizing) multidimensional array arithmetic. The convenient syntax of whole-table arithmetic, along with the usual operations of filtering and aggregation, and all in the setting ofmore » python's interactive REPL allows for rapid exploration of datasets.« less

  18. Additive Manufacturing in Production: A Study Case Applying Technical Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ituarte, Iñigo Flores; Coatanea, Eric; Salmi, Mika; Tuomi, Jukka; Partanen, Jouni

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is expanding the manufacturing capabilities. However, quality of AM produced parts is dependent on a number of machine, geometry and process parameters. The variability of these parameters affects the manufacturing drastically and therefore standardized processes and harmonized methodologies need to be developed to characterize the technology for end use applications and enable the technology for manufacturing. This research proposes a composite methodology integrating Taguchi Design of Experiments, multi-objective optimization and statistical process control, to optimize the manufacturing process and fulfil multiple requirements imposed to an arbitrary geometry. The proposed methodology aims to characterize AM technology depending upon manufacturing process variables as well as to perform a comparative assessment of three AM technologies (Selective Laser Sintering, Laser Stereolithography and Polyjet). Results indicate that only one machine, laser-based Stereolithography, was feasible to fulfil simultaneously macro and micro level geometrical requirements but mechanical properties were not at required level. Future research will study a single AM system at the time to characterize AM machine technical capabilities and stimulate pre-normative initiatives of the technology for end use applications.

  19. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  20. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  1. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  2. [Biologically active food additives].

    PubMed

    Velichko, M A; Shevchenko, V P

    1998-07-01

    More than half out of 40 projects for the medical science development by the year of 2000 have been connected with the bio-active edible additives that are called "the food of XXI century", non-pharmacological means for many diseases. Most of these additives--nutricevtics and parapharmacevtics--are intended for the enrichment of food rations for the sick or healthy people. The ecologicaly safest and most effective are combined domestic adaptogens with immuno-modulating and antioxidating action that give anabolic and stimulating effect,--"leveton", "phytoton" and "adapton". The MKTs-229 tablets are residue discharge means. For atherosclerosis and general adiposis they recommend "tsar tablets" and "aiconol (ikhtien)"--on the base of cod-liver oil or "splat" made out of seaweed (algae). All these preparations have been clinically tested and received hygiene certificates from the Institute of Dietology of the Russian Academy of Medical Science. PMID:9752776

  3. Decisions Concerning Directional Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Eye, Alexander; DeShon, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    In this rejoinder, von Eye and DeShon discuss the decision strategies proposed in their original article ("Directional Dependence in Developmental Research," this issue), as well as the ones proposed by the authors of the commentary (Pornprasertmanit and Little, "Determining Directional Dependency in Causal Associations," this issue). In addition,…

  4. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  5. Hydrocarbon fuel additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogio, S.

    1989-02-28

    This patent describes the method of fuel storage or combustion, wherein the fuel supply contains small amounts of water, the step of adding to the fuel supply an additive comprising a blend of a hydrophilic agent chosen from the group of ethylene glycol, n-butyl alcohol, and cellosolve in the range of 22-37% by weight; ethoxylated nonylphenol in the range of 26-35% by weight; nonylphenol polyethylene glycol ether in the range of 32-43% by weight.

  6. Attitude Towards Physics and Additional Mathematics Achievement Towards Physics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloo, Arsaythamby; Nor, Rahimah; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the difference in students' attitude towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement based on gender and relationship between attitudinal variables towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement with achievement in Physics. This research focused on six variables, which is attitude towards…

  7. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  8. Modeling Errors in Daily Precipitation Measurements: Additive or Multiplicative?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Tang, Ling; Sapiano, Matthew; Maggioni, Viviana; Wu, Huan

    2013-01-01

    The definition and quantification of uncertainty depend on the error model used. For uncertainties in precipitation measurements, two types of error models have been widely adopted: the additive error model and the multiplicative error model. This leads to incompatible specifications of uncertainties and impedes intercomparison and application.In this letter, we assess the suitability of both models for satellite-based daily precipitation measurements in an effort to clarify the uncertainty representation. Three criteria were employed to evaluate the applicability of either model: (1) better separation of the systematic and random errors; (2) applicability to the large range of variability in daily precipitation; and (3) better predictive skills. It is found that the multiplicative error model is a much better choice under all three criteria. It extracted the systematic errors more cleanly, was more consistent with the large variability of precipitation measurements, and produced superior predictions of the error characteristics. The additive error model had several weaknesses, such as non constant variance resulting from systematic errors leaking into random errors, and the lack of prediction capability. Therefore, the multiplicative error model is a better choice.

  9. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  10. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  11. Directional Dependence in Developmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Eye, Alexander; DeShon, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss and propose methods that may be of use to determine direction of dependence in non-normally distributed variables. First, it is shown that standard regression analysis is unable to distinguish between explanatory and response variables. Then, skewness and kurtosis are discussed as tools to assess deviation from…

  12. Texting Dependence, iPod Dependence, and Delay Discounting.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, F Richard; Weatherly, Jeffrey N

    2016-01-01

    We gave 127 undergraduates questionnaires about their iPod and texting dependence and 2 hypothetical delay discounting scenarios related to free downloaded songs and free texting for life. Using regression analyses we found that when iPod dependence was the dependent variable, Text2-excessive use, Text4-psychological and behavioral symptoms, iPod2-excessive use, and iPod3-relationship disruption were significant predictors of discounting. When texting dependence was the dependent variable, Text4-psychological and behavioral symptoms and iPod3-relationship disruption were significant predictors of discounting. These are the first data to show that delay discounting relates to certain aspects of social media, namely iPod and texting dependence. These data also show that across these 2 dependencies, both psychological and behavioral symptoms and relationship disruptions are affected. PMID:27424418

  13. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  14. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  15. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  16. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  17. Harvested populations are more variable only in more variable environments.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Tom C; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Reynolds, Alan; Hicks, Joseph P; Piertney, Stuart B; Benton, Tim G

    2016-06-01

    The interaction between environmental variation and population dynamics is of major importance, particularly for managed and economically important species, and especially given contemporary changes in climate variability. Recent analyses of exploited animal populations contested whether exploitation or environmental variation has the greatest influence on the stability of population dynamics, with consequences for variation in yield and extinction risk. Theoretical studies however have shown that harvesting can increase or decrease population variability depending on environmental variation, and requested controlled empirical studies to test predictions. Here, we use an invertebrate model species in experimental microcosms to explore the interaction between selective harvesting and environmental variation in food availability in affecting the variability of stage-structured animal populations over 20 generations. In a constant food environment, harvesting adults had negligible impact on population variability or population size, but in the variable food environments, harvesting adults increased population variability and reduced its size. The impact of harvesting on population variability differed between proportional and threshold harvesting, between randomly and periodically varying environments, and at different points of the time series. Our study suggests that predicting the responses to selective harvesting is sensitive to the demographic structures and processes that emerge in environments with different patterns of environmental variation. PMID:27516873

  18. Rationale, Detection, and Implications of Interactions between Independent Variables and Unmeasured Variables in Linear Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Phillip Karl; Games, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Conceptual rationales from five research contexts are presented, which all posit unmeasured variables that interact with observed independent variables to produce a complete model of the dependent variable. Strategies for overcoming related difficulties are outlined, including increased longitudinal assessment, oversampling of levels of…

  19. Biological Data Analysis as an Information Theory Problem: Multivariable Dependence Measures and the Shadows Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Sakhanenko, Nikita A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Information theory is valuable in multiple-variable analysis for being model-free and nonparametric, and for the modest sensitivity to undersampling. We previously introduced a general approach to finding multiple dependencies that provides accurate measures of levels of dependency for subsets of variables in a data set, which is significantly nonzero only if the subset of variables is collectively dependent. This is useful, however, only if we can avoid a combinatorial explosion of calculations for increasing numbers of variables.  The proposed dependence measure for a subset of variables, τ, differential interaction information, Δ(τ), has the property that for subsets of τ some of the factors of Δ(τ) are significantly nonzero, when the full dependence includes more variables. We use this property to suppress the combinatorial explosion by following the “shadows” of multivariable dependency on smaller subsets. Rather than calculating the marginal entropies of all subsets at each degree level, we need to consider only calculations for subsets of variables with appropriate “shadows.” The number of calculations for n variables at a degree level of d grows therefore, at a much smaller rate than the binomial coefficient (n, d), but depends on the parameters of the “shadows” calculation. This approach, avoiding a combinatorial explosion, enables the use of our multivariable measures on very large data sets. We demonstrate this method on simulated data sets, and characterize the effects of noise and sample numbers. In addition, we analyze a data set of a few thousand mutant yeast strains interacting with a few thousand chemical compounds. PMID:26335709

  20. Biological data analysis as an information theory problem: multivariable dependence measures and the shadows algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sakhanenko, Nikita A; Galas, David J

    2015-11-01

    Information theory is valuable in multiple-variable analysis for being model-free and nonparametric, and for the modest sensitivity to undersampling. We previously introduced a general approach to finding multiple dependencies that provides accurate measures of levels of dependency for subsets of variables in a data set, which is significantly nonzero only if the subset of variables is collectively dependent. This is useful, however, only if we can avoid a combinatorial explosion of calculations for increasing numbers of variables.  The proposed dependence measure for a subset of variables, τ, differential interaction information, Δ(τ), has the property that for subsets of τ some of the factors of Δ(τ) are significantly nonzero, when the full dependence includes more variables. We use this property to suppress the combinatorial explosion by following the "shadows" of multivariable dependency on smaller subsets. Rather than calculating the marginal entropies of all subsets at each degree level, we need to consider only calculations for subsets of variables with appropriate "shadows." The number of calculations for n variables at a degree level of d grows therefore, at a much smaller rate than the binomial coefficient (n, d), but depends on the parameters of the "shadows" calculation. This approach, avoiding a combinatorial explosion, enables the use of our multivariable measures on very large data sets. We demonstrate this method on simulated data sets, and characterize the effects of noise and sample numbers. In addition, we analyze a data set of a few thousand mutant yeast strains interacting with a few thousand chemical compounds. PMID:26335709

  1. Modelling Solar and Stellar Brightness Variabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, K. L.; Shapiro, A. I.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    Total and spectral solar irradiance, TSI and SSI, have been measured from space since 1978. This is accompanied by the development of models aimed at replicating the observed variability by relating it to solar surface magnetism. Despite significant progress, there remains persisting controversy over the secular change and the wavelength-dependence of the variation with impact on our understanding of the Sun's influence on the Earth's climate. We highlight the recent progress in TSI and SSI modelling with SATIRE. Brightness variations have also been observed for Sun-like stars. Their analysis can profit from knowledge of the solar case and provide additional constraints for solar modelling. We discuss the recent effort to extend SATIRE to Sun-like stars.

  2. Condition-dependent, phenotype-dependent and genetic-dependent factors in the natal dispersal of a solitary rodent.

    PubMed

    Selonen, Vesa; Hanski, Ilpo K

    2010-09-01

    1. Dispersal can be condition- and phenotype-dependent and related to individual genetic differences. Few studies have addressed the relative importance of these factors on dispersal. We studied the factors behind philopatry and dispersal in juvenile Siberian flying squirrels, Pteromys volans L. 2. The dispersal distance and the distances explored before abandoning the natal nest were not related to any of the condition-dependent factors studied such as the area of high-quality habitat or the number of conspecifics near the natal area. In addition, the body mass (a phenotypic trait) of individuals was not related to philopatry and dispersal in flying squirrels. 3. Genetic variability, measured by microsatellite heterozygosity, was positively correlated with dispersal. The correlation was mainly driven by one locus related to the distances explored before abandoning the natal nest. 4. We conclude that condition- and phenotype-dependent factors did not have detectable effects on philopatry and dispersal, but individual heterozygosity was related to dispersal in flying squirrels. Our results suggest that genetic variability is important behind the dispersal of the species. PMID:20561101

  3. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy. PMID:23888587

  4. Disease in a more variable and unpredictable climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, T. A.; Raffel, T.; Rohr, J. R.; Halstead, N.; Venesky, M.; Romansic, J.

    2014-12-01

    Global climate change is shifting the dynamics of infectious diseases of humans and wildlife with potential adverse consequences for disease control. Despite this, the role of global climate change in the decline of biodiversity and the emergence of infectious diseases remains controversial. Climate change is expected to increase climate variability in addition to increasing mean temperatures, making climate less predictable. However, few empirical or theoretical studies have considered the effects of climate variability or predictability on disease, despite it being likely that hosts and parasites will have differential responses to climatic shifts. Here we present a theoretical framework for how temperature variation and its predictability influence disease risk by affecting host and parasite acclimation responses. Laboratory experiments and field data on disease-associated frog declines in Latin America support this framework and provide evidence that unpredictable temperature fluctuations, on both monthly and diurnal timescales, decrease frog resistance to the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Furthermore, the pattern of temperature-dependent growth of the fungus on frogs was inconsistent with the pattern of Bd growth in culture, emphasizing the importance of accounting for the host-parasite interaction when predicting climate-dependent disease dynamics. Consistent with our laboratory experiments, increased regional temperature variability associated with global El Niño climatic events was the best predictor of widespread amphibian losses in the genus Atelopus. Thus, incorporating the effects of small-scale temporal variability in climate can greatly improve our ability to predict the effects of climate change on disease.

  5. Conformation Dependence of Backbone Geometry in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Berkholz, Donald S.; Shapovalov, Maxim V.; Dunbrack, Roland L.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Summary Protein structure determination and predictive modeling have long been guided by the paradigm that the peptide backbone has a single, context-independent ideal geometry. Both quantum-mechanics calculations and empirical analyses have shown this is an incorrect simplification in that backbone covalent geometry actually varies systematically as a function of the Φ and Ψ backbone dihedral angles. Here, we use a nonredundant set of ultrahigh-resolution protein structures to define these conformation-dependent variations. The trends have a rational, structural basis that can be explained by avoidance of atomic clashes or optimization of favorable electrostatic interactions. To facilitate adoption of this new paradigm, we have created a conformation-dependent library of covalent bond lengths and bond angles and shown that it has improved accuracy over existing methods without any additional variables to optimize. Protein structures derived both from crystallographic refinement and predictive modeling both stand to benefit from incorporation of the new paradigm. PMID:19836332

  6. Time dependent seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polidoro, B.; Iervolino, I.; Chioccarelli, E.; Giorgio, M.

    2012-04-01

    Probabilistic seismic hazard is usually computed trough a homogeneous Poisson process that even though it is a time-independent process it is widely used for its very convenient properties. However, when a single fault is of concern and/or the time scale is different from that of the long term, time-dependent processes are required. In this paper, different time-dependent models are reviewed with working examples. In fact, the Paganica fault (in central Italy) has been considered to compute both the probability of occurrence of at least one event in the lifespan of the structure, as well as the seismic hazard expressed in terms of probability of exceedance of an intensity value in a given time frame causing the collapse of the structure. Several models, well known or novel application to engineering hazard have been considered, limitation and issues in their applications are also discussed. The Brownian Passage Time (BPT) model is based on a stochastic modification of the deterministic stick-slip oscillator model for characteristic earthquakes; i.e., based on the addition of random perturbations (a Gaussian white noise) to the deterministic load path predicted by elastic rebound theory. This model assumes that the load state is at some ground level immediately after an event, increases steadly over time, reaches a failure threshold and relaxes instantaneously back to the ground level. For this model also a variable threshold has been considered to take into account the uncertainty of the threshold value. For the slip-predictable model it is assumed that the stress accumulates at a constant rate starting from some initial stress level. Stress is assumed to accumulate for a random period of time until an earthquake occurs. The size of the earthquake is governed by the stress release and it is a function of the elapsed time since the last event. In the time-predictable model stress buildup occurs at a constant rate until the accumulated stress reaches a threshold

  7. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  8. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  9. Clarifying the Relationship between Impulsive Delay Discounting and Nicotine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Amlung, Michael; MacKillop, James

    2014-01-01

    Impulsive delayed reward discounting (DRD) has been linked to nicotine dependence, but with some inconsistency. This may be related to the considerable variability in the literature with regard to the DRD assessments used, particularly in the case of reward magnitudes assessed. In addition, previous studies have often not considered concurrent substance use when examining the relationship between DRD and nicotine dependence. The current study sought to further clarify the relationship between DRD and nicotine dependence by characterizing DRD across diverse reward magnitudes and incorporating other substance use. Daily smokers (N = 933) were assessed for DRD preferences across nine reward magnitudes (delayed reward range: $2.50–$850), comorbid substance use, and relevant demographic variables (age, education, income). A significant large effect size magnitude effect was found for DRD, reflecting steeper discounting for smaller delayed rewards, but significant correlations across magnitudes also suggested similar relative levels of discounting. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to generate a single latent index of discounting across all magnitudes that accounted for 67% of the total variance. In both correlation and regression analyses, steeper composite DRD was significantly associated with nicotine dependence severity. This relationship remained statistically significant after incorporating demographic variables and alcohol and illicit drug use. These findings provide evidence of a specific link between impulsive DRD and nicotine dependence, and reveal that this association is robust across a broad range of monetary rewards. The study also demonstrates the utility of using PCA to generate latent indices of delay discounting across multiple magnitudes of delayed reward. PMID:24841186

  10. Clarifying the relationship between impulsive delay discounting and nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Amlung, Michael; MacKillop, James

    2014-09-01

    Impulsive delayed reward discounting (DRD) has been linked to nicotine dependence, but with some inconsistency. This may be related to the considerable variability in the literature with regard to the DRD assessments used, particularly in the case of the reward magnitudes assessed. In addition, previous studies have often not considered concurrent substance use when examining the relationship between DRD and nicotine dependence. The current study sought to further clarify the relationship between DRD and nicotine dependence by characterizing DRD across diverse reward magnitudes and incorporating other substance use. Daily smokers (N = 933) were assessed for DRD preferences across nine reward magnitudes (delayed reward range: $2.50-$850), comorbid substance use, and relevant demographic variables (age, education, income). A significant large effect size magnitude effect was found for DRD, reflecting steeper discounting for smaller delayed rewards, but significant correlations across magnitudes also suggested similar relative levels of discounting. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to generate a single latent index of discounting across all magnitudes that accounted for 69% of the total variance. In correlation and regression analyses, steeper composite DRD was significantly associated with nicotine dependence severity. This relationship remained statistically significant after incorporating demographic variables and alcohol and illicit drug use. These findings provide evidence of a specific link between impulsive DRD and nicotine dependence and reveal that this association is robust across a broad range of monetary rewards. The study also demonstrates the utility of using PCA to generate latent indices of delay discounting across multiple magnitudes of delayed reward. PMID:24841186

  11. Classification of the Electrophilic Addition Reactions of Olefins and Acetylenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Michael A.

    1975-01-01

    Divides addition reactions into molecular, stepwise, or termolecular, depending on whether the reaction is synchronous or multistep; and further into nucleophilic, electrophilic, or concerted, depending on how the electrons are transferred in the initiation step. (MLH)

  12. Differing Roles of Functional Movement Variability as Experience Increases in Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Busquets, Albert; Marina, Michel; Davids, Keith; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    gymnasts). Longswing assessment allowed us to evaluate inter-trial variability in representative performance context. Coordination variability presented two different configurations across experience levels depending on the variable of interest: either a U-shaped or a L- or \\-shaped graph. Increased inter-trial variability of the functional phase events offered flexibility to adapt the longswing performance in the advanced gymnasts, while decreasing variability in arm-trunk coordination modes was critical to improve longswing and to achieve the most advanced level. In addition, the relationship between variability measures and the global performance outcome (i.e. the swing amplitude) revealed different functional roles of movement variability (exploratory or restrictive) as a function of changes in experience levels. PMID:27274664

  13. Differing Roles of Functional Movement Variability as Experience Increases in Gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Albert; Marina, Michel; Davids, Keith; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa

    2016-06-01

    gymnasts). Longswing assessment allowed us to evaluate inter-trial variability in representative performance context.Coordination variability presented two different configurations across experience levels depending on the variable of interest: either a U-shaped or a L- or \\-shaped graph.Increased inter-trial variability of the functional phase events offered flexibility to adapt the longswing performance in the advanced gymnasts, while decreasing variability in arm-trunk coordination modes was critical to improve longswing and to achieve the most advanced level.In addition, the relationship between variability measures and the global performance outcome (i.e. the swing amplitude) revealed different functional roles of movement variability (exploratory or restrictive) as a function of changes in experience levels. PMID:27274664

  14. Buprenorphine for opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Ling, Walter

    2009-05-01

    As a treatment agent for opioid dependence, buprenorphine is a nearly ideal medication at our current stage of medication development. Unlike methadone, buprenorphine dosage can be rapidly adjusted with minimal potential for inducing severe consequences. In addition to its intrinsic safety, buprenorphine's relatively low abuse liability in the combination product (i.e., with naloxone as Suboxone) makes it even more acceptable in regulatory quarters as well as to prescribing physicians. The approval of buprenorphine as a pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence returns to physicians the ability to treat their opioid-dependent patients with an effective opioid-based treatment for the first time in nearly 100 years. Buprenorphine is an opioid, however, and potential for misuse remains, even in combination with naloxone. Whether buprenorphine will be increasingly accepted as a treatment for opioid-dependent patients depends on clinicians recognizing the advantages of its uniquely useful properties while still heeding the need to manage their patients' therapy with reasonable vigilance. PMID:19402772

  15. DETECTING VARIABILITY IN MASSIVE ASTRONOMICAL TIME-SERIES DATA. II. VARIABLE CANDIDATES IN THE NORTHERN SKY VARIABILITY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Min-Su; Yi, Hahn; Kim, Dae-Won; Chang, Seo-Won; Byun, Yong-Ik E-mail: yihahn@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr E-mail: seowony@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr

    2012-03-15

    We present variability analysis of data from the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS). Using the clustering method, which defines variable candidates as outliers from large clusters, we cluster 16,189,040 light curves having data points at more than 15 epochs as variable and non-variable candidates in 638 NSVS fields. Variable candidates are selected depending on how strongly they are separated from the largest cluster and how rarely they are grouped together in eight-dimensional space spanned by variability indices. All NSVS light curves are also cross-correlated with IRAS, AKARI, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and GALEX objects, as well as known objects in the SIMBAD database. The variability analysis and cross-correlation results are provided in a public online database, which can be used to select interesting objects for further investigation. Adopting conservative selection criteria for variable candidates, we find about 1.8 million light curves as possible variable candidates in the NSVS data, corresponding to about 10% of our entire NSVS sample. Multi-wavelength colors help us find specific types of variability among the variable candidates. Moreover, we also use morphological classification from other surveys such as SDSS to suppress spurious cases caused by blending objects or extended sources due to the low angular resolution of the NSVS.

  16. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Tagging Promotes Dendritic Branch Variability through the Capture of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II α (CaMKIIα) mRNAs by the RNA-binding Protein HuD.

    PubMed

    Sosanya, Natasha M; Cacheaux, Luisa P; Workman, Emily R; Niere, Farr; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F

    2015-06-26

    The fate of a memory, whether stored or forgotten, is determined by the ability of an active or tagged synapse to undergo changes in synaptic efficacy requiring protein synthesis of plasticity-related proteins. A synapse can be tagged, but without the "capture" of plasticity-related proteins, it will not undergo long lasting forms of plasticity (synaptic tagging and capture hypothesis). What the "tag" is and how plasticity-related proteins are captured at tagged synapses are unknown. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα) is critical in learning and memory and is synthesized locally in neuronal dendrites. The mechanistic (mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that increases CaMKIIα protein expression; however, the mechanism and site of dendritic expression are unknown. Herein, we show that mTOR activity mediates the branch-specific expression of CaMKIIα, favoring one secondary, daughter branch over the other in a single neuron. mTOR inhibition decreased the dendritic levels of CaMKIIα protein and mRNA by shortening its poly(A) tail. Overexpression of the RNA-stabilizing protein HuD increased CaMKIIα protein levels and preserved its selective expression in one daughter branch over the other when mTOR was inhibited. Unexpectedly, deleting the third RNA recognition motif of HuD, the domain that binds the poly(A) tail, eliminated the branch-specific expression of CaMKIIα when mTOR was active. These results provide a model for one molecular mechanism that may underlie the synaptic tagging and capture hypothesis where mTOR is the tag, preventing deadenylation of CaMKIIα mRNA, whereas HuD captures and promotes its expression in a branch-specific manner. PMID:25944900

  17. An Efficient Variable-Length Data-Compression Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Kar-Ming; Kiely, Aaron B.

    1996-01-01

    Adaptive variable-length coding scheme for compression of stream of independent and identically distributed source data involves either Huffman code or alternating run-length Huffman (ARH) code, depending on characteristics of data. Enables efficient compression of output of lossless or lossy precompression process, with speed and simplicity greater than those of older coding schemes developed for same purpose. In addition, scheme suitable for parallel implementation on hardware with modular structure, provides for rapid adaptation to changing data source, compatible with block orientation to alleviate memory requirements, ensures efficiency over wide range of entropy, and easily combined with such other communication schemes as those for containment of errors and for packetization.

  18. Multivariate and Multiscale Dependence in the Global Climate System Revealed Through Complex Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhaeuser, Karsten J K; Ganguly, Auroop R; Chawla, Nitesh

    2011-01-01

    A systematic characterization of multivariate dependence at multiple spatio-temporal scales is critical to understanding climate system dynamics and improving predictive ability from models and data. However, dependence structures in climate are complex due to nonlinear dynamical generating processes, long-range spatial and long-memory temporal relationships, as well as low-frequency variability. Here we utilize complex networks to explore dependence in climate data. Specifically, networks constructed from reanalysis-based atmospheric variables over oceans and partitioned with community detection methods demonstrate the potential to capture regional and global dependence structures within and among climate variables. Proximity-based dependence as well as long-range spatial relationships are examined along with their evolution over time, yielding new insights on ocean meteorology. The tools are implicitly validated by confirming conceptual understanding about aggregate correlations and teleconnections. Our results also suggest a close similarity of observed dependence patterns in relative humidity and horizontal wind speed over oceans. In addition, updraft velocity, which relates to convective activity over the oceans, exhibits short spatiotemporal decorrelation scales but long-range dependence over time. The multivariate and multi-scale dependence patterns broadly persist over multiple time windows. Our findings motivate further investigations of dependence structures among observations, reanalysis and model-simulated data to enhance process understanding, assess model reliability and improve regional climate predictions.

  19. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed

    Barker, R H

    1975-06-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  20. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  1. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, SK

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  2. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, S K

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  3. Latent Variable Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borsboom, Denny

    2008-01-01

    This paper formulates a metatheoretical framework for latent variable modeling. It does so by spelling out the difference between observed and latent variables. This difference is argued to be purely epistemic in nature: We treat a variable as "observed" when the inference from data structure to variable structure can be made with certainty and as…

  4. All varieties of encoding variability are not created equal: Separating variable processing from variable tasks

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Mark J.; Bodner, Glen E.

    2014-01-01

    Whether encoding variability facilitates memory is shown to depend on whether item-specific and relational processing are both performed across study blocks, and whether study items are weakly versus strongly related. Variable-processing groups studied a word list once using an item-specific task and once using a relational task. Variable-task groups’ two different study tasks recruited the same type of processing each block. Repeated-task groups performed the same study task each block. Recall and recognition were greatest in the variable-processing group, but only with weakly related lists. A variable-processing benefit was also found when task-based processing and list-type processing were complementary (e.g., item-specific processing of a related list) rather than redundant (e.g., relational processing of a related list). That performing both item-specific and relational processing across trials, or within a trial, yields encoding-variability benefits may help reconcile decades of contradictory findings in this area. PMID:25018583

  5. Effect of Operating Parameters and Chemical Additives on Crystal Habit and Specific Cake Resistance of Zinc Hydroxide Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    1999-08-01

    The effect of process parameters and chemical additives on the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates was investigated. The ability of a slurry to be filtered is dependent upon the particle habit of the solid and the particle habit is influenced by certain process variables. The process variables studied include neutralization temperature, agitation type, and alkalinity source used for neutralization. Several commercially available chemical additives advertised to aid in solid/liquid separation were also examined in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation. A statistical analysis revealed that the neutralization temperature and the source of alkalinity were statistically significant in influencing the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates in this study. The type of agitation did not significantly effect the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates. The use of chemical additives in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation had a favorable effect on the filterability. The morphology of the hydroxide precipitates was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Wavelength, temperature, and voltage dependent calibration of a nematic liquid crystal multispectral polarization generating device

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Boudreaux, Philip R

    2007-01-01

    Rapid calibration of liquid crystal variable retarder (LCVR) devices is critical for successful clinical implementation of a LC-based Mueller matrix imaging system being developed for noninvasisve skin cancer detection. For multispectral implementation of such a system, the effect of wavelength (), temperature (T), and voltage (V) on the retardance () required to generate each desired polarization state needs to be clearly understood. Calibration involves quantifying this interdependence such that for a given set of system input variables, T, the appropriate voltage is applied across a LC cell to generate a particular retardance. This paper presents findings that elucidate the dependence of voltage, for a set retardance, on the aforementioned variables for a nematic LC cell: 253 mv100 nm-dependence andd 10 mVC T-dependence. Additionally, an empirically derived model is presented that enables initial voltage calibration of retardance for any desired input wavelength within the calibration range of 460-905 nm. copyright 2007 Optical Society of America

  7. Variable conductance heat pipe technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, B. D.; Edwards, D. K.; Anderson, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    Research and development programs in variable conductance heat pipe technology were conducted. The treatment has been comprehensive, involving theoretical and/or experimental studies in hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, heat transfer into and out of the pipe, fluid selection, and materials compatibility, in addition to the principal subject of variable conductance control techniques. Efforts were not limited to analytical work and laboratory experimentation, but extended to the development, fabrication and test of spacecraft hardware, culminating in the successful flight of the Ames Heat Pipe Experiment on the OAO-C spacecraft.

  8. Spatial variability of magnetic soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Remke L.; Hendrickx, Jan M.; Harrison, Bruce; Borchers, Brian; Norman, David I.; Ndur, Samuel; Jasper, Chris; Niemeyer, Patrick; Nartey, Robert; Vega, David N.; Calvo, Lucas; Simms, Janet E.

    2004-09-01

    The presence of magnetic iron oxides in the soil can seriously hamper the performance of electromagnetic sensors for the detection of buried land mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). Previous work has shown that spatial variability in soil water content and texture affects the performance of ground penetrating radar and thermal sensors for land mine detection. In this paper we aim to study the spatial variability of iron oxides in tropical soils and the possible effect on electromagnetic induction sensors for buried low-metal land mine and UXO detection. We selected field sites in Panama, Hawaii, and Ghana. Along several horizontal transects in Panama and Hawaii we took closely spaced magnetic susceptibility readings using Bartington MS2D and MS2F sensors. In addition to the field measurements, we took soil samples from the selected sites for laboratory measurements of dual frequency magnetic susceptibility and textural characteristics of the material. The magnetic susceptibility values show a significant spatial variation in susceptibility and are comparable to values reported to hamper the operation of metal detectors in parts of Africa and Asia. The absolute values of susceptibility do not correlate with both frequency dependence and total iron content, which is an indication of the presence of different types of iron oxides in the studied material.

  9. Current Climate Variability & Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, J.; Criswell, B.; Elliott, W. C.

    2013-12-01

    Current Climate Variability & Change is the ninth among a suite of ten interconnected, sequential labs that address all 39 climate-literacy concepts in the U.S. Global Change Research Program's Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Sciences. The labs are as follows: Solar Radiation & Seasons, Stratospheric Ozone, The Troposphere, The Carbon Cycle, Global Surface Temperature, Glacial-Interglacial Cycles, Temperature Changes over the Past Millennium, Climates & Ecosystems, Current Climate Variability & Change, and Future Climate Change. All are inquiry-based, on-line products designed in a way that enables students to construct their own knowledge of a topic. Questions representative of various levels of Webb's depth of knowledge are embedded in each lab. In addition to the embedded questions, each lab has three or four essential questions related to the driving questions for the lab suite. These essential questions are presented as statements at the beginning of the material to represent the lab objectives, and then are asked at the end as questions to function as a summative assessment. For example, the Current Climate Variability & Change is built around these essential questions: (1) What has happened to the global temperature at the Earth's surface, in the middle troposphere, and in the lower stratosphere over the past several decades?; (2) What is the most likely cause of the changes in global temperature over the past several decades and what evidence is there that this is the cause?; and (3) What have been some of the clearly defined effects of the change in global temperature on the atmosphere and other spheres of the Earth system? An introductory Prezi allows the instructor to assess students' prior knowledge in relation to these questions, while also providing 'hooks' to pique their interest related to the topic. The lab begins by presenting examples of and key differences between climate variability (e.g., Mt. Pinatubo eruption) and

  10. Barn Owl Productivity Response to Variability of Vole Populations.

    PubMed

    Pavluvčík, Petr; Poprach, Karel; Machar, Ivo; Losík, Jan; Gouveia, Ana; Tkadlec, Emil

    2015-01-01

    We studied the response of the barn owl annual productivity to the common vole population numbers and variability to test the effects of environmental stochasticity on their life histories. Current theory predicts that temporal environmental variability can affect long-term nonlinear responses (e.g., production of young) both positively and negatively, depending on the shape of the relationship between the response and environmental variables. At the level of the Czech Republic, we examined the shape of the relationship between the annual sum of fledglings (annual productivity) and vole numbers in both non-detrended and detrended data. At the districts' level, we explored whether the degree of synchrony (measured by the correlation coefficient) and the strength of the productivity response increase (measured by the regression coefficient) in areas with higher vole population variability measured by the s-index. We found that the owls' annual productivity increased linearly with vole numbers in the Czech Republic. Furthermore, based on district data, we also found that synchrony between dynamics in owls' reproductive output and vole numbers increased with vole population variability. However, the strength of the response was not affected by the vole population variability. Additionally, we have shown that detrending remarkably increases the Taylor's exponent b relating variance to mean in vole time series, thereby reversing the relationship between the coefficient of variation and the mean. This shift was not responsible for the increased synchrony with vole population variability. Instead, we suggest that higher synchrony could result from high food specialization of owls on the common vole in areas with highly fluctuating vole populations. PMID:26709518

  11. Barn Owl Productivity Response to Variability of Vole Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pavluvčík, Petr; Poprach, Karel; Machar, Ivo; Losík, Jan; Gouveia, Ana; Tkadlec, Emil

    2015-01-01

    We studied the response of the barn owl annual productivity to the common vole population numbers and variability to test the effects of environmental stochasticity on their life histories. Current theory predicts that temporal environmental variability can affect long-term nonlinear responses (e.g., production of young) both positively and negatively, depending on the shape of the relationship between the response and environmental variables. At the level of the Czech Republic, we examined the shape of the relationship between the annual sum of fledglings (annual productivity) and vole numbers in both non-detrended and detrended data. At the districts’ level, we explored whether the degree of synchrony (measured by the correlation coefficient) and the strength of the productivity response increase (measured by the regression coefficient) in areas with higher vole population variability measured by the s-index. We found that the owls’ annual productivity increased linearly with vole numbers in the Czech Republic. Furthermore, based on district data, we also found that synchrony between dynamics in owls’ reproductive output and vole numbers increased with vole population variability. However, the strength of the response was not affected by the vole population variability. Additionally, we have shown that detrending remarkably increases the Taylor’s exponent b relating variance to mean in vole time series, thereby reversing the relationship between the coefficient of variation and the mean. This shift was not responsible for the increased synchrony with vole population variability. Instead, we suggest that higher synchrony could result from high food specialization of owls on the common vole in areas with highly fluctuating vole populations. PMID:26709518

  12. Rainfall variability effects on aggregate crop model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzotsi, Kofikuma Adzewoda

    Crop production operates in a highly heterogeneous environment. Space-time variability in weather and spatial heterogeneity in soil and management generate variability in crop yield. While it is practically unfeasible to thoroughly sample the variability of the crop environment, quantification of the associated uncertainties in crop performance can provide vital information for decision-making. The present study used rainfall data collected in southwestern Georgia at scales ranging from 1 km to 60 km to assess the effect of weather variability (in particular rainfall) on crop predictions aggregated over soil and management variations. The simple SALUS (System Approach to Land Use Sustainability) crop model was integrated in DSSAT (Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer) then parameterized and tested for maize, peanut and cotton for use in obtaining the crop predictions. Analysis of the rainfall data indicated that variability in storm characteristics depends upon the season. Winter rainfall was more correlated at a mean distance of 54 km between locations than summer rainfall was at a mean distance of 3 km. The pairwise correlation between locations decreased with distance faster in the summer than in the winter. This rainfall variability translated into crop yield variability in the study area (about 3100 km²). It was found that weather variability explained 60% and 49% of maize yield variability respectively in 2010 and 2011 when heterogeneity in weather, soil, cultivar and planting dates were accounted for simultaneously. Uncertainties in crop predictions due to rainfall spatial uncertainty decreased as the number of sites where weather data were collected increased. Expressed in terms of maize yield coefficient of variation, this uncertainty decreased exponentially from 27% to approximately 4% at a sampling density of 20 weather locations. Based on 30 years of generated weather data, it was concluded that the general form of the relationship

  13. America's water risk: Current demand and climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devineni, Naresh; Lall, Upmanu; Etienne, Elius; Shi, Daniel; Xi, Chen

    2015-04-01

    A new indicator of drought-induced water stress is introduced and applied at the county level in the USA. Unlike most existing drought metrics, we directly consider current daily water demands and renewable daily water supply to estimate the potential stress. Water stress indices developed include the Normalized Deficit Cumulated to represent multiyear droughts by computing the maximum cumulative deficit between demand and supply over the study period (1949-2009) and the Normalized Deficit Index representing drought associated with maximum cumulative deficit each year. These water stress indices map directly to storage requirements needed to buffer multiyear and within-year climate variability and can reveal the dependence on exogenous water transferred by rivers/canals to the area. Future climate change and variability can be also incorporated into this framework to inform climate-driven drought for additional storage development and potential applications of water trading across counties.

  14. Adam Smith and dependency.

    PubMed

    Ozler, Sule

    2012-06-01

    The focus of this paper is the works and life of Adam Smith, who is widely recognized as the father and founder of contemporary economics. Latent content analysis is applied to his seminal text in economics, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). The results reveal that Smith considers dependence on others a problem and sees the solution to this problem in impersonalized interdependence. In addition, his views on social dependency and personal dependency, reflected in his Lectures on Jurisprudence (1963) and The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), are analyzed. This analysis suggests a central tension between dependence and independence in Smith's writings. The personal dependency patterns he exhibited in his life, which also suggest a tension between dependence and independence, are identified through a reading of his biographies. Based on insights from psychoanalytic literature, this paper proposes that developing the ideas in the Wealth of Nations was part of Smith's creative solution to this tension. In particular, his solution to one individual's dependence on another was through a system of impersonalized interdependence. In other words, Smith defended against his personal dependence through his economic theorizing. PMID:22712591

  15. Variables related to romanticism and self-esteem in pregnant teenagers.

    PubMed

    Medora, N P; Goldstein, A; von der Hellen, C

    1993-01-01

    In this study, the Dean Romanticism Scale and the Bachman Self-esteem Scale were administered to 121 teenagers between the ages of 12 and 19 in Southern California to investigate their degree of romanticism and self-esteem. The study also explored whether there was any relationship between the dependent variables of romanticism and self-esteem and ten independent variables--age, race, place of residence during pregnancy, age when first sexual intercourse occurred, age when pregnancy occurred, incidence of sexual abuse, incidence of abortion, adoption considerations, whether the subject was currently sexually active, and whether the teenager planned to have a child with the father of the baby. The results indicated that two variables were significantly related to feelings of romanticism--adoption considerations and whether the adolescent planned to have a child with the baby's father. In addition, two variables were significantly related to self-esteem--the incidence of sexual abuse and the incidence of abortion. PMID:8456604

  16. A study of engine variable geometry systems for an advanced high subsonic long range commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compagnon, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Several variable geometry high Mach inlet concepts, aimed at meeting a system noise objective of 15 EPNdB below FAR part 36, for a long range, Mach 0.9 advanced commercial transport are assessed and compared to a fixed geometry inlet with multiple splitters. The effects of a variable exhaust nozzle (mixed exhaust engine) on noise, inlet geometry requirements, and economics are also presented. The best variable geometry inlet configuration identified is a variable cowl design which relies on a high throat Mach number for additional inlet noise suppression only at takeoff, and depends entirely on inlet wall treatment for noise suppression at approach power. Relative economic penalties as a function of noise level are also presented.

  17. Measurement of Tanning Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Heckman, C.J.; Darlow, S.; Kloss, J.D.; Cohen-Filipic, J.; Manne, S.L.; Munshi, T.; Yaroch, A.L.; Perlis, C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Indoor tanning has been found to be addictive. However, the most commonly-used tanning dependence measures have not been well-validated. Objective The study’s purpose was to explore the psychometric characteristics of and compare the mCAGE (modified Cut-down, Annoyed, Guilty, Eye-opener Scale), mDSM-IV-TR (modified Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Fourth Edition - Text Revised), and TAPS (Tanning Pathology Scale) measures of tanning dependence and provide recommendations for research and practice. Methods This study was a cross-sectional online survey with 18–25 year old female university students. The main outcome variable was tanning dependence measured by the mCAGE, mDSM-IV-TR, and TAPS. Results Internal consistency of the TAPS subscales was good but was poor for the mCAGE and mDSM-IV-TR, except when their items were combined. Agreement between the mCAGE and mDSM-IV-TR was fair. Factor analysis of the TAPS confirmed the current four-factor structure. All of the tanning dependence scales were significantly correlated with one another. Likewise, most of the tanning dependence scales were significantly correlated with other measures of tanning attitudes and behaviors. However, the tolerance to tanning TAPS subscale was not significantly correlated with any measure of tanning attitudes or behaviors and had the lowest subscale internal reliability and eigenvalues. Conclusion Based on the data and existing literature, we make recommendations for the continued use of tanning dependence measures. Intervention may be needed for the approximately 5% of college women who tend to be classified as tanning dependent across measures. Monitoring of individuals reporting tanning dependence symptoms is warranted. PMID:23980870

  18. Foundational Forces & Hidden Variables in Technology Commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Brandon

    2011-03-01

    The science of physics seems vastly different from the process of technology commercialization. Physics strives to understand our world through the experimental deduction of immutable laws and dependent variables and the resulting macro-scale phenomenon. In comparison, the~goal of business is to make a profit by addressing the needs, preferences, and whims of individuals in a market. It may seem that this environment is too dynamic to identify all the hidden variables and deduct the foundational forces that impact a business's ability to commercialize innovative technologies. One example of a business ``force'' is found in the semiconductor industry. In 1965, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore predicted that the number of transistors incorporated in a chip will approximately double every 24 months. Known as Moore's Law, this prediction has become the guiding principle for the semiconductor industry for the last 40 years. Of course, Moore's Law is not really a law of nature; rather it is the result of efforts by Intel and the entire semiconductor industry. A closer examination suggests that there are foundational principles of business that underlie the macro-scale phenomenon of Moore's Law. Principles of profitability, incentive, and strategic alignment have resulted in a coordinated influx of resources that has driven technologies to market, increasing the profitability of the semiconductor industry and optimizing the fitness of its participants. New innovations in technology are subject to these same principles. So, in addition to traditional market forces, these often unrecognized forces and variables create challenges for new technology commercialization. In this talk, I will draw from ethnographic research, complex adaptive theory, and industry data to suggest a framework with which to think about new technology commercialization. Intel's bio-silicon initiative provides a case study.

  19. Variables associated with upper extremity function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Mariska M H P; Hendriks, Jan C M; Geurts, Alexander C H; de Groot, Imelda J M

    2016-09-01

    Preserving upper extremity (UE) function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is extremely important as it is related to independence and quality of life. For clinical decision making, knowledge of variables associated with UE function is necessary. This knowledge is, however, limited. Therefore, this study aims to gain more insight into the variables associated with UE function in DMD. Data from an international web-based questionnaire on UE function, obtained from 213 DMD patients, were used. Six dependent variables regarding UE function were used in multivariable linear regression analyses. In addition, 26 independent variables regarding patient characteristics, medication, therapy, supportive aids, pain, stiffness and participation were used. Twelve independent variables showed a significant relation to UE function. Variables with a negative relation to UE function were: later disease stage, occurrence of scoliosis, higher age, use of UE splints, more frequent stiffness complaints, more limitations due to stiffness, more frequent elbow pain, and having physical therapy. A positive relation with UE function was seen for going to school or work, use of corticosteroids, higher BMI, and higher age at diagnosis. These variables explained 56-81 % of the variation of the different measures of UE function. Knowledge of variables associated with UE function is very important in the clinical management of DMD patients. The results of this study suggest that corticosteroid use and participation in school and work related activities are positively related to UE function in DMD patients, as well as reducing pain and stiffness and preventing scoliosis. PMID:27314968

  20. Tropical Pacific moisture variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguirk, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives are to describe synoptic scale variability of moisture over the tropical Pacific Ocean and the systems leading to this variability; implement satellite analysis procedures in support of this effort, and to incorporate additional satellite information into operational analysis forecast systems at the National Meteorological Center (NMC). Composite satellite radiance patterns describe features detectable well before the development of synoptic scale tropical plumes. These typical features were extracted from historical files of Tiros Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) radiance observations for a pair of tropical plumes which developed during January 1989. Signals were inserted into the NMC operational medium range forecast model and a suite of model integrations were conducted. Many of the 48 h model errors of the historical forecasts were eliminated by the inclusion of more complete satellite observations. Three studies in satellite radiance analysis progressed. An analysis which blended TOVS moisture channels, OLR observations and European Center for Medium Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model analysis to generate fields of total precipitable water comparable to those estimated from Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) mu-wave observations. This study demonstrated that a 10 y climatology of precipitable water over the oceans is feasible, using available infrared observations (OLR and TOVS) and model analysis (ECMWF, NMC or similar quality). The estimates are sensitive to model quality and the estimating model must be updated with operational model changes. Coe developed a set of tropical plume and ITCZ composites from TOVS observations, and from NMC and ECMWF analyses which had been passed through a radiative transfer model to simulate TOVS radiances. The composites have been completed as well as many statistical diagnostics of individual TOVS channels. Analysis of the computations is commencing. Chung has initiated a study of the

  1. On the Variability of the Dmanisi Mandibles

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Martinón-Torres, María; Sier, Mark Jan; Martín-Francés, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The description of a new skull (D4500) from the Dmanisi site (Republic of Georgia) has reopened the debate about the morphological variability within the genus Homo. The new skull fits with a mandible (D2600) often referred as ‘big’ or ‘enigmatic’ because of its differences with the other Dmanisi mandibles (D211 and D2735). In this report we present a comparative study of the variability of the Dmanisi mandibles under a different perspective, as we focus in morphological aspects related to growth and development. We have followed the notion of modularity and phenotypic integration in order to understand the architectural differences observed within the sample. Our study reveals remarkable shape differences between D2600 and the other two mandibles, that are established early in the ontogeny (during childhood or even before) and that do not depend on size or sexual dimorphism. In addition, D2600 exhibits a mosaic of primitive and derived features regarding the Homo clade, which is absent in D211 and D2735. This mosaic expression is related to the location of the features and can be explained under the concept of modularity. Our study would support the possibility of two different paleodemes represented at the Dmanisi site. This hypothesis has been previously rejected on the basis that all the individuals were constrained in the same stratigraphic and taphonomic settings. However, our revision of the complex Dmanisi stratigraphy suggests that the accumulation could cover an undetermined period of time. Even if “short” in geological terms, the hominin accumulation was not necessarily synchronic. In the same line we discard that the differences between D2600 and the small mandibles are consequence of wear-related dentoalveolar remodeling. In addition, dental wear pattern of D2600 could suggest an adaptation to a different ecological niche than the other Dmanisi individuals. PMID:24586309

  2. The integrity of independent variables in behavior analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, L; Homer, A L; Wonderlich, S A

    1982-01-01

    Establishing a functional relationship between the independent and the dependent variable is the primary focus of applied behavior analysis. Accurate and reliable description and observation of both the independent and dependent variables are necessary to achieve this goal. Although considerable attention has been focused on ensuring the integrity of the dependent variable in the operant literature, similar effort has not been directed at ensuring the integrity of the independent variable. Inaccurate descriptions of the application of the independent variable may threaten the reliability and validity of operant research data. A survey of articles in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis demonstrated that the majority of articles published do not use any assessment of the actual occurrence of the independent variable and a sizable minority do not provide operational definitions of the independent variable. The feasibility and utility of ensuring the integrity of the independent variable is described. PMID:7153187

  3. Variable Cosmological Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikova, Irina

    2003-06-01

    In the spherically symmetric case the dominant energy condition, together with the requirement of regularity of a density and finiteness of the mass, defines the family of asymptotically flat globally regular solutions to the Einstein minimally coupled equations which includes the class of metrics asymptotically de Sitter as r --> 0 and asymptotically Schwarzschild as r --> ∞. A source term connects smoothly de Sitter vacuum in the origin with the Minkowski vacuum at infinity and corresponds to anisotropic vacuum defined macroscopically by the algebraic structure of its stress-energy tensor invariant under boosts in the radial direction. Dependently on parameters, geometry describes vacuum nonsingular black and white holes, and self-gravitating particle-like structures. ADM mass for this class is related to both de Sitter vacuum trapped inside an object and to breaking of space-time symmetry. This class of metrics is easily extended to the case of nonzero cosmological constant at infinity. The source term connects then smoothly two de Sitter vacua and corresponds to extension of the Einstein cosmological term Λgμν to an r-dependent cosmological term Λμν. In this approach a constant scalar Λ associated with a vacuum density Λ = 8πGρvac, becomes a tensor component Λtt associated explicitly with a density component of a perfect fluid tensor whose vacuum properties follow from its symmetry and whose variability follows from the Bianchi identities. In this review we outline and discuss Λμν geometry and its applications.

  4. Variable Importance and Prediction Methods for Longitudinal Problems with Missing Variables

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Iván; Hubbard, Alan; Decker, Anna; Cohen, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    We present prediction and variable importance (VIM) methods for longitudinal data sets containing continuous and binary exposures subject to missingness. We demonstrate the use of these methods for prognosis of medical outcomes of severe trauma patients, a field in which current medical practice involves rules of thumb and scoring methods that only use a few variables and ignore the dynamic and high-dimensional nature of trauma recovery. Well-principled prediction and VIM methods can provide a tool to make care decisions informed by the high-dimensional patient’s physiological and clinical history. Our VIM parameters are analogous to slope coefficients in adjusted regressions, but are not dependent on a specific statistical model, nor require a certain functional form of the prediction regression to be estimated. In addition, they can be causally interpreted under causal and statistical assumptions as the expected outcome under time-specific clinical interventions, related to changes in the mean of the outcome if each individual experiences a specified change in the variable (keeping other variables in the model fixed). Better yet, the targeted MLE used is doubly robust and locally efficient. Because the proposed VIM does not constrain the prediction model fit, we use a very flexible ensemble learner (the SuperLearner), which returns a linear combination of a list of user-given algorithms. Not only is such a prediction algorithm intuitive appealing, it has theoretical justification as being asymptotically equivalent to the oracle selector. The results of the analysis show effects whose size and significance would have been not been found using a parametric approach (such as stepwise regression or LASSO). In addition, the procedure is even more compelling as the predictor on which it is based showed significant improvements in cross-validated fit, for instance area under the curve (AUC) for a receiver-operator curve (ROC). Thus, given that 1) our VIM applies to

  5. Time Variability of Quasars: the Structure Function Variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, C.; Ivezić, Ž.; de Vries, W.; Sesar, B.; Becker, A.

    2008-12-01

    Significant progress in the description of quasar variability has been recently made by employing SDSS and POSS data. Common to most studies is a fundamental assumption that photometric observations at two epochs for a large number of quasars will reveal the same statistical properties as well-sampled light curves for individual objects. We critically test this assumption using light curves for a sample of ~2,600 spectroscopically confirmed quasars observed about 50 times on average over 8 years by the SDSS stripe 82 survey. We find that the dependence of the mean structure function computed for individual quasars on luminosity, rest-frame wavelength and time is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to the behavior of the structure function derived from two-epoch observations of a much larger sample. We also reproduce the result that the variability properties of radio and X-ray selected subsamples are different. However, the scatter of the variability structure function for fixed values of luminosity, rest-frame wavelength and time is similar to the scatter induced by the variance of these quantities in the analyzed sample. Hence, our results suggest that, although the statistical properties of quasar variability inferred using two-epoch data capture some underlying physics, there is significant additional information that can be extracted from well-sampled light curves for individual objects.

  6. Variability as an Operant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holth, Per

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments on operant variability by Neuringer and colleagues (e.g., Neuringer, 1986, 2002; Page & Neuringer, 1985) have been repeatedly cited as showing that behavioral variability can be reinforced by making reinforcement contingent on it. They showed that the degree of variability in pigeons' eight-peck sequences, as measured by U…

  7. Hidden variables and nonlocality in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmick, Douglas Lloyd

    1997-05-01

    Most physicists hold a skeptical attitude toward a 'hidden variables' interpretation of quantum theory, despite David Bohm's successful construction of such a theory and John S. Bell's strong arguments in favor of the idea. The first reason for doubt concerns certain mathematical theorems (von Neumann's, Gleason's, Kochen and Specker's, and Bell's) which can be applied to the hidden variables issue. These theorems are often credited with proving that hidden variables are indeed 'impossible', in the sense that they cannot replicate the predictions of quantum mechanics. Many who do not draw such a strong conclusion nevertheless accept that hidden variables have been shown to exhibit prohibitively complicated features. The second concern is that the most sophisticated example of a hidden variables theory-that of David Bohm-exhibits non-locality, i.e., consequences of events at one place can propagate to other places instantaneously. However, neither the mathematical theorems in question nor the attribute of nonlocality detract from the importance of a hidden variables interpretation of quantum theory. Nonlocality is present in quantum mechanics itself, and is a required characteristic of any theory that agrees with the quantum mechanical predictions. We first discuss the earliest analysis of hidden variables-that of von Neumann's theorem-and review John S. Bell's refutation of von Neumann's 'impossibility proof'. We recall and elaborate on Bell's arguments regarding the theorems of Gleason, and Kochen and Specker. According to Bell, these latter theorems do not imply that hidden variables interpretations are untenable, but instead that such theories must exhibit contextuality, i.e., they must allow for the dependence of measurement results on the characteristics of both measured system and measuring apparatus. We demonstrate a new way to understand the implications of both Gleason's theorem and Kochen and Specker's theorem by noting that they prove a result we call

  8. Continuous dependence estimate for conservation laws with Lévy noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Imran H.; Koley, Ujjwal; Majee, Ananta K.

    2015-11-01

    We are concerned with multidimensional stochastic balance laws driven by Lévy processes. Using bounded variation (BV) estimates for vanishing viscosity approximations, we derive an explicit continuous dependence estimate on the nonlinearities of the entropy solutions under the assumption that Lévy noise only depends on the solution. This result is used to show the error estimate for the stochastic vanishing viscosity method. In addition, we establish fractional BV estimate for vanishing viscosity approximations in case the noise coefficient depends on both the solution and spatial variable.

  9. Measuring additive interaction using odds ratios

    PubMed Central

    Kalilani, Linda; Atashili, Julius

    2006-01-01

    Interaction measured on the additive scale has been argued to be better correlated with biologic interaction than when measured on the multiplicative scale. Measures of interaction on the additive scale have been developed using risk ratios. However, in studies that use odds ratios as the sole measure of effect, the calculation of these measures of additive interaction is usually performed by directly substituting odds ratios for risk ratios. Yet assessing additive interaction based on replacing risk ratios by odds ratios in formulas that were derived using the former may be erroneous. In this paper, we evaluate the extent to which three measures of additive interaction – the interaction contrast ratio (ICR), the attributable proportion due to interaction (AP), and the synergy index (S), estimated using odds ratios versus using risk ratios differ as the incidence of the outcome of interest increases in the source population and/or as the magnitude of interaction increases. Our analysis shows that the difference between the two depends on the measure of interaction used, the type of interaction present, and the baseline incidence of the outcome. Substituting odds ratios for risk ratios, when calculating measures of additive interaction, may result in misleading conclusions. Of the three measures, AP appears to be the most robust to this direct substitution. Formulas that use stratum specific odds and odds ratios to accurately calculate measures of additive interaction are presented. PMID:16620385

  10. Modeling local dependence in longitudinal IRT models.

    PubMed

    Olsbjerg, Maja; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2015-12-01

    Measuring change in a latent variable over time is often done using the same instrument at several time points. This can lead to dependence between responses across time points for the same person yielding within person correlations that are stronger than what can be attributed to the latent variable. Ignoring this can lead to biased estimates of changes in the latent variable. In this paper we propose a method for modeling local dependence in the longitudinal 2PL model. It is based on the concept of item splitting, and makes it possible to correctly estimate change in the latent variable. PMID:25552424

  11. Time and space variability of spectral estimates of atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavero, Flavio G.; Einaudi, Franco

    1987-01-01

    The temporal and spatial behaviors of atmospheric pressure spectra over the northern Italy and the Alpine massif were analyzed using data on surface pressure measurements carried out at two microbarograph stations in the Po Valley, one 50 km south of the Alps, the other in the foothills of the Dolomites. The first 15 days of the study overlapped with the Alpex Intensive Observation Period. The pressure records were found to be intrinsically nonstationary and were found to display substantial time variability, implying that the statistical moments depend on time. The shape and the energy content of spectra depended on different time segments. In addition, important differences existed between spectra obtained at the two stations, indicating a substantial effect of topography, particularly for periods less than 40 min.

  12. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  13. Genome Variability and Gene Content in Chordopoxviruses: Dependence on Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Eneida L.; Wang, Chunlin; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate gene loss in poxviruses belonging to the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily, we assessed the gene content of representative members of the subfamily, and determined whether individual genes present in each genome were intact, truncated, or fragmented. When nonintact genes were identified, the early stop mutations (ESMs) leading to gene truncation or fragmentation were analyzed. Of all the ESMs present in these poxvirus genomes, over 65% co-localized with microsatellites—simple sequence nucleotide repeats. On average, microsatellites comprise 24% of the nucleotide sequence of these poxvirus genomes. These simple repeats have been shown to exhibit high rates of variation, and represent a target for poxvirus protein variation, gene truncation, and reductive evolution. PMID:25912716

  14. Theoretical and experimental investigation of additive drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibulkin, Merwin

    1954-01-01

    The significance of additive drag is discussed and equations for determining its approximate value are derived for annular and open-nose inlets. Charts are presented giving values of additive drag coefficient over a range of free-stream Mach numbers for open and for annular-nose inlets with conical flow at the inlet. The effects on additive drag of variable inlet-total-pressure recovery and static pressures on the centerbody are investigated and an analytical method of predicting the variation of pressure on the centerbody with mass-flow ratio is given. Experimental additive-drag values are presented for a series of 20 degree and 25 degree cone half-angle inlets and one open-nose inlet operating at free-stream Mach numbers of 1.8 and 1.6. A comparison with the theoretical values of additive drag shows excellent agreement for the open-nose inlet and moderately good agreement for the annular inlets. (author)

  15. Statistical maps of small-scale electric field variability in the high-latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, E. D. P.; Shepherd, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    Statistical maps of small-scale electric field variability in the high-latitude ionosphere are derived for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres using 48 months of data from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). Maps of variability magnitude (from scales of 45-450 km and 2-20 min) are derived for a range of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations and dipole tilt angles (the angle between the best fit dipole axis and the plane perpendicular to the Sun-Earth line). It is found that the observed spatial distribution of average variability is significantly modified as the IMF and dipole tilt conditions change. Under negative (winter-like) and neutral (equinox-like) dipole tilt angles, variability is concentrated in the auroral and dayside cusp regions, and the spatial distributions of variability appear to be correlated to those of large- and small-scale field-aligned currents (FACs). Additionally, variability on the nightside is found to be more enhanced in the downward FAC region than it is in the upward FAC region. Under positive (summer-like) dipole tilt angles, the average variability magnitudes across the high-latitude regions are smaller than those observed under negative dipole tilt angles, and the spatial distributions are more uniform. These dipole tilt effects suggest that scale-size- and conductivity-dependent field-aligned potential drops and conductivity-dependent changes in the processes that generate variability are possible factors that impact the observed small-scale electric field variability. In general, Southern Hemisphere maps appear very similar to Northern Hemisphere maps, although some minor differences are observed that may result from interhemispheric asymmetries in the geomagnetic field.

  16. Deciphering the roles of multiple additives in organocatalyzed Michael additions.

    PubMed

    Günler, Z Inci; Companyó, Xavier; Alfonso, Ignacio; Burés, Jordi; Jimeno, Ciril; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2016-05-21

    The synergistic effects of multiple additives (water and acetic acid) on the asymmetric Michael addition of acetone to nitrostyrene catalyzed by primary amine-thioureas (PAT) were precisely determined. Acetic acid facilitates hydrolysis of the imine intermediates, thus leading to catalytic behavior, and minimizes the formation of the double addition side product. In contrast, water slows down the reaction but minimizes catalyst deactivation, eventually leading to higher final yields. PMID:27128165

  17. Some new addition formulae for Weierstrass elliptic functions

    PubMed Central

    Eilbeck, J. Chris; England, Matthew; Ônishi, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    We present new addition formulae for the Weierstrass functions associated with a general elliptic curve. We prove the structure of the formulae in n-variables and give the explicit addition formulae for the 2- and 3-variable cases. These new results were inspired by new addition formulae found in the case of an equianharmonic curve, which we can now observe as a specialization of the results here. The new formulae, and the techniques used to find them, also follow the recent work for the generalization of Weierstrass functions to curves of higher genus. PMID:25383018

  18. Titan's Variable Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, S. A.; Brecht, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini observations have found that the plasma and magnetic field conditions upstream of Titan are far more complex than they were thought to be after the Voyager encounter. Rymer et al., (2009) used the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) electron observations to classify the plasma conditions along Titan's orbit into 5 types (Plasma Sheet, Lobe, Mixed, Magnetosheath and Misc.). Nemeth et al., (2011) found that the CAPS ion observations could also be separated into the same plasma regions as defined by Rymer et al. Additionally the T-96 encounter found Titan in the solar wind adding a sixth classification. Understanding the effects of the variable upstream plasma conditions on Titan's plasma interaction and the evolution of Titan's ionosphere/atmosphere is one of the main objectives of the Cassini mission. To compliment the mission we perform hybrid simulations of Titan's plasma interaction to examine the effects of the incident plasma distribution function and the flow velocity. We closely examine the results on Titan's induced magnetosphere and the resulting pickup ion properties.

  19. Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Biman; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common primary immunodeficiency of young adolescents and adults which also affects the children. The disease remains largely under-diagnosed in India and Southeast Asian countries. Although in majority of cases it is sporadic, disease may be inherited in a autosomal recessive pattern and rarely, in autosomal dominant pattern. Patients, in addition to frequent sino-pulmonary infections, are also susceptible to various autoimmune diseases and malignancy, predominantly lymphoma and leukemia. Other characteristic lesions include lymphocytic and granulomatous interstitial lung disease, and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of gut. Diagnosis requires reduced levels of at least two immunoglobulin isotypes: IgG with IgA and/or IgM and impaired specific antibody response to vaccines. A number of gene mutations have been described in CVID; however, these genetic alterations account for less than 20% of cases of CVID. Flow cytometry aptly demonstrates a disturbed B cell homeostasis with reduced or absent memory B cells and increased CD21(low) B cells and transitional B cell populations. Approximately one-third of patients with CVID also display T cell functional defects. Immunoglobulin therapy remains the mainstay of treatment. Immunologists and other clinicians in India and other South East Asian countries need to be aware of CVID so that early diagnosis can be made, as currently, majority of these patients still go undiagnosed. PMID:26868026

  20. Nova-like variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladous, Constanze

    1993-01-01

    On grounds of different observable characteristics five classes of nova-like objects are distinguished: the UX Ursae Majoris stars, the antidwarf novae, the DQ Herculis stars, the AM Herculis stars, and the AM Canum Venaticorum stars. Some objects have not been classified specifically. Nova-like stars share most observable features with dwarf novae, except for the outburst behavior. The understanding is that dwarf novae, UX Ursae Majoris stars, and anti-dwarf novae are basically the same sort of objects. The difference between them is that in UX Ursae Majoris stars the mass transfer through the accretion disc always is high so the disc is stationary all the time; in anti-dwarf novae for some reason the mass transfer occasionally drops considerably for some time, and in dwarf novae it is low enough for the disc to undergo semiperiodic changes between high and low accretion events. DQ Herculis stars are believed to possess weakly magnetic white dwarfs which disrupt the inner disc at some distance from the central star; the rotation of the white dwarf can be seen as an additional photometric period. In AM Herculis stars, a strongly magnetic white dwarf entirely prevents the formation of an accretion disk and at the same time locks the rotation of the white dwarf to the binary orbit. Finally, AM Canum Venaticorum stars are believed to be cataclysmic variables that consist of two white dwarf components.

  1. Phenibut dependence

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, Andriy V; Paton-Gay, C Lindsay; Balchand, Kam; Rehm, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Phenibut is a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist designed and used as an anxiolytic in Russia. In Western countries, phenibut is not a registered medication but is available through online stores as a supplement. We present a case of a patient who used phenibut to self-medicate anxiety, insomnia and cravings for alcohol. While phenibut was helpful initially, the patient developed dependence including tolerance, significant withdrawal symptoms within 3–4 h of last use and failure to fulfil his roles at work and at home. He finally sought medical assistance in our addictions clinic. We have gradually, over the course of 9 weeks, substituted phenibut with baclofen, which has similar pharmacological properties, and then successfully tapered the patient off baclofen. This required approximately 10 mg of baclofen for each gram of phenibut. PMID:23391959

  2. Phenibut dependence.

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, Andriy V; Paton-Gay, C Lindsay; Balchand, Kam; Rehm, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Phenibut is a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist designed and used as an anxiolytic in Russia. In Western countries, phenibut is not a registered medication but is available through online stores as a supplement. We present a case of a patient who used phenibut to self-medicate anxiety, insomnia and cravings for alcohol. While phenibut was helpful initially, the patient developed dependence including tolerance, significant withdrawal symptoms within 3-4 h of last use and failure to fulfil his roles at work and at home. He finally sought medical assistance in our addictions clinic. We have gradually, over the course of 9 weeks, substituted phenibut with baclofen, which has similar pharmacological properties, and then successfully tapered the patient off baclofen. This required approximately 10 mg of baclofen for each gram of phenibut. PMID:23391959

  3. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  4. Adverse reactions to the sulphite additives

    PubMed Central

    Misso, Neil LA

    2012-01-01

    Sulphites are widely used as preservative and antioxidant additives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Exposure to sulphites has been reported to induce a range of adverse clinical effects in sensitive individuals, ranging from dermatitis, urticaria, flushing, hypotension, abdominal pain and diarrhoea to life-threatening anaphylactic and asthmatic reactions. Exposure to the sulphites arises mainly from the consumption of foods and drinks that contain these additives; however exposure may also occur through the use of pharmaceutical products, as well as in occupational settings. Most studies report a prevalence of sulphite sensitivity of 3 to 10% among asthmatic subjects who ingest these additives. However, the severity of these reactions varies, and steroid-dependent asthmatics, those with marked airway hyperresponsiveness, and children with chronic asthma, appear to be at greater risk. Although a number of potential mechanisms have been proposed, the precise mechanisms underlying sulphite sensitivity remain unclear. PMID:24834193

  5. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  6. 75 FR 27313 - Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED PROCUREMENT LIST Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the... or Severely Disabled, Jefferson Plaza 2, Suite 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway,...

  7. Greenland Glacier Albedo Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA) is a NASA-funded project with the prime goal of addressing the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. Since the formal initiation of the program in 1995, there has been a significant improvement in the estimates of the mass balance of the ice sheet. Results from this program reveal that the high-elevation regions of the ice sheet are approximately in balance, but the margins are thinning. Laser surveys reveal significant thinning along 70 percent of the ice sheet periphery below 2000 m elevations, and in at least one outlet glacier, Kangerdlugssuaq in southeast Greenland, thinning has been as much as 10 m/yr. This study examines the albedo variability in four outlet glaciers to help separate out the relative contributions of surface melting versus ice dynamics to the recent mass balance changes. Analysis of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder albedo shows that at the Petermann and Jakobshavn glaciers, there has been a negative trend in albedo at the glacier terminus from 1981 to 2000, whereas the Stor+strommen and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers show slightly positive trends in albedo. These findings are consistent with recent observations of melt extent from passive microwave data which show more melt on the western side of Greenland and slightly less on the eastern side. Significance of albedo trends will depend on where and when the albedo changes occur. Since the majority of surface melt occurs in the shallow sloping western margin of the ice sheet where the shortwave radiation dominates the energy balance in summer (e.g. Jakobshavn region) this region will be more sensitive to changes in albedo than in regions where this is not the case. Near the Jakobshavn glacier, even larger changes in albedo have been observed, with decreases as much as 20 percent per decade.

  8. Problem of hidden variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Emilio

    1992-10-01

    The problem of hidden variables in quantum mechanics is formalized as follows. A general or contextual (noncontextual) hidden-variables theory is defined as a mapping f: Q×M → C (f: Q→C) where Q is the set of projection operators in the appropriate (quantum) Hilbert space, M is the set of maximal Boolean subalgebras of Q and C is a (classical) Boolean algebra. It is shown that contextual (noncontextual) hidden-variables always exist (do not exist).

  9. Radiation-induced DNA content variability in mouse sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Lake, S.; Wyrobek, A.J.

    1983-09-01

    Mouse sperm collected from the cauda epididymidis 35 days after acute testicular X-ray exposure and fluorescently stained for DNA show dose-dependent increases in the coefficient of variation (CV) of flow cytometrically obtained fluorescence distributions. By comparing dose-response curves obtained with three protocols which overcome the optical and cytochemical difficulties of sperm measurement in different ways we conclude the response is due to X-ray-induced DNA content variability. In the range between 0 and 600 rad the dose dependence of the square of CV of the DNA content variability, delta CV2D, is described by delta CV2D . Bx + Cx2, with 0 less than or equal to B less than or equal to 0.23 X 10(-2) and C . (0.44 +/- 0.06) X 10(-4). The dose x is measured in rad and delta CVD is expressed in percent. Computer modeling of the shapes of the fluorescence distributions show that at 600 rad 30 to 40% of the sperm have abnormal DNA content. Some have errors as large as two whole chromosomes, but it is not clear whether they are due to whole chromosome nondisjunction or a finer fragmentation of the genome. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene and mitomycin C cause no detectable DNA content variability. We conclude mouse sperm DNA content measurements are not sensitive to small amounts of aneuploidy and as such will only be useful in detecting agents that produce substantial DNA content variability. Another animal with a smaller number of chromosomes might be more favorable. These sperm measurement techniques may find additional application in other areas of reproductive biology, such as the determination of the relative numbers of X and Y chromosome-bearing sperm in semen that may be artificially enriched in one population.

  10. The ROSAT variable sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.; Giommi, P.; White, N. E.

    1996-01-01

    The spectral and timing characteristics from a sample, of 91 objects, of the variable sources obtained using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test technique are presented. The data were extracted from the catalog constructed by White, Giommi and Angelini, the WGACAT, based on the pointed observations from the Rosat missions. The application of the test revealed more than 2400 individual variable candidates, with 'sq chi' greater than 12. The sample of these variable sources, mostly unidentified, probably contains many flare stars, a few cataclysmic variables and a possible transient source.

  11. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  12. Nonferromagnetic linear variable differential transformer

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, James F.; Walstrom, Peter L.

    1977-06-14

    A nonferromagnetic linear variable differential transformer for accurately measuring mechanical displacements in the presence of high magnetic fields is provided. The device utilizes a movable primary coil inside a fixed secondary coil that consists of two series-opposed windings. Operation is such that the secondary output voltage is maintained in phase (depending on polarity) with the primary voltage. The transducer is well-suited to long cable runs and is useful for measuring small displacements in the presence of high or alternating magnetic fields.

  13. Bounds on internal state variables in viscoplasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1993-01-01

    A typical viscoplastic model will introduce up to three types of internal state variables in order to properly describe transient material behavior; they are as follows: the back stress, the yield stress, and the drag strength. Different models employ different combinations of these internal variables--their selection and description of evolution being largely dependent on application and material selection. Under steady-state conditions, the internal variables cease to evolve and therefore become related to the external variables (stress and temperature) through simple functional relationships. A physically motivated hypothesis is presented that links the kinetic equation of viscoplasticity with that of creep under steady-state conditions. From this hypothesis one determines how the internal variables relate to one another at steady state, but most importantly, one obtains bounds on the magnitudes of stress and back stress, and on the yield stress and drag strength.

  14. Use of the Soil Management Assessment Framework in Spatially Variable Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil management is typically applied to tracts of land exhibiting spatial variability. Intensive soil sampling to quantify this variability is labor intensive and expensive. Additional approaches are needed to assess soil management within spatially variable fields. Apparent electrical conductivity ...

  15. Predictive Inference Using Latent Variables with Covariates*

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Lynne Steuerle; Junker, Brian; Taylor, Lowell J.; Black, Dan A.

    2014-01-01

    Plausible Values (PVs) are a standard multiple imputation tool for analysis of large education survey data that measures latent proficiency variables. When latent proficiency is the dependent variable, we reconsider the standard institutionally-generated PV methodology and find it applies with greater generality than shown previously. When latent proficiency is an independent variable, we show that the standard institutional PV methodology produces biased inference because the institutional conditioning model places restrictions on the form of the secondary analysts’ model. We offer an alternative approach that avoids these biases based on the mixed effects structural equations (MESE) model of Schofield (2008). PMID:25231627

  16. Buprenorphine for opioid dependence

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Walter

    2014-01-01

    As a treatment agent for opioid dependence, buprenorphine is a nearly ideal medication at our current stage of medication development. Unlike methadone, buprenorphine dosage can be rapidly adjusted with minimal potential for inducing severe consequences. In addition to its intrinsic safety, buprenorphine's relatively low abuse liability in the combination product (i.e., with naloxone as Suboxone®) makes it even more acceptable in regulatory quarters as well as to prescribing physicians. The approval of buprenorphine as a pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence returns to physicians the ability to treat their opioid-dependent patients with an effective opioid-based treatment for the first time in nearly 100 years. Buprenorphine is an opioid, however, and potential for misuse remains, even in combination with naloxone. Whether buprenorphine will be increasingly accepted as a treatment for opioid-dependent patients depends on clinicians recognizing the advantages of its uniquely useful properties while still heeding the need to manage their patients' therapy with reasonable vigilance. PMID:19402772

  17. [The research protocol IV: study variables].

    PubMed

    Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Miranda-Novales, María Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    The variables in a research study are all that is measured, the information collected, or the data that is collected in order to answer the research questions, which are specified in the objectives. Their selection is essential to the research protocol. This article aims to point out the elements to be considered in the section of the variables. To avoid ambiguity, it is necessary to select only those that will help achieve the study objectives. It should subsequently be defined how they will be measured to ensure that the findings can be replicated; it is therefore desirable to include conceptual and operational definitions. From the methodological point of view, the classification of variables helps us understand how the relationship between them is conceptualized. Depending on the study design, the independent, dependent, universal, and confounding variables should be noted. Another indispensable element for planning statistical analyses is the scale of variable measurement. Therefore, one must specify whether the variables correspond to one of the following four: qualitative nominal, qualitative ordinal, quantitative range, or quantitative ratio. Finally, we should detail the measurement units of each variable. PMID:27560918

  18. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  19. A novel variable selection approach that iteratively optimizes variable space using weighted binary matrix sampling.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bai-chuan; Yun, Yong-huan; Liang, Yi-zeng; Yi, Lun-zhao

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a new optimization algorithm called the Variable Iterative Space Shrinkage Approach (VISSA) that is based on the idea of model population analysis (MPA) is proposed for variable selection. Unlike most of the existing optimization methods for variable selection, VISSA statistically evaluates the performance of variable space in each step of optimization. Weighted binary matrix sampling (WBMS) is proposed to generate sub-models that span the variable subspace. Two rules are highlighted during the optimization procedure. First, the variable space shrinks in each step. Second, the new variable space outperforms the previous one. The second rule, which is rarely satisfied in most of the existing methods, is the core of the VISSA strategy. Compared with some promising variable selection methods such as competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS), Monte Carlo uninformative variable elimination (MCUVE) and iteratively retaining informative variables (IRIV), VISSA showed better prediction ability for the calibration of NIR data. In addition, VISSA is user-friendly; only a few insensitive parameters are needed, and the program terminates automatically without any additional conditions. The Matlab codes for implementing VISSA are freely available on the website: https://sourceforge.net/projects/multivariateanalysis/files/VISSA/. PMID:25083512

  20. The WFCAM multiwavelength Variable Star Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Dékány, I.; Catelan, M.; Cross, N. J. G.; Angeloni, R.; Leão, I. C.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Stellar variability in the near-infrared (NIR) remains largely unexplored. The exploitation of public science archives with data-mining methods offers a perspective for a time-domain exploration of the NIR sky. Aims: We perform a comprehensive search for stellar variability using the optical-NIR multiband photometric data in the public Calibration Database of the WFCAM Science Archive (WSA), with the aim of contributing to the general census of variable stars and of extending the current scarce inventory of accurate NIR light curves for a number of variable star classes. Methods: Standard data-mining methods were applied to extract and fine-tune time-series data from the WSA. We introduced new variability indices designed for multiband data with correlated sampling, and applied them for preselecting variable star candidates, i.e., light curves that are dominated by correlated variations, from noise-dominated ones. Preselection criteria were established by robust numerical tests for evaluating the response of variability indices to the colored noise characteristic of the data. We performed a period search using the string-length minimization method on an initial catalog of 6551 variable star candidates preselected by variability indices. Further frequency analysis was performed on positive candidates using three additional methods in combination, in order to cope with aliasing. Results: We find 275 periodic variable stars and an additional 44 objects with suspected variability with uncertain periods or apparently aperiodic variation. Only 44 of these objects had been previously known, including 11 RR Lyrae stars on the outskirts of the globular cluster M 3 (NGC 5272). We provide a preliminary classification of the new variable stars that have well-measured light curves, but the variability types of a large number of objects remain ambiguous. We classify most of the new variables as contact binary stars, but we also find several pulsating stars, among which

  1. Calculators and Computers: Graphical Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is presented that generates problem sets involving sketching graphs of trigonometric functions using graphical addition. The students use calculators to sketch the graphs and a computer solution is used to check it. (MP)

  2. Polyolefins as additives in plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Deanin, R.D.

    1993-12-31

    Polyolefins are not only major commodity plastics - they are also very useful as additives, both in other polyolefins and also in other types of plastics. This review covers ethylene, propylene, butylene and isobutylene polymers, in blends with each other, and as additives to natural rubber, styrene/butadiene rubber, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, polymethyl methacrylate, polyphenylene oxide, polycarbonate, thermoplastic polyesters, polyurethanes, polyamides, and mixed automotive plastics recycling.

  3. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  4. Microinertia and internal variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovski, Arkadi; Ván, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The description of microinertia in micromorphic continua is discussed from the point of view of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In the framework of dual internal variables, the microinertia stems from a thermodynamic equation of state related to the internal variable, which has the properties similar to mechanical momentum.

  5. Reinforcing Saccadic Amplitude Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paeye, Celine; Madelain, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Saccadic endpoint variability is often viewed as the outcome of neural noise occurring during sensorimotor processing. However, part of this variability might result from operant learning. We tested this hypothesis by reinforcing dispersions of saccadic amplitude distributions, while maintaining constant their medians. In a first experiment we…

  6. Latent Variable Interaction Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacker, Randall E.

    2002-01-01

    Used simulation to study two different approaches to latent variable interaction modeling with continuous observed variables: (1) a LISREL 8.30 program and (2) data analysis through PRELIS2 and SIMPLIS programs. Results show that parameter estimation was similar but standard errors were different. Discusses differences in ease of implementation.…

  7. Trends and variability in East African rainfall and temperature observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seregina, Larisa; Ermert, Volker; Fink, Andreas H.; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2014-05-01

    The economy of East Africa is highly dependent on agriculture, leading to a strong vulnerability of local society to fluctuations in seasonal rainfall amounts, including extreme events. Hence, the knowledge about the evolution of seasonal rainfall under future climate conditions is crucial. Rainfall regimes over East Africa are influenced by multiple factors, including two monsoon systems, several convergence zones and the Rift Valley lakes. In addition, local conditions, like topography, modulate the large-scale rainfall pattern. East African rainfall variability is also influenced by various teleconnections like the Indian Ocean Zonal Mode and El Niño Southern Oscillation. Regarding future climate projections, regional and global climate models partly disagree on the increase or decrease of East African rainfall. The specific aim of the present study is the acquirement of historic data from weather stations in East Africa (Kenya, Tanzania, Ruanda and Uganda), the use of gridded satellite (rainfall) products (ARC2 and TRMM), and three-dimensional atmospheric reanalysis (e.g., ERA-Interim) to quantify climate variability in the recent past and to understand its causes. Climate variability and trends, including changes in extreme events, are evaluated using ETCCDI climate change and standardized precipitation indices. These climate indices are determined in order to investigate the variability of temperature and rainfall and their trends with the focus on most recent decades. In the follow-up, statistical and dynamical analyses are conducted to quantify the local impact of pertinent large-scale modes of climate variability (Indian Ocean Zonal Mode, El Niño Southern Oscillation, Sea Surface Temperature of the Indian Ocean).

  8. Variable speed drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A variable speed drive wherein a first embodiment is comprised of a pivotally mounted prime mover coupled to a rotary fluid output device, such as a fan or pump, through a variable and fixed pulley drive arrangement is described. The pivotal position of the prime mover and accordingly the pitch diameter of variable pulley means is controlled in accordance with fluid motor means coupled to the prime mover. This is actuated in response to a fluid feedback control signal derived from a sensed output of the rotary fluid output device. The pivotal motion of the prime mover imparts an arcuate motion to the variable pulley means which effects a speed variation of the rotary fluid output device in accordance with the variation of the pitch diameter ratio of opposing variable and fixed pulley means.

  9. Basic properties and variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querci, Francois R.

    1987-01-01

    Giant and supergiant M, S, and C stars are discussed in this survey of research. Basic properties as determined by spectra, chemical composition, photometry, or variability type are discussed. Space motions and space distributions of cool giants are described. Distribution of these stars in our galaxy and those nearby is discussed. Mira variables in particular are surveyed with emphasis on the following topics: (1) phase lag phenomenon; (2) Mira light curves; (3) variations in color indices; (4) determination of multiple periods; (5) correlations between quantities such as period length, light-curve shape, infrared (IR) excess, and visible and IR color diagram; (6) semiregular (SR) variables and different time scales in SR light variations; (7) irregular variable Lb and Lc stars; (8) different time-scale light variations; (9) hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) stars, in particular RCB stars; and (10) irreversible changes and rapid evolution in red variable stars.

  10. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs). Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. Results We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. Conclusions We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does provide more interpretable

  11. Contingency management is effective across cocaine-dependent outpatients with different socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Secades-Villa, Roberto; García-Fernández, Gloria; Peña-Suárez, Elsa; García-Rodríguez, Olaya; Sánchez-Hervás, Emilio; Fernández-Hermida, José Ramón

    2013-03-01

    Contingency management (CM) has demonstrated its efficacy for treating cocaine dependence, but there is still some controversy with regard to its dissemination. Understanding how individual differences affect CM outcomes is important for detecting barriers to its dissemination. The aim of this study is to examine the impact of socioeconomic variables in cocaine-dependent outpatients on the effectiveness of CM in a community setting. Cocaine-dependent outpatients (N=118) were randomized to community reinforcement approach (CRA) treatment or a CRA plus vouchers program. The impact of baseline economic variables, alone and in combination with treatment conditions, on abstinence and retention outcomes after 6 months of treatment was assessed. Results showed that income had no effect on retention or abstinence outcomes after 6 months of treatment in either treatment condition. The addition of a CM component was beneficial for individuals with any socioeconomic status. These results support the generalizability of CM strategies with patients of different socioeconomic status in community settings. PMID:22999380

  12. Increased duplex stabilization in porphyrin-LNA zipper arrays with structure dependent exciton coupling† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthetic procedures for the building blocks and DNA strands, full spectroscopic analysis of the ssDNA and duplex systems. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ob01681a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Daniel G.; Hussain, Rohanah; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kumar, Pawan; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.; Berova, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Porphyrins were attached to LNA uridine building blocks via rigid 5-acetylene or more flexible propargyl-amide linkers and incorporated into DNA strands. The systems show a greatly increased thermodynamic stability when using as little as three porphyrins in a zipper arrangement. Thermodynamic analysis reveals clustering of the strands into more ordered duplexes with both greater negative ΔΔS and ΔΔH values, and less ordered duplexes with small positive ΔΔS differences, depending on the combination of linkers used. The exciton coupling between the porphyrins is dependent on the flanking DNA sequence in the single stranded form, and on the nature of the linker between the nucleobase and the porphyrin in the double stranded form; it is, however, also strongly influenced by intermolecular interactions. This system is suitable for the formation of stable helical chromophore arrays with sequence and structure dependent exciton coupling. PMID:26416024

  13. ADDITIVITY ASSESSMENT OF TRIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES BY PROPORTIONAL RESPONSE ADDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    If additivity is known or assumed, the toxicity of a chemical mixture may be predicted from the dose response curves of the individual chemicals comprising the mixture. As single chemical data are abundant and mixture data sparse, mixture risk methods that utilize single chemical...

  14. Variable Charge Soils: Mineralogy and Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Van Ranst, Eric; Noble, Andrew; Baert, Geert

    2003-11-01

    ferromagnesian-rich parent materials) the surfaces of phyllosilicates are coated to a lesser or greater extent by amorphous or crystalline, oppositely charged nanoparticles of Fe and Al oxides. These coatings exhibit a high reactive surface area and help cementing larger particles with one another. As a result of these electrostatic interactions, stable microaggregates that are difficult to disperse are formed in variable charge soils. Most of highly weathered soils have reached the “advanced stage” of Jackson-Sherman weathering sequence that is characterized by the removal of Na, K, Ca, Mg, and Fe(II), the presence of Fe and Al polymers, and very dilute soil solutions with an ionic strength (IS) of less than 1 mmol L-1. The inter-penetration or overlapping of the diffuse double layers on oppositely charged surfaces may occur in these dilute systems. These diffuse layer interactions may affect the magnitude of the effective charge, i.e., the counter-ion charge (4). In addition, salt adsorption, which is defined as the simultaneous adsorption in equivalent amounts of the cation and anion of an electrolyte with no net release of other ions into the soil solution, appears to be a common phenomenon in these soils. They act as cation- and anion-exchangers and as salt-sorbers. The magnitude of salt adsorption depends strongly on initial IS in the soil solution and the presence in appreciable amounts of oppositely charged surfaces. Among the authors that have made illustrious contributions towards a better understanding of these fascinating soil systems are S. Matson, R.K. Schofield, van Olphen, M.E. Sumner, G.W. Thomas, G.P. Gillman, G. Uehara, B.K.G. Theng, K. Wada, N.J. Barrow, J.W. Bowden, R.J. Hunter and G. Sposito. This entry is mainly based on publications by these authors.

  15. Influence of Pacific Ocean multidecadal variability on the distributional properties of hydrological variables in north-central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, J.; Rivera, D.; Oyarzún, R.; Arumí, J. L.

    2013-09-01

    This paper addresses the relationship between multitemporal variability and regime shifts in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and El Niño Southern Oscillation, with precipitation and streamflows in Andean watersheds of the north-central region of Chile. In addition, an analysis of the effect of a regime shift displayed by annual streamflow records on their distributional properties is performed. By applying empirical fluctuation processes to monthly standardized PDO, Niño 3.4, precipitation and streamflow time series, the occurrence of a regime shift in the streamflow series, consistent with that for PDO, but highly dependent on the latitude of particular watersheds, is shown. No regime shift is detected for the precipitation time series. Using the ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition procedure on all series, a relationship between climatic indices and hydrological variables in two main modes is determined: the former associated with a mean period of quasi 1.5-3 years related to interannual variability, and the latter with a mean period of quasi 30-35 years, related to decadal low frequency variability. Using the regional frequency analysis based on the L-moments procedure, it is found that the distributional properties of streamflow records are influenced by the phases of the PDO, with changes that affect the mean, L-CV, L-skewness and L-kurtosis in three identified homogeneous regions. The importance of incorporating low-frequency climate variability for distributional analysis and the implications of these results for water resources management and planning in north-central Chile and similar areas is discussed.

  16. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  17. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting. PMID:26118220

  18. Motivational and psychological correlates of bodybuilding dependence

    PubMed Central

    EMINI, NEIM N.; BOND, MALCOLM J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background and aims: Exercise may become physically and psychologically maladaptive if taken to extremes. One example is the dependence reported by some individuals who engage in weight training. The current study explored potential psychological, motivational, emotional and behavioural concomitants of bodybuilding dependence, with a particular focus on motives for weight training. Using a path analysis paradigm, putative causal models sought to explain associations among key study variables. Methods: A convenience sample of 101 men aged between 18 and 67 years was assembled from gymnasia in Adelaide, South Australia. Active weight trainers voluntarily completed a questionnaire that included measures of bodybuilding dependence (social dependency, training dependency, and mastery), anger, hostility and aggression, stress and motivations for weight training. Results: Three motives for weight training were identified: mood control, physique anxiety and personal challenge. Of these, personal challenge and mood control were the most directly salient to dependence. Social dependency was particularly relevant to personal challenge, whereas training dependency was associated with both personal challenge and mood control. Mastery demonstrated a direct link with physique anxiety, thus reflecting a unique component of exercise dependence. Conclusions: While it was not possible to determine causality with the available data, the joint roles of variables that influence, or are influenced by, bodybuilding dependence are identified. Results highlight unique motivations for bodybuilding and suggest that dependence could be a result of, and way of coping with, stress manifesting as aggression. A potential framework for future research is provided through the demonstration of plausible causal linkages among these variables. PMID:25317342

  19. Radiation-induced DNA content variability in mouse sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Gledhill, B.L.; van Dilla, M.A.; Lake, S.; Wyrobek, A.J.

    1983-09-01

    Mouse sperm collected from the cauda epididymidis 35 days after acute testicular x-ray exposure and fluorescently stained for DNA show dose-dependent increases in the coefficient of variation (CV) of flow cytometrically obtained fluorescence distributions. By comparing dose-response curves obtained with three protocols which overcome the optical and cytochemical difficulties of sperm measurement in different ways we conclude the response is due to x-ray-induced DNA content variability. Computer modeling of the shapes of the fluorescence distributions show that at 600 rad 30 to 40% of the sperm have abnormal DNA content. Some have errors as large as two whole chromosomes, but it is not clear whether they are due to whole chromosome nondisjunction or a finer fragmentation of the genome. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene and mitomycin C cause no detectable DNA content variability. We conclude mouse sperm DNA content measurements are not sensitive to small amounts of aneuploidy and as such will only be useful in detecting agents that produce substantial DNA content variability. Another animal with a smaller number of chromosomes might be more favorable. These sperm measurement techniques may find additional application in other areas of reproductive biology, such as the determination of the relative numbers of X and Y chromosome-bearing sperm in semen that may be artifically enriched in one population.

  20. The teratology testing of food additives.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Paul C; Spézia, François

    2013-01-01

    The developmental and reproductive toxicity testing (including teratogenicity) of new foods and food additives is performed worldwide according to the guidelines given in the FDA Redbook. These studies are not required for substances that are generally recognized as safe, according to the FDA inventory. The anticipated cumulated human exposure level above which developmental or reproduction studies are required depends on the structure-alert category. For food additives of concern, both developmental (prenatal) and reproduction (multigeneration) studies are required. The developmental studies are performed in two species, usually the rat and the rabbit. The reproduction study is generally performed in the rat. The two rat studies are preferably combined into a single experimental design, if possible. The test methods described in the FDA Redbook are similar to those specified by the OECD for the reproductive toxicity testing of chemicals. PMID:23138896

  1. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-01-01

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components. PMID:26553246

  2. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numericalmore » modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.« less

  3. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  4. Manipulating crystallization with molecular additives.

    PubMed

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Lee, Stephanie S; Kahr, Bart; Ward, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of organic crystals in a wide range of industrial applications, the chemistry, biology, materials science, and chemical engineering communities have focused considerable attention on developing methods to control crystal structure, size, shape, and orientation. Tailored additives have been used to control crystallization to great effect, presumably by selectively binding to particular crystallographic surfaces and sites. However, substantial knowledge gaps still exist in the fundamental mechanisms that govern the formation and growth of organic crystals in both the absence and presence of additives. In this review, we highlight research discoveries that reveal the role of additives, either introduced by design or present adventitiously, on various stages of formation and growth of organic crystals, including nucleation, dislocation spiral growth mechanisms, growth inhibition, and nonclassical crystal morphologies. The insights from these investigations and others of their kind are likely to guide the development of innovative methods to manipulate crystallization for a wide range of materials and applications. PMID:24579880

  5. Additive Manufacturing of Hybrid Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron C.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2016-07-01

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. Finally, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  6. Ionospheric variability over Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezquer, R. G.; Mosert, M.; Corbella, R.; Erazu, M.; de La Zerda, L.

    The understanding of ionospheric variability is important for the user of ionospheric models. A satellite designer or operator needs to know not only monthly average conditions but also the expected deviations from these mean values. In order to contribute to the studies on ionospheric variability, in this paper values of critical frequencies of F2, F1 and E regions and M(3000)F2 factor measured at 4 Japanese stations are used. Data correspond to equinoxes, solstices, high and low solar activity. Quartiles and median values are used to specify variability, because they have the advantage of being less affected by large deviations that can occur during magnetic storms. The results are similar for the considered stations and show that the highest variability correspond to foF2. For March high solar activity the variability of fof2 decreases during hours of maximum ionisation. The M3000F2 factor, in general, shown low variability. Akita (39.72° N, 140.13° E) showed the highest variability for the three frequencies. Moreover, it can be seen that quartiles are not equidistant from the median value.

  7. Description of Day-to-Day Variability in IRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Liu, Boding; Rodriguez, Joseph E.

    2013-04-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) describes the monthly average behavior of Earth's ionosphere based on most of the accessible and reliable ground and space observations of ionospheric parameters. IRI is doing an excellent job in accurately representing these average conditions as countless comparisons with additional data have shown and as acknowledged by the fact that international organizations (COSPAR, URSI, ISO, ECSS) have accepted IRI as their ionosphere standard. However, with our ever-increasing dependence on space technology it has become important to go beyond the monthly averages and to provide a description of the day-to-day variability of the ionosphere. We will review past and ongoing efforts to provide IRI users with a quantitative description of ionospheric variability depending on altitude, time of day, time of year, latitude and solar and magnetic activity. We will present new results from an analysis of ISIS and Alouette topside sounder data. The IRI team is also pursuing the development of an IRI Real-Time (IRI-RT) that uses assimilative algorithms or updating procedures to combine IRI with real-time data for a more accurate picture of current ionospheric conditions. We will review the status of these activities and report on latest results.

  8. Microstructural Control of Additively Manufactured Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P. C.; Brice, D. A.; Samimi, P.; Ghamarian, I.; Fraser, H. L.

    2016-07-01

    In additively manufactured (AM) metallic materials, the fundamental interrelationships that exist between composition, processing, and microstructure govern these materials’ properties and potential improvements or reductions in performance. For example, by using AM, it is possible to achieve highly desirable microstructural features (e.g., highly refined precipitates) that could not otherwise be achieved by using conventional approaches. Simultaneously, opportunities exist to manage macro-level microstructural characteristics such as residual stress, porosity, and texture, the last of which might be desirable. To predictably realize optimal microstructures, it is necessary to establish a framework that integrates processing variables, alloy composition, and the resulting microstructure. Although such a framework is largely lacking for AM metallic materials, the basic scientific components of the framework exist in literature. This review considers these key components and presents them in a manner that highlights key interdependencies that would form an integrated framework to engineer microstructures using AM.

  9. A space and time scale-dependent nonlinear geostatistical approach for downscaling daily precipitation and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Sanjeev Kumar; Mariethoz, Gregoire; Evans, Jason; McCabe, Matthew F.; Sharma, Ashish

    2015-08-01

    A geostatistical framework is proposed to downscale daily precipitation and temperature. The methodology is based on multiple-point geostatistics (MPS), where a multivariate training image is used to represent the spatial relationship between daily precipitation and daily temperature over several years. Here the training image consists of daily rainfall and temperature outputs from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at 50 and 10 km resolution for a 20 year period ranging from 1985 to 2004. The data are used to predict downscaled climate variables for the year 2005. The result, for each downscaled pixel, is daily time series of precipitation and temperature that are spatially dependent. Comparison of predicted precipitation and temperature against a reference data set indicates that both the seasonal average climate response together with the temporal variability are well reproduced. The explicit inclusion of time dependence is explored by considering the climate properties of the previous day as an additional variable. Comparison of simulations with and without inclusion of time dependence shows that the temporal dependence only slightly improves the daily prediction because the temporal variability is already well represented in the conditioning data. Overall, the study shows that the multiple-point geostatistics approach is an efficient tool to be used for statistical downscaling to obtain local-scale estimates of precipitation and temperature from General Circulation Models.

  10. Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS). Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    In the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization(MAWS) concept, actual waste streams are utilized as additive resources for vitrification, which may contain the basic components (glass formers and fluxes) for making a suitable glass or glassy slag. If too much glass former is present, then the melt viscosity or temperature will be too high for processing; while if there is too much flux, then the durability may suffer. Therefore, there are optimum combinations of these two important classes of constituents depending on the criteria required. The challenge is to combine these resources in such a way that minimizes the use of non-waste additives yet yields a processable and durable final waste form for disposal. The benefit to this approach is that the volume of the final waste form is minimized (waste loading maximized) since little or no additives are used and vitrification itself results in volume reduction through evaporation of water, combustion of organics, and compaction of the solids into a non-porous glass. This implies a significant reduction in disposal costs due to volume reduction alone, and minimizes future risks/costs due to the long term durability and leach resistance of glass. This is accomplished by using integrated systems that are both cost-effective and produce an environmentally sound waste form for disposal. individual component technologies may include: vitrification; thermal destruction; soil washing; gas scrubbing/filtration; and, ion-exchange wastewater treatment. The particular combination of technologies will depend on the waste streams to be treated. At the heart of MAWS is vitrification technology, which incorporates all primary and secondary waste streams into a final, long-term, stabilized glass wasteform. The integrated technology approach, and view of waste streams as resources, is innovative yet practical to cost effectively treat a broad range of DOE mixed and low-level wastes.

  11. Tougher Addition Polyimides Containing Siloxane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Maudgal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Laminates show increased impact resistances and other desirable mechanical properties. Bismaleamic acid extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic dianhydride. Bismaleamic acid also extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:2 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic diamine (Michael-addition reaction). Impact resistances improved over those of unmodified bismaleimide, showing significant increase in toughness. Aromatic addition polyimides developed as both matrix and adhesive resins for applications on future aircraft and spacecraft.

  12. The Relative Contribution of Internal and Model Variabilities to the Uncertainty in Decadal Climate Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobach, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2016-04-01

    distribution of the uncertainty reveals that the surface temperature has higher variability over land and at high latitudes, whereas the surface zonal wind has higher variability over the ocean. The relative importance of the internal and model variabilities depends on the averaging period, the definition of the anomaly, and the location. These findings suggest that several methods should be combined in order to assess future climate prediction uncertainties. In addition, the significant contribution of the model variability suggests that weighting of the ensemble members may reduce the uncertainties.

  13. Bouts of Responding: The Relation between Bout Rate and the Rate of Variable-Interval Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shull, Richard L.; Grimes, Julie A.; Bennett, J. Adam

    2004-01-01

    By nose poking a lighted key, rats obtained food pellets on either a variable- interval schedule of reinforcement or a schedule that required an average of four additional responses after the end of the variable-interval component (a tandem variable-interval variable-ratio 4 schedule). With both schedule types, the mean variable interval was…

  14. Variability study for saltstone

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Hansen, E. K.; Williams, V. J.

    2005-10-01

    This report is a summary of the bench-scale experimental studies performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to establish the viability of a grout-based variability study. In order for a variability study to be useful, the property measurements of the fresh and cured Saltstone must be reproducible with an inherent variation that is small compared to the changes in the properties measured over the expected range of variability for a Salt Batch. This scoping task addressed the issue of reproducibility for Saltstone.

  15. Magnetically Controlled Variable Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, Charles T.

    1994-01-01

    Improved variable-transformer circuit, output voltage and current of which controlled by use of relatively small current supplied at relatively low power to control windings on its magnetic cores. Transformer circuits of this type called "magnetic amplifiers" because ratio between controlled output power and power driving control current of such circuit large. This ratio - power gain - can be as large as 100 in present circuit. Variable-transformer circuit offers advantages of efficiency, safety, and controllability over some prior variable-transformer circuits.

  16. An Extended Version of the Richardson Model for Simulating Daily Weather Variables.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlange, Marc B.; Katz, Richard W.

    2000-05-01

    The Richardson model is a popular technique for stochastic simulation of daily weather variables, including precipitation amount, maximum and minimum temperature, and solar radiation. This model is extended to include two additional variables, daily mean wind speed and dewpoint, because these variables (or related quantities such as relative humidity) are required as inputs for certain ecological/vegetation response and agricultural management models. To allow for the positively skewed distribution of wind speed, a power transformation is applied. Solar radiation also is transformed to make the shape of its modeled distribution more realistic. A model identification criterion is used as an aid in determining whether the distributions of these two variables depend on precipitation occurrence. The approach can be viewed as an integration of what is known about the statistical properties of individual weather variables into a single multivariate model.As an application, this extended model is fitted to weather data in the Pacific Northwest. To aid in understanding how such a stochastic weather generator works, considerable attention is devoted to its statistical properties. In particular, marginal and conditional distributions of wind speed and solar radiation are examined, with the model being capable of representing relationships between variables in which the variance is not constant, as well as certain forms of nonlinearity.

  17. Understanding graphs with two independent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Jennifer L.

    Adults are not necessarily competent users of graphs with two independent variables, despite the frequency of this representational format. The three tasks in this thesis address the impact of interpretation statements and graph patterns. Interpretation statements were based on the statistical effects -- simple effects, main effects, and interactions. Graph patterns were systematically varied based on a novel classification scheme of graphs with two IVs. I suggest that the complexity of a graph's data pattern depends on the consistency of the simple effects' directions and magnitudes. In the first study, undergraduates constructed graphs based on statements about data patterns. Errors reflected a misunderstanding of how two IVs could be combined and represented graphically. When the experimental group had graph-relevant information added (variable labels spatially located on axes), the ability to represent the relationships among the IVs significantly increased. The ability to satisfy the constraints imposed by the statements was not affected. Adding labels specifically targeted skills relevant to graphical literacy. Transfer to a third trial was stronger for those of higher math abilities. The second study focused on the effect of an introductory statistics course. Overall, undergraduates performed well on statements describing the simple effects of the IVs. However, even though they improved from Time 1 to Time 2 for interaction statements, performance on statements about main effects and interactions still showed considerable room for improvement. In the third study, repeated trials of the 20 patterns proposed by the simple effects consistency model established that the proposed classification scheme addresses additional sources of variability in reasoning with graphs (i.e., sources not captured by traditional classification schemes). As the complexity level of the data pattern increased, performance (based on accuracy and RT) decreased, with parallel impacts on

  18. Promoting Additive Acculturation in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    A study focusing on 113 ninth graders of Mexican descent indicates that most students and their parents adhere to a strategy of additive acculturation (incorporating skills of the new culture and language), but that the school curriculum and general school climate devalue Mexican culture. (SLD)

  19. Individualized Additional Instruction for Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takata, Ken

    2010-01-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the…

  20. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan R.

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  1. Tinkertoy Color-Addition Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Joe L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes construction and use of a simple home-built device, using an overhead projector, for use in demonstrations of the addition of various combinations of red, green, and blue light. Useful in connection with discussions of color, color vision, or color television. (JRH)

  2. Silage Additives and Management Issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculants are the most common silage additives in the United States. These products contain lactic acid bacteria to supplement the lactic acid bacteria naturally on the crop and help insure a consistent fermentation in the silo. There are three types of inoculants: homofermentative lactic acid bact...

  3. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  4. Reanalyses and Essential Climate Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Reanalyses are a potentially powerful climate data collection driven by observations but also subjected to model bias. Additionally, reanalyses can produce and use essential climate variables in a consistent method. For example, snow cover and soil moisture (among other variables) will eventually be assimilated into the reanalyses, but also provide crucial validation data. Sea surface temperature can be prescribed or assimilated in a coupled reanalysis. The strength of reanalysis lies in the ancillary data that is produced from the modeling components but not routinely observed thereby providing more complete Earth system information. The weakness in this concept is that the model derived data can be affected by model bias and may also change relative to the available observing system. Here, we will review the status of existing reanalyses and the ECVs being considered for the workshop. Purpose of Michael Bosilovich's contribution to the workshop: Michael Bosilovich will represent US reanalysis community in this international discussion of Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) and the relative nature of reanalyses to ECVs.

  5. Variable frequency drive applications guide

    SciTech Connect

    Laloudakis, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Traditionally, fans and pumps have been designed to be capable of handling the maximum demand of the system in which they are installed. However, quite often the actual demand can vary and it can be much lower than the original design capacity. These situations have been corrected in the past through additions of outlet dampers to fans or throttling valves to pumps. While these can be effective and simple controls they severely affect the efficiency of the system. Variable frequency (speed) is the most efficient means of capacity control. The most cost effective method of achieving variable speed capacity control is using AC adjustable frequency drives. AC adjustable frequency controls convert any fixed speed AC motor into an adjustable speed device. Adjusting the speed of a motor, by controlling the frequency of the AC power to that motor, reduces its horsepower requirements. According to pump and fan laws, capacity is proportional to speed while horsepower is proportional to the cube of the speed. Therefore, by reducing the speed of an AC motor by 20 percent the horsepower requirement is reduced by nearly 50 percent. Reduced speed through variable frequency control allows for flexibility of meeting changing weather and comfort requirements without operating costly equipment at full capacity.

  6. IS QUASAR OPTICAL VARIABILITY A DAMPED RANDOM WALK?

    SciTech Connect

    Zu Ying; Kochanek, C. S.; Kozlowski, Szymon; Udalski, Andrzej

    2013-03-10

    The damped random walk (DRW) model is increasingly used to model the variability in quasar optical light curves, but it is still uncertain whether the DRW model provides an adequate description of quasar optical variability across all timescales. Using a sample of OGLE quasar light curves, we consider four modifications to the DRW model by introducing additional parameters into the covariance function to search for deviations from the DRW model on both short and long timescales. We find good agreement with the DRW model on timescales that are well sampled by the data (from a month to a few years), possibly with some intrinsic scatter in the additional parameters, but this conclusion depends on the statistical test employed and is sensitive to whether the estimates of the photometric errors are correct to within {approx}10%. On very short timescales (below a few months), we see some evidence of the existence of a cutoff below which the correlation is stronger than the DRW model, echoing the recent finding of Mushotzky et al. using quasar light curves from Kepler. On very long timescales (>a few years), the light curves do not constrain models well, but are consistent with the DRW model.

  7. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  8. The Intertemporal Variability of Teacher Effect Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Sass, Tim R.; Lockwood, J. R.; Mihaly, Kata

    2009-01-01

    The utility of value-added estimates of teachers' effects on student test scores depends on whether they can distinguish between high- and low-productivity teachers and predict future teacher performance. This article studies the year-to-year variability in value-added measures for elementary and middle school mathematics teachers from five large…

  9. Finding New Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) Initial findings are presented for several new variable stars that have been identified using CCD photometry done with the 0.9-meter telescope located at the BYU West Mountain Observatory.

  10. INTEGRAL and Cataclysmic Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, R.; Blazek, M.; Galis, R.; Kocka, M.

    2010-07-15

    The results of investigations of cataclysmic variables (CVs) with the ESA INTEGRAL satellite are briefly presented and discussed. It is evident that the satellite serves as an efficient tool to study some of these objects.

  11. Discovery of variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurochkin, N. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumented methods of discovering variable stars are reviewed, specifically the blink comparator, color contrast method, positive-negative method, and television method. Among the empirical methods discussed, the Van Gent method is the most important.

  12. Variable star data online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, Roger; Wilson, Andy; Poyner, Gary

    2012-06-01

    Roger Pickard, Andy Wilson and Gary Poyner describe the online database of the British Astronomical Association Variable Star Section, a treasure trove of observations stretching back nearly 125 years.

  13. Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Kenney; Garold L. Gresham; William A. Smith; Tyler L. Westover

    2013-01-01

    If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per-ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that, due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions and differing harvest, collection and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

  14. Understanding Biomass Feedstock Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Kenney; William A. Smith; Garold L. Gresham; Tyler L. Westover

    2013-01-01

    If the singular goal of biomass logistics and the design of biomass feedstock supply systems is to reduce the per ton supply cost of biomass, these systems may very well develop with ultimate unintended consequences of highly variable and reduced quality biomass feedstocks. This paper demonstrates that due to inherent species variabilities, production conditions, and differing harvest, collection, and storage practices, this is a very real scenario that biomass producers and suppliers as well as conversion developers should be aware of. Biomass feedstock attributes of ash, carbohydrates, moisture, and particle morphology will be discussed. We will also discuss specifications for these attributes, inherent variability of these attributes in biomass feedstocks, and approaches and solutions for reducing variability for improving feedstock quality.

  15. Determining Directional Dependency in Causal Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pornprasertmanit, Sunthud; Little, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    Directional dependency is a method to determine the likely causal direction of effect between two variables. This article aims to critique and improve upon the use of directional dependency as a technique to infer causal associations. We comment on several issues raised by von Eye and DeShon (2012), including: encouraging the use of the signs of…

  16. VARIABLE-THROW CAM

    DOEpatents

    Godsil, E.C.; Robinson, E.Y.

    1963-07-16

    A variable-throw cam comprising inner and outer eccentric sleeves which are adjustably locked together is described. The cam throw is varied by unlocking the inner and outer sleeves, rotating the outer sleeve relative to the inner one until the desired throw is obtained, and locking the sleeves together again. The cam is useful in applications wherein a continuously-variable throw is required, e.g., ram-and-die pressing operations, cyclic fatigue testing of materials, etc. (AEC)

  17. Variable contour securing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebus, P. P.; Packer, P. N.; Haynie, C. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A variable contour securing system has a retaining structure for a member whose surface contains a variable contour. The retaining mechanism includes a spaced array of adjustable spindles mounted on a housing. Each spindle has a base member support cup at one end. A vacuum source is applied to the cups for seating the member adjacent to the cups. A locking mechanism sets the spindles in a predetermined position once the member has been secured to the spindle support cups.

  18. The EPICS process variable gateway -- Version 2.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2005-01-01

    The EPICS Process Variable Gateway is both a Channel Access Server and Channel Access Client that provides a means for many clients, typically on different subnets, to access a process variable while making only one connection to the server that owns the process variable. It also provides additional access security beyond that implemented on the server. It thus protects critical servers while providing suitably restricted access to needed process variables. The original version of the Gateway worked with EPICS Base 3.13 but required a special version, since the changes necessary for its operation were never incorporated into EPICS Base. Version 2 works with any standard EPICS Base 3.14.6 or later and has many improvements in both performance and features over the older version. The Gateway is now used at many institutions and has become a stable, high-performance application. It is capable of handling tens of thousands of process variables with hundreds of thousands of events per second. It has run for over three months in a production environment without having to be restarted. It has many internal process variables that can be used to monitor its state using standard EPICS client tools, such as MEDM and StripTool. Other internal process variables can be used to stop the Gateway, make several kinds of reports, or change the access security without stopping the Gateway. It can even be started on remote workstations from MEDM by using a Secure Shell script. This paper will describe the new Gateway and how it is used. The Gateway is both a server (like an EPICS Input/Output Controller (IOC)) and a client (like the EPICS Motif Editor and Display Manager (MEDM), StripTool, and others). Clients connect to the server side, and the client side connects to IOCs and other servers, possibly other Gateways. See Fig. 1. There are perhaps three principal reasons for using the Gateway: (1) it allows many clients to access a process variable while making only one connection to

  19. Hierarchical Multiscale Adaptive Variable Fidelity Wavelet-based Turbulence Modeling with Lagrangian Spatially Variable Thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejadmalayeri, Alireza

    The current work develops a wavelet-based adaptive variable fidelity approach that integrates Wavelet-based Direct Numerical Simulation (WDNS), Coherent Vortex Simulations (CVS), and Stochastic Coherent Adaptive Large Eddy Simulations (SCALES). The proposed methodology employs the notion of spatially and temporarily varying wavelet thresholding combined with hierarchical wavelet-based turbulence modeling. The transition between WDNS, CVS, and SCALES regimes is achieved through two-way physics-based feedback between the modeled SGS dissipation (or other dynamically important physical quantity) and the spatial resolution. The feedback is based on spatio-temporal variation of the wavelet threshold, where the thresholding level is adjusted on the fly depending on the deviation of local significant SGS dissipation from the user prescribed level. This strategy overcomes a major limitation for all previously existing wavelet-based multi-resolution schemes: the global thresholding criterion, which does not fully utilize the spatial/temporal intermittency of the turbulent flow. Hence, the aforementioned concept of physics-based spatially variable thresholding in the context of wavelet-based numerical techniques for solving PDEs is established. The procedure consists of tracking the wavelet thresholding-factor within a Lagrangian frame by exploiting a Lagrangian Path-Line Diffusive Averaging approach based on either linear averaging along characteristics or direct solution of the evolution equation. This innovative technique represents a framework of continuously variable fidelity wavelet-based space/time/model-form adaptive multiscale methodology. This methodology has been tested and has provided very promising results on a benchmark with time-varying user prescribed level of SGS dissipation. In addition, a longtime effort to develop a novel parallel adaptive wavelet collocation method for numerical solution of PDEs has been completed during the course of the current work

  20. Mars dust storms - Interannual variability and chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Lyons, James R.

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis is that the global climate system, consisting of atmospheric dust interacting with the circulation, produces its own interannual variability when forced at the annual frequency. The model has two time-dependent variables representing the amount of atmospheric dust in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. Absorption of sunlight by the dust drives a cross-equatorial Hadley cell that brings more dust into the heated hemisphere. The circulation decays when the dust storm covers the globe. Interannual variability manifests itself either as a periodic solution in which the period is a multiple of the Martian year, or as an aperiodic (chaotic) solution that never repeats. Both kinds of solution are found in the model, lending support to the idea that interannual variability is an intrinsic property of the global climate system. The next step is to develop a hierarchy of dust-circulation models capable of being integrated for many years.

  1. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  2. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  3. Effects of Video Games as Reinforcers for Computerized Addition Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axelrod, Saul; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Four 2nd-grade students completed addition problems on a computer, using video games as reinforcers. Two variable ratio schedules of reinforcement failed to increase student accuracy or the rate of correct responses. In a no-games reinforcement condition, students had more opportunities to respond and had a greater number of correct answers.…

  4. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  5. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  6. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  7. Contextuality is about identity of random variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhafarov, Ehtibar N.; Kujala, Janne V.

    2014-12-01

    Contextual situations are those in which seemingly ‘the same’ random variable changes its identity depending on the conditions under which it is recorded. Such a change of identity is observed whenever the assumption that the variable is one and the same under different conditions leads to contradictions when one considers its joint distribution with other random variables (this is the essence of all Bell-type theorems). In our Contextuality-by-Default approach, instead of asking why or how the conditions force ‘one and the same’ random variable to change ‘its’ identity, any two random variables recorded under different conditions are considered different ‘automatically.’ They are never the same, nor are they jointly distributed, but one can always impose on them a joint distribution (probabilistic coupling). The special situations when there is a coupling in which these random variables are equal with probability 1 are considered noncontextual. Contextuality means that such couplings do not exist. We argue that the determination of the identity of random variables by conditions under which they are recorded is not a causal relationship and cannot violate laws of physics.

  8. MODFLOW-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model -- Three additions to the Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow (HUF) Package: Alternative storage for the uppermost active cells, Flows in hydrogeologic units, and the Hydraulic-coductivity depth-dependence (KDEP) capability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderman, Evan R.; Hill, Mary C.

    2003-01-01

    The Hydrogeologic-Unit Flow (HUF) Package is an internal flow package for MODFLOW-2000 that allows the vertical geometry of the system hydrogeology to be defined differently than the definition of model layers. Effective hydraulic properties for the model layers are calculated using the hydraulic properties of the hydrogeologic units. The HUF Package can be used instead of the Block-Centered Flow (BCF) or the Layer Property Flow (LPF) Packages. This report documents three additions to the HUF Package.

  9. Some results applying flicker-noise spectroscopy on climate variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanovas, Alexandre; Gomez, Vicent

    2000-02-01

    Several quality data sets of different climate variables have been analyzed by Timashev's flicker-noise spectroscopy (FNS) methods. The data include Mauna Loa and Barrow ozone concentration, GISP2 and GRIP ice core temperature proxies, Great Salt Lake volume, down-welling longwave irradiation and atmospheric clearness index. The data cover very different time scales ranging from few years to ice-ages. All of them show a coloured spectrum with a negative power f-n dependence on frequency, characteristic of correlations that die out in time and are therefore suitable for applying FNS methods. Results indicate that FNS methods are promising for analysing climate data and that these methods can give more insight into the implied phenomena, if the time series fulfill certain requisites of length and quality. Since the parameters obtained are phenomenological in nature, additional work should be done to connect the phenomenological parameters with model physical parameters.

  10. Bottlebrush Polymer Additives for Binary Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mah, Hui Zhen; Afzali, Pantea; Phan, Hanh; Qi, Luqing; Pesek, Stacy; Verduzco, Rafael; Stein, Gila

    Bottlebrush polymers are highly branched polymers that have been used in applications such as self-assembling photonics, drug delivery and stimuli-responsive surface coatings. However, they have not been widely studied as compatibilizers for polymer blends. In this study, bottlebrush polymers with poly(styrene-r-methyl methacrylate) side chains were used as additives for thin film blends of polystyrene (PS) and poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The blends were heated above the glass transition temperature to drive phase separation, and the resulting morphology was characterized with atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy. Outcomes were compared with PS/PMMA blends that contain conventional compatibilizers such as linear random copolymers of poly(styrene-r-methyl methacrylate) and diblock PS-PMMA copolymers. The bottlebrush additive accumulates at the PS/PMMA interface and drives the formation of vesicle-like droplets that assemble into longer chains. The continuity of the chains depends on the blend composition, where a network structure is achieved close to the critical composition. This unusual microstructure was not observed with the other additives, and may be a consequence of preferential wetting of the bottlebrush by the PS phase.

  11. Bond additivity corrections for quantum chemistry methods

    SciTech Connect

    C. F. Melius; M. D. Allendorf

    1999-04-01

    In the 1980's, the authors developed a bond-additivity correction procedure for quantum chemical calculations called BAC-MP4, which has proven reliable in calculating the thermochemical properties of molecular species, including radicals as well as stable closed-shell species. New Bond Additivity Correction (BAC) methods have been developed for the G2 method, BAC-G2, as well as for a hybrid DFT/MP2 method, BAC-Hybrid. These BAC methods use a new form of BAC corrections, involving atomic, molecular, and bond-wise additive terms. These terms enable one to treat positive and negative ions as well as neutrals. The BAC-G2 method reduces errors in the G2 method due to nearest-neighbor bonds. The parameters within the BAC-G2 method only depend on atom types. Thus the BAC-G2 method can be used to determine the parameters needed by BAC methods involving lower levels of theory, such as BAC-Hybrid and BAC-MP4. The BAC-Hybrid method should scale well for large molecules. The BAC-Hybrid method uses the differences between the DFT and MP2 as an indicator of the method's accuracy, while the BAC-G2 method uses its internal methods (G1 and G2MP2) to provide an indicator of its accuracy. Indications of the average error as well as worst cases are provided for each of the BAC methods.

  12. Neuroanatomical variability of religiosity.

    PubMed

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Barbey, Aron K; Su, Michael; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that religiosity, a set of traits variably expressed in the population, is modulated by neuroanatomical variability. We tested this idea by determining whether aspects of religiosity were predicted by variability in regional cortical volume. We performed structural magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in 40 healthy adult participants who reported different degrees and patterns of religiosity on a survey. We identified four Principal Components of religiosity by Factor Analysis of the survey items and associated them with regional cortical volumes measured by voxel-based morphometry. Experiencing an intimate relationship with God and engaging in religious behavior was associated with increased volume of R middle temporal cortex, BA 21. Experiencing fear of God was associated with decreased volume of L precuneus and L orbitofrontal cortex BA 11. A cluster of traits related with pragmatism and doubting God's existence was associated with increased volume of the R precuneus. Variability in religiosity of upbringing was not associated with variability in cortical volume of any region. Therefore, key aspects of religiosity are associated with cortical volume differences. This conclusion complements our prior functional neuroimaging findings in elucidating the proximate causes of religion in the brain. PMID:19784372

  13. Additional evidence of Mercurian volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trask, N.J.; Strom, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence concerned with (1) the character and distribution of terrain surrounding fresh basins, (2) albedo, color and temporal differences between a basin rim and smooth plains on its floor, and (3) the stratigraphic relations and local distribution of smooth plains in the hilly and lineated terrain are cited as additional evidence for an internal origin of much of the Mercurian smooth plains. Altough the question of Mercurian volcanism should be kept open, this evidence together with that presented in an earlier paper suggests that volcanism occurred on Mercury early in its history. ?? 1976.

  14. Individualized additional instruction for calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Ken

    2010-10-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the student's performance. Our study compares two calculus classes, one taught with mandatory remedial IAI and the other without. The class with mandatory remedial IAI did significantly better on comprehensive multiple-choice exams, participated more frequently in classroom discussion and showed greater interest in theorem-proving and other advanced topics.

  15. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  16. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  17. Biomarkers for the Development of New Medications for Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Bough, Kristopher J; Amur, Shashi; Lao, Guifang; Hemby, Scott E; Tannu, Nilesh S; Kampman, Kyle M; Schmitz, Joy M; Martinez, Diana; Merchant, Kalpana M; Green, Charles; Sharma, Jyoti; Dougherty, Anne H; Moeller, F Gerard

    2014-01-01

    There has been significant progress in personalized drug development. In large part, this has taken place in the oncology field and been due to the ability of researchers/clinicians to discover and develop novel drug development tools (DDTs), such as biomarkers. In cancer treatment research, biomarkers have permitted a more accurate pathophysiological characterization of an individual patient, and have enabled practitioners to target mechanistically the right drug, to the right patient, at the right time. Similar to cancer, patients with substance use disorders (SUDs) present clinically with heterogeneous symptomatology and respond variably to therapeutic interventions. If comparable biomarkers could be identified and developed for SUDs, significant diagnostic and therapeutic advances could be made. In this review, we highlight current opportunities and difficulties pertaining to the identification and development of biomarkers for SUDs. We focus on cocaine dependence as an example. Putative diagnostic, pharmacodynamic (PD), and predictive biomarkers for cocaine dependence are discussed across a range of methodological approaches. A possible cocaine-dependent clinical outcome assessment (COA)—another type of defined DDT—is also discussed. At present, biomarkers for cocaine dependence are in their infancy. Much additional research will be needed to identify, validate, and qualify these putative tools prior to their potential use for medications development and/or application to clinical practice. However, with a large unmet medical need and an estimated market size of several hundred million dollars per year, if developed, biomarkers for cocaine dependence will hold tremendous value to both industry and public health. PMID:23979119

  18. Multiscale multifractal analysis of heart rate variability recordings with a large number of occurrences of arrhythmia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierałtowski, J.; Żebrowski, J. J.; Baranowski, R.

    2012-02-01

    Human heart rate variability, in the form of time series of intervals between heart beats, shows complex, fractal properties. Recently, it was demonstrated many times that the fractal properties vary from point to point along the series, leading to multifractality. In this paper, we concentrate not only on the fact that the human heart rate has multifractal properties but also that these properties depend on the time scale in which the multifractality is measured. This time scale is related to the frequency band of the signal. We find that human heart rate variability appears to be far more complex than hitherto reported in the studies using a fixed time scale. We introduce a method called multiscale multifractal analysis (MMA), which allows us to extend the description of heart rate variability to include the dependence on the magnitude of the variability and time scale (or frequency band). MMA is relatively immune to additive noise and nonstationarity, including the nonstationarity due to inclusions into the time series of events of a different dynamics (e.g., arrhythmic events in sinus rhythm). The MMA method may provide new ways of measuring the nonlinearity of a signal, and it may help to develop new methods of medical diagnostics.

  19. Variables Separation in Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Valery

    2004-12-01

    To solve the problem of exact integration of the field equations or equations of motion of matter in curved spacetimes one can use a class of Riemannian metrics for which the simplest equations of motion can be integrated by the complete separation of variables method. Here, we consider the particular case of the class of Stäckel metrics. These metrics admit integration of the Hamilton Jacobi equation for test particle by the complete separation of variables method. It appears that the other important equations of motion (Klein Gordon Fock, Dirac,Weyl) in curved spacetimes can be integrated by complete separation of variables method only for the metrics, belonging to the class of Stäckel spaces.

  20. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.