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Sample records for additional disulfide bond

  1. Additional disulfide bonds in insulin: Prediction, recombinant expression, receptor binding affinity, and stability

    PubMed Central

    Vinther, Tine N; Pettersson, Ingrid; Huus, Kasper; Schlein, Morten; Steensgaard, Dorte B; Sørensen, Anders; Jensen, Knud J; Kjeldsen, Thomas; Hubalek, František

    2015-01-01

    The structure of insulin, a glucose homeostasis-controlling hormone, is highly conserved in all vertebrates and stabilized by three disulfide bonds. Recently, we designed a novel insulin analogue containing a fourth disulfide bond located between positions A10-B4. The N-terminus of insulin's B-chain is flexible and can adapt multiple conformations. We examined how well disulfide bond predictions algorithms could identify disulfide bonds in this region of insulin. In order to identify stable insulin analogues with additional disulfide bonds, which could be expressed, the Cβ cut-off distance had to be increased in many instances and single X-ray structures as well as structures from MD simulations had to be used. The analogues that were identified by the algorithm without extensive adjustments of the prediction parameters were more thermally stable as assessed by DSC and CD and expressed in higher yields in comparison to analogues with additional disulfide bonds that were more difficult to predict. In contrast, addition of the fourth disulfide bond rendered all analogues resistant to fibrillation under stress conditions and all stable analogues bound to the insulin receptor with picomolar affinities. Thus activity and fibrillation propensity did not correlate with the results from the prediction algorithm. PMID:25627966

  2. Disulfide bonds of acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee-Quigley, K.; Vedvick, T.; Taylor, P.; Taylor, S.

    1986-05-01

    The positions of the inter- and intrasubunit disulfide bridges were established for the 11S form of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) isolated from Torpedo californica. A major form of AChE localized within the basal lamina of the synapse is a dimensionally asymmetric molecule which contains either two (13S) or three (17S) sets of catalytic subunits linked to collagenous and non-collagenous structural subunits. Limited proteolysis yields a tetramer of catalytic subunits which sediments at 11S. Each catalytic subunit contains 8 cysteine residues. Initially, these Cys residues were identified following trypsin digestion of the reduced protein alkylated with (/sup 14/C)-iodoacetate. Peptides were resolved by gel filtration followed by reverse phase HPLC. To determine the disulfide bonding profile, native non-reduced 11S AChE was treated with a fluorescent, sulfhydryl-specific reagent, monobromobimane, prior to proteolytic digestion. One fluorescent Cys peptide was identified indicating that a single sulfhydryl residue was present in its reduced form. Three pairs of disulfide bonded peptides were identified, sequenced, and localized in the polypeptide chain. The Cys residue that is located in the C-terminal tryptic peptide was disulfide bonded to an identical peptide and thus forms the intersubunit crosslink. Finally, the cysteine positions have been compared with the sequence of the homologous protein, thyroglobulin. Both likely share a common pattern of folding.

  3. Chemical methods for producing disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins to study folding regulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Shimamoto, Shigeru; Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the folding of secretory and membrane proteins. Oxidative folding reactions of disulfide bond-containing proteins typically require several hours or days, and numerous misbridged disulfide isomers are often observed as intermediates. The rate-determining step in refolding is thought to be the disulfide-exchange reaction from nonnative to native disulfide bonds in folding intermediates, which often precipitate during the refolding process because of their hydrophobic properties. To overcome this, chemical additives or a disulfide catalyst, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), are generally used in refolding experiments to regulate disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding. This unit describes such methods in the context of the thermodynamic and kinetic control of peptide and protein folding, including (1) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptides and protein folding assisted by chemical additives, (2) reductive unfolding of disulfide-containing peptides and proteins, and (3) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding using PDI.

  4. Cellular Disulfide Bond Formation in Bioactive Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Nitin A.; Tailhades, Julien; Hughes, Richard Anthony; Separovic, Frances; Wade, John D.; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides play important roles in metabolic regulation and modulation and many are used as therapeutics. These peptides often possess disulfide bonds, which are important for their structure, function and stability. A systematic network of enzymes—a disulfide bond generating enzyme, a disulfide bond donor enzyme and a redox cofactor—that function inside the cell dictates the formation and maintenance of disulfide bonds. The main pathways that catalyze disulfide bond formation in peptides and proteins in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are remarkably similar and share several mechanistic features. This review summarizes the formation of disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins by cellular and recombinant machinery. PMID:25594871

  5. Disulfide bonds and glycosylation in fungal peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Limongi, P; Kjalke, M; Vind, J; Tams, J W; Johansson, T; Welinder, K G

    1995-01-15

    Four conserved disulfide bonds and N-linked and O-linked glycans of extracellular fungal peroxidases have been identified from studies of a lignin and a manganese peroxidase from Trametes versicolor, and from Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and recombinant C. cinereus peroxidase (rCIP) expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. The eight cysteine residues are linked 1-3, 2-7, 4-5 and 6-8, and are located differently from the four conserved disulfide bridges present in the homologous plant peroxidases. CIP and rCIP were identical in their glycosylation pattern, although the extent of glycan chain heterogeneity depended on the fermentation batch. CIP and rCIP have one N-linked glycan composed only of GlcNAc and Man at residue Asn142, and two O-linked glycans near the C-terminus. The major glycoform consists of single Man residues at Thr331 and at Ser338. T. versicolor lignin isoperoxidase TvLP10 contains a single N-linked glycan composed of (GlcNAc)2Man5 bound to Asn103, whereas (GlcNAc)2Man3 was found in T. versicolor manganese isoperoxidase TvMP2 at the same position. In addition, mass spectrometry of the C-terminal peptide of TvMP2 indicated the presence of five Man residues in O-linked glycans. No phosphate was found in these fungal peroxidases.

  6. Mitochondrial protein import: An unexpected disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Mokranjac, Dejana

    2016-08-15

    Most mitochondrial proteins are imported through the TIM23 translocation channel, the structure and molecular nature of which are still unclear. In this issue, Ramesh et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201602074) show that the TIM23 subunit Tim17 contains a disulfide bond that is crucial for protein translocation and channel gating. PMID:27502488

  7. Native Disulfide Bond Formation in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Woycechowsky, Kenneth J.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Native disulfide bond formation is critical for the proper folding of many proteins. Recent studies using newly identified protein oxidants, folding catalysts, and mutant cells provide insight into the mechanism of oxidative protein folding in vivo. This insight promises new strategies for more efficient protein production. PMID:11006541

  8. Enhancing protein stability with extended disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Yan; Luo, Xiaozhou; Li, Jack; Reed, Sean A; Xiao, Han; Young, Travis S; Schultz, Peter G

    2016-05-24

    Disulfide bonds play an important role in protein folding and stability. However, the cross-linking of sites within proteins by cysteine disulfides has significant distance and dihedral angle constraints. Here we report the genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids containing long side-chain thiols that are readily incorporated into both bacterial and mammalian proteins in good yields and with excellent fidelity. These amino acids can pair with cysteines to afford extended disulfide bonds and allow cross-linking of more distant sites and distinct domains of proteins. To demonstrate this notion, we preformed growth-based selection experiments at nonpermissive temperatures using a library of random β-lactamase mutants containing these noncanonical amino acids. A mutant enzyme that is cross-linked by one such extended disulfide bond and is stabilized by ∼9 °C was identified. This result indicates that an expanded set of building blocks beyond the canonical 20 amino acids can lead to proteins with improved properties by unique mechanisms, distinct from those possible through conventional mutagenesis schemes.

  9. DISULFIND: a disulfide bonding state and cysteine connectivity prediction server

    PubMed Central

    Ceroni, Alessio; Passerini, Andrea; Vullo, Alessandro; Frasconi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    DISULFIND is a server for predicting the disulfide bonding state of cysteines and their disulfide connectivity starting from sequence alone. Optionally, disulfide connectivity can be predicted from sequence and a bonding state assignment given as input. The output is a simple visualization of the assigned bonding state (with confidence degrees) and the most likely connectivity patterns. The server is available at . PMID:16844986

  10. Disulfide Bond Formation in Yeast NAD+-Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase†

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Joshua A.; Minard, Karyl I.; Lin, An-Ping; McAlister-Henn, Lee

    2009-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid cycle NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an octameric enzyme composed of four heterodimers of regulatory IDH1 and catalytic IDH2 subunits. Recent structural analyses revealed the close proximity of Cys-150 residues from IDH2 in adjacent heterodimers, and features of the structure for the ligand-free enzyme suggested that formation of a disulfide bond between these residues might stabilize an inactive form of the enzyme. We constructed two mutant forms of IDH, one containing a C150S substitution in IDH2 and the other containing C56S/C242S substitutions in IDH2 leaving Cys-150 as the sole cysteine residue. Treatment of the affinity-purified enzymes with diamide resulted in the formation of disulfide bonds and in decreased activities for the wild-type and C56S/C242S enzymes. Both effects were reversible by the addition of dithiothreitol. Diamide had no effect on the C150S mutant enzyme, suggesting that Cys-150 is essential for the formation of a disulfide bond that inhibits IDH activity. Diamide-induced formation of the Cys-150 disulfide bond was also observed in vivo for yeast transformants expressing the wild-type or C56S/C242S enzymes but not for a transformant expressing the C150S enzyme. Finally, natural formation of the Cys-150 disulfide bond with a concomitant decrease in cellular IDH activity was observed during the stationary phase for the parental strain and for transformants expressing wild-type or C56S/C242S enzymes but not for a transformant expressing the C150S enzyme. A reduction in viability for the latter strain suggests that a decrease in IDH activity is important for metabolic changes in stationary phase cells. PMID:19645416

  11. Oxidant Sensing by Reversible Disulfide Bond Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Claudia M.; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of the cellular redox balance is crucial for cell survival. An increase in reactive oxygen, nitrogen, or chlorine species can lead to oxidative stress conditions, potentially damaging DNA, lipids, and proteins. Proteins are very sensitive to oxidative modifications, particularly methionine and cysteine residues. The reversibility of some of these oxidative protein modifications makes them ideally suited to take on regulatory roles in protein function. This is especially true for disulfide bond formation, which has the potential to mediate extensive yet fully reversible structural and functional changes, rapidly adjusting the protein's activity to the prevailing oxidant levels. PMID:23861395

  12. Converting a Sulfenic Acid Reductase into a Disulfide Bond Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Chatelle, Claire; Kraemer, Stéphanie; Ren, Guoping; Chmura, Hannah; Marechal, Nils; Boyd, Dana; Roggemans, Caroline; Ke, Na; Riggs, Paul; Bardwell, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Posttranslational formation of disulfide bonds is essential for the folding of many secreted proteins. Formation of disulfide bonds in a protein with more than two cysteines is inherently fraught with error and can result in incorrect disulfide bond pairing and, consequently, misfolded protein. Protein disulfide bond isomerases, such as DsbC of Escherichia coli, can recognize mis-oxidized proteins and shuffle the disulfide bonds of the substrate protein into their native folded state. Results: We have developed a simple blue/white screen that can detect disulfide bond isomerization in vivo, using a mutant alkaline phosphatase (PhoA*) in E. coli. We utilized this screen to isolate mutants of the sulfenic acid reductase (DsbG) that allowed this protein to act as a disulfide bond isomerase. Characterization of the isolated mutants in vivo and in vitro allowed us to identify key amino acid residues responsible for oxidoreductase properties of thioredoxin-like proteins such as DsbC or DsbG. Innovation and Conclusions: Using these key residues, we also identified and characterized interesting environmental homologs of DsbG with novel properties, thus demonstrating the capacity of this screen to discover and elucidate mechanistic details of in vivo disulfide bond isomerization. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 945–957. PMID:26191605

  13. Thiol-disulfide exchange in signaling: disulfide bonds as a switch.

    PubMed

    Messens, Joris; Collet, Jean-François

    2013-05-01

    The major function of disulfide bonds is not only the stabilization of protein structures. Over the last 30 years, a change in perspective took place driven by groundbreaking experiments, which promoted disulfide bonds to central players in essential thiol-disulfide exchange reactions involved in signal transduction, thiol protection, and redox homeostasis regulation. This new view stimulated redox research and led to the discovery of novel redox pathways, redox enzymes, and new low-molecular-weight thiols. These redox-sensitive molecules operate along diverse pathways via a dynamic thiol-disulfide mechanism in which disulfide bonds are reversibly formed and reduced, thereby switching the molecules between different conformational and functional states. It is now clear that disulfide bonds play a pivotal role in cellular reduction and oxidation processes. However, in spite of the fundamental cell biological and medical importance of the thiol-disulfide exchange switches, we are only beginning to understand their principles of specificity, their mechanism of action, and their role in signal transduction. Our further progress in understanding the thiol-disulfide switches will strongly depend on the chemical tools and on the technological advances that will be made in the development of new methodologies.

  14. Intramolecular versus intermolecular disulfide bonds in prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Welker, Ervin; Raymond, Lynne D; Scheraga, Harold A; Caughey, Byron

    2002-09-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is the major component of the partially protease-resistant aggregate that accumulates in mammals with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The two cysteines of the scrapie form, PrP(Sc), were found to be in their oxidized (i.e. disulfide) form (Turk, E., Teplow, D. B., Hood, L. E., and Prusiner, S. B. (1988) Eur. J. Biochem. 176, 21-30); however, uncertainty remains as to whether the disulfide bonds are intra- or intermolecular. It is demonstrated here that the monomers of PrP(Sc) are not linked by intermolecular disulfide bonds. Furthermore, evidence is provided that PrP(Sc) can induce the conversion of the oxidized, disulfide-intact form of the monomeric cellular prion protein to its protease-resistant form without the temporary breakage and subsequent re-formation of the disulfide bonds in cell-free reactions.

  15. Catalysis of protein disulfide bond isomerization in a homogeneous substrate.

    PubMed

    Kersteen, Elizabeth A; Barrows, Seth R; Raines, Ronald T

    2005-09-13

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the rearrangement of nonnative disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells, a process that often limits the rate at which polypeptide chains fold into a native protein conformation. The mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by PDI is unclear. In assays involving protein substrates, the reaction appears to involve the complete reduction of some or all of its nonnative disulfide bonds followed by oxidation of the resulting dithiols. The substrates in these assays are, however, heterogeneous, which complicates mechanistic analyses. Here, we report the first analysis of disulfide bond isomerization in a homogeneous substrate. Our substrate is based on tachyplesin I, a 17-mer peptide that folds into a beta hairpin stabilized by two disulfide bonds. We describe the chemical synthesis of a variant of tachyplesin I in which its two disulfide bonds are in a nonnative state and side chains near its N and C terminus contain a fluorescence donor (tryptophan) and acceptor (N(epsilon)-dansyllysine). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from 280 to 465 nm increases by 28-fold upon isomerization of the disulfide bonds into their native state (which has a lower E(o') = -0.313 V than does PDI). We use this continuous assay to analyze catalysis by wild-type human PDI and a variant in which the C-terminal cysteine residue within each Cys-Gly-His-Cys active site is replaced with alanine. We find that wild-type PDI catalyzes the isomerization of the substrate with kcat/K(M) = 1.7 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), which is the largest value yet reported for catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. The variant, which is a poor catalyst of disulfide bond reduction and dithiol oxidation, retains virtually all of the activity of wild-type PDI in catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. Thus, the C-terminal cysteine residues play an insignificant role in the isomerization of the disulfide bonds in nonnative tachyplesin I. We conclude

  16. Characterization of disulfide bonds by planned digestion and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Na, Seungjin; Paek, Eunok; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Duwoon; Lee, Seung Jae; Kwon, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    The identification of disulfide bonds provides critical information regarding the structure and function of a protein and is a key aspect in understanding signaling cascades in biological systems. Recent proteomic approaches using digestion enzymes have facilitated the characterization of disulfide-bonds and/or oxidized products from cysteine residues, although these methods have limitations in the application of MS/MS. For example, protein digestion to obtain the native form of disulfide bonds results in short lengths of amino acids, which can cause ambiguous MS/MS analysis due to false positive identifications. In this study we propose a new approach, termed planned digestion, to obtain sufficient amino acid lengths after cleavage for proteomic approaches. Application of the DBond software to planned digestion of specific proteins accurately identified disulfide-linked peptides. RNase A was used as a model protein in this study because the disulfide bonds of this protein have been well characterized. Application of this approach to peptides digested with Asp-N/C (chemical digestion) and trypsin under acid hydrolysis conditions identified the four native disulfide bonds of RNase A. Missed cleavages introduced by trypsin treatment for only 3 hours generated sufficient lengths of amino acids for identification of the disulfide bonds. Analysis using MS/MS successfully showed additional fragmentation patterns that are cleavage products of S-S and C-S bonds of disulfide-linkage peptides. These fragmentation patterns generate thioaldehydes, persulfide, and dehydroalanine. This approach of planned digestion with missed cleavages using the DBond algorithm could be applied to other proteins to determine their disulfide linkage and the oxidation patterns of cysteine residues.

  17. Disulfide-Bond-Forming Pathways in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are important for the stability and function of many secreted proteins. In Gram-negative bacteria, these linkages are catalyzed by thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases (Dsb) in the periplasm. Protein oxidation has been well studied in these organisms, but it has not fully been explored in Gram-positive bacteria, which lack traditional periplasmic compartments. Recent bioinformatics analyses have suggested that the high-GC-content bacteria (i.e., actinobacteria) rely on disulfide-bond-forming pathways. In support of this, Dsb-like proteins have been identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but their functions are not known. Actinomyces oris and Corynebacterium diphtheriae have recently emerged as models to study disulfide bond formation in actinobacteria. In both organisms, disulfide bonds are catalyzed by the membrane-bound oxidoreductase MdbA. Remarkably, unlike known Dsb proteins, MdbA is important for pathogenesis and growth, which makes it a potential target for new antibacterial drugs. This review will discuss disulfide-bond-forming pathways in bacteria, with a special focus on Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26644434

  18. The disulfide bond pattern of catrocollastatin C, a disintegrin-like/cysteine-rich protein isolated from Crotalus atrox venom.

    PubMed Central

    Calvete, J. J.; Moreno-Murciano, M. P.; Sanz, L.; Jürgens, M.; Schrader, M.; Raida, M.; Benjamin, D. C.; Fox, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    The disulfide bond pattern of catrocollastatin-C was determined by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. The N-terminal disintegrin-like domain is a compact structure including eight disulfide bonds, seven of them in the same pattern as the disintegrin bitistatin. The protein has two extra cysteine residues (XIII and XVI) that form an additional disulfide bond that is characteristically found in the disintegrin-like domains of cellular metalloproteinases (ADAMs) and PIII snake venom Zn-metalloproteinases (SVMPs). The C-terminal cysteine-rich domain of catrocollastatin-C contains five disulfide bonds between nearest-neighbor cysteines and a long range disulfide bridge between CysV and CysX. These results provide structural evidence for a redefinition of the disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domain boundaries. An evolutionary pathway for ADAMs, PIII, and PII SVMPs based on disulfide bond engineering is also proposed. PMID:10933502

  19. Identification of Reduction-Susceptible Disulfide Bonds in Transferrin by Differential Alkylation Using O16/O18 Labeled Iodoacetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shunhai; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2015-05-01

    Stabilization of native three-dimensional structure has been considered for decades to be the main function of disulfide bonds in proteins. More recently, it was becoming increasingly clear that in addition to this static role, disulfide bonds are also important for many other aspects of protein behavior, such as regulating protein function in a redox-sensitive fashion. Dynamic disulfide bonds can be taken advantage of as candidate anchor sites for site-specific modification (such as PEGylation of conjugation to a drug molecule), but are also frequently implicated in protein aggregation (through disulfide bond scrambling leading to formation of intermolecular covalent linkages). A common feature of all these labile disulfide bonds is their high susceptibility to reduction, as they need to be selectively regulated by either specific local redox conditions in vivo or well-controlled experimental conditions in vitro. The ability to identify labile disulfide bonds in a cysteine-rich protein can be extremely beneficial for a variety of tasks ranging from understanding the mechanistic aspects of protein function to identification of troublesome "hot spots" in biopharmaceutical products. Herein, we describe a mass spectrometry (MS)-based method for reliable identification of labile disulfide bonds, which consists of limited reduction, differential alkylation with an O18-labeled reagent, and LC-MS/MS analysis. Application of this method to a cysteine-rich protein transferrin allows the majority of its native disulfide bonds to be measured for their reduction susceptibility, which appears to reflect both solvent accessibility and bond strain energy.

  20. Disulfide bond formation in prokaryotes: history, diversity and design.

    PubMed

    Hatahet, Feras; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon

    2014-08-01

    The formation of structural disulfide bonds is essential for the function and stability of a great number of proteins, particularly those that are secreted. There exists a variety of dedicated cellular catalysts and pathways from archaea to humans that ensure the formation of native disulfide bonds. In this review we describe the initial discoveries of these pathways and report progress in recent years in our understanding of the diversity of these pathways in prokaryotes, including those newly discovered in some archaea. We will also discuss the various successful efforts to achieve laboratory-based evolution and design of synthetic disulfide bond formation machineries in the bacterium Escherichia coli. These latter studies have also led to new more general insights into the redox environment of the cytoplasm and bacterial cell envelope. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Thiol-Based Redox Processes.

  1. An intact interchain disulfide bond is required for the neurotoxicity of tetanus toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Schiavo, G; Papini, E; Genna, G; Montecucco, C

    1990-01-01

    Tetanus toxin is composed of a heavy chain (100 kDa) and a light chain (50 kDa) held together by a single interchain disulfide bridge. An additional intrachain disulfide is present in the carboxy-terminal part of the heavy chain. Reduction of the two disulfide bonds in tetanus toxin with both chemical and proteinaceous reducing agents was studied. Dithiothreitol and 2-mercaptoethanol cleaved both the inter- and intrachain disulfide bridges of the toxin, while glutathione and cysteine were ineffective. Specific reduction of the single interchain disulfide link was achieved with the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system, thus indicating that this bond is exposed at the protein surface. Also, dead or permeabilized cells were able to reduce the toxin. Such reduced toxin bound to neuronal membranes as well as the native toxin but was not neurotoxic. These findings open the possibility that reduction by cytoplasmic agents released by dead cells contributes to detoxification of tetanus toxin. Moreover, together with the notion that the light chain is the active form of the toxin in the cytoplasm, these results suggest that the interchain disulfide bond of tetanus toxin plays a role in nerve cell penetration. Images PMID:2254033

  2. Disulfide bond cleavage: a redox reaction without electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Florian; Frank, Irmgard

    2010-05-01

    By using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations we have simulated a mechanically induced redox reaction. Previous single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrated that the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins with the weak reducing agent dithiothreitol depends on a mechanical destabilization of the breaking bond. With reactive molecular dynamics simulations the single steps of the reaction mechanism can be elucidated and the motion of the electrons can be monitored. The simulations show that the redox reaction consists of the heterolytic cleavage of the S--S bond followed by a sequence of proton transfers. PMID:20349464

  3. Human Defensin 5 Disulfide Array Mutants: Disulfide Bond Deletion Attenuates Antibacterial Activity Against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wanniarachchi, Yoshitha A.; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Wan, Andrea; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Human α-defensin 5 (HD5, HD5ox to specify the oxidized and disulfide linked form) is a 32-residue cysteine-rich host-defense peptide, expressed and released by small intestinal Paneth cells, that exhibits antibacterial activity against a number of Gram-negative and –positive bacterial strains. To ascertain the contributions of its disulfide array to structure, antimicrobial activity, and proteolytic stability, a series of HD5 double mutant peptides where pairs of cysteine residues corresponding to native disulfide linkages (Cys3—Cys31, Cys5—Cys20, Cys10—Cys30) were mutated to Ser or Ala residues were overexpressed in E. coli, purified and characterized. A hexa mutant peptide, HD5[Serhexa], where all six native Cys residues are replaced by Ser residues was also evaluated. Removal of a single native S—S linkage influences oxidative folding and regioisomerization, antibacterial activity, Gram-negative bacterial membrane permeabilization, and proteolytic stability. Whereas the majority of the HD5 mutant peptides show low-micromolar activity against Gram-negative E. coli ATCC 25922 in colony counting assays, the wild-type disulfide array is essential for low-micromolar activity against Gram-positive S. aureus ATCC 25923. Removal of a single disulfide bond attenuates the activity observed for HD5ox against this Gram-positive bacterial strain. This observation supports the notion that the HD5ox mechanism of antibacterial action differs for Gram-negative and Gram-positive species (Wei, G.; de Leeuw, E., Pazgier, M., Yuan, W., Zou, G., Wang, J., Ericksen, B., Lu, W.-Y.; Lehrer, R. I.; Lu, W. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 29180-29192), and that the native disulfide array is a requirement for its activity against S. aureus. PMID:21861459

  4. Tissue factor activation: is disulfide bond switching a regulatory mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Samit; Mandal, Samir K.

    2007-01-01

    A majority of tissue factor (TF) on cell surfaces exists in a cryptic form (ie, coagulation function inactive) but retains its functionality in cell signaling. Recent studies have suggested that cryptic TF contains unpaired cysteine thiols and that activation involves the formation of the disulfide bond Cys186-Cys 209 and that protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) regulates TF coagulant and signaling activities by targeting this disulfide bond. This study was carried out to investigate the validity of this novel concept. Although treatment of MDA 231 tumor cells, fibroblasts, and stimulated endothelial cells with the oxidizing agent HgCl2 markedly increased the cell-surface TF coagulant activity, the increase is associated with increased anionic phospholipids at the cell surface. Annexin V, which binds to anionic phospholipids, attenuated the increased TF coagulant activity. It is noteworthy that treatment of cells with reducing agents also increased the cell surface TF activity. No evidence was found for either detectable expression of PDI at the cell surface or association of TF with PDI. Furthermore, reduction of PDI with the gene silencing had no effect on either TF coagulant or cell signaling functions. Overall, the present data undermine the recently proposed hypothesis that PDI-mediated disulfide exchange plays a role in regulating TF procoagulant and cell signaling functions. PMID:17726162

  5. Disulfide bonds in ER protein folding and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Feige, Matthias J.; Hendershot, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins that are expressed outside the cell must be synthesized, folded and assembled in a way that ensures they can function in their designate location. Accordingly these proteins are primarily synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which has developed a chemical environment more similar to that outside the cell. This organelle is equipped with a variety of molecular chaperones and folding enzymes that both assist the folding process, while at the same time exerting tight quality control measures that are largely absent outside the cell. A major post-translational modification of ER-synthesized proteins is disulfide bridge formation, which is catalyzed by the family of protein disulfide isomerases. As this covalent modification provides unique structural advantages to extracellular proteins, multiple pathways to their formation have evolved. However, the advantages that disulfide bonds impart to these proteins come at a high cost to the cell. Very recent reports have shed light on how the cell can deal with or even exploit the side reactions of disulfide bond formation to maintain homeostasis of the ER and its folding machinery. PMID:21144725

  6. Intrachain disulfide bond in the core hinge region of human IgG4.

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, J. W.; Madanat, M. S.; Marriott, D.; Wong, T.; Chan, S. Y.

    1997-01-01

    IgG is a tetrameric protein composed of two copies each of the light and heavy chains. The four-chain structure is maintained by strong noncovalent interactions between the amino-terminal half of pairs of heavy-light chains and between the carboxyl-terminal regions of the two heavy chains. In addition, interchain disulfide bonds link each heavy-light chain and also link the paired heavy chains. An engineered human IgG4 specific for human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (CDP571) is similar to human myeloma IgG4 in that it is secreted as both disulfide bonded tetramers (approximately 75% of the total amount of IgG) and as tetramers composed of nondisulfide bonded half-IgG4 (heavy chain disulfide bonded to light chain) molecules. However, when CDP571 was genetically engineered with a proline at residue 229 of the core hinge region rather than serine, CDP571 (S229P), or with an IgG1 rather than IgG4 hinge region, CDP571(gamma 1), only trace amounts of nondisulfide bonded half-IgG tetramers were observed. Trypsin digest reversephase HPLC peptide mapping studies of CDP571 and CDP571(gamma 1) with on-line electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy supplemented with Edman sequencing identified the chemical factor preventing inter-heavy chain disulfide bond formation between half-IgG molecules: the two cysteines in the IgG4 and IgG1 core hinge region (CPSCP and CPPCP, respectively) are capable of forming an intrachain disulfide bond. Conformational modeling studies on cyclic disulfide bonded CPSCP and CPPCP peptides yielded energy ranges for the low-energy conformations of 31-33 kcal/mol and 40-42 kcal/mol, respectively. In addition, higher torsion and angle bending energies were observed for the CPPCP peptide due to backbone constraints caused by the extra proline. These modeling results suggest a reason why a larger fraction of intrachain bonds are observed in IgG4 rather than IgG1 molecules: the serine in the core hinge region of IgG4 allows more hinge region flexibility than

  7. Labile disulfide bonds are common at the leucocyte cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Cresswell, Peter; Ciaccia, Laura; Thomas, Benjamin; Barclay, A. Neil

    2011-01-01

    Redox conditions change in events such as immune and platelet activation, and during viral infection, but the biochemical consequences are not well characterized. There is evidence that some disulfide bonds in membrane proteins are labile while others that are probably structurally important are not exposed at the protein surface. We have developed a proteomic/mass spectrometry method to screen for and identify non-structural, redox-labile disulfide bonds in leucocyte cell-surface proteins. These labile disulfide bonds are common, with several classes of proteins being identified and around 30 membrane proteins regularly identified under different reducing conditions including using enzymes such as thioredoxin. The proteins identified include integrins, receptors, transporters and cell–cell recognition proteins. In many cases, at least one cysteine residue was identified by mass spectrometry as being modified by the reduction process. In some cases, functional changes are predicted (e.g. in integrins and cytokine receptors) but the scale of molecular changes in membrane proteins observed suggests that widespread effects are likely on many different types of proteins including enzymes, adhesion proteins and transporters. The results imply that membrane protein activity is being modulated by a ‘redox regulator’ mechanism. PMID:22645650

  8. Dissecting the Machinery That Introduces Disulfide Bonds in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Isabelle S.; Ball, Geneviève; Leverrier, Pauline; Garvis, Steven; Nicolaes, Valérie; Vertommen, Didier; Ize, Bérengère; Tamu Dufe, Veronica; Messens, Joris; Voulhoux, Romé; Collet, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Disulfide bond formation is required for the folding of many bacterial virulence factors. However, whereas the Escherichia coli disulfide bond-forming system is well characterized, not much is known on the pathways that oxidatively fold proteins in pathogenic bacteria. Here, we report the detailed unraveling of the pathway that introduces disulfide bonds in the periplasm of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The genome of P. aeruginosa uniquely encodes two DsbA proteins (P. aeruginosa DsbA1 [PaDsbA1] and PaDsbA2) and two DsbB proteins (PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2). We found that PaDsbA1, the primary donor of disulfide bonds to secreted proteins, is maintained oxidized in vivo by both PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2. In vitro reconstitution of the pathway confirms that both PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2 shuttle electrons from PaDsbA1 to membrane-bound quinones. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa dsbB1 (PadsbB1) and PadsbB2 is required to prevent the folding of several P. aeruginosa virulence factors and to lead to a significant decrease in pathogenicity. Using a high-throughput proteomic approach, we also analyzed the impact of PadsbA1 deletion on the global periplasmic proteome of P. aeruginosa, which allowed us to identify more than 20 new potential substrates of this major oxidoreductase. Finally, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of PaDsbA2, a highly oxidizing oxidoreductase, which seems to be expressed under specific conditions. By fully dissecting the machinery that introduces disulfide bonds in P. aeruginosa, our work opens the way to the design of novel antibacterial molecules able to disarm this pathogen by preventing the proper assembly of its arsenal of virulence factors. PMID:24327342

  9. Identification of disulfide bond isomerase substrates reveals bacterial virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Guoping; Champion, Matthew M.; Huntley, Jason F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacterial pathogens are exposed to toxic molecules inside the host and require efficient systems to form and maintain correct disulfide bonds for protein stability and function. The intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis encodes a disulfide bond formation protein ortholog, DsbA, which previously was reported to be required for infection of macrophages and mice. However, the molecular mechanisms by which F. tularensis DsbA contributes to virulence are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that F. tularensis DsbA is a bifunctional protein that oxidizes and, more importantly, isomerizes complex disulfide connectivity in substrates. A single amino acid in the conserved cis-proline loop of the DsbA thioredoxin domain was shown to modulate both isomerase activity and F. tularensis virulence. Trapping experiments in F. tularensis identified over 50 F. tularensis DsbA substrates, including outer membrane proteins, virulence factors, and many hypothetical proteins. Six of these hypothetical proteins were randomly selected and deleted, revealing two novel proteins, FTL_1548 and FTL_1709, which are required for F. tularensis virulence. We propose that the extreme virulence of F. tularensis is partially due to the bifunctional nature of DsbA, that many of the newly-identified substrates are required for virulence, and that the development of future DsbA inhibitors could have broad anti-bacterial implications. PMID:25257164

  10. Interleukin-2 signalling is modulated by a labile disulfide bond in the CD132 chain of its receptor

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Cresswell, Peter; Barclay, A. Neil

    2012-01-01

    Certain disulfide bonds present in leucocyte membrane proteins are labile and can be reduced in inflammation. This can cause structural changes that result in downstream functional effects, for example, in integrin activation. Recent studies have shown that a wide range of membrane proteins have labile disulfide bonds including CD132, the common gamma chain of the receptors for several cytokines including interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 (IL-2 and IL-4). The Cys183–Cys232 disulfide bond in mouse CD132 is susceptible to reduction by enzymes such as thioredoxin (TRX), gamma interferon-inducible lysosomal thiolreductase and protein disulfide isomerase, which are commonly secreted during immune activation. The Cys183–Cys232 disulfide bond is also reduced in an in vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute model of inflammation. Conditions that lead to the reduction of the Cys183–Cys232 disulfide bond in CD132 inhibit proliferation of an IL-2-dependent T cell clone and concomitant inhibition of the STAT-5 signalling pathway. The same reducing conditions had no effect on the proliferation of an IL-2-independent T cell clone, nor did they reduce disulfide bonds in IL-2 itself. We postulate that reduction of the Cys183–Cys232 disulfide in CD132 inhibits IL-2 binding to the receptor complex. Published data show that the Cys183–Cys232 disulfide bond is exposed at the surface of CD132 and in close contact with IL-2 and IL-4 in their respective receptor complexes. In addition, mutants in these Cys residues in human CD132 lead to immunodeficiency and loss of IL-2 binding. These results have wider implications for the regulation of cytokine receptors in general, as their activity can be modulated by a ‘redox regulator’ mechanism caused by the changes in the redox environment that occur during inflammation and activation of the immune system. PMID:22645657

  11. LPS ligand and culture additives improve production of monomeric MD-1 and 2 in Pichia pastoris by decreasing aggregation and intermolecular disulfide bonding.

    PubMed

    Mengwasser, Kristen E; Bryant, Clare E; Gay, Nick J; Gangloff, Monique

    2011-04-01

    Myeloid differentiation proteins MD-1 and MD-2 have both been shown to form a heterogeneous collection of oligomers when expressed in absence of their respective receptor, RP105 and TLR4. The biological relevance of these oligomers is not clear. Only monomeric proteins have been found to be active and able to trigger an immune response to endotoxin by modulating the TLR4 pathway. In this study, we produced variants of MD-1 and MD-2 in Pichia pastoris. To minimize the time and expense of initial expression tests, small-scale cultures have been set up to allow the rapid identification of the highest expressing clone and the optimal expression conditions. The expression vectors used, the site of linearization and the locus of integration affected the yield of transformation. Next we screened culture additives and found that they significantly increased the fraction of monomeric proteins secreted in the culture medium (up to 15% of the total MD protein produced). We confirmed their presence by size-exclusion chromatography. Optimal anti-aggregation agents were protein-dependent except for LPS that presented stabilizing effects for all MD proteins. Contrary to previous reports, this study suggests that MD-1 can bind to LPS. PMID:21130168

  12. Formation of disulfide bonds in insect prophenoloxidase enhances immunity through improving enzyme activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Anrui; Peng, Qin; Ling, Erjun

    2014-06-01

    Type 3 copper proteins, including insect prophenoloxidase (PPO), contain two copper atoms in the active site pocket and can oxidize phenols. Insect PPO plays an important role in immunity. Insects and other invertebrates show limited recovery from pathogen invasion and wounds if phenoloxidase (PO) activity is low. In most insect PPOs, two disulfide bonds are present near the C-terminus. However, in Pimpla hypochondriaca (a parasitoid wasp), each PPO contains one disulfide bond. We thus questioned whether the formation of two sulfide bonds in insect PPOs improved protein stability and/or increased insect innate immunity over time. Using Drosophila melanogaster PPO1 as a model, one or two disulfide bonds were deleted to evaluate the importance of disulfide bonds in insect immunity. rPPO1 and mutants lacking disulfide bonds could be expressed and showed PO activity. However, the PO activities of mutants lacking one or two disulfide bonds significantly decreased. Deletion of disulfide bonds also reduced PPO thermostability. Furthermore, antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis significantly decreased when disulfide bonds were deleted. Therefore, the formation of two disulfide bond(s) in insect PPO enhances antibacterial activity by increasing PO activity and stability.

  13. Peptide Bond Formation in Water Mediated by Carbon Disulfide.

    PubMed

    Leman, Luke J; Huang, Zheng-Zheng; Ghadiri, M Reza

    2015-09-01

    Demonstrating plausible nonenzymatic polymerization mechanisms for prebiotic monomers represents a fundamental goal in prebiotic chemistry. While a great deal is now known about the potentially prebiotic synthesis of amino acids, our understanding of abiogenic polymerization processes to form polypeptides is less well developed. Here, we show that carbon disulfide (CS2), a component of volcanic emission and sulfide mineral weathering, and a widely used synthetic reagent and solvent, promotes peptide bond formation in modest yields (up to ∼20%) from α-amino acids under mild aqueous conditions. Exposure of a variety of α-amino acids to CS2 initially yields aminoacyl dithiocarbamates, which in turn generate reactive 2-thiono-5-oxazolidone intermediates, the thio analogues of N-carboxyanhydrides. Along with peptides, thiourea and thiohydantoin species are produced. Amino acid stereochemistry was preserved in the formation of peptides. Our findings reveal that CS2 could contribute to peptide bond formation, and possibly other condensation reactions, in abiogenic settings. PMID:26308392

  14. Intermolecular disulfide bond formation promotes immunoglobulin aggregation: investigation by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nag, Moupriya; Bera, Kallol; Basak, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation generally results from association between hydrophobic regions of individual monomers. However, additional mechanisms arising from specific interactions, such as intermolecular disulfide bond formation, may also contribute to the process. The latter is proposed to be the initiating pathway for aggregation of immunoglobulin (IgG), which is essential for triggering its immune response. To test the veracity of this hypothesis, we have employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure the kinetics of aggregation of IgG in separate experiments either allowing or inhibiting disulfide formation. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements yielded a diffusion time (τ(D)) of ∼200 µsec for Rhodamine-labeled IgG, corresponding to a hydrodynamic radius (R(H)) of 56 Å for the IgG monomer. The aggregation kinetics of the protein was followed by monitoring the time evolution of τ(D) under conditions in which its cysteine residues were either free or blocked. In both cases, the progress curves confirmed that aggregation proceeded via the nucleation-dependent polymerization pathway. However, for aggregation in the presence of free cysteines, the lag times were shorter, and the aggregate sizes bigger, than their respective counterparts for aggregation in the presence of blocked cysteines. This result clearly demonstrates that formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds represents a preferred pathway in the aggregation process of IgG. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that aggregates formed in experiments where disulfide formation was prevented denatured at lower concentration of guanidine hydrochloride than those obtained in experiments where the disulfides were free to form, indicating that intermolecular disulfide bridging is a valid pathway for IgG aggregation. PMID:25371040

  15. Diversity of the Epsilonproteobacteria Dsb (disulfide bond) systems

    PubMed Central

    Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna M.; Grzeszczuk, Magdalena J.; Dziewit, Lukasz; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial proteins of the Dsb family—important components of the post-translational protein modification system—catalyze the formation of disulfide bridges, a process that is crucial for protein structure stabilization and activity. Dsb systems play an essential role in the assembly of many virulence factors. Recent rapid advances in global analysis of bacteria have thrown light on the enormous diversity among bacterial Dsb systems. While the Escherichia coli disulfide bond-forming system is quite well understood, the mechanisms of action of Dsb systems in other bacteria, including members of class Epsilonproteobacteria that contain pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria colonizing extremely diverse ecological niches, are poorly characterized. Here we present a review of current knowledge on Epsilonproteobacteria Dsb systems. We have focused on the Dsb systems of Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter spp. because our knowledge about Dsb proteins of Wolinella and Arcobacter spp. is still scarce and comes mainly from bioinformatic studies. Helicobacter pylori is a common human pathogen that colonizes the gastric epithelium of humans with severe consequences. Campylobacter spp. is a leading cause of zoonotic enteric bacterial infections in most developed and developing nations. We focus on various aspects of the diversity of the Dsb systems and their influence on pathogenicity, particularly because Dsb proteins are considered as potential targets for a new class of anti-virulence drugs to treat human infections by Campylobacter or Helicobacter spp. PMID:26106374

  16. Legionella pneumophila utilizes a Single Player Disulfide-Bond Oxidoreductase System to Manage Disulfide Bond Formation and Isomerization

    PubMed Central

    Kpadeh, Zegbeh Z.; Day, Shandra R.; Mills, Brandy W.; Hoffman, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila uses a single homodimeric disulfide bond (DSB) oxidoreductase DsbA2 to catalyze extracytoplasmic protein folding and to correct DSB errors through protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity. In Escherichia coli, these functions are separated to avoid futile cycling. In L. pneumophila, DsbA2 is maintained as a mixture of disulfides (S-S) and free thiols (SH), but when expressed in E. coli, only the SH form is observed. We provide evidence to suggest that structural differences in DsbB oxidases (LpDsbB1 and LpDsbB2) and DsbD reductases (LpDsbD1 and LpDsbD2) (compared to E. coli) permit bifunctional activities without creating a futile cycle. LpdsbB1 and LpdsbB2 partially complemented an EcdsbB mutant while neither LpdsbD1 nor LpdsbD2 complemented an EcdsbD mutant unless DsbA2 was also expressed. When the dsb genes of E. coli were replaced with those of L. pneumophila, motility was restored and DsbA2 was present as a mixture of redox forms. A dominant-negative approach to interfere with DsbA2 function in L. pneumophila determined that DSB oxidase activity was necessary for intracellular multiplication and assembly/function of the Dot/Icm Type IVb secretion system. Our studies show that a single-player system may escape the futile cycle trap by limiting transfer of reducing equivalents from LpDsbDs to DsbA2. PMID:25534767

  17. Preventing disulfide bond formation weakens non-covalent forces among lysozyme aggregates.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Vijay Kumar; Goel, Mohit; Kotamarthi, Hema Chandra; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti; Swaminathan, Rajaram

    2014-01-01

    Nonnative disulfide bonds have been observed among protein aggregates in several diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cataract and so on. The molecular mechanism by which formation of such bonds promotes protein aggregation is poorly understood. Here in this work we employ previously well characterized aggregation of hen eggwhite lysozyme (HEWL) at alkaline pH to dissect the molecular role of nonnative disulfide bonds on growth of HEWL aggregates. We employed time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy, atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy to quantify the size, morphology and non-covalent interaction forces among the aggregates, respectively. These measurements were performed under conditions when disulfide bond formation was allowed (control) and alternatively when it was prevented by alkylation of free thiols using iodoacetamide. Blocking disulfide bond formation affected growth but not growth kinetics of aggregates which were ∼50% reduced in volume, flatter in vertical dimension and non-fibrillar in comparison to control. Interestingly, single-molecule force spectroscopy data revealed that preventing disulfide bond formation weakened the non-covalent interaction forces among monomers in the aggregate by at least ten fold, thereby stalling their growth and yielding smaller aggregates in comparison to control. We conclude that while constrained protein chain dynamics in correctly disulfide bonded amyloidogenic proteins may protect them from venturing into partial folded conformations that can trigger entry into aggregation pathways, aberrant disulfide bonds in non-amyloidogenic proteins (like HEWL) on the other hand, may strengthen non-covalent intermolecular forces among monomers and promote their aggregation.

  18. In-Depth Characterization of Protein Disulfide Bonds by Online Liquid Chromatography-Electrochemistry-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Switzar, Linda; Nicolardi, Simone; Rutten, Julie W; Oberstein, Saskia A J Lesnik; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van der Burgt, Yuri E M

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are an important class of protein post-translational modifications, yet this structurally crucial modification type is commonly overlooked in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches. Recently, the benefits of online electrochemistry-assisted reduction of protein S-S bonds prior to MS analysis were exemplified by successful characterization of disulfide bonds in peptides and small proteins. In the current study, we have combined liquid chromatography (LC) with electrochemistry (EC) and mass analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS in an online LC-EC-MS platform to characterize protein disulfide bonds in a bottom-up proteomics workflow. A key advantage of a LC-based strategy is the use of the retention time in identifying both intra- and interpeptide disulfide bonds. This is demonstrated by performing two sequential analyses of a certain protein digest, once without and once with electrochemical reduction. In this way, the "parent" disulfide-linked peptide detected in the first run has a retention time-based correlation with the EC-reduced peptides detected in the second run, thus simplifying disulfide bond mapping. Using this platform, both inter- and intra-disulfide-linked peptides were characterized in two different proteins, ß-lactoglobulin and ribonuclease B. In order to prevent disulfide reshuffling during the digestion process, proteins were digested at a relatively low pH, using (a combination of) the high specificity proteases trypsin and Glu-C. With this approach, disulfide bonds in ß-lactoglobulin and ribonuclease B were comprehensively identified and localized, showing that online LC-EC-MS is a useful tool for the characterization of protein disulfide bonds.

  19. In-Depth Characterization of Protein Disulfide Bonds by Online Liquid Chromatography-Electrochemistry-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzar, Linda; Nicolardi, Simone; Rutten, Julie W.; Oberstein, Saskia A. J. Lesnik; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van der Burgt, Yuri E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are an important class of protein post-translational modifications, yet this structurally crucial modification type is commonly overlooked in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches. Recently, the benefits of online electrochemistry-assisted reduction of protein S-S bonds prior to MS analysis were exemplified by successful characterization of disulfide bonds in peptides and small proteins. In the current study, we have combined liquid chromatography (LC) with electrochemistry (EC) and mass analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS in an online LC-EC-MS platform to characterize protein disulfide bonds in a bottom-up proteomics workflow. A key advantage of a LC-based strategy is the use of the retention time in identifying both intra- and interpeptide disulfide bonds. This is demonstrated by performing two sequential analyses of a certain protein digest, once without and once with electrochemical reduction. In this way, the "parent" disulfide-linked peptide detected in the first run has a retention time-based correlation with the EC-reduced peptides detected in the second run, thus simplifying disulfide bond mapping. Using this platform, both inter- and intra-disulfide-linked peptides were characterized in two different proteins, ß-lactoglobulin and ribonuclease B. In order to prevent disulfide reshuffling during the digestion process, proteins were digested at a relatively low pH, using (a combination of) the high specificity proteases trypsin and Glu-C. With this approach, disulfide bonds in ß-lactoglobulin and ribonuclease B were comprehensively identified and localized, showing that online LC-EC-MS is a useful tool for the characterization of protein disulfide bonds.

  20. Ion mobility mass spectrometry as a potential tool to assign disulfide bonds arrangements in peptides with multiple disulfide bridges.

    PubMed

    Echterbille, Julien; Quinton, Loïc; Gilles, Nicolas; De Pauw, Edwin

    2013-05-01

    Disulfide bridges play a major role in defining the structural properties of peptides and proteins. However, the determination of the cysteine pairing is still challenging. Peptide sequences are usually achieved using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra of the totally reduced unfolded species, but the cysteine pairing information is lost. On the other hand, MS/MS experiments performed on native folded species show complex spectra composed of nonclassical ions. MS/MS alone does not allow either the cysteine pairing or the full sequence of an unknown peptide to be determined. The major goal of this work is to set up a strategy for the full structural characterization of peptides including disulfide bridges annotation in the sequence. This strategy was developed by combining ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). It is assumed that the opening of one S-S bridge in a peptide leads to a structural evolution which results in a modification of IMS drift time. In the presence of multiple S-S bridges, the shift in arrival time will depend on which disulfide(s) has (have) been reduced and on the shape adopted by the generated species. Due to specific fragmentations observed for each species, CID experiments performed after the mobility separation could provide not only information on peptide sequence but also on the localization of the disulfide bridges. To achieve this goal, synthetic peptides containing two disulfides were studied. The openings of the bridges were carried out following different experimental conditions such as reduction, reduction/alkylation, or oxidation. Due to disulfide scrambling highlighted with the reduction approaches, oxidation of S-S bonds into cysteic acids appeared to be the best strategy. Cysteine connectivity was then unambiguously determined for the two peptides, without any disulfide scrambling interference.

  1. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry as a Tool for the Structural Characterization of Peptides Bearing Intramolecular Disulfide Bond(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massonnet, Philippe; Haler, Jean R. N.; Upert, Gregory; Degueldre, Michel; Morsa, Denis; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Mourier, Gilles; Gilles, Nicolas; Quinton, Loïc; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-10-01

    Disulfide bonds are post-translationnal modifications that can be crucial for the stability and the biological activities of natural peptides. Considering the importance of these disulfide bond-containing peptides, the development of new techniques in order to characterize these modifications is of great interest. For this purpose, collision cross cections (CCS) of a large data set of 118 peptides (displaying various sequences) bearing zero, one, two, or three disulfide bond(s) have been measured in this study at different charge states using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. From an experimental point of view, CCS differences (ΔCCS) between peptides bearing various numbers of disulfide bonds and peptides having no disulfide bonds have been calculated. The ΔCCS calculations have also been applied to peptides bearing two disulfide bonds but different cysteine connectivities (Cys1-Cys2/Cys3-Cys4; Cys1-Cys3/Cys2-Cys4; Cys1-Cys4/Cys2-Cys3). The effect of the replacement of a proton by a potassium adduct on a peptidic structure has also been investigated.

  2. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry as a Tool for the Structural Characterization of Peptides Bearing Intramolecular Disulfide Bond(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massonnet, Philippe; Haler, Jean R. N.; Upert, Gregory; Degueldre, Michel; Morsa, Denis; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Mourier, Gilles; Gilles, Nicolas; Quinton, Loïc; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-08-01

    Disulfide bonds are post-translationnal modifications that can be crucial for the stability and the biological activities of natural peptides. Considering the importance of these disulfide bond-containing peptides, the development of new techniques in order to characterize these modifications is of great interest. For this purpose, collision cross cections (CCS) of a large data set of 118 peptides (displaying various sequences) bearing zero, one, two, or three disulfide bond(s) have been measured in this study at different charge states using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. From an experimental point of view, CCS differences (ΔCCS) between peptides bearing various numbers of disulfide bonds and peptides having no disulfide bonds have been calculated. The ΔCCS calculations have also been applied to peptides bearing two disulfide bonds but different cysteine connectivities (Cys1-Cys2/Cys3-Cys4; Cys1-Cys3/Cys2-Cys4; Cys1-Cys4/Cys2-Cys3). The effect of the replacement of a proton by a potassium adduct on a peptidic structure has also been investigated.

  3. Kinetics and intracellular location of intramolecular disulfide bond formation mediated by the cytoplasmic redox system encoded by vaccinia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Bisht, Himani; Brown, Erica; Moss, Bernard

    2010-03-15

    Poxviruses encode a redox system for intramolecular disulfide bond formation in cytoplasmic domains of viral proteins. Our objectives were to determine the kinetics and intracellular location of disulfide bond formation. The vaccinia virus L1 myristoylated membrane protein, used as an example, has three intramolecular disulfide bonds. Reduced and disulfide-bonded forms of L1 were distinguished by electrophoretic mobility and reactivity with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Because disulfide bonds formed during 5 min pulse labeling with radioactive amino acids, a protocol was devised in which dithiothreitol was present at this step. Disulfide bond formation was detected by 2 min after removal of reducing agent and was nearly complete in 10 min. When the penultimate glycine residue was mutated to prevent myristoylation, L1 was mistargeted to the endoplasmic reticulum and disulfide bond formation failed to occur. These data suggested that viral membrane association was required for oxidation of L1, providing specificity for the process.

  4. Heterologous expression of five disulfide-bonded insecticidal spider peptides.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Georgina; Silva, Anita O; Villegas, Elba; Ortiz, Ernesto; Beirão, Paulo S L; Corzo, Gerardo

    2016-09-01

    The genes of the five disulfide-bonded peptide toxins 1 and 2 (named Oxytoxins or Oxotoxins) from the spider Oxyopes lineatus were cloned into the expression vector pQE30 containing a 6His-tag and a Factor Xa proteolytic cleavage region. These two recombinant vectors were transfected into Escherichia coli BL21 cells and expressed under induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). The product of each gene was named HisrOxyTx1 or HisrOxyTx2, and the protein expression was ca 14 and 6 mg/L of culture medium, respectively. Either recombinant toxin HisrOxyTx1 or HisrOxyTx2 were found exclusively in inclusion bodies, which were solubilized using a chaotropic agent, and then, purified using affinity chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). The HisrOxyTx1 and HisrOxyTx2 products, obtained from the affinity chromatographic step, showed several peptide fractions having the same molecular mass of 9913.1 and 8030.1 Da, respectively, indicating that both HisrOxyTx1 and HisrOxyTx2 were oxidized forming several distinct disulfide bridge arrangements. The isoforms of both HisrOxyTx1 and HisrOxyTx2 after DTT reduction eluted from the column as a single protein component of 9923 and 8040 Da, respectively. In vitro folding of either HisrOxyTx1 or HisrOxyTx2 yielded single oxidized components, which were cleaved independently by the proteolytic enzyme Factor Xa to give the recombinant peptides rOxyTx1 and rOxyTx2. The experimental molecular masses of rOxyTx1 and rOxyTx2 were 8059.0 and 6176.4 Da, respectively, which agree with their expected theoretical masses. The recombinant peptides rOxyTx1 and rOxyTx2 showed lower but comparable toxicity to the native toxins when injected into lepidopteran larvae; furthermore, rOxyTx1 was able to inhibit calcium ion currents on dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons from Periplaneta americana. PMID:27263806

  5. Heterologous expression of five disulfide-bonded insecticidal spider peptides.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Georgina; Silva, Anita O; Villegas, Elba; Ortiz, Ernesto; Beirão, Paulo S L; Corzo, Gerardo

    2016-09-01

    The genes of the five disulfide-bonded peptide toxins 1 and 2 (named Oxytoxins or Oxotoxins) from the spider Oxyopes lineatus were cloned into the expression vector pQE30 containing a 6His-tag and a Factor Xa proteolytic cleavage region. These two recombinant vectors were transfected into Escherichia coli BL21 cells and expressed under induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). The product of each gene was named HisrOxyTx1 or HisrOxyTx2, and the protein expression was ca 14 and 6 mg/L of culture medium, respectively. Either recombinant toxin HisrOxyTx1 or HisrOxyTx2 were found exclusively in inclusion bodies, which were solubilized using a chaotropic agent, and then, purified using affinity chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). The HisrOxyTx1 and HisrOxyTx2 products, obtained from the affinity chromatographic step, showed several peptide fractions having the same molecular mass of 9913.1 and 8030.1 Da, respectively, indicating that both HisrOxyTx1 and HisrOxyTx2 were oxidized forming several distinct disulfide bridge arrangements. The isoforms of both HisrOxyTx1 and HisrOxyTx2 after DTT reduction eluted from the column as a single protein component of 9923 and 8040 Da, respectively. In vitro folding of either HisrOxyTx1 or HisrOxyTx2 yielded single oxidized components, which were cleaved independently by the proteolytic enzyme Factor Xa to give the recombinant peptides rOxyTx1 and rOxyTx2. The experimental molecular masses of rOxyTx1 and rOxyTx2 were 8059.0 and 6176.4 Da, respectively, which agree with their expected theoretical masses. The recombinant peptides rOxyTx1 and rOxyTx2 showed lower but comparable toxicity to the native toxins when injected into lepidopteran larvae; furthermore, rOxyTx1 was able to inhibit calcium ion currents on dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons from Periplaneta americana.

  6. Chemical methods and approaches to the regioselective formation of multiple disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Shigeru; Katayama, Hidekazu; Okumura, Masaki; Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide-bond formation plays an important role in the stabilization of the native conformation of peptides and proteins. In the case of multidisulfide-containing peptides and proteins, numerous folding intermediates are produced, including molecules that contain non-native and native disulfide bonds during in vitro folding. These intermediates can frequently be trapped covalently during folding and subsequently analyzed. The structural characterization of these kinetically trapped disulfide intermediates provides a clue to understanding the oxidative folding pathway. To investigate the folding of disulfide-containing peptides and proteins, in this unit, chemical methods are described for regulating regioselective disulfide formation (1) by using a combination of several types of thiol protecting groups, (2) by incorporating unique SeCys residues into a protein or peptide molecule, and (3) by combining with post-translational modification.

  7. Stabilization of cyclohexanone monooxygenase by a computationally designed disulfide bond spanning only one residue.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Hugo L; Wijma, Hein J; Fromont, Lucie; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important parameter in biocatalytic applications, and there is a strong need for efficient methods to generate robust enzymes. We investigated whether stabilizing disulfide bonds can be computationally designed based on a model structure. In our approach, unlike in previous disulfide engineering studies, short bonds spanning only a few residues were included. We used cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO), a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB9871 as the target enzyme. This enzyme has been the prototype BVMO for many biocatalytic studies even though it is notoriously labile. After creating a small library of mutant enzymes with introduced cysteine pairs and subsequent screening for improved thermostability, three stabilizing disulfide bonds were identified. The introduced disulfide bonds are all within 12 Å of each other, suggesting this particular region is critical for unfolding. This study shows that stabilizing disulfide bonds do not have to span many residues, as the most stabilizing disulfide bond, L323C-A325C, spans only one residue while it stabilizes the enzyme, as shown by a 6 °C increase in its apparent melting temperature.

  8. Stabilization of cyclohexanone monooxygenase by a computationally designed disulfide bond spanning only one residue.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Hugo L; Wijma, Hein J; Fromont, Lucie; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important parameter in biocatalytic applications, and there is a strong need for efficient methods to generate robust enzymes. We investigated whether stabilizing disulfide bonds can be computationally designed based on a model structure. In our approach, unlike in previous disulfide engineering studies, short bonds spanning only a few residues were included. We used cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO), a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB9871 as the target enzyme. This enzyme has been the prototype BVMO for many biocatalytic studies even though it is notoriously labile. After creating a small library of mutant enzymes with introduced cysteine pairs and subsequent screening for improved thermostability, three stabilizing disulfide bonds were identified. The introduced disulfide bonds are all within 12 Å of each other, suggesting this particular region is critical for unfolding. This study shows that stabilizing disulfide bonds do not have to span many residues, as the most stabilizing disulfide bond, L323C-A325C, spans only one residue while it stabilizes the enzyme, as shown by a 6 °C increase in its apparent melting temperature. PMID:24649397

  9. The presence of disulfide bonds reveals an evolutionarily conserved mechanism involved in mitochondrial protein translocase assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Lidia; Sokol, Anna M.; Chojnacka, Magdalena; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation is crucial for the biogenesis and structure of many proteins that are localized in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. The importance of disulfide bond formation within mitochondrial proteins was extended beyond soluble intermembrane space proteins. Tim22, a membrane protein and core component of the mitochondrial translocase TIM22, forms an intramolecular disulfide bond in yeast. Tim22 belongs to the Tim17/Tim22/Tim23 family of protein translocases. Here, we present evidence of the high evolutionary conservation of disulfide bond formation in Tim17 and Tim22 among fungi and metazoa. Topological models are proposed that include the location of disulfide bonds relative to the predicted transmembrane regions. Yeast and human Tim22 variants that are not oxidized do not properly integrate into the membrane complex. Moreover, the lack of Tim17 oxidation disrupts the TIM23 translocase complex. This underlines the importance of disulfide bond formation for mature translocase assembly through membrane stabilization of weak transmembrane domains. PMID:27265872

  10. Human CD4 Metastability Is a Function of the Allosteric Disulfide Bond in Domain 2.

    PubMed

    Owen, Gavin R; Channell, Jennifer A; Forsyth, V Trevor; Haertlein, Michael; Mitchell, Edward P; Capovilla, Alexio; Papathanasopoulos, Maria; Cerutti, Nichole M

    2016-04-19

    CD4 is expressed on the surface of specific leukocytes where it plays a key role in the activation of immunostimulatory T-cells and acts as a primary receptor for HIV-1 entry. CD4 has four ecto-domains (D1-D4) of which D1, D2, and D4 contain disulfide bonds. Although disulfide bonds commonly serve structural or catalytic functions, a rare class of disulfide bonds possessing unusually high dihedral strain energy and a relative ease of reduction can impact protein function by shuffling their redox state. D2 of CD4 possesses one such "allosteric" disulfide. While it is becoming accepted that redox exchange of the D2 allosteric disulfide plays an essential role in regulating CD4 activity, the biophysical consequences of its reduction remain incompletely understood. By analyzing the hydrodynamic volume, secondary structure, and thermal stability of the reduced and nonreduced forms of the single D1 and D2 domains, as well as the various redox isomers of two domain CD4, we have shown that ablation of the allosteric disulfide bond in domain 2 results in both a favorable structural collapse and an increase in the stability of CD4. Conversely, ablating the structural disulfide of D1 results in destabilizing structural rearrangements in CD4. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms by which oxidoreduction of the D2 allosteric disulfide regulates CD4 function; they reveal the intrinsic disulfide-dependent metastability of D2 and illustrate that redox shuffling of the allosteric disulfide results in previously undescribed conformational changes in CD4 that are likely important for its interaction with its protein partners. PMID:27009680

  11. Disulfide bond structure of glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2.

    PubMed Central

    Long, D; Wilcox, W C; Abrams, W R; Cohen, G H; Eisenberg, R J

    1992-01-01

    Glycoprotein D (gD) is a structural component of the herpes simplex virus envelope which is essential for virus penetration. The function of this protein is highly dependent on its structure, and its structure is dependent on maintenance of three intact disulfide bonds. gD contains six cysteines in its ectodomain whose spacing is conserved among all its homologs in other alphaherpesviruses as well as Marek's disease virus. For other proteins, conservation of cysteine spacing correlates with conservation of disulfide bond structure. We have now solved the disulfide bond structure of gD-1 and gD-2 of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, respectively. Two approaches were used. First, we constructed 15 double-Cys mutants of gD-1, representing all possible disulfide pairs. In each case, codons for cysteines were changed to serine. We reasoned that if two cysteines normally form a disulfide bond, double mutations which eliminate one proper bond should be less harmful to gD structure than double mutations which eliminate two disulfide bonds. The mutated genes were cloned into a eucaryotic expression vector, and the proteins were expressed in transiently transfected cells. Three double mutations, Cys-1,5, Cys-2,6, and Cys-3,4 permitted gD-1 folding, processing, transport to the cell surface, and function in virus infection, whereas 12 other double mutations each produced a malfolded and nonfunctional protein. Thus, the three functional double-Cys mutants may represent the actual partners in disulfide bond linkages. The second approach was to define the actual disulfide bond structure of gD by biochemical means. Purified native gD-2 was cleaved by CNBr and proteases, and the peptides were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Disulfide-linked peptides were subjected to N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The results show that cysteine 1 (amino acid [aa] 66) is bonded to cysteine 5 (aa 189), cysteine 2 (aa 106) is bonded to cysteine 6 (aa 202), and cysteine 3 (aa

  12. Engineering de novo disulfide bond in bacterial α-type carbonic anhydrase for thermostable carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Park, Tae Yoon; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-07-01

    Exploiting carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that rapidly catalyzes carbon dioxide hydration, is an attractive biomimetic route for carbon sequestration due to its environmental compatibility and potential economic viability. However, the industrial applications of CA are strongly hampered by the unstable nature of enzymes. In this work, we introduced in silico designed, de novo disulfide bond in a bacterial α-type CA to enhance thermostability. Three variants were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional disulfide bridge. One of the variants showed great enhancement in terms of both kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities. This improvement could be attributed to the loss of conformational entropy of the unfolded state, showing increased rigidity. The variant showed an upward-shifted optimal temperature and appeared to be thermoactivated, which compensated for the lowered activity at 25 °C. Collectively, the variant constructed by the rapid and effective de novo disulfide engineering can be used as an efficient biocatalyst for carbon sequestration under high temperature conditions.

  13. Engineering de novo disulfide bond in bacterial α-type carbonic anhydrase for thermostable carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Park, Tae Yoon; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that rapidly catalyzes carbon dioxide hydration, is an attractive biomimetic route for carbon sequestration due to its environmental compatibility and potential economic viability. However, the industrial applications of CA are strongly hampered by the unstable nature of enzymes. In this work, we introduced in silico designed, de novo disulfide bond in a bacterial α-type CA to enhance thermostability. Three variants were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional disulfide bridge. One of the variants showed great enhancement in terms of both kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities. This improvement could be attributed to the loss of conformational entropy of the unfolded state, showing increased rigidity. The variant showed an upward-shifted optimal temperature and appeared to be thermoactivated, which compensated for the lowered activity at 25 °C. Collectively, the variant constructed by the rapid and effective de novo disulfide engineering can be used as an efficient biocatalyst for carbon sequestration under high temperature conditions. PMID:27385052

  14. Engineering de novo disulfide bond in bacterial α-type carbonic anhydrase for thermostable carbon sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Park, Tae Yoon; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that rapidly catalyzes carbon dioxide hydration, is an attractive biomimetic route for carbon sequestration due to its environmental compatibility and potential economic viability. However, the industrial applications of CA are strongly hampered by the unstable nature of enzymes. In this work, we introduced in silico designed, de novo disulfide bond in a bacterial α-type CA to enhance thermostability. Three variants were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional disulfide bridge. One of the variants showed great enhancement in terms of both kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities. This improvement could be attributed to the loss of conformational entropy of the unfolded state, showing increased rigidity. The variant showed an upward-shifted optimal temperature and appeared to be thermoactivated, which compensated for the lowered activity at 25 °C. Collectively, the variant constructed by the rapid and effective de novo disulfide engineering can be used as an efficient biocatalyst for carbon sequestration under high temperature conditions. PMID:27385052

  15. The role of intra-domain disulfide bonds in heat-induced irreversible denaturation of camelid single domain VHH antibodies.

    PubMed

    Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Uegaki, Koichi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Camelid-derived single domain VHH antibodies are highly heat resistant, and the mechanism of heat-induced VHH denaturation predominantly relies on the chemical modification of amino acids. Although chemical modification of disulfide bonds has been recognized as a cause for heat-induced denaturation of many proteins, there have been no mutagenesis studies, in which the number of disulfide bonds was controlled. In this article, we examined a series of mutants of two different VHHs with single, double or no disulfide bonds, and scrutinized the effects of these disulfide bond modifications on VHH denaturation. With the exception of one mutant, the heat resistance of VHHs decreased when the number of disulfide bonds increased. The effect of disulfide bonds on heat denaturation was more striking if the VHH had a second disulfide bond, suggesting that the contribution of disulfide shuffling is significant in proteins with multiple disulfide bonds. Furthermore, our results directly indicate that removal of a disulfide bond can indeed increase the heat resistance of a protein, irrespective of the negative impact on equilibrium thermodynamic stability.

  16. Using intramolecular disulfide bonds in tau protein to deduce structural features of aggregation-resistant conformations.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sophie; Ullman, Orly; Stultz, Collin M

    2012-03-16

    Because tau aggregation likely plays a role in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, understanding the processes that affect tau aggregation is of considerable importance. One factor that has been shown to influence the aggregation propensity is the oxidation state of the protein itself. Tau protein, which contains two naturally occurring cysteine residues, can form both intermolecular disulfide bonds and intramolecular disulfide bonds. Several studies suggest that intermolecular disulfide bonds can promote tau aggregation in vitro. By contrast, although there are data to suggest that intramolecular disulfide bond formation retards tau aggregation in vitro, the precise mechanism underlying this observation remains unclear. While it has been hypothesized that a single intramolecular disulfide bond in tau leads to compact conformations that cannot form extended structure consistent with tau fibrils, there are few data to support this conjecture. In the present study we generate oxidized forms of the truncation mutant, K18, which contains all four microtubule binding repeats, and isolate the monomeric fraction, which corresponds to K18 monomers that have a single intramolecular disulfide bond. We study the aggregation propensity of the oxidized monomeric fraction and relate these data to an atomistic model of the K18 unfolded ensemble. Our results argue that the main effect of intramolecular disulfide bond formation is to preferentially stabilize conformers within the unfolded ensemble that place the aggregation-prone tau subsequences, PHF6* and PHF6, in conformations that are inconsistent with the formation of cross-β-structure. These data further our understanding of the precise structural features that retard tau aggregation.

  17. Structure-based approach to the prediction of disulfide bonds in proteins.

    PubMed

    Salam, Noeris K; Adzhigirey, Matvey; Sherman, Woody; Pearlman, David A

    2014-10-01

    Protein engineering remains an area of growing importance in pharmaceutical and biotechnology research. Stabilization of a folded protein conformation is a frequent goal in projects that deal with affinity optimization, enzyme design, protein construct design, and reducing the size of functional proteins. Indeed, it can be desirable to assess and improve protein stability in order to avoid liabilities such as aggregation, degradation, and immunogenic response that may arise during development. One way to stabilize a protein is through the introduction of disulfide bonds. Here, we describe a method to predict pairs of protein residues that can be mutated to form a disulfide bond. We combine a physics-based approach that incorporates implicit solvent molecular mechanics with a knowledge-based approach. We first assign relative weights to the terms that comprise our scoring function using a genetic algorithm applied to a set of 75 wild-type structures that each contains a disulfide bond. The method is then tested on a separate set of 13 engineered proteins comprising 15 artificial stabilizing disulfides introduced via site-directed mutagenesis. We find that the native disulfide in the wild-type proteins is scored well, on average (within the top 6% of the reasonable pairs of residues that could form a disulfide bond) while 6 out of the 15 artificial stabilizing disulfides scored within the top 13% of ranked predictions. Overall, this suggests that the physics-based approach presented here can be useful for triaging possible pairs of mutations for disulfide bond formation to improve protein stability.

  18. CHANGES IN DISULFIDE BOND CONTENT OF PROTEINS IN A YEAST STRAIN LACKING MAJOR SOURCES OF NADPH

    PubMed Central

    Minard, Karyl I.; Carroll, Christopher A.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Mc-Alister-Henn, Lee

    2006-01-01

    A yeast mutant lacking the two major cytosolic sources of NADPH, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Zwf1p) and NADP+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (Idp2p), has been demonstrated to lose viability when shifted to medium with acetate or oleate as the carbon source. This loss in viability was found to correlate with an accumulation of endogenous oxidative byproducts of respiration and peroxisomal β-oxidation. To assess effects on cellular protein of endogenous versus exogenous oxidative stress, a proteomics approach was used to compare disulfide bond-containing proteins in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain following shifts to acetate and oleate media with those in the parental strain following similar shifts to media containing hydrogen peroxide. Among prominent disulfide bond-containing proteins were several with known antioxidant functions. These and several other proteins were detected as multiple electrophoretic isoforms, with some isoforms containing disulfide bonds under all conditions and other isoforms exhibiting a redox-sensitive content of disulfide bonds, i.e., in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain and in the hydrogen peroxide-challenged parental strain. The disulfide bond content of some isoforms of these proteins was also elevated in the parental strain grown on glucose, possibly suggesting a redirection of NADPH reducing equivalents to support rapid growth. Further examination of protein carbonylation in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain shifted to oleate medium also led to identification of common and unique protein targets of endogenous oxidative stress. PMID:17157197

  19. Identification of protein disulfide isomerase 1 as a key isomerase for disulfide bond formation in apolipoprotein B100.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyu; Park, Shuin; Kodali, Vamsi K; Han, Jaeseok; Yip, Theresa; Chen, Zhouji; Davidson, Nicholas O; Kaufman, Randal J

    2015-02-15

    Apolipoprotein (apo) B is an obligatory component of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), and its cotranslational and posttranslational modifications are important in VLDL synthesis, secretion, and hepatic lipid homeostasis. ApoB100 contains 25 cysteine residues and eight disulfide bonds. Although these disulfide bonds were suggested to be important in maintaining apoB100 function, neither the specific oxidoreductase involved nor the direct role of these disulfide bonds in apoB100-lipidation is known. Here we used RNA knockdown to evaluate both MTP-dependent and -independent roles of PDI1 in apoB100 synthesis and lipidation in McA-RH7777 cells. Pdi1 knockdown did not elicit any discernible detrimental effect under normal, unstressed conditions. However, it decreased apoB100 synthesis with attenuated MTP activity, delayed apoB100 oxidative folding, and reduced apoB100 lipidation, leading to defective VLDL secretion. The oxidative folding-impaired apoB100 was secreted mainly associated with LDL instead of VLDL particles from PDI1-deficient cells, a phenotype that was fully rescued by overexpression of wild-type but not a catalytically inactive PDI1 that fully restored MTP activity. Further, we demonstrate that PDI1 directly interacts with apoB100 via its redox-active CXXC motifs and assists in the oxidative folding of apoB100. Taken together, these findings reveal an unsuspected, yet key role for PDI1 in oxidative folding of apoB100 and VLDL assembly. PMID:25518935

  20. Strategies for successful recombinant expression of disulfide bond-dependent proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    de Marco, Ario

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are simple and cost effective hosts for producing recombinant proteins. However, their physiological features may limit their use for obtaining in native form proteins of some specific structural classes, such as for instance polypeptides that undergo extensive post-translational modifications. To some extent, also the production of proteins that depending on disulfide bridges for their stability has been considered difficult in E. coli. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms keep their cytoplasm reduced and, consequently, disulfide bond formation is impaired in this subcellular compartment. Disulfide bridges can stabilize protein structure and are often present in high abundance in secreted proteins. In eukaryotic cells such bonds are formed in the oxidizing environment of endoplasmic reticulum during the export process. Bacteria do not possess a similar specialized subcellular compartment, but they have both export systems and enzymatic activities aimed at the formation and at the quality control of disulfide bonds in the oxidizing periplasm. This article reviews the available strategies for exploiting the physiological mechanisms of bactera to produce properly folded disulfide-bonded proteins. PMID:19442264

  1. 46 CFR 151.50-40 - Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon... Special Requirements § 151.50-40 Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl... waterways at the loading and unloading points. (f) The special requirements of § 151.50-41 for...

  2. 46 CFR 151.50-40 - Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon... Special Requirements § 151.50-40 Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl... waterways at the loading and unloading points. (f) The special requirements of § 151.50-41 for...

  3. 46 CFR 151.50-40 - Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon... Special Requirements § 151.50-40 Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl... waterways at the loading and unloading points. (f) The special requirements of § 151.50-41 for...

  4. 46 CFR 151.50-40 - Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon... Special Requirements § 151.50-40 Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl... waterways at the loading and unloading points. (f) The special requirements of § 151.50-41 for...

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-40 - Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon... Special Requirements § 151.50-40 Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl... waterways at the loading and unloading points. (f) The special requirements of § 151.50-41 for...

  6. Balancing oxidative protein folding: the influences of reducing pathways on disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Kojer, Kerstin; Riemer, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Oxidative protein folding is confined to few compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum, the mitochondrial intermembrane space and the bacterial periplasm. Conversely, in compartments in which proteins are translated such as the cytosol, the mitochondrial matrix and the chloroplast stroma proteins are kept reduced by the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin systems that functionally overlap. The highly reducing NADPH pool thereby serves as electron donor that enables glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase to keep glutathione pools and thioredoxins in their reduced redox state, respectively. Notably, also compartments containing oxidizing machineries are linked to these reducing pathways. Reducing pathways aid in proofreading of disulfide bond formation by isomerization or they provide reducing equivalents for the reduction of disulfides prior to degradation. In addition, they contribute to the thiol-dependent regulation of protein activities, and they help to counteract oxidative stress. The existence of oxidizing and reducing pathways in the same compartment poses a potential problem as the cell has to avoid futile cycles of oxidation and subsequent reduction reactions. Thus, compartments that contain oxidizing machineries have developed sophisticated ways to spatiotemporally balance and regulate oxidation and reduction. In this review, we discuss oxidizing and reducing pathways in the endoplasmic reticulum, the periplasm and the mitochondrial intermembrane space and highlight the role of glutathione especially in the endoplasmic reticulum and the intermembrane space. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Thiol-Based Redox Processes.

  7. Disulfide bonds in a recombinant protein modeled after a core repeat in an aquatic insect's silk protein.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S. V.; Correia, J. J.; Case, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    We constructed a gene encoding rCAS, recombinant constant and subrepeat protein, modeled after tandem repeats found in the major silk proteins synthesized by aquatic larvae of the midge, Chironomus tentans. Bacterially synthesized rCAS was purified to near homogeneity and characterized by several biochemical and biophysical methods including amino-terminal sequencing, amino acid compositional analysis, sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation, and mass spectrometry. Complementing these techniques with quantitative sulfhydryl assays, we discovered that the four cysteines present in rCAS form two intramolecular disulfide bonds. Mapping studies revealed that the disulfide bonds are heterogeneous. When reduced and denatured rCAS was allowed to refold and its disulfide bonding state monitored, it again adopted a conformation with two intramolecular disulfide bonds. The inherent ability of rCAS to quantitatively form two intramolecular disulfide bonds may reflect a previously unknown feature of the in vivo silk proteins from which it is derived. PMID:7663350

  8. The biologically active form of the sea urchin egg receptor for sperm is a disulfide-bonded homo-multimer

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Since many cell surface receptors exist in their active form as oligomeric complexes, we have investigated the subunit composition of the biologically active sperm receptor in egg plasma membranes from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Electrophoretic analysis of the receptor without prior reduction of disulfide bonds revealed that the surface receptor exists in the form of a disulfide-bonded multimer, estimated to be a tetramer. These findings are in excellent agreement with the fact that the NH2-terminus of the extracellular domain of the sperm receptor is rich in cysteine residues. Studies with cross-linking agents of various length and hydrophobicity suggest that no other major protein is tightly associated with the receptor. Given the multimeric structure of the receptor, we investigated the effect of disulfide bond reduction on its biological activity. Because in quantitative bioassays fertilization was found to be inhibited by treatment of eggs with 5 mM dithiothreitol, we undertook more direct studies of the effect of reduction on properties of the receptor. First, we studied the effect of addition of isolated, pure receptor on fertilization. Whereas the non-reduced, native receptor complex inhibited fertilization in a dose- dependent manner, the reduced and alkylated receptor was inactive. Second, we tested the ability of the isolated receptor to mediate binding of acrosome-reacted sperm to polystyrene beads. Whereas beads coated with native receptor bound sperm, those containing reduced and alkylated receptor did not. Thus, these results demonstrate that the biologically active form of the sea urchin sperm receptor consists only of 350 kD subunits and that these must be linked as a multimer via disulfide bonds to produce a complex that is functional in sperm recognition and binding. PMID:8188748

  9. A role for disulfide bonding in keratin intermediate filament organization and dynamics in skin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xia; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2015-04-13

    We recently reported that a trans-dimer, homotypic disulfide bond involving Cys367 in keratin 14 (K14) occurs in an atomic-resolution structure of the interacting K5/K14 2B domains and in keratinocyte cell lines. Here we show that a sizable fraction of the K14 and K5 protein pools participates in interkeratin disulfide bonding in primary cultures of mouse skin keratinocytes. By comparing the properties of wild-type K14 with a completely cysteine-free variant thereof, we found that K14-dependent disulfide bonding limited filament elongation during polymerization in vitro but was necessary for the genesis of a perinuclear-concentrated network of keratin filaments, normal keratin cycling, and the sessile behavior of the nucleus and whole cell in keratinocytes studied by live imaging. Many of these phenotypes were rescued when analyzing a K14 variant harboring a single Cys residue at position 367. These findings establish disulfide bonding as a novel and important mechanism regulating the assembly, intracellular organization, and dynamics of K14-containing intermediate filaments in skin keratinocytes.

  10. A role for disulfide bonding in keratin intermediate filament organization and dynamics in skin keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xia

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that a trans-dimer, homotypic disulfide bond involving Cys367 in keratin 14 (K14) occurs in an atomic-resolution structure of the interacting K5/K14 2B domains and in keratinocyte cell lines. Here we show that a sizable fraction of the K14 and K5 protein pools participates in interkeratin disulfide bonding in primary cultures of mouse skin keratinocytes. By comparing the properties of wild-type K14 with a completely cysteine-free variant thereof, we found that K14-dependent disulfide bonding limited filament elongation during polymerization in vitro but was necessary for the genesis of a perinuclear-concentrated network of keratin filaments, normal keratin cycling, and the sessile behavior of the nucleus and whole cell in keratinocytes studied by live imaging. Many of these phenotypes were rescued when analyzing a K14 variant harboring a single Cys residue at position 367. These findings establish disulfide bonding as a novel and important mechanism regulating the assembly, intracellular organization, and dynamics of K14-containing intermediate filaments in skin keratinocytes. PMID:25869667

  11. Occurrence of protein disulfide bonds in different domains of life: a comparison of proteins from the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Bošnjak, I; Bojović, V; Šegvić-Bubić, T; Bielen, A

    2014-03-01

    Disulfide bonds (SS bonds) are important post-translational modifications of proteins. They stabilize a three-dimensional (3D) structure (structural SS bonds) and also have the catalytic or regulatory functions (redox-active SS bonds). Although SS bonds are present in all groups of organisms, no comparative analyses of their frequency in proteins from different domains of life have been made to date. Using the Protein Data Bank, the number and subcellular locations of SS bonds in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya have been compared. Approximately three times higher frequency of proteins with SS bonds in eukaryotic secretory organelles (e.g. endoplasmic reticulum) than in bacterial periplasmic/secretory pathways was calculated. Protein length also affects the SS bond frequency: the average number of SS bonds is positively correlated with the length for longer proteins (>200 amino acids), while for the shorter and less stable proteins (<200 amino acids) this correlation is negative. Medium-sized proteins (250-350 amino acids) indicated a high number of SS bonds only in Archaea which could be explained by the need for additional protein stabilization in hyperthermophiles. The results emphasize higher capacity for the SS bond formation and isomerization in Eukarya when compared with Archaea and Bacteria.

  12. The significance of disulfide bonding in biological activity of HB-EGF, a mutagenesis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, J.T.; Zhou, Z.; Harding, P.A.

    2008-10-31

    A site-directed mutagenesis approach was taken to disrupt each of 3 disulfide bonds within human HB-EGF by substituting serine for both cysteine residues that contribute to disulfide bonding. Each HB-EGF disulfide analogue (HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121}, HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132}, and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 134/143}) was cloned under the regulation of the mouse metallothionein (MT) promoter and stably expressed in mouse fibroblasts. HB-EGF immunoreactive proteins with M{sub r} of 6.5, 21 and 24 kDa were observed from lysates of HB-EGF and each HB-EGF disulfide analogue. HB-EGF immunohistochemical analyses of each HB-EGF stable cell line demonstrated ubiquitous protein expression except HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121} and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132} stable cell lines which exhibited accumulated expression immediately outside the nucleus. rHB-EGF, HB-EGF, and HB-EGF{sub 134/143} proteins competed with {sup 125}I-EGF in an A431 competitive binding assay, whereas HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121} and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132} failed to compete. Each HB-EGF disulfide analogue lacked the ability to stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of the 170 kDa EGFR. These results suggest that HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 134/143} antagonizes EGFRs.

  13. Model building of disulfide bonds in proteins with known three-dimensional structure.

    PubMed

    Hazes, B; Dijkstra, B W

    1988-07-01

    As an aid in the selection of sites in a protein where a disulfide bond might be engineered, a computer program has been developed. The algorithm starts with the generation of C beta positions from the N, C alpha and C atom coordinates available from a three-dimensional model. A first set of residue pairs that might form a disulfide bond is selected on the basis of C beta-C beta distances between residues. Then, for each residue in this set, S gamma positions are generated, which satisfy the requirement that, with ideal values for the C alpha-C beta and C beta-S gamma bond lengths and for the bond angle at C beta, the distance between S gamma of residue 1 and C beta of residue 2 in a pair (determined by the bond angle at S gamma 2) is at, or very close to its ideal value. Usually two acceptable S gamma positions are found for each half cystine, resulting in up to four different conformations for the disulfide bond. Finally, these conformations are subjected to an energy minimization procedure to remove large deviations from ideal geometry and their final energies are calculated. User input determines which final conformations are energetically acceptable. These conformations are written to a file to allow further analysis and e.g. inspection on a computer graphics device. PMID:3244694

  14. Disulfide Bonding within Components of the Chlamydia Type III Secretion Apparatus Correlates with Development ▿

    PubMed Central

    Betts-Hampikian, H. J.; Fields, K. A.

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia spp. exhibit a unique biphasic developmental cycle whereby infectious elementary bodies (EBs) invade host epithelial cells and differentiate into noninfectious, metabolically active reticulate bodies (RBs). EBs posses a unique outer envelope where rigidity is achieved by disulfide bonding among cysteine-rich envelope-associated proteins. Conversely, these disulfide bonds become reduced in RBs to accommodate vegetative growth, thereby linking the redox status of cysteine-rich envelope proteins with progression of the developmental cycle. We investigated the potential role of disulfide bonding within the chlamydial type III secretion system (T3SS), since activity of this system is also closely linked to development. We focused on structural components of the T3S apparatus that contain an unusually high number of cysteine residues compared to orthologs in other secretion systems. Nonreducing SDS-PAGE revealed that EB-localized apparatus proteins such as CdsF, CdsD, and CdsC form higher-order complexes mediated by disulfide bonding. The most dramatic alterations were detected for the needle protein CdsF. Significantly, disulfide bonding patterns shifted during differentiation of developmental forms and were completely reduced in RBs. Furthermore, at later time points during infection following RB to EB conversion, we found that CdsF is reoxidized into higher-order complexes. Overall, we conclude that the redox status of specific T3SS apparatus proteins is intimately linked to the developmental cycle and constitutes a newly appreciated aspect of functionally significant alterations within proteins of the chlamydial envelope. PMID:22001510

  15. Dissecting the role of disulfide bonds on the amyloid formation of insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Gong, Hao; Sun, Yue; Yan, Juan; Cheng, Biao; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Jing; Yu, Mengying; Guo, Yu; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Kun

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We dissect how individual disulfide bond affects the amyloidogenicity of insulin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A controlled reduction system for insulin is established in this study. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide breakage is associated with unfolding and increased amyloidogenicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Breakage of A6-A11 is associated with significantly increased cytotoxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analogs without A6-A11 have a higher potency to form high order toxic oligomers. -- Abstract: Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the stability and folding of proteins. Here, we used insulin as a model system, to investigate the role of its individual disulfide bond during the amyloid formation of insulin. Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) was applied to reduce two of the three disulfide bonds in porcine insulin and the reduced disulfide bonds were then alkylated by iodoacetamide. Three disulfide bond-modified insulin analogs, INS-2 (lack of A6-A11), INS-3 (lack of A7-B7) and INS-6 (lack of both A6-A11 and A7-B7), were obtained. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy results indicated that the secondary structure of INS-2 was the closest to insulin under neutral conditions, followed by INS-3 and INS-6, whereas in an acidic solution all analogs were essentially unfolded. To test how these modifications affect the amyloidogenicity of insulin, thioflavin-T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) were performed. Our results showed that all analogs were more prone to aggregation than insulin, with the order of aggregation rates being INS-6 > INS-3 > INS-2. Cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP) assay results showed that analogs without A6-A11 (INS-2 and INS-6) have a higher potential for oligomerization than insulin and INS-3, which is accompanied with a higher cytotoxicity as the hemolytic assays of human erythrocytes suggested. The results indicated that breakage of A7

  16. Controlling Disulfide Bond Formation and Crystal Growth from 2-Mercaptobenzoic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Clare E.; Cantos, P. M.; Toby, B. H.; Frisch, M.; Deschamps, J. R.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2011-03-02

    We report disulfide bond formation from 2-mercaptobenzoic acid (2-MBA) under hydrothermal conditions as a function of pH. Under acidic conditions, 2-MBA remains unchanged. Upon increasing pH, however, we observe 50% oxidation to 2,2'-disulfanediyldibenzoic acid (2,2'-DSBA), which is isolated as a cocrystal of both the thiol and disulfide molecules. At neutral pH, we observe complete oxidation and concurrent crystal growth. The pH sensitivity of this system allows targeting crystals of specific composition from simple building units through a straightforward pH manipulation.

  17. Modulation of Titin-Based Stiffness by Disulfide Bonding in the Cardiac Titin N2-B Unique Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Grützner, Anika; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Kötter, Sebastian; Badilla, Carmen L.; Fernandez, Julio M.; Linke, Wolfgang A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The giant protein titin is responsible for the elasticity of nonactivated muscle sarcomeres. Titin-based passive stiffness in myocardium is modulated by titin-isoform switching and protein-kinase (PK)A- or PKG-dependent titin phosphorylation. Additional modulatory effects on titin stiffness may arise from disulfide bonding under oxidant stress, as many immunoglobulin-like (Ig-)domains in titin's spring region have a potential for S-S formation. Using single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-extension measurements on recombinant Ig-domain polyprotein constructs, we show that titin Ig-modules contain no stabilizing disulfide bridge, contrary to previous belief. However, we demonstrate that the human N2-B-unique sequence (N2-Bus), a cardiac-specific, physiologically extensible titin segment comprising 572 amino-acid residues, contains up to three disulfide bridges under oxidizing conditions. AFM force spectroscopy on recombinant N2-Bus molecules demonstrated a much shorter contour length in the absence of a reducing agent than in its presence, consistent with intramolecular S-S bonding. In stretch experiments on isolated human heart myofibrils, the reducing agent thioredoxin lowered titin-based stiffness to a degree that could be explained (using entropic elasticity theory) by altered extensibility solely of the N2-Bus. We conclude that increased oxidant stress can elevate titin-based stiffness of cardiomyocytes, which may contribute to the global myocardial stiffening frequently seen in the aging or failing heart. PMID:19651040

  18. The effect of disulfide bond introduction and related Cys/Ser mutations on the stability of a cyclohexanone monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sandy; Genz, Maika; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2015-11-20

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMO) belong to the class B of flavin-dependent monooxygenases (type I BVMOs) and catalyze the oxidation of (cyclic) ketones into esters and lactones. The prototype BVMO is the cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB 9871. This enzyme shows an impressive substrate scope with a high chemo-, regio- and/or enantioselectivity. BVMO reactions are often difficult, if not impossible to achieve by chemical approaches and this makes these enzymes thus highly desired candidates for industrial applications. Unfortunately, the industrial use is hampered by several factors related to the lack of stability of these biocatalysts. Thus, the aim of this study was to improve the CHMO's long-term stability, one of the most relevant parameter for biocatalytic processes, and additionally its stability against oxidation. We used an easy computational method for the prediction of stabilizing disulfide bonds in the CHMO-scaffold. The three most promising predicted disulfide pairs were created and biochemically characterized. The most oxidatively stable variant (Y411C-A463C) retained nearly 60% activity after incubation with 25 mM H2O2 whereas the wild type retained only 16%. In addition, one extra disulfide pair (T415C-A463C) was created and tested for increased stability. The melting temperature (Tm) of this variant was increased by 5°C with simultaneous improved long-term stability. After verification by ABD-F labeling that this mutant does not form a disulfide bond, single and double Cys/Ser mutants were prepared and investigated. Subsequent analysis revealed that the T415C single point variant is the most stable variant with a 30-fold increased long-term stability (33% residual activity after 24h incubation at 25°C) showcasing a great achievement for practical applications.

  19. Evolution Rescues Folding of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Envelope Glycoprotein GP120 Lacking a Conserved Disulfide Bond

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shang-Te D.; van Anken, Eelco; Liscaljet, I. Marije; Dankers, Martijn; Bontjer, Ilja; Land, Aafke; Braakman, Ineke; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J.; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    The majority of eukaryotic secretory and membrane proteins contain disulfide bonds, which are strongly conserved within protein families because of their crucial role in folding or function. The exact role of these disulfide bonds during folding is unclear. Using virus-driven evolution we generated a viral glycoprotein variant, which is functional despite the lack of an absolutely conserved disulfide bond that links two antiparallel β-strands in a six-stranded β-barrel. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that improved hydrogen bonding and side chain packing led to stabilization of the β-barrel fold, implying that β-sheet preference codirects glycoprotein folding in vivo. Our results show that the interactions between two β-strands that are important for the formation and/or integrity of the β-barrel can be supported by either a disulfide bond or β-sheet favoring residues. PMID:18753405

  20. Conversion of a disulfide bond into a thioacetal group during echinomycin biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, Kinya; Keegan, Ronan M.; Ranganathan, Soumya; Fang, Minyi; Bibby, Jaclyn; Winn, Martyn D.; Sato, Michio; Lian, Mingzhu; Watanabe, Kenji; Rigden, Daniel J.; Kim, Chu-Young

    2013-12-02

    Echinomycin is a nonribosomal depsipeptide natural product with a range of interesting bioactivities that make it an important target for drug discovery and development. It contains a thioacetal bridge, a unique chemical motif derived from the disulfide bond of its precursor antibiotic triostin A by the action of an S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferase, Ecm18. The crystal structure of Ecm18 in complex with its reaction products S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine and echinomycin was determined at 1.50 Å resolution. Phasing was achieved using a new molecular replacement package called AMPLE, which automatically derives search models from structure predictions based on ab initio protein modelling. Structural analysis indicates that a combination of proximity effects, medium effects, and catalysis by strain drives the unique transformation of the disulfide bond into the thioacetal linkage.

  1. Nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms homo-dimers stabilized by disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Daniel; Sheen, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H; Bueno, Carlos; Santos, Marco; Pando-Robles, Victoria; Batista, Cesar V; Zimic, Mirko

    2014-12-01

    Recombinant wild-pyrazinamidase from H37Rv Mycobacterium tuberculosis was analyzed by gel electrophoresis under differential reducing conditions to evaluate its quaternary structure. PZAse was fractionated by size exclusion chromatography under non-reducing conditions. PZAse activity was measured and mass spectrometry analysis was performed to determine the identity of proteins by de novo sequencing and to determine the presence of disulfide bonds. This study confirmed that M. tuberculosis wild type PZAse was able to form homo-dimers in vitro. Homo-dimers showed a slightly lower specific PZAse activity compared to monomeric PZAse. PZAse dimers were dissociated into monomers in response to reducing conditions. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the existence of disulfide bonds (C72-C138 and C138-C138) stabilizing the quaternary structure of the PZAse homo-dimer.

  2. Air sparging for prevention of antibody disulfide bond reduction in harvested CHO cell culture fluid.

    PubMed

    Mun, Melissa; Khoo, Stefanie; Do Minh, Aline; Dvornicky, James; Trexler-Schmidt, Melody; Kao, Yung-Hsiang; Laird, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    During the scale-up of several Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell monoclonal antibody production processes, significant reduction of the antibody interchain disulfide bonds was observed. The reduction was correlated with excessive mechanical cell shear during the harvest operations. These antibody reduction events resulted in failed product specifications and the subsequent loss of the drug substance batches. Several methods were recently developed to prevent antibody reduction, including modifying the cell culture media, using pre- and post-harvest chemical additions to the cell culture fluid (CCF), lowering the pH, and air sparging of the harvested CCF (HCCF). The work described in this paper further explores the option of HCCF air sparging for preventing antibody reduction. Here, a small-scale model was developed using a 3-L bioreactor to mimic the conditions of a manufacturing-scale harvest vessel and was subsequently employed to evaluate several air sparging strategies. In addition, these studies enabled further understanding of the relationships between cell lysis levels, oxygen consumption, and antibody reduction. Finally, the effectiveness of air sparging for several CHO cell lines and the potential impact on product quality were assessed to demonstrate that air sparging is an effective method in preventing antibody reduction.

  3. Identification of disulfide bonds in wheat gluten proteins by means of mass spectrometry/electron transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Elena; Wieser, Herbert; Koehler, Peter

    2012-04-11

    Disulfide bonds within gluten proteins play a key role in the breadmaking performance of wheat flour. In the present study, disulfide bonds of wheat gluten proteins were identified by using a new liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technique with alternating electron transfer dissociation (ETD)/collision-induced dissociation (CID). Wheat flour was partially hydrolyzed with thermolysin (pH 6.5, 37 °C, 16 h), and the digest was subjected to LC-MS with alternating ETD/CID fragmentation. Whereas CID provided peptide fragments with intact disulfide bonds, cleavage of disulfide bonds was preferred over peptide backbone fragmentations in ETD. The simultaneous observation of disulfide-linked and disulfide-cleaved peptide ions in the mass spectra not only provided distinct interpretation with high confidence but also simplified the conventional approach for determination of disulfide bonds, which often requires two separate experiments with and without chemical reduction. By application of the new method 14 cystine peptides were identified. Eight peptides confirmed previously established disulfide bonds within gluten proteins, and the other six cystine peptides were identified for the first time. One of the newly identified cystine peptides represented a "head-to-tail" cross-link between high molecular weight glutenin subunits. This type of cross-link, which has been postulated as an integral part of glutenin models published previously, has now been proven experimentally for the first time. From the six remaining cystine peptides interchain disulfide bonds between α-gliadins, γ-gliadins, and low molecular weight glutenin subunits were established.

  4. A single disulfide bond restores thermodynamic and proteolytic stability to an extensively mutated protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roesler, K. R.; Rao, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    The potential for engineering stable proteins with multiple amino acid substitutions was explored. Eleven lysine, five methionine, two tryptophan, one glycine, and three threonine substitutions were simultaneously made in barley chymotrypsin inhibitor-2 (CI-2) to substantially improve the essential amino acid content of the protein. These substitutions were chosen based on the three-dimensional structure of CI-2 and an alignment of homologous sequences. The initial engineered protein folded into a wild-type-like structure, but had a free energy of unfolding of only 2.2 kcal/mol, considerably less than the wild-type value of 7.5 kcal/mol. Restoration of the lysine mutation at position 67 to the wild-type arginine increased the free energy of unfolding to 3.1 kcal/mol. Subsequent cysteine substitutions at positions 22 and 82 resulted in disulfide bond formation and a protein with nearly wild-type thermodynamic stability (7.0 kcal/mol). None of the engineered proteins retained inhibitory activity against chymotrypsin or elastase, and all had substantially reduced inhibitory activity against subtilisin. The proteolytic stabilities of the proteins correlated with their thermodynamic stabilities. Reduction of the disulfide bond resulted in substantial loss of both thermodynamic and proteolytic stabilities, confirming that the disulfide bond, and not merely the cysteine substitutions, was responsible for the increased stability. We conclude that it is possible to replace over a third of the residues in CI-2 with minimal disruption of stability and structural integrity. PMID:11045611

  5. Compounds targeting disulfide bond forming enzyme DsbB of Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Landeta, Cristina; Blazyk, Jessica L.; Hatahet, Feras; Meehan, Brian M.; Eser, Markus; Myrick, Alissa; Bronstain, Ludmila; Minami, Shoko; Arnold, Holly; Ke, Na; Rubin, Eric J.; Furie, Barbara C.; Furie, Bruce; Beckwith, Jon; Dutton, Rachel; Boyd, Dana

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, disulfide bonds confer stability on many proteins exported to the cell envelope or beyond. These proteins include numerous bacterial virulence factors. Thus, bacterial enzymes that promote disulfide bond formation represent targets for compounds inhibiting bacterial virulence. Here, we describe a novel target- and cell-based screening methodology for identifying compounds that inhibit the disulfide bond-forming enzymes E. coli DsbB (EcDsbB) or M. tuberculosis VKOR (MtbVKOR). MtbVKOR can replace EcDsbB although the two are not homologues. Initial screening of 51,487 compounds yielded six specifically inhibiting EcDsbB. These compounds share a structural motif and do not inhibit MtbVKOR. A medicinal chemistry approach led us to select related compounds some of which are much more effective DsbB inhibitors than those found in the screen. These compounds inhibit purified DsbB and prevent anaerobic E. coli growth. Furthermore, these compounds inhibit all but one of the DsbBs of nine other gram-negative pathogenic bacteria tested. PMID:25686372

  6. Key amino acids of arabidopsis VKOR in the activity of phylloquinone reduction and disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Jian; Cui, Hao-Ran; Yu, Zhi-Bo; Du, Jia-Jia; Xu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins in chloroplast are regulated through the disulfide bond/thiol transformation to realize their activities. A homologue of VKOR (Vitamin K epoxide reductase) in Arabidopsis chloroplast is found to catalyze the disulfide bond formation in vivo and to mediate the specific phylloquinone reduction in vitro. It is also called LTO1 (Lumen Thiol Oxidoreductase 1). Investigations about functions and essential amino acid residues of AtVKOR have important theoretical significance to clarify the chloroplast redox regulation mechanism. In this study, several amino acids in the VKOR domain of AtVKOR were identified to be involved in binding of phylloquinone. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to study the function of these positions. The results suggested that residues Ser77, Leu87, Phe137 and Leu141 were quite important in the binding and catalyzing the reduction of phylloquinone. These residues were also involved in the electron transferring and disulfide bond formation of substrate proteins by motility assays in vivo, suggesting that the binding of phylloquinone not only affected the delivery of electrons to phylloquinone but also affected the whole electron transfer process. The conserved cysteines in the AtVKOR domain also played critical roles in phylloquinone reduction. When each of the four conserved cysteines was mutated to alanine, the mutants lost reduction activity entirely, suggesting that the four conserved cysteines played crucial roles in the electron transfer process. PMID:25267254

  7. Overcoming residual frustration in domain-swapping: the roles of disulfide bonds in dimerization and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Samuel S; Levy, Yaakov; Onuchic, José N; Wolynes, Peter G

    2005-06-01

    The prevalence of domain-swapping in nature is a manifestation of the principle of minimal frustration in that the interactions designed by evolution to stabilize the protein are also involved in this mode of binding. We previously demonstrated that the Symmetrized-Go potential accurately predicts the experimentally observed domain-swapped structure of Eps8 based solely on the structure of the monomer. There can be, however, multiple modes of domain-swapping, reflecting a higher level of frustration, which is a consequence of symmetry. The human prion and cyanovirin-N are too frustrated to form unique domain-swapped structures on the basis of the Symmetrized-Go potential. However, supplementing the completely symmetric model with intermolecular and intramolecular disulfide bonds in the prion and cyanovirin-N proteins, respectively, yielded unique domain-swapped structures with a remarkable similarity to the experimentally observed ones. These results suggest that the disulfide bonds may sometimes be critical in overcoming the intrinsic frustration of the symmetrized energy landscapes for domain-swapping. We also discuss the implications of intermolecular disulfide bonds in the formation of mammalian prion aggregates.

  8. A conserved cysteine residue is involved in disulfide bond formation between plant plasma membrane aquaporin monomers.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Gerd P; Cavez, Damien; Besserer, Arnaud; Berny, Marie C; Gilis, Dimitri; Rooman, Marianne; Chaumont, François

    2012-07-01

    AQPs (aquaporins) are conserved in all kingdoms of life and facilitate the rapid diffusion of water and/or other small solutes across cell membranes. Among the different plant AQPs, PIPs (plasma membrane intrinsic proteins), which fall into two phylogenetic groups, PIP1 and PIP2, play key roles in plant water transport processes. PIPs form tetramers in which each monomer acts as a functional channel. The intermolecular interactions that stabilize PIP oligomer complexes and are responsible for the resistance of PIP dimers to denaturating conditions are not well characterized. In the present study, we identified a highly conserved cysteine residue in loop A of PIP1 and PIP2 proteins and demonstrated by mutagenesis that it is involved in the formation of a disulfide bond between two monomers. Although this cysteine seems not to be involved in regulation of trafficking to the plasma membrane, activity, substrate selectivity or oxidative gating of ZmPIP1s (Zm is Zea mays), ZmPIP2s and hetero-oligomers, it increases oligomer stability under denaturating conditions. In addition, when PIP1 and PIP2 are co-expressed, the loop A cysteine of ZmPIP1;2, but not that of ZmPIP2;5, is involved in the mercury sensitivity of the channels.

  9. Control of stability of polypeptide multilayer nanofilms by quantitative control of disulfide bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yang; Li, Bingyun; Haynie, Donald T.

    2006-12-01

    The crosslinking of polymers in a polymeric material will alter the mechanical properties of the material. Control over the mechanical properties of polyelectrolyte multilayer films (PEMs) could be useful for applications of the technology in medicine and other areas. Disulfide bonds are 'natural' polypeptide crosslinks found widely in wild-type proteins. Here, we have designed and synthesized three pairs of oppositely charged 32mer polypeptide to have 0, 4, or 8 cysteine (Cys) residues per molecule, and we have characterized physical properties of the peptides in a PEM context. The average linear density of free thiol in the designed peptides was 0, 0.125, or 0.25 per amino acid residue. The peptides were used to make 10-bilayer PEMs by electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly (LBL). Cys was included in the peptides to study specific effects of disulfide bond formation on PEM properties. Features of film assembly have been found to depend on the amino acid sequence, as in protein folding. Following polypeptide self-assembly into multilayer films, Cys residues were disulfide-crosslinked under mild oxidizing conditions. The stability of the crosslinked films at acidic pH has been found to depend on the number of Cys residues per peptide for a given crosslinking procedure. Crosslinked and non-crosslinked films have been analysed by ultraviolet spectroscopy (UVS), ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize film assembly, surface morphology, and disassembly. A selective etching model of the disassembly process at acidic pH is proposed on the basis of the experimental data. In this model, regions of film in which the disulfide bond density is low are etched at a higher rate than regions where the density is high.

  10. Crystal Structure of Reduced and of Oxidized Peroxiredoxin IV Enzyme Reveals a Stable Oxidized Decamer and a Non-disulfide-bonded Intermediate in the Catalytic Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhenbo; Tavender, Timothy J.; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Bulleid, Neil J.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin IV (PrxIV) is an endoplasmic reticulum-localized enzyme that metabolizes the hydrogen peroxide produced by endoplasmic reticulum oxidase 1 (Ero1). It has been shown to play a role in de novo disulfide formation, oxidizing members of the protein disulfide isomerase family of enzymes, and is a member of the typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. We have determined the crystal structure of both reduced and disulfide-bonded, as well as a resolving cysteine mutant of human PrxIV. We show that PrxIV has a similar structure to other typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and undergoes a conformational change from a fully folded to a locally unfolded form following the formation of a disulfide between the peroxidatic and resolving cysteine residues. Unlike other mammalian typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, we show that human PrxIV forms a stable decameric structure even in its disulfide-bonded state. In addition, the structure of a resolving cysteine mutant reveals an intermediate in the reaction cycle that adopts the locally unfolded conformation. Interestingly the peroxidatic cysteine in the crystal structure is sulfenylated rather than sulfinylated or sulfonylated. In addition, the peroxidatic cysteine in the resolving cysteine mutant is resistant to hyper-oxidation following incubation with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. These results highlight some unique properties of PrxIV and suggest that the equilibrium between the fully folded and locally unfolded forms favors the locally unfolded conformation upon sulfenylation of the peroxidatic cysteine residue. PMID:21994946

  11. Proteolysis approach without chemical modification for a simple and rapid analysis of disulfide bonds using thermostable protease-immobilized microreactors.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya; Maeda, Hideaki

    2010-08-01

    Disulfide bonds in proteins are important not only for the conformational stability of the protein but also for the regulation of oxidation-reduction in signal transduction. The conventional method for the assignment of disulfide bond by chemical cleavage and/or proteolysis is a time-consuming multi-step procedure. In this study, we report a simple and rapid analysis of disulfide bond from protein digests that were prepared by the thermostable protease-immobilized microreactors. The feasibility and performance of this approach were evaluated by digesting lysozyme and BSA at several temperatures. The proteins which stabilize their conformations by disulfide bonds were thermally denatured during proteolysis and were efficiently digested by the immobilized protease but not by free protease. The digests were directly analyzed by ESI-TOF MS without any purification or concentration step. All four disulfide bonds on lysozyme and 10 of 17 on BSA were assigned from the digests by the trypsin-immobilized microreactor at 50 degrees C. The procedure for proteolysis and the assignment were achieved within 2 h without any reduction and alkylation procedure. From the present results, the proteolysis approach by the thermostable protease-immobilized microreactor provides a strategy for the high-throughput analysis of disulfide bond in proteomics.

  12. 30 CFR 256.53 - Additional bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional bonds. 256.53 Section 256.53 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Bonding § 256.53 Additional bonds. (a) This paragraph explains...

  13. Organic Matter Polymerization by Disulfide Bonding Near the Chemocline in Cariaco Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raven, M. R.; Adkins, J. F.; Sessions, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The preservation of organic carbon in sediments as kerogen is an essential pathway in the global carbon cycle, but the chemical reactions involved in kerogen formation remain poorly understood. Previous researchers have found that many sediments deposited under euxinic conditions contain sulfur-bearing non-polar lipids as well as disulfide bonds among lipid and carbohydrate monomers. It remains unclear, however, when during organic matter decomposition and diagenesis these different sulfur-bearing structures form, and how different environmental conditions affect the extent of organic matter sulfurization. We investigate organic sulfurization processes armed with a technique for measuring the sulfur-isotopic compositions of individual organosulfur compounds by coupled gas chromatography - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Organic compounds were extracted from sediments and water column sediment traps from Cariaco Basin, a euxinic basin in the Caribbean Sea. We measured the sulfur-isotopic compositions of both non-polar lipids and of derivatized disulfide-bound compounds from eight sediment trap profiles and a six-meter-long sediment core. In Cariaco Basin, lipid sulfurization processes appear to begin near the chemocline and continue in sediments on timescales of thousands of years. Slow diagenetic sulfurization in sediments produces lipid monomers with sulfur atoms in ring structures that are 34S-depleted relative to coexisting dissolved sulfide. Lipid monomers become progressively enriched in 34S over time, indicating ongoing formation coinciding with an increase in the amount of total sulfur in bulk kerogen. One of the most abundant monomers observed in Cariaco sediments, a phytol-related thiophene, is also produced intermittently near the chemocline. Phytol thiophene δ34S values in sediment traps are similar to those observed in shallow Cariaco sediments except during occasional ';enrichment events,' when phytol thiophene δ34S values increase to

  14. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzymatic reducing agents. Analysis of CD44 crystal structures reveal the disulfide bond to be solvent accessible and in the–LH hook configuration characteristic of labile disulfide bonds. Kinetic trapping and binding experiments on CD44-Fc chimeric proteins show the bond is preferentially reduced over the other disulfide bonds in CD44 and reduction inhibits the CD44-HA interaction. Furthermore cells transfected with CD44 no longer adhere to HA coated surfaces after pre-treatment with reducing agents. The implications of CD44 redox regulation are discussed in the context of immune function, disease and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26379032

  15. Conformational instability governed by disulfide bonds partitions the dominant from subdominant helper T-cell responses specific for HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hong-Nam P; Steede, N Kalaya; Robinson, James E; Landry, Samuel J

    2015-06-01

    Most individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) generate a CD4(+) T-cell response that is dominated by a few epitopes. Immunodominance may be counterproductive because a broad CD4(+) T-cell response is associated with reduced viral load. Previous studies indicated that antigen three-dimensional structure controls antigen processing and presentation and therefore CD4(+) T-cell epitope dominance. Dominant epitopes occur adjacent to the V1-V2, V3, and V4 loops because proteolytic antigen processing in the loops promotes presentation of adjacent sequences. In this study, three gp120 (strain JR-FL) variants were constructed, in which deletions of single outer-domain disulfide bonds were expected to introduce local conformational flexibility and promote presentation of additional CD4(+) T-cell epitopes. Following mucosal immunization of C57BL/6 mice with wild-type or variant gp120 lacking the V3-flanking disulfide bond, the typical pattern of dominant epitopes was observed, suggesting that the disulfide bond posed no barrier to antigen presentation. In mice that lacked gamma interferon-inducible lysosomal thioreductase (GILT), proliferative responses to the typically dominant epitopes of gp120 were selectively depressed, and the dominance pattern was rearranged. Deletion of the V3-flanking disulfide bond or one of the V4-flanking disulfide bonds partially restored highly proliferative responses to the typically dominant epitopes. These results reveal an acute dependence of dominant CD4(+) T-cell responses on the native gp120 conformation. PMID:25944298

  16. The Pediocin PA-1 Accessory Protein Ensures Correct Disulfide Bond Formation in the Antimicrobial Peptide Pediocin PA-1.

    PubMed

    Oppegård, Camilla; Fimland, Gunnar; Anonsen, Jan Haug; Nissen-Meyer, Jon

    2015-05-19

    Peptides, in contrast to proteins, are generally not large enough to form stable and well-defined three-dimensional structures. However, peptides are still able to form correct disulfide bonds. Using pediocin-like bacteriocins, we have examined how this may be achieved. Some pediocin-like bacteriocins, such as pediocin PA-1 and sakacin P[N24C+44C], have four cysteines. There are three possible ways by which the four cysteines may combine to form two disulfide bonds, and the three variants are expected to be produced in approximately equal amounts if their formation is random. Pediocin PA-1 and sakacin P[N24C+44C] with correct disulfide bonds were the main products when they were secreted by the pediocin PA-1 ABC transporter and accessory protein, but when they were secreted by the corresponding secretion machinery for sakacin A, a pediocin-like bacteriocin with one disulfide bond (two cysteines), peptides with all three possible disulfide bonds were produced in approximately equal amounts. All five cysteines in the pediocin PA-1 ABC transporter and the two cysteines (that form a CxxC motif) in the accessory protein were individually replaced with serines to examine their involvement in disulfide bond formation in pediocin PA-1. The Cys86Ser mutation in the accessory protein caused a 2-fold decrease in the amount of pediocin PA-1 with correct disulfide bonds, while the Cys83Ser mutation nearly abolished the production of pediocin PA-1 and resulted in the production of all three disufide bond variants in equal amounts. The Cys19Ser mutation in the ABC transporter completely abolished secretion of pediocin PA-1, suggesting that Cys19 is in the proteolytic active site and involved in cleaving the prebacteriocin. Replacing the other four cysteines in the ABC transporter with serines caused a slight reduction in the overall amount of secreted pediocin PA-1, but the relative amount with the correct disulfide bonds remained large. These results indicate that the pediocin

  17. Chitosan films with improved tensile strength and toughness from N-acetyl-cysteine mediated disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Miles, Kevin Barrett; Ball, Rebecca Lee; Matthew, Howard William Trevor

    2016-03-30

    To improve the mechanical properties of chitosan (Ct) materials without the use of cytotoxic crosslinkers, disulfide cross-linkable Ct was synthesized by grafting N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) to Ct using carbodiimide chemistry. Cast films of NAC-Ct conjugates were prepared with degrees of substitution (DS) of 0%, 6%, 15%, and 20%, and the disulfide bond formation was induced by increasing the reaction media pH to 11. The tensile strength, breaking strain, elastic moduli and toughness of disulfide cross-linked polymers were analyzed by monotonic tensile testing of hydrated NAC-Ct films. Crystallinity was determined via XRD. Results demonstrated that NAC incorporation and crosslinking in chitosan produced tougher polymer films with 4-fold higher tensile strength (10 MPa) and 6-fold greater elongation (365%), but reduced crystallinity, compared to unmodified chitosan. The resilience of NAC-Ct films was evaluated by cyclic testing, and results demonstrate that increasing NAC content produced a more resilient material that dissipated less energy when deformed. These improved mechanical properties broaden chitosan's applicability towards the construction of mechanically robust implantable scaffolds for tissue regeneration.

  18. Identification of Disulfide Bonds in Protein Proteolytic Degradation Products Using de Novo-Protein Unique Sequence Tags Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Purvine, Samuel O.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-08-01

    Disulfide bonds are a form of posttranslational modification that often determines protein structure(s) and function(s). In this work, we report a mass spectrometry method for identification of disulfides in degradation products of proteins, and specifically endogenous peptides in the human blood plasma peptidome. LC-Fourier transform tandem mass spectrometry (FT MS/MS) was used for acquiring mass spectra that were de novo sequenced and then searched against the IPI human protein database. Through the use of unique sequence tags (UStags) we unambiguously correlated the spectra to specific database proteins. Examination of the UStags’ prefix and/or suffix sequences that contain cysteine(s) in conjunction with sequences of the UStags-specified database proteins is shown to enable the unambigious determination of disulfide bonds. Using this method, we identified the intermolecular and intramolecular disulfides in human blood plasma peptidome peptides that have molecular weights of up to ~10 kDa.

  19. Identification of disulfide bonds in protein proteolytic degradation products using de novo-protein unique sequence tags approach.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolić, Nikola; Purvine, Samuel O; Smith, Richard D

    2010-08-01

    Disulfide bonds are a form of post-translational modification that often determines protein structure(s) and function(s). In this work, we report a mass spectrometry method for identification of disulfides in degradation products of proteins, specifically endogenous peptides in the human blood plasma peptidome. LC-Fourier transform tandem mass spectrometry (FT MS/MS) was used for acquiring mass spectra that were de novo sequenced and then searched against the IPI human protein database. Through the use of unique sequence tags (UStags), we unambiguously correlated the spectra to specific database proteins. Examination of the UStags' prefix and/or suffix sequences that contain cysteine(s) in conjunction with sequences of the UStags-specified database proteins is shown to enable the unambigious determination of disulfide bonds. Using this method, we identified the intermolecular and intramolecular disulfides in human blood plasma peptidome peptides that have molecular weights of up to approximately 10 kDa. PMID:20590115

  20. The conserved disulfide bond of human tear lipocalin modulates conformation and lipid binding in a ligand selective manner

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, Oktay K.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of this study is the elucidation of the mechanism of disulfide induced alteration of ligand binding in human tear lipocalin (TL). Disulfide bonds may act as dynamic scaffolds to regulate conformational changes that alter protein function including receptor-ligand interactions. A single disulfide bond, (Cys61-Cys153), exists in TL that is highly conserved in the lipocalin superfamily. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies were applied to investigate the mechanism by which disulfide bond removal effects protein stability, dynamics and ligand binding properties. Although the secondary structure is not altered by disulfide elimination, TL shows decreased stability against urea denaturation. Free energy change (ΔG0) decreases from 4.9± 0.2 to 2.1± 0.3 kcal/mol with removal of the disulfide bond. Furthermore, ligand binding properties of TL without the disulfide vary according to the type of ligand. The binding of a bulky ligand, NBD-cholesterol, has a decreased time constant (from 11.8± 0.2 to 3.3 s). In contrast, the NBD-labeled phospholipid shows a moderate decrease in the time constant for binding, from 33.2± 0.2 to 22.2± 0.4 s. FRET experiments indicate that the hairpin CD is directly involved in modulation of both ligand binding and flexibility of TL. In TL complexed with palmitc acid (PA-TL), the distance between the residues 62 of strand D and 81 of loop EF is decreased by disulfide bond reduction. Consequently, removal of the disulfide bond boosts flexibility of the protein to reach a CD-EF loop distance (24.3 Å, between residues 62 and 81), which is not accessible for the protein with an intact disulfide bond (26.2 Å). The results suggest that enhanced flexibility of the protein promotes a faster accommodation of the ligand inside the cavity and energetically favorable ligand-protein complex. PMID:21466861

  1. Additive for iron disulfide cathodes used in thermal batteries

    DOEpatents

    Armijo, James R.; Searcy, Jimmie Q.

    1983-01-01

    The invention comprises thermal batteries employing an FeS.sub.2 depolarizer, i.e. cathode material, and the depolarizer itself. A minor amount of CaSi.sub.2 preferably, 1-3% by weight is provided as an additive in the FeS.sub.2 depolarizer to eliminate the voltage transient (spike) which normally occurs upon activation of batteries of this type. The amount of FeS.sub.2 by weight generally comprises 64-90%.

  2. Additive for iron disulfide cathodes used in thermal batteries

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-03-23

    The invention comprises thermal batteries employing an FeS/sub 2/ depolarizer itself. A minor amount of CaSi/sub 2/ preferably 1-3% by weight is provided as an additive in the FeS/sub 2/ depolarizer to eliminate the voltage transient (spike) which normally occurs upon activation of batteries of this type. The amount of FeS/sub 2/ by weight generally comprises 64 to 90%.

  3. Evidence for the presence of a critical disulfide bond in the mouse EP3γ receptor

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Jason D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the contribution of cysteines to the function of the mouse E-prostanoid subtype 3 gamma (mEP3γ), we tested a series of cysteine-to-alanine mutants. Two of these mutants, C107A and C184A, showed no agonist-dependent activation in a cell-based reporter assay for mEP3γ, whereas none of the other cysteine-to-alanine mutations disrupted mEP3γ signal transduction. Total cell membranes prepared from HEK293 cells transfected with mEP3γ C107A or C184A had no detectable radioligand binding. Other mutant mEP3γ receptors had radioligand affinities and receptor densities similar to wild-type. Cell-surface ELISA against the N-terminal HA-tag of C107A and C184A demonstrated 40 % and 47 % reductions respectively in receptor protein expression at the cell surface, and no radioligand binding was detected as assessed by intact cell radioligand binding experiments. These data suggest a key role for C107 and C184 in both receptor structure/stability and function and is consistent with the presence of a conserved disulfide bond between C107 and C184 in mouse EP3 that is required for normal receptor expression and function. Our results also indicate that if a second disulfide bond is present in the native receptor it is non-essential for receptor assembly or function. PMID:21236356

  4. Coupling gold nanoparticles to silica nanoparticles through disulfide bonds for glutathione detection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yupeng; Zhang, Heng; Yue, Zhenfeng; Zhang, Zhaomin; Teng, Kar-Seng; Li, Mei-Jin; Yi, Changqing; Yang, Mengsu

    2013-09-20

    Advances in the controlled assembly of nanoscale building blocks have resulted in functional devices which can find applications in electronics, biomedical imaging, drug delivery etc. In this study, novel covalent nanohybrid materials based upon [Ru(bpy)3](2+)-doped silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), which could be conditioned as OFF-ON probes for glutathione (GSH) detection, were designed and assembled in sequence, with the disulfide bonds as the bridging elements. The structural and optical properties of the nanohybrid architectures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. Zeta potential measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were employed to monitor the reaction processes of the SiNPs-S-S-COOH and SiNPs-S-S-AuNPs synthesis. It was found that the covalent nanohybrid architectures were fluorescently dark (OFF state), indicating that SiNPs were effectively quenched by AuNPs. The fluorescence of the OFF-ON probe was resumed (ON state) when the bridge of the disulfide bond was cleaved by reducing reagents such as GSH. This work provides a new platform and strategy for GSH detection using covalent nanohybrid materials.

  5. The Disulfide Bonding System Suppresses CsgD-Independent Cellulose Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hufnagel, David A.; DePas, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial extracellular matrix encases cells and protects them from host-related and environmental insults. The Escherichia coli master biofilm regulator CsgD is required for the production of the matrix components curli and cellulose. CsgD activates the diguanylate cyclase AdrA, which in turn stimulates cellulose production through cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Here, we identified and characterized a CsgD- and AdrA-independent cellulose production pathway that was maximally active when cultures were grown under reducing conditions or when the disulfide bonding system (DSB) was compromised. The CsgD-independent cellulose activation pathway was dependent on a second diguanylate cyclase, called YfiN. c-di-GMP production by YfiN was repressed by the periplasmic protein YfiR, and deletion of yfiR promoted CsgD-independent cellulose production. Conversely, when YfiR was overexpressed, cellulose production was decreased. Finally, we found that YfiR was oxidized by DsbA and that intraprotein YfiR disulfide bonds stabilized YfiR in the periplasm. Altogether, we showed that reducing conditions and mutations in the DSB system caused hyperactivation of YfiN and subsequent CsgD-independent cellulose production. PMID:25112475

  6. Structure of the Disulfide Bond Generating Membrane Protein DsbB in the Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Nesbitt, Anna E.; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Gennis, Robert B.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2013-01-01

    The integral membrane protein DsbB in Escherichia coli is responsible for oxidizing the periplasmic protein DsbA, which forms disulfide bonds in substrate proteins. We have developed a high-resolution structural model by combining experimental X-ray and solid-state NMR with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We embedded the high-resolution DsbB structure, derived from the joint calculation with X-ray reflections and solid-state NMR restraints, into the lipid bilayer and performed MD simulations to provide a mechanistic view of DsbB function in the membrane. Further, we revealed the membrane topology of DsbB by selective proton spin diffusion experiments, which directly probe the correlations of DsbB with water and lipid acyl chains. NMR data also support the model of a flexible periplasmic loop and an interhelical hydrogen bond between Glu26 and Tyr153. PMID:23416557

  7. Disulfide bond reduction-triggered molecular hydrogels of folic acid-Taxol conjugates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengbiao; Li, Dongxia; Fengzhao, Qianqi; Wang, Lianyong; Wang, Ling; Yang, Zhimou

    2013-09-25

    Molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents are a novel kind of self-delivery system that can sustain release of drugs or pro-drugs. We have previously developed a molecular hydrogelator of folic acid (FA)-Taxol conjugate triggered by phosphatase. In this paper, we report a novel molecular hydrogelator system of FA-Taxol conjugates with improved synthetic strategy. The hydrogels are formed by the reduction of disulfide bond by glutathione (GSH). These hydrogels could sustain release of Taxol through ester bond hydrolysis. Compared with intravenous (i.v.) injection of clinically used Taxol® with four times the dosage, our hydrogel could inhibit tumor growth more efficiently by a single dose of intra-tumor (i.t.) administration. These observations suggested the big potential of this novel gelation system of Taxol for cancer therapy.

  8. A disulfide bond in the TIM23 complex is crucial for voltage gating and mitochondrial protein import.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Ajay; Peleh, Valentina; Martinez-Caballero, Sonia; Wollweber, Florian; Sommer, Frederik; van der Laan, Martin; Schroda, Michael; Alexander, R Todd; Campo, María Luisa; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-08-15

    Tim17 is a central, membrane-embedded subunit of the mitochondrial protein import machinery. In this study, we show that Tim17 contains a pair of highly conserved cysteine residues that form a structural disulfide bond exposed to the intermembrane space (IMS). This disulfide bond is critical for efficient protein translocation through the TIM23 complex and for dynamic gating of its preprotein-conducting channel. The disulfide bond in Tim17 is formed during insertion of the protein into the inner membrane. Whereas the import of Tim17 depends on the binding to the IMS protein Mia40, the oxidoreductase activity of Mia40 is surprisingly dispensable for Tim17 oxidation. Our observations suggest that Tim17 can be directly oxidized by the sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1. Thus, import and oxidation of Tim17 are mediated by the mitochondrial disulfide relay, though the mechanism by which the disulfide bond in Tim17 is formed differs considerably from that of soluble IMS proteins. PMID:27502485

  9. CO sub 2 ter dot minus radical induced cleavage of disulfide bonds in proteins. A gamma-ray and pulse radiolysis mechanistic investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Favaudon, V.; Tourbez, H.; Lhoste, J-M. ); Houee-Levin, C. )

    1990-12-01

    Disulfide bond reduction by the CO{sub 2}{sup {center dot}{minus}} radical was investigated in aponeocarzinostatin, aporiboflavin-binding protein, and bovine immunoglobulin. Protein-bound cysteine free thiols were formed under {gamma}-ray irradiation in the course of a pH-dependent and protein concentration dependent chain reaction. The chain efficiency increased upon acidification of the medium, with an apparent pK{sub a} around 5, and decreased abruptly below pH 3.6. It decreased also at neutral pH as cysteine accumulated. From pulse radiolysis analysis, CO{sub 2}{sup {center dot}{minus}} proved able to induce rapid one-electron oxidation of thiols and of tyrosine phenolic groups in addition to one-electron donation to exposed disulfide bonds. The bulk rate constant of CO{sub 2}{sup {center dot}{minus}} uptake by the native proteins was 5{minus} to 10-fold faster at pH 3 than at pH 8, and the protonated form of the disulfide radical anion, appeared to be the major protein radical species formed under acidic conditions. Formation of the disulfide radical cation, phenoxyl radical Tyr-O{sup {center dot}} disproportionation, and phenoxyl radical induced oxidation of preformed thiol groups should also be taken into consideration to explain the fate of the oxygen-centered phenoxyl radical.

  10. On-Line Electrochemical Reduction of Disulfide Bonds: Improved FTICR-CID and -ETD Coverage of Oxytocin and Hepcidin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolardi, Simone; Giera, Martin; Kooijman, Pieter; Kraj, Agnieszka; Chervet, Jean-Pierre; Deelder, André M.; van der Burgt, Yuri E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Particularly in the field of middle- and top-down peptide and protein analysis, disulfide bridges can severely hinder fragmentation and thus impede sequence analysis (coverage). Here we present an on-line/electrochemistry/ESI-FTICR-MS approach, which was applied to the analysis of the primary structure of oxytocin, containing one disulfide bridge, and of hepcidin, containing four disulfide bridges. The presented workflow provided up to 80 % (on-line) conversion of disulfide bonds in both peptides. With minimal sample preparation, such reduction resulted in a higher number of peptide backbone cleavages upon CID or ETD fragmentation, and thus yielded improved sequence coverage. The cycle times, including electrode recovery, were rapid and, therefore, might very well be coupled with liquid chromatography for protein or peptide separation, which has great potential for high-throughput analysis.

  11. Bile salt-induced intermolecular disulfide bond formation activates Vibrio cholerae virulence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Menghua; Liu, Zhi; Hughes, Chambers; Stern, Andrew M; Wang, Hui; Zhong, Zengtao; Kan, Biao; Fenical, William; Zhu, Jun

    2013-02-01

    To be successful pathogens, bacteria must often restrict the expression of virulence genes to host environments. This requires a physical or chemical marker of the host environment as well as a cognate bacterial system for sensing the presence of a host to appropriately time the activation of virulence. However, there have been remarkably few such signal-sensor pairs identified, and the molecular mechanisms for host-sensing are virtually unknown. By directly applying a reporter strain of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, to a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate containing mouse intestinal extracts, we found two host signals that activate virulence gene transcription. One of these was revealed to be the bile salt taurocholate. We then show that a set of bile salts cause dimerization of the transmembrane transcription factor TcpP by inducing intermolecular disulfide bonds between cysteine (C)-207 residues in its periplasmic domain. Various genetic and biochemical analyses led us to propose a model in which the other cysteine in the periplasmic domain, C218, forms an inhibitory intramolecular disulfide bond with C207 that must be isomerized to form the active C207-C207 intermolecular bond. We then found bile salt-dependent effects of these cysteine mutations on survival in vivo, correlating to our in vitro model. Our results are a demonstration of a mechanism for direct activation of the V. cholerae virulence cascade by a host signal molecule. They further provide a paradigm for recognition of the host environment in pathogenic bacteria through periplasmic cysteine oxidation.

  12. Egg white sulfhydryl oxidase: kinetic mechanism of the catalysis of disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Hoober, K L; Thorpe, C

    1999-03-01

    The flavin-dependent sulfhydryl oxidase from chicken egg white catalyzes the oxidation of sulfhydryl groups to disulfides with reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. The oxidase contains FAD and a redox-active cystine bridge and accepts a total of 4 electrons per active site. Dithiothreitol (DTT; the best low molecular weight substrate known) reduces the enzyme disulfide bridge with a limiting rate of 502/s at 4 degrees C, pH 7.5, yielding a thiolate-to-flavin charge-transfer complex. Further reduction to EH4 is limited by the slow internal transfer of reducing equivalents from enzyme dithiol to oxidized flavin (3.3/s). In the oxidative half of catalysis, oxygen rapidly converts EH4 to EH2, but Eox appearance is limited by the slow internal redox equilibration. During overall turnover with DTT, the thiolate-to-flavin charge-transfer complex accumulates with an apparent extinction coefficient of 4.9 mM-1 cm-1 at 560 nm. In contrast, glutathione (GSH) is a much slower reductant of the oxidase to the EH2 level and shows a kcat/Km 100-fold smaller than DTT. Full reduction of EH2 by GSH shows a limiting rate of 3.6/s at 4 degrees C comparable to that seen with DTT. Reduced RNase is an excellent substrate of the enzyme, with kcat/Km per thiol some 1000- and 10-fold better than GSH and DTT, respectively. Enzyme-monitored steady-state turnover shows that RNase is a facile reductant of the oxidase to the EH2 state. This work demonstrates the basic similarity in the mechanism of turnover between all of these three substrates. A physiological role for sulfhydryl oxidase in the formation of disulfide bonds in secreted proteins is discussed.

  13. Characterization of an alternative low energy fold for bovine α-lactalbumin formed by disulfide bond shuffling.

    PubMed

    Lewney, Sarah; Smith, Lorna J

    2012-03-01

    Bovine α-lactalbumin (αLA) forms a misfolded disulfide bond shuffled isomer, X-αLA. This X-αLA isomer contains two native disulfide bridges (Cys 6-Cys 120 and Cys 28-Cys 111) and two non-native disulfide bridges (Cys 61-Cys 73 and Cys 77-Cys 91). MD simulations have been used to characterize the X-αLA isomer and its formation via disulfide bond shuffling and to compare it with the native fold of αLA. In the simulations of the X-αLA isomer the structure of the α-domain of native αLA is largely retained in agreement with experimental data. However, there are significant rearrangements in the β-domain, including the loss of the native β-sheet and calcium binding site. Interestingly, the energies of X-αLA and native αLA in simulations in the absence of calcium are closely similar. Thus, the X-αLA isomer represents a different low energy fold for the protein. Calcium binding to native αLA is shown to help preserve the structure of the β-domain of the protein limiting possibilities for disulfide bond shuffling. Hence, binding calcium plays an important role in both maintaining the native structure of αLA and providing a mechanism for distinguishing between folded and misfolded species.

  14. Peroxiredoxin Ahp1 Acts as a Receptor for Alkylhydroperoxides to Induce Disulfide Bond Formation in the Cad1 Transcription Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Kenta; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during cellular metabolism are toxic to cells. As a result, cells must be able to identify ROS as a stress signal and induce stress response pathways that protect cells from ROS toxicity. Recently, peroxiredoxin (Prx)-induced relays of disulfide bond formation have been identified in budding yeast, namely the disulfide bond formation of Yap1, a crucial transcription factor for oxidative stress response, by a specific Prx Gpx3 and by a major Prx Tsa1. Here, we show that an atypical-type Prx Ahp1 can act as a receptor for alkylhydroperoxides, resulting in activation of the Cad1 transcription factor that is homologous to Yap1. We demonstrate that Ahp1 is required for the formation of intermolecular Cad1 disulfide bond(s) in both an in vitro redox system and in cells treated with alkylhydroperoxide. Furthermore, we found that Cad1-dependent transcriptional activation of the HSP82 gene is dependent on Ahp1. Our results suggest that, although the Gpx3-Yap1 pathway contributes more strongly to resistance than the Ahp1-Cad1 pathway, the Ahp1-induced activation of Cad1 can function as a defense system against stress induced by alkylhydroperoxides, possibly including lipid peroxides. Thus, the Prx family of proteins have an important role in determining peroxide response signals and in transmitting the signals to specific target proteins by inducing disulfide bond formation. PMID:20145245

  15. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide N-Terminus Fragment Self-Assembly: Effect of Conserved Disulfide Bond on Aggregation Propensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilitchev, Alexandre I.; Giammona, Maxwell J.; Do, Thanh D.; Wong, Amy G.; Buratto, Steven K.; Shea, Joan-Emma; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2016-06-01

    Amyloid formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) has long been implicated in the pathogeny of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and failure of islet transplants, but the mechanism of IAPP self-assembly is still unclear. Numerous fragments of hIAPP are capable of self-association into oligomeric aggregates, both amyloid and non-amyloid in structure. The N-terminal region of IAPP contains a conserved disulfide bond between cysteines at position 2 and 7, which is important to hIAPP's in vivo function and may play a role in in vitro aggregation. The importance of the disulfide bond in this region was probed using a combination of ion mobility-based mass spectrometry experiments, molecular dynamics simulations, and high-resolution atomic force microscopy imaging on the wildtype 1-8 hIAPP fragment, a reduced fragment with no disulfide bond, and a fragment with both cysteines at positions 2 and 7 mutated to serine. The results indicate the wildtype fragment aggregates by a different pathway than either comparison peptide and that the intact disulfide bond may be protective against aggregation due to a reduction of inter-peptide hydrogen bonding.

  16. Peroxiredoxin Ahp1 acts as a receptor for alkylhydroperoxides to induce disulfide bond formation in the Cad1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Kenta; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2010-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during cellular metabolism are toxic to cells. As a result, cells must be able to identify ROS as a stress signal and induce stress response pathways that protect cells from ROS toxicity. Recently, peroxiredoxin (Prx)-induced relays of disulfide bond formation have been identified in budding yeast, namely the disulfide bond formation of Yap1, a crucial transcription factor for oxidative stress response, by a specific Prx Gpx3 and by a major Prx Tsa1. Here, we show that an atypical-type Prx Ahp1 can act as a receptor for alkylhydroperoxides, resulting in activation of the Cad1 transcription factor that is homologous to Yap1. We demonstrate that Ahp1 is required for the formation of intermolecular Cad1 disulfide bond(s) in both an in vitro redox system and in cells treated with alkylhydroperoxide. Furthermore, we found that Cad1-dependent transcriptional activation of the HSP82 gene is dependent on Ahp1. Our results suggest that, although the Gpx3-Yap1 pathway contributes more strongly to resistance than the Ahp1-Cad1 pathway, the Ahp1-induced activation of Cad1 can function as a defense system against stress induced by alkylhydroperoxides, possibly including lipid peroxides. Thus, the Prx family of proteins have an important role in determining peroxide response signals and in transmitting the signals to specific target proteins by inducing disulfide bond formation. PMID:20145245

  17. Disulfide-bonded discontinuous epitopes on the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (New Jersey serotype).

    PubMed

    Grigera, P R; Keil, W; Wagner, R R

    1992-06-01

    Intrachain disulfide bonds between paired cysteines in the glycoprotein (G) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) are required for the recognition of discontinuous epitopes by specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (W. Keil and R. R. Wagner, Virology 170:392-407, 1989). Cleavage by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease of the 517-amino-acid VSV-New Jersey G protein, limited to the glutamic acid at residue 110, resulted in a protein (designated GV8) with greatly retarded migration by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) under nonreducing conditions. By Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, protein GV8 was found to lose discontinuous epitope IV, which maps within the first 193 NH2-terminal amino acids. These data, coupled with those obtained by PAGE migration of a vector-expressed, truncated protein (G1-193) under reducing and nonreducing conditions, lead us to postulate the existence of a major loop structure within the first 193 NH2-terminal amino acids of the G protein, possibly anchored by a disulfide bond between cysteine 108 and cysteine 169, encompassing epitope IV. Site-directed mutants in which 10 of the 12 cysteines were individually converted to serines in vaccinia virus-based vectors expressing these single-site mutant G proteins were also constructed, each of which was then tested by immunoprecipitation for its capacity to recognize epitope-specific MAbs. These results showed that mutations in NH2-terminal cysteines 130, 174, and, to a lesser extent, 193 all resulted in the loss of neutralization epitope VIII. A mutation at NH2-terminal cysteine 130 also resulted in the loss of neutralization epitope VII, as did a mutation at cysteine 108 to a lesser extent. Both epitopes VII and VIII disappeared when mutations were made in COOH-distal cysteine 235, 240, or 273, the general map locations of epitopes VII and VIII. These studies also reveal that distal, as well as proximal, cysteine residues markedly influence the disulfide-bond secondary structure, which

  18. An internal disulfide bond acts as a switch for intein activity

    PubMed Central

    Nicastri, Michael C.; Xega, Kristina; Li, Lingyun; Xie, Jian; Wang, Chunyu; Linhardt, Robert J.; Reitter, Julie N.; Mills, Kenneth V.

    2013-01-01

    Inteins are intervening polypeptides that catalyze their own removal from flanking exteins, concomitant to the ligation of the exteins. The intein that interrupts the DP2 (large) subunit of DNA Polymerase II from Methanoculleus marisnigri (Mma) can promote protein splicing. However, protein splicing can be prevented or reduced by over-expression under non-reducing conditions, due to the formation of a disulfide bond between two internal intein Cys residues. This redox sensitivity leads to differential activity in different strains of E. coli as well as in different cell compartments. The redox-dependent control of in vivo protein splicing in an intein derived from an anaerobe that can occupy multiple environments hints at a possible physiological role for protein splicing. PMID:23906287

  19. Transmembrane Domain Interactions and Residue Proline 378 Are Essential for Proper Structure, Especially Disulfide Bond Formation, in the Human Vitamin K-Dependent γ-Glutamyl Carboxylase†

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Jian-Ke; Zheng, Mei-Yan; Hsiao, Kuang-Ling N.; Perera, Lalith; Stafford, Darrel W.; Straight, David L.

    2009-01-01

    We used recombinant techniques to create a two-chain form (residues 1–345 and residues 346–758) of the vitamin K-dependent γ-glutamyl carboxylase, a glycoprotein located in the endoplasmic reticulum containing five transmembrane domains. The two-chain carboxylase had carboxylase and epoxidase activities similar to those of one-chain carboxylase. In addition, it had normal affinity for the propeptide of factor IX. We employed this molecule to investigate formation of the one disulfide bond in carboxylase, the transmembrane structure of carboxylase, and the potential interactions among the carboxylase’s transmembrane domains. Our results indicate that the two peptides of the two-chain carboxylase are joined by a disulfide bond. Proline 378 is important for the structure necessary for disulfide formation. Results with the P378L carboxylase indicate that noncovalent bonds maintain the two-chain structure even when the disulfide bond is disrupted. As we had previously proposed, the fifth transmembrane domain of carboxylase is the last and only transmembrane domain in the C-terminal peptide of the two-chain carboxylase. We show that the noncovalent association between the two chains of carboxylase involves an interaction between the fifth transmembrane domain and the second transmembrane domain. Results of a homology model of transmembrane domains 2 and 5 suggest that not only do these two domains associate but that transmembrane domain 2 may interact with another transmembrane domain. This latter interaction may be mediated at least in part by a motif of glycine residues in the second transmembrane domain. PMID:18498174

  20. A dielectric barrier discharge terminally inactivates RNase A by oxidizing sulfur-containing amino acids and breaking structural disulfide bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackmann, J.-W.; Baldus, S.; Steinborn, E.; Edengeiser, E.; Kogelheide, F.; Langklotz, S.; Schneider, S.; Leichert, L. I. O.; Benedikt, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Bandow, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    RNases are among the most stable proteins in nature. They even refold spontaneously after heat inactivation, regaining full activity. Due to their stability and universal presence, they often pose a problem when experimenting with RNA. We investigated the capabilities of nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas to inactivate RNase A and studied the inactivation mechanism on a molecular level. While prolonged heating above 90 °C is required for heat inactivating RNase A, direct plasma treatment with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) source caused permanent inactivation within minutes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that DBD-treated RNase A unfolds rapidly. Raman spectroscopy indicated methionine modifications and formation of sulfonic acid. A mass spectrometry-based analysis of the protein modifications that occur during plasma treatment over time revealed that methionine sulfoxide formation coincides with protein inactivation. Chemical reduction of methionine sulfoxides partially restored RNase A activity confirming that sulfoxidation is causal and sufficient for RNase A inactivation. Continued plasma exposure led to over-oxidation of structural disulfide bonds. Using antibodies, disulfide bond over-oxidation was shown to be a general protein inactivation mechanism of the DBD. The antibody’s heavy and light chains linked by disulfide bonds dissociated after plasma exposure. Based on their ability to inactivate proteins by oxidation of sulfur-containing amino acids and over-oxidation of disulfide bonds, DBD devices present a viable option for inactivating undesired or hazardous proteins on heat or solvent-sensitive surfaces.

  1. Next generation maleimides enable the controlled assembly of antibody–drug conjugates via native disulfide bond bridging† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthetic procedures, 1H and 13C NMR spectra for synthesised compounds, additional SDS-PAGE gels, LCMS chromatograms, Ellman's analysis and other supplementary results. See DOI: 10.1039/c4ob01550a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Felix F.; Nunes, João P. M.; Maruani, Antoine; Chudasama, Vijay; Smith, Mark E. B.; Chester, Kerry A.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of Adcetris™ and Kadcyla™, two recently FDA-approved antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs), in the clinic has had a major impact on the treatment of lymphoma and breast cancer patients, respectively, worldwide. Despite these successes many new ADCs fail at various stages of development, often due to shortcomings in the methods used for their assembly. To address this problem we have developed next generation maleimides (NGMs), which specifically re-bridge reduced interchain disulfide bonds and allow the efficient conjugation of small molecules to antibodies, without the need for engineering of the target antibody. The method is site-specific and generates near homogeneous products in good yields. Moreover, adjustment of the reaction conditions allows control of the conjugation in terms of stoichiometry (drug-loading) and site selectivity. Using this method we prepared a series of ADCs from trastuzumab and doxorubicin (DOX) with a controlled drug-to-antibody ratio (DAR) of 1, 2, 3 and 4. All of these constructs were fully active by ELISA and had more than 90% of re-bridged disulfide bonds by CE-SDS when compared to clinical grade antibody. Furthermore, digest experiments of the DAR 2 material revealed that almost all of the drug had been targeted to the Fab arms of the antibody. Thus, NGMs offer a flexible and simple platform for the controlled assembly of ADCs from an antibody. PMID:25103319

  2. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein.

  3. The role of short-range Cys171-Cys178 disulfide bond in maintaining cutinase active site integrity: A molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matak, Mehdi Youssefi; Moghaddam, Majid Erfani

    2009-12-11

    Understanding structural determinants in enzyme active site integrity can provide a good knowledge to design efficient novel catalytic machineries. Fusarium solani pisi cutinase with classic triad Ser-His-Asp is a promising enzyme to scrutinize these structural determinants. We performed two MD simulations: one, with the native structure, and the other with the broken Cys171-Cys178 disulfide bond. This disulfide bond stabilizes a turn in active site on which catalytic Asp175 is located. Functionally important H-bonds and atomic fluctuations in catalytic pocket have been changed. We proposed that this disulfide bond within active site can be considered as an important determinant of cutinase active site structural integrity.

  4. Imbalance of heterologous protein folding and disulfide bond formation rates yields runaway oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The protein secretory pathway must process a wide assortment of native proteins for eukaryotic cells to function. As well, recombinant protein secretion is used extensively to produce many biologics and industrial enzymes. Therefore, secretory pathway dysfunction can be highly detrimental to the cell and can drastically inhibit product titers in biochemical production. Because the secretory pathway is a highly-integrated, multi-organelle system, dysfunction can happen at many levels and dissecting the root cause can be challenging. In this study, we apply a systems biology approach to analyze secretory pathway dysfunctions resulting from heterologous production of a small protein (insulin precursor) or a larger protein (α-amylase). Results HAC1-dependent and independent dysfunctions and cellular responses were apparent across multiple datasets. In particular, processes involving (a) degradation of protein/recycling amino acids, (b) overall transcription/translation repression, and (c) oxidative stress were broadly associated with secretory stress. Conclusions Apparent runaway oxidative stress due to radical production observed here and elsewhere can be explained by a futile cycle of disulfide formation and breaking that consumes reduced glutathione and produces reactive oxygen species. The futile cycle is dominating when protein folding rates are low relative to disulfide bond formation rates. While not strictly conclusive with the present data, this insight does provide a molecular interpretation to an, until now, largely empirical understanding of optimizing heterologous protein secretion. This molecular insight has direct implications on engineering a broad range of recombinant proteins for secretion and provides potential hypotheses for the root causes of several secretory-associated diseases. PMID:22380681

  5. β-Boomerang Antimicrobial and Antiendotoxic Peptides: Lipidation and Disulfide Bond Effects on Activity and Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and endotoxin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammations are among some of the most prominent health issues globally. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are eminent molecules that can kill drug-resistant strains and neutralize LPS toxicity. LPS, the outer layer of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria safeguards cell integrity against hydrophobic compounds, including antibiotics and AMPs. Apart from maintaining structural integrity, LPS, when released into the blood stream, also induces inflammatory pathways leading to septic shock. In previous works, we have reported the de novo design of a set of 12-amino acid long cationic/hydrophobic peptides for LPS binding and activity. These peptides adopt β-boomerang like conformations in complex with LPS. Structure-activity studies demonstrated some critical features of the β-boomerang scaffold that may be utilized for the further development of potent analogs. In this work, β-boomerang lipopeptides were designed and structure-activity correlation studies were carried out. These lipopeptides were homo-dimerized through a disulfide bridge to stabilize conformations and for improved activity. The designed peptides exhibited potent antibacterial activity and efficiently neutralized LPS toxicity under in vitro assays. NMR structure of C4YI13C in aqueous solution demonstrated the conserved folding of the lipopeptide with a boomerang aromatic lock stabilized with disulfide bond at the C-terminus and acylation at the N-terminus. These lipo-peptides displaying bacterial sterilization and low hemolytic activity may be useful for future applications as antimicrobial and antiendotoxin molecules. PMID:24756162

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations on pars intercerebralis major peptide-C (PMP-C) reveal the role of glycosylation and disulfide bonds in its enhanced structural stability and function.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Sandeep; Mohanty, Debasisa; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2012-01-01

    Fucosylation of Thr 9 in pars intercerebralis major peptide-C (PMP-C) enhances its structural stability and functional ability as a serine protease inhibitor. In order to understand the role of disulfide bonds and glycosylation on the structure and function of PMP-C, we have carried out multiple explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on fucosylated and non-fucosylated forms of PMP-C, both in the presence and absence of the disulfide bonds. Our simulations revealed that there were no significant structural changes in the native disulfide bonded forms of PMP-C due to fucosylation. On the other hand, the non-fucosylated form of PMP-C without disulfide bonds showed larger deviations from the starting structure than the fucosylated form. However, the structural deviations were restricted to the terminal regions while core β-sheet retained its hydrogen bonded structure even in absence of disulfide bonds as well as fucosylation. Interestingly, fucosylation of disulfide bonded native PMP-C led to a decreased thermal flexibility in the residue stretch 29-32 which is known to interact with the active site of the target proteases. Our analysis revealed that disulfide bonds covalently connect the residue stretch 29-32 to the central β-sheet of PMP-C and using a novel network of side chain interactions and disulfide bonds fucosylation at Thr 9 is altering the flexibility of the stretch 29-32 located at a distal site. Thus, our simulations explain for the first time, how presence of disulfide bonds between conserved cysteines and fucosylation enhance the function of PMP-C as a protease inhibitor.

  7. Chemical synthesis of La1 isolated from the venom of the scorpion Liocheles australasiae and determination of its disulfide bonding pattern.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Junya; Miyashita, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    La1 is a 73-residue cysteine-rich peptide isolated from the scorpion Liocheles australasiae venom. Although La1 is the most abundant peptide in the venom, its biological function remains unknown. Here, we describe a method for efficient chemical synthesis of La1 using the native chemical ligation (NCL) strategy, in which three peptide components of less than 40 residues were sequentially ligated. The peptide thioester necessary for NCL was synthesized using an aromatic N-acylurea approach with Fmoc-SPPS. After completion of sequential NCL, disulfide bond formation was carried out using a dialysis method, in which the linear peptide dissolved in an acidic solution was dialyzed against a slightly alkaline buffer to obtain correctly folded La1. Next, we determined the disulfide bonding pattern of La1. Enzymatic and chemical digests of La1 without reduction of disulfide bonds were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), which revealed two of four disulfide bond linkages. The remaining two linkages were assigned based on MS/MS analysis of a peptide fragment containing two disulfide bonds. Consequently, the disulfide bonding pattern of La1 was found to be similar to that of a von Willebrand factor type C (VWC) domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the experimental determination of the disulfide bonding pattern of peptides having a single VWC domain as well as their chemical synthesis. La1 synthesized in this study will be useful for investigation of its biological role in the venom.

  8. Inhibition of botulinum neurotoxins interchain disulfide bond reduction prevents the peripheral neuroparalysis of botulism.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Giulia; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Pirazzini, Marcon; Binz, Thomas; Shone, Clifford C; Fillo, Silvia; Lista, Florigio; Rossetto, Ornella; Montecucco, Cesare

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) form a growing family of metalloproteases with a unique specificity either for VAMP, SNAP25 or syntaxin. The BoNTs are grouped in seven different serotypes indicated by letters from A to G. These neurotoxins enter the cytosol of nerve terminals via a 100 kDa chain which binds to the presynaptic membrane and assists the translocation of a 50 kDa metalloprotease chain. These two chains are linked by a single disulfide bridge which plays an essential role during the entry of the metalloprotease chain in the cytosol, but thereafter it has to be reduced to free the proteolytic activity. Its reduction is mediated by thioredoxin which is continuously regenerated by its reductase. Here we show that inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase or of thioredoxin prevent the specific proteolysis of VAMP by the four VAMP-specific BoNTs: type B, D, F and G. These compounds are effective not only in primary cultures of neurons, but also in preventing the in vivo mouse limb neuroparalysis. In addition, one of these inhibitors, Ebselen, largely protects mice from the death caused by a systemic injection. Together with recent results obtained with BoNTs specific for SNAP25 and syntaxin, the present data demonstrate the essential role of the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system in reducing the interchain disulfide during the nerve intoxication mechanism of all serotypes. Therefore its inhibitors should be considered for a possible use to prevent botulism and for treating infant botulism.

  9. Inhibition of botulinum neurotoxins interchain disulfide bond reduction prevents the peripheral neuroparalysis of botulism.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Giulia; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Pirazzini, Marcon; Binz, Thomas; Shone, Clifford C; Fillo, Silvia; Lista, Florigio; Rossetto, Ornella; Montecucco, Cesare

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) form a growing family of metalloproteases with a unique specificity either for VAMP, SNAP25 or syntaxin. The BoNTs are grouped in seven different serotypes indicated by letters from A to G. These neurotoxins enter the cytosol of nerve terminals via a 100 kDa chain which binds to the presynaptic membrane and assists the translocation of a 50 kDa metalloprotease chain. These two chains are linked by a single disulfide bridge which plays an essential role during the entry of the metalloprotease chain in the cytosol, but thereafter it has to be reduced to free the proteolytic activity. Its reduction is mediated by thioredoxin which is continuously regenerated by its reductase. Here we show that inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase or of thioredoxin prevent the specific proteolysis of VAMP by the four VAMP-specific BoNTs: type B, D, F and G. These compounds are effective not only in primary cultures of neurons, but also in preventing the in vivo mouse limb neuroparalysis. In addition, one of these inhibitors, Ebselen, largely protects mice from the death caused by a systemic injection. Together with recent results obtained with BoNTs specific for SNAP25 and syntaxin, the present data demonstrate the essential role of the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system in reducing the interchain disulfide during the nerve intoxication mechanism of all serotypes. Therefore its inhibitors should be considered for a possible use to prevent botulism and for treating infant botulism. PMID:26449594

  10. Bond additivity corrections for quantum chemistry methods

    SciTech Connect

    C. F. Melius; M. D. Allendorf

    1999-04-01

    In the 1980's, the authors developed a bond-additivity correction procedure for quantum chemical calculations called BAC-MP4, which has proven reliable in calculating the thermochemical properties of molecular species, including radicals as well as stable closed-shell species. New Bond Additivity Correction (BAC) methods have been developed for the G2 method, BAC-G2, as well as for a hybrid DFT/MP2 method, BAC-Hybrid. These BAC methods use a new form of BAC corrections, involving atomic, molecular, and bond-wise additive terms. These terms enable one to treat positive and negative ions as well as neutrals. The BAC-G2 method reduces errors in the G2 method due to nearest-neighbor bonds. The parameters within the BAC-G2 method only depend on atom types. Thus the BAC-G2 method can be used to determine the parameters needed by BAC methods involving lower levels of theory, such as BAC-Hybrid and BAC-MP4. The BAC-Hybrid method should scale well for large molecules. The BAC-Hybrid method uses the differences between the DFT and MP2 as an indicator of the method's accuracy, while the BAC-G2 method uses its internal methods (G1 and G2MP2) to provide an indicator of its accuracy. Indications of the average error as well as worst cases are provided for each of the BAC methods.

  11. Single-cell Characterization of Autotransporter-mediated Escherichia coli Surface Display of Disulfide Bond-containing Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Sendra, Victor G; Cirino, Patrick C; Varadarajan, Navin

    2012-01-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are a family of bacterial proteins containing a C-terminal β-barrel-forming domain that facilitates the translocation of N-terminal passenger domain whose functions range from adhesion to proteolysis. Genetic replacement of the native passenger domain with heterologous proteins is an attractive strategy not only for applications such as biocatalysis, live-cell vaccines, and protein engineering but also for gaining mechanistic insights toward understanding AT translocation. The ability of ATs to efficiently display functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides has remained largely controversial. By employing high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry, we have systematically investigated the ability of the Escherichia coli AT Antigen 43 (Ag43) to display two different recombinant reporter proteins, a single-chain antibody (M18 scFv) that contains two disulfides and chymotrypsin that contains four disulfides, by varying the signal peptide and deleting the different domains of the native protein. Our results indicate that only the C-terminal β-barrel and the threaded α-helix are essential for efficient surface display of functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides. These results imply that there are no inherent constraints for functional translocation and display of disulfide bond-containing proteins mediated by the AT system and should open new avenues for protein display and engineering. PMID:23019324

  12. Two Pairs of Conserved Cysteines Are Required for the Oxidative Activity of Ero1p in Protein Disulfide Bond Formation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Frand, Alison R.; Kaiser, Chris A.

    2000-01-01

    In the major pathway for protein disulfide-bond formation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), oxidizing equivalents flow from the conserved ER-membrane protein Ero1p to secretory proteins via protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). Herein, a mutational analysis of the yeast ERO1 gene identifies two pairs of conserved cysteines likely to form redox-active disulfide bonds in Ero1p. Cys100, Cys105, Cys352, and Cys355 of Ero1p are important for oxidative protein folding and for cell viability, whereas Cys90, Cys208, and Cys349 are dispensable for these functions. Substitution of Cys100 with alanine impedes the capture of Ero1p-Pdi1p mixed-disulfide complexes from yeast, and also blocks oxidation of Pdi1p in vivo. Cys352 and Cys355 are required to maintain the fully oxidized redox state of Ero1p, and also play an auxiliary role in thiol–disulfide exchange with Pdi1p. These results suggest a model for the function of Ero1p wherein Cys100 and Cys105 form a redox-active disulfide bond that engages directly in thiol–disulfide exchange with ER oxidoreductases. The Cys352–Cys355 disulfide could then serve to reoxidize the Cys100–Cys105 cysteine pair, possibly through an intramolecular thiol–disulfide exchange reaction. PMID:10982384

  13. Comprehensive identification of disulfide bonds using non-specific proteinase K digestion and CID-cleavable crosslinking analysis methodology for Orbitrap LC/ESI-MS/MS data.

    PubMed

    Makepeace, Karl A T; Serpa, Jason J; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Borchers, Christoph H

    2015-11-01

    Disulfide bonds are valuable constraints in protein structure modeling. The Cys-Cys disulfide bond undergoes specific fragmentation under CID and, therefore, can be considered as a CID-cleavable crosslink. We have recently reported on the benefits of using non-specific digestion with proteinase K for inter-peptide crosslink determination. Here, we describe an updated application of our CID-cleavable crosslink analysis software and our crosslinking analysis with non-specific digestion methodology for the robust and comprehensive determination of disulfide bonds in proteins, using Orbitrap LC/ESI-MS/MS data.

  14. Heat treatment of bovine alpha-lactalbumin results in partially folded, disulfide bond shuffled states with enhanced surface activity.

    PubMed

    Wijesinha-Bettoni, Ramani; Gao, Chunli; Jenkins, John A; Mackie, Alan R; Wilde, Peter J; Mills, E N Clare; Smith, Lorna J

    2007-08-28

    Prolonged heating of holo bovine alpha-lactalbumin (BLA) at 80 degrees C in pH 7 phosphate buffer in the absence of a thiol initiator improves the surface activity of the protein at the air:water interface, as determined by surface tension measurements. Samples after 30, 60, and 120 min of heating were analyzed on cooling to room temperature. Size-exclusion chromatography shows sample heterogeneity that increases with the length of heating. After 120 min of heating monomeric, dimeric, and oligomeric forms of BLA are present, with aggregates formed from disulfide bond linked hydrolyzed protein fragments. NMR characterization at pH 7 in the presence of Ca2+ of the monomer species isolated from the sample heated for 120 min showed that it consisted of a mixture of refolded native protein and partially folded protein and that the partially folded protein species had spectral characteristics similar to those of the pH 2 molten globule state of the protein. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the non-native species had approximately 40% of the alpha-helical content of the native state, but lacked persistent tertiary interactions. Proteomic analysis using thermolysin digestion of three predominant non-native monomeric forms isolated by high-pressure liquid chromatography indicated the presence of disulfide shuffled isomers, containing the non-native 61-73 disulfide bond. These partially folded, disulfide shuffled species are largely responsible for the pronounced improvement in surface activity of the protein on heating.

  15. Characterization of striped bass growth hormone receptors by disulfide-bond reduction and cross-linking studies.

    PubMed

    Gray, E S; Tsai, R W

    1994-05-01

    Growth hormone (GH) receptors were analyzed in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) by addition of disulfide-bond reducing agents to radioreceptor assays and by cross-linking both striped bass and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) crude membrane preparations to radiolabeled hormone. Dithiothreitol (DTT) caused a dose-dependent increase in specific binding of 125I-tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) GH to striped bass membrane preparations. Maximal enhancement of 3.4-fold was obtained with 1 mM DTT and 0.03 trypsin inhibitor units/ml of aprotinin. Addition of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), which binds covalently to free sulfhydryl groups, decreased specific binding. Scatchard analysis of striped bass membrane preparations indicated a single class of GH receptors. Addition of DTT with aprotinin increased GH-binding site concentration from 278 to 507 fmol/mg, while the dissociation constant of 0.56 nM remained unchanged. Cross-linking 125I-tilapia GH to striped bass hepatic membrane preparations and 125I-salmon GH to coho salmon membrane preparations yielded two to three specifically labeled proteins on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Endoglycosidase H treatment was without effect on specifically labeled proteins from either species. Following digestion with N-glycosidase F, relative molecular weights of specifically labeled 125I-GH complexes were reduced, suggesting that hepatic GH-binding proteins in striped bass and salmon are N-linked glycoproteins.

  16. Preparation of copolymer paclitaxel covalently linked via a disulfide bond and its application on controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wulian; Shi, Yuanlin; Feng, Hua; Du, Ming; Zhang, Jin Zhong; Hu, Jianhua; Yang, Dong

    2012-08-01

    A novel controlled drug delivery system based on copolymer covalently linked paclitaxel via a disulfide bond was constructed. Copolymer with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains and carboxyl groups on the backbone was prepared by radical copolymerization of tert-butyl acrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate, followed by selectively hydrolyzing tert-butyl groups to carboxyl groups. Utilizing the carboxyl group as an active reaction site, paclitaxel, a well-known chemotherapeutic drug, could be covalently linked to the backbone of a copolymer via a disulfide bond, and the loading content of paclitaxel could reach up to 32 wt %. In aqueous solution, this drug-loaded copolymer could self-assemble into a spherical micelle, with the hydrophobic drug as the core and hydrophilic PEG as the shell. The mean diameter of the micelles evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) was approximately 60 nm. The in vitro cytotoxicity experiments showed that the copolymer was biocompatible and suitable to use as a drug carrier. After covalently loading the drug, the copolymer showed apparent cytotoxicity to OS-RC-2 cells (kidney tumor cells) and low cytotoxicity to macrophage cells (human normal cells), indicating that the disulfide bond was stable in human normal cells, but would be broken in tumor cells. This selective bond scission behavior is potentially favorable for reducing the toxic and side effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:22774761

  17. Enhanced preclinical efficacy of tamoxifen developed as alginate-cysteine/disulfide bond reduced albumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A; Muñiz, E; Iglesias, I; Teijón, J M; Blanco, M D

    2012-10-15

    Tamoxifen (TMX) is the most common clinical choice for the treatment of advanced or metastatic estrogen-dependent breast cancer. However, research on new challenging therapies is necessary due to its undesirable side effects and the limitation of the treatment only to the oral route. In this study, the antitumor activity of TMX-loaded nanoparticles based on different mixtures of alginate-cysteine and disulfide bond reduced bovine serum albumin was tested in vivo in MCF-7 nude mice xenograft model. These systems showed an enhancement of the TMX antitumor activity, since lower tumor evolutions and lower tumor growth rates were observed in mice treated with them. Moreover, histological and immunohistochemical studies revealed that treatments with TMX-loaded nanoparticles showed the most regressive and less proliferative tumor tissues. TMX biodistribution studies determined that TMX-loaded nanoparticles caused more accumulation of the drug into the tumor site with undetectable levels of TMX in plasma, reducing the possibility of delivering TMX to other not-targeted organs and, consequently, developing possible side effects. Thus, these TMX nanoparticulate systems are expected to provide a novel approach to the treatment of breast cancer in the future. PMID:22850290

  18. Ion Channels of Alamethicin Dimer N-Terminally Linked by Disulfide Bond

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Takashi; Sakoh, Machiko; Nagaoka, Yasuo; Asami, Koji

    2003-01-01

    A covalent dimer of alamethicin Rf30 was synthesized by linking the N-termini by a disulfide bond. When the dimer peptides were added to the cis-side of a diphytanoyl PC membrane, macroscopic channel current was induced only at cis positive voltages. The single-channel recordings showed several conductance levels that were alternately stabilized. These results indicate that the dimer peptides form stable channels by N-terminal insertion like alamethicin and that most of the pores are assembled from even numbers of helices. Taking advantages of the long open duration of the dimer peptide channels, the current-voltage (I-V) relations of the single-channels were obtained by applying fast voltage ramps during the open states. The I-V relations showed rectification, such that current from the cis-side toward the trans-side is larger than that in the opposite direction. The intrinsic rectification is mainly attributed to the macro dipoles of parallel peptide helices surrounding a central pore. PMID:12829482

  19. Synthesis strategies for disulfide bond-containing polymer-based drug delivery system for reduction-responsive controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Liu, Peng

    2015-09-01

    Tumor micro-environment responsive drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been developed as a potential approach to reduce the side effects of cancer chemotherapy. Glutathione (GSH) has been supposed to the most significant signal of the difference between the normal tissue and the tumor cells, besides the media pH and temperature. In recent years, the reduction-responsive DDSs have attracted more and more attention for delivery of anti-cancer drugs, based on such physiological signal. Among them, disulfide bond-containing polymers have been designed as the main tool for the purpose. The recent progress in the synthesis strategies for the disulfide bond-containing polymer-based DDS is focused in the present review.

  20. Enzymatic reduction of disulfide bonds in lysosomes: Characterization of a Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Balasubramanian; Phan, Uyen T.; Geuze, Hans J.; Cresswell, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Proteins internalized into the endocytic pathway are usually degraded. Efficient proteolysis requires denaturation, induced by acidic conditions within lysosomes, and reduction of inter- and intrachain disulfide bonds. Cytosolic reduction is mediated enzymatically by thioredoxin, but the mechanism of lysosomal reduction is unknown. We describe here a lysosomal thiol reductase optimally active at low pH and capable of catalyzing disulfide bond reduction both in vivo and in vitro. The active site, determined by mutagenesis, consists of a pair of cysteine residues separated by two amino acids, similar to other enzymes of the thioredoxin family. The enzyme is a soluble glycoprotein that is synthesized as a precursor. After delivery into the endosomal/lysosomal system by the mannose 6-phosphate receptor, N- and C-terminal prosequences are removed. The enzyme is expressed constitutively in antigen-presenting cells and induced by IFN-γ in other cell types, suggesting a potentially important role in antigen processing.

  1. Disulfide bond-dependent mechanism of protection against oxidative stress in pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase of anaerobic Desulfovibrio bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vita, Nicolas; Hatchikian, E Claude; Nouailler, Matthieu; Dolla, Alain; Pieulle, Laetitia

    2008-01-22

    Oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate forming acetyl-coenzyme A is a crucial step in many metabolic pathways. In most anaerobes, this reaction is carried out by pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), an enzyme normally oxygen sensitive except in Desulfovibrio africanus (Da), where it shows an abnormally high oxygen stability. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have specified a disulfide bond-dependent protective mechanism against oxidative conditions in Da PFOR. Our data demonstrated that the two cysteine residues forming the only disulfide bond in the as-isolated PFOR are crucial for the stability of the enzyme in oxidative conditions. A methionine residue located in the environment of the proximal [4Fe-4S] cluster was also found to be essential for this protective mechanism. In vivo analysis demonstrated unambiguously that PFOR in Da cells as well as two other Desulfovibrio species was efficiently protected against oxidative stress. Importantly, a less active but stable Da PFOR in oxidized cells rapidly reactivated when returned to anaerobic medium. Our work demonstrates the existence of an elegant disulfide bond-dependent reversible mechanism, found in the Desulfovibrio species to protect one of the key enzymes implicated in the central metabolism of these strict anaerobes. This new mechanism could be considered as an adaptation strategy used by sulfate-reducing bacteria to cope with temporary oxidative conditions and to maintain an active dormancy. PMID:18161989

  2. Intermolecular disulfide bonds are not required for the expression of the dimeric state and functional activity of the transferrin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, E; Gironès, N; Davis, R J

    1989-01-01

    The human transferrin receptor is expressed as a disulfide-linked dimer at the cell surface. The sites of intermolecular disulfide bonds are Cys-89 and Cys-98. We have examined the functional significance of the covalent dimeric structure of the transferrin receptor by substitution of Cys-89 and Cys-98 with serine residues. Wild-type and mutated transferrin receptors were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells (clone TF-) that lack detectable endogenous transferrin receptors. The rates of receptor endocytosis and recycling were measured and the accumulation of iron by cells incubated with [59Fe]diferric transferrin was investigated. No significant differences between these rates were observed when cells expressing wild-type and mutated receptors were compared. The structure of the mutant receptor lacking intermolecular disulfide bonds was investigated. The presence of a population of mutant receptors with a non-covalent dimeric structure was indicated by cross-linking studies using diferric [125I]transferrin and the bifunctional reagent disuccinimidyl suberimidate. However, sucrose density gradient sedimentation analysis of Triton X-100 solubilized transferrin receptors demonstrated that the mutant receptor existed as a monomer in the absence of diferric transferrin and as an apparent dimer in the presence of this receptor ligand. We conclude that the covalent dimeric structure of the transferrin receptor is not required for the expression of the dimeric state and functional activity of the receptor. Images PMID:2507316

  3. Site-Specific Conjugation of Peptides and Proteins via Rebridging of Disulfide Bonds Using the Thiol-Yne Coupling Reaction.

    PubMed

    Griebenow, Nils; Dilmaç, Alicia M; Greven, Simone; Bräse, Stefan

    2016-04-20

    Herein, we describe an extension of our previously reported photomediated disulfide rebridging methodology to the conjugation of peptides and proteins. The methodology proved to be reproducible with various alkynes and different peptides. This study includes the first rebridging of the disulfide bond of a peptide through a thiol-yne reaction with a cyclooctyne. In all cases, the rebridging was proven by MS analyses and confirmed by the absence of olefinic protons on (1)H NMR spectra of the resulting products. Finally, this one-pot reduction thiol-yne conjugation was successfully applied to an antibody Fab fragment with a promising conversion, which set a good ground for the future syntheses of new protein and antibody conjugates. PMID:27031217

  4. Role of P225 and the C136-C201 disulfide bond in tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Vindigni, A.; Di Cera, E.

    1998-01-01

    The protease domain of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a key fibrinolytic enzyme, was expressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of 1 mg per liter of media. The recombinant protein was titrated with the Erythrina caraffa trypsin inhibitor (ETI) and characterized in its interaction with plasminogen and the natural inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Analysis of the catalytic properties of tPA using a library of chromogenic substrates carrying substitutions at P1, P2, and P3 reveals a strong preference for Arg over Lys at P1, unmatched by other serine proteases like thrombin or trypsin. In contrast to these proteases and plasmin, tPA shows little or no preference for Pro over Gly at P2. A specific inhibition of tPA by Cu2+ was discovered. The divalent cation presumably binds to H188 near D189 in the primary specificity pocket and inhibits substrate binding in a competitive manner with a Kd = 19 microM. In an attempt to engineer Na+ binding and enhanced catalytic activity in tPA, P225 was replaced with Tyr, the residue present in Na+-dependent allosteric serine proteases. The P225Y mutation did not result in cation binding, but caused a significant loss of specificity (up to 100-fold) toward chromogenic substrates and plasminogen and considerably reduced the inhibition by PAI-1 and ETI. Interestingly, the P225Y substitution enhanced the ability of Cu2+ to inhibit the enzyme. Elimination of the C136-C201 disulfide bond, that is absent in all Na+-dependent allosteric serine proteases, significantly enhanced the yield (5 mg per liter of media) of expression in E. coli, but caused no changes in the properties of the enzyme whether residue 225 was Pro or Tyr. These findings point out an unanticipated crucial role for residue 225 in controlling the catalytic activity of tPA, and suggest that engineering of a Na+-dependent allosteric enhancement of catalytic activity in this enzyme, must involve substantial changes in the region homologous to the Na

  5. Stabilizing Exposure of Conserved Epitopes by Structure Guided Insertion of Disulfide Bond in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Pampi; Labranche, Celia; Go, Eden P.; Clark, Daniel F.; Sun, Yide; Nandi, Avishek; Hartog, Karin; Desaire, Heather; Montefiori, David; Carfi, Andrea; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Barnett, Susan W.

    2013-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into target cells requires binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to cellular receptors and subsequent conformational changes that culminates in fusion of viral and target cell membranes. Recent structural information has revealed that these conformational transitions are regulated by three conserved but potentially flexible layers stacked between the receptor-binding domain (gp120) and the fusion arm (gp41) of Env. We hypothesized that artificial insertion of a covalent bond will ‘snap’ Env into a conformation that is less mobile and stably expose conserved sites. Therefore, we analyzed the interface between these gp120 layers (layers 1, 2 and 3) and identified residues that may form disulfide bonds when substituted with cysteines. We subsequently probed the structures of the resultant mutant gp120 proteins by assaying their binding to a variety of ligands using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) assay. We found that a single disulfide bond strategically inserted between the highly conserved layers 1 and 2 (C65-C115) is able to ‘lock’ gp120 in a CD4 receptor bound conformation (in the absence of CD4), as indicated by the lower dissociation constant (Kd) for the CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope binding 17b antibody. When disulfide-stabilized monomeric (gp120) and trimeric (gp140) Envs were used to immunize rabbits, they were found to elicit a higher proportion of antibodies directed against both CD4i and CD4 binding site epitopes than the wild-type proteins. These results demonstrate that structure-guided stabilization of inter-layer interactions within HIV-1 Env can be used to expose conserved epitopes and potentially overcome the sequence diversity of these molecules. PMID:24146829

  6. FipB, an Essential Virulence Factor of Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis, Has Dual Roles in Disulfide Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Aiping; Zhang, Yan; Clark, Melinda E.; Rabideau, Meaghan M.; Millan Barea, Luis R.

    2014-01-01

    FipB, an essential virulence factor of Francisella tularensis, is a lipoprotein with two conserved domains that have similarity to disulfide bond formation A (DsbA) proteins and the amino-terminal dimerization domain of macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) proteins, which are proteins with peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity. This combination of conserved domains is unusual, so we further characterized the enzymatic activity and the importance of the Mip domain and lipid modification in virulence. Unlike typical DsbA proteins, which are oxidases, FipB exhibited both oxidase and isomerase activities. FipA, which also shares similarity with Mip proteins, potentiated the isomerase activity of FipB in an in vitro assay and within the bacteria, as measured by increased copper sensitivity. To determine the importance of the Mip domain and lipid modification of FipB, mutants producing FipB proteins that lacked either the Mip domain or the critical cysteine necessary for lipid modification were constructed. Both strains replicated within host cells and retained virulence in mice, though there was some attenuation. FipB formed surface-exposed dimers that were sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT), dependent on the Mip domain and on at least one cysteine in the active site of the DsbA-like domain. However, these dimers were not essential for virulence, because the Mip deletion mutant, which failed to form dimers, was still able to replicate intracellularly and retained virulence in mice. Thus, the Mip domains of FipB and FipA impart additional isomerase functionality to FipB, but only the DsbA-like domain and oxidase activity are essential for its critical virulence functions. PMID:25092026

  7. Protein disulfide engineering.

    PubMed

    Dombkowski, Alan A; Sultana, Kazi Zakia; Craig, Douglas B

    2014-01-21

    Improving the stability of proteins is an important goal in many biomedical and industrial applications. A logical approach is to emulate stabilizing molecular interactions found in nature. Disulfide bonds are covalent interactions that provide substantial stability to many proteins and conform to well-defined geometric conformations, thus making them appealing candidates in protein engineering efforts. Disulfide engineering is the directed design of novel disulfide bonds into target proteins. This important biotechnological tool has achieved considerable success in a wide range of applications, yet the rules that govern the stabilizing effects of disulfide bonds are not fully characterized. Contrary to expectations, many designed disulfide bonds have resulted in decreased stability of the modified protein. We review progress in disulfide engineering, with an emphasis on the issue of stability and computational methods that facilitate engineering efforts.

  8. Tribological properties of adaptive phosphate composite coatings with addition of silver and molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cancan; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Jiansong; Zhou, Huidi; Chen, Jianmin

    2014-05-01

    Adaptive phosphate composite coatings with addition of solid lubricants of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and silver (Ag) using aluminum chromium phosphate as the binder were fabricated on high-temperature steel. The tribological properties of phosphate composite coatings were evaluated from room temperature (RT) to 700 °C. The phase composition and microstructure were investigated according to the characterization by power X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the composite coating with the Ag/MoS2 mass ratio of 2:1 exhibits the stable and low friction coefficients from RT to 700 °C and relative low wear rates at all testing temperatures. The tribo-chemical reaction between Ag and MoS2 occurred in the rubbing process to form silver molybdates compounds lubricating film. The temperature-adaptive tribological properties were attributed to the formation of lubricating films composed of lubricants silver, MoS2 and silver molybdates phases on the worn surfaces of the composites coatings in a wide-temperature range.

  9. The Interplay of Disulfide Bonds, α-Helicity, and Hydrophobic Interactions Leads to Ultrahigh Proteolytic Stability of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaqi; Yang, Chaoqiong; Li, Tao; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Yang; Gauthier, Marc A; Zhao, Yibing; Wu, Chuanliu

    2015-08-10

    The contribution of noncovalent interactions to the stability of naturally occurring peptides and proteins has been generally acknowledged, though how these can be rationally manipulated to improve the proteolytic stability of synthetic peptides remains to be explored. In this study, a platform to enhance the proteolytic stability of peptides was developed by controllably dimerizing them into α-helical dimers, connected by two disulfide bonds. This platform not only directs peptides toward an α-helical conformation but permits control of the interfacial hydrophobic interactions between the peptides of the dimer. Using two model dimeric systems constructed from the N-terminal α-helix of RNase A and known inhibitors for the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 (and its homologue MDMX), a deeper understanding into the interplay of disulfide bonds, α-helicity, and hydrophobic interactions on enhanced proteolytic stability was sought out. Results reveal that all three parameters play an important role on attaining ultrahigh proteolytic resistance, a concept that can be exploited for the development of future peptide therapeutics. The understanding gained through this study will enable this strategy to be tailored to new peptides because the proposed strategy displays substantial tolerance to sequence permutation. It thus appears promising for conveniently creating prodrugs composed entirely of the therapeutic peptide itself (i.e., in the form of a dimer).

  10. The Structure of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor-4E from Wheat Reveals a Novel Disulfide Bond

    SciTech Connect

    Monzingo,A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dutt-Chaudhuri, A.; Lyon, A.; Sadow, J.; Hoffman, D.; Robertus, J.; Browning, K.

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor-4E (eIF4E) recognizes and binds the m{sup 7} guanosine nucleotide at the 5' end of eukaryotic messenger RNAs; this protein-RNA interaction is an essential step in the initiation of protein synthesis. The structure of eIF4E from wheat (Triticum aestivum) was investigated using a combination of x-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The overall fold of the crystallized protein was similar to eIF4E from other species, with eight {beta}-strands, three {alpha}-helices, and three extended loops. Surprisingly, the wild-type protein did not crystallize with m{sup 7}GTP in its binding site, despite the ligand being present in solution; conformational changes in the cap-binding loops created a large cavity at the usual cap-binding site. The eIF4E crystallized in a dimeric form with one of the cap-binding loops of one monomer inserted into the cavity of the other. The protein also contained an intramolecular disulfide bridge between two cysteines (Cys) that are conserved only in plants. A Cys-to-serine mutant of wheat eIF4E, which lacked the ability to form the disulfide, crystallized with m{sup 7}GDP in its binding pocket, with a structure similar to that of the eIF4E-cap complex of other species. NMR spectroscopy was used to show that the Cys that form the disulfide in the crystal are reduced in solution but can be induced to form the disulfide under oxidizing conditions. The observation that the disulfide-forming Cys are conserved in plants raises the possibility that their oxidation state may have a role in regulating protein function. NMR provided evidence that in oxidized eIF4E, the loop that is open in the ligand-free crystal dimer is relatively flexible in solution. An NMR-based binding assay showed that the reduced wheat eIF4E, the oxidized form with the disulfide, and the Cys-to-serine mutant protein each bind m{sup 7}GTP in a similar and labile manner, with dissociation rates in the range of 20

  11. Structures of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKG) Iα Leucine Zippers Reveal an Interchain Disulfide Bond Important for Dimer Stability.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liying; Reger, Albert S; Guo, Elaine; Yang, Matthew P; Zwart, Peter; Casteel, Darren E; Kim, Choel

    2015-07-28

    cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) Iα is a central regulator of smooth muscle tone and vasorelaxation. The N-terminal leucine zipper (LZ) domain dimerizes and targets PKG Iα by interacting with G-kinase-anchoring proteins. The PKG Iα LZ contains C42 that is known to form a disulfide bond upon oxidation and to activate PKG Iα. To understand the molecular details of the PKG Iα LZ and C42-C42' disulfide bond, we determined crystal structures of the PKG Iα wild-type (WT) LZ and C42L LZ. Our data demonstrate that the C42-C42' disulfide bond dramatically stabilizes PKG Iα and that the C42L mutant mimics the oxidized WT LZ structurally.

  12. Structures of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKG) Iα Leucine Zippers Reveal an Interchain Disulfide Bond Important for Dimer Stability

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Liying; Reger, Albert S.; Guo, Elaine; Yang, Matthew P.; Zwart, Peter; Casteel, Darren E.; Kim, Choel

    2016-01-01

    cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) Iα is a central regulator of smooth muscle tone and vasorelaxation. The N-terminal leucine zipper (LZ) domain dimerizes and targets PKG Iα by interacting with G-kinase-anchoring proteins. The PKG Iα LZ contains C42 that is known to form a disulfide bond upon oxidation and to activate PKG Iα. To understand the molecular details of the PKG Iα LZ and C42–C42′ disulfide bond, we determined crystal structures of the PKG Iα wild-type (WT) LZ and C42L LZ. Our data demonstrate that the C42–C42′ disulfide bond dramatically stabilizes PKG Iα and that the C42L mutant mimics the oxidized WT LZ structurally. PMID:26132214

  13. A major peroxiredoxin-induced activation of Yap1 transcription factor is mediated by reduction-sensitive disulfide bonds and reveals a low level of transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Tsuyoshi; Okazaki, Shoko; Murayama, Asako; Naganuma, Akira; Nomoto, Akio; Kuge, Shusuke

    2009-02-13

    Redox reactions involving cysteine thiol-disulfide exchange are crucial for the intracellular monitoring of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Yap1, the master transcription factor for the oxidative stress response in budding yeast, is activated by the formation of disulfide bonds in response to H(2)O(2). Gpx3 (glutathione peroxidase-like protein 3) acts as a receptor for H(2)O(2), and Ybp1 (Yap1-binding protein 1) is crucial for Gpx3-dependent disulfide bond formation in Yap1. We previously reported that Tsa1, a major peroxiredoxin in yeast cells, is required for activation of Yap1 in a widely used yeast strain, W303-1b, carrying the ybp1-1 mutant allele encoding a truncated Ybp1 protein. In the present study, we show that Tsa1 can interact with Yap1 via disulfide linkages and induce the formation of intramolecular disulfide bonds in Yap1 in ybp1-1 cells. The results provide evidence that Prx can have intrinsic activity as an H(2)O(2) receptor and can relay H(2)O(2) as a signal to the Prx target proteins in terms of formation of disulfide linkage. Furthermore, our data reveal that there is more of the reduction-resistant active form of Yap1 (i.e. Yap1 (oxII)) when it is partnered with Gpx3 than with Tsa1. These data support our hypothesis that changes in the redox status of Yap1 to reduction-resistant forms by multiple disulfide bond formation are important for determining the level and duration of Yap1 activity in the dynamic equilibrium of redox reactions in cells exposed to H(2)O(2). PMID:19106090

  14. Amino acid sequence and location of the disulfide bonds in bovine beta 2 glycoprotein I: the presence of five Sushi domains.

    PubMed

    Kato, H; Enjyoji, K

    1991-12-17

    beta 2 glycoprotein I is a plasma protein with the ability to bind with various kinds of negatively charged substances. The complete amino acid sequence and the location of all the disulfide bonds of bovine beta 2 glycoprotein I were determined. Bovine beta 2 glycoprotein I consists of 326 amino acid residues with five asparagine-linked carbohydrate chains. Homology with the human protein was calculated to be 83%. Eleven disulfide bonds in bovine beta 2 glycoprotein I constitute four characteristic domains, Sushi domains, and one modified form of a Sushi domain.

  15. 30 CFR 556.53 - Additional bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL... what bonds the lessee must provide before lease exploration activities commence. (1)(i) You must... of the lease by the earliest of: (A) The date you submit a proposed Exploration Plan (EP)...

  16. 30 CFR 556.53 - Additional bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL... what bonds the lessee must provide before lease exploration activities commence. (1)(i) You must... of the lease by the earliest of: (A) The date you submit a proposed Exploration Plan (EP)...

  17. 30 CFR 556.53 - Additional bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL... what bonds the lessee must provide before lease exploration activities commence. (1)(i) You must... of the lease by the earliest of: (A) The date you submit a proposed Exploration Plan (EP)...

  18. Proteins in vacuo: A molecular dynamics study of the unfolding behavior of highly charged disulfide-bond-intact lysozyme subjected to a temperature pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, C. T.; Velázquez, I.; Bittner, M.; Tapia, O.

    1999-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to interpret a variety of experimental data on highly charged disulfide-bond-intact lysozyme in vacuo. The simulation approach involved submitting a model of the protein [Reimann, Velázquez, and Tapia, J. Phys. Chem. B 102, 9344 (1998)] in a given charge state to a 3-ns-long heat pulse (usually at 500 K) followed by cooling or relaxation for 1 ns back to room temperature (293 K). This treatment yielded a charge threshold around Q0=8+ for obtaining significant unfolding, as indicated by an enhancement in collision cross section and conformer length. The collision cross sections and lengths theoretically obtained, along with the threshold charge state for initiating unfolding, were compatible with experimental results on lysozyme in vacuo. The unfolded, highly elongated conformations obtained for Q>=9+ displayed a significant level of non-native β-sheet content which appeared to be additionally stabilized by charge self-solvation.

  19. Lumen Thiol Oxidoreductase1, a Disulfide Bond-Forming Catalyst, Is Required for the Assembly of Photosystem II in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Karamoko, Mohamed; Cline, Sara; Redding, Kevin; Ruiz, Natividad; Hamel, Patrice P.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we identify Arabidopsis thaliana Lumen Thiol Oxidoreductase1 (LTO1) as a disulfide bond–forming enzyme in the thylakoid lumen. Using topological reporters in bacteria, we deduced a lumenal location for the redox active domains of the protein. LTO1 can partially substitute for the proteins catalyzing disulfide bond formation in the bacterial periplasm, which is topologically equivalent to the plastid lumen. An insertional mutation within the LTO1 promoter is associated with a severe photoautotrophic growth defect. Measurements of the photosynthetic activity indicate that the lto1 mutant displays a limitation in the electron flow from photosystem II (PSII). In accordance with these measurements, we noted a severe depletion of the structural subunits of PSII but no change in the accumulation of the cytochrome b6f complex or photosystem I. In a yeast two-hybrid assay, the thioredoxin-like domain of LTO1 interacts with PsbO, a lumenal PSII subunit known to be disulfide bonded, and a recombinant form of the molecule can introduce a disulfide bond in PsbO in vitro. The documentation of a sulfhydryl-oxidizing activity in the thylakoid lumen further underscores the importance of catalyzed thiol-disulfide chemistry for the biogenesis of the thylakoid compartment. PMID:22209765

  20. Mass spectrometry study of PRL-3 phosphatase inactivation by disulfide bond formation and cysteine into glycine conversion.

    PubMed

    Orsatti, Laura; Innocenti, Federica; Lo Surdo, Paola; Talamo, Fabio; Barbato, Gaetano

    2009-09-01

    The Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver-3 (PRL-3) is a cysteine-based phosphatase (CBP) that is highly over-expressed in liver metastasis in colorectal cancer and suspected to be involved in the progression from tumor to metastasis. During substrate-specificity studies based on the screening of PRL-3 phosphatase activity on several phosphorylated synthetic peptides, we observed a decrease in activity depending on sample aging and storage conditions. By liquid chromatography combined with selective alkylation and mass spectrometry, we found two main PRL-3 inactivation pathways: a disulfide bond formation between the catalytic C104 and C49, blocking the enzyme in an inactive oxidized form, or the conversion of the catalytic C104 into glycine. We also found that the disulfide formation and the cysteine into glycine conversion are catalyzed by cations present in the sample after protein purification through a nickel column. By adding a cation chelator such as EDTA and de-oxygenating the sample with argon, PRL-3 phosphatase activity was preserved. These findings suggest that PRL-3, like other CBPs, is sensitive to inactivation by catalytic cysteine oxidation and this has implications for future studies of its activity and specificity. PMID:19639556

  1. Formation and reshuffling of disulfide bonds in bovine serum albumin demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Scherf, Katharina A; Lambrecht, Marlies A; Koehler, Peter; Delcour, Jan A

    2015-01-01

    Thermolysin hydrolyzates of freshly isolated, extensively stored (6 years, 6 °C, dry) and heated (60 min, 90 °C, in excess water) bovine serum albumin (BSA) samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography (LC) electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using alternating electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). The positions of disulfide bonds and free thiol groups in the different samples were compared to those deduced from the crystal structure of native BSA. Results revealed non-enzymatic posttranslational modifications of cysteine during isolation, extensive dry storage, and heating. Heat-induced extractability loss of BSA was linked to the impact of protein unfolding on the involvement of specific cysteine residues in intermolecular and intramolecular thiol-disulfide interchange and thiol oxidation reactions. The here developed approach holds promise for exploring disulfide bond formation and reshuffling in various proteins under conditions relevant for chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical and food processing. PMID:26193081

  2. Formation and reshuffling of disulfide bonds in bovine serum albumin demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Scherf, Katharina A; Lambrecht, Marlies A; Koehler, Peter; Delcour, Jan A

    2015-07-20

    Thermolysin hydrolyzates of freshly isolated, extensively stored (6 years, 6 °C, dry) and heated (60 min, 90 °C, in excess water) bovine serum albumin (BSA) samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography (LC) electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using alternating electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). The positions of disulfide bonds and free thiol groups in the different samples were compared to those deduced from the crystal structure of native BSA. Results revealed non-enzymatic posttranslational modifications of cysteine during isolation, extensive dry storage, and heating. Heat-induced extractability loss of BSA was linked to the impact of protein unfolding on the involvement of specific cysteine residues in intermolecular and intramolecular thiol-disulfide interchange and thiol oxidation reactions. The here developed approach holds promise for exploring disulfide bond formation and reshuffling in various proteins under conditions relevant for chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical and food processing.

  3. Computational Modeling of Laminin N-Terminal Domains Using Sparse Distance Constraints from Disulfide Bonds and Chemical Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Kalkhof, Stefan; Haehn, Sebastian; Paulsson, Mats; Smyth, Neil; Meiler, Jens; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Basement membranes are thin extracellular protein layers, which separate endothelial and epithelial cells from the underlying connecting tissue. The main non-collagenous components of basement membranes are laminins, trimeric glycoproteins, which form polymeric networks by interactions of their N-terminal (LN) domains; however, no high-resolution structure of laminin LN domains exists so far. To construct models for laminin β1 and γ1 LN domains 14 potentially suited template structures were determined using fold recognition methods. For each target/template-combination comparative models were created with Rosetta. Final models were selected based on their agreement with experimentally obtained distance constraints from natural cross-links, i.e., disulfide bonds as well as chemical cross-links obtained from reactions with two amine-reactive cross-linkers. We predict that laminin β1 and γ1 LN domains share the galactose-binding domain-like fold. PMID:20939100

  4. Counting sulfhydryls and disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins using mercurial ions as an MS-tag.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yifei; Chen, Liqin; Yang, Limin; Wang, Qiuquan

    2008-08-01

    Organic mercurial compounds are the most specific and sensitive reagents for reaction with the sulfhydryl groups (SHs) in peptides and proteins because of the strong mercury-sulfur affinity. Using the monofunctional organic mercury ion RHg(+) as a mass spectrometry (MS)-tag has the advantages of reacting with one sulfhydryl group, offering definite mass shift, and especially stable and characteristic nonradioactive isotopic distribution. Mass spectrometric analysis of derivatized sulfhydryls in peptides/proteins is thus an alternative for precisely counting the number of sulfhydryl groups and disulfide bonds (SS). Here the tags used include monomethylmercury chloride, monoethylmercury chloride, and 4-(hydroxymercuri) benzoic acid. The feasibility of this strategy is demonstrated using HPLC/ESI-MS to count SHs and SS in model peptides/proteins, i.e., glutathione, phytochelatins, lysozyme and beta-lactoglobulin, which contain increasing SHs and various SS linkages. PMID:18524619

  5. The Disulfide Bond Cys255-Cys279 in the Immunoglobulin-Like Domain of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2 Is Required for Membrane Insertion of Anthrax Protective Antigen Pore

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Kyle; Altiyev, Agamyrat; Puschhof, Jens; Sauter, Roland; Arigi, Emma; Ruiz, Blanca; Peng, Xiuli; Almeida, Igor; Sherman, Michael; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptors act as molecular clamps or switches that control anthrax toxin entry, pH-dependent pore formation, and translocation of enzymatic moieties across the endosomal membranes. We previously reported that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain of the anthrax toxin receptor 2 (ANTXR2) inhibited the function of the protective antigen (PA) pore. In the present study, the disulfide linkage in the Ig domain was identified as Cys255-Cys279 and Cys230-Cys315. Specific disulfide bond deletion mutants were achieved by replacing Cys residues with Ala residues. Deletion of the disulfide bond C255-C279, but not C230-C315, inhibited the PA pore-induced release of the fluorescence dyes from the liposomes, suggesting that C255-C279 is essential for PA pore function. Furthermore, we found that deletion of C255-C279 did not affect PA prepore-to-pore conversion, but inhibited PA pore membrane insertion by trapping the PA membrane-inserting loops in proteinaceous hydrophobic pockets. Fluorescence spectra of Trp59, a residue adjacent to the PA-binding motif in von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of ANTXR2, showed that deletion of C255-C279 resulted in a significant conformational change on the receptor ectodomain. The disulfide deletion-induced conformational change on the VWA domain was further confirmed by single-particle 3D reconstruction of the negatively stained PA-receptor heptameric complexes. Together, the biochemical and structural data obtained in this study provides a mechanistic insight into the role of the receptor disulfide bond C255-C279 in anthrax toxin action. Manipulation of the redox states of the receptor, specifically targeting to C255-C279, may become a novel strategy to treat anthrax. PMID:26107617

  6. Formation of an Intramolecular Periplasmic Disulfide Bond in TcpP Protects TcpP and TcpH from Degradation in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Sarah J.; French, Emily L.; Thomson, Joshua J.; Seaborn, Craig P.; Shively, Christian A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT TcpP and ToxR coordinately regulate transcription of toxT, the master regulator of numerous virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae. TcpP and ToxR are membrane-localized transcription factors, each with a periplasmic domain containing two cysteines. In ToxR, these cysteines form an intramolecular disulfide bond and a cysteine-to-serine substitution affects activity. We determined that the two periplasmic cysteines of TcpP also form an intramolecular disulfide bond. Disruption of this intramolecular disulfide bond by mutation of either cysteine resulted in formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds. Furthermore, disruption of the intramolecular disulfide bond in TcpP decreased the stability of TcpP. While the decreased stability of TcpP-C207S resulted in a nearly complete loss of toxT activation and cholera toxin (CT) production, the second cysteine mutant, TcpP-C218S, was partially resistant to proteolytic degradation and maintained ∼50% toxT activation capacity. TcpP-C218S was also TcpH independent, since deletion of tcpH did not affect the stability of TcpP-C218S, whereas wild-type TcpP was degraded in the absence of TcpH. Finally, TcpH was also unstable when intramolecular disulfides could not be formed in TcpP, suggesting that the single periplasmic cysteine in TcpH may assist with disulfide bond formation in TcpP by interacting with the periplasmic cysteines of TcpP. Consistent with this finding, a TcpH-C114S mutant was unable to stabilize TcpP and was itself unstable. Our findings demonstrate a periplasmic disulfide bond in TcpP is critical for TcpP stability and virulence gene expression. IMPORTANCE The Vibrio cholerae transcription factor TcpP, in conjunction with ToxR, regulates transcription of toxT, the master regulator of numerous virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae. TcpP is a membrane-localized transcription factor with a periplasmic domain containing two cysteines. We determined that the two periplasmic cysteines of TcpP form an

  7. Probing the Conformational and Functional Consequences of Disulfide Bond Engineering in Growth Hormone by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Coupled to Electron Transfer Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Seger, Signe T; Breinholt, Jens; Faber, Johan H; Andersen, Mette D; Wiberg, Charlotte; Schjødt, Christine B; Rand, Kasper D

    2015-06-16

    Human growth hormone (hGH), and its receptor interaction, is essential for cell growth. To stabilize a flexible loop between helices 3 and 4, while retaining affinity for the hGH receptor, we have engineered a new hGH variant (Q84C/Y143C). Here, we employ hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to map the impact of the new disulfide bond on the conformational dynamics of this new hGH variant. Compared to wild type hGH, the variant exhibits reduced loop dynamics, indicating a stabilizing effect of the introduced disulfide bond. Furthermore, the disulfide bond exhibits longer ranging effects, stabilizing a short α-helix quite distant from the mutation sites, but also rendering a part of the α-helical hGH core slightly more dynamic. In the regions where the hGH variant exhibits a different deuterium uptake than the wild type protein, electron transfer dissociation (ETD) fragmentation has been used to pinpoint the residues responsible for the observed differences (HDX-ETD). Finally, by use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements, we show that the new disulfide bond does not compromise receptor affinity. Our work highlight the analytical potential of HDX-ETD combined with functional assays to guide protein engineering. PMID:25978680

  8. Inverse-Micelle-Encapsulated Water-Enabled Bond Breaking of Dialkyl Diselenide/Disulfide: A Critical Step for Synthesizing High- Quality Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzhna, Oksana; Li, Ying; Allison, Thomas C.; Tong, Yu ye J.

    2012-10-09

    Inverse-micelle-encapsulated water formed in the two-phase Brust-Schiffrin method (BSM) synthesis of Au nanoparticles (NPs) is identified as essential for dialkyl diselenide/disulfide to react with the Au(III) complex in which the Se-Se/S-S bond is broken, leading to formation of higher-quality Au NPs.

  9. Role of disulfide bonds in maintaining the structural integrity of the sheath of Leptothrix discophora SP-6.

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, D; Ghiorse, W C

    1993-01-01

    Isolated sheaths of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 (ATCC 51168) were tested for susceptibility to degradation by a variety of chemical denaturants and lytic enzymes and found to be resistant to many reagents and enzyme treatments. However, disulfide bond-reducing agents such as dithiothreitol (DTT), beta-mercaptoethanol, sodium cyanide, and sodium sulfite degraded the sheath, especially at elevated pH (pH 9) and temperature (50 degrees C). DTT and beta-mercaptoethanol caused more rapid degradation of the sheath than cyanide or sulfite. Treatment of the sheath with 1 N NaOH resulted in rapid breakdown, while treatment with 1 N HCl resulted in slow but significant hydrolysis. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the 6.5-nm fibrils previously shown to be an integral structural element of the sheath fabric (D. Emerson and W. C. Ghiorse, J. Bacteriol. 175:7808-7818, 1993) were progressively dissociated into random masses during DTT-induced degradation. Quantitation of disulfide bonds with DTT showed that the sheaths contained approximately 2.2 mumol of disulfides per mg of sheath protein. Reaction with 5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) showed that sheaths also contained approximately 0.8 mumol of free sulfhydryls per mg of protein. A sulfhydryl-specific fluorescent probe (fluorescein 5-maleimide) showed that the free sulfhydryls in sheathed cell filaments were evenly distributed throughout the sheath. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography of [14C]iodoacetamide-labeled sheaths and DTT-dissociated sheath fibril suspensions showed that the majority of 14C-labeled sulfhydryls in the sheaths did not enter the gel. However, low-molecular-mass silver-staining bands (14 to 45 kDa) did appear in the gels after iodoacetic acid or iodoacetamide alkylation of the dissociated fibrils. These bands did not stain with Coomassie blue. Their migration in gels was slightly affected by digestion with pronase. The fibrils contained 20 to 25

  10. Role of disulfide bonds in maintaining the structural integrity of the sheath of Leptothrix discophora SP-6.

    PubMed

    Emerson, D; Ghiorse, W C

    1993-12-01

    Isolated sheaths of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 (ATCC 51168) were tested for susceptibility to degradation by a variety of chemical denaturants and lytic enzymes and found to be resistant to many reagents and enzyme treatments. However, disulfide bond-reducing agents such as dithiothreitol (DTT), beta-mercaptoethanol, sodium cyanide, and sodium sulfite degraded the sheath, especially at elevated pH (pH 9) and temperature (50 degrees C). DTT and beta-mercaptoethanol caused more rapid degradation of the sheath than cyanide or sulfite. Treatment of the sheath with 1 N NaOH resulted in rapid breakdown, while treatment with 1 N HCl resulted in slow but significant hydrolysis. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the 6.5-nm fibrils previously shown to be an integral structural element of the sheath fabric (D. Emerson and W. C. Ghiorse, J. Bacteriol. 175:7808-7818, 1993) were progressively dissociated into random masses during DTT-induced degradation. Quantitation of disulfide bonds with DTT showed that the sheaths contained approximately 2.2 mumol of disulfides per mg of sheath protein. Reaction with 5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) showed that sheaths also contained approximately 0.8 mumol of free sulfhydryls per mg of protein. A sulfhydryl-specific fluorescent probe (fluorescein 5-maleimide) showed that the free sulfhydryls in sheathed cell filaments were evenly distributed throughout the sheath. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography of [14C]iodoacetamide-labeled sheaths and DTT-dissociated sheath fibril suspensions showed that the majority of 14C-labeled sulfhydryls in the sheaths did not enter the gel. However, low-molecular-mass silver-staining bands (14 to 45 kDa) did appear in the gels after iodoacetic acid or iodoacetamide alkylation of the dissociated fibrils. These bands did not stain with Coomassie blue. Their migration in gels was slightly affected by digestion with pronase. The fibrils contained 20 to 25

  11. The Kringle-like Domain Facilitates Post-endoplasmic Reticulum Changes to Premelanosome Protein (PMEL) Oligomerization and Disulfide Bond Configuration and Promotes Amyloid Formation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tina; Watt, Brenda; Spruce, Lynn A; Seeholzer, Steven H; Marks, Michael S

    2016-02-12

    The formation of functional amyloid must be carefully regulated to prevent the accumulation of potentially toxic products. Premelanosome protein (PMEL) forms non-toxic functional amyloid fibrils that assemble into sheets upon which melanins ultimately are deposited within the melanosomes of pigment cells. PMEL is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum but forms amyloid only within post-Golgi melanosome precursors; thus, PMEL must traverse the secretory pathway in a non-amyloid form. Here, we identified two pre-amyloid PMEL intermediates that likely regulate the timing of fibril formation. Analyses by non-reducing SDS-PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, and sedimentation velocity revealed two native high Mr disulfide-bonded species that contain Golgi-modified forms of PMEL. These species correspond to disulfide bond-containing dimeric and monomeric PMEL isoforms that contain no other proteins as judged by two-dimensional PAGE of metabolically labeled/immunoprecipitated PMEL and by mass spectrometry of affinity-purified complexes. Metabolic pulse-chase analyses, small molecule inhibitor treatments, and evaluation of site-directed mutants suggest that the PMEL dimer forms around the time of endoplasmic reticulum exit and is resolved by disulfide bond rearrangement into a monomeric form within the late Golgi or a post-Golgi compartment. Mutagenesis of individual cysteine residues within the non-amyloid cysteine-rich Kringle-like domain stabilizes the disulfide-bonded dimer and impairs fibril formation as determined by electron microscopy. Our data show that the Kringle-like domain facilitates the resolution of disulfide-bonded PMEL dimers and promotes PMEL functional amyloid formation, thereby suggesting that PMEL dimers must be resolved to monomers to generate functional amyloid fibrils. PMID:26694611

  12. Accumulation of β-Conglycinin in Soybean Cotyledon through the Formation of Disulfide Bonds between α′- and α-Subunits1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wadahama, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Kensuke; Matsusaki, Motonori; Nishizawa, Keito; Ishimoto, Masao; Arisaka, Fumio; Takagi, Kyoko; Urade, Reiko

    2012-01-01

    β-Conglycinin, one of the major soybean (Glycine max) seed storage proteins, is folded and assembled into trimers in the endoplasmic reticulum and accumulated into protein storage vacuoles. Prior experiments have used soybean β-conglycinin extracted using a reducing buffer containing a sulfhydryl reductant such as 2-mercaptoethanol, which reduces both intermolecular and intramolecular disulfide bonds within the proteins. In this study, soybean proteins were extracted from the cotyledons of immature seeds or dry beans under nonreducing conditions to prevent the oxidation of thiol groups and the reduction or exchange of disulfide bonds. We found that approximately half of the α′- and α-subunits of β-conglycinin were disulfide linked, together or with P34, prior to amino-terminal propeptide processing. Sedimentation velocity experiments, size-exclusion chromatography, and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis, with blue native PAGE followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE, indicated that the β-conglycinin complexes containing the disulfide-linked α′/α-subunits were complexes of more than 720 kD. The α′- and α-subunits, when disulfide linked with P34, were mostly present in approximately 480-kD complexes (hexamers) at low ionic strength. Our results suggest that disulfide bonds are formed between α′/α-subunits residing in different β-conglycinin hexamers, but the binding of P34 to α′- and α-subunits reduces the linkage between β-conglycinin hexamers. Finally, a subset of glycinin was shown to exist as noncovalently associated complexes larger than hexamers when β-conglycinin was expressed under nonreducing conditions. PMID:22218927

  13. Determination of the disulfide bond arrangement of human respiratory syncytial virus attachment (G) protein by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, J. J.; Ferguson, B. L.; Speelman, D.; Mills, J.

    1997-01-01

    The attachment protein or G protein of the A2 strain of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was digested with trypsin and the resultant peptides separated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). One tryptic peptide produced a mass by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) corresponding to residues 152-187 with the four Cys residues of the ectodomain (residues 173, 176, 182, and 186) in disulfide linkage and absence of glycosylation. Sub-digestion of this tryptic peptide with pepsin and thermolysin produced peptides consistent with disulfide bonds between Cys173 and Cys186 and between Cys176 and Cys182. Analysis of ions produced by post-source decay of a peptic peptide during MALDI-TOF-MS revealed fragmentation of peptide bonds with minimal fission of an inter-chain disulfide bond. Ions produced by this unprecedented MALDI-induced post-source fragmentation corroborated the existence of the disulfide arrangement deduced from mass analysis of proteolysis products. These findings indicate that the ectodomain of the G protein has a non-glycosylated subdomain containing a "cystine noose." PMID:9194191

  14. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Kristin A.; Black, Paul J.; Mercer, Kermit R.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Owen, Robin L.; Snell, Edward H.; Bernhard, William A.

    2013-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage, to confirm a multi-track radiation-damage process and to develop a model of that process. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV–visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5–0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure.

  15. Assignment of disulfide bonds in gp64, a putative cell-cell adhesion protein of Polysphondylium pallidum. Presence of Sushi domains in the cellular slime mold protein.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Kumazaki, T; Ochiai, H

    1994-11-18

    The 64-kDa membrane-bound glycoprotein of the cellular slime mold Polysphondylium pallidum (referred to as gp64), seems to be implicated in cell-cell adhesion. Previously we have isolated a full-length gp64 cDNA, determined its nucleotide sequence, and found that all cysteine residues in the protein are involved in the formation of disulfide bonds. The disulfide arrangement of the 36 cysteines in gp64 was established by analysis of proteolytically cleaved protein and sequence analysis of cystine-containing fragments. Since gp64 has 36 Cys residues, 18 disulfide bonds must exist and the positions of 15 of them were determined. The 15 disulfide bonds in gp64 constitute five characteristic, so-called Sushi domains. In a Sushi domain, the first Cys in a sequence is connected to the third one and the second Cys to the fourth one. This is the first report describing the presence of Sushi domains in a cellular slime mold protein. From these data, gp64 appears to be distinct from all other previously described cell-adhesion proteins.

  16. Disulfide bond stabilization of the hexameric capsomer of human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Pornillos, Owen; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Banumathi, Sankaran; Hua, Yuanzi; Yeager, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 capsid is modeled as a Fullerene cone that is composed of ~250 hexamers of the viral CA protein and 12 CA pentamers. Structures of CA hexamers have been difficult to obtain because the hexamer-stabilizing interactions are inherently weak, and CA tends to spontaneously assemble into capsid-like particles. Here, we describe a two-step biochemical strategy to obtain soluble CA hexamers for crystallization. First, the hexamer was stabilized by engineering disulfide crosslinks (either A14C/E45C or A42C/T54C) between the N-terminal domains of adjacent subunits. Second, the crosslinked hexamers were prevented from polymerizing further into hyperstable capsid-like structures by mutations (W184A and M185A) that interfered with dimeric association between the C-terminal domains that link adjacent hexamers. The structures of two different HIV-1 CA hexamers were nearly identical, and we combined the non-mutated portions of the structures to generate an atomic-resolution model for the native hexamer. This hybrid approach for structure determination should be applicable to other viral capsomers and protein-protein complexes in general. PMID:20600115

  17. Addition of methanetrisulfonyl fluoride to unsaturated bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Yagupol'skii, Yu.L.; Gerus, I.I.; Savina, T.I.

    1988-06-10

    The reactions of methanetrisulfonyl fluoride, HC(SO/sub 2/F)/sub 3/ with acrylic acid derivatives lead to addition products containing the tris(fluorosulfonyl)methyl group, while methyl vinyl ketone gives an unstable adduct. The methyl ester of propiolic acid is converted to a mixture of cis- and trans-tris(fluorosulfonyl)-crotonic acid esters. The reaction of cyclohexene with methanesulfonyl fluoride leads to dimerization of the olefin and the cyclohexyl derivative is formed in low yield. Sulfonyl fluoride acts as catalyst for the conversion of cyclohexene to dimer and only a small portion of the cyclohexyl cation reacts with the weakly nucleophilic /sup /minus//C(SO/sub 2/F)/sub 3/ anion.

  18. Rotational and hinge dynamics of discoidal high density lipoproteins probed by interchain disulfide bond formation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Li, Songlin; Jones, Martin K.; Segrest, Jere P.

    2013-01-01

    To develop a detailed double belt model for discoidal HDL, we previously scored inter-helical salt bridges between all possible registries of two stacked antiparallel amphipathic helical rings of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I. The top score was the antiparallel apposition of helix 5 with 5 followed closely by appositions of helix 5 with 4 and helix 5 with 6. The rationale for the current study is that, for each of the optimal scores, a pair of identical residues can be identified in juxtaposition directly on the contact edge between the two antiparallel helical belts of apoA-I. Further, these residues are always in the ‘9th position’ in one of the eighteen 11-mer repeats that make up the lipid-associating domain of apoA-I. To illustrate our terminology, 129j (LL5/5) refers to the juxtaposition of the Ca atoms of G129 (in a ‘9th position’) in the pairwise helix 5 domains. We reasoned that if identical residues in the double belt juxtapositions were mutated to a cysteine and kept under reducing conditions during disc formation, we would have a precise method for determining registration in discoidal HDL by formation of a disulfide-linked apoA-I homodimer. Using this approach, we conclude that 129j (LL5/5) is the major rotamer orientation for double belt HDL and propose that the small ubiquitous gap between the pairwise helix 5 portions of the double belt in larger HDL discoidal particles is significantly dynamic to hinge off the disc edge under certain conditions, e.g., in smaller particles or perhaps following binding of the enzyme LCAT. PMID:22063273

  19. 31 CFR 315.91 - Additional requirements; bond of indemnity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional requirements; bond of indemnity. 315.91 Section 315.91 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance.... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, J, AND K, AND U.S. SAVINGS NOTES Miscellaneous...

  20. Effects of Divalent Cations and Disulfide Bond Reducing Agents on Specific Binding of Growth Hormone to Liver Membrane Receptors from Snakehead Fish (Ophiocephalus argus, Cantor).

    PubMed

    Sun, Xun; Zhang, Xin-Na; Zhu, Shang-Quan; Zheng, Han-Qi

    2000-01-01

    Divalent cations, Ca(2 ), Mg(2 ) and Mn(2 ) enhance the binding of bream growth hormone (brGH) to snakehead fish liver membrane, and their optimum concentration was found to be 8 12 mmol/L, at which Ca(2 ), Mg(2 ) and Mn(2 ) could increase, respectively, the specific binding to 230%, 180%, and 200%, compared with the binding in the absence of ions. The Eadie-Scatchard plot was used for the dynamic analysis of the Ca(2 ) binding site. A low affinity Ca(2 ) binding site was found in the GH-receptor complex with K(m)=0.384 mmol/L, and the affinity constant (K(a)) was increased from 1.045x10(9) L.mol(-1) to 1.295x10(9) L.mol(-1) by the addition of 10 mmol/L CaCl(2). The effects of disulfide bond reducing agents, DTT and ME, on (125)I-brGH binding to growth hormone receptor (GHR) on snakehead fish liver memebrane were also analyzed. The addition of 0.1 20 mmol/L DTT or 0.01% 1% ME to the radioreceptor assay system caused a significant dose dependent increase in the specific binding for (125)I-brGH. In the presence of 0.8 mmol/L DTT or 0.08% ME, the specific binding of (125)I-brGH was increased from 10.2% to 15.5% and 13.2% respectively, and the affinity constant was also increased from 1.265x10(9) L.mol(-1) to 2.185x10(9) L.mol(-1) and 1.625x10(9) L.mol(-1), respectively but no changes in the binding capacity were observed. Further studies showed that the effects of reductants on the specific binding of brGH were due in part to the ligand itself and in part to GHR. In addition, it was observed that one of the three disulfide bonds of brGH could be reduced by 0.8 mmol/L DTT.

  1. Oxidative Addition of Disulfides, Alkyl Sulfides, and Diphosphides to an Aluminum(I) Center.

    PubMed

    Chu, Terry; Boyko, Yaroslav; Korobkov, Ilia; Kuzmina, Lyudmila G; Howard, Judith A K; Nikonov, Georgii I

    2016-09-01

    The aluminum(I) compound NacNacAl (1) reacts with diphenyl disulfide and diethyl sulfide to form the respective four-coordinate bis(phenyl sulfide) complex NacNacAl(SPh)2 (2) and alkyl thiolate aluminum complex NacNacAlEt(SEt) (3). As well, reaction of 1 with tetraphenyl diphosphine furnishes the bis(diphenyl phosphido) complex NacNacAl(PPh2)2 (4). Production of 3 and 4 are the first examples of C(sp(3))-S and R2P-PR2 activation by a main-group element complex. All three complexes were characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystal structure analysis. Furthermore, a variable-temperature NMR spectroscopic study was undertaken on 4 to study its dynamic behavior in solution. PMID:27529564

  2. Structural analysis of an intact monoclonal antibody by online electrochemical reduction of disulfide bonds and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nicolardi, Simone; Deelder, André M; Palmblad, Magnus; van der Burgt, Yuri E M

    2014-06-01

    Structural confirmation and quality control of recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by top-down mass spectrometry is still challenging due to the size of the proteins, disulfide content, and post-translational modifications such as glycosylation. In this study we have applied electrochemistry (EC) to overcome disulfide bridge complexity in top-down analysis of mAbs. To this end, an electrochemical cell was coupled directly to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source and a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer (MS) equipped with a 15 T magnet. By performing online EC-assisted reduction of interchain disulfide bonds in an intact mAb, the released light chains could be selected for tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis without interference from heavy-chain fragments. Moreover, the acquisition of full MS scans under denaturing conditions allowed profiling of all abundant mAb glycoforms. Ultrahigh-resolution FTICR-MS measurements provided fully resolved isotopic distributions of intact mAb and enabled the identification of the most abundant adducts and other interfering species. Furthermore, it was found that reduction of interchain disulfide bonds occurs in the ESI source dependent on capillary voltage and solvent composition. This phenomenon was systematically evaluated and compared with the results obtained from reduction in the electrochemical cell.

  3. Formation of intersubunit disulfide bonds and properties of the single histidine and cysteine residues in each subunit relative to the decameric structure of cyanase.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P M; Korte, J J; Holcomb, T A; Cho, Y G; Son, C M; Sung, Y C

    1994-05-27

    Reaction of the single cysteine residue in each subunit of cyanase with certain SH reagents gives an active decameric derivative that dissociates reversibly to an inactive dimer derivative (Anderson, P. M., Johnson, W. V., Korte, J. J., Xiong, X., Sung, Y.-c., and Fuchs, J. A. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 5674-5680). Reaction of mixed disulfide dimer derivatives of cyanase with dithiothreitol at 0 degree C results in formation of a disulfide bond between the subunits in the dimer. The disulfide dimer was inactive and did not associate to a decamer; the intersubunit disulfide bond could not be formed when the dimers were associated as a decamer. The two SH groups apparently are in close proximity to each other in the dissociated dimer but not when the dimer is associated to a decamer. Substitution of glycine for the cysteine residue or of tyrosine, asparagine, glycine, valine, or leucine for the single histidine residue in each subunit gave mutant enzymes that were active. However, H113N, H113Y, and C83G were unstable at low temperature and/or ionic strength, dissociating reversibly to an inactive dimer. Efficient reassociation required the presence of bicarbonate or cyanate analog. The results are consistent with a proposed single site per subunit model explaining apparent half-site binding of substrates and the requirement of decameric structure for activity.

  4. Rational Design of Disulfide Bonds Increases Thermostability of a Mesophilic 1,3-1,4-β-Glucanase from Bacillus terquilensis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Li, Qi

    2016-01-01

    1,3–1,4-β-glucanase is an important biocatalyst in brewing industry and animal feed industry, while its low thermostability often reduces its application performance. In this study, the thermostability of a mesophilic β-glucanase from Bacillus terquilensis was enhanced by rational design and engineering of disulfide bonds in the protein structure. Protein spatial configuration was analyzed to pre-exclude the residues pairs which negatively conflicted with the protein structure and ensure the contact of catalytic center. The changes in protein overall and local flexibility among the wild-type enzyme and the designated mutants were predicted to select the potential disulfide bonds for enhancement of thermostability. Two residue pairs (N31C-T187C and P102C-N125C) were chosen as engineering targets and both of them were proved to significantly enhance the protein thermostability. After combinational mutagenesis, the double mutant N31C-T187C/P102C-N125C showed a 48.3% increase in half-life value at 60°C and a 4.1°C rise in melting temperature (Tm) compared to wild-type enzyme. The catalytic property of N31C-T187C/P102C-N125C mutant was similar to that of wild-type enzyme. Interestingly, the optimal pH of double mutant was shifted from pH6.5 to pH6.0, which could also increase its industrial application. By comparison with mutants with single-Cys substitutions, the introduction of disulfide bonds and the induced new hydrogen bonds were proved to result in both local and overall rigidification and should be responsible for the improved thermostability. Therefore, the introduction of disulfide bonds for thermostability improvement could be rationally and highly-effectively designed by combination with spatial configuration analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. PMID:27100881

  5. Evidences for the existence of intermolecular disulfide-bonded oligomers in the H3 hemagglutinins expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shun; Zhou, Jianqiang; Liu, Qiliang; Liu, Kang; Xue, Chunyi; Li, Xiaoming; Zheng, Jing; Luo, Dongyu; Cao, Yongchang

    2014-04-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA) protein as the predominant antigen, executes receptor binding and membrane fusion, which critically influence the virological characteristics of influenza viruses. The literature contained scattered data showing reduction-sensitive HA oligomers when HA proteins were analyzed under non-reducing conditions. However, whether the reduction-sensitive HA oligomers are inter-monomer disulfide-bonded has not been studied. Here, we showed: (1) the detection of β-mercaptoethanol-sensitive H3 HA oligomers was not affected by the treatment of cells with iodoacetamide prior to cell solubilization; (2) H3 HA oligomers were present on cell surfaces; (3) H3 HA oligomers had higher density than monomers; and (4) mutation of all the five C-terminal cysteines completely abolished the formation of H3 HA oligomers. Furthermore, mutant HAs with mutations of TM cysteines, CT cysteines or all five cysteines had decreased thermal stability but increased fusion activity in comparison with wildtype HA. In conclusion, this study has presented enough evidence for the existence of inter-monomer S-S H3 HA oligomers formed by five C-terminal cysteines, and suggested that all five C-terminal cysteines exerted opposite effects on HA thermal stability and fusion activity.

  6. A Winged-Helix Protein From Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus Points Toward Stabilizing Disulfide Bonds in the Intracellular Proteins of a Hyperthermophilic Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E.T.; Eilers, B.; Menon, S.; Reiter, D.; Ortmann, A.; Young, M.J.; Lawrence, C.M.

    2009-06-03

    Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) was the first non-tailed icosahedral virus to be isolated from an archaeal host. Like other archaeal viruses, its 37 open reading frames generally lack sequence similarity to genes with known function. The roles of the gene products in this and other archaeal viruses are thus largely unknown. However, a protein's three-dimensional structure may provide functional and evolutionary insight in cases of minimal sequence similarity. In this vein, the structure of STIV F93 reveals a homodimer with strong similarity to the winged-helix family of DNA-binding proteins. Importantly, an interchain disulfide bond is found at the dimer interface, prompting analysis of the cysteine distribution in the putative intracellular proteins of the viral proteome. The analysis suggests that intracellular disulfide bonds are common in cellular STIV proteins, where they enhance the thermostability of the viral proteome.

  7. Disulfide bond tethering of extracellular loops does not affect the closure of OmpF porin at acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Wager, Beau; Baslé, Arnaud; Delcour, Anne H

    2010-11-01

    The permeability of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is essentially controlled by pore-forming proteins of the porin family. The trimeric E. coli porin OmpF is assembled as a triple β-barrel, where each monomer contains a central pore and extracellular loops. Electrophysiological analysis of the behavior of OmpF at acidic pH reveals that the protein undergoes a conformational change leading to the sequential step-wise closure of the three monomers. A previous atomic force microscopy study suggested that the conformational change might be due to a bending of extracellular loops over the pore opening, and loop deletion experiments suggested that loops L1, L7, and L8 are involved. In order to test the hypothesis for loop movement, we engineered a series of double cysteine mutants in loops L1, L6, L7 and L8 in order to create disulfide bonds linking two loops to each other, or the two branches of a loop, or a loop to the β-barrel. Five out of the six mutants showed the formation of the disulfide bond. However, none of these had an altered response to acidic pH relative to the wildtype channel. Although we cannot dismiss the possibility that the mobility restriction introduced by each disulfide bond was too localized to impact a more global conformational change of the three loops, the fact that all of the different types of disulfide bond tethering were similarly ineffective suggests that the extracellular loops L1, L7, and L8 may not undergo a major acidic-pH induced conformational change leading to channel closure.

  8. The noncanonical disulfide bond as the important stabilizing element of the immunoglobulin fold of the Dr fimbrial DraE subunit.

    PubMed

    Piatek, Rafał; Bruździak, Piotr; Wojciechowski, Marek; Zalewska-Piatek, Beata; Kur, Józef

    2010-02-23

    Fimbrial adhesins of pathogenic bacteria are linear protein associates responsible for binding to the specific host cell receptors. They are assembled via the chaperone/usher pathway conserved in Gram-negative bacteria. These adhesive organelles are characterized by the high resistance to dissociation and unfolding caused by temperature or chemical denaturants. The self-complemented (SC) recombinant subunits of adhesive structures make up the minimal model used to analyze stability phenomena of these organelles. The SC subunits are both highly stabilized thermodynamically and kinetically. They are characterized by a standard free energy of unfolding of 70-80 kJ/mol and a rate constant of unfolding of 10(-17) s(-1) (half-life of unfolding of 10(8) years at 25 degrees C). The DraE subunit of Dr fimbriae is characterized by a disulfide bond that joins the beginning of the A1 strand with the end of the B strand. Such localization is unique and differentiates this protein from other proteins of the Ig-like family. Sequence analysis shows that many protein subunits of adhesive structures possess cysteines that may form a potential disulfide bond homologous to that of DraE. In this paper, we investigate the influence of this noncanonical disulfide bond on the stability of DraE-sc by constructing a DraE-sc-DeltaSS mutant protein (Cys/Ala mutant). This construct unfolds thermally at a T(m) of 65.4 degrees C, more than 20 degrees C lower than that of the native DraE-sc protein, and possesses a different unfolding mechanism. The calculated standard free energy of unfolding of DraE-sc-DeltaSS is equal to 30 +/- 5 kJ/mol. This allows us to suggest that the disulfide bond is an important stabilizing feature of many fimbrial subunits.

  9. Covalent assembly of mouse immunoglobulin G subclasses in vitro: application of a theoretical model for interchain disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Percy, M E; Baumal, R; Dorrington, K J; Percy, J R

    1976-08-01

    The pathways and kinetics of interchain disulfide bond formation have been determined in vitro for purified myeloma proteins representing the three major subclasses of mouse immunoglobulin G(IgG) using the reoxidation system described previously (Petersen, J.G.L. & Dorrington, K.J. (1974) J. Biol. Chem. 249, 5633-5641). Mixtures of oxidized and reduced glutathione were added to act as a disulfide interchange catalyst. The pathways of covalent assembly observed in vitro were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those followed by the various subclasses in vivo. HH and HHL were the principle covalent intermediates seen with IgG1 (MOPC 31C) and IgG2a (MOPC 173 and clone 19). With IgG2b( MPC 11C), HL, HH and HHL were all prominant intermediates. The time courses of reoxidation were simulated using a theoretical model based on second-order reaction kinetics (Percy, J.R., Percy, M.E. & Dorrington, K.J. (1974) J. Biol. Chem. 250, 2398-2400). Two distinct phases were apparent in the reoxidation sequence. The first, which lasted for the initial 5-15 min, did not confirm to the theoretical model. The second phase could be accounted for by the model and represented the remainder of the covalent assembly process. The physico-chemical basis for this biphasic phenomenon was explored. Sedimentation velocity studies showed that noncovalent association was incomplete at the beginning of the reoxidation step for all proteins except IgG2b (MOPC 11C). No dissociation was apparent in the reduced and alkylated proteins at pH 5 in the absence of prior exposure to acid conditions. Thus, exposure to acid appears to affect the affinity between the subunits in the native proteins. Transfer of the proteins from pH 5 to pH 8.2 (the pH at which reoxidation proceeds) is accompanied by the generation of an absorption difference spectrum over an 8-10 min period. These data suggest that a pH-dependent conformational relaxation process may influence the early stages of reoxidation. PMID:953849

  10. Proteome Analysis of the Effect of Mucoid Conversion on Global Protein Expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PAO1 Shows Induction of the Disulfide Bond Isomerase, DsbA

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Sonal; Silo-Suh, Laura A.; Mathee, Kalai; Ohman, Dennis E.

    2000-01-01

    activity, increased sensitivity to dithiothreitol, reduced type IV pilin-mediated twitching motility, and reduced accumulation of extracellular proteases, including elastase. Although efficient secretion of elastase in the dsbA mutant was still demonstrable, the elastase produced appeared to be unstable, possibly as a result of mispaired disulfide bonds. Disruption of dsbA in the mucoid PDO300 background did not affect alginate production. Thus, even though dsbA is coregulated with mucoid conversion, it was not required for alginate production. This suggests that mucA mutation, which deregulates sigma-22, results in a global response that includes other factors in addition to increasing the production of alginate. PMID:11092861

  11. Biophysical characterization, including disulfide bond assignments, of the anti-angiogenic type 1 domains of human thrombospondin-1.

    PubMed

    Huwiler, Kristin G; Vestling, Martha M; Annis, Douglas S; Mosher, Deane F

    2002-12-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), a modular secreted glycoprotein, possesses anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. This activity has been localized to the thrombospondin type 1 repeats/domains (TSR). A TSP1 monomer contains three TSRs, each with a hydrophobic cluster with three conserved tryptophans (WxxWxxW), a basic cluster with two conserved arginines (RxR), and six conserved cysteines. Using the baculovirus system, we expressed TSRs of human TSP1 as either the three domains in tandem (P123) or the third domain alone (P3) and demonstrated that both P123 and P3 at nanomolar concentrations inhibit either basic fibroblast-growth-factor or sphingosine-1-phosphate induced endothelial cell migration. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) indicated that P123 and P3 have a common global fold that is very similar to properdin, a protein with six TSRs. Near-UV CD and fluorescence quenching studies indicated the conserved tryptophans are in a structured, partially solvent-accessible, positively charged environment. N-terminal sequence and mass spectrometry analysis of trypsin-digested TSRs indicated that the RFK linker sequence between P1 and P2 is readily proteolyzed and the conserved arginines are solvent accessible. By a combination of proteolysis and mass spectrometry, the recombinant TSRs were determined to be fully disulfide bonded with a connectivity of 1-5, 2-6, and 3-4 (cysteines are numbered sequentially from N- to C-terminus). TSRs are found in numerous extracellular proteins. These TSRs share the hydrophobic and basic clusters of the TSP TSRs but some have quite different placement of cysteine residues. We propose a sorting of TSRs into six groups that reconciles our results with information about other TSRs.

  12. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Kristin A.; Black, Paul J.; Mercer, Kermit R.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Owen, Robin L.; Snell, Edward H.; Bernhard, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV–visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5–0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure. PMID:24311579

  13. Formation and reshuffling of disulfide bonds in bovine serum albumin demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Scherf, Katharina A.; Koehler, Peter; Delcour, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermolysin hydrolyzates of freshly isolated, extensively stored (6 years, 6 °C, dry) and heated (60 min, 90 °C, in excess water) bovine serum albumin (BSA) samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography (LC) electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using alternating electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). The positions of disulfide bonds and free thiol groups in the different samples were compared to those deduced from the crystal structure of native BSA. Results revealed non-enzymatic posttranslational modifications of cysteine during isolation, extensive dry storage, and heating. Heat-induced extractability loss of BSA was linked to the impact of protein unfolding on the involvement of specific cysteine residues in intermolecular and intramolecular thiol-disulfide interchange and thiol oxidation reactions. The here developed approach holds promise for exploring disulfide bond formation and reshuffling in various proteins under conditions relevant for chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical and food processing. PMID:26193081

  14. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Kristin A; Black, Paul J; Mercer, Kermit R; Garman, Elspeth F; Owen, Robin L; Snell, Edward H; Bernhard, William A

    2013-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV-visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV-visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5-0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure.

  15. Conformational HER-2/neu B-cell epitope peptide vaccine designed to incorporate two native disulfide bonds enhances tumor cell binding and antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Dakappagari, Naveen K; Lute, Kenneth D; Rawale, Sharad; Steele, Joan T; Allen, Stephanie D; Phillips, Gary; Reilly, R Todd; Kaumaya, Pravin T P

    2005-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to elicit an antibody response that target antigenic sites on a tumor antigen must closely mimic the three-dimensional structure of the corresponding region on the antigen. We have designed a complex immunogen derived from the extracellular domain of human HER-2/neu-(626-649) that represents a three-dimensional epitope. We have successfully introduced two disulfide bonds into this sequence, thereby recapitulating the natural disulfide pairings observed in the native protein. To evaluate the immunogenicity of the doubly cyclized disulfide-linked peptide versus the free uncyclized peptide we examined the induction of antibody responses in both inbred and outbred mice strains, with both constructs eliciting high titered antibodies. The disulfide-paired specific antibodies exhibited enhanced cross-reactivity to HER-2/neu expressed on BT-474 cell line as determined by flow cytometry. The antitumor activities of the disulfidepaired specific antibodies did not improve the in vitro growth inhibition of human breast cancer cells overexpressing HER-2, but showed superior antitumor responses in the context of ADCC and interferon-gamma induction. Inbred mice (FVB/n) vaccinated with the disulfide-paired epitope exhibited a statistically significant reduction in the development of exogenously administered tumors in vivo compared with mice receiving either the free uncyclized or the promiscuous T-cell epitope (MVF) control peptide (p = 0.001). This study demonstrates the feasibility and importance of designing conformational epitopes that mimic the tertiary structure of the native protein for eliciting biologically relevant anti-tumor antibodies. Such approaches are a prerequisite to the design of effective peptide vaccines.

  16. [The in vitro production of three-finger neurotoxins from snake venoms with a high abundance of disulfide bonds. Problems and their solutions].

    PubMed

    Liukmanova, E N; Shulepko, M A; Shenkarev, Z O; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2010-01-01

    alpha-Neurotoxins from snake venom are highly efficient inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). These small proteins that have a beta-structural organization attract much interest as a tool for studies of nACh R and as prototypes for the development of new Pharmaceuticals for the treatment of diseases of the nervous system. However, the in vitro production of "three-finger" neurotoxins is complicated by the presence of four or five disulfide bonds that are closely located in their molecules. The present review contains a description of the most frequently used modern approaches for the E. coli expression of recombinant proteins (direct expression, expression as fusions, and secretion) with an emphasis placed on the recombinant production of snake alpha-neurotoxins. The methods of E. coli expression of isotopically labeled neurotoxins are described. The proposed solutions will be of broad interest for the bacterial production of other disulfide-abundant proteins.

  17. Aminoboration: Addition of B–N σ Bonds across C–C π Bonds

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This communication demonstrates the first catalytic aminoboration of C–C π bonds by B–N σ bonds and its application to the synthesis of 3-borylated indoles. The regiochemistry and broad functional group compatibility of this addition reaction enable substitution patterns that are incompatible with major competing technologies. This aminoboration reaction effects the formation of C–B and C–N bonds in a single step from aminoboronic esters, which are simple starting materials available on the gram scale. This reaction generates synthetically valuable N-heterocyclic organoboron compounds as potential building blocks for drug discovery. The working mechanistic hypothesis involves a bifunctional Lewis acid/base catalysis strategy involving the combination of a carbophilic gold cation and a trifluoroacetate anion that activate the C–C π bond and the B–N σ bond simultaneously. PMID:26238962

  18. A Disulfide Bond-forming Machine Is Linked to the Sortase-mediated Pilus Assembly Pathway in the Gram-positive Bacterium Actinomyces oris.

    PubMed

    Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Chang, Chungyu; Wu, Chenggang; Jooya, Neda; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2015-08-28

    Export of cell surface pilins in Gram-positive bacteria likely occurs by the translocation of unfolded precursor polypeptides; however, how the unfolded pilins gain their native conformation is presently unknown. Here, we present physiological studies to demonstrate that the FimA pilin of Actinomyces oris contains two disulfide bonds. Alanine substitution of cysteine residues forming the C-terminal disulfide bridge abrogates pilus assembly, in turn eliminating biofilm formation and polymicrobial interaction. Transposon mutagenesis of A. oris yielded a mutant defective in adherence to Streptococcus oralis, and revealed the essential role of a vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) gene in pilus assembly. Targeted deletion of vkor results in the same defects, which are rescued by ectopic expression of VKOR, but not a mutant containing an alanine substitution in its conserved CXXC motif. Depletion of mdbA, which encodes a membrane-bound thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase, abrogates pilus assembly and alters cell morphology. Remarkably, overexpression of MdbA or a counterpart from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, rescues the Δvkor mutant. By alkylation assays, we demonstrate that VKOR is required for MdbA reoxidation. Furthermore, crystallographic studies reveal that A. oris MdbA harbors a thioredoxin-like fold with the conserved CXXC active site. Consistently, each MdbA enzyme catalyzes proper disulfide bond formation within FimA in vitro that requires the catalytic CXXC motif. Because the majority of signal peptide-containing proteins encoded by A. oris possess multiple Cys residues, we propose that MdbA and VKOR constitute a major folding machine for the secretome of this organism. This oxidative protein folding pathway may be a common feature in Actinobacteria.

  19. A novel database of disulfide patterns and its application to the discovery of distantly related homologs.

    PubMed

    van Vlijmen, Herman W T; Gupta, Abhas; Narasimhan, Lakshmi S; Singh, Juswinder

    2004-01-23

    Disulfide bonds are conserved strongly among proteins of related structure and function. Despite the explosive growth of protein sequence databases and the vast numbers of sequence search tools, no tool exists to draw relations between the disulfide patterns of homologous proteins. We present a comprehensive database of disulfide bonding patterns and a search method to find proteins with similar disulfide patterns. The disulfide database was constructed using disulfide annotations extracted from SwissProt, and was expanded significantly from 16,736 to 94,499 disulfide-containing domains by an inference method that combines SwissProt annotations with Pfam multiple alignments. To search the database, we define a disulfide description, called the disulfide signature, which encodes both spacings between cysteine residues and cysteine connectivity. A web tool was developed that allows users to search for related disulfide patterns and for subpatterns resulting from the removal of one or more disulfides from the pattern. We explore the possibility of using disulfide pattern conservation to identify protein homologs that are undetectable by PSI-BLAST. Examples include the homology between a sea anemone antihypertensive/antiviral protein and a sea anemone neurotoxin, and the homology between tick anticoagulant peptide and bovine trypsin inhibitor. In both examples, there is a clear structural similarity and a functional relationship. We used the database to find structural homologs for the Cripto CFC domain. The identification of a von Willebrand Factor C (VWFC)-like domain agrees with its functional role and explains mutation data. We believe that the rapid increase in structure determinations arising from structural genomics efforts and advances in mass spectrometry techniques will greatly increase the number of disulfide annotations. This information will become a valuable resource for structural and functional annotations of proteins. The availability of a searchable

  20. The Structure of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor-4E from Wheat Reveals a Novel Disulfide Bond1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Monzingo, Arthur F.; Dhaliwal, Simrit; Dutt-Chaudhuri, Anirvan; Lyon, Angeline; Sadow, Jennifer H.; Hoffman, David W.; Robertus, Jon D.; Browning, Karen S.

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor-4E (eIF4E) recognizes and binds the m7 guanosine nucleotide at the 5′ end of eukaryotic messenger RNAs; this protein-RNA interaction is an essential step in the initiation of protein synthesis. The structure of eIF4E from wheat (Triticum aestivum) was investigated using a combination of x-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The overall fold of the crystallized protein was similar to eIF4E from other species, with eight β-strands, three α-helices, and three extended loops. Surprisingly, the wild-type protein did not crystallize with m7GTP in its binding site, despite the ligand being present in solution; conformational changes in the cap-binding loops created a large cavity at the usual cap-binding site. The eIF4E crystallized in a dimeric form with one of the cap-binding loops of one monomer inserted into the cavity of the other. The protein also contained an intramolecular disulfide bridge between two cysteines (Cys) that are conserved only in plants. A Cys-to-serine mutant of wheat eIF4E, which lacked the ability to form the disulfide, crystallized with m7GDP in its binding pocket, with a structure similar to that of the eIF4E-cap complex of other species. NMR spectroscopy was used to show that the Cys that form the disulfide in the crystal are reduced in solution but can be induced to form the disulfide under oxidizing conditions. The observation that the disulfide-forming Cys are conserved in plants raises the possibility that their oxidation state may have a role in regulating protein function. NMR provided evidence that in oxidized eIF4E, the loop that is open in the ligand-free crystal dimer is relatively flexible in solution. An NMR-based binding assay showed that the reduced wheat eIF4E, the oxidized form with the disulfide, and the Cys-to-serine mutant protein each bind m7GTP in a similar and labile manner, with dissociation rates in the range of 20 to 100 s−1. PMID:17322339

  1. The disulfide bond pairing of the pheromones Er-1 and Er-2 of the ciliated protozoan Euplotes raikovi.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A. E.; Raffioni, S.; Chaudhary, T.; Chait, B. T.; Luporini, P.; Bradshaw, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    The disulfide pairings of the two Euplotes raikovi pheromones Er-1 and Er-2 have been determined by chemical and mass spectrometric analyses. Cystine-linked peptides from thermolytic digestions of the native molecules were purified by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and identified in the known sequences to make the assignments. The same pairing, Cys(I)-Cys(IV), Cys(II)-Cys(VI), and Cys(III)-Cys(V), was found in both pheromones, suggesting that this pattern occurs commonly throughout this family of molecules. This arrangement of disulfides indicates that the three-dimensional structure is defined by three loops, which can vary in size and charge distribution from one pheromone to another. PMID:1304918

  2. Labeling Primary Amine Groups in Peptides and Proteins with N-Hydroxysuccinimidyl Ester Modified Fe3O4@SiO2 Nanoparticles Containing Cleavable Disulfide-bond Linkers

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ujwal S.; Qu, Haiou; Caruntu, Daniela; O’Connor, Charles J.; Sharma, Arjun; Cai, Yang; Tarr, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    The surface of superparamagnetic silica coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@SiO2) nanoparticles was functionalized with a disulfide bond linked N-hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) ester group in order to develop a method for labeling primary amines in peptides/proteins. The nanoparticle labeled proteins/peptides formed after NHS ester reaction with the primary amine groups were isolated using a magnet without any additional purification step. Nanoparticle moieties conjugated to peptides/proteins were then trimmed by cleavage at the disulfide linker with a reducing agent. The labeled peptides were analyzed by LC-MS/MS to determine their sequences and the sites of NHS ester labeling. This novel approach allowed characterization of lysine residues on the solvent accessible surface of native bovine serum albumin. Low cost, rapid magnetic separation, and specificity towards primary amine groups make NHS ester coated Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles a potential labeling probe to study proteins on living cell surfaces. PMID:23909594

  3. Step-wise addition of disulfide bridge in firefly luciferase controls color shift through a flexible loop: a thermodynamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Mahboobeh; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Hassani, Leila

    2013-02-01

    Multi-color bioluminescence is developed using the introduction of single/double disulfide bridges in firefly luciferase. The bioluminescence reaction, which uses luciferin, Mg(2+)-ATP and molecular oxygen to yield an electronically excited oxyluciferin, is carried out by the luciferase and emits visible light. The bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases is determined by the luciferase sequence and assay conditions. It has been proposed that the stability of a protein may increase through the introduction of a disulfide bridge that decreases the configurational entropy of unfolding. Single and double disulfide bridges are introduced into Photinus pyralis firefly luciferase to make separate mutant enzymes with a single/double bridge (C(81)-A(105)C, L(306)C-L(309)C, P(451)C-V(469)C; C(81)-A(105)C/P(451)C-V(469)C, and A(296)C-A(326)C/P(451)C-V(469)C). By introduction of disulfide bridges using site-directed mutagenesis in Photinus pyralis luciferase the color of emitted light was changed to red or kept in different extents. The bioluminescence color shift occurred with displacement of a critical loop in the luciferase structure without any change in green emitter mutants. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that among mutants, L(306)C-L(309)C shows a remarkable stability against urea denaturation and also a considerable increase in kinetic stability and a clear shift in bioluminescence spectra towards red.

  4. Early events in the disulfide-coupled folding of BPTI.

    PubMed Central

    Bulaj, G.; Goldenberg, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies of the refolding of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) have shown that a previously unidentified intermediate with a single disulfide is formed much more rapidly than any other one-disulfide species. This intermediate contains a disulfide that is present in the native protein (between Cys14 and 38), but it is thermodynamically less stable than the other two intermediates with single native disulfides. To characterize the role of the [14-38] intermediate and the factors that favor its formation, detailed kinetic and mutational analyses of the early disulfide-formation steps were carried out. The results of these studies indicate that the formation of [14-38] from the fully reduced protein is favored by both local electrostatic effects, which enhance the reactivities of the Cys14 and 38 thiols, and conformational tendencies that are diminished by the addition of urea and are enhanced at lower temperatures. At 25 degrees C and pH 7.3, approximately 35% of the reduced molecules were found to initially form the 14-38 disulfide, but the majority of these molecules then undergo intramolecular rearrangements to generate non-native disulfides, and subsequently the more stable intermediates with native disulfides. Amino acid replacements, other than those involving Cys residues, were generally found to have only small effects on either the rate of forming [14-38] or its thermodynamic stability, even though many of the same substitutions greatly destabilized the native protein and other disulfide-bonded intermediates. In addition, those replacements that did decrease the steady-state concentration of [14-38] did not adversely affect further folding and disulfide formation. These results suggest that the weak and transient interactions that are often detected in unfolded proteins and early folding intermediates may, in some cases, not persist or promote subsequent folding steps. PMID:10493584

  5. Thiol-disulfide exchange in peptides derived from human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Epling, Daniel E; Sophocleous, Andreas M; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds stabilize proteins by cross-linking distant regions into a compact three-dimensional structure. They can also participate in hydrolytic and oxidative pathways to form nonnative disulfide bonds and other reactive species. Such covalent modifications can contribute to protein aggregation. Here, we present experimental data for the mechanism of thiol-disulfide exchange in tryptic peptides derived from human growth hormone in aqueous solution. Reaction kinetics was monitored to investigate the effect of pH (6.0-10.0), temperature (4-50°C), oxidation suppressants [ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N2 sparging], and peptide secondary structure (amide cyclized vs. open form). The concentrations of free thiol containing peptides, scrambled disulfides, and native disulfide-linked peptides generated via thiol-disulfide exchange and oxidation reactions were determined using reverse-phase HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentration versus time data were fitted to a mathematical model using nonlinear least squares regression analysis. At all pH values, the model was able to fit the data with R(2) ≥ 0.95. Excluding oxidation suppressants (EDTA and N2 sparging) resulted in an increase in the formation of scrambled disulfides via oxidative pathways but did not influence the intrinsic rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. In addition, peptide secondary structure was found to influence the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. PMID:24549831

  6. Cell-free synthesis system suitable for disulfide-containing proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Satoru; Kigawa, Takanori

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Cell-free synthesis system suitable for disulfide-containing proteins is proposed. ► Disulfide bond formation was facilitated by the use of glutathione buffer. ► DsbC catalyzed the efficient shuffling of incorrectly formed disulfide bonds. ► Milligram quantities of functional {sup 15}N-labeled BPTI and lysozyme C were obtained. ► Synthesized proteins were both catalytically functional and properly folded. -- Abstract: Many important therapeutic targets are secreted proteins with multiple disulfide bonds, such as antibodies, cytokines, hormones, and proteases. The preparation of these proteins for structural and functional analyses using cell-based expression systems still suffers from several issues, such as inefficiency, low yield, and difficulty in stable-isotope labeling. The cell-free (or in vitro) protein synthesis system has become a useful protein production method. The openness of the cell-free system allows direct control of the reaction environment to promote protein folding, making it well suited for the synthesis of disulfide-containing proteins. In this study, we developed the Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell lysate-based cell-free synthesis system for disulfide-containing proteins, which can produce sufficient amounts of functional proteins for NMR analyses. Disulfide bond formation was facilitated by the use of glutathione buffer. In addition, disulfide isomerase, DsbC, catalyzed the efficient shuffling of incorrectly formed disulfide bonds during the protein synthesis reaction. We successfully synthesized milligram quantities of functional {sup 15}N-labeled higher eukaryotic proteins, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and human lysozyme C (LYZ). The NMR spectra and functional analyses indicated that the synthesized proteins are both catalytically functional and properly folded. Thus, the cell-free system is useful for the synthesis of disulfide-containing proteins for structural and functional analyses.

  7. Role for the disulfide-bonded region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 in receptor-triggered activation of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy-McIntyre, Anna K.; Baer, Severine; Ludlow, Louise; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2010-04-16

    The conserved disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion glycoprotein, gp41, mediates association with the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gp120. Interactions between gp120, CD4 and chemokine receptors activate the fusion activity of gp41. The introduction of W596L and W610F mutations to the DSR of HIV-1{sub QH1549.13} blocked viral entry and hemifusion without affecting gp120-gp41 association. The fusion defect correlated with inhibition of CD4-triggered gp41 pre-hairpin formation, consistent with the DSR mutations having decoupled receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 from gp41 activation. Our data implicate the DSR in sensing conformational changes in the gp120-gp41 complex that lead to fusion activation.

  8. Disulfide Bond Formation at the C Termini of Vaccinia Virus A26 and A27 Proteins Does Not Require Viral Redox Enzymes and Suppresses Glycosaminoglycan-Mediated Cell Fusion▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Yao-Cheng; Chung, Che-Sheng; Huang, Cheng-Yen; Hsia, Yu; Tang, Yin-Liang; Chang, Wen

    2009-01-01

    Vaccinia virus A26 protein is an envelope protein of the intracellular mature virus (IMV) of vaccinia virus. A mutant A26 protein with a truncation of the 74 C-terminal amino acids was expressed in infected cells but failed to be incorporated into IMV (W. L. Chiu, C. L. Lin, M. H. Yang, D. L. Tzou, and W. Chang, J. Virol 81:2149-2157, 2007). Here, we demonstrate that A27 protein formed a protein complex with the full-length form but not with the truncated form of A26 protein in infected cells as well as in IMV. The formation of the A26-A27 protein complex occurred prior to virion assembly and did not require another A27-binding protein, A17 protein, in the infected cells. A26 protein contains six cysteine residues, and in vitro mutagenesis showed that Cys441 and Cys442 mediated intermolecular disulfide bonds with Cys71 and Cys72 of viral A27 protein, whereas Cys43 and Cys342 mediated intramolecular disulfide bonds. A26 and A27 proteins formed disulfide-linked complexes in transfected 293T cells, showing that the intermolecular disulfide bond formation did not depend on viral redox pathways. Finally, using cell fusion from within and fusion from without, we demonstrate that cell surface glycosaminoglycan is important for virus-cell fusion and that A26 protein, by forming complexes with A27 protein, partially suppresses fusion. PMID:19369327

  9. Solution synthesis and biological activity of human pleiotrophin, a novel heparin-binding neurotrophic factor consisting of 136 amino acid residues with five disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Inui, T; Nakao, M; Nishio, H; Nishiuchi, Y; Kojima, S; Muramatsu, T; Kimura, T

    2000-05-01

    Human pleiotrophin (hPTN), a novel heparin-binding neurotrophic factor consisting of 136 amino acid residues with five intramolecular disulfide bonds, was synthesized by solution procedure in order to demonstrate the utility of our strategy using our newly developed solvent system, a mixture of trifluoroethanol (TFE) and dichloromethane (DCM) or chloroform (CHL). The final protected peptide was synthesized by coupling two larger protected intermediates, Boc-(1-64)-OH and H-(65-136)-OBzl, in CHL/TFE (3:1; v/v) using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) in the presence of 3,4-dihydro-3-hydroxy-4-oxo-1,2,3-benzotriazine (HOOBt). After removal of all protecting groups using the HF procedure followed by treatment with Hg(OAc)2, the fully deprotected peptide was subjected to an oxidative folding reaction. The product was confirmed as having the correct disulfide structure by examining the cystine peptides obtained by enzymatic digestions, and as possessing the same biological activities as those of the natural product. The N- and C-terminal half domains (1-64 and 65-136) were also synthesized, and measurement of their biological activities indicated that the C-terminal half domain displays almost all the activities of the full-length molecule, whereas the N-terminal half domain shows almost no activity. From these results, we were able to confirm that the C-terminal half domain is responsible for the expression of biological activities in the same manner as human midkine (hMK), another heparin-binding neurotrophic growth factor.

  10. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the DNA-binding affinity of Cro repressor protein stabilized by a disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Baleja, J D; Sykes, B D

    1994-01-01

    The structure, dynamics, and DNA-binding characteristics of wild-type and cross-linked Cro repressors are compared by using circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. The Cro repressor is a small dimeric DNA-binding protein from bacteriophage lambda. Replacement of valine-55 by cysteine in the dimer interaction region of each monomer subunit results in the spontaneous formation of a disulfide cross-link between the subunits. Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy and CD data show the variant has nearly the same conformation as the wild-type protein. However, by monitoring the CD band at 222 nm, the cross-linked protein is shown to have a heat-denaturation midpoint temperature of 67 degrees C, whereas the wild-type protein has a melting temperature of about 47 degrees C. Using 1H-NMR to follow the denaturation by heat, the same melting temperature is observed for wild-type Cro (47 degrees C), but a much lower melting temperature is seen for V55C Cro (58 degrees C). This suggests that between 58 and 67 degrees C the cross-linked protein exists in a molten globule state with the alpha-helices mainly intact, but without the interaction of chemical groups that cause spectral dispersion. Binding parameters for interaction of the proteins with DNA were obtained by observing the NMR spectrum for the imino protons of a 10 base-pair half-operator DNA and titrating in protein. The cross-linked protein binds DNA (Kd = 160 microM) about eight times more weakly than the wild-type protein (Kd = 19 microM). Adjustments in protein structure, necessary to form a tight protein-DNA complex, appear to be hindered by a loss in protein flexibility caused by the intersubunit cross-link.

  11. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes via cleavable disulfide bonds for efficient intracellular delivery of siRNA and potent gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kam, Nadine Wong Shi; Liu, Zhuang; Dai, Hongjie

    2005-09-14

    We present a novel functionalization scheme for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to afford nanotube-biomolecule conjugates with the incorporation of cleavable bonds to enable controlled molecular releasing from nanotube surfaces, thus creating "smart" nanomaterials with high potential for chemical and biological applications. With this versatile functionalization, we demonstrate transporting, enzymatic cleaving and releasing of DNA from SWNT transporters, and subsequent nuclear translocation of DNA oligonucleotides in mammalian cells. We further show highly efficient delivery of siRNA by SWNTs and achieving more potent RNAi functionality than a widely used conventional transfection agent. Thus, the novel functionalization of SWNTs with cleavable bonds is highly promising for a wide range of applications including gene and protein therapy.

  12. PEP-FOLD: an updated de novo structure prediction server for both linear and disulfide bonded cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Thévenet, Pierre; Shen, Yimin; Maupetit, Julien; Guyon, Frédéric; Derreumaux, Philippe; Tufféry, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    In the context of the renewed interest of peptides as therapeutics, it is important to have an on-line resource for 3D structure prediction of peptides with well-defined structures in aqueous solution. We present an updated version of PEP-FOLD allowing the treatment of both linear and disulphide bonded cyclic peptides with 9-36 amino acids. The server makes possible to define disulphide bonds and any residue-residue proximity under the guidance of the biologists. Using a benchmark of 34 cyclic peptides with one, two and three disulphide bonds, the best PEP-FOLD models deviate by an average RMS of 2.75 Å from the full NMR structures. Using a benchmark of 37 linear peptides, PEP-FOLD locates lowest-energy conformations deviating by 3 Å RMS from the NMR rigid cores. The evolution of PEP-FOLD comes as a new on-line service to supersede the previous server. The server is available at: http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/PEP-FOLD.

  13. Antileishmanial Activity of Disulfiram and Thiuram Disulfide Analogs in an Ex Vivo Model System Is Selectively Enhanced by the Addition of Divalent Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Peniche, Alex G; Renslo, Adam R; Melby, Peter C; Travi, Bruno L

    2015-10-01

    Current treatments for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis are toxic, expensive, difficult to administer, and limited in efficacy and availability. Disulfiram has primarily been used to treat alcoholism. More recently, it has shown some efficacy as therapy against protozoan pathogens and certain cancers, suggesting a wide range of biological activities. We used an ex vivo system to screen several thiuram disulfide compounds for antileishmanial activity. We found five compounds (compound identifier [CID] 7188, 5455, 95876, 12892, and 3117 [disulfiram]) with anti-Leishmania activity at nanomolar concentrations. We further evaluated these compounds with the addition of divalent metal salts based on studies that indicated these salts could potentiate the action of disulfiram. In addition, clinical studies suggested that zinc has some efficacy in treating cutaneous leishmaniasis. Several divalent metal salts were evaluated at 1 μM, which is lower than the normal levels of copper and zinc in plasma of healthy individuals. The leishmanicidal activity of disulfiram and CID 7188 were enhanced by several divalent metal salts at 1 μM. The in vitro therapeutic index (IVTI) of disulfiram and CID 7188 increased 12- and 2.3-fold, respectively, against L. major when combined with ZnCl2. The combination of disulfiram with ZnSO4 resulted in a 1.8-fold increase in IVTI against L. donovani. This novel combination of thiuram disulfides and divalent metal ions salts could have application as topical and/or oral therapies for treatment of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:26239994

  14. Antileishmanial Activity of Disulfiram and Thiuram Disulfide Analogs in an Ex Vivo Model System Is Selectively Enhanced by the Addition of Divalent Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Peniche, Alex G.; Renslo, Adam R.; Melby, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Current treatments for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis are toxic, expensive, difficult to administer, and limited in efficacy and availability. Disulfiram has primarily been used to treat alcoholism. More recently, it has shown some efficacy as therapy against protozoan pathogens and certain cancers, suggesting a wide range of biological activities. We used an ex vivo system to screen several thiuram disulfide compounds for antileishmanial activity. We found five compounds (compound identifier [CID] 7188, 5455, 95876, 12892, and 3117 [disulfiram]) with anti-Leishmania activity at nanomolar concentrations. We further evaluated these compounds with the addition of divalent metal salts based on studies that indicated these salts could potentiate the action of disulfiram. In addition, clinical studies suggested that zinc has some efficacy in treating cutaneous leishmaniasis. Several divalent metal salts were evaluated at 1 μM, which is lower than the normal levels of copper and zinc in plasma of healthy individuals. The leishmanicidal activity of disulfiram and CID 7188 were enhanced by several divalent metal salts at 1 μM. The in vitro therapeutic index (IVTI) of disulfiram and CID 7188 increased 12- and 2.3-fold, respectively, against L. major when combined with ZnCl2. The combination of disulfiram with ZnSO4 resulted in a 1.8-fold increase in IVTI against L. donovani. This novel combination of thiuram disulfides and divalent metal ions salts could have application as topical and/or oral therapies for treatment of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:26239994

  15. Antileishmanial Activity of Disulfiram and Thiuram Disulfide Analogs in an Ex Vivo Model System Is Selectively Enhanced by the Addition of Divalent Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Peniche, Alex G; Renslo, Adam R; Melby, Peter C; Travi, Bruno L

    2015-10-01

    Current treatments for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis are toxic, expensive, difficult to administer, and limited in efficacy and availability. Disulfiram has primarily been used to treat alcoholism. More recently, it has shown some efficacy as therapy against protozoan pathogens and certain cancers, suggesting a wide range of biological activities. We used an ex vivo system to screen several thiuram disulfide compounds for antileishmanial activity. We found five compounds (compound identifier [CID] 7188, 5455, 95876, 12892, and 3117 [disulfiram]) with anti-Leishmania activity at nanomolar concentrations. We further evaluated these compounds with the addition of divalent metal salts based on studies that indicated these salts could potentiate the action of disulfiram. In addition, clinical studies suggested that zinc has some efficacy in treating cutaneous leishmaniasis. Several divalent metal salts were evaluated at 1 μM, which is lower than the normal levels of copper and zinc in plasma of healthy individuals. The leishmanicidal activity of disulfiram and CID 7188 were enhanced by several divalent metal salts at 1 μM. The in vitro therapeutic index (IVTI) of disulfiram and CID 7188 increased 12- and 2.3-fold, respectively, against L. major when combined with ZnCl2. The combination of disulfiram with ZnSO4 resulted in a 1.8-fold increase in IVTI against L. donovani. This novel combination of thiuram disulfides and divalent metal ions salts could have application as topical and/or oral therapies for treatment of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis.

  16. Carbon disulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbon disulfide ; CASRN 75 - 15 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  17. Recombinant expression, in vitro refolding and characterizing disulfide bonds of a mouse inhibitory C-type lectin-like receptor Nkrp1b.

    PubMed

    Hernychová, L; Mrázek, H; Ivanova, L; Kukačka, Z; Chmelík, J; Novák, P

    2015-01-01

    As a part of the innate immunity, NK (Natural Killer) cells provide an early immune response to different stimuli, e.g. viral infections and tumor growths. However, their functions are more complex; they play an important role in reproduction, alloimmunity, autoimmunity and allergic diseases. NK cell activities require an intricate system of regulation that is ensured by many different receptors on a cell surface which integrate signals from interacting cells and soluble factors. One way to understand NK cell biology is through the structure of NK receptors, which can reveal ligand binding conditions. We present a modified protocol for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli and in vitro refolding of the ligand-binding domain of the inhibitory Nkrp1b (SJL/J) protein. Nkrp1b identity and folding was confirmed using mass spectrometry (accurate mass of the intact protein and evaluation of disulfide bonds) and one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The intention is to provide the basis for conducting structural studies of the inhibitory Nkrp1b protein, since only the activating Nkrp1a receptor structure is known. PMID:26447598

  18. Structural Basis of IgE Binding to α- and γ-Gliadins: Contribution of Disulfide Bonds and Repetitive and Nonrepetitive Domains.

    PubMed

    Mameri, Hamza; Brossard, Chantal; Gaudin, Jean-Charles; Gohon, Yann; Paty, Evelyne; Beaudouin, Etienne; Moneret-Vautrin, Denise-Anne; Drouet, Martine; Solé, Véronique; Wien, Frank; Lupi, Roberta; Larré, Colette; Snégaroff, Jacques; Denery-Papini, Sandra

    2015-07-29

    Wheat products cause IgE-mediated allergies. The present study aimed to decipher the molecular basis of α- and γ-gliadin allergenicity. Gliadins and their domains, the repetitive N-terminal and the nonrepetitive C-terminal domains, were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Their secondary structures and their IgE binding capacity were compared with those of natural proteins before and after reduction/alkylation. Allergenicity was evaluated with sera from patients who had a wheat food allergy or baker's asthma. The secondary structures of natural and recombinant proteins were slightly different. Compared with natural gliadins, recombinant proteins retained IgE binding but with reduced reactivity. Reduction/alkylation decreased IgE binding for both natural and recombinant gliadins. Although more continuous epitopes were identified in the N-terminal domains of α- and γ-gliadins, both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains contributed to IgE binding. As for other members of the prolamin superfamily, disulfide bonds appear to be of high importance for IgE binding.

  19. Phylogeny of the Vitamin K 2,3-Epoxide Reductase (VKOR) Family and Evolutionary Relationship to the Disulfide Bond Formation Protein B (DsbB) Family.

    PubMed

    Bevans, Carville G; Krettler, Christoph; Reinhart, Christoph; Watzka, Matthias; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-07-29

    In humans and other vertebrate animals, vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase (VKOR) family enzymes are the gatekeepers between nutritionally acquired K vitamins and the vitamin K cycle responsible for posttranslational modifications that confer biological activity upon vitamin K-dependent proteins with crucial roles in hemostasis, bone development and homeostasis, hormonal carbohydrate regulation and fertility. We report a phylogenetic analysis of the VKOR family that identifies five major clades. Combined phylogenetic and site-specific conservation analyses point to clade-specific similarities and differences in structure and function. We discovered a single-site determinant uniquely identifying VKOR homologs belonging to human pathogenic, obligate intracellular prokaryotes and protists. Building on previous work by Sevier et al. (Protein Science 14:1630), we analyzed structural data from both VKOR and prokaryotic disulfide bond formation protein B (DsbB) families and hypothesize an ancient evolutionary relationship between the two families where one family arose from the other through a gene duplication/deletion event. This has resulted in circular permutation of primary sequence threading through the four-helical bundle protein folds of both families. This is the first report of circular permutation relating distant a-helical membrane protein sequences and folds. In conclusion, we suggest a chronology for the evolution of the five extant VKOR clades.

  20. Direct, simple derivatization of disulfide bonds in proteins with organic mercury in alkaline medium without any chemical pre-reducing agents.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Ferrari, Carlo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Bramanti, Emilia

    2014-09-16

    In this work we have studied the derivatization of protein disulfide bonds with p-Hydroxymercurybenzoate (pHMB) in strong alkaline medium without any preliminary reduction. The reaction has been followed by the determination of the protein-pHMB complex using size exclusion chromatography coupled to a microwave/UV mercury oxidation system for the on-line oxidation of free and protein-complexed pHMB and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (SEC-CVG-AFS) detection. The reaction has been optimized by an experimental design using lysozyme as a model protein and applied to several thiolic proteins. The proposed method reports, for the first time, that it is possible to label 75-100% cysteines of proteins and, thus, to determine thiolic proteins without the need of any reducing step to obtain reduced SH groups before mercury labelling. We obtained a detection limit of 100 nmol L(-1) based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for unbound and complexed pHMB, corresponding to a detection limit of proteins ranged between 3 and 360 nmol L(-1), depending on the number of cysteines in the protein sequence.

  1. The attack of the phytopathogens and the trumpet solo: Identification of a novel plant antifungal peptide with distinct fold and disulfide bond pattern.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Porto, William F; Dey, Prabuddha; Maiti, Mrinal K; Ghosh, Ananta K; Franco, Octavio L

    2013-10-01

    Phytopathogens cause economic losses in agribusiness. Plant-derived compounds have been proposed to overcome this problem, including the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). This paper reports the identification of Ps-AFP1, a novel AMP isolated from the Pisum sativum radicle. Ps-AFP1 was purified and evaluated against phytopathogenic fungi, showing clear effectiveness. In silico analyses were performed, suggesting an unusual fold and disulfide bond pattern. A novel fold and a novel AMP class were here proposed, the αβ-trumpet fold and αβ-trumpet peptides, respectively. The name αβ-trumpet was created due to the peptide's fold, which resembles the musical instrument. The Ps-AFP1 mechanism of action was also proposed. Microscopic analyses revealed that Ps-AFP1 could affect the fungus during the hyphal elongation from spore germination. Furthermore, confocal microscopy performed with Ps-AFP1 labeled with FITC shows that the peptide was localized at high concentration along the fungal cell surface. Due to low cellular disruption rates, it seems that the main target is the fungal cell wall. The binding thermogram and isothermal titration, molecular dynamics and docking analyses were also performed, showing that Ps-AFP1 could bind to chitin producing a stable complex. Data here reported provided novel structural-functional insights into the αβ-trumpet peptide fold.

  2. Structural Basis of IgE Binding to α- and γ-Gliadins: Contribution of Disulfide Bonds and Repetitive and Nonrepetitive Domains.

    PubMed

    Mameri, Hamza; Brossard, Chantal; Gaudin, Jean-Charles; Gohon, Yann; Paty, Evelyne; Beaudouin, Etienne; Moneret-Vautrin, Denise-Anne; Drouet, Martine; Solé, Véronique; Wien, Frank; Lupi, Roberta; Larré, Colette; Snégaroff, Jacques; Denery-Papini, Sandra

    2015-07-29

    Wheat products cause IgE-mediated allergies. The present study aimed to decipher the molecular basis of α- and γ-gliadin allergenicity. Gliadins and their domains, the repetitive N-terminal and the nonrepetitive C-terminal domains, were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Their secondary structures and their IgE binding capacity were compared with those of natural proteins before and after reduction/alkylation. Allergenicity was evaluated with sera from patients who had a wheat food allergy or baker's asthma. The secondary structures of natural and recombinant proteins were slightly different. Compared with natural gliadins, recombinant proteins retained IgE binding but with reduced reactivity. Reduction/alkylation decreased IgE binding for both natural and recombinant gliadins. Although more continuous epitopes were identified in the N-terminal domains of α- and γ-gliadins, both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains contributed to IgE binding. As for other members of the prolamin superfamily, disulfide bonds appear to be of high importance for IgE binding. PMID:26186140

  3. Disulfide Bridges: Bringing Together Frustrated Structure in a Bioactive Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Schulten, Klaus; Gruebele, Martin; Bansal, Paramjit S; Wilson, David; Daly, Norelle L

    2016-04-26

    Disulfide bridges are commonly found covalent bonds that are usually believed to maintain structural stability of proteins. Here, we investigate the influence of disulfide bridges on protein dynamics through molecular dynamics simulations on the cysteine-rich trypsin inhibitor MCoTI-II with three disulfide bridges. Correlation analysis of the reduced cyclic peptide shows that two of the three disulfide distances (Cys(11)-Cys(23) and Cys(17)-Cys(29)) are anticorrelated within ∼1 μs of bridge formation or dissolution: when the peptide is in nativelike structures and one of the distances shortens to allow bond formation, the other tends to lengthen. Simulations over longer timescales, when the denatured state is less structured, do not show the anticorrelation. We propose that the native state contains structural elements that frustrate one another's folding, and that the two bridges are critical for snapping the frustrated native structure into place. In contrast, the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge is predicted to form together with either of the other two bridges. Indeed, experimental chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance data show that an engineered peptide with the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge deleted can still fold into its near-native structure even in its noncyclic form, confirming the lesser role of the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge. The results highlight the importance of disulfide bridges in a small bioactive peptide to bring together frustrated structure in addition to maintaining protein structural stability.

  4. Disulfide Bridges: Bringing Together Frustrated Structure in a Bioactive Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Schulten, Klaus; Gruebele, Martin; Bansal, Paramjit S; Wilson, David; Daly, Norelle L

    2016-04-26

    Disulfide bridges are commonly found covalent bonds that are usually believed to maintain structural stability of proteins. Here, we investigate the influence of disulfide bridges on protein dynamics through molecular dynamics simulations on the cysteine-rich trypsin inhibitor MCoTI-II with three disulfide bridges. Correlation analysis of the reduced cyclic peptide shows that two of the three disulfide distances (Cys(11)-Cys(23) and Cys(17)-Cys(29)) are anticorrelated within ∼1 μs of bridge formation or dissolution: when the peptide is in nativelike structures and one of the distances shortens to allow bond formation, the other tends to lengthen. Simulations over longer timescales, when the denatured state is less structured, do not show the anticorrelation. We propose that the native state contains structural elements that frustrate one another's folding, and that the two bridges are critical for snapping the frustrated native structure into place. In contrast, the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge is predicted to form together with either of the other two bridges. Indeed, experimental chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance data show that an engineered peptide with the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge deleted can still fold into its near-native structure even in its noncyclic form, confirming the lesser role of the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge. The results highlight the importance of disulfide bridges in a small bioactive peptide to bring together frustrated structure in addition to maintaining protein structural stability. PMID:27119635

  5. Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies enhances the effects of disulfide bonds reducer on Escherichia coli growth and affects the bacterial surface oxidation-reduction state.

    PubMed

    Torgomyan, Heghine; Trchounian, Armen

    2011-10-14

    Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies (flux capacity - 0.06 mW cm(-2)) had bactericidal effects on Escherichia coli. This EMI (1h) exposure suppressed the growth of E. coli K-12(λ). The pH value (6.0-8.0) did not significantly affect the growth. The lag-phase duration was prolonged, and the growth specific rate was inhibited, and these effects were more noticeable after 73 GHz irradiation. These effects were enhanced by the addition of DL-dithiothreitol (DTT), a strong reducer of disulfide bonds in surface membrane proteins, which in its turn also has bactericidal effect. Further, the number of accessible SH-groups in membrane vesicles was markedly decreased by EMI that was augmented by N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide and DTT. These results indicate a change in the oxidation-reduction state of bacterial cell membrane proteins that could be the primary membranous mechanism in the bactericidal effects of low-intensity EMI of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies.

  6. Functional Analysis of the Disulfide-Bonded Loop/Chain Reversal Region of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41 Reveals a Critical Role in gp120-gp41 Association

    PubMed Central

    Maerz, Anne L.; Drummer, Heidi E.; Wilson, Kirilee A.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2001-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry into cells is mediated by the surface-exposed envelope protein (SU) gp120, which binds to cellular CD4 and chemokine receptors, triggering the membrane fusion activity of the transmembrane (TM) protein gp41. The core of gp41 comprises an N-terminal triple-stranded coiled coil and an antiparallel C-terminal helical segment which is packed against the exterior of the coiled coil and is thought to correspond to a fusion-activated conformation. The available gp41 crystal structures lack the conserved disulfide-bonded loop region which, in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and murine leukemia virus TM proteins, mediates a chain reversal, connecting the antiparallel N- and C-terminal regions. Mutations in the HTLV-1 TM protein gp21 disulfide-bonded loop/chain reversal region adversely affected fusion activity without abolishing SU-TM association (A. L. Maerz, R. J. Center, B. E. Kemp, B. Kobe, and P. Poumbourios, J. Virol. 74:6614–6621, 2000). We now report that in contrast to our findings with HTLV-1, conservative substitutions in the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide-bonded loop/chain reversal region abolished association with gp120. While the mutations affecting gp120-gp41 association also affected cell-cell fusion activity, HIV-1 glycoprotein maturation appeared normal. The mutant glycoproteins were processed, expressed at the cell surface, and efficiently immunoprecipitated by conformation-dependent monoclonal antibodies. The gp120 association site includes aromatic and hydrophobic residues on either side of the gp41 disulfide-bonded loop and a basic residue within the loop. The HIV-1 gp41 disulfide-bonded loop/chain reversal region is a critical gp120 contact site; therefore, it is also likely to play a central role in fusion activation by linking CD4 plus chemokine receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 to gp41 fusogenicity. These gp120 contact residues are present in diverse primate lentiviruses

  7. Homolytic S-S bond dissociation of 11 bis(thiocarbonyl)disulfides R-C(=S)-S-S-C(=S)R and prediction of a novel rubber vulcanization accelerator.

    PubMed

    Mak, Adrian Matthew; Steudel, Ralf; Wong, Ming Wah

    2008-06-01

    The structures and energetics of eight substituted bis(thiocarbonyl)disulfides (RCS(2))(2), their associated radicals RCS(2)(*), and their coordination compounds with a lithium cation have been studied at the G3X(MP2) level of theory for R = H, Me, F, Cl, OMe, SMe, NMe(2), and PMe(2). The effects of substituents on the dissociation of (RCS(2))(2) to RCS(2)(*) were analyzed using isodesmic stabilization reactions. Electron-donating groups with an unshared pair of electrons have a pronounced stabilization effect on both (RCS(2))(2) and RCS(2)(*). The S-S bond dissociation enthalpy of tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD, R = NMe(2)) is the lowest in the above series (155 kJ mol(-1)), attributed to the particular stability of the formed Me(2)NCS(2)(*) radical. Both (RCS(2))(2) and the fragmented radicals RCS(2)(*) form stable chelate complexes with a Li(+) cation. The S-S homolytic bond cleavage in (RCS(2))(2) is facilitated by the reaction [Li(RCS(2))(2)](+)+Li(+)-->2 [Li(RCS(2))](*+). Three other substituted bis(thiocarbonyl) disulfides with the unconventional substituents R = OSF(5), Gu(1), and Gu(2) have been explored to find suitable alternative rubber vulcanization accelerators. Bis(thiocarbonyl)disulfide with a guanidine-type substituent, (Gu(1)CS(2))(2), is predicted to be an effective accelerator in sulfur vulcanization of rubber. Compared to TMTD, (Gu(1)CS(2))(2) is calculated to have a lower bond dissociation enthalpy and smaller associated barrier for the S-S homolysis. PMID:18418826

  8. Homolytic S-S bond dissociation of 11 bis(thiocarbonyl)disulfides R-C(=S)-S-S-C(=S)R and prediction of a novel rubber vulcanization accelerator.

    PubMed

    Mak, Adrian Matthew; Steudel, Ralf; Wong, Ming Wah

    2008-06-01

    The structures and energetics of eight substituted bis(thiocarbonyl)disulfides (RCS(2))(2), their associated radicals RCS(2)(*), and their coordination compounds with a lithium cation have been studied at the G3X(MP2) level of theory for R = H, Me, F, Cl, OMe, SMe, NMe(2), and PMe(2). The effects of substituents on the dissociation of (RCS(2))(2) to RCS(2)(*) were analyzed using isodesmic stabilization reactions. Electron-donating groups with an unshared pair of electrons have a pronounced stabilization effect on both (RCS(2))(2) and RCS(2)(*). The S-S bond dissociation enthalpy of tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD, R = NMe(2)) is the lowest in the above series (155 kJ mol(-1)), attributed to the particular stability of the formed Me(2)NCS(2)(*) radical. Both (RCS(2))(2) and the fragmented radicals RCS(2)(*) form stable chelate complexes with a Li(+) cation. The S-S homolytic bond cleavage in (RCS(2))(2) is facilitated by the reaction [Li(RCS(2))(2)](+)+Li(+)-->2 [Li(RCS(2))](*+). Three other substituted bis(thiocarbonyl) disulfides with the unconventional substituents R = OSF(5), Gu(1), and Gu(2) have been explored to find suitable alternative rubber vulcanization accelerators. Bis(thiocarbonyl)disulfide with a guanidine-type substituent, (Gu(1)CS(2))(2), is predicted to be an effective accelerator in sulfur vulcanization of rubber. Compared to TMTD, (Gu(1)CS(2))(2) is calculated to have a lower bond dissociation enthalpy and smaller associated barrier for the S-S homolysis.

  9. Perturbation of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Micelles by Sushi 3 (S3) antimicrobial peptide. The importance of an intermolecular disulfide bond in S3 dimer for binding, disruption, and neutralization of LPS.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wohland, Thorsten; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2004-11-26

    S3 peptide, derived from the Sushi 3 domain of Factor C, which is the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-sensitive serine protease of the horseshoe crab coagulation cascade, was shown previously to harbor antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria. However, the mechanism of action remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we demonstrate that the intermolecular disulfide bonding of S3 resulting in S3 dimers is indispensable for its interaction with LPS. The binding properties of the S3 monomer and dimer to LPS were analyzed by several approaches including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based assay, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). It is evident that the S3 dimer exhibits stronger binding to LPS, demonstrating 50% LPS-neutralizing capability at a concentration of 1 mum. Circular dichroism spectrometry revealed that the S3 peptide undergoes conformational change in the presence of a disulfide bridge, transitioning from a random coil to beta-sheet structure. Using a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy monitoring system, we describe a novel approach for examining the mechanism of peptide interaction with LPS in the native environment. The strategy shows that intermolecular disulfide bonding of S3 into dimers plays a critical role in its propensity to disrupt LPS micelles and consequently neutralize LPS activity. S3 dimers display detergent-like properties in disrupting LPS micelles. Considering intermolecular disulfide bonds as an important parameter in the structure-activity relationship, this insight provides clues for the future design of improved LPS-binding and -neutralizing peptides.

  10. The Variable Transition State in Polar Additions to Pi Bonds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2010-01-01

    A vast majority of polar additions of Bronsted acids to alkynes involve a termolecular transition state. With strong acids, considerable positive charge is developed on carbon and Markovnikov addition predominates. In less acidic solutions, however, the reaction is much slower and the transition state more closely resembles the olefinic product.…

  11. Single-residue changes in the C-terminal disulfide-bonded loop of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pilin influence pilus assembly and twitching motility.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Hanjeong; Habash, Marc; Aidoo, Francisca; Burrows, Lori L

    2009-11-01

    PilA, the major pilin subunit of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili (T4P), is a principal structural component. PilA has a conserved C-terminal disulfide-bonded loop (DSL) that has been implicated as the pilus adhesinotope. Structural studies have suggested that DSL is involved in intersubunit interactions within the pilus fiber. PilA mutants with single-residue substitutions, insertions, or deletions in the DSL were tested for pilin stability, pilus assembly, and T4P function. Mutation of either Cys residue of the DSL resulted in pilins that were unable to assemble into fibers. Ala replacements of the intervening residues had a range of effects on assembly or function, as measured by changes in surface pilus expression and twitching motility. Modification of the C-terminal P-X-X-C type II beta-turn motif, which is one of the few highly conserved features in pilins across various species, caused profound defects in assembly and twitching motility. Expression of pilins with suspected assembly defects in a pilA pilT double mutant unable to retract T4P allowed us to verify which subunits were physically unable to assemble. Use of two different PilA antibodies showed that the DSL may be an immunodominant epitope in intact pili compared with pilin monomers. Sequence diversity of the type IVa pilins likely reflects an evolutionary compromise between retention of function and antigenic variation. The consequences of DSL sequence changes should be evaluated in the intact protein since it is technically feasible to generate DSL-mimetic peptides with mutations that will not appear in the natural repertoire due to their deleterious effects on assembly.

  12. Interrelationships among biological activity, disulfide bonds, secondary structure, and metal ion binding for a chemically synthesized 34-amino-acid peptide derived from alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    MacColl, R; Eisele, L E; Stack, R F; Hauer, C; Vakharia, D D; Benno, A; Kelly, W C; Mizejewski, G J

    2001-10-01

    A 34-amino-acid peptide has been chemically synthesized based on a sequence from human alpha-fetoprotein. The purified peptide is active in anti-growth assays when freshly prepared in pH 7.4 buffer at 0.20 g/l, but this peptide slowly becomes inactive. This functional change is proven by mass spectrometry to be triggered by the formation of an intrapeptide disulfide bond between the two cysteine residues on the peptide. Interpeptide cross-linking does not occur. The active and inactive forms of the peptide have almost identical secondary structures as shown by circular dichroism (CD). Zinc ions bind to the active peptide and completely prevents formation of the inactive form. Cobalt(II) ions also bind to the peptide, and the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the cobalt-peptide complex shows that: (1) a near-UV sulfur-to-metal-ion charge-transfer band had a molar extinction coefficient consistent with two thiolate bonds to Co(II); (2) the lowest-energy visible d-d transition maximum at 659 nm, also, demonstrated that the two cysteine residues are ligands for the metal ion; (3) the d-d molar extinction coefficient showed that the metal ion-ligand complex was in a distorted tetrahedral symmetry. The peptide has two cysteines, and it is speculated that the other two metal ion ligands might be the two histidines. The Zn(II)- and Co(II)-peptide complexes had similar peptide conformations as indicated by their ultraviolet CD spectra, which differed very slightly from that of the free peptide. Surprisingly, the cobalt ions acted in the reverse of the zinc ions in that, instead of stabilizing anti-growth form of the peptide, they catalyzed its loss. Metal ion control of peptide function is a saliently interesting concept. Calcium ions, in the conditions studied, apparently do not bind to the peptide. Trifluoroethanol and temperature (60 degrees C) affected the secondary structure of the peptide, and the peptide was found capable of assuming various conformations in solution

  13. Disulfide Bonds in Hepatitis C Virus Glycoprotein E1 Control the Assembly and Entry Functions of E2 Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Wahid, Ahmed; Helle, François; Descamps, Véronique; Duverlie, Gilles; Penin, François

    2013-01-01

    Class II membrane fusion proteins have been described in viruses in which the envelope proteins are derived from a precursor polyprotein containing two transmembrane glycoproteins arranged in tandem. Although the second protein, which carries the membrane fusion function, is in general well characterized, the companion protein, which is a protein chaperone for the folding of the fusion protein, is less well characterized for some viruses, like hepatitis C virus (HCV). To investigate the role of the class II companion glycoprotein E1 of HCV, we chose to target conserved cysteine residues in the protein, and we systematically mutated them in a full-length infectious HCV clone by reverse genetics. All the mutants were infectious, albeit with lower titers than the wild-type virus. The reduced infectivity was in part due to a decrease in viral assembly, as revealed by measurement of intracellular infectivity and by quantification of core protein released from cells transfected with mutant genomes. Analyses of mutated proteins did not show any major defect in folding. However, the mutations reduced virus stability, and they could also affect the density of infectious viral particles. Mutant viruses also showed a defect in cell-to-cell transmission. Finally, our data indicate that HCV glycoprotein E1 can also affect the fusion protein E2 by modulating its recognition by the cellular coreceptor CD81. Therefore, in the context of HCV, our data identify an additional function of a class II companion protein as a molecule that can control the binding capacity of the fusion protein. PMID:23175356

  14. Alkoxyboration: Ring-Closing Addition of B–O σ Bonds across Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    For nearly 70 years, the addition of boron–X σ bonds to carbon–carbon multiple bonds has been employed in the preparation of organoboron reagents. However, the significantly higher strength of boron–oxygen bonds has thus far precluded their activation for addition, preventing a direct route to access a potentially valuable class of oxygen-containing organoboron reagents for divergent synthesis. We herein report the realization of an alkoxyboration reaction, the addition of boron–oxygen σ bonds to alkynes. Functionalized O-heterocyclic boronic acid derivatives are produced using this transformation, which is mild and exhibits broad functional group compatibility. Our results demonstrate activation of this boron–O σ bond using a gold catalysis strategy that is fundamentally different from that used previously for other boron addition reactions. PMID:24588331

  15. Diphenyl disulfide as a new bifunctional film-forming additive for high-voltage LiCoO2/graphite battery charged to 4.4 V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minkai; Zuo, Xiaoxi; Ma, Xiangdong; Xiao, Xin; Yu, Le; Nan, Junmin

    2016-08-01

    Diphenyl disulfide (DPDS) is evaluated as a new bifunctional electrolyte additive to improve the high-voltage performance of LiCoO2/graphite batteries. With the addition of DPDS in the electrolyte, the cell with 2.0 wt% DPDS exhibits enhanced performance in the normal voltage range of 3.0 V-4.2 V. In particular, when the cut-off potential is increased from 4.2 V to 4.4 V, the cell with 1.0 wt% DPDS also exhibits improved discharge capacity and cycle performance. Linear sweep voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry indicate that the DPDS can be reduced prior to the solvent and that the oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte can also be suppressed. In addition, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses demonstrate that the solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film is produced primarily on the graphite anode via the decomposition of DPDS at normal voltage and that the SEI films induced by DPDS can be formed simultaneously on the two electrodes at higher potentials. It is hypothesized that these compact SEI films covering the electrode surface provide protection for the LiCoO2 and graphite materials and accordingly improve the cyclic performance of battery in the voltage range of 3.0 V-4.4 V.

  16. Disulfide structures of highly bridged peptides: a new strategy for analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach is described for analyzing disulfide linkage patterns in peptides containing tightly clustered cystines. Such peptides are very difficult to analyze with traditional strategies, which require that the peptide chain be split between close or adjacent Cys residues. The water-soluble tris-(2-carboxyethyl)-phosphine (TCEP) reduced disulfides at pH 3, and partially reduced peptides were purified by high performance liquid chromatography with minimal thiol-disulfide exchange. Alkylation of free thiols, followed by sequencer analysis, provided explicit assignment of disulfides that had been reduced. Thiol-disulfide exchange occurred during alkylation of some peptides, but correct deductions were still possible. Alkylation competed best with exchange when peptide solution was added with rapid mixing to 2.2 M iodoacetamide. Variants were developed in which up to three alkylating agents were used to label different pairs of thiols, allowing a full assignment in one sequencer analysis. Model peptides used included insulin (three bridges, intra- and interchain disulfides; -Cys.Cys- pair), endothelin and apamin (two disulfides; -Cys.x.Cys- pair), conotoxin GI and isomers (two disulfides; -Cys.Cys- pair), and bacterial enterotoxin (three bridges within 13 residues; two -Cys.Cys- pairs). With insulin, all intermediates in the reduction pathway were identified; with conotoxin GI, analysis was carried out successfully for all three disulfide isomers. In addition to these known structures, the method has been applied successfully to the analysis of several previously unsolved structures of similar complexity. Rates of reduction of disulfide bonds varied widely, but most peptides did not show a strongly preferred route for reduction. PMID:8251945

  17. Carbon–carbon bond activation of cyclobutenones enabled by the addition of chiral organocatalyst to ketone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bao-Sheng; Wang, Yuhuang; Jin, Zhichao; Zheng, Pengcheng; Ganguly, Rakesh; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-01-01

    The activation of carbon–carbon (C–C) bonds is an effective strategy in building functional molecules. The C–C bond activation is typically accomplished via metal catalysis, with which high levels of enantioselectivity are difficult to achieve due to high reactivity of metal catalysts and the metal-bound intermediates. It remains largely unexplored to use organocatalysis for C–C bond activation. Here we describe an organocatalytic activation of C–C bonds through the addition of an NHC to a ketone moiety that initiates a C–C single bond cleavage as a key step to generate an NHC-bound intermediate for chemo- and stereo-selective reactions. This reaction constitutes an asymmetric functionalization of cyclobutenones using organocatalysts via a C–C bond activation process. Structurally diverse and multicyclic compounds could be obtained with high optical purities via an atom and redox economic process. PMID:25652912

  18. Disulfide bonds are critical for tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase function revealed by analysis of mutant proteins bearing a C(201)-Y or C(489)-S substitution associated with severe hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Satou, Yasuhito; Al-Shawafi, Hiba A; Sultana, Sara; Makita, Saori; Sohda, Miwa; Oda, Kimimitsu

    2012-04-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP), a rare genetic disease characterized by reduced serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and failure in bone and tooth mineralization, is caused by mutations in tissue-nonspecific ALP (TNSALP) gene. Two missense mutations (C201Y and C489S, standardized nomenclature) of TNSALP, involved in intra-chain disulfide bonds, were reported in patients diagnosed with perinatal HPP (Taillandier A. et al. Hum. Mutat. 13 (1999) 171-172, Hum. Mutat. 15 (2000) 293). To investigate the role of the disulfide bond in TNSALP, we expressed TNSALP (C201Y) and TNSALP (C489S) in COS-1 cells transiently. Compared with the wild-type enzyme [TNSALP (W)], both the TNSALP mutants exhibited a diminished ALP activity in the cells, where a 66kDa immature form was predominant with a marginal amount of a 80kDa mature form of TNSALP. Detailed studies on Tet-On CHO established cell line expressing TNSALP (W) or TNSALP (C201Y) showed that the 66kDa form of TNSALP (C201Y) exists as a monomer in contrast to a dimer of TNSALP (W). Only a small fraction of the TNSALP (C201Y) reached cell surface as the 80kDa mature form, though most of the 66kDa form was found to be endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase H sensitive and rapidly degraded in proteasome following polyubiquitination. Collectively, these results indicate not only that the intra-subunit disulfide bonds are crucial for TNSALP to properly fold and assemble into the dimeric enzyme, but also that the development of HPP associated with TNSALP (C201Y) or TNSALP (C489S) is attributed to decreased cell surface appearance of the functional enzyme.

  19. Transition metal-catalyzed process for addition of amines to carbon-carbon double bonds

    DOEpatents

    Hartwig, John F.; Kawatsura, Motoi; Loeber, Oliver

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for addition of amines to carbon-carbon double bonds in a substrate, comprising: reacting an amine with a compound containing at least one carbon-carbon double bond in the presence a transition metal catalyst under reaction conditions effective to form a product having a covalent bond between the amine and a carbon atom of the former carbon-carbon double bond. The transition metal catalyst comprises a Group 8 metal and a ligand containing one or more 2-electron donor atoms. The present invention is also directed to enantioselective reactions of amine compounds with compounds containing carbon-carbon double bonds, and a calorimetric assay to evaluate potential catalysts in these reactions.

  20. Independent of their localization in protein the hydrophobic amino acid residues have no effect on the molten globule state of apomyoglobin and the disulfide bond on the surface of apomyoglobin stabilizes this intermediate state.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Tatiana N; Majorina, Maria A; Larina, Daria S; Kashparov, Ivan A; Samatova, Ekaterina N; Glukhov, Anatoly S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2014-01-01

    At present it is unclear which interactions in proteins reveal the presence of intermediate states, their stability and formation rate. In this study, we have investigated the effect of substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues in the hydrophobic core of protein and on its surface on a molten globule type intermediate state of apomyoglobin. It has been found that independent of their localization in protein, substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues do not affect the stability of the molten globule state of apomyoglobin. It has been shown also that introduction of a disulfide bond on the protein surface can stabilize the molten globule state. However in the case of apomyoglobin, stabilization of the intermediate state leads to relative destabilization of the native state of apomyoglobin. The result obtained allows us not only to conclude which mutations can have an effect on the intermediate state of the molten globule type, but also explains why the introduction of a disulfide bond (which seems to "strengthen" the protein) can result in destabilization of the protein native state of apomyoglobin. PMID:24892675

  1. The disulfide relay system of mitochondria is required for the biogenesis of mitochondrial Ccs1 and Sod1.

    PubMed

    Reddehase, Silvia; Grumbt, Barbara; Neupert, Walter; Hell, Kai

    2009-01-16

    Cells protect themselves against oxygen stress and reactive oxygen species. An important enzyme in this process is superoxide dismutase, Sod1, which converts superoxide radicals into water and hydrogen peroxide. The biogenesis of functional Sod1 is dependent on its copper chaperone, Ccs1, which introduces a disulfide bond and a copper ion into Sod1. Ccs1 and Sod1 are present in the cytosol but are also found in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS), the compartment between the outer and the inner membrane of mitochondria. Ccs1 mediates mitochondrial localization of Sod1. Here, we report on the biogenesis of the fractions of Ccs1 and Sod1 present in mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The IMS of mitochondria harbors a disulfide relay system consisting of the import receptor Mia40 and the thiol oxidase Erv1, which drives the import of substrates with conserved cysteine residues arranged in typical twin Cx(3)C and twin Cx(9)C motifs. We show that depletion of Mia40 results in decreased levels of Ccs1 and Sod1. On the other hand, overexpression of Mia40 increased the mitochondrial fraction of both proteins. In addition, the import rates of Ccs1 were enhanced by increased levels of Mia40 and reduced upon depletion of Mia40. Mia40 forms mixed disulfides with Ccs1, suggesting a role of Mia40 for the generation of disulfide bonds in Ccs1. We suggest that the disulfide relay system transfers disulfide bonds via Mia40 to Ccs1, which then shuttles disulfide bonds to Sod1. In conclusion, the disulfide relay system is crucial for the import of Ccs1, thereby affecting the transport of Sod1, and it can control the distribution of Ccs1 and Sod1 between the IMS of mitochondria and the cytosol.

  2. Electrochemical reduction of disulfide-containing proteins for hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mysling, Simon; Salbo, Rune; Ploug, Michael; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of disulfide bond-containing proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) requires reduction of the disulfide bonds under acidic and cold conditions, where the amide hydrogen exchange reaction is quenched (pH 2.5, 0 °C). The reduction typically requires a high concentration (>200 mM) of the chemical reducing agent Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) as its reduction rate constant is decreased at low pH and temperature. Serious adverse effects on chromatographic and mass spectrometric performances have been reported when using high concentrations of TCEP. In the present study, we explore the feasibility of using electrochemical reduction as a substitute for TCEP in HDX-MS analyses. Our results demonstrate that efficient disulfide bond reduction is readily achieved by implementing an electrochemical cell into the HDX-MS workflow. We also identify some challenges in using electrochemical reduction in HDX-MS analyses and provide possible conditions to attenuate these limitations. For example, high salt concentrations hamper disulfide bond reduction, necessitating additional dilution of the sample with aqueous acidic solution at quench conditions. PMID:24251601

  3. Disulfide by Design 2.0: a web-based tool for disulfide engineering in proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Disulfide engineering is an important biotechnological tool that has advanced a wide range of research. The introduction of novel disulfide bonds into proteins has been used extensively to improve protein stability, modify functional characteristics, and to assist in the study of protein dynamics. Successful use of this technology is greatly enhanced by software that can predict pairs of residues that will likely form a disulfide bond if mutated to cysteines. Results We had previously developed and distributed software for this purpose: Disulfide by Design (DbD). The original DbD program has been widely used; however, it has a number of limitations including a Windows platform dependency. Here, we introduce Disulfide by Design 2.0 (DbD2), a web-based, platform-independent application that significantly extends functionality, visualization, and analysis capabilities beyond the original program. Among the enhancements to the software is the ability to analyze the B-factor of protein regions involved in predicted disulfide bonds. Importantly, this feature facilitates the identification of potential disulfides that are not only likely to form but are also expected to provide improved thermal stability to the protein. Conclusions DbD2 provides platform-independent access and significantly extends the original functionality of DbD. A web server hosting DbD2 is provided at http://cptweb.cpt.wayne.edu/DbD2/. PMID:24289175

  4. Disulfide Bond-mediated Multimerization of Ask1 and Its Reduction by Thioredoxin-1 Regulate H2O2-induced c-Jun NH2-terminal Kinase Activation and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Philippe J.; Charette, Steve J.; Toledano, Michel B.

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulated kinase-1 (Ask1) lies upstream of a major redox-sensitive pathway leading to the activation of Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and the induction of apoptosis. We found that cell exposure to H2O2 caused the rapid oxidation of Ask1, leading to its multimerization through the formation of interchain disulfide bonds. Oxidized Ask1 was fully reduced within minutes after induction by H2O2. During this reduction, the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) became covalently associated with Ask1. Overexpression of Trx1 accelerated the reduction of Ask1, and a redox-inactive mutant of Trx1 (C35S) remained trapped with Ask1, blocking its reduction. Preventing the oxidation of Ask1 by either overexpressing Trx1 or using an Ask1 mutant in which the sensitive cysteines were mutated (Ask1-ΔCys) impaired the activation of JNK and the induction of apoptosis while having little effect on Ask1 activation. These results indicate that Ask1 oxidation is required at a step subsequent to activation for signaling downstream of Ask1 after H2O2 treatment. PMID:17652454

  5. Extracellular disulfide bridges stabilize TRPC5 dimerization, trafficking, and activity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chansik; Kwak, Misun; Myeong, Jongyun; Ha, Kotdaji; Wie, Jinhong; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk

    2015-04-01

    Crucial cysteine residues can be involved in the modulation of protein activity via the modification of thiol (-SH) groups. Among these reactions, disulfide bonds (S-S) play a key role in the folding, stability, and activity of membrane proteins. However, the regulation of extracellular cysteines in classical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels remains controversial. Here, we examine the functional importance of the extracellular disulfide bond in TRPC5 in modulating channel gating and trafficking. Specifically, we investigated TRPC5 activity in transiently transfected HEK293 cells with wild-type (WT) or cysteine (C553 and C558) mutants in the pore loop. Using reducing agents, we determined that a disulfide linkage mediates the tetrameric formation of the TRPC5 channel. By measuring the TRPC5 current, we observed that C553S or C558S mutants completely lose channel activity induced by lanthanides or receptor stimulation. Co-expression of TRPC5 (WT) with mutants demonstrated a dominant-negative function in mutants, which inhibited the activity of TRPC5 (WT). We generated TRPC5-TRPC5 dimers and observed reduced activity of WT-mutant (C553S or C558S) dimers compared to WT-WT dimers. When pretreated with reducing agents for 12 h, the TRPC5 current decreased due to a reduction in membrane TRPC5 distribution. In addition, we identified a reduced expression of C553S mutant in plasma membrane. We analyzed a dimeric interaction of wild-type and mutant TRPC5 using co-immunoprecipitation and FRET method, indicating a weak interaction between dimeric partners. These results indicated that the disulfide bond between conserved extracellular cysteines, especially C553, is essential for functional TRPC5 activity by channel multimerization and trafficking.

  6. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus infection by agents that interfere with thiol-disulfide interchange upon virus-receptor interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Ryser, H J; Levy, E M; Mandel, R; DiSciullo, G J

    1994-01-01

    The cell surface of mammalian cells is capable of reductively cleaving disulfide bonds of exogenous membrane-bound macromolecules (for instance, the interchain disulfide of diphtheria toxin), and inhibiting this process with membrane-impermeant sulfhydryl reagents prevents diphtheria toxin cytotoxicity. More recently it was found that the same membrane function can be inhibited by bacitracin, an inhibitor of protein disulfide-isomerase (PDI), and by monoclonal antibodies against PDI, suggesting that PDI catalyzes a thiol-disulfide interchange between its thiols and the disulfides of membrane-bound macromolecules. We provide evidence that the same reductive process plays a role in the penetration of membrane-bound human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and show that HIV infection of human lymphoid cells is markedly inhibited by the membrane-impermeant sulfhydryl blocker 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), by bacitracin, and by anti-PDI antibodies. The results imply that HIV and its target cell engage in a thiol-disulfide interchange mediated by PDI and that the reduction of critical disulfides in viral envelope glycoproteins may be the initial event that triggers conformational changes required for HIV entry and cell infection. These findings suggest additional approaches to impede cell infection by HIV. PMID:8183947

  7. DsbA2 (27-kDa Com1-Like Protein) of Legionella pneumophila Catalyses Extracytoplasmic Disulfide-Bond Formation in Proteins Including the Dot/Icm Type IV Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Jameson-Lee, Max; Garduno, Rafael A.; Hoffman, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary In Gram negative bacteria, thiol oxidoreductases catalyze the formation of disulfide bonds (DSB) in extracytoplasmic proteins. In this study, we sought to identify DSB-forming proteins required for assembly of macromolecular structures in Legionella pneumophila. Here we describe two DSB forming proteins, one annotated as dsbA1 and the other annotated as a 27-kDa outer membrane protein similar to Com1 of Coxiella burnetii, which we designate as dsbA2. Both proteins are predicted to be periplasmic, and while dsbA1 mutants were readily isolated and without phenotype, dsbA2 mutants were not obtained. To advance studies of DsbA2, a cis-proline residue at position 198 was replaced with threonine that enables formation of stable disulfide-bond complexes with substrate proteins. Expression of DsbA2 P198T-mutant protein from an inducible promoter produced dominant-negative effects on DsbA2 function that resulted in loss of infectivity for amoeba and HeLa cells and loss of Dot/Icm T4SS-mediated contact hemolysis of erythrocytes. Analysis of captured DsbA2 P198T-substrate complexes from L. pneumophila by mass spectrometry identified periplasmic and outer membrane proteins that included components of the Dot/Icm T4SS. More broadly, our studies establish a DSB oxidoreductase function for the Com1 lineage of DsbA2-like proteins which appear to be conserved among those bacteria also expressing T4SS. PMID:21375592

  8. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Direct Addition of Aryl C-H Bonds to Unsaturated Electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xian-Ying; Han, Wen-Jing; Li, Chao-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The direct addition of Csp(2) -H bonds onto polar C=C, C=O, and C=N bonds is both synthetically and mechanistically important, because using aromatic C-H substrates in place of organometallic reagents provides a more direct and atom-economical alternative to many important compounds without the pre-generation of organometallic compounds from stoichiometric halides and the unavoidable generation of stoichiometric metal halide waste. In this account, we summarize our contributions to the transition-metal-catalyzed addition of aromatic C-H bonds to polar C=C, C=O, and C=N bonds via directing-group-assisted regiospecific reactions. These synthetic methods provide efficient access to benzylic alcohols, alkylbenzenes, 3-substituted phthalides, N-substituted phthalimides, N-aryl benzamides, and indene derivatives from commercially available reagents. It is worth noting that valuable heterocycles such as 3-substituted phthalides and N-substituted phthalimides can be obtained in one step by this approach. PMID:27059538

  9. Disulfide chromophore and its optical activity.

    PubMed

    Maloň, Petr; Bednárová, Lucie; Straka, Michal; Krejčí, Lucie; Kumprecht, Lukáš; Kraus, Tomáš; Kubáňová, Markéta; Baumruk, Vladimír

    2010-01-01

    The compounds I-IV derived from α-D-cyclodextrin moiety by bridging and/or interconnecting with various patterns of disulfide bonds were chosen as models for the spectroscopic study of conformation of the disulfide bridge. The energy gap between the disulfide and cyclodextrin's electronic transitions allows us to investigate absorption and electronic circular dichroism spectra without disturbing spectral overlaps with amides or aromatic amino acids in peptides or proteins. Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra were measured and the bands due to S-S and C-S stretching motion identified. Comparison with the quantum mechanical calculations of simple models indicates that sense of disulfide twist follows sign of the measured S-S ROA band.

  10. Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Bond Addition/Amine-Mediated Cyclization of Bis-Michael Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Potter, Tyler J; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2016-08-01

    A Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H bond addition/primary amine-promoted cyclization of bis-Michael acceptors is reported. The C-H bond addition step occurs with high chemoselectivity, and the subsequent intramolecular Michael addition, mediated by a primary amine catalyst, sets three contiguous stereocenters with high diastereoselectivity. A broad range of directing groups and both aromatic and alkenyl C-H bonds were shown to be effective in this transformation, affording functionalized piperidines, tetrahydropyrans, and cyclohexanes.

  11. Production of Recombinant Disulfide-Rich Venom Peptides for Structural and Functional Analysis via Expression in the Periplasm of E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Natalie J.; Seshadri, Radha; Lau, Ho Yee; Bende, Niraj S.; Undheim, Eivind A. B.; Rash, Lachlan D.; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F.

    2013-01-01

    Disulfide-rich peptides are the dominant component of most animal venoms. These peptides have received much attention as leads for the development of novel therapeutic agents and bioinsecticides because they target a wide range of neuronal receptors and ion channels with a high degree of potency and selectivity. In addition, their rigid disulfide framework makes them particularly well suited for addressing the crucial issue of in vivo stability. Structural and functional characterization of these peptides necessitates the development of a robust, reliable expression system that maintains their native disulfide framework. The bacterium Escherichia coli has long been used for economical production of recombinant proteins. However, the expression of functional disulfide-rich proteins in the reducing environment of the E. coli cytoplasm presents a significant challenge. Thus, we present here an optimised protocol for the expression of disulfide-rich venom peptides in the periplasm of E. coli, which is where the endogenous machinery for production of disulfide-bonds is located. The parameters that have been investigated include choice of media, induction conditions, lysis methods, methods of fusion protein and peptide purification, and sample preparation for NMR studies. After each section a recommendation is made for conditions to use. We demonstrate the use of this method for the production of venom peptides ranging in size from 2 to 8 kDa and containing 2–6 disulfide bonds. PMID:23667680

  12. Production of recombinant disulfide-rich venom peptides for structural and functional analysis via expression in the periplasm of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Klint, Julie K; Senff, Sebastian; Saez, Natalie J; Seshadri, Radha; Lau, Ho Yee; Bende, Niraj S; Undheim, Eivind A B; Rash, Lachlan D; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F

    2013-01-01

    Disulfide-rich peptides are the dominant component of most animal venoms. These peptides have received much attention as leads for the development of novel therapeutic agents and bioinsecticides because they target a wide range of neuronal receptors and ion channels with a high degree of potency and selectivity. In addition, their rigid disulfide framework makes them particularly well suited for addressing the crucial issue of in vivo stability. Structural and functional characterization of these peptides necessitates the development of a robust, reliable expression system that maintains their native disulfide framework. The bacterium Escherichia coli has long been used for economical production of recombinant proteins. However, the expression of functional disulfide-rich proteins in the reducing environment of the E. coli cytoplasm presents a significant challenge. Thus, we present here an optimised protocol for the expression of disulfide-rich venom peptides in the periplasm of E. coli, which is where the endogenous machinery for production of disulfide-bonds is located. The parameters that have been investigated include choice of media, induction conditions, lysis methods, methods of fusion protein and peptide purification, and sample preparation for NMR studies. After each section a recommendation is made for conditions to use. We demonstrate the use of this method for the production of venom peptides ranging in size from 2 to 8 kDa and containing 2-6 disulfide bonds.

  13. Oxidative addition of the C-I bond on aluminum nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Turbasu; Das, Susanta; Pal, Sourav

    2015-07-01

    Energetics and the in-depth reaction mechanism of the oxidative addition step of the cross-coupling reaction are studied in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) on aluminum nanoclusters. Aluminum metal in its bulk state is totally inactive towards carbon-halogen bond dissociation but selected Al nanoclusters (size ranging from 3 to 20 atoms) have shown a significantly lower activation barrier towards the oxidative addition reaction. The calculated energy barriers are lower than the gold clusters and within a comparable range with the conventional and most versatile Pd catalyst. Further investigations reveal that the activation energies and other reaction parameters are highly sensitive to the geometrical shapes and electronic structures of the clusters rather than their size, imposing the fact that comprehensive studies on aluminum clusters can be beneficial for nanoscience and nanotechnology. To understand the possible reaction mechanism in detail, the reaction pathway is investigated with the ab initio Born Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulation and the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. In short, our theoretical study highlights the thermodynamic and kinetic details of C-I bond dissociation on aluminum clusters for future endeavors in cluster chemistry.Energetics and the in-depth reaction mechanism of the oxidative addition step of the cross-coupling reaction are studied in the framework of density functional theory (DFT) on aluminum nanoclusters. Aluminum metal in its bulk state is totally inactive towards carbon-halogen bond dissociation but selected Al nanoclusters (size ranging from 3 to 20 atoms) have shown a significantly lower activation barrier towards the oxidative addition reaction. The calculated energy barriers are lower than the gold clusters and within a comparable range with the conventional and most versatile Pd catalyst. Further investigations reveal that the activation energies and other reaction parameters are highly

  14. Pyrazine-derived disulfide-reducing agent for chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Lukesh, John C; Wallin, Kelly K; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-08-28

    For fifty years, dithiothreitol (DTT) has been the preferred reagent for the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins and other biomolecules. Herein we report on the synthesis and characterization of 2,3-bis(mercaptomethyl)pyrazine (BMMP), a readily accessible disulfide-reducing agent with reactivity under biological conditions that is markedly superior to DTT and other known reagents.

  15. A degradable polydopamine coating based on disulfide-exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Daewha; Lee, Hojae; Kim, Beom Jin; Park, Taegyun; Choi, Ji Yu; Park, Matthew; Lee, Juno; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Hong, Seok-Pyo; Yang, Sung Ho; Jung, Sun Ho; Ko, Sung-Bo; Choi, Insung S.

    2015-11-01

    Although the programmed degradation of biocompatible films finds applications in various fields including biomedical and bionanotechnological areas, coating methods have generally been limited to be substrate-specific, not applicable to any kinds of substrates. In this paper, we report a dopamine derivative, which allows for both universal coating of various substrates and stimuli-responsive film degradation, inspired by mussel-adhesive proteins. Two dopamine moieties are linked together by the disulfide bond, the cleavage of which enables the programmed film degradation. Mechanistic analysis of the degradable films indicates that the initial cleavage of the disulfide linkage causes rapid uptake of water molecules, hydrating the films, which leads to rapid degradation. Our substrate-independent coating of degradable films provides an advanced tool for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and anti-fouling strategies.Although the programmed degradation of biocompatible films finds applications in various fields including biomedical and bionanotechnological areas, coating methods have generally been limited to be substrate-specific, not applicable to any kinds of substrates. In this paper, we report a dopamine derivative, which allows for both universal coating of various substrates and stimuli-responsive film degradation, inspired by mussel-adhesive proteins. Two dopamine moieties are linked together by the disulfide bond, the cleavage of which enables the programmed film degradation. Mechanistic analysis of the degradable films indicates that the initial cleavage of the disulfide linkage causes rapid uptake of water molecules, hydrating the films, which leads to rapid degradation. Our substrate-independent coating of degradable films provides an advanced tool for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and anti-fouling strategies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis, characterization, and other additional details. See DOI: 10

  16. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Laura, Richard P; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F; Maki, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO's single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO's unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO. PMID:26890638

  17. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Laura, Richard P; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F; Maki, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO's single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO's unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO.

  18. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Laura, Richard P.; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F.; Maki, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO’s single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO’s unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO. PMID:26890638

  19. New hydrogen-bonding organocatalysts: Chiral cyclophosphazanes and phosphorus amides as catalysts for asymmetric Michael additions

    PubMed Central

    Klare, Helge; Neudörfl, Jörg M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ten novel hydrogen-bonding catalysts based on open-chain PV-amides of BINOL and chinchona alkaloids as well as three catalysts based on rigid cis-PV-cyclodiphosphazane amides of N 1,N 1-dimethylcyclohexane-1,2-diamine have been developed. Employed in the asymmetric Michael addition of 2-hydroxynaphthoquinone to β-nitrostyrene, the open-chain 9-epi-aminochinchona-based phosphorus amides show a high catalytic activity with almost quantitative yields of up to 98% and enantiomeric excesses of up to 51%. The cyclodiphosphazane catalysts show the same high activity and give improved enantiomeric excesses of up to 75%, thus representing the first successful application of a cyclodiphosphazane in enantioselective organocatalysis. DFT computations reveal high hydrogen-bonding strengths of cyclodiphosphazane PV-amides compared to urea-based catalysts. Experimental results and computations on the enantiodetermining step with cis-cyclodiphosphazane 14a suggest a strong bidentate H-bond activation of the nitrostyrene substrate by the catalyst. PMID:24605142

  20. Big Area Additive Manufacturing of High Performance Bonded NdFeB Magnets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Tirado, Angelica; Nlebedim, I. C.; Rios, Orlando; Post, Brian; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lowden, R. R.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Fredette, Robert; Ormerod, John; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Paranthaman, M. Parans

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing allows for the production of complex parts with minimum material waste, offering an effective technique for fabricating permanent magnets which frequently involve critical rare earth elements. In this report, we demonstrate a novel method - Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) - to fabricate isotropic near-net-shape NdFeB bonded magnets with magnetic and mechanical properties comparable or better than those of traditional injection molded magnets. The starting polymer magnet composite pellets consist of 65 vol% isotropic NdFeB powder and 35 vol% polyamide (Nylon-12). The density of the final BAAM magnet product reached 4.8 g/cm3, and the room temperature magnetic properties are: intrinsic coercivity Hci = 688.4 kA/m, remanence Br = 0.51 T, and energy product (BH)max = 43.49 kJ/m3 (5.47 MGOe). In addition, tensile tests performed on four dog-bone shaped specimens yielded an average ultimate tensile strength of 6.60 MPa and an average failure strain of 4.18%. Scanning electron microscopy images of the fracture surfaces indicate that the failure is primarily related to the debonding of the magnetic particles from the polymer binder. The present method significantly simplifies manufacturing of near-net-shape bonded magnets, enables efficient use of rare earth elements thus contributing towards enriching the supply of critical materials. PMID:27796339

  1. Understanding the Oxidative Addition of σ-Bonds to Group 13 Compounds.

    PubMed

    García-Rodeja, Yago; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Fernández, Israel

    2016-09-12

    The oxidative addition reaction of X-H σ-bonds to Group 13 (E=Al, Ga, In) containing compounds has been computationally explored within the density functional theory framework. These reactions, which proceed concertedly involving the E(I) →E(III) oxidation, are exothermic and associated with relatively low activation barriers. In addition, the following trends in reactivity are found: (i) the activation barriers are lower for the X-H bonds involving the heavier element in the same group (ΔE(≠) : C>Si; N>P; O>S), (ii) the process becomes kinetically more favorable in going from left to right in the same period (ΔE(≠) : C>N>O; Si≈P>S), and (iii) the activation barrier systematically increases when heavier Group 13 elements are involved in the transformation (ΔE(≠) : Al

  2. Radical/π-bond addition between o-benzyne and cyclic C5 hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Comandini, Andrea; Brezinsky, Kenneth

    2012-02-01

    Recent theoretical investigations of the radical/π-bond addition between single-ring aromatic hydrocarbons highlight the importance of this category of reactions for the formation of PAH intermediates and soot. The present investigation extends the theory of the radical/π-bond addition reactions to the o-benzyne + cyclic C(5) hydrocarbons systems. The calculations, performed using the uB3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) method, have addressed the possible role of the reaction between o-benzyne and cyclopentadiene in the formation of indene through the fragmentation of the bicyclo intermediate benzonorbornadiene. The complex potential energy surface for the reaction between o-benzyne and cyclopentadienyl radical was also investigated. In this case, the formation of the bicyclo benzonorbornadienyl radical and its subsequent fragmentation to indenyl radical and acetylene is not the main reaction pathway, although it could be relevant at relatively high temperatures. At lower temperatures, the isomerization reactions, which lead to the formation of a variety of multiring compounds, are dominant.

  3. Probing conformational changes in the I-like domain and the cysteine-rich repeat of human beta 3 integrins following disulfide bond disruption by cysteine mutations: identification of cysteine 598 involved in alphaIIbbeta3 activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Melchior, C; Brons, N H; Schlegel, N; Caen, J; Kieffer, N

    2001-10-19

    We have investigated receptor function and epitope expression of recombinant alpha(IIb)beta(3) mutated at Cys(177) or Cys(273) in the I-like domain as well as Cys(598), located in the fourth repeat of the membrane-proximal cysteine-rich region and mutated in a Glanzmann's thrombasthenia type II patient. The beta(3) mutants beta(3)C177A, beta(3)C273A, and beta(3)C598Y exhibited a decreased electrophoretic mobility in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nonreducing conditions, confirming the disruption of the respective disulfide loops. Despite reduced surface expression, the alpha(IIb)beta(3)C177A, alpha(IIb)beta(3)C273A, and alpha(IIb)beta(3)C598Y receptors mediated cell adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen and translocated into focal adhesion plaques. The beta(3)C598Y mutation, but not the beta(3)C177A or beta(3)C273A mutations, induced spontaneous binding of the ligand mimetic monoclonal antibody PAC-1, while the beta(3)C177A and beta(3)C273A mutants exhibited reduced complex stability in the absence of Ca(2+). Epitope mapping of function-blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) allowed the identification of two distinct subgroups; mAbs A2A9, pl2-46, 10E5, and P256 did not interact with alpha(IIb)beta(3)C273A and bound only weakly to alpha(IIb)beta(3)C177A, while mAbs AP2, LM609 and 7E3 bound normally to mutant alpha(IIb)beta(3)C273A, but interacted only weakly with mutant alpha(IIb)beta(3)C177A. Furthermore, a cryptic epitope recognized by mAb 4D10G3 and not exposed on wild type alpha(IIb)beta(3) became accessible only on mutant alpha(IIb)beta(3)C177A and was mapped to the 60-kDa chymotrypsin fragment of beta(3). Finally, the ligand-induced binding site (LIBS) epitopes AP5, D3, LIBS1, and LIBS2 were spontaneously expressed on all three mutants independent of RGDS or dithiothreitol treatment. Our results provide evidence that disruption of a single cysteine disulfide bond in the cysteine-rich repeat domain, but not in the I-like domain, activates integrin

  4. Protein disulfide isomerase homolog TrPDI2 contributing to cellobiohydrolase production in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guokun; Lv, Pin; He, Ronglin; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Lixian; Zhang, Dongyuan; Chen, Shulin

    2015-09-01

    The majority of the cysteine residues in the secreted proteins form disulfide bonds via protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-mediated catalysis, stabilizing the enzyme activity. The role of PDI in cellulase production is speculative, as well as the possibility of PDI as a target for improving enzyme production efficiency of Trichoderma reesei, a widely used producer of enzyme for the production of lignocellulose-based biofuels and biochemicals. Here, we report that a PDI homolog, TrPDI2 in T. reesei exhibited a 36.94% and an 11.81% similarity to Aspergillus niger TIGA and T. reesei PDI1, respectively. The capability of TrPDI2 to recover the activity of reduced and denatured RNase by promoting refolding verified its protein disulfide isomerase activity. The overexpression of Trpdi2 increased the secretion and the activity of CBH1 at the early stage of cellulase induction. In addition, both the expression level and redox state of TrPDI2 responded to cellulase induction in T. reesei, providing sustainable oxidative power to ensure cellobiohydrolase maturation and production. The results suggest that TrPDI2 may contribute to cellobiohydrolase secretion by enhancing the capability of disulfide bond formation, which is essential for protein folding and maturation. PMID:26138396

  5. Protein disulfide isomerase homolog TrPDI2 contributing to cellobiohydrolase production in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guokun; Lv, Pin; He, Ronglin; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Lixian; Zhang, Dongyuan; Chen, Shulin

    2015-09-01

    The majority of the cysteine residues in the secreted proteins form disulfide bonds via protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-mediated catalysis, stabilizing the enzyme activity. The role of PDI in cellulase production is speculative, as well as the possibility of PDI as a target for improving enzyme production efficiency of Trichoderma reesei, a widely used producer of enzyme for the production of lignocellulose-based biofuels and biochemicals. Here, we report that a PDI homolog, TrPDI2 in T. reesei exhibited a 36.94% and an 11.81% similarity to Aspergillus niger TIGA and T. reesei PDI1, respectively. The capability of TrPDI2 to recover the activity of reduced and denatured RNase by promoting refolding verified its protein disulfide isomerase activity. The overexpression of Trpdi2 increased the secretion and the activity of CBH1 at the early stage of cellulase induction. In addition, both the expression level and redox state of TrPDI2 responded to cellulase induction in T. reesei, providing sustainable oxidative power to ensure cellobiohydrolase maturation and production. The results suggest that TrPDI2 may contribute to cellobiohydrolase secretion by enhancing the capability of disulfide bond formation, which is essential for protein folding and maturation.

  6. Pt and Hf Additions to NiAl Bond Coats and Their Effect on the Lifetime of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Gleeson, B.; Sordelet, D.; Barrett, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    The lifetimes of thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) with various NiAlPt(HfZr) bond coats were determined by cyclic oxidation testing at 1163 C (2125 F). The bond coats were sprayed from powders by low pressure plasma spraying onto Rene N5 superalloy substrates. Yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) top coats were applied by air plasma spraying. Surprisingly, there was not a strong correlation between TBC lifetime and Pt or Hf content although Zr additions decreased lifetimes. TBC failure morphologies and bond coat microstructures were examined and are discussed with respect to the bond coat compositions.

  7. Effect of Hf Additions to Pt Aluminide Bond Coats on EB-PVD TBC Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James; Nagaraj, Ben; Williams, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    Small Hf additions were incorporated into a Pt aluminide coating during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on single crystal RENE N5 substrates. Standard yttria-stabilized zirconia top coats were subsequently deposited onto the coated substrates by electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). The coated substrates underwent accelerated thermal cycle testing in a furnace at a temperature in excess of 1121 C (2050 F) (45 minute hot exposure, 15 minute cool to approximately 121 C (250 F)) until the thermal barrier coating (TBC) failed by spallation. Incorporating Hf in the bond coat increased the TBC life by slightly more than three times that of a baseline coating without added Hf. Scanning electron microscopy of the spalled surfaces indicated that the presence of the Hf increased the adherence of the thermally grown alumina to the Pt aluminide bond coat. The presence of oxide pegs growing into the coating from the thermally grown alumina may also partially account for the improved TBC life by creating a near-surface layer with a graded coefficient of thermal expansion.

  8. Microstructural Characterization of Bonding Interfaces in Aluminum 3003 Blocks Fabricated by Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Schick, D. E.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Lippold, John C; Hahnlen, R.M.; Dapino, M.J.; Dehoff, Ryan R; Collins, P.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a process by which hybrid and near-netshaped products can be manufactured from thin metallic tapes. One of the main concerns of UAM is the development of anisotropic mechanical properties. In this work, the microstructures in the bond regions are characterized with optical and electron microscopy. Recrystallization and grain growth across the interface are proposed as a mechanism for the bond formation. The presence of voids or unbonded areas, which reduce the load-bearing cross section and create a stress intensity factor, is attributed to the transfer of the sonotrode texture to the new foil layer. This results in large peaks and valleys that are not filled in during processing. Tensile testing revealed the weld interface strength was 15% of the bulk foil. Shear tests of the weld interfaces showed almost 50% of the bulk shear strength of the material. Finally, optical microscopy of the fracture surfaces from the tensile tests revealed 34% of the interface area was unbonded.

  9. Oxidative addition of zero-valent lanthanides at transition metal-halogen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Suleimanov, G.Z.; Khandozhko, V.N.; Mekhdiev, R.Yu.; Petrovskii, P.V.; Kolobova, N.E.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1986-11-20

    Alkyl and aryl iodides add to zero-valent lanthanides to form Grignard-like reagents RLnI. The authors have already studied the addition of Ln(0) at the Hg-I bond in HgI/sub 2/ and RHgI compounds to give bimetallic derivatives of divalent lanthanides. In the present work, preliminary results are given for a study of the reactions of rare-earth elements with metal carbonyl halides with the general formula L(OC)/sub m/M-X (I), where L(OC)/sub m/M = Cp(OC)/sub 3/Cr, Cp(OC)/sub 3/Mo, Cp(OC)/sub 3/W, (OC)/sub 5/Mn, (OC)/sub 5/Re, or Cp(OC/sub 2/)Fe and X = Cl, BR, or I.

  10. Polarized and depolarized Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulfide in the pressure range 0-10 kbar. I. Vibration frequencies, C-S bond length, and Fermi resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, S.; Whalley, Edward

    1986-09-01

    The effect of pressure on the polarized and depolarized Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulphide, i.e., the peak frequencies, bandwidths, and relative intensities of both the allowed ν1 and 2ν2 bands and the interaction-induced ν2 and ν3 bands, have been measured at 22 °C up to 10 kbar. This paper discusses the effect of pressure on the frequencies and on the relative isotropic intensity of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands. The frequency of the ν1 band increases linearly with pressure, within the experimental uncertainty, at the rate 0.16±0.01 cm-1 kbar-1, and the frequencies of the ν2, ν3, and 2ν2 bands decrease nonlinearly. The frequency shifts are described by second-order perturbation theory with the molecular anharmonicity and the intermolecular interaction as perturbations. The leading terms of the shifts consist of the same derivative of the interaction potential, multiplied by different anharmonicity constants, and the shifts of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands suggests that the C-S bond length decreases at the rate 2×10-4 Å kbar-1. The relative isotropic intensity of the 2ν2 and ν1 bands increases with pressure at the rate 0.050 kbar-1, whereas the anisotropic 2ν2 intensity relative to the isotropic ν1 intensity is independent of pressure to the experimental precision of ˜0.005. The effect of pressure on the second derivative of the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the polarizability with respect to the bend coordinate was estimated as 1.1×10-43 C m2 V-1 kbar-1 and ˜0, respectively, from these values.

  11. Enzyme structure captures four cysteines aligned for disulfide relay

    PubMed Central

    Gat, Yair; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Grossman, Iris; Major, Dan Thomas; Fass, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin superfamily proteins introduce disulfide bonds into substrates, catalyze the removal of disulfides, and operate in electron relays. These functions rely on one or more dithiol/disulfide exchange reactions. The flavoenzyme quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX), a catalyst of disulfide bond formation with an interdomain electron transfer step in its catalytic cycle, provides a unique opportunity for exploring the structural environment of enzymatic dithiol/disulfide exchange. Wild-type Rattus norvegicus QSOX1 (RnQSOX1) was crystallized in a conformation that juxtaposes the two redox-active di-cysteine motifs in the enzyme, presenting the entire electron-transfer pathway and proton-transfer participants in their native configurations. As such a state cannot generally be enriched and stabilized for analysis, RnQSOX1 gives unprecedented insight into the functional group environments of the four cysteines involved in dithiol/disulfide exchange and provides the framework for analysis of the energetics of electron transfer in the presence of the bound flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor. Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) free energy simulations based on the X-ray crystal structure suggest that formation of the interdomain disulfide intermediate is highly favorable and secures the flexible enzyme in a state from which further electron transfer via the flavin can occur. PMID:24888638

  12. Stable Gold(III) Catalysts by Oxidative Addition of a Carbon-Carbon Bond

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Yeh; Horibe, Takahiro; Jacobsen, Christian Borch

    2014-01-01

    Whereas low-valent late transition metal catalysis has become indispensible for chemical synthesis, homogeneous high-valent transition metal catalysis is underdeveloped, mainly due to the reactivity of high-valent transition metal complexes and the challenges associated with synthesizing them. In this manuscript, we report a mild carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction by a Au(I) complex that generates a stable Au(III) cationic complex. Complementary to the well-established soft and carbophilic Au(I) catalyst, this Au(III) complex exhibits hard, oxophilic Lewis acidity. This is exemplified by catalytic activation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes towards selective conjugate additions as well as activation of an unsaturated aldehyde-allene for a [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction. The origin of the regioselectivity and catalytic activity was elucidated by X-ray crystallographic analysis of an isolated Au(III)-activated cinnamaldehyde intermediate. The concepts revealed in this study provide a strategy for accessing high-valent transition metal catalysis from readily available precursors. PMID:25612049

  13. Stable gold(III) catalysts by oxidative addition of a carbon-carbon bond.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Yeh; Horibe, Takahiro; Jacobsen, Christian Borch; Toste, F Dean

    2015-01-22

    Low-valent late transition-metal catalysis has become indispensable to chemical synthesis, but homogeneous high-valent transition-metal catalysis is underdeveloped, mainly owing to the reactivity of high-valent transition-metal complexes and the challenges associated with synthesizing them. Here we report a carbon-carbon bond cleavage at ambient conditions by a Au(i) complex that generates a stable Au(iii) cationic complex. In contrast to the well-established soft and carbophilic Au(i) catalyst, this Au(iii) complex exhibits hard, oxophilic Lewis acidity. For example, we observed catalytic activation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes towards selective conjugate additions as well as activation of an unsaturated aldehyde-allene for a [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction. The origin of the regioselectivity and catalytic activity was elucidated by X-ray crystallographic analysis of an isolated Au(iii)-activated cinnamaldehyde intermediate. The concepts revealed suggest a strategy for accessing high-valent transition-metal catalysis from readily available precursors.

  14. Stable gold(III) catalysts by oxidative addition of a carbon-carbon bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Yeh; Horibe, Takahiro; Jacobsen, Christian Borch; Toste, F. Dean

    2015-01-01

    Low-valent late transition-metal catalysis has become indispensable to chemical synthesis, but homogeneous high-valent transition-metal catalysis is underdeveloped, mainly owing to the reactivity of high-valent transition-metal complexes and the challenges associated with synthesizing them. Here we report a carbon-carbon bond cleavage at ambient conditions by a Au(I) complex that generates a stable Au(III) cationic complex. In contrast to the well-established soft and carbophilic Au(I) catalyst, this Au(III) complex exhibits hard, oxophilic Lewis acidity. For example, we observed catalytic activation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes towards selective conjugate additions as well as activation of an unsaturated aldehyde-allene for a [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction. The origin of the regioselectivity and catalytic activity was elucidated by X-ray crystallographic analysis of an isolated Au(III)-activated cinnamaldehyde intermediate. The concepts revealed suggest a strategy for accessing high-valent transition-metal catalysis from readily available precursors.

  15. Exploring the folding pathway of green fluorescent protein through disulfide engineering.

    PubMed

    Pitman, Derek J; Banerjee, Shounak; Macari, Stephen J; Castaldi, Christopher A; Crone, Donna E; Bystroff, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    We have introduced two disulfide crosslinks into the loop regions on opposite ends of the beta barrel in superfolder green fluorescent protein (GFP) in order to better understand the nature of its folding pathway. When the disulfide on the side opposite the N/C-termini is formed, folding is 2× faster, unfolding is 2000× slower, and the protein is stabilized by 16 kJ/mol. But when the disulfide bond on the side of the termini is formed we see little change in the kinetics and stability. The stabilization upon combining the two crosslinks is approximately additive. When the kinetic effects are broken down into multiple phases, we observe Hammond behavior in the upward shift of the kinetic m-value of unfolding. We use these results in conjunction with structural analysis to assign folding intermediates to two parallel folding pathways. The data are consistent with a view that the two fastest transition states of folding are "barrel closing" steps. The slower of the two phases passes through an intermediate with the barrel opening occurring between strands 7 and 8, while the faster phase opens between 9 and 4. We conclude that disulfide crosslink-induced perturbations in kinetics are useful for mapping the protein folding pathway.

  16. Theoretical study of the OH addition to the endocyclic and exocyclic double bonds of the d-limonene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Ramírez, Víctor M.; Nebot-Gil, Ignacio

    2005-06-01

    The initial step of the d-limonene + OH gas-phase reaction mechanism was investigated by means of ab initio calculations. We have considered eight different possibilities for the OH addition, corresponding to the two C-C double bonds, the two C atoms of each double bond, and the syn or anti orientation, with respect to the isopropenyl group (endocyclic attack) or the ring cycle (exocyclic attack). Activation energies calculated at the QCISD(T)/6-31G(d)//UMP2/6-31G(d) level, show that there are preferred orientations for the OH addition under atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure.

  17. P2 addition to terminal phosphide M[triple bond]P triple bonds: a rational synthesis of cyclo-P3 complexes.

    PubMed

    Piro, Nicholas A; Cummins, Christopher C

    2008-07-23

    The diphosphaazide complex (Mes*NPP)Nb(N[Np]Ar)3 (Mes* = 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl, Np = neopentyl, Ar = 3,5-Me2C6H3), 1, has previously been reported to lose the P2 unit upon gentle heating, to form (Mes*N)Nb(N[Np]Ar)3, 2. The first-order activation parameters for this process have been estimated here using an Eyring analysis to have the values Delta H(double dagger) = 19.6(2) kcal/mol and Delta S(double dagger) = -14.2(5) eu. The eliminated P2 unit can be transferred to the terminal phosphide complexes P[triple bond]M(N[(i)Pr]Ar)3, 3-M (M = Mo, W), and [P[triple bond]Nb(N[Np]Ar)3](-), 3-Nb, to give the cyclo-P3 complexes (P3)M(N[(i)Pr]Ar)3 and [(P3)Nb(N[Np]Ar)3](-). These reactions represent the formal addition of a P[triple bond]P triple bond across a M[triple bond]P triple bond and are the first efficient transfers of the P2 unit to substrates present in stoichiometric quantities. The related complex (OC)5W(Mes*NPP)Nb(N[Np]Ar)3, 1-W(CO)5, was used to transfer the (P2)W(CO)5 unit in an analogous manner to the substrates 3-M (M = Mo, W, Nb) as well as to [(OC)5WP[triple bond]Nb(N[Np]Ar)3](-). The rate constants for the fragmentation of 1 and 1-W(CO)5 were unchanged in the presence of the terminal phosphide 3-Mo, supporting the hypothesis that molecular P2 and (P2)W(CO)5, respectively, are reactive intermediates. In a reaction related to the combination of P[triple bond]P and M[triple bond]P triple bonds, the phosphaalkyne AdC[triple bond]P (Ad = 1-adamantyl) was observed to react with 3-Mo to generate the cyclo-CP2 complex (AdCP2)Mo(N[(i)Pr]Ar)3. Reactions of the electrophiles Ph3SnCl, Mes*NPCl, and AdC(O)Cl with the anionic, nucleophilic complexes [(OC)5W(P3)Nb(N[Np]Ar)3](-) and [{(OC)5W}2(P3)Nb(N[Np]Ar)3](-) yielded coordinated eta(2)-triphosphirene ligands. The Mes*NPW(CO)5 group of one such product engages in a fluxional ring-migration process, according to NMR spectroscopic data. The structures of (OC)5W(P3)W(N[(i)Pr]Ar)3, [(Et2O)Na][{(OC)5W}2(P3)Nb

  18. Studying Chemical Reactions, One Bond at a Time, with Single Molecule AFM Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Julio M.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mechanical forces regulate the kinetics of a chemical reaction are unknown. In my lecture I will demonstrate how we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy and protein engineering to study the effect of force on the kinetics of thiol/disulfide exchange. Reduction of disulfide bond via the thiol/disulfide exchange chemical reaction is crucial in regulating protein function and is of common occurrence in mechanically stressed proteins. While reduction is thought to proceed through a substitution nucleophilic bimolecular (SN2) reaction, the role of a mechanical force in modulating this chemical reaction is unknown. We apply a constant stretching force to single engineered disulfide bonds and measure their rate of reduction by dithiothreitol (DTT). We find that while the reduction rate is linearly dependent on the concentration of DTT, it is exponentially dependent on the applied force, increasing 10-fold over a 300 pN range. This result predicts that the disulfide bond lengthens by 0.34 å at the transition state of the thiol/disulfide exchange reaction. In addition to DTT, we also study the reduction of the engineered disulfide bond by the E. coli enzyme thioredoxin (Trx). Thioredoxins are enzymes that catalyze disulfide bond reduction in all organisms. As before, we apply a mechanical force in the range of 25-450 pN to the engineered disulfide bond substrate and monitor the reduction of these bonds by individual enzymes. In sharp contrast with the data obtained with DTT, we now observe two alternative forms of the catalytic reaction, the first requiring a reorientation of the substrate disulfide bond, causing a shortening of the substrate polypeptide by 0.76±0.07 å, and the second elongating the substrate disulfide bond by 0.21±0.01 å. These results support the view that the Trx active site regulates the geometry of the participating sulfur atoms, with sub-ångström precision, in order to achieve efficient catalysis. Single molecule

  19. Insight into the reaction mechanisms for oxidative addition of strong σ bonds to an Al(i) center.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangfei; Cao, Zexing

    2016-06-21

    The oxidation addition of a series of σ H-X bonds (X = H, B, C, Si, N, P, and O) to a single Al(i) supported by a (NacNac)(-) bidentate ligand ((NacNac)(-) = [ArNC(Me)CHC(Me)NAr](-) and Ar = 2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3) has been explored through extensive DFT calculations. The presented results show that activation and addition of these σ bonds follow various reaction mechanisms, in which hydride transfer, proton transfer, and Al-X bond coupling steps are involved. The predicted free energy barriers for these oxidative additions range from 8 to 32 kcal mol(-1), and all the reactions are remarkably favorable thermodynamically. However, sterically hindered ligands, for most reactants, make the formation of the initial reactant complex difficult and may reduce the efficiency of the reaction. Calculations reveal a strong dependence of the reaction mechanism and low-energy channel on the bonding features of X-H and the local structural environments. PMID:27249667

  20. Folding and activity of hybrid sequence, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, J.H.B.; Storrs, R.W.; Wemmer, D.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Peptides have been synthesized that have hybrid sequences, partially derived from the bee venom peptide apamin and partially from the S peptide of ribonuclease A. The hybrid peptides were demonstrated by NMR spectroscopy to fold, forming the same disulfides and basic three-dimensional structure as native apamin, containing a {beta}-turn and an {alpha}-helix. These hybrids were active in complementing S protein, reactivating nuclease activity. In addition, the hybrid peptide was effective in inducing antibodies that cross-react with the RNase, without conjugation to a carrier protein. The stability of the folded structure of this peptide suggests that it should be possible to elicit antibodies that will react not only with a specific sequence, but also with a specific secondary structure. Hybrid sequence peptides also provide opportunities to study separately nucleation and propagation steps in formation of secondary structure. The authors show that in S peptide the {alpha}-helix does not end abruptly but rather terminates gradually over four or five residues. In general, these hybrid sequence peptides, which fold predictably because of disulfide bond formation, can provide opportunities for examining structure - function relationships for many biologically active sequences.

  1. Insights into the Electronic Structure of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide from Generalized Valence Bond Theory: Addition of Hydrogen Atoms.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Beth A; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are valence isoelectronic species, yet their properties and reactivities differ dramatically. In particular, O3 is highly reactive, whereas SO2 is chemically relatively stable. In this paper, we investigate serial addition of hydrogen atoms to both the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2 and to the central atom of these species. It is well-known that the terminal atoms of O3 are much more amenable to bond formation than those of SO2. We show that the differences in the electronic structure of the π systems in the parent triatomic species account for the differences in the addition of hydrogen atoms to the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2. Further, we find that the π system in SO2, which is a recoupled pair bond dyad, facilitates the addition of hydrogen atoms to the sulfur atom, resulting in stable HSO2 and H2SO2 species.

  2. Cobalt(III)-Catalyzed Synthesis of Indazoles and Furans by C–H Bond Functionalization/Addition/Cyclization Cascades

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of operationally straightforward and cost-effective routes for the assembly of heterocycles from simple inputs is important for many scientific endeavors, including pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and materials research. In this article we describe the development of a new air-stable cationic Co(III) catalyst for convergent, one-step benchtop syntheses of N-aryl-2H-indazoles and furans by C–H bond additions to aldehydes followed by in situ cyclization and aromatization. Only a substoichiometric amount of AcOH is required as an additive that is both low-cost and convenient to handle. The syntheses of these heterocycles are the first examples of Co(III)-catalyzed additions to aldehydes, and reactions are demonstrated for a variety of aromatic, heteroaromatic, and aliphatic derivatives. The syntheses of both N-aryl-2H-indazoles and furans have been performed on 20 mmol scales and should be readily applicable to larger scales. The reported heterocycle syntheses also demonstrate the use of directing groups that have not previously been applied to Co(III)-catalyzed C–H bond functionalizations. Additionally, the synthesis of furans demonstrates the first example of Co(III)-catalyzed functionalization of alkenyl C–H bonds. PMID:25494296

  3. Design of new disulfide-based organic compounds for the improvement of self-healing materials.

    PubMed

    Matxain, Jon M; Asua, José M; Ruipérez, Fernando

    2016-01-21

    Self-healing materials are a very promising kind of materials due to their capacity to repair themselves. Among others, diphenyl disulfide-based compounds (Ph2S2) appear to be among the best candidates to develop materials with optimum self-healing properties. However, few is known regarding both the reaction mechanism and the electronic structure that make possible such properties. In this vein, theoretical approaches are of great interest. In this work, we have carried out theoretical calculations on a wide set of different disulfide compounds, both aromatic and aliphatic, in order to elucidate the prevalent reaction mechanism and the necessary electronic conditions needed for improved self-healing properties. Two competitive mechanisms were considered, namely, the metathesis and the radical-mediated mechanism. According to our calculations, the radical-mediated mechanism is the responsible for this process. The formation of sulfenyl radicals strongly depends on the S-S bond strength, which can be modulated chemically by the use of proper derivatives. At this point, amino derivatives appear to be the most promising ones. In addition to the S-S bond strength, hydrogen bonding between disulfide chains seems to be relevant to favour the contact among disulfide units. This is crucial for the reaction to take place. The calculated hydrogen bonding energies are of the same order of magnitude as the S-S bond energies. Finally, reaction barriers have been analysed for some promising candidates. Two reaction mechanisms were compared, namely, the [2+2] metathesis reaction mechanism and the [2+1] radical-mediated mechanism. No computational evidence for the existence of any transition state for the metathesis mechanism was found, which indicates that the radical-mediated mechanism is the one responsible in the self-healing process of these materials. Interestingly, the calculated reaction barriers are around 10 kcal mol(-1) regardless the substituent employed. All these

  4. Design of new disulfide-based organic compounds for the improvement of self-healing materials.

    PubMed

    Matxain, Jon M; Asua, José M; Ruipérez, Fernando

    2016-01-21

    Self-healing materials are a very promising kind of materials due to their capacity to repair themselves. Among others, diphenyl disulfide-based compounds (Ph2S2) appear to be among the best candidates to develop materials with optimum self-healing properties. However, few is known regarding both the reaction mechanism and the electronic structure that make possible such properties. In this vein, theoretical approaches are of great interest. In this work, we have carried out theoretical calculations on a wide set of different disulfide compounds, both aromatic and aliphatic, in order to elucidate the prevalent reaction mechanism and the necessary electronic conditions needed for improved self-healing properties. Two competitive mechanisms were considered, namely, the metathesis and the radical-mediated mechanism. According to our calculations, the radical-mediated mechanism is the responsible for this process. The formation of sulfenyl radicals strongly depends on the S-S bond strength, which can be modulated chemically by the use of proper derivatives. At this point, amino derivatives appear to be the most promising ones. In addition to the S-S bond strength, hydrogen bonding between disulfide chains seems to be relevant to favour the contact among disulfide units. This is crucial for the reaction to take place. The calculated hydrogen bonding energies are of the same order of magnitude as the S-S bond energies. Finally, reaction barriers have been analysed for some promising candidates. Two reaction mechanisms were compared, namely, the [2+2] metathesis reaction mechanism and the [2+1] radical-mediated mechanism. No computational evidence for the existence of any transition state for the metathesis mechanism was found, which indicates that the radical-mediated mechanism is the one responsible in the self-healing process of these materials. Interestingly, the calculated reaction barriers are around 10 kcal mol(-1) regardless the substituent employed. All these

  5. Disulfide cross-linking influences symbiotic activities of nodule peptide NCR247.

    PubMed

    Shabab, Mohammed; Arnold, Markus F F; Penterman, Jon; Wommack, Andrew J; Bocker, Hartmut T; Price, Paul A; Griffitts, Joel S; Nolan, Elizabeth M; Walker, Graham C

    2016-09-01

    Interactions of rhizobia with legumes establish the chronic intracellular infection that underlies symbiosis. Within nodules of inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) legumes, rhizobia differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. This terminal differentiation is driven by host nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides that orchestrate the adaptation of free-living bacteria into intracellular residents. Medicago truncatula encodes a family of >700 NCR peptides that have conserved cysteine motifs. NCR247 is a cationic peptide with four cysteines that can form two intramolecular disulfide bonds in the oxidized forms. This peptide affects Sinorhizobium meliloti transcription, translation, and cell division at low concentrations and is antimicrobial at higher concentrations. By preparing the three possible disulfide-cross-linked NCR247 regioisomers, the reduced peptide, and a variant lacking cysteines, we performed a systematic study of the effects of intramolecular disulfide cross-linking and cysteines on the activities of an NCR peptide. The relative activities of the five NCR247 variants differed strikingly among the various bioassays, suggesting that the NCR peptide-based language used by plants to control the development of their bacterial partners during symbiosis is even greater than previously recognized. These patterns indicate that certain NCR bioactivities require cysteines whereas others do not. The results also suggest that NCR247 may exert some of its effects within the cell envelope whereas other activities occur in the cytoplasm. BacA, a membrane protein that is critical for symbiosis, provides protection against all bactericidal forms of NCR247. Oxidative folding protects NCR247 from degradation by the symbiotically relevant metalloprotease HrrP (host range restriction peptidase), suggesting that disulfide bond formation may additionally stabilize NCR peptides during symbiosis. PMID:27551097

  6. Structure of conkunitzin-S1, a neurotoxin and Kunitz-fold disulfide variant from cone snail

    SciTech Connect

    Dy, Catherine Y.; Buczek, Pawel; Imperial, Julita S.; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Horvath, Martin P.

    2006-09-01

    Most Kunitz proteins like BPTI and α-dendrotoxin are stabilized by three disulfide bonds. The crystal structure shows how subtle repacking of non-covalent interactions may compensate for disulfide bond loss in a naturally occurring two-disulfide variant, conkunitzin-S1, the first discovered member of a new conotoxin family. Cone snails (Conus) are predatory marine mollusks that immobilize prey with venom containing 50–200 neurotoxic polypeptides. Most of these polypeptides are small disulfide-rich conotoxins that can be classified into families according to their respective ion-channel targets and patterns of cysteine–cysteine disulfides. Conkunitzin-S1, a potassium-channel pore-blocking toxin isolated from C. striatus venom, is a member of a newly defined conotoxin family with sequence homology to Kunitz-fold proteins such as α-dendrotoxin and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). While conkunitzin-S1 and α-dendrotoxin are 42% identical in amino-acid sequence, conkunitzin-S1 has only four of the six cysteines normally found in Kunitz proteins. Here, the crystal structure of conkunitzin-S1 is reported. Conkunitzin-S1 adopts the canonical 3{sub 10}–β–β–α Kunitz fold complete with additional distinguishing structural features including two completely buried water molecules. The crystal structure, although completely consistent with previously reported NMR distance restraints, provides a greater degree of precision for atomic coordinates, especially for S atoms and buried solvent molecules. The region normally cross-linked by cysteines II and IV in other Kunitz proteins retains a network of hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions comparable to those found in α-dendrotoxin and BPTI. In conkunitzin-S1, glycine occupies the sequence position normally reserved for cysteine II and the special steric properties of glycine allow additional van der Waals contacts with the glutamine residue substituting for cysteine IV. Evolution has thus defrayed

  7. Preliminary Hazards Assessment: Iron disulfide purification system

    SciTech Connect

    1991-07-30

    A process for the purification (washing) of iron disulfide (FeS{sub 2}) powder is conducted in the Northeast corner (Area 353) of the main plant building (Building 100). This location is about 130 feet from the fenced boundary of the Partnership School/Child Development Center. In the first steps of the process, raw iron disulfide powder is ground and separated by particle size. The ground and sized powder is then purified in a three-step acid washing process using both hydrochloric acid (HCI) and hydrofluoric (HF) acid. The iron disulfide process is an intermittent batch process conducted four to eight times a year. This study is a Preliminary Hazards Assessment (PHA) to assess the hazards associated with the iron disulfide process. This is a preliminary study and will be used to determine if additional safety analysis is necessary. The scope of the PHA includes assessment of the process steps of grinding, size classification, and purification. The purpose is to identify major hazards and determine if the current and newly added safeguards are adequate for operation. The PHA also lists recommendations for additional safety features that should be added to reduce the risks of operation.

  8. A Disulfide Stabilized β-Sandwich Defines the Structure of a New Cysteine Framework M-Superfamily Conotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kancherla, Aswani K; Meesala, Srinu; Jorwal, Pooja; Palanisamy, Ramasamy; Sikdar, Sujit K; Sarma, Siddhartha P

    2015-08-21

    The structure of a new cysteine framework (-C-CC-C-C-C-) "M"-superfamily conotoxin, Mo3964, shows it to have a β-sandwich structure that is stabilized by inter-sheet cross disulfide bonds. Mo3964 decreases outward K(+) currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and increases the reversal potential of the NaV1.2 channels. The structure of Mo3964 (PDB ID: 2MW7 ) is constructed from the disulfide connectivity pattern, i.e., 1-3, 2-5, and 4-6, that is hitherto undescribed for the "M"-superfamily conotoxins. The tertiary structural fold has not been described for any of the known conus peptides. NOE (549), dihedral angle (84), and hydrogen bond (28) restraints, obtained by measurement of (h3)JNC' scalar couplings, were used as input for structure calculation. The ensemble of structures showed a backbone root mean square deviation of 0.68 ± 0.18 Å, with 87% and 13% of the backbone dihedral (ϕ, ψ) angles lying in the most favored and additional allowed regions of the Ramachandran map. The conotoxin Mo3964 represents a new bioactive peptide fold that is stabilized by disulfide bonds and adds to the existing repertoire of scaffolds that can be used to design stable bioactive peptide molecules. PMID:25961405

  9. 46 CFR 153.1040 - Carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon disulfide. 153.1040 Section 153.1040 Shipping... § 153.1040 Carbon disulfide. (a) No person may load, carry, or discharge carbon disulfide unless the... charge of a carbon disulfide transfer operation shall ensure that carbon disulfide is discharged only...

  10. 46 CFR 153.1040 - Carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon disulfide. 153.1040 Section 153.1040 Shipping... § 153.1040 Carbon disulfide. (a) No person may load, carry, or discharge carbon disulfide unless the... charge of a carbon disulfide transfer operation shall ensure that carbon disulfide is discharged only...

  11. 46 CFR 153.1040 - Carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon disulfide. 153.1040 Section 153.1040 Shipping... § 153.1040 Carbon disulfide. (a) No person may load, carry, or discharge carbon disulfide unless the... charge of a carbon disulfide transfer operation shall ensure that carbon disulfide is discharged only...

  12. 46 CFR 153.1040 - Carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon disulfide. 153.1040 Section 153.1040 Shipping... § 153.1040 Carbon disulfide. (a) No person may load, carry, or discharge carbon disulfide unless the... charge of a carbon disulfide transfer operation shall ensure that carbon disulfide is discharged only...

  13. 46 CFR 153.1040 - Carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon disulfide. 153.1040 Section 153.1040 Shipping... § 153.1040 Carbon disulfide. (a) No person may load, carry, or discharge carbon disulfide unless the... charge of a carbon disulfide transfer operation shall ensure that carbon disulfide is discharged only...

  14. The cryogenic bonding evaluation at the metallic-composite interface of a composite overwrapped pressure vessel with additional impact investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Eric A.

    A bonding evaluation that investigated the cryogenic tensile strength of several different adhesives/resins was performed. The test materials consisted of 606 aluminum test pieces adhered to a wet-wound graphite laminate in order to simulate the bond created at the liner-composite interface of an aluminum-lined composite overwrapped pressure vessel. It was found that for cryogenic applications, a flexible, low modulus resin system must be used. Additionally, the samples prepared with a thin layer of cured resin -- or prebond -- performed significantly better than those without. It was found that it is critical that the prebond surface must have sufficient surface roughness prior to the bonding application. Also, the aluminum test pieces that were prepared using a surface etchant slightly outperformed those that were prepared with a grit blast surface finish and performed significantly better than those that had been scored using sand paper to achieve the desired surface finish. An additional impact investigation studied the post impact tensile strength of composite rings in a cryogenic environment. The composite rings were filament wound with several combinations of graphite and aramid fibers and were prepared with different resin systems. The rings were subjected to varying levels of Charpy impact damage and then pulled to failure in tension. It was found that the addition of elastic aramid fibers with the carbon fibers mitigates the overall impact damage and drastically improves the post-impact strength of the structure in a cryogenic environment.

  15. Electron Capture Dissociation of Disulfide, Sulfur-Selenium, and Diselenide Bound Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huilin; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2012-11-01

    To examine the electron capture dissociation (ECD) behavior of disulfide (S-S), sulfur-selenium (S-Se), and diselenide (Se-Se) bonds-containing peptides, a series of free cysteine (Cys) and selenocysteine (Sec) containing peptides were reacted to form interchain S-S, S-Se, and Se-Se bonds, and then studied using ECD with Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). These results demonstrate that the radical has higher tendency to stay at selenium rather than sulfur after the cleavage of Se-S bonds by ECD. In addition, -SH (-33), -S (-32), and -S + H (-31) small neutral losses were all observed from the cleavage of C-S bonds of a disulfide bound peptide. Similar, but minor, fragments were also detected in S-Se bound peptides. In contrast, the cleavage of C-Se bonds of the Se-Se species mainly forms fragments with neutral loss of -Se + H (-78.90868), and the radical tends to stay on the selenium of its corresponding complementary pair. Although the electron affinities of S atom (2.07 eV) and Se atom (2.02 eV) are very close; they have very different reactivity towards electrons. The replacement of sulfur with selenium greatly increases the electron affinities of S-Se and Se-Se bonds comparing to S-S bonds (with an increase of electron affinity by about 0.20 eV by replacing a sulfur with a selenium) (Int J Quantum Chem 110:513-523, 2010), which in turn leads to different ECD fragmentation behavior and mechanisms. Our results are in good agreement with previously published ab initio calculations on Se-Se compounds by other groups.

  16. Additives-biological activities of tin-containing polymers bonded to noncarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Carraher, C.; Butler, C.; Foster, V.; Pandya, B.; Sterling, D.

    1993-12-31

    Organotin-containing polymers serve as effective additives to a silicon-based sealant, latex coating and talc exhibiting inhibition to tested bacteria and fungi. These polymers are candidates for uses a paint additives, sealant and caulk additives and within talc as an epidermal treatment.

  17. Disulfide Reduction in the Endocytic Pathway: Immunological Functions of Gamma-Interferon-Inducible Lysosomal Thiol Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) is constitutively expressed in most antigen presenting cells and is interferon γ inducible in other cell types via signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. Normally, N- and C-terminal propeptides are cleaved in the early endosome, and the mature protein resides in late endosomes and lysosomes. Correspondingly, GILT has maximal reductase activity at an acidic pH. Monocyte differentiation via Toll-like receptor 4 triggers secretion of a disulfide-linked dimer of the enzymatically active precursor, which may contribute to inflammation. GILT facilitates major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted processing through reduction of protein disulfide bonds in the endocytic pathway and is hypothesized to expose buried epitopes for MHC class II binding. GILT can also facilitate the transfer of disulfide-containing antigens into the cytosol, enhancing their cross-presentation by MHC class I. A variety of antigens are strongly influenced by GILT-mediated reduction, including hen egg lysozyme, melanocyte differentiation antigens, and viral envelope glycoproteins. In addition, GILT is conserved among lower eukaryotes and likely has additional functions. For example, GILT expression increases the stability of superoxide dismutase 2 and decreases reactive oxygen species, which correlates with decreased cellular proliferation. It is also a critical host factor for infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 657–668. PMID:21506690

  18. Wear characteristics of bonded solid film lubricant under high load condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiraoka, Naofumi; Sasaki, Akira; Kawashima, Noritsugu; Honda, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Wear properties of phenolic resin bonded molybdenum disulfide film lubricant were studied. In-vacuo journal bearing tests were performed to evaluate the wear-life of this film lubricant. The wear-life depends on substrate materials and on sliding velocity. Pretreated substrate surfaces were examined to reveal the reasons for these results. Additionally, investigations on film wear mechanisms were made.

  19. Oxygen switch in visible-light photoredox catalysis: radical additions and cyclizations and unexpected C-C-bond cleavage reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaoqun; Das, Arindam; Bui, Lan; Zhou, Hanjun; Curran, Dennis P; Rueping, Magnus

    2013-02-01

    Visible light photoredox catalyzed inter- and intramolecular C-H functionalization reactions of tertiary amines have been developed. Oxygen was found to act as chemical switch to trigger two different reaction pathways and to obtain two different types of products from the same starting material. In the absence of oxygen, the intermolecular addition of N,N-dimethyl-anilines to electron-deficient alkenes provided γ-amino nitriles in good to high yields. In the presence of oxygen, a radical addition/cyclization reaction occurred which resulted in the formation of tetrahydroquinoline derivatives in good yields under mild reaction conditions. The intramolecular version of the radical addition led to the unexpected formation of indole-3-carboxaldehyde derivatives. Mechanistic investigations of this reaction cascade uncovered a new photoredox catalyzed C-C bond cleavage reaction.

  20. Preliminary assessment of metal-porcelain bonding strength of CoCrW alloy after 3wt.% Cu addition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjin; Zhao, Chaoqian; Ren, Ling; Guo, Sai; Gan, Yiliang; Yang, Chunguang; Wu, Songquan; Lin, Junjie; Huang, Tingting; Yang, Ke; Lin, Jinxin

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a novel Cu-bearing CoCrW alloy fabricated by selective laser melting for dental application has been studied. For its successful application, the bonding strength of metal-porcelain is essential to be systematically investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the metal-porcelain bonding strength of CoCrWCu alloy by three-point bending test, meanwhile the Ni-free CoCrW alloy was used as control. The oxygen content was investigated by an elemental analyzer; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the surface chemical composition of CoCrW based alloy after preoxidation treatment; the fracture mode was investigated by X-ray energy spectrum analysis (EDS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Result from the oxygen content analysis showed that the content of oxygen dramatically increased after the Cu addition. And the XPS suggested that Co-oxidation, Cr2O3, CrO2, WO3, Cu2O and CuO existed on the preoxidated surface of the CoCrWCu alloy; the three-point bending test showed that the bonding strength of the CoCrWCu alloy was 43.32 MPa, which was lower than that of the CoCrW group of 47.65 MPa. However, the average metal-porcelain bonding strength is significantly higher than the minimum value in the ISO 9693 standard. Results from the SEM images and EDS indicated that the fracture mode of CoCrWCu-porcelain was mixed between cohesive and adhesive. Based on the results obtained in this study, it can be indicated that the Cu-bearing CoCrW alloy fabricated by the selective laser melting is a promising candidate for use in dental application. PMID:27040193

  1. Copper(I)-catalyzed regioselective addition of nucleophilic silicon across terminal and internal carbon-carbon triple bonds.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Chinmoy K; Fopp, Carolin; Oestreich, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The copper(I) alkoxide-catalyzed release of a silicon-based cuprate reagent from a silicon-boron pronucleophile is applied to the addition across carbon-carbon triple bonds. Commercially available CuBr⋅Me2S was found to be a general precatalyst that secures high regiocontrol for both aryl- and alkyl-substituted terminal as well as internal alkynes. The solvent greatly influences the regioisomeric ratio, favoring the linear regioisomer with terminal acceptors. This facile protocol even allows for the transformation of internal acceptors with remarkable levels of regio- and diastereocontrol.

  2. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2011-06-01

    With the aim of forming the ‘lock-washer’ conformation of the origin-binding domain of SV40 large T antigen in solution, using structure-based analysis an intermolecular disulfide bridge was engineered into the origin-binding domain to generate higher order oligomers in solution. The 1.7 Å resolution structure shows that the mutant forms a spiral in the crystal and has the de novo disulfide bond at the protein interface, although structural rearrangements at the interface are observed relative to the wild type. The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS–PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  3. Partial de novo sequencing and unusual CID fragmentation of a 7 kDa, disulfide-bridged toxin.

    PubMed

    Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Bohlen, Christopher J

    2012-05-01

    A 7 kDa toxin isolated from the venom of the Texas coral snake (Micrurus tener tener) was subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) analyses both before and after reduction at low pH. Manual and automated approaches to de novo sequencing are compared in detail. Manual de novo sequencing utilizing the combination of high accuracy CID and ETD data and an acid-related cleavage yielded the N-terminal half of the sequence from the reduced species. The intact polypeptide, containing 3 disulfide bridges produced a series of unusual fragments in ion trap CID experiments: abundant internal amino acid losses were detected, and also one of the disulfide-linkage positions could be determined from fragments formed by the cleavage of two bonds. In addition, internal and c-type fragments were also observed.

  4. Endosomolytic bioreducible poly(amido amine disulfide) polymer conjugates for the in vivo systemic delivery of siRNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Rubina Giare; Busuek, Marina; Walsh, Eileen S; Leander, Karen R; Howell, Bonnie J; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Kemp, Eric; Crocker, Louis S; Leone, Anthony; Kochansky, Christopher J; Carr, Brian A; Garbaccio, Robert M; Colletti, Steven L; Wang, Weimin

    2013-04-17

    Efficient siRNA delivery is dependent not only on the ability of the delivery vehicle to target a specific organ but also on its ability to enable siRNA entry into the cytoplasm of the target cells. Polymers with endosomolytic properties are increasingly being used as siRNA delivery vehicles due to their potential to facilitate endosomal escape and intracellular delivery. Addition of disulfide bonds in the backbone of these polymers was expected to provide degradability through reduction by glutathione in cytosol. This paper describes the synthesis of new endosomolytic bioreducible poly(amido amine disulfide) polymers whose lytic potential can be masked at physiological pH, but can be restored at acidic endosomal pH. These polymer conjugates gave good in vitro knockdown (KD) and did not demonstrate cytotoxicity in a MTS assay. Efficient mRNA KD for apolipoprotein B in mouse liver was observed with these polyconjugates following intravenous dosing.

  5. Thermodynamic properties of zirconium disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Volovik, L.S.; Kovalevskaya, E.I.; Litvinenko, V.F.

    1986-02-01

    This paper uses a method of comparative calculation -- double comparison -for the quantitative evaluation of the themodynamic characteristics of zirconium disulfide. The method enables one to apply known characteristics of compounds of the given or an adjacent group to analogous compounds of elements. The enthalpy of zirconium disulfide was determined by a formula and the calculation was carried out on the basis of data on the enthalpy of hafnium, niobium, and tantalum disulfides measured by the mixing method in the temperature range 500-1800 K.

  6. Mobile phase additives for enhancing the chromatographic performance of astaxanthin on nonendcapped polymeric C30-bonded stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Philipp; Surmann, Peter; Fuhrmann, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Astaxanthin shows peak deformation and reduced peak area response when eluted with methanol and methyl tert-butyl ether on nonendcapped polymeric C30-bonded HPLC phases. The present study tested different column manufacturers, column batches, and ten mobile phase additives including acids, bases, buffers, complexing and antioxidant agents for improvement of peak shape and peak area response. Concerning chromatographic benefits and feasibility, ammonium acetate was found to be the best additive followed by triethylamine for all columns tested. Variation of the mobile phase pH equivalent and the column temperature showed no synergistic effects on peak shape and peak area response. Results indicate that peak tailing and variation of peak area response are due to different on-column effects. Possible mechanisms of the observed phenomenon will be discussed. PMID:19051191

  7. Peel bond strength of resilient liner modified by the addition of antimicrobial agents to denture base acrylic resin

    PubMed Central

    ALCÂNTARA, Cristiane S.; de MACÊDO, Allana F.C.; GURGEL, Bruno C.V.; JORGE, Janaina H.; NEPPELENBROEK, Karin H.; URBAN, Vanessa M.

    2012-01-01

    In order to prolong the clinical longevity of resilient denture relining materials and reduce plaque accumulation, incorporation of antimicrobial agents into these materials has been proposed. However, this addition may affect their properties. Objective This study evaluated the effect of the addition of antimicrobial agents into one soft liner (Soft Confort, Dencril) on its peel bond strength to one denture base (QC 20, Dentsply). Material and Methods Acrylic specimens (n=9) were made (75x10x3 mm) and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 48 h. The drug powder concentrations (nystatin 500,000U - G2; nystatin 1,000,000U - G3; miconazole 125 mg - G4; miconazole 250 mg - G5; ketoconazole 100 mg - G6; ketoconazole 200 mg - G7; chlorhexidine diacetate 5% - G8; and 10% chlorhexidine diacetate - G9) were blended with the soft liner powder before the addition of the soft liner liquid. A group (G1) without any drug incorporation was used as control. Specimens (n=9) (75x10x6 mm) were plasticized according to the manufacturers' instructions and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h. Relined specimens were then submitted to a 180-degree peel test at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min. Data (MPa) were analyzed by analysis of variance (α=0.05) and the failure modes were visually classified. Results No significant difference was found among experimental groups (p=0.148). Cohesive failure located within the resilient material was predominantly observed in all tested groups. Conclusions Peel bond strength between the denture base and the modified soft liner was not affected by the addition of antimicrobial agents. PMID:23329241

  8. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  9. Intermolecular disulfide bonds stabilize VirB7 homodimers and VirB7/VirB9 heterodimers during biogenesis of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-complex transport apparatus.

    PubMed

    Spudich, G M; Fernandez, D; Zhou, X R; Christie, P J

    1996-07-23

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB7 lipoprotein contributes to the stabilization of VirB proteins during biogenesis of the putative T-complex transport apparatus. Here, we report that stabilization of VirB7 itself is correlated with its ability to form disulfide cross-linked homodimers via a reactive Cys-24 residue. Three types of beta-mercaptoethanol-dissociable complexes were visualized with VirB7 and/or a VirB7::PhoA41 fusion protein: (i) a 9-kDa complex corresponding in size to a VirB7 homodimer, (ii) a 54-kDa complex corresponding in size to a VirB7/VirB7::PhoA41 mixed dimer, and (iii) a 102-kDa complex corresponding to a VirB7::PhoA41 homodimer. A VirB7C24S mutant protein was immunologically undetectable, whereas the corresponding VirB7C24S::PhoA41 derivative accumulated to detectable levels but failed to form dissociable homodimers or mixed dimers with wild-type VirB7. We further report that VirB7-dependent stabilization of VirB9 is correlated with the ability of these two proteins to dimerize via formation of a disulfide bridge between reactive Cys-24 and Cys-262 residues, respectively. Two types of dissociable complexes were visualized: (i) a 36-kDa complex corresponding in size to a VirB7/VirB9 heterodimer and (ii) an 84-kDa complex corresponding in size to a VirB7/VirB9::PhoA293 heterodimer. A VirB9C262S mutant protein was immunologically undetectable, whereas the corresponding VirB9C262S::PhoA293 derivative accumulated to detectable levels but failed to form dissociable heterodimers with wild-type VirB7. Taken together, these results support a model in which the formation of disulfide cross-linked VirB7 dimers represent critical early steps in the biogenesis of the T-complex transport apparatus. PMID:8755505

  10. Densification of Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride with the Addition of Fine Si Powder Effects on the Sinterability and Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sea-Hoon; Cho, Chun-Rae; Park, Young-Jo; Ko, Jae-Woong; Kim, Hai-Doo; Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    The densification behavior and strength of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitrides (SRBSN) that contain Lu2O3-SiO2 additives were improved by the addition of fine Si powder. Dense specimens (relative density: 99.5%) were obtained by gas-pressure sintering (GPS) at 1850oC through the addition of fine Si. In contrast, the densification of conventional specimens did not complete at 1950oC. The fine Si decreased the onset temperature of shrinkage and increased the shrinkage rate because the additive helped the compaction of green bodies and induced the formation of fine Si3N4 particles after nitridation and sintering at and above 1600oC. The amount of residual SiO2 within the specimens was not strongly affected by adding fine Si powder because most of the SiO2 layer that had formed on the fine Si particles decomposed during nitridation. The maximum strength and fracture toughness of the specimens were 991 MPa and 8.0 MPa m1/2, respectively.

  11. Eliminating disulfide exchange during glutamyl endopeptidase digestion of native protein.

    PubMed

    Dormady, S J; Lei, J; Regnier, F E

    1999-12-24

    Numerous advantages of using immobilized enzymes over free-solution protein digests have been cited in the literature. This investigation examines both the rate of hydrolysis and the extent of disulfide bond exchange in disulfide bridged dipeptide fragments formed during proteolysis of native protein. Glutamyl endopeptidase as both an immobilized enzyme and in free solution was used in these studies. It was found that extensive hydrolysis of insulin was achieved in 2 min with immobilized enzyme cartridges operated in the stopped-flow mode orders. This is orders of magnitude faster than was seen in free solution. Other advantages ranging from ease of use and reduction in sample size to the potential for automation were also noted with the immobilized enzyme cartridge. Normal free-solution proteolysis generally requires 12-24 h, based on the lower enzyme-to-substrate ratio in solution. A disturbing feature noted in these lengthy free-solution reactions was the tendency to form disulfide bridged peptide artifacts. This could lead to the erroneous conclusion that disulfide bonding in a sample was not that of the native protein. It is concluded that the advantage of immobilized enzymes over free-solution reactions will be most important in the pharmaceutical industry where proteolytic fragment "fingerprinting" of recombinant proteins is being used to confirm structure.

  12. An empirical approach to the bond additivity model in quantitative interpretation of sum frequency generation vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui; Zhang, Wen-kai; Gan, Wei; Cui, Zhi-feng; Wang, Hong-fei

    2006-10-01

    Knowledge of the ratios between different polarizability βi'j'k' tensor elements of a chemical group in a molecule is crucial for quantitative interpretation and polarization analysis of its sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) spectrum at interface. The bond additivity model (BAM) or the hyperpolarizability derivative model along with experimentally obtained Raman depolarization ratios has been widely used to obtain such tensor ratios for the CH3, CH2, and CH groups. Successfully, such treatment can quantitatively reproduce the intensity polarization dependence in SFG-VS spectra for the symmetric (SS) and asymmetric (AS) stretching modes of CH3 and CH2 groups, respectively. However, the relative intensities between the SS and AS modes usually do not agree with each other within this model even for some of the simplest molecular systems, such as the air/methanol interface. This fact certainly has cast uncertainties on the effectiveness and conclusions based on the BAM. One of such examples is that the AS mode of CH3 group has never been observed in SFG-VS spectra from the air/methanol interface, while this AS mode is usually very strong for SFG-VS spectra from the air/ethanol interface, other short chain alcohol, as well as long chain surfactants. In order to answer these questions, an empirical approach from known Raman and IR spectra is used to make corrections to the BAM. With the corrected ratios between the βi'j'k' tensor elements of the SS and AS modes, all features in the SFG-VS spectra of the air/methanol and air/ethanol interfaces can be quantitatively interpreted. This empirical approach not only provides new understandings of the effectiveness and limitations of the bond additivity model but also provides a practical way for its application in SFG-VS studies of molecular interfaces.

  13. Accelerated exchange of a buried water molecule in selectively disulfide-reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Denisov, Vladimir P; Peters, Jörg; Hörlein, Hans Dietrich; Halle, Bertil

    2004-09-28

    Using magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD), we have previously shown that the four internal water molecules in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) exchange with bulk water on time scales between 10(-8) and 10(-4) s at room temperature. Because this exchange is controlled by the protein structure, internal water molecules can be used to probe rare conformational fluctuations. Here, we report (2)H and (17)O MRD data at three temperatures for wild-type BPTI and two BPTI variants where the 14-38 disulfide bond has been cleaved by a double Cys --> Ser mutation or by disulfide reduction and carboxamidomethylation. The MRD data show that the internal water molecules are conserved on disulfide cleavage. However, the exchange rate of the water molecule buried near the disulfide bond is enhanced by 2-4 orders of magnitude. The relation of water exchange to other dynamic processes in BPTI is discussed.

  14. Disulfide-based multifunctional conjugates for targeted theranostic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Hee; Sessler, Jonathan L; Kim, Jong Seung

    2015-11-17

    Theranostics, chemical entities designed to combine therapeutic effects and imaging capability within one molecular system, have received considerable attention in recent years. Much of this interest reflects the promise inherent in personalized medicine, including disease-targeted treatments for cancer patients. One important approach to realizing this latter promise involves the development of so-called theranostic conjugates, multicomponent constructs that selectively target cancer cells and deliver cytotoxic agents while producing a readily detectable signal that can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo. This requires the synthesis of relatively complex systems comprising imaging reporters, masked chemotherapeutic drugs, cleavable linkers, and cancer targeting ligands. Ideally, the cleavage process should take place within or near cancer cells and be activated by cellular components that are associated with cancer states or specifically expressed at a higher level in cancer cells. Among the cleavable linkers currently being explored for the construction of such localizing conjugates, disulfide bonds are particularly attractive. This is because disulfide bonds are stable in most blood pools but are efficiently cleaved by cellular thiols, including glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx), which are generally found at elevated levels in tumors. When disulfide bonds are linked to fluorophores, changes in emission intensity or shifts in the emission maxima are typically seen upon cleavage as the result of perturbations to internal charge transfer (ICT) processes. In well-designed systems, this allows for facile imaging. In this Account, we summarize our recent studies involving disulfide-based fluorescent drug delivery conjugates, including preliminary tests of their biological utility in vitro and in vivo. To date, a variety of chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and camptothecin, have been used to create disulfide-based conjugates, as have

  15. Oxidative Addition of Carbon–Carbon Bonds with a Redox-Active Bis(imino)pyridine Iron Complex

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Jonathan M.; Stieber, S. Chantal E.; Sylvester, Kevin T.; Fernández, Ignacio; Lobkovsky, Emil; Semproni, Scott P.; Bill, Eckhard; Wieghardt, Karl; DeBeer, Serena; Chirik, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Addition of biphenylene to the bis(imino)pyridine iron dinitrogen complexes, (iPrPDI)Fe(N2)2 and [(MePDI)Fe(N2)]2(μ2-N2) (RPDI = 2,6-(2,6-R2—C6H3— N=CMe)2C5H3N; R = Me, iPr), resulted in oxidative addition of a C—C bond at ambient temperature to yield the corresponding iron biphenyl compounds, (RPDI)Fe-(biphenyl). The molecular structures of the resulting bis-(imino)pyridine iron metallacycles were established by X-ray diffraction and revealed idealized square pyramidal geometries. The electronic structures of the compounds were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, magnetochemistry, and X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopies. The experimental data, in combination with broken-symmetry density functional theory calculations, established spin crossover (low to intermediate spin) ferric compounds antiferromagnetically coupled to bis(imino)pyridine radical anions. Thus, the overall oxidation reaction involves cooperative electron loss from both the iron center and the redox-active bis(imino)pyridine ligand. PMID:23043331

  16. Pressure-induced metallization of molybdenum disulfide.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhen-Hua; Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Zhang, Haidong; Goncharov, Alexander F; Lobanov, Sergey S; Kagayama, Tomoko; Sakata, Masafumi; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2014-07-18

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements of molybdenum disulfide MoS(2) are performed at pressures up to 81 GPa in diamond anvil cells. Above 20 GPa, we find discontinuous changes in Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction patterns which provide evidence for isostructural phase transition from 2H(c) to 2H(a) modification through layer sliding previously predicted theoretically. This first-order transition, which is completed around 40 GPa, is characterized by a collapse in the c-lattice parameter and volume and also by changes in interlayer bonding. After the phase transition completion, MoS(2) becomes metallic. The reversibility of the phase transition is identified from all these techniques. PMID:25083660

  17. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev: DETERMINANTS OF DNA BINDING AND REDOX REGULATION BY DISULFIDE BOND FORMATION.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher D O; Newman, Joseph A; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-05-29

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40-200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors.

  18. Application of a C-C Bond-Forming Conjugate Addition Reaction in Asymmetric Dearomatization of β-Naphthols.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongxu; Wang, Linqing; Kai, Ming; Li, Dan; Yao, Xiaojun; Wang, Rui

    2015-08-10

    A C-C bond-forming conjugate reaction was successfully applied to the enantioselective dearomatization of β-naphthols. A C(sp2)-C(sp3) bond is formed by using propargylic ketones as reactive partners. Good to excellent Z/E ratios and ee values were obtained by employing an in situ generated magnesium catalyst. Further transformations of the Z-configured C-C double bond in the products were achieved under mild reaction conditions. Moreover, the stereocontrolling element of this magnesium-catalyzed dearomatization reaction was explored by computational chemistry. PMID:26173841

  19. Thiol/disulfide redox states in signaling and sensing

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in redox systems biology are creating new opportunities to understand complexities of human disease and contributions of environmental exposures. New understanding of thiol-disulfide systems have occurred during the past decade as a consequence of the discoveries that thiol and disulfide systems are maintained in kinetically controlled steady-states displaced from thermodynamic equilibrium, that a widely distributed family of NADPH oxidases produces oxidants that function in cell signaling, and that a family of peroxiredoxins utilize thioredoxin as a reductant to complement the well-studied glutathione antioxidant system for peroxide elimination and redox regulation. This review focuses on thiol/disulfide redox state in biologic systems and the knowledge base available to support development of integrated redox systems biology models to better understand the function and dysfunction of thiol-disulfide redox systems. In particular, central principles have emerged concerning redox compartmentalization and utility of thiol/disulfide redox measures as indicators of physiologic function. Advances in redox proteomics show that, in addition to functioning in protein active sites and cell signaling, cysteine residues also serve as redox sensors to integrate biologic functions. These advances provide a framework for translation of redox systems biology concepts to practical use in understanding and treating human disease. Biological responses to cadmium, a widespread environmental agent, are used to illustrate the utility of these advances to the understanding of complex pleiotropic toxicities. PMID:23356510

  20. Structure-based Design of a Disulfide-lined Oligomeric Form of the Simian Virus 40 (SV40) Large T Antigen DNA-Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    G Meinke; P Phelan; A Fradet-Turcotte; J Archambault; P Bullock

    2011-12-31

    The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS-PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  1. Blastomyces Virulence Adhesin-1 Protein Binding to Glycosaminoglycans Is Enhanced by Protein Disulfide Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Beaussart, Audrey; Brandhorst, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Blastomyces adhesin-1 (BAD-1) protein mediates the virulence of the yeast Blastomyces dermatitidis, in part by binding host lung tissue, the extracellular matrix, and cellular receptors via glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparan sulfate. The tandem repeats that make up over 90% of BAD-1 appear in their native state to be tightly folded into an inactive conformation, but recent work has shown that they become activated and adhesive upon reduction of a disulfide linkage. Here, atomic force microscopy (AFM) of a single BAD-1 molecule interacting with immobilized heparin revealed that binding is enhanced upon treatment with protein disulfide isomerase and dithiothreitol (PDI/DTT). PDI/DTT treatment of BAD-1 induced a plateau effect in atomic force signatures that was consistent with sequential rupture of tandem binding domains. Inhibition of PDI in murine macrophages blunted BAD-1 binding to heparin in vitro. Based on AFM, we found that a short Cardin-Weintraub sequence paired with a WxxWxxW sequence in the first, degenerate repeat at the N terminus of BAD-1 was sufficient to initiate heparin binding. Removal of half of the 41 BAD-1 tandem repeats led to weaker adhesion, illustrating their role in enhanced binding. Mass spectroscopy of the tandem repeat revealed that the PDI-induced interaction with heparin is characterized by ruptured disulfide bonds and that cysteine thiols remain reduced. Further binding studies showed direct involvement of thiols in heparin ligation. Thus, we propose that the N-terminal domain of BAD-1 governs the initial association with host GAGs and that proximity to GAG-associated host PDI catalyzes activation of additional binding motifs conserved within the tandem repeats, leading to enhanced avidity and availability of reduced thiols. PMID:26396244

  2. Disulfide Trapping for Modeling and Structure Determination of Receptor:Chemokine Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Holden, Lauren G.; Qin, Ling; Zheng, Yi; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent breakthrough advances in GPCR crystallography, structure determination of protein-protein complexes involving chemokine receptors and their endogenous chemokine ligands remains challenging. Here we describe disulfide trapping, a methodology for generating irreversible covalent binary protein complexes from unbound protein partners by introducing two cysteine residues, one per interaction partner, at selected positions within their interaction interface. Disulfide trapping can serve at least two distinct purposes: (i) stabilization of the complex to assist structural studies, and/or (ii) determination of pairwise residue proximities to guide molecular modeling. Methods for characterization of disulfide-trapped complexes are described and evaluated in terms of throughput, sensitivity, and specificity towards the most energetically favorable cross-links. Due to abundance of native disulfide bonds at receptor:chemokine interfaces, disulfide trapping of their complexes can be associated with intramolecular disulfide shuffling and result in misfolding of the component proteins; because of this, evidence from several experiments is typically needed to firmly establish a positive disulfide crosslink. An optimal pipeline that maximizes throughput and minimizes time and costs by early triage of unsuccessful candidate constructs is proposed. PMID:26921956

  3. Oxidative addition of disulfides to the complex W(CO){sub 3}(phen)(EtCN). Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of W(CO){sub 2}(phen)(SR){sub 2}(R = Ph, Me, CH{sub 2}Ph, {sup t}Bu; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) coordinatively unsaturated complexes of tungsten(II) that reversibly bind CO and other ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, R.F.; Ju, T.D.; Kiss, G. |

    1994-08-31

    The complex W(CO){sub 3}(phen)(EtCN) undergoes oxidative addition with disulfides forming the formally 16-electron complexes W(CO){sub 2}(phen)(SR){sub 2}(R=Ph, {sup t}Bu, Me, benzyl). The reactions proceed through intermediates identified spectroscopically as the coordinated disulfide complexes. The rate of oxidative addition of coordinated disulfides is in the order {sup t}BuSSBu{sup t}<addition, ligand substitution, and thiol/thiolate exchange reactions. Variable-temperature equilibrium studies yielded thermodynamic parameters for binding of CO to W(CO){sub 2}(phen)(SR){sub 2}: R=Ph, {Delta}H =-7.2{plus_minus}0.5 kcal/mol, {Delta}S =-29{plus_minus}3.5 cal/(mol deg); R = {sup t}Bu, {Delta}H =-9.5{plus_minus}0.5 kcal/mol, {Delta}S =-41{plus_minus}3.5 cal/(mol deg). Reaction with trimethylphosphine yields an equilibrium mixture of the 18-electron adduct W(CO){sub 2}(phen)(PMe{sub 3})(SPh){sub 2} as well as the 16-electron monocarbonyl complex W(CO)(phen)(PMe{sub 3})(SPh){sub 2}. Addition of trimethyl phosphite yields only W(CO)(phen)(P(OMe){sub 3})(SPh){sub 2}. Pyridine, propionitrile, hydrogen, and THF do not bind to the W(II) complexes. Reaction of W(CO){sub 2}(phen)(S{sup t}Bu){sub 2} with 1 equiv of thiophenol yields W(CO){sub 2}(phen)(S{sup t}Bu)(SPh), which reacts with additional thiophenol to yield W(CO){sub 2}(phen)(SPh){sub 2}. Reaction with excess hydrogen sulfide yields W(CO){sub 2}(phen)(SPh){sub 2}. Crystal structures are reported for W(CO){sub 2}(phen)(SPh){sub 2} and W(CO)(phen)(P(OMe){sub 3})(SPh){sub 2}.

  4. Characterization of the kringle fold and identification of a ubiquitous new class of disulfide rotamers.

    PubMed

    Ozhogina, Olga A; Bominaar, Emile L

    2009-11-01

    The disulfide-bridged chains in the kringle (K) and fibronectin type II (FN2) domains are characterized using a taxonomy that considers the regularities in both beta-secondary structure and cystine cluster. The structural core of the kringle fold comprises an assembly of two beta-hairpins (a "beta-meander") accommodating two overlapping disulfides; one cystine is incorporated in adjacent beta-strands, whereas the other is located just beyond the ends of non-adjacent beta-strands. The dispositions of the (N, C) termini of the two overlapping disulfides in the kringle fold are given as (m, j+1) and (i-1, k+1), in which m, i, j, and k (mbonded pair of an antiparallel beta-sheet. This pattern is the structural signature of the kringle fold and is referred to as the "disulfide kringle-cross". The metrics of this motif are quantified, revealing structural differences between the two families of the kringle fold. The conformations of disulfides in the kringle fold are poorly accommodated by existing classification schemes. To elucidate the nature of these rotamers we have performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations for diethyl disulfide. A new classification for the disulfide conformations in proteins is proposed, consisting of six rotamer types: spiral, trans-spiral, corner, trans, hook, and staple. Its relation with previous classification schemes is specified. A survey of high-resolution X-ray structures reveals that the disulfide conformations are clustered around the averaged conformations for the six classes. Average conformation dihedral and distance values are in excellent agreement with the DFT values. The two overlapping disulfides in kringle domains adopt the trans-spiral conformation that appears to be ubiquitous (~17%) in proteins. One of the disulfides stretches across the beta

  5. Mor-Dalphos-Pd (II) oxidative addition complexes and related NH3 adducts: Insights into bonding and nonbonding interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima Batista, Ana P.; Braga, Ataualpa A. C.

    2016-09-01

    The stabilizing effects and bonding properties of the Pd metallic center in [(κ2 -P,N-Mor-Dalphos)Pd(Ar)Cl] complexes and related NH3 adducts were investigated by density functional theory (DFT), the intrinsic bond orbital (IBO) approach and the Su-Li energy decomposition method (Su-Li EDA). The IBO analysis showed that the P atom from the P,N-Mor-Dalphos structure has stabilizing contributions in all Pd-Cl and Pd-NH3 bonds in the complexes. According to the Su-Li energy decomposition analysis, the main energy that drives the interaction between the [Mor-Dalphos-Pd(Ar)] moiety and Cl- is the electrostatic term, therefore, the electrostatic energy interaction between them might be an important factor for taking into account when designing other [Mor-Dalphos-Pd(Ar)]-Cl precatalysts.

  6. Structure of the catalytic a(0)a fragment of the protein disulfide isomerase ERp72.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Guennadi; Azeroual, Simon; Rosenauer, Angelika; Määttänen, Pekka; Denisov, Alexey Yu; Thomas, David Y; Gehring, Kalle

    2010-08-27

    Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) are responsible for catalyzing the proper oxidation and isomerization of disulfide bonds of newly synthesized proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The ER contains many different PDI-like proteins. Some, such as PDI, are general enzymes that directly recognize misfolded proteins while others, such as ERp57 and ERp72, have more specialized roles. Here, we report the high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal portion of ERp72 (also known as CaBP2 or PDI A4), which contains two a(0)a catalytic thioredoxin-like domains. The structure shows that the a(0) domain contains an additional N-terminal beta-strand and a different conformation of the beta5-alpha4 loop relative to other thioredoxin-like domains. The structure of the a domain reveals that a conserved arginine residue inserts into the hydrophobic core and makes a salt bridge with a conserved glutamate residue in the vicinity of the catalytic site. A structural model of full-length ERp72 shows that all three catalytic sites roughly face each other and positions the adjacent hydrophobic patches that are likely involved in protein substrate binding.

  7. Disulfide structure of the pheromone binding protein from the silkworm moth, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Leal, W S; Nikonova, L; Peng, G

    1999-12-24

    Disulfide bond formation is the only known posttranslational modification of insect pheromone binding proteins (PBPs). In the PBPs from moths (Lepidoptera), six cysteine residues are highly conserved at positions 19, 50, 54, 97, 108 and 117, but to date nothing is known about their respective linkage or redox status. We used a multiple approach of enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage, partial reduction with Tris-(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, followed by digestion with endoproteinase Lys-C to determine the disulfide connectivity in the PBP from Bombyx mori (BmPBP). Identification of the reaction products by on-line liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) and protein sequencing supported the assignment of disulfide bridges at Cys-19-Cys-54, Cys-50-Cys-108 and Cys-97-Cys-117. The disulfide linkages were identical in the protein obtained by periplasmic expression in Escherichia coli and in the native BmPBP.

  8. A degradable polydopamine coating based on disulfide-exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Hong, Daewha; Lee, Hojae; Kim, Beom Jin; Park, Taegyun; Choi, Ji Yu; Park, Matthew; Lee, Juno; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Hong, Seok-Pyo; Yang, Sung Ho; Jung, Sun Ho; Ko, Sung-Bo; Choi, Insung S

    2015-12-21

    Although the programmed degradation of biocompatible films finds applications in various fields including biomedical and bionanotechnological areas, coating methods have generally been limited to be substrate-specific, not applicable to any kinds of substrates. In this paper, we report a dopamine derivative, which allows for both universal coating of various substrates and stimuli-responsive film degradation, inspired by mussel-adhesive proteins. Two dopamine moieties are linked together by the disulfide bond, the cleavage of which enables the programmed film degradation. Mechanistic analysis of the degradable films indicates that the initial cleavage of the disulfide linkage causes rapid uptake of water molecules, hydrating the films, which leads to rapid degradation. Our substrate-independent coating of degradable films provides an advanced tool for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and anti-fouling strategies.

  9. A Cobalt(I) Pincer Complex with an η(2) -C(aryl)-H Agostic Bond: Facile C-H Bond Cleavage through Deprotonation, Radical Abstraction, and Oxidative Addition.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Sathiyamoorthy; Stöger, Berthold; Pittenauer, Ernst; Allmaier, Günter; Veiros, Luis F; Kirchner, Karl

    2016-02-24

    The synthesis and reactivity of a Co(I) pincer complex [Co(ϰ(3) P,CH,P-P(CH)P(NMe) -iPr)(CO)2](+) featuring an η(2)-C(aryl)-H agostic bond is described. This complex was obtained by protonation of the Co(I) complex [Co(PCP(NMe) -iPr)(CO)2]. The Co(III) hydride complex [Co(PCP(NMe) -iPr)(CNtBu)2(H)](+) was obtained upon protonation of [Co(PCP(NMe) -iPr)(CNtBu)2]. Three ways to cleave the agostic C-H bond are presented. First, owing to the acidity of the agostic proton, treatment with pyridine results in facile deprotonation (C-H bond cleavage) and reformation of [Co(PCP(NMe) -iPr)(CO)2]. Second, C-H bond cleavage is achieved upon exposure of [Co(ϰ(3)P,CH,P-P(CH)P(NMe) -iPr)(CO)2](+) to oxygen or TEMPO to yield the paramagnetic Co(II) PCP complex [Co(PCP(NMe) -iPr)(CO)2](+). Finally, replacement of one CO ligand in [Co(ϰ(3) P,CH,P-P(CH)P(NMe) -iPr)(CO)2](+) by CNtBu promotes the rapid oxidative addition of the agostic η(2) -C(aryl)-H bond to give two isomeric hydride complexes of the type [Co(PCP(NMe) -iPr)(CNtBu)(CO)(H)](+).

  10. Oxidation of kinetically trapped thiols by protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Walker, K W; Gilbert, H F

    1995-10-17

    The formation of a stabilized structure during oxidative protein folding can severely retard disulfide formation if the structure must be disrupted to gain access to buried cysteines. These kinetic traps can slow protein folding and disulfide bond formation to the extent that unassisted folding is too slow to be kinetically competent in the cell. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) facilitates the oxidation of a kinetically trapped state of RTEM-1 beta-lactamase in which two cysteines that form the single disulfide bond in the native protein are buried and approximately 500-fold less reactive than exposed cysteines. Under second-order conditions, PDI-dependent oxidation of reduced, folded beta-lactamase is 500-fold faster than GSSG-dependent oxidation. The rate difference observed between PDI and GSSG can be accounted for by the 520-fold higher kinetic reactivity of PDI as an oxidant. Noncovalent interactions between PDI (35 microM) and beta-lactamase increase the reactivity or unfolding of beta-lactamase in the steady-state by less than 3-fold. At high concentrations of PDI or alkylating agents, the reaction of beta-lactamase cysteines approaches a constant rate, limited by the spontaneous unfolding of the protein (kunfold = 0.024 +/- 0.005 min-1). PDI does not substantially increase the rate of beta-lactamase unfolding; however, once beta-lactamase spontaneously unfolds, PDI at concentrations greater than 44 +/- 4 microM, oxidizes the unfolded substrate before it can refold (kfold = 1.5 +/- 0.2 min-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Role of protein disulfide isomerase and other thiol-reactive proteins in HIV-1 envelope protein-mediated fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ou Wu . E-mail: wou@niaid.nih.gov; Silver, Jonathan . E-mail: jsilver@nih.gov

    2006-07-05

    Cell-surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been proposed to promote disulfide bond rearrangements in HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) that accompany Env-mediated fusion. We evaluated the role of PDI in ways that have not been previously tested by downregulating PDI with siRNA and by overexpressing wild-type or variant forms of PDI in transiently and stably transfected cells. These manipulations, as well as treatment with anti-PDI antibodies, had only small effects on infection or cell fusion mediated by NL4-3 or AD8 strains of HIV-1. However, the cell-surface thiol-reactive reagent 5, 5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) had a much stronger inhibitory effect in our system, suggesting that cell-surface thiol-containing molecules other than PDI, acting alone or in concert, have a greater effect than PDI on HIV-1 Env-mediated fusion. We evaluated one such candidate, thioredoxin, a PDI family member reported to reduce a labile disulfide bond in CD4. We found that the ability of thioredoxin to reduce the disulfide bond in CD4 is enhanced in the presence of HIV-1 Env gp120 and that thioredoxin also reduces disulfide bonds in gp120 directly in the absence of CD4. We discuss the implications of these observations for identification of molecules involved in disulfide rearrangements in Env during fusion.

  12. Role of disulfide linkages in desulfurization chemistry. The reactions of benzenethiol on a sulfur-covered Mo(110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, M.K.; Napier, M.E.; Wiegand, B.C.; Friend, C.M.; Uvdal, P.

    1994-09-07

    The reactions of benzenethiol on a sulfur-covered Mo(110) surface were studied using temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron, and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopies. The sulfur overlayer profoundly alters the kinetics and selectivity for desulfurization and dehydrogenation. By using isotopic labeling, we have established that phenyl disulfide (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}S-S-) is formed via S-H bond scission and S-S bond formation on Mo(110) at 100 K. The S-S- linkage is oriented perpendicular and the phenyl ring parallel to the surface. The disulfide subsequently forms an upright phenylthiolate species, bound directly to the Mo(110) surface, prior to the onset of benzene formation at 300 K. In contrast to the clean surface, where only the low-temperature state is observed, a second benzene peak is observed at 500 K on the sulfur-covered surface. This feature is attributed to disproportionation of surface phenyl groups to produce gaseous benzene and surface benzyne. In addition, gaseous phenyl also desorbs from the surface in the same temperature range, due to a lack of available surface hydrogen. The selectivity for gaseous hydrocarbon production is approximately 80%, nearly twice that on the clean surface, while the total amount of reaction remains the same. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Association Between Foldability and Aggregation Propensity in Small Disulfide-Rich Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Hugo; Graña-Montes, Ricardo; Illa, Ricard; Covaleda, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Disulfide-rich domains (DRDs) are small proteins whose native structure is stabilized by the presence of covalent disulfide bonds. These domains are versatile and can perform a wide range of functions. Many of these domains readily unfold on disulfide bond reduction, suggesting that in the absence of covalent bonding they might display significant disorder. Results: Here, we analyzed the degree of disorder in 97 domains representative of the different DRDs families and demonstrate that, in terms of sequence, many of them can be classified as intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or contain predicted disordered regions. The analysis of the aggregation propensity of these domains indicates that, similar to IDPs, their sequences are more soluble and have less aggregating regions than those of other globular domains, suggesting that they might have evolved to avoid aggregation after protein synthesis and before they can attain its compact and covalently linked native structure. Innovation and Conclusion: DRDs, which resemble IDPs in the reduced state and become globular when their disulfide bonds are formed, illustrate the link between protein folding and aggregation propensities and how these two properties cannot be easily dissociated, determining the main traits of the folding routes followed by these small proteins to attain their native oxidized states. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 368–383. PMID:24635049

  14. Conferring specificity in redox pathways by enzymatic thiol/disulfide exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Netto, Luis Eduardo S; de Oliveira, Marcos Antonio; Tairum, Carlos A; da Silva Neto, José Freire

    2016-01-01

    Thiol-disulfide exchange reactions are highly reversible, displaying nucleophilic substitutions mechanism (S(N)2 type). For aliphatic, low molecular thiols, these reactions are slow, but can attain million times faster rates in enzymatic processes. Thioredoxin (Trx) proteins were the first enzymes described to accelerate thiol-disulfide exchange reactions and their high reactivity is related to the high nucleophilicity of the attacking thiol. Substrate specificity in Trx is achieved by several factors, including polar, hydrophobic, and topological interactions through a groove in the active site. Glutaredoxin (Grx) enzymes also contain the Trx fold, but they do not share amino acid sequence similarity with Trx. A conserved glutathione binding site is a typical feature of Grx that can reduce substrates by two mechanisms (mono and dithiol). The high reactivity of Grx enzymes is related to the very acid pK(a) values of reactive Cys that plays roles as good leaving groups. Therefore, although distinct oxidoreductases catalyze similar thiol–disulfide exchange reactions, their enzymatic mechanisms vary. PDI and DsbA are two other oxidoreductases, but they are involved in disulfide bond formation, instead of disulfide reduction, which is related to the oxidative environment where they are found. PDI enzymes and DsbC are endowed with disulfide isomerase activity, which is related with their tetra-domain architecture. As illustrative description of specificity in thiol-disulfide exchange, redox aspects of transcription activation in bacteria, yeast, and mammals are presented in an evolutionary perspective. Therefore, thiol-disulfide exchange reactions play important roles in conferring specificity to pathways, a required feature for signaling.

  15. Mechanism of Protein Kinetic Stabilization by Engineered Disulfide Crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Romero, Inmaculada; Ariza, Antonio; Wilson, Keith S.; Skjøt, Michael; Vind, Jesper; De Maria, Leonardo; Skov, Lars K.; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of disulfide bonds on protein stability goes beyond simple equilibrium thermodynamics effects associated with the conformational entropy of the unfolded state. Indeed, disulfide crosslinks may play a role in the prevention of dysfunctional association and strongly affect the rates of irreversible enzyme inactivation, highly relevant in biotechnological applications. While these kinetic-stability effects remain poorly understood, by analogy with proposed mechanisms for processes of protein aggregation and fibrillogenesis, we propose that they may be determined by the properties of sparsely-populated, partially-unfolded intermediates. Here we report the successful design, on the basis of high temperature molecular-dynamics simulations, of six thermodynamically and kinetically stabilized variants of phytase from Citrobacter braakii (a biotechnologically important enzyme) with one, two or three engineered disulfides. Activity measurements and 3D crystal structure determination demonstrate that the engineered crosslinks do not cause dramatic alterations in the native structure. The inactivation kinetics for all the variants displays a strongly non-Arrhenius temperature dependence, with the time-scale for the irreversible denaturation process reaching a minimum at a given temperature within the range of the denaturation transition. We show this striking feature to be a signature of a key role played by a partially unfolded, intermediate state/ensemble. Energetic and mutational analyses confirm that the intermediate is highly unfolded (akin to a proposed critical intermediate in the misfolding of the prion protein), a result that explains the observed kinetic stabilization. Our results provide a rationale for the kinetic-stability consequences of disulfide-crosslink engineering and an experimental methodology to arrive at energetic/structural descriptions of the sparsely populated and elusive intermediates that play key roles in irreversible protein

  16. Green polymer chemistry: Synthesis of poly(disulfide) polymers and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal-Kim, Emily Quinn

    The disulfide group is unique in that it presents a covalent bond that is easily formed and cleaved under certain biological conditions. While the ease of disulfide bond cleavage is often harnessed as a method of biodegradation, the ease of disulfide bond formation as a synthetic strategy is often overlooked. The objective this research was to synthesize poly(disulfide) polymers and disulfide crosslinked networks from a green chemistry approach. The intent of the green chemistry approach was to take advantage of the mild conditions applicable to disulfide bond synthesis from thiols. With anticipated use as biomaterials, it was also desired that the polymer materials could be degraded under biological conditions. Here, a new method of poly(disulfide) polymer synthesis is introduced which was inspired by the reaction conditions and reagents found in Nature. Ambient temperatures and aqueous mixtures were used in the new method. Hydrogen peroxide, one of the Nature's most powerful oxidizing species was used as the oxidant in the new polymerization reaction. The dithiol monomer, 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol was first solubilized in triethylamine, which activated the thiol groups and made the monomer water soluble. At room temperature, the organic dithiol/amine solution was then mixed with dilute aqueous hydrogen peroxide (3% by weight) to make the poly(disulfide) polymers. The presence of a two phase system (organic and aqueous phases) was critical to the polymerization reaction. As the reaction progresses, a third, polymer phase appeared. At ambient temperatures and above, this phase separated from the reaction mixture and the polymer product was easily removed from the reaction solution. These polymers reach Mn > 250,000 g/mol in under two hours. Molecular weight distributions were between 1.5 and 2.0. Reactions performed in an ice bath which remain below room temperature contain high molecular weight polymers with Mn ≈ 120,000 g/mol and have a molecular weight

  17. Mitochondrial Disulfide Relay: Redox-regulated Protein Import into the Intermembrane Space*

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Johannes M.; Riemer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    99% of all mitochondrial proteins are synthesized in the cytosol, from where they are imported into mitochondria. In contrast to matrix proteins, many proteins of the intermembrane space (IMS) lack presequences and are imported in an oxidation-driven reaction by the mitochondrial disulfide relay. Incoming polypeptides are recognized and oxidized by the IMS-located receptor Mia40. Reoxidation of Mia40 is facilitated by the sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1 and the respiratory chain. Although structurally unrelated, the mitochondrial disulfide relay functionally resembles the Dsb (disufide bond) system of the bacterial periplasm, the compartment from which the IMS was derived 2 billion years ago. PMID:22157015

  18. An algorithmic approach to automated high-throughput identification of disulfide connectivity in proteins using tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Timothy; Singh, Rahul; Yen, Ten-Yang; Macher, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of the pattern of disulfide linkages in a protein leads to a better understanding of its tertiary structure and biological function. At the state-of-the-art, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) can produce spectra of the peptides in a protein that are putatively joined by a disulfide bond. In this setting, efficient algorithms are required for matching the theoretical mass spaces of all possible bonded peptide fragments to the experimentally derived spectra to determine the number and location of the disulfide bonds. The algorithmic solution must also account for issues associated with interpreting experimental data from mass spectrometry, such as noise, isotopic variation, neutral loss, and charge state uncertainty. In this paper, we propose a algorithmic approach to high-throughput disulfide bond identification using data from mass spectrometry, that addresses all the aforementioned issues in a unified framework. The complexity of the proposed solution is of the order of the input spectra. The efficacy and efficiency of the method was validated using experimental data derived from proteins with with diverse disulfide linkage patterns.

  19. Water interaction and bond strength to dentin of dye-labelled adhesive as a function of the addition of rhodamine B

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Linda; BIM, Odair; LOPES, Adolfo Coelho de Oliveira; FRANCISCONI-DOS-RIOS, Luciana Fávaro; MAENOSONO, Rafael Massunari; D’ALPINO, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; ATTA, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This study investigated the effect of the fluorescent dye rhodamine B (RB) for interfacial micromorphology analysis of dental composite restorations on water sorption/solubility (WS/WSL) and microtensile bond strength to dentin (µTBS) of a 3-step total etch and a 2-step self-etch adhesive system. Material and Methods The adhesives Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (MP) and Clearfil SE Bond (SE) were mixed with 0.1 mg/mL of RB. For the WS/WSL tests, cured resin disks (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm thick) were prepared and assigned into four groups (n=10): MP, MP-RB, SE, and SE-RB. For µTBS assessment, extracted human third molars (n=40) had the flat occlusal dentin prepared and assigned into the same experimental groups (n=10). After the bonding and restoration procedures, specimens were sectioned in rectangular beams, stored in water and tested after seven days or after 12 months. The failure mode of fractured specimens was qualitatively evaluated under optical microscope (x40). Data from WS/WSL and µTBS were assessed by one-way and three-way ANOVA, respectively, and Tukey’s test (α=5%). Results RB increased the WSL of MP and SE. On the other hand, WS of both MP and SE was not affected by the addition of RB. No significance in µTBS between MP and MP-RB for seven days or one year was observed, whereas for SE a decrease in the µTBS means occurred in both storage times. Conclusions RB should be incorporated into non-simplified DBSs with caution, as it can interfere with their physical-mechanical properties, leading to a possible misinterpretation of bonded interface. PMID:27556201

  20. On the additivity of bond dipole moments. Stark effect studies of the rotationally resolved electronic spectra of aniline, benzonitrile, and aminobenzonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borst, David R.; Korter, Timothy M.; Pratt, David W.

    2001-12-01

    We study the influence of an applied electric field on the fully resolved electronic spectra of aniline (AN), benzonitrile (BN), and 4-aminobenzonitrile (ABN) in the gas phase. Using these data, we test the commonly held but rarely proven assumption that the total dipole moment of a polyatomic molecule is the vector sum of bond dipole moments, localized in different parts of the molecule. We find that μa(ABN)≈ μa(AN)+ μa(BN) in the excited S 1 state, but not in the ground S 0 state. Possible reasons for this non-additivity are discussed.

  1. Mutations in domain a′ of protein disulfide isomerase affect the folding pathway of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A

    PubMed Central

    Ruoppolo, Margherita; Orrù, Stefania; Talamo, Fabio; Ljung, Johanna; Pirneskoski, Annamari; Kivirikko, Kari I.; Marino, Gennaro; Koivunen, Peppi

    2003-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, EC 5.3.4.1), an enzyme and chaperone, catalyses disulfide bond formation and rearrangements in protein folding. It is also a subunit in two proteins, the enzyme collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase and the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein. It consists of two catalytically active domains, a and a′, and two inactive ones, b and b′, all four domains having the thioredoxin fold. Domain b′ contains the primary peptide binding site, but a′ is also critical for several of the major PDI functions. Mass spectrometry was used here to follow the folding pathway of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) in the presence of three PDI mutants, F449R, Δ455–457, and abb′, and the individual domains a and a′. The first two mutants contained alterations in the last α helix of domain a′, while the third lacked the entire domain a′. All mutants produced genuine, correctly folded RNase A, but the appearance rate of 50% of the product, as compared to wild-type PDI, was reduced 2.5-fold in the case of PDI Δ455–457, 7.5-fold to eightfold in the cases of PDI F449R and PDI abb′, and over 15-fold in the cases of the individual domains a and a′. In addition, PDI F449R and PDI abb′ affected the distribution of folding intermediates. Domains a and a′ catalyzed the early steps in the folding but no disulfide rearrangements, and therefore the rate observed in the presence of these individual domains was similar to that of the spontaneous process. PMID:12717017

  2. Hapten-directed spontaneous disulfide shuffling: a universal technology for site-directed covalent coupling of payloads to antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dengl, Stefan; Hoffmann, Eike; Grote, Michael; Wagner, Cornelia; Mundigl, Olaf; Georges, Guy; Thorey, Irmgard; Stubenrauch, Kay-Gunnar; Bujotzek, Alexander; Josel, Hans-Peter; Dziadek, Sebastian; Benz, Joerg; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    Humanized hapten-binding IgGs were designed with an accessible cysteine close to their binding pockets, for specific covalent payload attachment. Individual analyses of known structures of digoxigenin (Dig)- and fluorescein (Fluo) binding antibodies and a new structure of a biotin (Biot)-binder, revealed a "universal" coupling position (52(+2)) in proximity to binding pockets but without contributing to hapten interactions. Payloads that carry a free thiol are positioned on the antibody and covalently linked to it via disulfides. Covalent coupling is achieved and driven toward complete (95-100%) payload occupancy by spontaneous redox shuffling between antibody and payload. Attachment at the universal position works with different haptens, antibodies, and payloads. Examples are the haptens Fluo, Dig, and Biot combined with various fluorescent or peptidic payloads. Disulfide-bonded covalent antibody-payload complexes do not dissociate in vitro and in vivo. Coupling requires the designed cysteine and matching payload thiol because payload or antibody without the Cys/thiol are not linked (<5% nonspecific coupling). Hapten-mediated positioning is necessary as hapten-thiol-payload is only coupled to antibodies that bind matching haptens. Covalent complexes are more stable in vivo than noncovalent counterparts because digoxigeninylated or biotinylated fluorescent payloads without disulfide-linkage are cleared more rapidly in mice (approximately 50% reduced 48 hour serum levels) compared with their covalently linked counterparts. The coupling technology is applicable to many haptens and hapten binding antibodies (confirmed by automated analyses of the structures of 140 additional hapten binding antibodies) and can be applied to modulate the pharmacokinetics of small compounds or peptides. It is also suitable to link payloads in a reduction-releasable manner to tumor- or tissue-targeting delivery vehicles.

  3. C-C Bond Formation via Copper-Catalyzed Conjugate Addition Reactions to Enones in Water at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Huang, Shenlin; Leong, Wendy Wen Yi; Isley, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Conjugate addition reactions to enones can now be done in water at room temperature with in situ-generated organocopper reagents. Mixing an enone, zinc powder, TMEDA, and an alkyl halide in a micellar environemnt containing catalytic amounts of Cu(I), Ag(I), and Au(III), leads to 1,4-adducts in good isolated yields: no organometallic precursor is involved. PMID:23190029

  4. Oxidation of the N-terminal domain of the wheat metallothionein Ec -1 leads to the formation of three distinct disulfide bridges.

    PubMed

    Tarasava, Katsiaryna; Chesnov, Serge; Freisinger, Eva

    2016-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight proteins, characterized by a high cysteine content and the ability to coordinate large amounts of d(10) metal ions, for example, Zn(II), Cd(II), and Cu(I), in form of metal-thiolate clusters. Depending on intracellular conditions such as redox potential or metal ion concentrations, MTs can occur in various states ranging from the fully metal-loaded holo- to the metal-free apo-form. The Cys thiolate groups in the apo-form can be either reduced or be involved in disulfide bridges. Although oxidation-mediated Zn(II) release might be a possible mechanism for the regulation of Zn(II) availability by MTs, no concise information regarding the associated pathways and the structure of oxidized apo-MT forms is available. Using the well-studied Zn2 γ-Ec -1 domain of the wheat Zn6 Ec -1 MT we attempt here to answer several question regarding the structure and biophysical properties of oxidized MT forms, such as: (1) does disulfide bond formation increase the stability against proteolysis, (2) is the overall peptide backbone fold similar for the holo- and the oxidized apo-MT form, and (3) are disulfide bridges specifically or randomly formed? Our investigations show that oxidation leads to three distinct disulfide bridges independently of the applied oxidation conditions and of the initial species used for oxidation, that is, the apo- or the holo-form. In addition, the oxidized apo-form is as stable against proteolysis as Zn2 γ-Ec -1, rendering the currently assumed degradation of oxidized MTs unlikely and suggesting a role of the oxidation process for the extension of protein lifetime in absence of sufficient amounts of metal ions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 295-308, 2016.

  5. Structure of Coenzyme A-Disulfide Reductase from Staphylococcus aureus at 1.54 Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett,T.; Wallen, J.; Karplus, P.; Sakai, H.; Tsukihara, T.; Claiborne, A.

    2006-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoASH) replaces glutathione as the major low molecular weight thiol in Staphylococcus aureus; it is maintained in the reduced state by coenzyme A-disulfide reductase (CoADR), a homodimeric enzyme similar to NADH peroxidase but containing a novel Cys43-SSCoA redox center. The crystal structure of S. aureus CoADR has been solved using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion data and refined at a resolution of 1.54 {angstrom}. The resulting electron density maps define the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide conformation, with Cys43-S{gamma} located at the flavin si face, 3.2 {angstrom} from FAD-C4aF, and the CoAS- moiety lying in an extended conformation within a cleft at the dimer interface. A well-ordered chloride ion is positioned adjacent to the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide and receives a hydrogen bond from Tyr361'-OH of the complementary subunit, suggesting a role for Tyr361' as an acid-base catalyst during the reduction of CoAS-disulfide. Tyr419'-OH is located 3.2 {angstrom} from Tyr361'-OH as well and, based on its conservation in known functional CoADRs, also appears to be important for activity. Identification of residues involved in recognition of the CoAS-disulfide substrate and in formation and stabilization of the Cys43-SSCoA redox center has allowed development of a CoAS-binding motif. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that CoADR enzymes are broadly distributed in both bacterial and archaeal kingdoms, suggesting an even broader significance for the CoASH/CoAS-disulfide redox system in prokaryotic thiol/disulfide homeostasis.

  6. The disulfide oxidoreductase SdbA is active in Streptococcus gordonii using a single C-terminal cysteine of the CXXC motif.

    PubMed

    Davey, Lauren; Cohen, Alejandro; LeBlanc, Jason; Halperin, Scott A; Lee, Song F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we identified a novel disulfide oxidoreductase, SdbA, in the oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii. Disulfide oxidoreductases form disulfide bonds in nascent proteins using a CXXC catalytic motif. Typically, the N-terminal cysteine interacts with substrates, whereas the C-terminal cysteine is buried and only reacts with the first cysteine of the motif. In this study, we investigated the SdbA C(86) P(87) D(88) C(89) catalytic motif. In vitro, SdbA single cysteine variants at the N or C-terminal position (SdbAC86P and SdbAC89A ) were active but displayed different susceptibility to oxidation, and N-terminal cysteine was prone to sulfenylation. In S. gordonii, mutants with a single N-terminal cysteine were inactive and formed unstable disulfide adducts with other proteins. Activity was partially restored by inactivation of pyruvate oxidase, a hydrogen peroxide generator. Presence of the C-terminal cysteine alone (in the SdbAC86P variant) could complement the ΔsdbA mutant and restore disulfide bond formation in recombinant and natural protein substrates. These results provide evidence that certain disulfide oxidoreductases can catalyze disulfide bond formation using a single cysteine of the CXXC motif, including the buried C-terminal cysteine.

  7. Correct disulfide pairing is required for the biological activity of crustacean androgenic gland hormone (AGH): synthetic studies of AGH.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hidekazu; Hojo, Hironobu; Ohira, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Akira; Nozaki, Takamichi; Goto, Kiyomi; Nakahara, Yuko; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Hasegawa, Yuriko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Nakahara, Yoshiaki

    2010-03-01

    Androgenic gland hormone (AGH) of the woodlouse, Armadillidium vulgare, is a heterodimeric glycopeptide. In this study, we synthesized AGH with a homogeneous N-linked glycan using the expressed protein ligation method. Unexpectedly, disulfide bridge arrangement of a semisynthetic peptide differed from that of a recombinant peptide prepared in a baculovirus expression system, and the semisynthetic peptide showed no biological activity in vivo. To confirm that the loss of biological activity resulted from disulfide bond isomerization, AGH with a GlcNAc moiety was chemically synthesized by the selective disulfide formation. This synthetic AGH showed biological activity in vivo. These results indicate that the native conformation of AGH is not the most thermodynamically stable form, and correct disulfide linkages are important for conferring AGH activity. PMID:20092253

  8. Correct disulfide pairing is required for the biological activity of crustacean androgenic gland hormone (AGH): synthetic studies of AGH.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hidekazu; Hojo, Hironobu; Ohira, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Akira; Nozaki, Takamichi; Goto, Kiyomi; Nakahara, Yuko; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Hasegawa, Yuriko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Nakahara, Yoshiaki

    2010-03-01

    Androgenic gland hormone (AGH) of the woodlouse, Armadillidium vulgare, is a heterodimeric glycopeptide. In this study, we synthesized AGH with a homogeneous N-linked glycan using the expressed protein ligation method. Unexpectedly, disulfide bridge arrangement of a semisynthetic peptide differed from that of a recombinant peptide prepared in a baculovirus expression system, and the semisynthetic peptide showed no biological activity in vivo. To confirm that the loss of biological activity resulted from disulfide bond isomerization, AGH with a GlcNAc moiety was chemically synthesized by the selective disulfide formation. This synthetic AGH showed biological activity in vivo. These results indicate that the native conformation of AGH is not the most thermodynamically stable form, and correct disulfide linkages are important for conferring AGH activity.

  9. Synthesis of cyclic disulfide-rich peptides.

    PubMed

    Akcan, Muharrem; Craik, David J

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we describe two SPPS approaches for producing cyclic disulfide-rich peptides in our laboratory, including cyclotides from plants, cyclic conotoxins from cone snail venoms, chlorotoxin from scorpion venom, and the sunflower trypsin inhibitor peptide, SFTI-1.

  10. Transfer of molybdenum disulfide to various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, G. C.; Pepper, S. V.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with molybdenum disulfide single crystals in contact with sputter cleaned surfaces of copper, nickel, gold, and 304 stainless steel. Transfer of the molybdenum disulfide to the metals was monitored with Auger electron spectroscopy. Results of the investigation indicate molybdenum disulfide transfers to all clean metal surfaces after a single pass over the metal surface with film thickness observed to increase with repeated passes over the same surfaces. Large particle transfer occurs when the orientation of the crystallites is other than basal. This is frequently accompanied by abrasion of the metal. Adhesion of molybdenum disulfide films occurred readily to copper and nickel, less readily to 304 stainless steel, and even less effectively to the gold, which indicates a chemical effect.

  11. Linearity and additivity in cluster-induced sputtering: A molecular-dynamics study of van der Waals bonded systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Johnson, Robert E.

    2004-10-15

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study sputtering of a condensed-gas solid induced by the impact of atomic clusters with sizes 1{<=}n{<=}10{sup 4}. Above a nonlinear onset regime, we find a linear increase of the sputter yield Y with the total energy E of the bombarding cluster. The fitting coefficients in the linear regime depend only on the cluster size n such that for fixed bombardment energy, sputtering decreases with increasing cluster size n. We find that to a good approximation the sputter yield in this regime obeys an additivity rule in cluster size n such that doubling the cluster size at the same cluster velocity amounts to doubling the sputter yield. The sputter-limiting energy {epsilon}{sub s} is introduced which separates erosion ({epsilon}>{epsilon}{sub s}) from growth ({epsilon}<{epsilon}{sub s}) under cluster impact.

  12. Thioredoxin A Active-Site Mutants Form Mixed Disulfide Dimers That Resemble Enzyme–Substrate Reaction Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Kouwen, Thijs R.H.M.; Andréll, Juni; Schrijver, Rianne; Dubois, Jean-Yves F.; Maher, Megan J.; Iwata, So; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Thioredoxin functions in nearly all organisms as the major thiol–disulfide oxidoreductase within the cytosol. Its prime purpose is to maintain cysteine-containing proteins in the reduced state by converting intramolecular disulfide bonds into dithiols in a disulfide exchange reaction. Thioredoxin has been reported to contribute to a wide variety of physiological functions by interacting with specific sets of substrates in different cell types. To investigate the function of the essential thioredoxin A (TrxA) in the low-GC Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, we purified wild-type TrxA and three mutant TrxA proteins that lack either one or both of the two cysteine residues in the CxxC active site. The pure proteins were used for substrate-binding studies known as “mixed disulfide fishing” in which covalent disulfide-bonded reaction intermediates can be visualized. An unprecedented finding is that both active-site cysteine residues can form mixed disulfides with substrate proteins when the other active-site cysteine is absent, but only the N-terminal active-site cysteine forms stable interactions. A second novelty is that both single-cysteine mutant TrxA proteins form stable homodimers due to thiol oxidation of the remaining active-site cysteine residue. To investigate whether these dimers resemble mixed enzyme–substrate disulfides, the structure of the most abundant dimer, C32S, was characterized by X-ray crystallography. This yielded a high-resolution (1.5Å) X-ray crystallographic structure of a thioredoxin homodimer from a low-GC Gram-positive bacterium. The C32S TrxA dimer can be regarded as a mixed disulfide reaction intermediate of thioredoxin, which reveals the diversity of thioredoxin/substrate-binding modes. PMID:18455736

  13. Werner Complexes with ω-Dimethylaminoalkyl Substituted Ethylenediamine Ligands: Bifunctional Hydrogen-Bond-Donor Catalysts for Highly Enantioselective Michael Additions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subrata K; Ganzmann, Carola; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai; Gladysz, John A

    2016-03-18

    The racemic carbonate complex [Co(en)2 O2 CO](+) Cl(-) (en=1,2-ethylenediamine) and (S)-[H3 NCH((CH2 )n NHMe2 )CH2 NH3 ](3+) 3 Cl(-) (n=1-4) react (water, charcoal, 100 °C) to give [Co(en)2 ((S)-H2 NCH((CH2 )n NHMe2 )CH2 NH2 )](4+) 4 Cl(-) (3 a-d H(4+) 4 Cl(-) ) as a mixture of Λ/Δ diastereomers that separate on chiral-phase Sephadex columns. These are treated with NaOH/Na(+) BArf (-) (BArf =B(3,5-C6 H3 (CF3 )2 )4 ) to give lipophilic Λ- and Δ-3 a-d(3+) 3 BArf (-) , which are screened as catalysts (10 mol %) for additions of dialkyl malonates to nitroalkenes. Optimal results are obtained with Λ-3 c(3+) 3 BArf (-) (CH2 Cl2 , -35 °C; 98-82 % yields and 99-93 % ee for six β-arylnitroethenes). The monofunctional catalysts Λ- and Δ-[Co(en)3 ](3+) 3 BArf (-) give enantioselectivities of <10 % ee with equal loadings of Et3 N. The crystal structure of Δ-3 a H(4+) 4 Cl(-) provides a starting point for speculation regarding transition-state assemblies. PMID:26918320

  14. Antagonistic effect of disulfide-rich peptide aptamers selected by cDNA display on interleukin-6-dependent cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Naoto; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Ueno, Shingo; Machida, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Toshikatsu; Sakai, Takafumi

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibits IL-6-dependent cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide bond of peptide aptamer is essential for its affinity to IL-6R. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibitory effect of peptide depends on number and pattern of its disulfide bonds. -- Abstract: Several engineered protein scaffolds have been developed recently to circumvent particular disadvantages of antibodies such as their large size and complex composition, low stability, and high production costs. We previously identified peptide aptamers containing one or two disulfide-bonds as an alternative ligand to the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Peptide aptamers (32 amino acids in length) were screened from a random peptide library by in vitro peptide selection using the evolutionary molecular engineering method 'cDNA display'. In this report, the antagonistic activity of the peptide aptamers were examined by an in vitro competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an IL-6-dependent cell proliferation assay. The results revealed that a disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibited IL-6-dependent cell proliferation with similar efficacy to an anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody.

  15. Multiple disulfide bridges modulate conformational stability and flexibility in hyperthermophilic archaeal purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Bagarolo, Maria Libera; Porcelli, Marina; Martino, Elisa; Feller, Georges; Cacciapuoti, Giovanna

    2015-10-01

    5'-Deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is a hexameric hyperthermophilic protein containing in each subunit two pairs of disulfide bridges, a CXC motif, and one free cysteine. The contribution of each disulfide bridge to the protein conformational stability and flexibility has been assessed by comparing the thermal unfolding and the limited proteolysis of the wild-type enzyme and its variants obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of the seven cysteine residues. All variants catalyzed efficiently MTA cleavage with specific activity similar to the wild-type enzyme. The elimination of all cysteine residues caused a substantial decrease of ΔHcal (850 kcal/mol) and Tmax (39°C) with respect to the wild-type indicating that all cysteine pairs and especially the CXC motif significantly contribute to the enzyme thermal stability. Disulfide bond Cys200-Cys262 and the CXC motif weakly affected protein flexibility while the elimination of the disulfide bond Cys138-Cys205 lead to an increased protease susceptibility. Experimental evidence from limited proteolysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing and nonreducing conditions also allowed to propose a stabilizing role for the free Cys164.

  16. The structure of spider toxin huwentoxin-II with unique disulfide linkage: Evidence for structural evolution

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Qin; Lu, Shan-Yun; Gu, Xiao-Cheng; Liang, Song-Ping

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of huwentoxin-II (HWTX-II), an insecticidal peptide purified from the venom of spider Selenocosmia huwena with a unique disulfide bond linkage as I-III, II-V, and IV-VI, has been determined using 2D 1H-NMR. The resulting structure of HWTX-II contains two β-turns (C4-S7 and K24-W27) and a double-stranded antiparallel β-sheet (W27-C29 and C34-K36). Although the C-terminal double-stranded β-sheet cross-linked by two disulfide bonds (II-V and IV-VI in HWTX-II, II-V and III-VI in the ICK molecules) is conserved both in HWTX-II and the ICK molecules, the structure of HWTX-II is unexpected absence of the cystine knot because of its unique disulfide linkage. It suggests that HWTX-II adopts a novel scaffold different from the ICK motif that is adopted by all other spider toxin structures elucidated thus far. Furthermore, the structure of HWTX-II, which conforms to the disulfide-directed β-hairpin (DDH) motif, not only supports the hypothesis that the ICK is a minor elaboration of the more ancestral DDH motif but also suggests that HWTX-II may have evolved from the same structural ancestor. PMID:11790834

  17. Disulfide linked pyrazole derivatives inhibit phagocytosis of opsonized blood cells.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Meena K; Scovell, Iain; Neschadim, Anton; Katsman, Yulia; Branch, Donald R; Kotra, Lakshmi P

    2013-04-15

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is caused by production of an autoantibody to autologous platelets. ITP can be treated either by reducing platelet destruction or by increasing platelet production. Fcγ receptor mediated phagocytosis of the opsonized blood cells is a well-accepted mechanism for the underlying pathogenesis of ITP and inhibition of this phagocytosis process with small molecules is a potential strategy for the development of drugs against ITP. A broad screen indicated that 4-methyl-1-phenyl-pyrazole derivative (1) could inhibit the phagocytosis of opsonized blood cells with weak potency. We reveal here the discovery of the polysulfide products, synthesis of various 1-phenyl-pyrazole derivatives, and the biological evaluation of pyrazole derivatives as inhibitors of phagocytosis for potential use as therapeutics for ITP. Substitution at C4 of the pyrazole moiety in the disulfide-bridged dimers influenced the potency in the increasing order of 10 ~/= 11~/= 16 < 19 < 20. A novel scaffold, 20 with an IC(50) of 100 nM inhibiting opsonized blood cell phagocytosis was identified as a potential candidate for further studies. Confirmation of the disulfide bridge additionally provides clues for the non-thiol or non-disulfide bridge carrying ligands targeting ITP and other similar disorders.

  18. Injectable and Self-Healing Dynamic Hydrogels Based on Metal(I)-Thiolate/Disulfide Exchange as Biomaterials with Tunable Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Casuso, Pablo; Odriozola, Ibon; Pérez-San Vicente, Adrián; Loinaz, Iraida; Cabañero, Germán; Grande, Hans-Jürgen; Dupin, Damien

    2015-11-01

    Despite numerous strategies involving dynamic covalent bonds to produce self-healing hydrogels with similar frequency-dependent stiffness to native tissues, it remains challenging to use biologically relevant thiol/disulfide exchange to confer such properties to polymeric networks. Herein, we report a new method based on Metal(I) [Au(I) or Ag(I)] capping to protect thiolates from aerial oxidation without preventing thiolate/disulfide exchange. Dynamic hydrogels were readily prepared by injecting simultaneously aqueous solutions of commercially available HAuCl4 and 4-arm thiol-terminated polyethylene glycol [(PEGSH)4], resulting in a network containing a mixture of Au(I)-thiolate (Au-S) and disulfide bonds (SS). While the dynamic properties of the hydrogel were closely dependent on the pH, the mechanical properties could be easily tuned by adjusting (PEGSH)4 concentration and amount of Au-S, as judged by dynamic rheology studies. Permanent Au-S/SS exchange at physiological pH conferred self-healing behavior and frequency-dependent stiffness to the hydrogel. In addition, in vitro studies confirmed that Au-based dynamic material was not cytotoxic to human dermal fibroblasts, demonstrating its potential use as a medical device. Dynamic hydrogels obtained using Ag(I) ions demonstrated that the exchange reaction was not affected by the nature of the Metal(I) capping. Finally, this efficient thiolate capping strategy offers a simple way to produce injectable and self-healing dynamic hydrogels from virtually any thiol-containing polymers. PMID:26418440

  19. The disulfide proteome and other reactive cysteine proteomes: analysis and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Marika; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Kieselbach, Thomas

    2011-06-15

    Ten years ago, proteomics techniques designed for large-scale investigations of redox-sensitive proteins started to emerge. The proteomes, defined as sets of proteins containing reactive cysteines that undergo oxidative post-translational modifications, have had a particular impact on research concerning the redox regulation of cellular processes. These proteomes, which are hereafter termed "disulfide proteomes," have been studied in nearly all kingdoms of life, including animals, plants, fungi, and bacteria. Disulfide proteomics has been applied to the identification of proteins modified by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species under stress conditions. Other studies involving disulfide proteomics have addressed the functions of thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. Hence, there is a steadily growing number of proteins containing reactive cysteines, which are probable targets for redox regulation. The disulfide proteomes have provided evidence that entire pathways, such as glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Calvin-Benson cycle, are controlled by mechanisms involving changes in the cysteine redox state of each enzyme implicated. Synthesis and degradation of proteins are processes highly represented in disulfide proteomes and additional biochemical data have established some mechanisms for their redox regulation. Thus, combined with biochemistry and genetics, disulfide proteomics has a significant potential to contribute to new discoveries on redox regulation and signaling.

  20. Rv2969c, essential for optimal growth in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a DsbA-like enzyme that interacts with VKOR-derived peptides and has atypical features of DsbA-like disulfide oxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane Heras, Begoña; Duprez, Wilko; Walden, Patricia; Halili, Maria; Kurth, Fabian; Fairlie, David P.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2013-10-01

    The gene product of M. tuberculosis Rv2969c is shown to be a disulfide oxidase enzyme that has a canonical DsbA-like fold with novel structural and functional characteristics. The bacterial disulfide machinery is an attractive molecular target for developing new antibacterials because it is required for the production of multiple virulence factors. The archetypal disulfide oxidase proteins in Escherichia coli (Ec) are DsbA and DsbB, which together form a functional unit: DsbA introduces disulfides into folding proteins and DsbB reoxidizes DsbA to maintain it in the active form. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), no DsbB homologue is encoded but a functionally similar but structurally divergent protein, MtbVKOR, has been identified. Here, the Mtb protein Rv2969c is investigated and it is shown that it is the DsbA-like partner protein of MtbVKOR. It is found that it has the characteristic redox features of a DsbA-like protein: a highly acidic catalytic cysteine, a highly oxidizing potential and a destabilizing active-site disulfide bond. Rv2969c also has peptide-oxidizing activity and recognizes peptide segments derived from the periplasmic loops of MtbVKOR. Unlike the archetypal EcDsbA enzyme, Rv2969c has little or no activity in disulfide-reducing and disulfide-isomerase assays. The crystal structure of Rv2969c reveals a canonical DsbA fold comprising a thioredoxin domain with an embedded helical domain. However, Rv2969c diverges considerably from other DsbAs, including having an additional C-terminal helix (H8) that may restrain the mobility of the catalytic helix H1. The enzyme is also characterized by a very shallow hydrophobic binding surface and a negative electrostatic surface potential surrounding the catalytic cysteine. The structure of Rv2969c was also used to model the structure of a paralogous DsbA-like domain of the Ser/Thr protein kinase PknE. Together, these results show that Rv2969c is a DsbA-like protein with unique properties and a limited

  1. Hapten-directed spontaneous disulfide shuffling: a universal technology for site-directed covalent coupling of payloads to antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Dengl, Stefan; Hoffmann, Eike; Grote, Michael; Wagner, Cornelia; Mundigl, Olaf; Georges, Guy; Thorey, Irmgard; Stubenrauch, Kay-Gunnar; Bujotzek, Alexander; Josel, Hans-Peter; Dziadek, Sebastian; Benz, Joerg; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Humanized hapten-binding IgGs were designed with an accessible cysteine close to their binding pockets, for specific covalent payload attachment. Individual analyses of known structures of digoxigenin (Dig)- and fluorescein (Fluo) binding antibodies and a new structure of a biotin (Biot)-binder, revealed a “universal” coupling position (52+2) in proximity to binding pockets but without contributing to hapten interactions. Payloads that carry a free thiol are positioned on the antibody and covalently linked to it via disulfides. Covalent coupling is achieved and driven toward complete (95–100%) payload occupancy by spontaneous redox shuffling between antibody and payload. Attachment at the universal position works with different haptens, antibodies, and payloads. Examples are the haptens Fluo, Dig, and Biot combined with various fluorescent or peptidic payloads. Disulfide-bonded covalent antibody-payload complexes do not dissociate in vitro and in vivo. Coupling requires the designed cysteine and matching payload thiol because payload or antibody without the Cys/thiol are not linked (<5% nonspecific coupling). Hapten-mediated positioning is necessary as hapten-thiol-payload is only coupled to antibodies that bind matching haptens. Covalent complexes are more stable in vivo than noncovalent counterparts because digoxigeninylated or biotinylated fluorescent payloads without disulfide-linkage are cleared more rapidly in mice (approximately 50% reduced 48 hour serum levels) compared with their covalently linked counterparts. The coupling technology is applicable to many haptens and hapten binding antibodies (confirmed by automated analyses of the structures of 140 additional hapten binding antibodies) and can be applied to modulate the pharmacokinetics of small compounds or peptides. It is also suitable to link payloads in a reduction-releasable manner to tumor- or tissue-targeting delivery vehicles.—Dengl, S., Hoffmann, E., Grote, M., Wagner, C., Mundigl, O

  2. Methods of measuring Protein Disulfide Isomerase activity: a critical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Monica; Laurindo, Francisco; Fernandes, Denise

    2014-09-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase is an essential redox chaperone from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is responsible for correct disulfide bond formation in nascent proteins. PDI is also found in other cellular locations in the cell, particularly the cell surface. Overall, PDI contributes to ER and global cell redox homeostasis and signaling. The knowledge about PDI structure and function progressed substantially based on in vitro studies using recombinant PDI and chimeric proteins. In these experimental scenarios, PDI reductase and chaperone activities are readily approachable. In contrast, assays to measure PDI isomerase activity, the hallmark of PDI family, are more complex. Assessment of PDI roles in cells and tissues mainly relies on gain- or loss-of-function studies. However, there is limited information regarding correlation of experimental readouts with the distinct types of PDI activities. In this mini-review, we evaluate the main methods described for measuring the different kinds of PDI activity: thiol reductase, thiol oxidase, thiol isomerase and chaperone. We emphasize the need to use appropriate controls and the role of critical interferents (e.g., detergent, presence of reducing agents). We also discuss the translation of results from in vitro studies with purified recombinant PDI to cellular and tissue samples, with critical comments on the interpretation of results.

  3. Engineered disulfides improve mechanical properties of recombinant spider silk

    PubMed Central

    Grip, S; Johansson, J; Hedhammar, M

    2009-01-01

    Nature's high-performance polymer, spider silk, is composed of specific proteins, spidroins, which form solid fibers. So far, fibers made from recombinant spidroins have failed in replicating the extraordinary mechanical properties of the native material. A recombinant miniature spidroin consisting of four poly-Ala/Gly-rich tandem repeats and a nonrepetitive C-terminal domain (4RepCT) can be isolated in physiological buffers and undergoes self assembly into macrofibers. Herein, we have made a first attempt to improve the mechanical properties of 4RepCT fibers by selective introduction of AA → CC mutations and by letting the fibers form under physiologically relevant redox conditions. Introduction of AA → CC mutations in the first poly-Ala block in the miniature spidroin increases the stiffness and tensile strength without changes in ability to form fibers, or in fiber morphology. These improved mechanical properties correlate with degree of disulfide formation. AA → CC mutations in the forth poly-Ala block, however, lead to premature aggregation of the protein, possibly due to disulfide bonding with a conserved Cys in the C-terminal domain. Replacement of this Cys with a Ser, lowers thermal stability but does not interfere with dimerization, fiber morphology or tensile strength. These results show that mutagenesis of 4RepCT can reveal spidroin structure-activity relationships and generate recombinant fibers with improved mechanical properties. PMID:19388023

  4. Bis(trifluoromethyl)methylene Addition to Vinyl-Terminated SAMs: A Gas-Phase C–C Bond-Forming Reaction on a Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Vinyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silicon oxide substrates were chemically modified by the addition of a bis(trifluoromethyl)methylene group in a rare gas-phase C–C bond-forming reaction to directly generate films carrying terminal CF3 groups. The vinyl-terminated films were treated with hexafluoroacetone azine (HFAA) for modification. The films were characterized with ellipsometry, contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In this study, we find that for optimized conditions clean reactions occur on a surface between SAMs with terminal olefins and HFAA, and the product is consistent with bis(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropanation formation after nitrogen extrusion. PMID:24806554

  5. Effects of Ce and Si additions to CoNiCrAlY bond coat materials on oxidation behavior and crack propagation of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, K.; Ito, K.; Shoji, T.; Seo, D. W.; Tezuka, H.; Kato, H.

    2006-12-01

    In thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems, thermally grown oxide (TGO) forms at the interface between the top coat and the bond coat (BC) during service. Delamination or spallation at the interface occurs by the TGO formation and growth. Therefore, modifications of the BC materials are one means to inhibit the TGO formation and to improve the crack resistance of TBCs. In this study, morphologies of TGO were controlled by using Ce and Si additions to conventional CoNiCrAlY BC material. The evaluation of the crack resistance was carried out using acoustic emission methods under pure bending conditions. As a result, when the BCs of TBCs with Ce added were aged at 1373 K over 10 h, the morphologies of the TGO were changed drastically. The BC materials of TBCs coated with Ce added indicated an improved crack resistance with high-temperature exposure. It is expected that the morphologies can improve the crack resistance of TBCs.

  6. Secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effects in irreversible additions of hydride and carbon nucleophiles to aldehydes: A spectrum of transition states from complete bond formation to single electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, J.J.; Bocian, W.; Harris, N.J.; Olson, L.P.; Gajewski, J.P.

    1999-01-20

    The competitive kinetics of hydride and organometallic additions to benzaldehyde-H and -D were determined at {minus}78 C using LiAlH{sub 4}, LiBEt{sub 3}H, NaBH{sub 4}, LiBH{sub 4}, LiAl(O-tert-butoxy){sub 3}H, NaB(OMe){sub 3}H, NaB-(Ac){sub 3}H (at 20 C) methyl, phenyl, and allyl Grignard, and methyl-, phenyl-, n-butyl-, tert-butyl-, and allyllithium. The additions of hydride were found to have an inverse secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effects in all cases, but the magnitude of the effect varied inversely with the apparent reactivity of the hydride. In the additions of methyl Grignard reagent and of methyllithium and phenyllithium, inverse secondary deuterium isotope effects were observed; little if any isotope effect was observed with phenyl Grignard or n-butyl- and tert-butyllithium. With allyl Grignard and allyllithium, a normal secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effect was observed. The results indicate that rate-determining single-electron transfer occurs with allyl reagents, but direct nucleophilic reaction occurs with all of the other reagents, with the extent of bond formation dependent on the reactivity of the reagent. In the addition of methyllithium to cyclohexanecarboxyaldehyde, a less inverse secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effect was observed than that observed in the addition of methyllithium to benzaldehyde, and allyllithium addition to cyclohexanecarboxaldehyde had a kinetic isotope effect near unity. The data with organometallic additions, which are not incompatible with observations of carbonyl carbon isotope effects, suggest that electrochemically determined redox potentials which indicate endoergonic electron transfer with energies less than ca. 13 kcal/mol allow electron-transfer mechanisms to compete well with direct polar additions to aldehydes, provided that the reagent is highly stabilized, like allyl species. Methyllithium and phenyllithium and methyl and phenyl Grignard reagents are estimated to undergo electron transfer with

  7. Rational Design of a Fusion Protein to Exhibit Disulfide-Mediated Logic Gate Behavior

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cellular logic gates are primarily built from gene circuits owing to their inherent modularity. Single proteins can also possess logic gate functions and offer the potential to be simpler, quicker, and less dependent on cellular resources than gene circuits. However, the design of protein logic gates that are modular and integrate with other cellular components is a considerable challenge. As a step toward addressing this challenge, we describe the design, construction, and characterization of AND, ORN, and YES logic gates built by introducing disulfide bonds into RG13, a fusion of maltose binding protein and TEM-1 β-lactamase for which maltose is an allosteric activator of enzyme activity. We rationally designed these disulfide bonds to manipulate RG13’s allosteric regulation mechanism such that the gating had maltose and reducing agents as input signals, and the gates could be toggled between different gating functions using redox agents, although some gates performed suboptimally. PMID:25144732

  8. Collision-Induced Dissociation Fragmentation Inside Disulfide C-Terminal Loops of Natural Non-Tryptic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samgina, Tatiana Y.; Vorontsov, Egor A.; Gorshkov, Vladimir A.; Artemenko, Konstantin A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Ytterberg, Jimmy A.; Lebedev, Albert T.

    2013-07-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of long non-tryptic peptides are usually quite complicated and rather difficult to interpret. Disulfide bond formed by two cysteine residues at C-terminus of frog skin peptides precludes one to determine sequence inside the forming loop. Thereby, chemical modification of S-S bonds is often used in "bottom up" sequencing approach. However, low-energy CID spectra of natural non-tryptic peptides with C-terminal disulfide cycle demonstrate an unusual fragmentation route, which may be used to elucidate the "hidden" C-terminal sequence. Low charge state protonated molecules experience peptide bond cleavage at the N-terminus of C-terminal cysteine. The forming isomeric acyclic ions serve as precursors for a series of b-type ions revealing sequence inside former disulfide cycle. The reaction is preferable for peptides with basic lysine residues inside the cycle. It may also be activated by acidic protons of Asp and Glu residues neighboring the loop. The observed cleavages may be quite competitive, revealing the sequence inside disulfide cycle, although S-S bond rupture does not occur in this case.

  9. Tris(3-hydroxypropyl)phosphine (THPP): A mild, air-stable reagent for the rapid, reductive cleavage of small-molecule disulfides.

    PubMed

    McNulty, James; Krishnamoorthy, Venkatesan; Amoroso, Dino; Moser, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Tris(3-hydroxypropyl)phosphine (THPP) is demonstrated to be a versatile, water-soluble and air-stable reducing agent, allowing for the rapid, irreversible reductive cleavage of disulfide bonds in both aqueous and buffered aqueous-organic media. The reagent shows exceptional stability at biological pH under which condition it permits the rapid reduction of a wide range of differentially functionalized small-molecule disulfides. PMID:26318995

  10. The disulfide relay of the intermembrane space of mitochondria: an oxygen-sensing system?

    PubMed

    Bihlmaier, Karl; Mesecke, Nikola; Kloeppel, Christine; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2008-12-01

    The intermembrane space of mitochondria contains many proteins that lack classical mitochondrial targeting sequences. Instead, these proteins often show characteristic patterns of cysteine residues that are critical for their accumulation in the organelle. Import of these proteins is catalyzed by two essential components, Mia40 and Erv1. Mia40 is a protein in the intermembrane space that directly binds newly imported proteins via disulfide bonds. By reorganization of these bonds, intramolecular disulfide bonds are formed in the imported proteins, which are thereby released from Mia40 into the intermembrane space. Because folded proteins are unable to traverse the import pore of the outer membrane, this leads to a permanent location of these proteins within the mitochondria. During this reaction, Mia40 becomes reduced and needs to be re-oxidized to regain its activity. Oxidation of Mia40 is carried out by Erv1, a conserved flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding sulfhydryl oxidase. Erv1 directly interacts with Mia40 and shuttles electrons from reduced Mia40 to oxidized cytochrome c, from whence they flow through cytochrome oxidase to molecular oxygen. The connection of the disulfide relay with the respiratory chain not only significantly increases the efficiency of the oxidase activity, but also prevents the formation of potentially deleterious hydrogen peroxide. The oxidative activity of Erv1 strongly depends on the oxygen concentration in mitochondria. Erv1, therefore, may function as a molecular switch that adapts mitochondrial activities to the oxygen levels in the cell.

  11. Voltammetric studies of poly(carbon disulfide)

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, L.; Xu, J.; Prasad, S.; Skotheim, T.A.; Lee, H.S.; McBreen, J.

    1992-12-31

    Poly(carbon disulfide) was studied by cyclic voltammetry using glassy carbon and platinum macro- and microdisk electrodes. The electron transfer kinetics is significantly faster at glassy carbon electrodes than at Pt electrodes. It is chemically reversible with moderate electron transfer rates. Voltammetric results of poly(carbon disulfide) are in good agreement with battery testing data. The k{sup 0} value measured at a Pt microdisk electrode is 7{times}10{sup 3} cm/sec. Electrochemical data suggest that PCS can be a potential cathode material for low current density lithium batteries.

  12. Effects of Interface Coating and Nitride Enhancing Additive on Properties of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishana T.; Hull, David R.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Babuder, Raymond

    2000-01-01

    Strong and tough Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites (SiC/ RBSN) have been fabricated by the fiber lay-up approach. Commercially available uncoated and PBN, PBN/Si-rich PBN, and BN/SiC coated SiC Hi-Nicalon fiber tows were used as reinforcement. The composites contained approximately 24 vol % of aligned 14 micron diameter SiC fibers in a porous RBSN matrix. Both one- and two-dimensional composites were characterized. The effects of interface coating composition, and the nitridation enhancing additive, NiO, on the room temperature physical, tensile, and interfacial shear strength properties of SiC/RBSN matrix composites were evaluated. Results indicate that for all three coated fibers, the thickness of the coatings decreased from the outer periphery to the interior of the tows, and that from 10 to 30 percent of the fibers were not covered with the interface coating. In the uncoated regions, chemical reaction between the NiO additive and the SiC fiber occurs causing degradation of tensile properties of the composites. Among the three interface coating combinations investigated, the BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced RBSN matrix composite showed the least amount of uncoated regions and reasonably uniform interface coating thickness. The matrix cracking stress in SiC/RBSN composites was predicted using a fracture mechanics based crack bridging model.

  13. Reductive metalation of cyclic and acyclic pseudopeptidic bis-disulfides and back conversion of the resulting diamidato/dithiolato complexes to bis-disulfides.

    PubMed

    Desbenoît, Nicolas; Galardon, Erwan; Frapart, Yves; Tomas, Alain; Artaud, Isabelle

    2010-09-20

    Cyclic and acyclic pseudopeptidic bis-disulfides built on an o-phenylene diamine scaffold were prepared: (N(2)H(2)S(2))(2), 1a, N(2)H(2)(S-SCH(3))(2), 1b, and N(2)H(2)(S-StBu)(2), 1c. Reductive metalation of these disulfides with (PF(6))[Cu(CH(3)CN)(4)] in the presence of Et(4)NOH as a base, or with (Et(4)N)[Fe(SEt)(4)] and Et(4)NCl, yields the corresponding diamidato/dithiolato copper(III) or iron(III) complex, (Et(4)N)[Cu(N(2)S(2))], 2, or (Et(4)N)(2)[Fe(N(2)S(2))Cl], 5. These complexes display characteristics similar to those previously described in the literature. The mechanism of the metalation with copper has been investigated by X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at 10 K. After metalation of the bis-disulfide 1c and deprotonation of the amide nitrogens, the reductive cleavage of the S-S bonds occurs by two one-electron transfers leading to the intermediate formation of a copper(II) complex and a thyil radical. Complexes 2 and 5 can be converted back to the cyclic bis-disulfide 1a with iodine in an 80% yield. Reaction of 5 with iodine in the presence of CH(3)S-SCH(3) affords a 1/1 mixture of the acyclic N(2)H(2)(S-SCH(3))(2) disulfide 1b and cyclic bis-disulfide 1a. From 2, the reaction was monitored by (1)H NMR and gives 1b as major product. While there is no reaction of 2 or 5 with tBuS-StBu and iodine, reaction with an excess of tBuSI affords quantitatively the di-tert-butyl disulfide 1c. To assess the role of the Cu(III) oxidation state, control experiments were carried out under strictly anaerobic conditions with the copper(II) complex, (Et(4)N)(2)[Cu(N(2)S(2))], 6. Complex 6 is oxidized to 2 by iodine, and it reacts with an excess of tBuSI, yielding 1c as final product, through the intermediate formation of complex 2. PMID:20718487

  14. Solvation agent for disulfide precipitates from inhibited glycol-water solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M. F.

    1971-01-01

    Small additions /0.01 percent or less/ of triethanoloamine sodium sulfite adduct to mercapto benzothiazole inhibited glycol water heat transfer solutions containing disulfide precipitate produce marked reduction in amount of precipitate. Adduct is useful as additive in glycol base antifreezes and coolants.

  15. Immediate stabilization of human blood for delayed quantification of endogenous thiols and disulfides.

    PubMed

    Giustarini, Daniela; Galvagni, Federico; Orlandini, Maurizio; Fanti, Paolo; Rossi, Ranieri

    2016-04-15

    Endogenous thiols undergo rapid and reversible oxidation to disulfides when exposed to oxidants and are, therefore, suitable biomarkers of oxidative stress. However, accurate analysis of thiols in blood is frequently compromised by their artifactual oxidation during sample manipulation, which spuriously elevates the disulfide levels. Here, we describe a validated pre-analytical procedure that prevents both artifactual oxidation of thiols during sample manipulation and their oxidative decay for months in biosamples that are stored at -80°C. Addition of N-ethylmaleimide to blood samples from healthy donors was used to stabilize whole blood, red blood cells, platelets and plasma disulfides, whereas addition of citrate buffer followed by dilution of plasma with H2O was used to stabilize plasma thiols. The concentrations of thiols and disulfides were stable in all biosamples for at least 6 months when analyzed by UV/Vis HPLC at regular intervals. Only 3 ml of blood were needed to perform the analyses of thiols and disulfides in the different blood fractions. This pre-analytical procedure is reliable for use in both animal and human prospective studies. Its ease of implementation makes the method suitable for application to multicenter studies where blood samples are collected by different sites and personnel and are shipped to specific specialized laboratories. PMID:26896310

  16. Ru3(CO)12-catalyzed reactions of catechols with alkynes: an atom-economic process for the synthesis of 2,2-disubstituted 1,3-benzodioxoles from the double addition of the O-H bond across a triple bond.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Hua, Ruimao

    2008-11-01

    Ru3(CO)12 has been found to be the efficient catalyst for the addition reactions of catechols with both terminal and internal alkynes to selectively afford 2,2-disubstituted 1,3-benzodioxoles in good to high yields. The formation of 2,2-substituted 1,3-benzodioxoles results from the tandem addition of two O-H bonds of catechols to alkyne's triple bond.

  17. [Introduction of additional thiol groups into glucoamylase in Aspergillus awamori and their effect on the thermal stability and catalytic activity of the enzyme].

    PubMed

    Surzhik, M A; Shmidt, A E; Glazunov, E A; Firsov, D L; Petukhov, M G

    2014-01-01

    Five mutant forms of glucoamylase (GA) from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus awamori with artificial disulfide bonds (4D-G137A\\A14C, 6D-A14C\\Y419C\\G137A, 10D-V13C\\G396C, 11D-V13C\\G396C\\A14C\\Y419C\\G137A, and 20D-G137A\\A246C\\A14C) were constructed using computer simulation and experimentally tested for thermostability. The introduction of two additional disulfide bonds between its first and thirteenth alpha-helices and that of the loop located close to a catalytic residue--E400--made it possible to assess the effects of disulfide bridges on protein thermostability. The mutant proteins with combined amino acid substitutions G137A\\A14C, V13C\\G396C\\A14C\\Y419C\\G137A, and G137A\\A246C\\A14C showed higher thermal stability as compared to the wild-type protein. At the same time, new disulfide bridges in the mutant A14C\\Y419C\\G137A and V13C\\G396C proteins led to the destabilization of their structure and the loss of thermal stability.

  18. Facile and Promising Method for Michael Addition of Indole and Pyrrole to Electron-Deficient trans-β-Nitroolefins Catalyzed by a Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalyst Feist's Acid and Preliminary Study of Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al Majid, Abdullah M. A.; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Barakat, Assem; Al-Agamy, Mohamed H. M.; Naushad, Mu.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of cooperative hydrogen-bonding effects has been demonstrated using novel 3-methylenecyclopropane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (Feist's acid (FA)) as hydrogen bond donor catalysts for the addition of indole and pyrrole to trans-β-nitrostyrene derivatives. Because of the hydrogen bond donor (HBD) ability, Feist's acid (FA) has been introduced as a new class of hydrogen bond donor catalysts for the activation of nitroolefin towards nucleophilic substitution reaction. It has effectively catalyzed the Michael addition of indoles and pyrrole to β-nitroolefins under optimum reaction condition to furnish the corresponding Michael adducts in good to excellent yields (up to 98%). The method is general, atom-economical, convenient, and eco-friendly and could provide excellent yields and regioselectivities. Some newly synthesized compounds were for examined in vitro antimicrobial activity and their preliminary results are reported. PMID:24574906

  19. Synthetic peptide models for the redox-active disulfide loop of glutaredoxin. Conformational studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore, R.; Raghothama, S.; Balaram, P.

    1988-04-05

    Two cyclic peptide disulfides have been synthesized as models for the 14-membered redox-active disulfide loop glutaredoxin. /sup 1/H NMR studies at 270 MHz in chloroform solutions establish a type I ..beta..-turn conformation for the Pro-X segment in both peptides, stabilized by a 4 ..-->.. 1 hydrogen bond between the Cys(1) CO and Cys(4) NH groups. Nuclear Overhauser effects establish that the aromatic ring in the X = Phe peptide is oriented over the central peptide unit. In dimethyl sulfoxide solutions two conformational species are observed in slow exchange on the NMR time scale, for both peptides. These are assigned to type I and type II ..beta..-turn structures with -Pro-Tyr(Phe)-as the corner resides. The structural assignments are based on correlation of NMR parameters with model 14-membered cyclic cystine peptides with Pro-X spacers. Circular dichroism studies based on the -S-S-n-sigma* transition suggest a structural change in the disulfide bridge with changing solvent polarity, establishing conformational coupling between the peptide backbone and the disulfide linkage in these systems.

  20. Reversible Inter- and Intra-Microgel Cross-Linking using Disulfides

    PubMed Central

    Gaulding, Jeffrey C.; Smith, Michael H.; Hyatt, John S.; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Lyon, L. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Thermoresponsive hydrogel nanoparticles composed of poly(N-isopropylmethacrylamide) (pNIPMAm) and the disulfide-based cross-linker N,N’-bis(acryloyl)cystamine (BAC) have been prepared using a redox-initiated, aqueous precipitation polymerization approach, leading to improved stability of the disulfide bond compared to traditional thermally-initiated methods. The resultant particles demonstrate complete erosion in response to reducing conditions or thiol competition. This stands in contrast to the behavior of thermally-initiated particles, which retain a cross-linked network following disulfide cleavage due to uncontrolled chain-branching and self-cross-linking side reactions. The synthetic strategy has also been combined with the non-degradable cross-linker N,N-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS) to generate “co-cross-linked” pNIPMAm-BAC-BIS microgels. These particles are redox-responsive, swell upon BAC cross-link scission and present reactive thiols. This pendant thiol functionality was demonstrated to be useful for conjugation of thiol-reactive probes and in reversible network formation by assembling particles cross-linked by disulfide linkages. PMID:22287810

  1. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  2. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  3. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  4. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  5. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  6. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  7. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  8. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  9. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  10. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  11. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  12. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  13. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  14. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  15. Recovery of molybdenum from molybdenum disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderpool, C.D.; MacInnis, M.B.

    1986-07-08

    A process is described for recovering molybdenum from molybdenum disulfide. The process consists of: (a) forming a slurry of the molybdenum disulfide in a solution of an alkali metal hydroxide, the amount of alkali metal hydroxide being sufficient to react with at least a portion of the molybdenum disulfide to form an alkali metal molybdate and an alkali sulfate; (b) heating the slurry in an oxidizing atmosphere at an elevated temperature and pressure and for a sufficient time to convert at least a portion of the molybdenum disulfide to the alkali metal molybdate and provide a pregnant liquor of the alkali metal molybdate and a residue; (c) separating the pregnant liquor from the residue; (d) adding a sufficient amount of a hexamine to the pregnant liquor to form an hexamine-molybdenum compound containing the major portion of the molybdenum which is in the pregnant liquor; (e) adjusting the pH of the resulting hexamine-treated pregnant liquor to from about 1.5 to about 3.8 to precipitate the major portion of the hexamine-molybdenum compound; and (f) separating the hexamine-molybdenum compound from the resulting mother liquor.

  16. An Interface-Enriched eXtended Finite Element-Level Set Simulation of Solutal Melting of Additive Powder Particles during Transient Liquid Phase Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, A.; Hunedy, J.; Ojo, O. A.

    2013-02-01

    A new numerical simulation model is developed by using an interface-enriched eXtended Finite Element-Level Set (XFE-LS) method to study the solute-induced melting of additive powder particles (APPs) during transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding. The robust model captures rapidly occurring concurrent interfacial events at multiple propagating liquid-solid interfaces to simulate the melting behavior. In contrast to the critical assumption in analytical models, numerical calculations show that solute-transport into the APPs during the equilibration of the liquid composition is a significant factor that affects the APPs melting behavior. Also, the study shows that the solute-transport dependence of extent of APPs melting is influenced by the kinetics of solid-state solute diffusion within the particles. The understanding generated by the numerical analysis has resulted in the use of interlayer powder mixture that contains base-alloy APPs to produce single crystal TLP joint that has matching crystallographic orientations with single crystal substrate material, at a substantially reduced processing time, which has been previously considered unfeasible.

  17. Reactions of the alkoxy radicals formed following OH-addition to alpha-pinene and beta-pinene. C-C bond scission reactions.

    PubMed

    Dibble, T S

    2001-05-01

    The atmospheric degradation pathways of the atmospherically important terpenes alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are studied using density functional theory. We employ the correlation functional of Lee, Yang, and Parr and the three-parameter HF exchange functional of Becke (B3LYP) together with the 6-31G(d) basis set. The C-C bond scission reactions of the beta-hydroxyalkoxy radicals that are formed after OH addition to alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are investigated. Both of the alkoxy radicals formed from the alpha-pinene-OH adduct possess a single favored C-C scission pathway with an extremely low barrier (approximately 3 kcal/mol) leading to the formation of pinonaldehyde. Neither of these pathways produces formaldehyde, and preliminary computational results offer some support for suggestions that 1,5 or 1,6 H-shift (isomerization) reactions of alkoxy radicals contribute to formaldehyde production. In the case of the alkoxy radical formed following OH addition to the methylene group of beta-pinene, there exists two C-C scission reactions with nearly identical barrier heights (approximately 7.5 kcal/mol); one leads to known products (nopinone and formaldehyde) but the ultimate products of the competing reaction are unknown. The single C-C scission pathway of the other alkoxy radical from beta-pinene possesses a very low (approximately 4 kcal/mol) barrier. The kinetically favored C-C scission reactions of all four alkoxy radicals appear to be far faster than expected rates of reaction with O2. The rearrangement of the alpha-pinene-OH adduct, a key step in the proposed mechanism of formation of acetone from alpha-pinene, is determined to possess a barrier of 11.6 kcal/mol. This value is consistent with another computational result and is broadly consistent with the modest acetone yields observed in product yield studies.

  18. Thermochemical Properties and Bond Dissociation Energies for Fluorinated Methanol, CH3-xFxOH, and Fluorinated Methyl Hydroperoxides, CH3-xFxOOH: Group Additivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2016-09-01

    Oxygenated fluorocarbons are routinely found in sampling of environmental soils and waters as a result of the widespread use of fluoro and chlorofluoro carbons as heat transfer fluids, inert materials, polymers, fire retardants and solvents; the influence of these chemicals on the environment is a growing concern. The thermochemical properties of these species are needed for understanding their stability and reactions in the environment and in thermal process. Structures and thermochemical properties on the mono- to trifluoromethanol, CH3-xFxOH, and fluoromethyl hydroperoxide, CH3-xFxOOH (1 ≤ x ≤ 3), are determined by CBS-QB3, CBS-APNO, and G4 calculations. Entropy, S°298, and heat capacities, Cp(T)'s (300 ≤ T/K ≤ 1500) from vibration, translation, and external rotation contributions are calculated on the basis of the vibration frequencies and structures obtained from the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) density functional method. Potential barriers for the internal rotations are also calculated from this method and used to calculate hindered rotor contributions to S°298 and Cp(T)'s using direct integration over energy levels of the internal rotational potentials. Standard enthalpies of formation, ΔfH°298 (units in kcal mol(-1)) are CH2FOOH (-83.7), CHF2OOH (-138.1), CF3OOH (-193.6), CH2FOO(•) (-44.9), CHF2OO(•) (-99.6), CF3OO(•) (-153.8), CH2FOH (-101.9), CHF2OH (-161.6), CF3OH (-218.1), CH2FO(•) (-49.1), CHF2O(•) (-97.8), CF3O(•) (-150.5), CH2F(•) (-7.6), CHF2(•) (-58.8), and CF3(•) (-112.6). Bond dissociation energies for the R-OOH, RO-OH, ROO-H, R-OO(•), RO-O(•), R-OH, RO-H, R-O(•), and R-H bonds are determined and compared with methyl hydroperoxide to observe the trends from added fluoro substitutions. Enthalpy of formation for the fluoro-hydrocarbon oxygen groups C/F/H2/O, C/F2/H/O, C/F3/O, are derived from the above fluorinated methanol and fluorinated hydroperoxide species for use in Benson's Group Additivity. It was determined that

  19. Diaryl Disulfides as Novel Stabilizers of Tumor Suppressor Pdcd4

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Tobias; Blees, Johanna S.; Bajer, Magdalena M.; Wild, Janine; Pescatori, Luca; Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Scipione, Luigi; Costi, Roberta; Henrich, Curtis J.; Brüne, Bernhard; Colburn, Nancy H.; Di Santo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The translation inhibitor and tumor suppressor Pdcd4 was reported to be lost in various tumors and put forward as prognostic marker in tumorigenesis. Decreased Pdcd4 protein stability due to PI3K-mTOR-p70S6K1 dependent phosphorylation of Pdcd4 followed by β-TrCP1-mediated ubiquitination, and proteasomal destruction of the protein was characterized as a major mechanism contributing to the loss of Pdcd4 expression in tumors. In an attempt to identify stabilizers of Pdcd4, we used a luciferase-based high-throughput compatible cellular assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4 in response to mitogen stimulation. Following a screen of approximately 2000 compounds, we identified 1,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)disulfide as a novel Pdcd4 stabilizer. To determine an initial structure-activity relationship, we used 3 additional compounds, synthesized according to previous reports, and 2 commercially available compounds for further testing, in which either the linker between the aryls was modified (compounds 2–4) or the chlorine residues were replaced by groups with different electronic properties (compounds 5 and 6). We observed that those compounds with alterations in the sulfide linker completely lost the Pdcd4 stabilizing potential. In contrast, modifications in the chlorine residues showed only minor effects on the Pdcd4 stabilizing activity. A reporter with a mutated phospho-degron verified the specificity of the compounds for stabilizing the Pdcd4 reporter. Interestingly, the active diaryl disulfides inhibited proliferation and viability at concentrations where they stabilized Pdcd4, suggesting that Pdcd4 stabilization might contribute to the anti-proliferative properties. Finally, computational modelling indicated that the flexibility of the disulfide linker might be necessary to exert the biological functions of the compounds, as the inactive compound appeared to be energetically more restricted. PMID:26982744

  20. A DFT study on the NHC catalysed Michael addition of enols to α,β-unsaturated acyl-azoliums. A base catalysed C-C bond-formation step.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Sáez, José A; Arnó, Manuel

    2014-02-14

    The NHC catalysed nucleophilic additions of enols to α,β-unsaturated acyl-azolium intermediates have been investigated using DFT methods at the MPWB1K/6-31G** computational level. In the direct and the conjugate additions, formation of a hydrogen bond (HB) with the carboxyl oxygen is not sufficient to favour the C-C bond formation as a consequence of the low nucleophilic character of enols. Interestingly, when enols form a HB with the chloride counterion, the activation energies associated with the conjugate addition decrease as a consequence of the increased nucleophilic character of enols and the increased electrophilic character of the 'acyl-azolium + Cl' ion pair. Analysis of the DFT reactivity indices allows establishing a base catalysed C-C bond-formation step promoted by the chloride counterion. PMID:24343422

  1. A DFT study on the NHC catalysed Michael addition of enols to α,β-unsaturated acyl-azoliums. A base catalysed C-C bond-formation step.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Sáez, José A; Arnó, Manuel

    2014-02-14

    The NHC catalysed nucleophilic additions of enols to α,β-unsaturated acyl-azolium intermediates have been investigated using DFT methods at the MPWB1K/6-31G** computational level. In the direct and the conjugate additions, formation of a hydrogen bond (HB) with the carboxyl oxygen is not sufficient to favour the C-C bond formation as a consequence of the low nucleophilic character of enols. Interestingly, when enols form a HB with the chloride counterion, the activation energies associated with the conjugate addition decrease as a consequence of the increased nucleophilic character of enols and the increased electrophilic character of the 'acyl-azolium + Cl' ion pair. Analysis of the DFT reactivity indices allows establishing a base catalysed C-C bond-formation step promoted by the chloride counterion.

  2. Rv2969c, essential for optimal growth in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a DsbA-like enzyme that interacts with VKOR-derived peptides and has atypical features of DsbA-like disulfide oxidases.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Heras, Begoña; Duprez, Wilko; Walden, Patricia; Halili, Maria; Kurth, Fabian; Fairlie, David P; Martin, Jennifer L

    2013-10-01

    The bacterial disulfide machinery is an attractive molecular target for developing new antibacterials because it is required for the production of multiple virulence factors. The archetypal disulfide oxidase proteins in Escherichia coli (Ec) are DsbA and DsbB, which together form a functional unit: DsbA introduces disulfides into folding proteins and DsbB reoxidizes DsbA to maintain it in the active form. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), no DsbB homologue is encoded but a functionally similar but structurally divergent protein, MtbVKOR, has been identified. Here, the Mtb protein Rv2969c is investigated and it is shown that it is the DsbA-like partner protein of MtbVKOR. It is found that it has the characteristic redox features of a DsbA-like protein: a highly acidic catalytic cysteine, a highly oxidizing potential and a destabilizing active-site disulfide bond. Rv2969c also has peptide-oxidizing activity and recognizes peptide segments derived from the periplasmic loops of MtbVKOR. Unlike the archetypal EcDsbA enzyme, Rv2969c has little or no activity in disulfide-reducing and disulfide-isomerase assays. The crystal structure of Rv2969c reveals a canonical DsbA fold comprising a thioredoxin domain with an embedded helical domain. However, Rv2969c diverges considerably from other DsbAs, including having an additional C-terminal helix (H8) that may restrain the mobility of the catalytic helix H1. The enzyme is also characterized by a very shallow hydrophobic binding surface and a negative electrostatic surface potential surrounding the catalytic cysteine. The structure of Rv2969c was also used to model the structure of a paralogous DsbA-like domain of the Ser/Thr protein kinase PknE. Together, these results show that Rv2969c is a DsbA-like protein with unique properties and a limited substrate-binding specificity.

  3. Tryparedoxins from Crithidia fasciculata and Trypanosoma brucei: photoreduction of the redox disulfide using synchrotron radiation and evidence for a conformational switch implicated in function.

    PubMed

    Alphey, Magnus S; Gabrielsen, Mads; Micossi, Elena; Leonard, Gordon A; McSweeney, Sean M; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Tetaud, Emmanuel; Fairlamb, Alan H; Bond, Charles S; Hunter, William N

    2003-07-11

    Tryparedoxin (TryX) is a member of the thioredoxin (TrX) fold family involved in the regulation of oxidative stress in parasitic trypanosomatids. Like TrX, TryX carries a characteristic Trp-Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Cys motif, which positions a redox-active disulfide underneath a tryptophan lid. We report the structure of a Crithidia fasciculata tryparedoxin isoform (CfTryX2) in two crystal forms and compare them with structures determined previously. Efforts to chemically generate crystals of reduced TryX1 were unsuccessful, and we carried out a novel experiment to break the redox-active disulfide, formed between Cys-40 and Cys-43, utilizing the intense x-radiation from a third generation synchrotron undulator beamline. A time course study of the S-S bond cleavage is reported with the structure of a TryX1 C43A mutant as the control. When freed from the constraints of a disulfide link to Cys-43, Cys-40 pivots to become slightly more solvent-accessible. In addition, we have determined the structure of Trypanosoma brucei TryX, which, influenced by the molecular packing in the crystal lattice, displays a significantly different orientation of the active site tryptophan lid. This structural change may be of functional significance when TryX interacts with tryparedoxin peroxidase, the final protein in the trypanothione-dependent peroxidase pathway. Comparisons with chloroplast TrX and its substrate fructose 1,6-bisphosphate phosphatase suggest that this movement may represent a general feature of redox regulation in the trypanothione and thioredoxin peroxidase pathways.

  4. Disulfide isomers of alpha-neurotoxins from King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom.

    PubMed

    Lin, S R; Chang, L S; Chang, C C

    1999-01-01

    Two novel alpha-neurotoxins, Oh-6A and Oh-6B, isolated from the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom, consist of 70 amino acid residues with 10 cysteine residues and share the same amino acid sequences as determined by Edman degradation on the peptide fragments generated from the proteolytic hydrolysates. Their sequences share 46-53% homology with Oh-4, Oh-5, Toxin a, and Toxin b from the same venom. The finding that Oh-6A and Oh-6B had different retention times in the reversed-phase column suggested that the two toxin molecules should not have the same conformation. Selective reduction on the disulfide bond, Cys26--Cys30, at the tip of their loop II structures resulted in the production of the partially reduced derivatives eluted at the same position. Under redox conditions, the partially reduced Oh-6A and 6B exclusively converted into native Oh-6A as evidenced by HPLC analyses. This suggests that Oh-6A and Oh-6B are disulfide isomers which probably arise from cis-trans isomerization of the Cys26--Cys30 disulfide bond. Alternatively, the two toxins exhibited binding activity toward nAChR and lethal toxicity equally. It reflects that the diversity around the extra loop at the loop II structure does not exert a significant effect on the manifestation of the neurotoxicity of Oh-6A and Oh-6B.

  5. Dehydrofluorination of Hydrofluorocarbons by Titanium Alkylidynes via Sequential C-H/C-F Bond Activation Reactions. A Synthetic, Structural, and Mechanistic Study of 1,2-CH Bond Addition and [beta]-Fluoride Elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Fout, A.R.; Scott, J.; Miller, D.L.; Bailey, B.C.; Pink, M.; Mindiola, D.J.

    2009-01-07

    The neopentylidene-neopentyl complex (PNP)Ti=CH{sup t}Bu(CH{sub 2}{sup t}Bu) (1); (PNP{sup -} = N[2-P(CHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-4-methylphenyl]{sub 2}) extrudes neopentane in neat fluorobenzene under mild conditions (25 C) to generate the transient titanium alkylidyne (PNP)Ti-C{sup t}Bu (A), which subsequently undergoes regioselective 1,2-CH bond addition of a fluorobenzene across the Ti-C linkage to generate (PNP)Ti=CH{sup t}Bu(o-FC{sub 6}H{sub 4}) (2). Kinetic and mechanistic studies suggest that the C-H activation process is pseudo-first-order in titanium, with the {alpha}-hydrogen abstraction being the rate-determining step and the post-rate-determining step being the C-H bond activation of fluorobenzene. At 100 C complex 2 does not equilibrate back to A and the preference for C-H activation in benzene versus fluorobenzene is 2:3, respectively. Compound 1 also reacts readily, and in most cases cleanly, with a series of hydrofluoroarenes (HAr{sub F}), to form a family of alkylidene-arylfluoride derivatives of the type (PNP)Ti=CH{sup t}Bu(Ar{sub F}). Thermolysis of the latter compounds generates the titanium alkylidene-fluoride (PNP)Ti=CH{sup t}Bu(F) (14) by a {beta}-fluoride elimination, concurrent with formation of o-benzyne. {beta}-Fluoride elimination to yield 14 occurs from 2 under elevated temperatures with k{sub average} = 4.96(16) x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} and with activation parameters {Delta}H{sub {-+}} = 29(1) kcal/mol and {Delta}S{sub {-+}} = -3(4) cal/mol {center_dot}K. It was found that {beta}-fluoride elimination is accelerated when electron-rich groups are adjacent to the fluoride group, thus implying that a positive charge buildup at the arylfluoride ring occurs in the activated complex of 2. The alkylidene derivative (PNP)Ti=CHSiMe{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3}) (15) also undergoes {alpha}-hydrogen abstraction to form the putative (PNP)Ti'-CSiMe{sub 3} (B) at higher temperatures (>70 C) and dehydrofluorinates the same series of HArF when the reaction

  6. "Additive" cooperativity of hydrogen bonds in complexes of catechol with proton acceptors in the gas phase: FTIR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A; Klimovitskii, Alexander E; Abaidullina, Dilyara I; Madzhidov, Timur I; Solomonov, Boris N

    2012-06-01

    Experimental study of hydrogen bond cooperativity in hetero-complexes in the gas phase was carried out by IR-spectroscopy method. Stretching vibration frequencies of O-H groups in phenol and catechol molecules as well as of their complexes with nitriles and ethers were determined in the gas phase using a specially designed cell. O-H groups experimental frequency shifts in the complexes of catechol induced by the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds are significantly higher than in the complexes of phenol due to the hydrogen bond cooperativity. It was shown that the cooperativity factors of hydrogen bonds in the complexes of catechol with nitriles and ethers in the gas phase are approximately the same. Quantum chemical calculations of the studied systems have been performed using density functional theory (DFT) methods. It was shown, that theoretically obtained cooperativity factors of hydrogen bonds in the complexes of catechol with proton acceptors are in good agreement with experimental values. Cooperative effects lead to a strengthening of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the complexes of catechol on about 30%, despite the significant difference in the proton acceptor ability of the bases. The analysis within quantum theory of atoms in molecules was carried out for the explanation of this fact.

  7. Transmembrane Signaling by the Aspartate Receptor: Engineered Disulfides Reveal Static Regions of the Subunit Interface†

    PubMed Central

    Chervitz, Stephen A.; Lin, Christina M.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Ligand binding to the periplasmic domain of the transmembrane aspartate receptor generates an intramolecular conformational change which spans the bilayer and ultimately signals the cytoplasmic CheA histidine kinase, thereby triggering chemotaxis. The receptor is a homodimer stabilized by the interface between its two identical subunits: the present study investigates the role of the periplasmic and transmembrane regions of this interface in the mechanism of transmembrane signaling. Free cysteines and disulfide bonds are engineered into selected interfacial positions, and the resulting effects on the transmembrane signal are assayed by monitoring in vitro regulation of kinase activity. Three of the 14 engineered cysteine pairs examined, as well as six of the 14 engineered disulfides, cause perturbations of the interface structure which essentially destroy transmembrane regulation of the kinase. The remaining 11 cysteine pairs, and eight engineered disulfides covalently linking the two subunits at locations spanning positions 18–75, are observed to retain significant transmembrane kinase regulation. The eight functional disulfides positively identify adjacent faces of the two N-terminal helices in the native receptor dimer and indicate that large regions of the periplasmic and transmembrane subunit interface remain effectively static during the transmembrane signal. The results are consistent with a model in which the subunit interface plays a structural role, while the second membrane-spanning helix transmits the ligand-induced signal across the bilayer to the kinase binding domain. The effects of engineered cysteines and disulfides on receptor methylation in vitro are also measured, enabling direct comparison of the in vitro methylation and phosphorylation assays. PMID:7626643

  8. Easy oxidative addition of the carbon-halogen bond by dimethylplatinum(II) complexes containing a related series of diimine ligands: Synthesis, spectral characterization and crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Badri Z.; Fathi, Nastaran; Mohagheghi, Arezoo

    2015-01-01

    Dimethylplatinum(II) complexes [PtMe2(NN)] {NN = 4,4‧-Me2bpy (4,4‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine); 5,5‧-Me2bpy (5,5‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine)} were reacted with alkyl halides (RX = EtI, EtBr) to yield the organoplatinum(IV) complexes [PtMe2RX(NN)]. On the basis of NMR data, the platinum(IV) product of each reaction contains almost exclusively the trans isomer but small traces of the cis isomers are also observed. On the other hand, the reaction of [PtMe2(NN)] {NN = bu2bpy (4,4‧-di-tert-butyl-2,2‧-bipyridine); 4,4‧-Me2bpy; 5,5‧-Me2bpy} with CH2Br2 gave a mixture of cis and trans-[PtMe2(CH2Br)Br(NN)] formed by the oxidative addition of one of the C-Br bonds. The formation of the cis isomer increases in the order of 5,5‧-Me2bpy > bu2bpy > 4,4‧-Me2bpy. The reaction of [PtMe2(NN)] {NN = bpy (2,2‧-bipyridine), phen (1,10-phenanthroline)} with 1,8-dibromooctane or 1,9-dibromononane afforded the mononuclear complexes [PtMe2{(CH2)nBr}Br(NN)] (n = 8-9). The products were fully characterized by elemental analysis, 1H, 13C, HH COSY, HMQC, DEPT and DEPTQ-135 NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of [PtMe2EtI(4,4‧-Me2bpy)] reveals that Pt(IV) atom is six-coordinated in a slightly distorted octahedral geometry with the ethyl group trans to iodide.

  9. Structure of yeast sulfhydryl oxidase erv1 reveals electron transfer of the disulfide relay system in the mitochondrial intermembrane space.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng-Chao; Ma, Jin-Di; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Wang, Shu-Jie; Bao, Zhang-Zhi; Yu, Xiao-Jie; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2012-10-12

    The disulfide relay system in the mitochondrial intermembrane space drives the import of proteins with twin CX(9)C or twin CX(3)C motifs by an oxidative folding mechanism. This process requires disulfide bond transfer from oxidized Mia40 to a substrate protein. Reduced Mia40 is reoxidized/regenerated by the FAD-linked sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1 (EC 1.8.3.2). Full-length Erv1 consists of a flexible N-terminal shuttle domain (NTD) and a conserved C-terminal core domain (CTD). Here, we present crystal structures at 2.0 Å resolution of the CTD and at 3.0 Å resolution of a C30S/C133S double mutant of full-length Erv1 (Erv1FL). Similar to previous homologous structures, the CTD exists as a homodimer, with each subunit consisting of a conserved four-helix bundle that accommodates the isoalloxazine ring of FAD and an additional single-turn helix. The structure of Erv1FL enabled us to identify, for the first time, the three-dimensional structure of the Erv1NTD, which is an amphipathic helix flanked by two flexible loops. This structure also represents an intermediate state of electron transfer from the NTD to the CTD of another subunit. Comparative structural analysis revealed that the four-helix bundle of the CTD forms a wide platform for the electron donor NTD. Moreover, computational simulation combined with multiple-sequence alignment suggested that the amphipathic helix close to the shuttle redox enter is critical for the recognition of Mia40, the upstream electron donor. These findings provide structural insights into electron transfer from Mia40 via the shuttle domain of one subunit of Erv1 to the CTD of another Erv1 subunit.

  10. The alkaline earth intercalates of molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.; Samson, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has been intercalated with calcium and strontium by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Chemical, X-ray, and superconductivity data are presented. The X-ray data reveal a lowering of crystal symmetry and increase of complexity of the structure upon intercalation with the alkaline earth metals. The Ca and Sr intercalates start to superconduct at 4 and 5.6 K, respectively, and show considerable anisotropy regarding the critical magnetic field.

  11. Lithium/disulfide cells capable of long cycle life

    SciTech Connect

    Kaun, T.D.; Holifield, T.F.; DeLuca, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    The lithium-alloy/disulfide cell has undergone improvements to provide a very stable, high performance upper-plateau (UP) FeS/sub 2/ electrode. Prismatic UP FeS/sub 2/ cell tests (12--24 Ah capacity) with a LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic electrolyte have demonstrated 1000 deep discharge cycles at 400/degree/C with less than a 20% drop in capacity and without reduced power capability. Previous lithium-alloy/disulfide cells, which were based on a two voltage-plateau FeS/sub 2/ electrode and LiCl-KCl eutectic electrolyte had a life expectancy of only 100 cycles. Both time- and cycle-related capacity loss mechanisms have been eliminated with the improved cell design. In addition, new cell design features of overcharge tolerance and overdischarge safeguarding enhance battery durability. The performance prospects of a Li-alloy/UP FeS/sub 2/ battery for an IDSEP van application are discussed. A specific energy of 150 Wh/kg for this battery after 1000 cycles of operation is projected. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Lithium/disulfide cells capable of long cycle life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaun, T. D.; Holifield, T. F.; Deluca, W. H.

    The lithium-alloy/disulfide cell has undergone improvements to provide a very stable, high performance Upper-Plateau (UP) FeS2 electrode. Prismatic UP FeS2 cell tests (12 to 24 Ah capacity) with a LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic electrolyte have demonstrated 1000 deep discharge cycles at 400 C with less than a 20 percent drop in capacity and without reduced power capability. Previous lithium-alloy/disulfide cells, which were based on a two voltage-plateau FeS2 electrode and LiCl-KCl eutectic electrolyte had a life expectancy of only 100 cycles. Both time- and cycle-related capacity loss mechanisms have been eliminated with the improved cell design. In addition, new cell design features of overcharge tolerance and overdischarge safeguarding enhance battery durability. The performance prospects of a Li-alloy/UP FeS2 battery for an IDSEP van application are discussed. A specific energy of 150 Wh/kg for this battery after 1000 cycles of operation is projected.

  13. Functional Differences in Yeast Protein Disulfide Isomerases

    PubMed Central

    Nørgaard, Per; Westphal, Vibeke; Tachibana, Christine; Alsøe, Lene; Holst, Bjørn; Winther, Jakob R.

    2001-01-01

    PDI1 is the essential gene encoding protein disulfide isomerase in yeast. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, however, contains four other nonessential genes with homology to PDI1: MPD1, MPD2, EUG1, and EPS1. We have investigated the effects of simultaneous deletions of these genes. In several cases, we found that the ability of the PDI1 homologues to restore viability to a pdi1-deleted strain when overexpressed was dependent on the presence of low endogenous levels of one or more of the other homologues. This shows that the homologues are not functionally interchangeable. In fact, Mpd1p was the only homologue capable of carrying out all the essential functions of Pdi1p. Furthermore, the presence of endogenous homologues with a CXXC motif in the thioredoxin-like domain is required for suppression of a pdi1 deletion by EUG1 (which contains two CXXS active site motifs). This underlines the essentiality of protein disulfide isomerase-catalyzed oxidation. Most mutant combinations show defects in carboxypeptidase Y folding as well as in glycan modification. There are, however, no significant effects on ER-associated protein degradation in the various protein disulfide isomerase-deleted strains. PMID:11157982

  14. The nature of the bond between peptide and carrier molecule determines the immunogenicity of the construct.

    PubMed

    Beekman, N J; Schaaper, W M; Langeveld, J P; Boshuizen, R S; Meloen, R H

    2001-09-01

    The influence of the nature of the bond between a peptide and a (lipidic) carrier molecule on the immunogenicity of that construct was investigated. As types of bonds a thioester-, a disulfide-, an amide- and a thioether bond were investigated. As carrier molecules a peptide, an N-palmitoylated peptide or a C(16)-hydrocarbon chain were used. The biostability of the bond between peptide and carrier molecule is thioether > amide > disulfide > thioester. However, the immunogenic potency of the constructs used was found to be thioester > disulfide > amide > thioether. In conclusion, a construct with a bond between peptide and (lipidic) carrier molecule that is more susceptible to biological degradation is more immunogenic when used in a peptide-based vaccine than a bond that is less susceptible to biological degradation. PMID:11576330

  15. Disulfide assignment of the C-terminal cysteine knot of agouti-related protein (AGRP) by direct sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Young, Y; Zeni, L; Rosenfeld, R D; Stark, K L; Rohde, M F; Haniu, M

    1999-12-01

    We have assigned the disulfide structure of Md-65 agouti-related protein (Md65-AGRP) using differential reduction and alkylation followed by direct sequencing analysis. The mature human AGRP is a single polypeptide chain of 112 amino acid residues, consisting of an N-terminal acidic region and a unique C-terminal cysteine-rich domain. The C-terminal domain, a 48 amino acid peptide named Md65-AGRP, was expressed in Escherichia coil cells and refolded under different conditions from the mature recombinant protein. The disulfide bonds in the cystine knot structure of Md65-AGRP were partially reduced using tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (TCEP) under acidic conditions, followed by alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). The procedure generated several isoforms with varying degrees of NEM alkylation. The multiple forms of Md65-AGRP generated by partial reduction and NEM modification were then completely reduced and carboxymethylated to identify unreactive disulfide bonds. Differentially labeled Md65-AGRP were directly sequenced and analyzed by MALDI mass spectrometry. The results confirmed that Md65-AGRP contained the same disulfide structure as that of Md5-AGRP reported previously [Bures, E. J., Hui, J. O., Young, Y. et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 12172-12177].

  16. A Tin(IV) Chloride Promoted Tandem C-O Bond Cleavage/Nazarov Cyclization/Nucleophilic Addition Reaction of 1,1-Disubstituted Allylic Ethers toward the Synthesis of Multisubstituted Indenes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Xu, Zheng-Liang; Shao, Hui; Mou, Xue-Qing; Wang, Jie; Wang, Shao-Hua

    2015-11-01

    A novel SnCl4-promoted tandem reaction toward multisubstituted indenes via a sequential C-O bond cleavage/Nazarov cyclization/nucleophilic addition reaction has been developed to afford a series of multisubstituted indenes with an all-carbon quaternary center in moderate to good yields. PMID:26465205

  17. Structure of transition-metal cluster compounds: Use of an additional orbital resulting from the f, g character of spd bond orbitals*

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus

    1977-01-01

    A general theory of the structure of complexes of the transition metals is developed on the basis of the enneacovalence of the metals and the requirements of the electroneutrality principle. An extra orbital may be provided through the small but not negligible amount of f and g character of spd bond orbitals, and an extra electron or electron pair may be accepted in this orbital for a single metal or a cluster to neutralize the positive electric charge resulting from the partial ionic character of the bonds with ligands, such as the carbonyl group. Examples of cluster compounds of cobalt, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, and gold are discussed. PMID:16592470

  18. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  19. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  20. Prokaryotic soluble overexpression and purification of bioactive human growth hormone by fusion to thioredoxin, maltose binding protein, and protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Tan; Koo, Bon-Kyung; Thi Vu, Thu Trang; Song, Jung-A; Chong, Seon-Ha; Jeong, Boram; Ryu, Han-Bong; Moh, Sang-Hyun; Choe, Han

    2014-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is synthesized by somatotroph cells of the anterior pituitary gland and induces cell proliferation and growth. This protein has been approved for the treatment of various conditions, including hGH deficiency, chronic renal failure, and Turner syndrome. Efficient production of hGH in Escherichia coli (E. coli) has proven difficult because the E. coli-expressed hormone tends to aggregate and form inclusion bodies, resulting in poor solubility. In this study, seven N-terminal fusion partners, hexahistidine (His6), thioredoxin (Trx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), maltose-binding protein (MBP), N-utilization substance protein A (NusA), protein disulfide bond isomerase (PDI), and the b'a' domain of PDI (PDIb'a'), were tested for soluble overexpression of codon-optimized hGH in E. coli. We found that MBP and hPDI tags significantly increased the solubility of the hormone. In addition, lowering the expression temperature to 18°C also dramatically increased the solubility of all the fusion proteins. We purified hGH from MBP-, PDIb'a'-, or Trx-tagged hGH expressed at 18°C in E. coli using simple chromatographic techniques and compared the final purity, yield, and activity of hGH to assess the impact of each partner protein. Purified hGH was highly pure on silver-stained gel and contained very low levels of endotoxin. On average, ∼37 mg, ∼12 mg, and ∼7 mg of hGH were obtained from 500 mL-cell cultures of Trx-hGH, MBP-hGH, and PDIb'a'-hGH, respectively. Subsequently, hGH was analyzed using mass spectroscopy to confirm the presence of two intra-molecular disulfide bonds. The bioactivity of purified hGHs was demonstrated using Nb2-11 cell.

  1. Prokaryotic soluble overexpression and purification of bioactive human growth hormone by fusion to thioredoxin, maltose binding protein, and protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Tan; Koo, Bon-Kyung; Thi Vu, Thu Trang; Song, Jung-A; Chong, Seon-Ha; Jeong, Boram; Ryu, Han-Bong; Moh, Sang-Hyun; Choe, Han

    2014-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is synthesized by somatotroph cells of the anterior pituitary gland and induces cell proliferation and growth. This protein has been approved for the treatment of various conditions, including hGH deficiency, chronic renal failure, and Turner syndrome. Efficient production of hGH in Escherichia coli (E. coli) has proven difficult because the E. coli-expressed hormone tends to aggregate and form inclusion bodies, resulting in poor solubility. In this study, seven N-terminal fusion partners, hexahistidine (His6), thioredoxin (Trx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), maltose-binding protein (MBP), N-utilization substance protein A (NusA), protein disulfide bond isomerase (PDI), and the b'a' domain of PDI (PDIb'a'), were tested for soluble overexpression of codon-optimized hGH in E. coli. We found that MBP and hPDI tags significantly increased the solubility of the hormone. In addition, lowering the expression temperature to 18°C also dramatically increased the solubility of all the fusion proteins. We purified hGH from MBP-, PDIb'a'-, or Trx-tagged hGH expressed at 18°C in E. coli using simple chromatographic techniques and compared the final purity, yield, and activity of hGH to assess the impact of each partner protein. Purified hGH was highly pure on silver-stained gel and contained very low levels of endotoxin. On average, ∼37 mg, ∼12 mg, and ∼7 mg of hGH were obtained from 500 mL-cell cultures of Trx-hGH, MBP-hGH, and PDIb'a'-hGH, respectively. Subsequently, hGH was analyzed using mass spectroscopy to confirm the presence of two intra-molecular disulfide bonds. The bioactivity of purified hGHs was demonstrated using Nb2-11 cell. PMID:24614134

  2. Supramolecular polymerisation in water; elucidating the role of hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond interactions† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, characterization by IR and UV spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering, video files of optical microscopy imaging. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sm02843d Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Leenders, Christianus M. A.; Baker, Matthew B.; Pijpers, Imke A. B.; Lafleur, René P. M.; Albertazzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the self-assembly of small molecules in water is crucial for the development of responsive, biocompatible soft materials. Here, a family of benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivatives that comprise a BTA moiety connected to an amphiphilic chain is synthesised with the aim to elucidate the role of hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions in the self-assembly of these BTAs. The amphiphilic chain consists of an alkyl chain with a length of 10, 11, or 12 methylene units, connected to a tetraethylene glycol (at the periphery). The results show that an undecyl spacer is the minimum length required for these BTAs to self-assemble into supramolecular polymers. Interestingly, exchange studies reveal only minor differences in exchange rates between BTAs containing undecyl or dodecyl spacers. Additionally, IR spectroscopy provides the first experimental evidence that hydrogen-bonding is operative and contributes to the stabilisation of the supramolecular polymers in water. PMID:26892482

  3. Copper(i) chloride promoted Csp(2)-N cross-coupling of 1,2-di(pyrimidin-2-yl) disulfides with amines: an efficient approach to obtain C2-amino functionalized pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai-Jie; Quan, Zheng-jun; Zhang, Zhang; Da, Yu-xia; Wang, Xi-cun

    2016-02-28

    The copper(i)-promoted cross-coupling of 1,2-di(pyrimidin-2-yl) disulfides with aromatic amines and aliphatic amines to deliver C-N coupling products in moderate to good yields is reported in this paper. Central to this strategy is the conversion of disulfides into aryl- and alkyl amines by a copper-promoted chemoselective C-S bond cleavage. PMID:26821885

  4. Reduction of disulfide bridges in the lumenal domain of ATF6 in response to glucose starvation.

    PubMed

    Nadanaka, Satomi; Yoshida, Hiderou; Mori, Kazutoshi

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian transcription factor ATF6 is constitutively synthesized as a type II transmembrane protein embedded in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Upon ER stress ATF6 is transported to the Golgi apparatus where it is cleaved to release its cytoplasmic domain. This is then translocated into the nucleus where it activates transcription of ER-localized molecular chaperones and folding enzymes to maintain the homeostasis of the ER. We recently found that, owing to the presence of intra- and intermolecular disulfide bridges, ATF6 occurs in unstressed ER in monomer, dimer and oligomer forms. Disulfide-bonded ATF6 is reduced on treatment of cells with various chemical ER stress inducers, and only the reduced monomer ATF6 reaches the Golgi apparatus. In this study, we evoked ER stress under more physiological conditions, namely, glucose starvation, and analyzed its consequence for ATF6 activation. Glucose starvation activated ATF6 and induced the ER chaperone BiP, albeit weakly. ATF6 was thus dissociated from BiP, transported to the Golgi apparatus, and cleaved. Glucose starvation enhanced the synthesis of ATF6 approximately two-fold, probably via transcriptional induction. Importantly, reduction of disulfide bridges and transport of reduced monomer occurred in response to glucose starvation. We conclude that ER stress-induced reduction of ATF6 represents a general feature of the ATF6 activation process. PMID:17130669

  5. Protein disulfide isomerase-immunopositive inclusions in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Honjo, Yasuyuki; Kaneko, Satoshi; Ito, Hidefumi; Horibe, Tomohisa; Nagashima, Masato; Nakamura, Masataka; Fujita, Kengo; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Kawakami, Koji

    2011-11-01

    The major pathological hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) and swollen neurites. Superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1-immunopositive NCIs are observed in patients with familial ALS (FALS), and TAR DNA-binding protein 43kDa (TDP-43)-immunopositive NCIs are found in patients with sporadic ALS (SALS). Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a member of the thioredoxin superfamily and is believed to accelerate the folding of disulfide-bonded proteins by catalyzing the disulfide interchange reaction, which is the rate-limiting step during protein folding in the luminal space of the endoplasmic reticulum. Post mortem spinal cord specimens from five patients with SALS and one with FALS (I113T), and five normal controls were utilized in this immunohistochemical study. We found PDI-immunopositive swollen neurites and NCIs in the patients with ALS. Furthermore, PDI was colocalized with TDP-43 and SOD1 in NCIs. The accumulation of misfolding proteins may disturb axon transport and make swollen neurites. As the motor neuron is the longest cell in the nervous system, the motor system may selectively be disturbed. In conclusion, we assume that PDI is S-nitrosylated in the affected neurons, which inhibits its enzymatic activity and thus allows protein misfolding to occur in ALS. PMID:21745122

  6. Giant magnetic anisotropy in doped single layer molybdenum disulfide and fluorographene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivek, J.; Sahin, H.; Partoens, B.; Peeters, F. M.

    2016-05-01

    Stable monolayer materials based on existing, well known and stable two-dimensional crystal fluorographene and molybdenum disulfide are predicted to exhibit a huge magnetocrystalline anisotropy when functionalized with adsorbed transition metal atoms at vacant sides. Ab initio calculations within the density-functional theory formalism were performed to investigate the adsorption of the transitional metals in a single S (or F) vacancy of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (or fluorographene). We found strong bonding of the transitional metal atoms to the vacant sites with binding energies ranging from 2.5 to 5.2 eV. Our calculations revealed that these systems with adsorbed metal atoms exhibit a magnetic anisotropy, specifically the structures including Os and Ir show a giant magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of 31-101 meV. Our results demonstrate the possibility of obtaining stable monolayer materials with huge magnetocrystalline anisotropy based on preexisting, well known and stable two-dimensional crystals: fluorographene and molybdenum disulfide. We believe that the results obtained here are useful not only for deeper understanding of the origin of magnetocrystalline anisotropy but also for the design of monolayer optoelectronic devices with novel functionalities.

  7. Giant magnetic anisotropy in doped single layer molybdenum disulfide and fluorographene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivek, J.; Sahin, H.; Partoens, B.; Peeters, F. M.

    2016-05-01

    Stable monolayer materials based on existing, well known and stable two-dimensional crystal fluorographene and molybdenum disulfide are predicted to exhibit a huge magnetocrystalline anisotropy when functionalized with adsorbed transition metal atoms at vacant sides. Ab initio calculations within the density-functional theory formalism were performed to investigate the adsorption of the transitional metals in a single S (or F) vacancy of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (or fluorographene). We found strong bonding of the transitional metal atoms to the vacant sites with binding energies ranging from 2.5 to 5.2 eV. Our calculations revealed that these systems with adsorbed metal atoms exhibit a magnetic anisotropy, specifically the structures including Os and Ir show a giant magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of 31–101 meV. Our results demonstrate the possibility of obtaining stable monolayer materials with huge magnetocrystalline anisotropy based on preexisting, well known and stable two-dimensional crystals: fluorographene and molybdenum disulfide. We believe that the results obtained here are useful not only for deeper understanding of the origin of magnetocrystalline anisotropy but also for the design of monolayer optoelectronic devices with novel functionalities.

  8. Biocompatible thermoresponsive PEGMA nanoparticles crosslinked with cleavable disulfide-based crosslinker for dual drug release.

    PubMed

    Ulasan, Mehmet; Yavuz, Emine; Bagriacik, Emin Umit; Cengeloglu, Yunus; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman

    2015-01-01

    Smart materials have been attracting much attention because of their stimuli responsive nature. We have synthesized biocompatible thermoresponsive crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA)-co-vinyl pyrrolidone nanoparticles (PEGMA NPs) using disulfide-based crosslinker by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization method. Particle characterization studies were carried out by dynamic light scattering, and scanning electron microscopy. Polymerization kinetics, effect of crosslinker and initiator concentrations on both average hydrodynamic diameter and polydispersity index were investigated. Hydrodynamic diameters of thermoresponsive PEGMA NPs were decreased from 210 nm to 90 nm upon heating over the lowest critical solution temperature (LCST). Disulfide crosslinked PEGMA NPs were demonstrated as a dual delivery system. Rhodamine B, a model of small-sized drug molecule, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-alizarin yellow, a model of large drug molecule, were loaded into PEGMA NPs where LCST of these NPs was tuned to 37°C, the body temperature. The rhodamine B was released from PEGMA NPs upon heating to 39°C. Then, PEG-alizarin content was released by subsequent degradation of nanoparticles using dithiothreitol (DTT), which reduces disulfide bonds to thiols. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies of PEGMA NPs were carried out in 3T3 cells, which resulted in no toxic effect on the cells.

  9. Self-Immolative Linkers Literally Bridge Disulfide Chemistry and the Realm of Thiol-Free Drugs.

    PubMed

    Riber, Camilla Frich; Smith, Anton A A; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2015-08-26

    The ultimate goal of controlled, intracellulardrug delivery is to get the drug to the target cell without spilling the contents in transit and then release the entire payload upon cell entry. One of the most powerful platforms to achieve this relies on the intracellular disulfide reshuffling as a trigger for drug release form the engineered prodrugs. However, utility of disulfide reshuffling for drug release is naturally applicable only to the thiol containing molecules-ultimately leaving nearly all commercialized drugs beyond the scope of this platform. This is a drastic limitation. A cunning new tool of organic chemistry is fast entering the mainstream of prodrug design: the self-immolative linkers. This platform allows overcoming the natural chemical barrier and makes it possible to link virtually any drug to its carrier via a disulfide bond and engineer a specific intracellular release. It is a game-changing accomplishment of modern organic chemistry. The scope and limitations of this novel opportunity for medicinal chemistry and nanomedicine are outlined.

  10. Identification of disulfide cross-linked tau dimer responsible for tau propagation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohee; Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md. Mamunul; Ryoo, Nayeon; Hong, Hyun Seok; Rhim, Hyewhon; Lee, Dong-Eun; Chang, Young-Tae; Lee, Jun-Seok; Cheong, Eunji; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that tau aggregates are not only neurotoxic, but also propagate in neurons acting as a seed for native tau aggregation. Prion-like tau transmission is now considered as an important pathogenic mechanism driving the progression of tau pathology in the brain. However, prion-like tau species have not been clearly characterized. To identify infectious tau conformers, here we prepared diverse tau aggregates and evaluated the effect on inducing intracellular tau-aggregation. Among tested, tau dimer containing P301L-mutation is identified as the most infectious form to induce tau pathology. Biochemical analysis reveals that P301L-tau dimer is covalently cross-linked with a disulfide bond. The relatively small and covalently cross-linked tau dimer induced tau pathology efficiently in primary neurons and also in tau-transgenic mice. So far, the importance of tau disulfide cross-linking has been overlooked in the study of tau pathology. Here our results suggested that tau disulfide cross-linking might play critical role in tau propagation by producing structurally stable and small tau conformers. PMID:26470054

  11. Disulfide connectivity and reduction in pheromone-binding proteins of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honson, Nicolette S.; Plettner, Erika

    2006-06-01

    Males of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, are attracted by a pheromone released by females. Pheromones are detected by olfactory neurons housed in specialized sensory hairs located on the antennae of the male moth. Once pheromone molecules enter the sensilla lymph, a highly abundant pheromone-binding protein (PBP) transports the molecule to the sensory neuron. The PBPs are members of the insect odorant-binding protein family, with six conserved cysteine residues. In this study, the disulfide bond connectivities of the pheromone-binding proteins PBP1 and PBP2 from the gypsy moth were found to be cysteines 19-54, 50-109, and 97-118 for PBP1, and cysteines 19-54, 50-110, and 97-119 for PBP2, as determined by cyanylation reactions and cyanogen bromide chemical cleavage. We have discovered that the second disulfide linkage is the most easily reduced of the three, and this same linkage is missing among four cysteine-containing insect odorant-binding proteins (OBPs). We are the first to identify the unique steric and electronic properties of this second disulfide linkage.

  12. Disulfide connectivity and reduction in pheromone-binding proteins of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar.

    PubMed

    Honson, Nicolette S; Plettner, Erika

    2006-06-01

    Males of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, are attracted by a pheromone released by females. Pheromones are detected by olfactory neurons housed in specialized sensory hairs located on the antennae of the male moth. Once pheromone molecules enter the sensilla lymph, a highly abundant pheromone-binding protein (PBP) transports the molecule to the sensory neuron. The PBPs are members of the insect odorant-binding protein family, with six conserved cysteine residues. In this study, the disulfide bond connectivities of the pheromone-binding proteins PBP1 and PBP2 from the gypsy moth were found to be cysteines 19-54, 50-109, and 97-118 for PBP1, and cysteines 19-54, 50-110, and 97-119 for PBP2, as determined by cyanylation reactions and cyanogen bromide chemical cleavage. We have discovered that the second disulfide linkage is the most easily reduced of the three, and this same linkage is missing among four cysteine-containing insect odorant-binding proteins (OBPs). We are the first to identify the unique steric and electronic properties of this second disulfide linkage.

  13. Photoinduced Cross-Linking of Dynamic Poly(disulfide) Films via Thiol Oxidative Coupling.

    PubMed

    Feillée, Noémi; Chemtob, Abraham; Ley, Christian; Croutxé-Barghorn, Céline; Allonas, Xavier; Ponche, Arnaud; Le Nouen, Didier; Majjad, Hicham; Jacomine, Léandro

    2016-01-01

    Initially developed as an elastomer with an excellent record of barrier and chemical resistance properties, poly(disulfide) has experienced a revival linked to the dynamic nature of the S-S covalent bond. A novel photobase-catalyzed oxidative polymerization of multifunctional thiols to poly(disulfide) network is reported. Based solely on air oxidation, the single-step process is triggered by the photodecarboxylation of a xanthone acetic acid liberating a strong bicyclic guanidine base. Starting with a 1 μm thick film based on trithiol poly(ethylene oxide) oligomer, the UV-mediated oxidation of thiols to disulfides occurs in a matter of minutes both selectively, i.e., without overoxidation, and quantitatively as assessed by a range of spectroscopic techniques. Thiolate formation and film thickness determine the reaction rates and yield. Spatial control of the photopolymerization serves to generate robust micropatterns, while the reductive cleavage of S-S bridges allows the recycling of 40% of the initial thiol groups. PMID:26502361

  14. Engineering of betabellin 14D: disulfide-induced folding of a beta-sheet protein.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Y.; Erickson, B. W.

    1994-01-01

    The betabellin target structure consists of 2 32-residue beta sheets packed against each other by hydrophobic interactions. We have designed, chemically synthesized, and biophysically characterized betabellin 14S, a single chain, and betabellin 14D, the disulfide-bridged double chain. The 32-residue nongenetic betabellin-14 chain (HSLTASIkaLTIHVQakTATCQVkaYTVHISE, a = D-Ala, k = D-Lys) has a palindromic pattern of polar (p), nonpolar (n), end (e), and beta-turn (t,r) residues (epnpnpnttnpnpnprrpnpnpnttnpnpnpe). Each half contains the same 14-residue palindromic pattern (underlined). Pairs of D-amino acid residues are used to favor formation of inverse-common (type-I') beta turns. In water at pH 6.5, the single chain of betabellin 14S is not folded, but the disulfide-linked betabellin 14D is folded into a stable beta-sheet structure. Thus, folding of the covalent dimer beta-bellin 14D is induced by formation of the single interchain disulfide bond. The binary pattern of alternating polar and nonpolar residues of its beta-sheets is not sufficient to induce folding. Betabellin 14D is a very water-soluble (10 mg/mL), small (64 residues), nongenetic (12 D residues) beta-sheet protein with properties (well-dispersed proton NMR resonances; Tm = 58 degrees C and delta Hm = 106 kcal/mol at pH 5.5) like those of a native protein structure. PMID:7920252

  15. The role of the plasma membrane and a non-lysosomal compartment in the disulfide cleavage of endocytosed macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Feener, E.P.

    1990-01-01

    The cleavage of disulfide bonds in endocytosed macromolecules was investigated using new disulfide containing macromolecular conjugates. A conjugate, in which ({sup 125}I-tyr) was linked to the nondegradable macromolecular carrier poly D-lysine (PDL) through a disulfide spacer ({sup 125}I-tyr-SS-PDL), was used to monitor disulfide cleavage in adsorptive endocytosis in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Reductive cleavage of this probe released 3-thiopropionyl-{sup 125} {sup 125}I-tyramine, measurable as acid soluble radioactivity. In pulse experiments, reductive cleavage of {sup 125}I-tyr-SS-PDL differed in its kinetics from the proteolysis of {sup 125}I-labeled Poly L-lysine. Proteolytic degradation began after a 15 to 30 min lag, i.e. the time required for transport of poly(lysine) to heavy lysosomes, while reductive cleavage increased linearly between 0 and 15 min. In the first hour of chase, proteolytic and reductive cleavage amounted to 30% and 7% of the total cell bound radioactivity, respectively. The reductive cleavage observed during the first 30 min of chase was inhibited by 80-90% with cell impermeant sulfhydryl reagents (dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and p-chloromercuriphenyl-sulfonate), which indicated that cleavage occurred at the cell surface. In contrast, disulfide cleavage observed after 1 hr chase was not significantly inhibited by these reagents and, therefore, resulted from an intracellular process. Subcellular fractionation demonstrated that lysosomes could be excluded as a site of disulfide cleavage, but that a subcellular fraction characterized by a buoyant density of 1.03g/ml was associated with the cleavage of {sup 125}I-tyr-SS-PDL. Of the relevant structures which constitute this subcellular fraction, early endosomes and plasma membrane could be excluded as the reducing structures on the basis of kinetic considerations.

  16. Template synthesis and characterization of molybdenum disulfide nanotubules

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dongbo; Feng, Yi; Zhu, Yanfang; Zhang, Xuebin; Li, Bin; Liu, Huiqiang

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: The image is a SEM image of branched MoS{sub 2} nanotubes, which are prepared in AAO templates. It is obvious to observe the branch of MoS{sub 2} nanotubes (labeled by arrows), and it reflects the microcosmic morphologies of pores in templates. Highlights: {yields} Large quantities of hollow MoS2 tubules. {yields} Explanation for the formation of branched shape. {yields} Explanation for the morphology of bamboo-like structure. -- Abstract: Molybdenum disulfide nanotubules were prepared by thermal decomposition of ammonium thiomolybdate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}MoS{sub 4}) precursors on anodized aluminum oxide template. Large quantities of hollow MoS{sub 2} nanotubules with the bamboo-like structure were obtained. The morphology and structures of MoS{sub 2} tubules were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron diffraction and optical absorption spectroscopy. MoS{sub 2} nanotubules completely reflected the three-dimensional structure of nanopores in template. The properties of Mo-S chemical bonds in lattice structure and the wetting state between porous surface and precursor have a great effect on the formation of sections in nanotubules, the ridges in the nanopores also play a very special role of this formation.

  17. Formation and stability of point defects in monolayer rhenium disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horzum, S.; ćakır, D.; Suh, J.; Tongay, S.; Huang, Y.-S.; Ho, C.-H.; Wu, J.; Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-04-01

    Recently, rhenium disulfide (ReS2) monolayers were experimentally extracted by conventional mechanical exfoliation technique from as-grown ReS2 crystals. Unlike the well-known members of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), ReS2 crystallizes in a stable distorted-1T structure and lacks an indirect to direct gap crossover. Here we present an experimental and theoretical study of the formation, energetics, and stability of the most prominent lattice defects in monolayer ReS2. Experimentally, irradiation with 3-MeV He+2 ions was used to break the strong covalent bonds in ReS2 flakes. Photoluminescence measurements showed that the luminescence from monolayers is mostly unchanged after highly energetic α particle irradiation. In order to understand the energetics of possible vacancies in ReS2 we performed systematic first-principles calculations. Our calculations revealed that the formation of a single sulfur vacancy has the lowest formation energy in both Re and S rich conditions and a random distribution of such defects are energetically more preferable. Sulfur point defects do not result in any spin polarization whereas the creation of Re-containing point defects induce magnetization with a net magnetic moment of 1-3μB. Experimentally observed easy formation of sulfur vacancies is in good agreement with first-principles calculations.

  18. High Throughput Quantitative Expression Screening and Purification Applied to Recombinant Disulfide-rich Venom Proteins Produced in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Natalie J.; Nozach, Hervé; Blemont, Marilyne; Vincentelli, Renaud

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most widely used expression system for the production of recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. However, purifying proteins is sometimes challenging since many proteins are expressed in an insoluble form. When working with difficult or multiple targets it is therefore recommended to use high throughput (HTP) protein expression screening on a small scale (1-4 ml cultures) to quickly identify conditions for soluble expression. To cope with the various structural genomics programs of the lab, a quantitative (within a range of 0.1-100 mg/L culture of recombinant protein) and HTP protein expression screening protocol was implemented and validated on thousands of proteins. The protocols were automated with the use of a liquid handling robot but can also be performed manually without specialized equipment. Disulfide-rich venom proteins are gaining increasing recognition for their potential as therapeutic drug leads. They can be highly potent and selective, but their complex disulfide bond networks make them challenging to produce. As a member of the FP7 European Venomics project (www.venomics.eu), our challenge is to develop successful production strategies with the aim of producing thousands of novel venom proteins for functional characterization. Aided by the redox properties of disulfide bond isomerase DsbC, we adapted our HTP production pipeline for the expression of oxidized, functional venom peptides in the E. coli cytoplasm. The protocols are also applicable to the production of diverse disulfide-rich proteins. Here we demonstrate our pipeline applied to the production of animal venom proteins. With the protocols described herein it is likely that soluble disulfide-rich proteins will be obtained in as little as a week. Even from a small scale, there is the potential to use the purified proteins for validating the oxidation state by mass spectrometry, for characterization in pilot studies, or for sensitive

  19. High throughput quantitative expression screening and purification applied to recombinant disulfide-rich venom proteins produced in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Saez, Natalie J; Nozach, Hervé; Blemont, Marilyne; Vincentelli, Renaud

    2014-07-30

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most widely used expression system for the production of recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. However, purifying proteins is sometimes challenging since many proteins are expressed in an insoluble form. When working with difficult or multiple targets it is therefore recommended to use high throughput (HTP) protein expression screening on a small scale (1-4 ml cultures) to quickly identify conditions for soluble expression. To cope with the various structural genomics programs of the lab, a quantitative (within a range of 0.1-100 mg/L culture of recombinant protein) and HTP protein expression screening protocol was implemented and validated on thousands of proteins. The protocols were automated with the use of a liquid handling robot but can also be performed manually without specialized equipment. Disulfide-rich venom proteins are gaining increasing recognition for their potential as therapeutic drug leads. They can be highly potent and selective, but their complex disulfide bond networks make them challenging to produce. As a member of the FP7 European Venomics project (www.venomics.eu), our challenge is to develop successful production strategies with the aim of producing thousands of novel venom proteins for functional characterization. Aided by the redox properties of disulfide bond isomerase DsbC, we adapted our HTP production pipeline for the expression of oxidized, functional venom peptides in the E. coli cytoplasm. The protocols are also applicable to the production of diverse disulfide-rich proteins. Here we demonstrate our pipeline applied to the production of animal venom proteins. With the protocols described herein it is likely that soluble disulfide-rich proteins will be obtained in as little as a week. Even from a small scale, there is the potential to use the purified proteins for validating the oxidation state by mass spectrometry, for characterization in pilot studies, or for sensitive

  20. Conformational difference in human IgG2 disulfide isoforms revealed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aming; Fang, Jing; Chou, Robert Y-T; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Zhang, Zhongqi

    2015-03-17

    Both recombinant and natural human IgG2 antibodies have several different disulfide bond isoforms, which possess different global structures, thermal stabilities, and biological activities. A detailed mapping of the structural difference among IgG2 disulfide isoforms, however, has not been established. In this work, we employed hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to study the conformation of three major IgG2 disulfide isoforms known as IgG2-B, IgG2-A1, and IgG2-A2 in two recombinant human IgG2 monoclonal antibodies. By comparing the protection factors between amino acid residues in isoforms B and A1 (the classical form), we successfully identified several local regions in which the IgG2-B isoform showed more solvent protection than the IgG2-A1 isoform. On the basis of three-dimensional structural models of IgG2, these identified regions were located on the Fab domains, close to the hinge, centered on the side where the two Fab arms faced each other in spatial proximity. We speculated that in the more solvent-protected B isoform, the two Fab arms were brought into contact by the nonclassical disulfide bonds, resulting in a more compact global structure. Loss of Fab domain flexibility in IgG2-B could limit its ability to access cell-surface epitopes, leading to reduced antigen binding potency. The A2 isoform was previously found to have disulfide linkages similar to those of the classical A1 isoform, but with different biophysical behaviors. Our data indicated that, compared to IgG2-A1, IgG2-A2 had less solvent protection in some heavy-chain Fab regions close the hinge, suggesting that the A2 isoform had more flexible Fab domains. PMID:25730439

  1. Cooperative Protein Folding by Two Protein Thiol Disulfide Oxidoreductases and ERO1 in Soybean1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Aya; Masuda, Taro; Koishihara, Katsunori; Mita, Ryuta; Iwasaki, Kensuke; Hara, Kumiko; Naruo, Yurika; Hirose, Akiho; Tsuchi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells fold via disulfide formation (oxidative folding). Oxidative folding is catalyzed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and PDI-related ER protein thiol disulfide oxidoreductases (ER oxidoreductases). In yeast and mammals, ER oxidoreductin-1s (Ero1s) supply oxidizing equivalent to the active centers of PDI. In this study, we expressed recombinant soybean Ero1 (GmERO1a) and found that GmERO1a oxidized multiple soybean ER oxidoreductases, in contrast to mammalian Ero1s having a high specificity for PDI. One of these ER oxidoreductases, GmPDIM, associated in vivo and in vitro with GmPDIL-2, was unable to be oxidized by GmERO1a. We therefore pursued the possible cooperative oxidative folding by GmPDIM, GmERO1a, and GmPDIL-2 in vitro and found that GmPDIL-2 synergistically accelerated oxidative refolding. In this process, GmERO1a preferentially oxidized the active center in the a′ domain among the a, a′, and b domains of GmPDIM. A disulfide bond introduced into the active center of the a′ domain of GmPDIM was shown to be transferred to the active center of the a domain of GmPDIM and the a domain of GmPDIM directly oxidized the active centers of both the a or a′ domain of GmPDIL-2. Therefore, we propose that the relay of an oxidizing equivalent from one ER oxidoreductase to another may play an essential role in cooperative oxidative folding by multiple ER oxidoreductases in plants. PMID:26645455

  2. A theoretical study of cyclohexyne addition to carbonyl-Cα bonds: allowed and forbidden electrocyclic and nonpericyclic ring-openings of strained cyclobutenes.

    PubMed

    Sader, C Avery; Houk, K N

    2012-06-01

    The mechanism of cyclohexyne insertion into a C(O)-C(α) bond of cyclic ketones, explored experimentally by the Carreira group, has been investigated using density functional theory. B3LYP and M06-2X calculations were performed in both gas phase and THF (CPCM, UAKS radii). The reaction proceeds through a stepwise [2 + 2] cycloaddition of cyclohexyne to the enolate, followed by three disparate ring-opening possibilities of the cyclobutene alkoxide to give the product: (1) thermally allowed conrotatory electrocyclic ring-opening, (2) thermally forbidden disrotatory electrocyclic ring-opening, or (3) nonpericyclic C-C bond cleavage. Our computational results for the model alkoxide and potassium alkoxide systems show that the thermally allowed electrocyclic ring-opening pathway is favored by less than 1 kcal/mol. In more complex systems containing a potassium alkoxide (e-f), the barrier of the allowed conrotatory ring-opening is disfavored by 4-8 kcal/mol. This suggests that the thermodynamically more stable disrotatory product can be formed directly through a "forbidden" pathway. Analysis of geometrical parameters and atomic charges throughout the ring-opening pathways provides evidence for a nonpericyclic C-C bond cleavage, rather than a thermally forbidden disrotatory ring-opening. A true forbidden disrotatory ring-opening transition structure was computed for the cyclobutene alcohol; however, it was 19 kcal/mol higher in energy than the allowed conrotatory transition structure. An alternate mechanism in which the disrotatory product forms via isomerization of the conrotatory product was also explored for the alkoxide and potassium alkoxide systems. PMID:22537557

  3. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  4. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  7. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  8. Metabolism of saikosaponin a in rats: diverse oxidations on the aglycone moiety in liver and intestine in addition to hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqiang; Tian, Yuan; Li, Geng; Xu, Lei; Song, Rui; Zhang, Zunjian

    2013-03-01

    The main objective of the present study was to completely characterize the metabolites of the triterpenoid saikosaponin a (SSa) in rats. To this aim, we compared the metabolites in plasma, bile, urine, and feces samples following oral and i.v. routes of administration using liquid chromatography-diode array detector coupled with hybrid ion trap-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. As a result, besides 2 known metabolites, prosaikogenin f and saikogenin f, 15 new metabolites were detected in all. It was found that SSa is metabolized mainly in phase I manner, i.e., hydration and monooxidation on the aglycone moiety and hydrolysis of the β-glucosidic bond in the liver, and sequential hydrolysis of β-glucosidic and β-fucosidic bonds followed by dehydrogenation, hydroxylation, carboxylation, and combinations of these steps on the aglycone moiety in the intestinal tract. Both the renal and biliary routes were observed for the excretion of SSa and its metabolites. Further, a clear metabolic profile in rats was proposed in detail according to the results from the in vivo animal experiment after different routes of administration. Our results update the preclinical metabolism and disposition data on SSa, which is not only helpful for the future human metabolic study of this compound but also provides basic information for better understanding of the efficacy and safety of prescriptions containing saikosaponins. PMID:23277344

  9. Transferable potentials for phase equilibria. 8. United-atom description for thiols, sulfides, disulfides, and thiophene.

    PubMed

    Lubna, Nusrat; Kamath, Ganesh; Potoff, Jeffrey J; Rai, Neeraj; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2005-12-22

    An extension of the transferable potentials for phase equilibria united-atom (TraPPE-UA) force field to thiol, sulfide, and disulfide functionalities and thiophene is presented. In the TraPPE-UA force field, nonbonded interactions are governed by a Lennard-Jones plus fixed point charge functional form. Partial charges are determined through a CHELPG analysis of electrostatic potential energy surfaces derived from ab initio calculations at the HF/6-31g+(d,p) level. The Lennard-Jones well depth and size parameters for four new interaction sites, S (thiols), S(sulfides), S(disulfides), and S(thiophene), were determined by fitting simulation data to pure-component vapor-equilibrium data for methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and thiophene, respectively. Configurational-bias Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble combined with histogram-reweighting methods were used to calculate the vapor-liquid coexistence curves for methanethiol, ethanethiol, 2-methyl-1-propanethiol, 2-methyl-2-propanethiol, 2-butanethiol, pentanethiol, octanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, diethyl sulfide, ethylmethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl disulfide, and thiophene. Excellent agreement with experiment is achieved, with unsigned errors of less than 1% for saturated liquid densities and less than 3% for critical temperatures. The normal boiling points were predicted to within 1% of experiment in most cases, although for certain molecules (pentanethiol) deviations as large as 5% were found. Additional calculations were performed to determine the pressure-composition behavior of ethanethiol+n-butane at 373.15 K and the temperature-composition behavior of 1-propanethiol+n-hexane at 1.01 bar. In each case, a good reproduction of experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium separation factors is achieved; both of the coexistence curves are somewhat shifted because of overprediction of the pure-component vapor pressures.

  10. Mechanochemistry: One Bond at a Time

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jian; Fernández, Julio M.

    2009-01-01

    Single-molecule force clamp spectroscopy offers a novel platform for mechanically denaturing proteins by applying a constant force to a polyprotein. A powerful emerging application of the technique is that, by introducing a disulfide bond in each protein module, the chemical kinetics of disulfide bond cleavage under different stretching forces can be probed at the single-bond level. Even at forces much lower than that can rupture the chemical bond, the breaking of the S-S bond at the presence of various chemical reducing agents is significantly accelerated. Our previous work demonstrated that the rate of thiol/disulfide exchange reaction is force-dependent, and well described by an Arrhenius term of the form: r = A(exp((FΔxr-Ea)/kBT)[nucleophile]). From Arrhenius fits to the force dependency of the reduction rate we measured the bond elongation parameter, Δxr, along the reaction coordinate to the transition state of the SN2 reaction cleaved by different nucleophiles and enzymes, never before observed by any other technique. For S-S cleavage by various reducing agents, obtaining the Δxr value can help depicting the energy landscapes and elucidating the mechanisms of the reactions at the single-molecule level. Small nucleophiles, such as 1, 4-DL-dithiothreitol (DTT), tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) and L-cysteine, react with the S-S bond with monotonically increasing rates under the applied force; while thioredoxin enzymes exhibit both stretching-favored and —resistant reaction-rate regimes. These measurements demonstrate the power of single-molecule force clamp spectroscopy approach in providing unprecedented access to chemical reactions. PMID:19572737

  11. Surface modification of amorphous substrates by disulfide derivatives: A photo-assisted route to direct functionalization of chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalric, Julien; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline

    2011-12-01

    A novel route for chalcogenide glass surface modification is disclosed. The formation of an organic monolayer from disulfide derivatives is studied on two different glasses of formula GexAsySez by water contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode (FTIR-ATR). The potential anchoring group is the disulfide functionality. Since thioctic acid derivatives absorb around 335 nm, an irradiation step is included, in order to favor S-S disruption. Three types of disulfide compounds are grafted onto small glass breaks for contact angle and XPS analyses. The results show effective changes of surface state. According to contact angle measurement, the deposited organic layer functionalized by a small polyethylene glycol chain leads to a more hydrophilic surface, long alkyl chain or a perfluorinated carbon chain leads to a more hydrophobic surface. XPS shows the presence at the surface of an organic layer with sulfur and ethylene oxide chains, or augmentation of organic carbons or fluorine and Csbnd F bonds. The photo-assisted grafting of the disulfides onto an ATR prism made of chalcogenide glass shows that this surface modification process does not affect infrared transparency, despite UV treatment, and accurate structural analysis can be performed.

  12. Superconductivity in highly disordered dense carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ranga P; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Kim, Minseob; Muramatsu, Takaki; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2013-07-16

    High pressure plays an increasingly important role in both understanding superconductivity and the development of new superconducting materials. New superconductors were found in metallic and metal oxide systems at high pressure. However, because of the filled close-shell configuration, the superconductivity in molecular systems has been limited to charge-transferred salts and metal-doped carbon species with relatively low superconducting transition temperatures. Here, we report the low-temperature superconducting phase observed in diamagnetic carbon disulfide under high pressure. The superconductivity arises from a highly disordered extended state (CS4 phase or phase III[CS4]) at ~6.2 K over a broad pressure range from 50 to 172 GPa. Based on the X-ray scattering data, we suggest that the local structural change from a tetrahedral to an octahedral configuration is responsible for the observed superconductivity.

  13. Ferromagnetism in exfoliated tungsten disulfide nanosheets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional-layered transition metal dichalcogenides nanosheets have attracted tremendous attention for their promising applications in spintronics because the atomic-thick nanosheets can not only enhance the intrinsic properties of their bulk counterparts, but also give birth to new promising properties. In this paper, ultrathin tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanosheets were gotten by liquid exfoliation route from its bulk form using dimethylformamide (DMF). Compared to the antiferromagnetism bulk WS2, ultrathin WS2 nanosheets show intrinsic room-temperature ferromagnetism (FM) with the maximized saturation magnetization of 0.004 emu/g at 10 K, where the appearance of FM in the nanosheets is partly due to the presence of zigzag edges in the magnetic ground state at the grain boundaries. PMID:24134699

  14. Advances in rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, K.; Stiles, J. A. R.

    1985-01-01

    The lithium molybdenum disulfide system as demonstrated in a C size cell, offers performance characteristics for applications where light weight and low volume are important. A gravimetric energy density of 90 watt hours per kilogram can be achieved in a C size cell package. The combination of charge retention capabilities, high energy density and a state of charge indicator in a rechargeable cell provides power package for a wide range of devices. The system overcomes the memory effect in Nicads where the full capacity of the battery cannot be utilized unless it was utilized on previous cycles. The development of cells with an advanced electrolyte formulation led to an improved rate capability especially at low temperatures and to a significantly improved life cycle.

  15. A Heterologous Reporter Defines the Role of the Tetanus Toxin Interchain Disulfide in Light-Chain Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Zuverink, Madison; Chen, Chen; Przedpelski, Amanda; Blum, Faith C.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus toxin (TeNT) are the most potent toxins for humans and elicit unique pathologies due to their ability to traffic within motor neurons. BoNTs act locally within motor neurons to elicit flaccid paralysis, while retrograde TeNT traffics to inhibitory neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) to elicit spastic paralysis. BoNT and TeNT are dichain proteins linked by an interchain disulfide bond comprised of an N-terminal catalytic light chain (LC) and a C-terminal heavy chain (HC) that encodes an LC translocation domain (HCT) and a receptor-binding domain (HCR). LC translocation is the least understood property of toxin action, but it involves low pH, proteolysis, and an intact interchain disulfide bridge. Recently, Pirazzini et al. (FEBS Lett 587:150–155, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.febslet.2012.11.007) observed that inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) blocked TeNT and BoNT action in cerebellar granular neurons. In the current study, an atoxic TeNT LC translocation reporter was engineered by fusing β-lactamase to the N terminus of TeNT [βlac-TeNT(RY)] to investigate LC translocation in primary cortical neurons and Neuro-2a cells. βlac-TeNT(RY) retained the interchain disulfide bond, showed ganglioside-dependent binding to neurons, required acidification to promote βlac translocation, and was sensitive to auranofin, an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase. Mutation of βlac-TeNT(RY) at C439S and C467S eliminated the interchain disulfide bond and inhibited βlac translocation. These data support the requirement of an intact interchain disulfide for LC translocation and imply that disulfide reduction is a prerequisite for LC delivery into the host cytosol. The data also support a model that LC translocation proceeds from the C to the N terminus. βlac-TeNT(RY) is the first reporter system to measure translocation by an AB single-chain toxin in intact cells. PMID:25895970

  16. Scope and limitations of aliphatic Friedel-Crafts alkylations. Lewis acid catalyzed addition reactions of alkyl chlorides to carbon-carbon double bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, H.; Striepe, W.

    1983-04-22

    Lewis acid catalyzed addition reactions of alkyl halides with unsaturated hydrocarbons have been studied. 1:1 addition products are formed if the addends dissociate faster than the corresponding products; otherwise, polymerization takes place. For reaction conditions under which these compounds exist mainly undissociated, solvolysis constants of model compounds can be used to predict the outcome of any such addition reactions if systems with considerable steric hindrance are excluded.

  17. Carbon disulfide removal by zero valent iron.

    PubMed

    McGeough, Karen L; Kalin, Robert M; Myles, Philip

    2007-07-01

    The use of zero valent iron (Fe0) for the remediation of water contaminated with carbon disulfide (CS2), a common groundwater contaminant, has been evaluated in this study. Mineralogical analysis of Fe0 filings and polished Fe0 cross-sections indicates that iron sulfide is formed due to the removal of carbon disulfide from solution by Fe0. The kinetics of CS2 removal by Fe0 was examined through both batch and column testing, and it is demonstrated that CS2 is removed rapidly from solution. A linear relationship was observed, through batch testing, between the pseudo-first-order rate constant (k(obs)) and the surface area concentration of Fe0 (rho(a)). Data obtained from kinetic batch tests performed at four temperature levels conformed to the Arrhenius equation, and the calculated apparent activation energy (E(a)) was 37 +/- 2.3 kJ mol(-1), indicating that the kinetics of CS2 removal by Fe0 is controlled by a chemical surface reaction. The temperature correction factors for CS2 from a reference of 25 degrees C were x 1.4 for 18 degrees C, x 1.7 for 15 degrees C, x 2.0 for 12 degrees C, and x 2.3 for 9 degrees C. Surface area normalization of k(obs) obtained through batch and column testing gives specific reaction rate constants (k(SA)) within 1 order of magnitude, indicating that k(SA) values are useful as a general descriptor of CS2-Fe0 reaction kinetics and that these values provide a clear starting point for design calculations prior to commencing site-specific treatability studies for permeable reactive barrier design.

  18. Oxidative folding and reductive activities of EhPDI, a protein disulfide isomerase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Mares, Rosa E; Magaña, Paloma D; Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Licea, Alexei F; Cornejo-Bravo, José M; Ramos, Marco A

    2009-09-01

    PDI enzymes are oxidoreductases that catalyze oxidation, reduction and isomerization of disulfide bonds in polypeptide substrates. We have previously identified an E. histolytica PDI enzyme (EhPDI) that exhibits oxidase activity in vivo. However, little is known about the specific role of its redox-related structural features on the enzymatic activity. Here, we have studied the in vivo oxidative folding of EhPDI by mutagenic analysis and functional complementation assays as well as the in vitro oxidative folding and reductive activities by comparative kinetics using functional homologues in standard assays. We have found that the active-site cysteine residues of the functional domains (Trx-domains) are essential for catalysis of disulfide bond formation in polypeptides and proteins, such as the bacterial alkaline phosphatase. Furthermore, we have shown that the recombinant EhPDI enzyme has some typical properties of PDI enzymes: oxidase and reductase activities. These activities were comparable to those observed for other functional equivalents, such as bovine PDI or bacterial thioredoxin, under the same experimental conditions. These findings will be helpful for further studies intended to understand the physiological role of EhPDI.

  19. A PDI-catalyzed thiol-disulfide switch regulates the production of hydrogen peroxide by human Ero1.

    PubMed

    Ramming, Thomas; Okumura, Masaki; Kanemura, Shingo; Baday, Sefer; Birk, Julia; Moes, Suzette; Spiess, Martin; Jenö, Paul; Bernèche, Simon; Inaba, Kenji; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) involves ER oxidoreductin 1 (Ero1)-mediated disulfide formation in protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). In this process, Ero1 consumes oxygen (O2) and releases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), but none of the published Ero1 crystal structures reveal any potential pathway for entry and exit of these reactants. We report that additional mutation of the Cys(208)-Cys(241) disulfide in hyperactive Ero1α (Ero1α-C104A/C131A) potentiates H2O2 production, ER oxidation, and cell toxicity. This disulfide clamps two helices that seal the flavin cofactor where O2 is reduced to H2O2. Through its carboxyterminal active site, PDI unlocks this seal by forming a Cys(208)/Cys(241)-dependent mixed-disulfide complex with Ero1α. The H2O2-detoxifying glutathione peroxidase 8 also binds to the Cys(208)/Cys(241) loop region. Supported by O2 diffusion simulations, these data describe the first enzymatically controlled O2 access into a flavoprotein active site, provide molecular-level understanding of Ero1α regulation and H2O2 production/detoxification, and establish the deleterious consequences of constitutive Ero1 activity.

  20. Comparison of Thiyl, Alkoxyl, and Alkyl Radical Addition to Double Bonds: The Unusual Contrasting Behavior of Sulfur and Oxygen Radical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Degirmenci, Isa; Coote, Michelle L

    2016-03-17

    High-level ab initio calculations have been used to compare prototypical thiyl, alkoxyl, and alkyl radical addition reactions. Thiyl radical addition to the sulfur center of thioketones is exothermic and rapid, occurring with negative enthalpic barriers and only weakly positive Gibbs free energy barriers. In stark contrast, alkoxyl radical addition to the oxygen center of ketones is highly endothermic and occurs with very high reaction barriers, though these are also suppressed. On the basis of analysis of the corresponding alkyl radical additions to these substrates and the corresponding reactions of these heteroatom radicals with alkenes, it suggested that addition reactions involving thiyl radicals have low intrinsic barriers because their unpaired electrons are better able to undergo stabilizing resonance interactions with the π* orbitals of the substrate in the transition state. PMID:26932454

  1. Redox-assisted regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum by disulfide reductase ERdj5

    PubMed Central

    Ushioda, Ryo; Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Inoue, Michio; Watanabe, Satoshi; Okumura, Masaki; Maegawa, Ken-ichi; Uegaki, Kaiku; Fujii, Shohei; Fukuda, Yasuko; Umitsu, Masataka; Takagi, Junichi; Inaba, Kenji; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) is an important second messenger that regulates numerous cellular functions. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) is strictly controlled by Ca2+ channels and pumps on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plasma membranes. The ER calcium pump, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), imports Ca2+ from the cytosol into the ER in an ATPase activity-dependent manner. The activity of SERCA2b, the ubiquitous isoform of SERCA, is negatively regulated by disulfide bond formation between two luminal cysteines. Here, we show that ERdj5, a mammalian ER disulfide reductase, which we reported to be involved in the ER-associated degradation of misfolded proteins, activates the pump function of SERCA2b by reducing its luminal disulfide bond. Notably, ERdj5 activated SERCA2b at a lower ER luminal [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]ER), whereas a higher [Ca2+]ER induced ERdj5 to form oligomers that were no longer able to interact with the pump, suggesting [Ca2+]ER-dependent regulation. Binding Ig protein, an ER-resident molecular chaperone, exerted a regulatory role in the oligomerization by binding to the J domain of ERdj5. These results identify ERdj5 as one of the master regulators of ER calcium homeostasis and thus shed light on the importance of cross talk among redox, Ca2+, and protein homeostasis in the ER. PMID:27694578

  2. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  4. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  5. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  6. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  7. Human Dickkopf-1 (huDKK1) protein: characterization of glycosylation and determination of disulfide linkages in the two cysteine-rich domains.

    PubMed

    Haniu, Mitsuru; Horan, Tom; Spahr, Chris; Hui, John; Fan, Wei; Chen, Ching; Richards, William G; Lu, Hsieng S

    2011-11-01

    Human Dickkopf-1 (huDKK1), an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt-signaling pathway that has been implicated in bone metabolism and other diseases, was expressed in engineered Chinese hamster ovary cells and purified. HuDKK1 is biologically active in a TCF/lef-luciferase reporter gene assay and is able to bind LRP6 coreceptor. In SDS-PAGE, huDKK1 exhibits molecular weights of 27-28 K and 30 K at ∼ 1:9 ratio. By MALDI-MS analysis, the observed molecular weights of 27.4K and 29.5K indicate that the low molecular weight form may contain O-linked glycans while the high molecular weight form contains both N- and O-linked glycans. LC-MS/MS peptide mapping indicates that ∼ 92% of huDKK1 is glycosylated at Asn²²⁵ with three N-linked glycans composed of two biantennary forms with 1 and 2 sialic acid (23% and 60%, respectively), and one triantennary structure with 2 sialic acids (9%). HuDKK1 contains two O-linked glycans, GalNAc (sialic acid)-Gal-sialic acid (65%) and GalNAc-Gal[sialic acid] (30%), attached at Ser³⁰ as confirmed by β-elimination and targeted LC-MS/MS. The 10 intramolecular disulfide bonds at the N- and C-terminal cysteine-rich domains were elucidated by analyses including multiple proteolytic digestions, isolation and characterization of disulfide-containing peptides, and secondary digestion and characterization of selected disulfide-containing peptides. The five disulfide bonds within the huDKK1 N-terminal domain are unique to the DKK family proteins; there are no exact matches in disulfide positioning when compared to other known disulfide clusters. The five disulfide bonds assigned in the C-terminal domain show the expected homology with those found in colipase and other reported disulfide clusters. PMID:21805521

  8. Batch and Flow Synthesis of Disulfides by Visible-Light-Induced TiO2 Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Bottecchia, Cecilia; Erdmann, Nico; Tijssen, Patricia M A; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Brunsveld, Luc; Hessel, Volker; Noël, Timothy

    2016-07-21

    A mild and practical method for the preparation of disulfides through visible-light-induced photocatalytic aerobic oxidation of thiols has been developed. The method involves the use of TiO2 as a heterogeneous photocatalyst. The catalyst's high stability and recyclability makes this method highly practical. The reaction can be substantially accelerated in a continuous-flow packed-bed reactor, which enables a safe and reliable scale-up of the reaction conditions. The batch and flow protocol described herein can be applied to a diverse set of thiol substrates for the preparation of homo- and hetero-dimerized disulfides. Furthermore, biocompatible reaction conditions (i.e., room temperature, visible light, neutral buffer solution, and no additional base) have been developed, which permits the rapid and chemoselective modification of densely functionalized peptide substrates without recourse to complex purification steps.

  9. Batch and Flow Synthesis of Disulfides by Visible-Light-Induced TiO2 Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Bottecchia, Cecilia; Erdmann, Nico; Tijssen, Patricia M A; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Brunsveld, Luc; Hessel, Volker; Noël, Timothy

    2016-07-21

    A mild and practical method for the preparation of disulfides through visible-light-induced photocatalytic aerobic oxidation of thiols has been developed. The method involves the use of TiO2 as a heterogeneous photocatalyst. The catalyst's high stability and recyclability makes this method highly practical. The reaction can be substantially accelerated in a continuous-flow packed-bed reactor, which enables a safe and reliable scale-up of the reaction conditions. The batch and flow protocol described herein can be applied to a diverse set of thiol substrates for the preparation of homo- and hetero-dimerized disulfides. Furthermore, biocompatible reaction conditions (i.e., room temperature, visible light, neutral buffer solution, and no additional base) have been developed, which permits the rapid and chemoselective modification of densely functionalized peptide substrates without recourse to complex purification steps. PMID:27329945

  10. Structural insights into Cn-AMP1, a short disulfide-free multifunctional peptide from green coconut water.

    PubMed

    Santana, Mábio J; de Oliveira, Aline L; Queiroz Júnior, Luiz H K; Mandal, Santi M; Matos, Carolina O; Dias, Renata de O; Franco, Octavio L; Lião, Luciano M

    2015-02-27

    Multifunctional and promiscuous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can be used as an efficient strategy to control pathogens. However, little is known about the structural properties of plant promiscuous AMPs without disulfide bonds. CD and NMR were used to elucidate the structure of the promiscuous peptide Cn-AMP1, a disulfide-free peptide isolated from green coconut water. Data here reported shows that peptide structure is transitory and could be different according to the micro-environment. In this regard, Cn-AMP1 showed a random coil in a water environment and an α-helical structure in the presence of SDS-d25 micelles. Moreover, deuterium exchange experiments showed that Gly4, Arg5 and Met9 residues are less accessible to solvent, suggesting that flexibility and cationic charges seem to be essential for Cn-AMP1 multiple activities.

  11. In HspA from Helicobacter pylori vicinal disulfide bridges are a key determinant of domain B structure.

    PubMed

    Loguercio, Salvatore; Dian, Cyril; Flagiello, Angela; Scannella, Alessandra; Pucci, Piero; Terradot, Laurent; Zagari, Adriana

    2008-10-15

    Helicobacter pylori produces a heat shock protein A (HspA) that is unique to this bacteria. While the first 91 residues (domain A) of the protein are similar to GroES, the last 26 (domain B) are unique to HspA. Domain B contains eight histidines and four cysteines and was suggested to bind nickel. We have produced HspA and two mutants: Cys94Ala and Cys94Ala/Cys111Ala and identified the disulfide bridge pattern of the protein. We found that the cysteines are engaged in three disulfide bonds: Cys51/Cys53, Cys94/Cys111 and Cys95/Cys112 that result in a unique closed loop structure for the domain B. PMID:18805417

  12. Increasing Tumor Accessibility with Conjugatable Disulfide-Bridged Tumor-Penetrating Peptides for Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Sharma, Shweta; Kolhar, Poornima; Agemy, Lilach; Pavlovich, James; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides with tissue-penetrating properties increase the efficacy of targeted cancer therapy by delivering an anticancer agent to the tumor interior. LyP-1 (CGNKRTRGC) and iRGD (CRGDKGPDC) are founding members of this class of peptides. The presence of the cysteines forming the cyclizing disulfide bond complicates conjugation of these peptides with other molecules, such as drugs. Here, we report the synthesis of conjugatable disulfide-bridged peptides and their conjugation to biologically important molecules. We have synthesized the LyP-1, iRGD, and CRGDC (GACRGDCLGA) peptides with a cysteine or maleimidohexanoic acid added externally at N-terminus of the sequences. Subsequent conjugation to payloads yielded stable compounds in which the tumor-homing properties of the peptide and the biological activity of the payload were retained. PMID:27385913

  13. Synthesis of radioiodine labeled dibenzyl disulfide for evaluation of tumor cell uptake.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Eun Kyoung; Choe, Yearn Seong; Byun, Sang Sung; Lee, Kyung-Han; Chi, Dae Yoon; Choi, Yong; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2004-03-01

    Benzyl 4-halobenzyl and ally benzyl disulfide were synthesized as diallyl disulfide analogues and their tumor growth inhibitory effects on the cancer cells (SNU C5 and MCF-7) were comparable to that of diallyl disulfide, indicating that the disulfide functional group was responsible for the tumor growth inhibitory effects. Cu(I)-assisted radioiodination of benzyl 4-bromobenzyl disulfide gave benzyl 4-[123I/125I]iodobenzyl disulfide in 30-40% radiochemical yield. The radiolabeled disulfide was taken up by the cancer cells in a time-dependent manner, and the uptake was inhibited by the pretreatment of S-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS), phorone and diallyl disulfide. This study suggested that the radiolabeled dibenzyl disulfide was taken up by the cancer cells via thiol-disulfide exchange and retained inside the cells. PMID:14980597

  14. Visible-Light-Promoted Dual C-C Bond Formations of Alkynoates via a Domino Radical Addition/Cyclization Reaction: A Synthesis of Coumarins.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangbiao; Xie, Xingang; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Lin; Zhong, Zhuliang; Xu, Dengyu; She, Xuegong

    2016-08-01

    A visible-light-promoted, mild, and direct difunctionalization of alkynoates has been accomplished. This procedure provides a new strategy toward synthesis of the coumarin core structure by photoredox-mediated oxidation to generate the α-oxo radical, which supervenes a domino radical addition/cyclization reaction in moderate to good yields with high regioselectivity at ambient temperature.

  15. First-principles study of the sulfur K and L2,3 edges of transition metal disulfide monolayers, MS2 (M=Mo, W and Re)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadsetani, Mehrdad; Nejatipour, Hajar; Nouri, Tahereh

    2015-09-01

    By means of the energy loss near edge structure (ELNES) analysis, the electronic structures of layered transition metal disulfides were studied. In the framework of full potential linearized augmented plane wave method, ELNES spectra of sulfur K and L2,3 edges of layered MoS2, WS2 and ReS2 have been calculated at magic angle conditions, and compared with those of bulks and the only existing experimental fine structure. Compared to the bulks, the energy differences between the main peaks in sulfur K and L2,3 edges of monolayers decrease due to the slightly larger bond lengths that it can be used as a fingerprint for monolayers. Sulfur K edges in monolayers include some main features originated from electron transition to pz (π) and px+py (σ) states and their hybridization. The overall dispersions of the sulfur L2,3 edges in all cases are similar to the D-symmetry density of states. The first two features in L2,3 edge of bulks and monolayers can be attributed to electron transition of sulfur 2p to the both unoccupied 3s-like states of sulfur and 4d states of transition metal atoms. Due to the considerable amount of s states at the energy position of a shoulder like structure in L2,3 edge of both bulks and monolayers, these structures can be assigned to the sulfur 2p electron transition to unoccupied sulfur 3s states. The other features at higher energies are due to the transition of sulfur 2p electrons to the D-symmetry states of sulfur. In addition, due to the considerable energy band gaps, it seems that the use of core-hole approximation is essential for accurate reproduction of ELNES features of transition metal disulfides.

  16. Direct carbon-carbon bond formation via reductive soft enolization: a syn-selective Mannich addition of α-iodo thioesters.

    PubMed

    Truong, Ngoc; Sauer, Scott J; Seraphin-Hatcher, Cyndie; Coltart, Don M

    2016-08-16

    The β-amino carboxylic acid moiety is a key feature of numerous important biologically active compounds. We describe a syn-selective direct Mannich addition reaction that uses α-iodo thioesters and sulfonyl imines and produces β-amino thioesters. Enolate formation is achieved by reductive soft enolization. The products of the reaction provide straightforward access to biologically important β-lactams through a variety of known reactions. PMID:27492274

  17. Bond Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  18. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  19. Scalable Production of Molybdenum Disulfide Based Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Carl H; Kybert, Nicholas J; Schneier, Camilla; Xi, Jin; Romero, Gabriela; Saven, Jeffery G; Liu, Renyu; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2016-06-28

    We demonstrate arrays of opioid biosensors based on chemical vapor deposition grown molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field effect transistors (FETs) coupled to a computationally redesigned, water-soluble variant of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). By transferring dense films of monolayer MoS2 crystals onto prefabricated electrode arrays, we obtain high-quality FETs with clean surfaces that allow for reproducible protein attachment. The fabrication yield of MoS2 FETs and biosensors exceeds 95%, with an average mobility of 2.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) (36 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) at room temperature under ambient (in vacuo). An atomic length nickel-mediated linker chemistry enables target binding events that occur very close to the MoS2 surface to maximize sensitivity. The biosensor response calibration curve for a synthetic opioid peptide known to bind to the wild-type MOR indicates binding affinity that matches values determined using traditional techniques and a limit of detection ∼3 nM (1.5 ng/mL). The combination of scalable array fabrication and rapid, precise binding readout enabled by the MoS2 transistor offers the prospect of a solid-state drug testing platform for rapid readout of the interactions between novel drugs and their intended protein targets.

  20. Raman Signatures of Polytypism in Molybdenum Disulfide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Ung; Kim, Kangwon; Han, Songhee; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Zonghoon; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2016-02-23

    Since the stacking order sensitively affects various physical properties of layered materials, accurate determination of the stacking order is important for studying the basic properties of these materials as well as for device applications. Because 2H-molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is most common in nature, most studies so far have focused on 2H-MoS2. However, we found that the 2H, 3R, and mixed stacking sequences exist in few-layer MoS2 exfoliated from natural molybdenite crystals. The crystal structures are confirmed by HR-TEM measurements. The Raman signatures of different polytypes are investigated by using three different excitation energies that are nonresonant and resonant with A and C excitons, respectively. The low-frequency breathing and shear modes show distinct differences for each polytype, whereas the high-frequency intralayer modes show little difference. For resonant excitations at 1.96 and 2.81 eV, distinct features are observed that enable determination of the stacking order.

  1. Raman Signatures of Polytypism in Molybdenum Disulfide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Ung; Kim, Kangwon; Han, Songhee; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Zonghoon; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2016-02-23

    Since the stacking order sensitively affects various physical properties of layered materials, accurate determination of the stacking order is important for studying the basic properties of these materials as well as for device applications. Because 2H-molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is most common in nature, most studies so far have focused on 2H-MoS2. However, we found that the 2H, 3R, and mixed stacking sequences exist in few-layer MoS2 exfoliated from natural molybdenite crystals. The crystal structures are confirmed by HR-TEM measurements. The Raman signatures of different polytypes are investigated by using three different excitation energies that are nonresonant and resonant with A and C excitons, respectively. The low-frequency breathing and shear modes show distinct differences for each polytype, whereas the high-frequency intralayer modes show little difference. For resonant excitations at 1.96 and 2.81 eV, distinct features are observed that enable determination of the stacking order. PMID:26756836

  2. Scalable Production of Molybdenum Disulfide Based Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Carl H; Kybert, Nicholas J; Schneier, Camilla; Xi, Jin; Romero, Gabriela; Saven, Jeffery G; Liu, Renyu; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2016-06-28

    We demonstrate arrays of opioid biosensors based on chemical vapor deposition grown molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field effect transistors (FETs) coupled to a computationally redesigned, water-soluble variant of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). By transferring dense films of monolayer MoS2 crystals onto prefabricated electrode arrays, we obtain high-quality FETs with clean surfaces that allow for reproducible protein attachment. The fabrication yield of MoS2 FETs and biosensors exceeds 95%, with an average mobility of 2.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) (36 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) at room temperature under ambient (in vacuo). An atomic length nickel-mediated linker chemistry enables target binding events that occur very close to the MoS2 surface to maximize sensitivity. The biosensor response calibration curve for a synthetic opioid peptide known to bind to the wild-type MOR indicates binding affinity that matches values determined using traditional techniques and a limit of detection ∼3 nM (1.5 ng/mL). The combination of scalable array fabrication and rapid, precise binding readout enabled by the MoS2 transistor offers the prospect of a solid-state drug testing platform for rapid readout of the interactions between novel drugs and their intended protein targets. PMID:27227361

  3. Intrinsic structural defects in monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wu; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a two-dimensional direct band gap semiconductor with distinctive mechanical, electronic, optical and chemical properties that can be utilized for novel nanoelectronics and optoelectronics devices. The performance of these electronic devices strongly depends on the quality and defect morphology of the MoS2 layers. Yet, little is known about the atomic structure of defects present in monolayer MoS2 and their influences on the material properties. Here we provide a systematic study of various intrinsic structural defects, including point defects, grain boundaries, and edges, in chemical vapor phase grown monolayer MoS2 via direct atomic resolution imaging, and explore their energy landscape and electronic properties using first-principles calculations. We discover that one-dimensional metallic wires can be created via two different types of 60 grain boundaries consisting of distinct 4-fold ring chains. A new type of edge reconstruction, representing a transition state during growth, was also identified, providing insights into the material growth mechanism. The atomic scale study of structural defects presented here brings new opportunities to tailor the properties of MoS2 via controlled synthesis and defect engineering.

  4. Carbon disulfide traveling-wave Kerr cells.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, A J; Gaddy, O L; Holshouser, D F

    1966-10-01

    Carbon disulfide has identical microwave and optical dielectric constants, as well as extremely low optical and microwave loss. These properties make it possible to construct long travelingwave light modulators at microwave frequencies using the Kerr electrooptic effect induced in CS(2) by an electric field propagating on a TEM transmission line.Several experiments with traveling-wave Kerr cells consisting of resonant strip transmission lines immersed in CS(2) are described. A decrease in the microwave power required for modulation by a factor of two, by cooling the modulators to a temperature of -55 degrees C, is demonstrated. Simultaneous modulation of light at two microwave frequencies by excitation of two of the longitudinal modes of the strip line resonator is also described. Relatively high efficiency modulation with long devices of this type is also reported. In these experiments, the microwave power required for large depths of modulation is reduced by almost two orders of magnitude compared to previously reported CS(2) light modulators, and is within less than a factor of two of the calculated power for cells up to 44 cm in length. For longer cells, increasingly larger than predicted powers are required.

  5. Mutation of the Thiol-Disulfide Oxidoreductase SdbA Activates the CiaRH Two-Component System, Leading to Bacteriocin Expression Shutdown in Streptococcus gordonii

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Lauren; Halperin, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus gordonii is a commensal inhabitant of the human oral cavity. To maintain its presence as a major component of oral biofilms, S. gordonii secretes inhibitory molecules such as hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins to inhibit competitors. S. gordonii produces two nonmodified bacteriocins (i.e., Sth1 and Sth2) that are regulated by the Com two-component regulatory system, which also regulates genetic competence. Previously we found that the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase SdbA was required for bacteriocin activity; however, the role of SdbA in Com signaling was not clear. Here we demonstrate that ΔsdbA mutants lacked bacteriocin activity because the bacteriocin gene sthA was strongly repressed and the peptides were not secreted. Addition of synthetic competence-stimulating peptide to the medium reversed the phenotype, indicating that the Com pathway was functional but was not activated in the ΔsdbA mutant. Repression of bacteriocin production was mediated by the CiaRH two-component system, which was strongly upregulated in the ΔsdbA mutant, and inactivation of CiaRH restored bacteriocin production. The CiaRH-induced protease DegP was also upregulated in the ΔsdbA mutant, although it was not required for inhibition of bacteriocin production. This establishes CiaRH as a regulator of Sth bacteriocin activity and links the CiaRH and Com systems in S. gordonii. It also suggests that either SdbA or one of its substrates is an important factor in regulating activation of the CiaRH system. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus gordonii is a noncariogenic colonizer of the human oral cavity. To be competitive in the oral biofilm, S. gordonii secretes antimicrobial peptides called bacteriocins, which inhibit closely related species. Our previous data showed that mutation of the disulfide oxidoreductase SdbA abolished bacteriocin production. In this study, we show that mutation of SdbA generates a signal that upregulates the CiaRH two-component system, which in turn

  6. Ambiphilic properties of SF5CF2CF2Br derived perfluorinated radical in addition reactions across carbon-carbon double bonds.

    PubMed

    Dudziński, Piotr; Matsnev, Andrej V; Thrasher, Joseph S; Haufe, Günter

    2015-03-01

    The extraordinary properties of the pentafluorosulfanyl (SF5) group attract attention of organic chemists. While numerous SF5-substituted compounds have been synthesized, the direct introduction of SF5(CF2)n moieties has remained almost unexplored. Our investigations revealed the ambiphilic character of the SF5CF2CF2 radical. Addition reactions to electron-rich or electron-deficient alkenes profit either from its electrophilic or nucleophilic properties. Thus, the readily available SF5CF2CF2Br proved to be a promising and versatile building block for the introduction of this perfluorinated moiety.

  7. Oxidative addition of the Cα-Cβ bond in β-O-4 linkage of lignin to transition metals using a relativistic pseudopotential-based ccCA-ONIOM method.

    PubMed

    Oyedepo, Gbenga A; Wilson, Angela K

    2011-12-01

    A multi-level multi-layer QM/QM method, the relativistic pseudopotential correlation-consistent composite approach within an ONIOM framework (rp-ccCA-ONIOM), was applied to study the oxidative addition of the C(α)-C(β) bond in an archetypal arylglycerol β-aryl ether (β-O-4 linkage) substructure of lignin to Ni, Cu, Pd and Pt transition metal atoms. The chemically active high-level layer is treated using the relativistic pseudopotential correlation-consistent composite approach (rp-ccCA), an efficient methodology designed to reproduce an accuracy that would be obtained using the more computationally demanding CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pCV∞Z-PP, albeit at a significantly reduced computational cost, while the low-level layer is computed using B3LYP/cc-pVTZ. The thermodynamic and kinetic feasibilities of the model reactions are reported in terms of enthalpies of reactions at 298 K (ΔH°(298)) and activation energies (ΔH-act). The results obtained from the rp-ccCA:B3LYP hybrid method are compared to the corresponding values using CCSD(T) and several density functionals including B3LYP, M06, M06 L, B2PLYP, mPWPLYP and B2GP-PLYP. The energetics of the oxidative addition of CC bond in ethane to Ni, Cu, Pd and Pt atoms are also reported to demonstrate that the rp-ccCA method effectively reproduces the accuracy of the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pCV∞Z method. Our results show that in the catalytic activation of the C(α)-C(β) bond of β-O-4, the use of platinum metal catalysts will lead to the most thermodynamically favored reaction with the lowest activation barrier. PMID:22144374

  8. Diallyl disulfide inhibits the proliferation of human tumor cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, S G; Milner, J A

    1996-01-17

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), an oil-soluble organosulfur compound in processed garlic, was more effective in inhibiting the in vitro growth of human tumor cell lines: HCT-15 (colon), A549 (lung), and SK MEL-2 (skin) than isomolar quantities of the water-soluble compound S-allyl cysteine (SAC). Addition of DADS (100 microM) was cytostatic to all three cell lines. The importance of the allyl and the disulfide groups were revealed by the lack of a comparable depression in the growth of HCT-15 cells exposed to its saturated analogue, dipropyl disulfide (DPDS). Treatment with DADS also resulted in a dose-dependent increase in intracellular free calcium in cells. A dose-dependent decrease in the activity of calcium-dependent ATPase enzyme occurred in HCT-15 cells exposed to increasing quantities of DADS. A correlation (r = -0.975) was found between the intracellular free calcium levels and the Ca-ATPase activity in DADS-treated cells. These studies document that DADS, a constituent of garlic oil, is an effective inhibitor of the growth of human neoplastic cells. Alterations in calcium hemostasis are likely involved in the growth inhibition/cytotoxicity caused by DADS.

  9. Ru(II)-Catalyzed C-H Activation: Amide-Directed 1,4-Addition of the Ortho C-H Bond to Maleimides.

    PubMed

    Keshri, Puspam; Bettadapur, Kiran R; Lanke, Veeranjaneyulu; Prabhu, Kandikere Ramaiah

    2016-07-15

    Maleimide has been used as a selective coupling partner to generate conjugate addition products exclusively. The typical Heck-type oxidative coupling that occurs when alkenes are used is avoided by choosing maleimide as an alkene, which cannot undergo β-hydride elimination due to the unavailability of a syn-periplanar β-hydrogen atom. The amide nitrogen, which is notorious for undergoing tandem reactions to generate spirocyclic or annulation products under cross-coupling conditions, remains innocent in this report. Along with the substrate scope, a robustness screen has been performed to analyze the performance of amide as a directing group in the presence of other directing groups and also to examine the tolerance of the reaction conditions for other frequently encountered functional groups. PMID:27314834

  10. Template Catalysis by Metal-Ligand Cooperation. C-C Bond Formation via Conjugate Addition of Non-activated Nitriles under Mild, Base-free Conditions Catalyzed by a Manganese Pincer Complex.

    PubMed

    Nerush, Alexander; Vogt, Matthias; Gellrich, Urs; Leitus, Gregory; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2016-06-01

    The first example of a catalytic Michael addition reaction of non-activated aliphatic nitriles to α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds under mild, neutral conditions is reported. A new de-aromatized pyridine-based PNP pincer complex of the Earth-abundant, first-row transition metal manganese serves as the catalyst. The reaction tolerates a variety of nitriles and Michael acceptors with different steric features and acceptor strengths. Mechanistic investigations including temperature-dependent NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations reveal that the cooperative activation of alkyl nitriles, which leads to the generation of metalated nitrile nucleophile species (α-cyano carbanion analogues), is a key step of the mechanism. The metal center is not directly involved in the catalytic bond formation but rather serves, cooperatively with the ligand, as a template for the substrate activation. This approach of "template catalysis" expands the scope of potential donors for conjugate addition reactions. PMID:27164437

  11. Rhenium Disulfide Depletion-Load Inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, Connor; Corbet, Chris; Rai, Amritesh; Movva, Hema C. P.; Tutuc, Emanuel; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-03-01

    Many semiconducting Transition Metal Dichalcogenide (TMD) materials have been effectively used to create Field-Effect Transistor (FET) devices but have yet to be used in logic designs. We constructed a depletion-load voltage inverter using ultrathin layers of Rhenium Disulfide (ReS2) as the semiconducting channel. This ReS2 inverter was fabricated on a single micromechanically-exfoliated flake of ReS2. Electron beam lithography and physical vapor deposition were used to construct Cr/Au electrical contacts, an Alumina top-gate dielectric, and metal top-gate electrodes. By using both low (Aluminum) and high (Palladium) work-function metals as two separate top-gates on a single ReS2 flake, we create a dual-gated depletion mode (D-mode) and enhancement mode (E-mode) FETs in series. Both FETs displayed current saturation in the output characteristics as a result of the FET ``pinch-off'' mechanism and On/Off current ratios of 105. Field-effect mobilities of 23 and 17 cm2V-1s-1 and subthreshold swings of 97 and 551 mV/decade were calculated for the E-mode and D-mode FETs, respectively. With a supply voltage of 1V, at low/negative input voltages the inverter output was at a high logic state of 900 mV. Conversely with high/positive input voltages, the inverter output was at a low logic state of 500 mV. The inversion of the input signal demonstrates the potential for using ReS2 in future integrated circuit designs and the versatility of depletion-load logic devices for TMD research. NRI SWAN Center and ARL STTR Program.

  12. Functional Role of the Disulfide Isomerase ERp57 in Axonal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Woehlbier, Ute; Rozas, Pablo; Andreu, Catherine; Medinas, Danilo; Valdés, Pamela; Osorio, Fabiola; Mercado, Gabriela; Vidal, René L.; Kerr, Bredford; Court, Felipe A.; Hetz, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    ERp57 (also known as grp58 and PDIA3) is a protein disulfide isomerase that catalyzes disulfide bonds formation of glycoproteins as part of the calnexin and calreticulin cycle. ERp57 is markedly upregulated in most common neurodegenerative diseases downstream of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. Despite accumulating correlative evidence supporting a neuroprotective role of ERp57, the contribution of this foldase to the physiology of the nervous system remains unknown. Here we developed a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses ERp57 in the nervous system under the control of the prion promoter. We analyzed the susceptibility of ERp57 transgenic mice to undergo neurodegeneration. Unexpectedly, ERp57 overexpression did not affect dopaminergic neuron loss and striatal denervation after injection of a Parkinson’s disease-inducing neurotoxin. In sharp contrast, ERp57 transgenic animals presented enhanced locomotor recovery after mechanical injury to the sciatic nerve. These protective effects were associated with enhanced myelin removal, macrophage infiltration and axonal regeneration. Our results suggest that ERp57 specifically contributes to peripheral nerve regeneration, whereas its activity is dispensable for the survival of a specific neuronal population of the central nervous system. These results demonstrate for the first time a functional role of a component of the ER proteostasis network in peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26361352

  13. The Unfolded Protein Response and the Role of Protein Disulfide Isomerase in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Emma R.; Thomas, Colleen J.; Parakh, Sonam; Spencer, Damian M.; Atkin, Julie D.

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance and regulation of proteostasis is a critical function for post-mitotic neurons and its dysregulation is increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite having different clinical manifestations, these disorders share similar pathology; an accumulation of misfolded proteins in neurons and subsequent disruption to cellular proteostasis. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an important component of proteostasis, and when the accumulation of misfolded proteins occurs within the ER, this disturbs ER homeostasis, giving rise to ER stress. This triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR), distinct signaling pathways that whilst initially protective, are pro-apoptotic if ER stress is prolonged. ER stress is increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, and emerging evidence highlights the complexity of the UPR in these disorders, with both protective and detrimental components being described. Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI) is an ER chaperone induced during ER stress that is responsible for the formation of disulfide bonds in proteins. Whilst initially considered to be protective, recent studies have revealed unconventional roles for PDI in neurodegenerative diseases, distinct from its normal function in the UPR and the ER, although these mechanisms remain poorly defined. However, specific aspects of PDI function may offer the potential to be exploited therapeutically in the future. This review will focus on the evidence linking ER stress and the UPR to neurodegenerative diseases, with particular emphasis on the emerging functions ascribed to PDI in these conditions. PMID:26779479

  14. Novel human 3-domain disulfide-stabilized antibody fragment against glycoprotein of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kun; Wang, Hui; Bao, Shizhong; Shi, Jing; Hou, Xiaojun; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Hao; Yin, Jun

    2008-04-01

    Mutated disulfide bond sites VH (Cys44) and VL (Cys100) were constructed in variable domains (Fvs) of the human anti-glycoprotein antigen of the rabies virus (anti-GPRV), and the light chain variable (VL) and heavy chain variable (VH) fragments were linked using the heavy chain constant region 1 (CH1) of the human immunoglobulin (Ig) to successfully construct a 3-domain disulfide-stabilized fragment of variables (3d-dsFv). 3d-dsFv was mainly expressed as an inclusion body. After refolding by the conventional dilution method, 3d-dsFv was purified using a nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) column. Enyzme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine the binding activity of 3d-dsFv to GPRV. Flow cytometry studies and rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test were used to evaluate the function of 3d-dsFv. The results showed that the stability of 3d-dsFv was improved notably in some aspects such as thermal kinetics, ability to withstand urea denaturation, etc. 3d-dsFv could bind specially to infective cells and the GPRV. The titration of 3d-dsFv to RV-CVS is 83.3 IU/mg, and it can easily reach 2.5IU/mL, which is the value suggested by the WHO as effective for neutralization titration of the rabies virus.

  15. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis in patients wit